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Sample records for actuator rate limiting

  1. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  2. Hydraulic actuator motion limiter ensures operator safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, C. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device regulates action of hydraulic linkage to control column to minimize hazard to operator. Primary components of device are flow rate control valve, limiter accumulator, and shutoff valve. Limiter may be incorporated into other hydraulic systems to prevent undue wear on hydraulic actuators and associated components.

  3. A Control Allocation Technique to Recover From Pilot-Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildiz, Yildiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation technique that can help pilots recover from pilot induced oscillations (PIO). When actuators are rate-saturated due to aggressive pilot commands, high gain flight control systems or some anomaly in the system, the effective delay in the control loop may increase depending on the nature of the cause. This effective delay increase manifests itself as a phase shift between the commanded and actual system signals and can instigate PIOs. The proposed control allocator reduces the effective time delay by minimizing the phase shift between the commanded and the actual attitude accelerations. Simulation results are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from PIOs. Conversion of the objective function to be minimized and constraints to a form that is suitable for implementation is given.

  4. Electromechanically Actuated Valve for Controlling Flow Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A proposed valve for controlling the rate of flow of a fluid would include an electric-motor-driven ball-screw mechanism for adjusting the seating element of the valve to any position between fully closed and fully open. The motor would be of a type that can be electronically controlled to rotate to a specified angular position and to rotate at a specified rate, and the ball screw would enable accurate linear positioning of the seating element as a function of angular position of the motor. Hence, the proposed valve would enable fine electronic control of the rate of flow and the rate of change of flow. The uniqueness of this valve lies in a high degree of integration of the actuation mechanism with the flow-control components into a single, relatively compact unit. A notable feature of this integration is that in addition to being a major part of the actuation mechanism, the ball screw would also be a flow-control component: the ball screw would be hollow so as to contain part of the main flow passage, and one end of the ball screw would be the main seating valve element. The relationships among the components of the valve are best understood by reference to the figure, which presents meridional cross sections of the valve in the fully closed and fully open positions. The motor would be supported by a bracket bolted to the valve body. By means of gears or pulleys and a timing belt, motor drive would be transmitted to a sleeve that would rotate on bearings in the valve body. A ball nut inside the sleeve would be made to rotate with the sleeve by use of a key. The ball screw would pass through and engage the ball nut. A key would prevent rotation of the ball screw in the valve body while allowing the ball screw to translate axially when driven by the ball nut. The outer surface of the ball screw would be threaded only in a mid-length region: the end regions of the outer surface of the ball screw would be polished so that they could act as dynamic sealing surfaces

  5. Flight Control System Design with Rate Saturating Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Snell, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Actuator rate saturation is an important factor adversely affecting the stability and performance of aircraft flight control systems. It has been identified as a catalyst in pilot-induced oscillations, some of which have been catastrophic. A simple design technique is described that utilizes software rate limiters to improve the performance of control systems operating in the presence of actuator rate saturation. As described, the technique requires control effectors to be ganged such that any effector is driven by only a single compensated error signal. Using an analysis of the steady-state behavior of the system, requirements are placed upon the type of the loop transmissions and compensators in the proposed technique. Application of the technique to the design of a multi-input/multi-output, lateral-directional control system for a simple model of a high-performance fighter is demonstrated as are the stability and performance improvements that can accrue with the technique.

  6. Effect of actuation sequence on flow rates of peristaltic micropumps with PZT actuators.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Shu, Kuan; Yu, Yung-Chiang; Li, Yuan-Jie; Chen, Chiun-Hsun

    2009-02-01

    Many biomedical applications require the administration of drugs at a precise and preferably programmable rate. The flow rate generated by the peristaltic micropumps used in such applications depends on the actuation sequence. Accordingly, the current study performs an analytical and experimental investigation to determine the correlation between the dynamic response of the diaphragms in the micropump and the actuation sequence. A simple analytical model of a peristaltic micropump is established to analyze the shift in the resonant frequency of the diaphragms caused by the viscous damping effect. The analytical results show that this damping effect increases as the oscillation frequency of the diaphragm increases. A peristaltic micropump with three piezoelectric actuators is fabricated on a silicon substrate and is actuated using 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-phase actuation sequences via a driving system comprising a microprocessor and a phase controller. A series of experiments is conducted using de-ionized water as the working fluid to determine the diaphragm displacement and the flow rates induced by each of the different actuation sequences under phase frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The results show that the damping effect of actuation sequences influences diaphragm resonant frequency, which in turn affects the profiles of flow rates. PMID:18821016

  7. Very compact, high-stability electrostatic actuator featuring contact-free self-limiting displacement

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Miller, Samuel L.

    2003-01-01

    A compact electrostatic actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator utilizes stationary and moveable electrodes, with the stationary electrodes being formed on a substrate and the moveable electrodes being supported above the substrate on a frame. The frame provides a rigid structure which allows the electrostatic actuator to be operated at high voltages (up to 190 Volts) to provide a relatively large actuation force compared to conventional electrostatic comb actuators which are much larger in size. For operation at its maximum displacement, the electrostatic actuator is relatively insensitive to the exact value of the applied voltage and provides a self-limiting displacement.

  8. Robust, Decoupled, Flight Control Design with Rate Saturating Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, S. A.; Hess, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Techniques for the design of control systems for manually controlled, high-performance aircraft must provide the following: (1) multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) solutions, (2) acceptable handling qualities including no tendencies for pilot-induced oscillations, (3) a tractable approach for compensator design, (4) performance and stability robustness in the presence of significant plant uncertainty, and (5) performance and stability robustness in the presence actuator saturation (particularly rate saturation). A design technique built upon Quantitative Feedback Theory is offered as a candidate methodology which can provide flight control systems meeting these requirements, and do so over a considerable part of the flight envelope. An example utilizing a simplified model of a supermaneuverable fighter aircraft demonstrates the proposed design methodology.

  9. Conceptual hermetically sealed elbow actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuenscher, H. F.

    1968-01-01

    Electrically or hydraulically powered, hermetically sealed angular or rotary actuator deflects mechanical members over a range of plus or minus 180 degrees. The actuator design provides incremental flexures which keep the local deflection rate within elastic limits.

  10. Effects of actuator limits in bifurcation control with applications to active control of fluid instabilities in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong

    Bifurcations are ubiquitous in engineering applications. Subcritical bifurcations are typically associated with hysteresis and catastrophic instability inception, while supercritical bifurcations are usually associated with gradual and more benign instability inception. With the assumption that the bifurcating modes are linearly unstabilizable, we give a constructive procedure of designing feedback laws to change the criticality of bifurcations from subcritical to supercritical. Algebraic necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained under which the criticality of a simple steady-state or Hopf bifurcation can be changed to supercritical by a smooth feedback. The effects of magnitude saturation, bandwidth, and rate limits are important issues in control engineering. We give qualitative estimates of the region of attraction to the stabilized bifurcating equilibrium/periodic orbits under these constraints. We apply the above theoretical results to the Moore-Greitzer model in active control of rotating stall and surge in gas turbine engines. Though linear stabilizability can be achieved using distributed actuation, it limits the practical usefulness due to considerations of affordability and reliability. On the other hand, simple but practically promising actuation schemes such as outlet bleed valves, a couple of air injectors, and magnetic bearings will make the system loss of linear stabilizability, thus the control design becomes a challenging task. The above mentioned theory in bifurcation stabilization can be applied to these cases. We analyze the effects of magnitude and rate saturations in active control of rotating stall using bleed valves. Analytic formulas are obtained for the operability enhancement as a function of system parameters, noise level, and actuator magnitude and rate limits. The formulas give good qualitative predictions when compared with experiments. Our conclusion is that actuator magnitude and rate limits are serious limiting factors in

  11. Metallic muscles at work: high rate actuation in nanoporous gold/polyaniline composites.

    PubMed

    Detsi, Eric; Onck, Patrick; De Hosson, Jeff Th M

    2013-05-28

    Metallic muscles made of nanoporous metals suffer from serious drawbacks caused by the usage of an aqueous electrolyte for actuation. An aqueous electrolyte prohibits metallic muscles from operating in dry environments and hampers a high actuation rate due to the low ionic conductivity of electrolytes. In addition, redox reactions involved in electrochemical actuation severely coarsen the ligaments of nanoporous metals, leading to a substantial loss in performance of the actuator. Here we present an electrolyte-free approach to put metallic muscles to work via a metal/polymer interface. A nanocoating of polyaniline doped with sulfuric acid was grown onto the ligaments of nanoporous gold. Dopant sulfate anions coadsorbed into the polymer coating matrix were exploited to tune the nanoporous metal surface stress and subsequently generate macroscopic dimensional changes in the metal. Strain rates achieved in the single-component nanoporous metal/polymer composite actuator are 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of the standard three-component nanoporous metal/electrolyte hybrid actuator. PMID:23582044

  12. A Method for Exploiting Redundancy to Accommodate Actuator Limits in Multivariable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan; Roulette, Greg

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for accommodating actuator saturation in a multivariable system with actuator redundancy. Actuator saturation can cause significant deterioration in control system performance because unmet demand may result in sluggish transients and oscillations in response to setpoint changes. To help compensate for this problem, a technique has been developed which takes advantage of redundancy in multivariable systems to redistribute the unmet control demand over the remaining useful effectors. This method is not a redesign procedure, rather it modifies commands to the unlimited effectors to compensate for those which are limited, thereby exploiting the built-in redundancy. The original commands are modified by the increments due to unmet demand, but when a saturated effector comes off its limit, the incremental commands disappear and the original unmodified controller remains intact. This scheme provides a smooth transition between saturated and unsaturated modes as it divides up the unmet requirement over any available actuators. This way, if there is sufficiently redundant control authority, performance can be maintained.

  13. Experimental comparison of rate-dependent hysteresis models in characterizing and compensating hysteresis of piezoelectric tube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljanaideh, Omar; Habineza, Didace; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Al Janaideh, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to characterize rate-dependent hysteresis of a piezoelectric tube actuator at different excitation frequencies. The experimental measurements were followed by modeling and compensation of the hysteresis nonlinearities of the piezoelectric tube actuator using both the inverse rate-dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model (RDPI) and inverse rate-independent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model (RIPI) coupled with a controller. The comparison of hysteresis modeling and compensation of the actuator with both models is presented.

  14. Monitoring of ultraviolet pulse rate dependent photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes using fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Suri, Ashish; Asokan, S.; Misra, Abha

    2014-01-06

    In this Letter, we present a non-contact method of controlling and monitoring photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) by exposing it to ultra-violet radiation at different pulse rates (10 to 200 Hz). This is accomplished by imparting a reversible photo induced strain (5–330 με) on CNT coated fibre Bragg gratings; CNT undergoes an internal reversible structural change due to cyclic photon absorption that leads to the development of mechanical strain, which in turn allows reversible switching of the Bragg wavelength. The results also reveal an interesting pulse rate dependent rise and fall times of photomechanical actuation in CNT.

  15. Multi-objective control of nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics with actuator magnitude and rate constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pang-Chia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates multi-objective controller design approaches for nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics subject to actuator magnitude and rate constraints. System nonlinearity is handled by a suitable linear parameter varying system representation with drum pressure as the system varying parameter. Variation of the drum pressure is represented by suitable norm-bounded uncertainty and affine dependence on system matrices. Based on linear matrix inequality algorithms, the magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator and the deviations of fluid density and water level are formulated while the tracking abilities on the drum pressure and power output are optimized. Variation ranges of drum pressure and magnitude tracking commands are used as controller design parameters, determined according to the boiler-turbine's operation range. PMID:22959740

  16. Compensator-based 6-DOF control for probe asteroid-orbital-frame hovering with actuator limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Keping; Li, Yuanchun

    2016-05-01

    This paper is concerned with 6-DOF control of a probe hovering in the orbital frame of an asteroid. Considering the requirements of the scientific instruments pointing direction and orbital position in practical missions, the coordinate control of relative attitude and orbit between the probe and target asteroid is imperative. A 6-DOF dynamic equation describing the relative translational and rotational motion of a probe in the asteroid's orbital frame is derived, taking the irregular gravitation, model and parameter uncertainties and external disturbances into account. An adaptive sliding mode controller is employed to guarantee the convergence of the state error, where the adaptation law is used to estimate the unknown upper bound of system uncertainty. Then the controller is improved to deal with the practical problem of actuator limitations by introducing a RBF neural network compensator, which is used to approximate the difference between the actual control with magnitude constraint and the designed nominal control law. The closed-loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable through the Lyapunov stability analysis. Numerical simulations are performed to compare the performances of the preceding designed control laws. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the control scheme using the compensator-based adaptive sliding mode control law in the presence of actuator limitations, system uncertainty and external disturbance.

  17. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  18. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. PMID:27036808

  19. Flow rate self-sensing of a pump with double piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Kan, Junwu; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Hongyun; Wen, Jianming; Ma, Zehui

    2013-12-01

    According to the method of segmenting electrode, the flow rate self-sensing of a conventional piezoelectric pump with the actuators of double diaphragms is presented in this paper. The novel pump is characterized by the simultaneous function of fluid transportation and the flow rate self-testing through only one piezoelectric element. The analysis indicates that direct and converse piezoelectric effect can be concurrently applied to obtain the simultaneous function through dividing the electrode of the piezoelectric element into driving unit and sensing unit. With two commercialized segmented-electrode piezoelectric diaphragms, a prototype pump is fabricated with the size of 65 mm×40 mm×12 mm and tested according to the frequency characteristics at a fixed driving voltage and the driving voltage characteristics at a fixed frequency. The results show that sensing voltages of diaphragms are increased or decreased with the change of the flow rate as a function of frequency. When the flow rate reaches the maximum value of 45.98 ml/min at 15 Hz, outlet/inlet sensing voltages also reach maximum values of 6.80 Vpp and 19.4 Vpp, respectively. It demonstrates that the pump itself could accurately reflect the optimal frequency through monitoring outlet/inlet sensing voltages. The testing results indicate the good linear relationship between outlet/inlet sensing voltages and the flow rate as a function of driving voltage. Therefore, both theoretical analysis and experiments have proved that flow rate self-sensing can be realized for the piezoelectric pumps with double actuators through segmenting their electrode. Moreover, if any electrode of double piezoelectric actuators is segmented, the pump can obtain the complete self-sensing function.

  20. Limits to sustainable human metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, K R

    2001-09-01

    There is a limit to the performance of an organism set by energy intake and energy mobilization. Here, the focus is on humans with unlimited access to food and for whom physical activity can be limited by energy mobilization. The physical activity level (PAL) in the general population, calculated as doubly-labelled-water-assessed average daily metabolic rate as a multiple of basal metabolic rate, has an upper limit of 2.2-2.5. The upper limit of sustainable metabolic rate is approximately twice as high in endurance athletes, mainly because of long-term exercise training with simultaneous consumption of carbohydrate-rich food during exercise. Endurance athletes have an increased fat-free mass and can maintain energy balance at a PAL value of 4.0-5.0. High altitude limits exercise performance as a result of combined effects on nutrient supply and the capacity to process nutrients. Thus, trained subjects climbing Mount Everest reached PAL values of 2.0-2.7, well below the observed upper limit at sea level. PMID:11581332

  1. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of applications such as precision agriculture, medicine, and the military. These systems have common features which often includes an action by an “actuator” interacting with a target. While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems. The present paper develops a simple model for estimation of the success rate for hitting random targets from a moving platform. The model has two main dimensionless parameters: the ratio of actuator spacing to target diameter; and the ratio of platform distance moved (between actuator “firings”) to the target diameter. It is found that regions of parameter space having specified high success are described by simple equations, providing guidance on design. The role of a “cost function” is introduced which, when minimized, provides optimization of design, operating, and risk mitigation costs. PMID:26610500

  2. Electromagnetically-Actuated Reciprocating Pump for High-Flow-Rate Microfluidic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ming-Tsun; Zhong, Jian-Hao; Lee, Chia-Yen

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an electromagnetically-actuated reciprocating pump for high-flow-rate microfluidic applications. The pump comprises four major components, namely a lower glass plate containing a copper microcoil, a middle PMMA plate incorporating a PDMS diaphragm with a surface-mounted magnet, upper PMMA channel plates, and a ball-type check valve located at the channel inlet. When an AC current is passed through the microcoil, an alternating electromagnetic force is established between the coil and the magnet. The resulting bi-directional deflection of the PDMS diaphragm causes the check-valve to open and close; thereby creating a pumping effect. The experimental results show that a coil input current of 0.4 A generates an electromagnetic force of 47 mN and a diaphragm deflection of 108 μm. Given an actuating voltage of 3 V and a driving frequency of 15 Hz, the flow rate is found to be 13.2 mL/min under zero head pressure conditions. PMID:23201986

  3. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    PubMed

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  4. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    PubMed Central

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  5. Influence of flow rate on aerosol particle size distributions from pressurized and breath-actuated inhalers.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Chan, H K; Brown, K F

    1998-01-01

    Particle size distribution of delivered aerosols and the total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler are important determinants of pulmonary deposition and response to inhalation therapy. Inhalation flow rate may vary between patients and from dose to dose. The Andersen Sampler (AS) cascade impactor operated at flow rates of 30 and 55 L/min and the Marple-Miller Impactor (MMI) operated at flow rates of 30, 55, and 80 L/min were used in this study to investigate the influence of airflow rate on the particle size distributions of inhalation products. Total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler, fine particle mass, fine particle fraction, percentage of nonrespirable particles, and amount of formulation retained within the inhaler were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry for several commercial bronchodilator products purchased in the marketplace, including a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), breath-actuated pressurized inhaler (BAMDI), and three dry powder inhalers (DPIs), two containing salbutamol sulphate and the other containing terbutaline sulphate. Varying the flow rate through the cascade impactor produced no significant change in performance of the pressurized inhalers. Increasing the flow rate produced a greater mass of drug delivered and an increase in respirable particle mass and fraction from all DPIs tested. PMID:10346666

  6. Thermodynamic limitations on microbially catalyzed reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, Douglas E.; Dale, Andrew W.; Amend, Jan P.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of global biogeochemical cycles requires knowledge of the rates at which microorganisms catalyze chemical reactions. In order for models that describe these processes to capture global patterns of change, the underlying formulations in them must account for biogeochemical transformations over seasonal and millennial time scales in environments characterized by different energy levels. Building on existing models, a new thermodynamic limiting function is introduced. With only one adjustable parameter, this function that can be used to model microbial metabolism throughout the range of conditions in which organisms are known to be active. The formulation is based on a comparison of the amount of energy available from any redox reaction to the energy required to maintain a membrane potential, a proxy for the minimum amount of energy required by an active microorganism. This function does not require species- or metabolism-specific parameters, and can be used to model metabolisms that capture any amount of energy. The utility of this new thermodynamic rate limiting term is illustrated by applying it to three low-energy processes: fermentation, methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. The model predicts that the rate of fermentation will be reduced by half once the Gibbs energy of the catalyzed reaction reaches -12 kJ (mol e-)-1, and then slowing exponentially until the energy yield approaches zero. Similarly, the new model predicts that the low energy yield of methanogenesis, -4 to -0.5 kJ (mol e-)-1, for a partial pressure of H2 between 11 and 0.6 Pa decreases the reaction rate by 95-99%. Finally, the new function's utility is illustrated through its ability to accurately model sulfate concentration data in an anoxic marine sediment.

  7. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  8. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-limiting ADP release

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S.A. Kuznetsov and V.I. Gelfand is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin. The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that P/sub i/ release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (K/sub i/ < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by (/sup 14/C)ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  9. Robust efficiency and actuator saturation explain healthy heart rate control and variability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Cruz, Jerry; Chien, Chenghao Simon; Sojoudi, Somayeh; Recht, Benjamin; Stone, David; Csete, Marie; Bahmiller, Daniel; Doyle, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The correlation of healthy states with heart rate variability (HRV) using time series analyses is well documented. Whereas these studies note the accepted proximal role of autonomic nervous system balance in HRV patterns, the responsible deeper physiological, clinically relevant mechanisms have not been fully explained. Using mathematical tools from control theory, we combine mechanistic models of basic physiology with experimental exercise data from healthy human subjects to explain causal relationships among states of stress vs. health, HR control, and HRV, and more importantly, the physiologic requirements and constraints underlying these relationships. Nonlinear dynamics play an important explanatory role––most fundamentally in the actuator saturations arising from unavoidable tradeoffs in robust homeostasis and metabolic efficiency. These results are grounded in domain-specific mechanisms, tradeoffs, and constraints, but they also illustrate important, universal properties of complex systems. We show that the study of complex biological phenomena like HRV requires a framework which facilitates inclusion of diverse domain specifics (e.g., due to physiology, evolution, and measurement technology) in addition to general theories of efficiency, robustness, feedback, dynamics, and supporting mathematical tools. PMID:25092335

  10. Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

    1981-09-01

    Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

  11. Integrated modeling for determining launch survival and limitations of actuated lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2008-07-01

    The future of space telescopes lies in large, lightweight, segmented aperture systems. Segmented apertures eliminate manufacturability and launch vehicle fairing diameter as apertures size constraints. Low areal density, actuated segments allow the systems to meet both launch mass restrictions and on-orbit wavefront error requirements. These systems, with silicon carbide as a leading material, have great potential for increasing the productivity, affordability, and manufacturability of future space-based optical systems. Thus far, progress has been made on the manufacturing, sensing, actuation, and on-orbit control of such systems. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the harsh environment of launch. The launch environment may dominate aspects of the design of the mirror segments, with survivability requirements eliminating many potentially good designs. Integrated modeling of a mirror segment can help identify trends in mirror geometries that maximize launch performance, ensuring survivability without drastically over designing the mirror. A finite element model of a single, ribbed, actuated, silicon carbide mirror segment is created, and is used to develop a dynamic, state-space model, with launch load spectra as disturbance inputs, and mirror stresses as performance outputs. The parametric nature of this model allows analysis of many geometrically different mirror segments, helping to identify key parameters for launch survival. The modeling method described herein will enable identification of the design decisions that are dominated by launch, and will allow for development of launch-load alleviation techniques to further push the areal density boundaries in support of the creation of larger and lighter mirrors than previously possible.

  12. Flight Evaluation of an Aircraft with Side and Center Stick Controllers and Rate-Limited Ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deppe, P. R.; Chalk, C. R.; Shafer, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    As part of an ongoing government and industry effort to study the flying qualities of aircraft with rate-limited control surface actuators, two studies were previously flown to examine an algorithm developed to reduce the tendency for pilot-induced oscillation when rate limiting occurs. This algorithm, when working properly, greatly improved the performance of the aircraft in the first study. In the second study, however, the algorithm did not initially offer as much improvement. The differences between the two studies caused concern. The study detailed in this paper was performed to determine whether the performance of the algorithm was affected by the characteristics of the cockpit controllers. Time delay and flight control system noise were also briefly evaluated. An in-flight simulator, the Calspan Learjet 25, was programmed with a low roll actuator rate limit, and the algorithm was programmed into the flight control system. Side- and center-stick controllers, force and position command signals, a rate-limited feel system, a low-frequency feel system, and a feel system damper were evaluated. The flight program consisted of four flights and 38 evaluations of test configurations. Performance of the algorithm was determined to be unaffected by using side- or center-stick controllers or force or position command signals. The rate-limited feel system performed as well as the rate-limiting algorithm but was disliked by the pilots. The low-frequency feel system and the feel system damper were ineffective. Time delay and noise were determined to degrade the performance of the algorithm.

  13. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  14. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation.

    PubMed

    Booster, N A; Su, F Y; Adolph, S C; Ahn, A N

    2015-04-01

    Tarantulas extend the femur-patella (proximal) and tibia-metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R(2)) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind-legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  15. Effect of temperature on leg kinematics in sprinting tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi): high speed may limit hydraulic joint actuation

    PubMed Central

    Booster, N. A.; Su, F. Y.; Adolph, S. C.; Ahn, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tarantulas extend the femur–patella (proximal) and tibia–metatarsal (distal) joints of their legs hydraulically. Because these two hydraulically actuated joints are positioned in series, hemolymph flow within each leg is expected to mechanically couple the movement of the joints. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: (1) at lower temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints within a leg will be less coupled because of increased hemolymph viscosity slowing hemolymph flow; and (2) at higher temperatures, movement of the two in-series hydraulic joints will be less coupled because the higher stride frequencies limit the time available for hemolymph flow. We elicited maximal running speeds at four ecologically relevant temperatures (15, 24, 31 and 40°C) in Texas Brown tarantulas (Aphonopelma hentzi). The spiders increased sprint speed 2.5-fold over the temperature range by changing their stride frequency but not stride length. The coefficient of determination for linear regression (R2) of the proximal and distal joint angles was used as the measure of the degree of coupling between the two joints. This coupling coefficient between the proximal and distal joint angles, for both forelegs and hind­legs, was significantly lowest at the highest temperature at which the animals ran the fastest with the highest stride frequencies. The coordination of multiple, in-series hydraulically actuated joints may be limited by operating speed. PMID:25833132

  16. Limiting vibration in systems with constant amplitude actuators through command preshaping. M.S Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Keith Eric

    1994-01-01

    The basic concepts of command preshaping were taken and adapted to the framework of systems with constant amplitude (on-off) actuators. In this context, pulse sequences were developed which help to attenuate vibration in flexible systems with high robustness to errors in frequency identification. Sequences containing impulses of different magnitudes were approximated by sequences containing pulses of different durations. The effects of variation in pulse width on this approximation were examined. Sequences capable of minimizing loads induced in flexible systems during execution of commands were also investigated. The usefulness of these techniques in real-world situations was verified by application to a high fidelity simulation of the space shuttle. Results showed that constant amplitude preshaping techniques offer a substantial improvement in vibration reduction over both the standard and upgraded shuttle control methods and may be mission enabling for use of the shuttle with extremely massive payloads.

  17. Theoretical Limits of Damping Attainable by Smart Beams with Rate Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1997-01-01

    Using a generally accepted model we present a comprehensive analysis (within the page limitation) of an Euler- Bernoulli beam with PZT sensor-actuator and pure rate feedback. The emphasis is on the root locus - the dependence of the attainable damping on the feedback gain. There is a critical value of the gain beyond which the damping decreases to zero. We construct the time-domain response using semigroup theory, and show that the eigenfunctions form a Riesz basis, leading to a 'modal' expansion.

  18. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  19. 12 CFR 226.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 226.30 Section 226.30... TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor shall include in... this section will constitute compliance with the disclosure requirements on limitations on increases...

  20. 14 CFR 35.5 - Propeller ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller ratings and operating limitations. 35.5 Section 35.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS General § 35.5 Propeller ratings and operating limitations. (a) Propeller ratings and...

  1. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine ratings and operating limitations. 33.7 Section 33.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES General § 33.7 Engine ratings and operating limitations. (a) Engine ratings and...

  2. Design of IPMC actuator-driven valve-less micropump and its flow rate estimation at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangki; Kim, Kwang J.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the design and flow rate predictions of an IPMC (ionic polymer-metal composite) actuator-driven valve-less micropump. It should be noted that IPMC is a promising material candidate for micropump applications since it can be operated with low input voltages and can produce large stroke volumes, while having controllable flow rates. The micropump manufacturing process with IPMC is also convenient; it is anticipated that the manufacturing cost of the IPMC micropump is competitive with other technologies. In order to design an effective IPMC diaphragm that functions as an actuating motor for a micropump, a finite element analysis (FEA) was utilized to optimize the electrode shape of the IPMC diaphragm and estimate its stroke volumes. In addition, the effect of the pump chamber pressure on the stroke volume was numerically investigated. Appropriate inlet and outlet nozzle/diffuser elements were also studied for the valve-less micropump. Based on the selected geometry of nozzle/diffuser elements and the estimated stroke volume of the IPMC diaphragm, the flow rate of the micropump was estimated at a low Reynolds number of about 50.

  3. 5 CFR 531.606 - Maximum limits on locality rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the pay limitations established in 5 CFR 304.105. (d) A portion of a locality payment that is not... rates. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, a locality rate may not exceed the rate of basic pay payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule. (b)(1) A locality rate for an...

  4. 5 CFR 536.306 - Limitation on retained rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other law or regulation to the rate of basic pay the employee would have received but for this... AND PAY RETENTION Pay Retention § 536.306 Limitation on retained rates. (a) A retained rate may not at any time exceed the rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule. (b) When an...

  5. 12 CFR 1026.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 1026.30 Section 1026.30 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 1026.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor shall include in any consumer credit contract secured by...

  6. 12 CFR 1026.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 1026.30 Section 1026.30 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 1026.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor shall include in any consumer credit contract secured by...

  7. 12 CFR 1026.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 1026.30 Section 1026.30 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 1026.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor shall include in any consumer credit contract secured by...

  8. 12 CFR 226.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 226.30 Section 226.30 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor...

  9. 12 CFR 226.30 - Limitation on rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limitation on rates. 226.30 Section 226.30 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.30 Limitation on rates. A creditor shall include...

  10. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  11. Mechanical characterization of sub-100-nm-thick Au thin films by electrostatically actuated tensile testing with several strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Jin; Kawase, Shinya; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Isono, Yoshitada

    2014-02-01

    We have developed the tensile testing device based on MEMS technology and applied it to the Au thin films with thickness in the sub-100-nm regime. The specimen was fabricated by thermal deposition and sputtering processes in the course of device fabrication. This technique of device fabrication in combination with the specimen realizes the precise loading direction without preloading before tensile tests. The loads were applied electrostatically by the comb-drive actuator. The obtained Young’s modulus was 28 ± 3 GPa and was insensitive to the strain rate. The 0.2% yield strength was in the range from 192 to 519 MPa with a trend of decrease with decreasing strain rate in the range from 5 × 10-5 to 5 × 10-2 s-1.

  12. 48 CFR 352.231-70 - Salary rate limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rate in excess of the Federal Executive Schedule Level I in effect on the date an expense is incurred... salary rate limitation provision established in the HHS appropriations act in effect when the expense is... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Salary rate...

  13. 48 CFR 352.231-70 - Salary rate limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rate in excess of the Federal Executive Schedule Level I in effect on the date an expense is incurred... salary rate limitation provision established in the HHS appropriations act in effect when the expense is... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Salary rate...

  14. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  15. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  16. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  17. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results. PMID:26329224

  18. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., ratings and operating limitations are established relating to the following: (1) Horsepower or torque, r.p.... (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine... following: (1) Horsepower, torque, or thrust, r.p.m., gas temperature, and time for— (i) Rated...

  19. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., ratings and operating limitations are established relating to the following: (1) Horsepower or torque, r.p.... (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine... following: (1) Horsepower, torque, or thrust, r.p.m., gas temperature, and time for— (i) Rated...

  20. Enhancing vehicle cornering limit through sideslip and yaw rate control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qian; Gentile, Pierangelo; Tota, Antonio; Sorniotti, Aldo; Gruber, Patrick; Costamagna, Fabio; De Smet, Jasper

    2016-06-01

    Fully electric vehicles with individually controlled drivetrains can provide a high degree of drivability and vehicle safety, all while increasing the cornering limit and the 'fun-to-drive' aspect. This paper investigates a new approach on how sideslip control can be integrated into a continuously active yaw rate controller to extend the limit of stable vehicle cornering and to allow sustained high values of sideslip angle. The controllability-related limitations of integrated yaw rate and sideslip control, together with its potential benefits, are discussed through the tools of multi-variable feedback control theory and non-linear phase-plane analysis. Two examples of integrated yaw rate and sideslip control systems are presented and their effectiveness is experimentally evaluated and demonstrated on a four-wheel-drive fully electric vehicle prototype. Results show that the integrated control system allows safe operation at the vehicle cornering limit at a specified sideslip angle independent of the tire-road friction conditions.

  1. 48 CFR 42.707 - Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates. 42.707 Section 42.707 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Indirect Cost Rates 42.707 Cost-sharing rates and...

  2. 48 CFR 42.707 - Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates. 42.707 Section 42.707 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Indirect Cost Rates 42.707 Cost-sharing rates and...

  3. Maximum organic carbon limits at different melter feed rates (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    This report documents the results of a study to assess the impact of varying melter feed rates on the maximum total organic carbon (TOC) limits allowable in the DWPF melter feed. Topics discussed include: carbon content; feed rate; feed composition; melter vapor space temperature; combustion and dilution air; off-gas surges; earlier work on maximum TOC; overview of models; and the results of the work completed.

  4. 48 CFR 42.707 - Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... indirect costs; (ii) Has a recent record of a rapidly increasing indirect cost rate due to a declining... limitations on indirect cost rates. 42.707 Section 42.707 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Indirect Cost Rates...

  5. 48 CFR 42.707 - Cost-sharing rates and limitations on indirect cost rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... indirect costs; (ii) Has a recent record of a rapidly increasing indirect cost rate due to a declining... limitations on indirect cost rates. 42.707 Section 42.707 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Indirect Cost Rates...

  6. Response of Microbial Soil Carbon Mineralization Rates to Oxygen Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, M.; Denney, A.; Nico, P. S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is known to be controlled by climatic factors as well as molecular structure, mineral-organic associations, and physical protection. What remains elusive is to what extent oxygen (O2) limitations impact overall rates of microbial SOM mineralization (oxidation) in soils. Even within upland soils that are aerobic in bulk, factors limiting O2 diffusion such as texture and soil moisture can result in an abundance of anaerobic microsites in the interior of soil aggregates. Variation in ensuing anaerobic respiration pathways can further impact SOM mineralization rates. Using a combination of (first) aggregate model systems and (second) manipulations of intact field samples, we show how limitations on diffusion and carbon bioavailability interact to impose anaerobic conditions and associated respiration constraints on SOM mineralization rates. In model aggregates, we examined how particle size (soil texture) and amount of dissolved organic carbon (bioavailable carbon) affect O2 availability and distribution. Monitoring electron acceptor profiles (O2, NO3-, Mn and Fe) and SOM transformations (dissolved, particulate, mineral-associated pools) across the resulting redox gradients, we then determined the distribution of operative microbial metabolisms and their cumulative impact on SOM mineralization rates. Our results show that anaerobic conditions decrease SOM mineralization rates overall, but those are partially offset by the concurrent increases in SOM bioavailability due to transformations of protective mineral phases. In intact soil aggregates collected from soils varying in texture and SOM content, we mapped the spatial distribution of anaerobic microsites. Optode imaging, microsensor profiling and 3D tomography revealed that soil texture regulates overall O2 availability in aggregate interiors, while particulate SOM in biopores appears to control the fine-scale distribution of anaerobic microsites. Collectively, our

  7. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... turbine wheel inlet gas. (5) Pressure of— (i) Fuel at the fuel inlet; and (ii) Oil at the main oil gallery. (6) Accessory drive torque and overhang moment. (7) Component life. (8) Turbosupercharger turbine wheel r.p.m. (c) For turbine engines, ratings and operating limitations are established relating to...

  8. 15 CFR 700.18 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limitations on placing rated orders. 700.18 Section 700.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND...

  9. 15 CFR 700.18 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limitations on placing rated orders. 700.18 Section 700.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND...

  10. 15 CFR 700.18 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limitations on placing rated orders. 700.18 Section 700.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND...

  11. 15 CFR 700.18 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limitations on placing rated orders. 700.18 Section 700.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND...

  12. 15 CFR 700.18 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limitations on placing rated orders. 700.18 Section 700.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND...

  13. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  14. Estimation of the diffusion-limited rate of microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Odde, D J

    1997-01-01

    Microtubule assembly is a complex process with individual microtubules alternating stochastically between extended periods of assembly and disassembly, a phenomenon known as dynamic instability. Since the discovery of dynamic instability, molecular models of assembly have generally assumed that tubulin incorporation into the microtubule lattice is primarily reaction-limited. Recently this assumption has been challenged and the importance of diffusion in microtubule assembly dynamics asserted on the basis of scaling arguments, with tubulin gradients predicted to extend over length scales exceeding a cell diameter, approximately 50 microns. To assess whether individual microtubules in vivo assemble at diffusion-limited rates and to predict the theoretical upper limit on the assembly rate, a steady-state mean-field model for the concentration of tubulin about a growing microtubule tip was developed. Using published parameter values for microtubule assembly in vivo (growth rate = 7 microns/min, diffusivity = 6 x 10(-12) m2/s, tubulin concentration = 10 microM), the model predicted that the tubulin concentration at the microtubule tip was approximately 89% of the concentration far from the tip, indicating that microtubule self-assembly is not diffusion-limited. Furthermore, the gradients extended less than approximately 50 nm (the equivalent of about two microtubule diameters) from the microtubule tip, a distance much less than a cell diameter. In addition, a general relation was developed to predict the diffusion-limited assembly rate from the diffusivity and bulk tubulin concentration. Using this relation, it was estimated that the maximum theoretical assembly rate is approximately 65 microns/min, above which tubulin can no longer diffuse rapidly enough to support faster growth. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199774

  15. Determination of the rate-limiting process for bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Lahoz, C.; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Wilson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Vadose zone remediation by bioventing may be rate limited by biological activity or mass transfer processes affecting the stripping of the contaminant and the supply of oxygen from the gaseous to the aqueous phase. Knowledge of the rate coefficients for both processes is required for sound design and operation of bioventing systems. The rapid in situ respiration test presented by Hinchee and Ong (1992), together with the model presented here, can be used for the estimation of both kinetic parameters. These results indicate that oxygen supply to the aqueous phase may be, in some cases, the rate-limiting step for biodegradation. Equivalent aqueous diffusion lengths calculated from the mass transfer coefficients obtained are relatively small, in the range of few millimeters. The model can be used for decision making for bioventing optimization. In the present model hydrocarbons and biodegradable solvents spilled in the vadose zone are considered to be basically in three phases: gaseous, aqueous, and nonaqueous phase liquid.

  16. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek, A. Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2014-07-15

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  17. Rate-limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-05-17

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homologue of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182--G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, we determined activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover using measurements over a temperature range of 15-30 °C. (15)N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for the N-terminal domain and I182--G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate-limiting motions. PMID:21425868

  18. Rate limitations of lime dissolution into coal ash slag

    SciTech Connect

    L.K. Elliott; John A. Lucas; Jim Happ; John Patterson; Harry Hurst; Terry F. Wall

    2008-11-15

    The rate-limiting mechanisms of lime dissolution from a solid pellet into coal ash slag and synthetic slag was investigated using an experiment involving a rotating cylinder of lime in a liquid slag bath at temperatures of 1450-1650{degree}C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the slag composition around the lime cylinder was used to determine the nature of the boundary layer surrounding the pellet and the calcium concentration profile. Predictions using shrinking core models of a cylindrical pellet were compared to experimental results, suggesting that diffusion through the slag boundary layer and the change of the phase of lime from solid to liquid in the boundary layer combine to limit the process. These results indicate that a combination of controlling steps: diffusion through the boundary layer and the phase change of lime from solid to liquid, must be considered when predicting lime dissolution rates. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Corotation lag limit on mass-loss rate from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Considering rapid escape of H2O from Io during an early hot evolutionary epoch, an H2O plasma torus is constructed by balancing dissociation and ionization products against centrifugally driven diffusion, including for the first time the effects of corotation lag resulting from mass loading. Two fundamental limits are found as the mass injection rate increases: (1) an 'ignition' limit of 1.1 x 10 to the 6th kg/s, beyond which the torus cannot ionize itself and photoionization dominates; and (2) the ultimate mass loading limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th kg/s, which occurs when neutrals newly created by charge exchange and recombination cannot leave the torus, thereby bringing magnetospherically driven transport to a halt. Connecting this limit with the variations of Io's temperature in its early evolution epoch gives an estimate of the upper limit on the total mass loss from Io, about 3.0 x 10 to the 20th kg (for high-opacity nebula) and about 8.9 x 10 to the 20th kg (for low-opacity nebula). These limits correspond to eroding 8 km and 22 km of H2O from the surface. It is concluded that compared to the other Galilean satellites, Io was created basically dry.

  20. Carbon limitation of denitrification rates in an anaerobic groundwater system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Fernandez, M., Jr.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    Rates of potential denitrification were determined for anaerobic aquifer sediments collected at a site where groundwater NO3 concentrations ranged from 0.7 ??M to 8.6 mM. A significant relation (p = 0.046) was observed between denitrification rates and the in situ concentration of NO3, but NO3 concentration only accounted for approximately 34% (r2) of the variation in activity. The highly significant relation (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.80) between potential denitrification and sediment total organic content and the enhanced activity of sediments amended with glucose indicated that denitrification rates in this aquifer system were carbon limited. No significant relation was observed between denitrification and the in situ groundwater pH, but short-term variations in pH influenced both the magnitude and the end products of denitrification. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  1. Flow rate limitation in open wedge channel under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, YueXing; Chen, XiaoQian; Huang, YiYong

    2013-08-01

    A study of flow rate limitation in an open wedge channel is reported in this paper. Under microgravity condition, the flow is controlled by the convection and the viscosity in the channel as well as the curvature of the liquid free surface. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the curvature cannot balance the pressure difference leading to a collapse of the free surface. A 1-dimensional theoretical model is used to predict the critical flow rate and calculate the shape of the free surface. Computational Fluid Dynamics tool is also used to simulate the phenomenon. Results show that the 1-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate because extra pressure loss is not included in the governing equation. Good agreement is found in 3-dimensional simulation results. Parametric study with different wedge angles and channel lengths show that the critical flow rate increases with increasing the cross section area; and decreases with increasing the channel length. The work in this paper can help understand the surface collapsing without gravity and for the design in propellant management devices in satellite tanks.

  2. Carbon dioxide limitation of marine phytoplankton growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebesell, U.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Smetacek, V.

    1993-01-01

    THE supply of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is not considered to limit oceanic primary productivity1, as its concentration in sea water exceeds that of other plant macronutrients such as nitrate and phosphate by two and three orders of magnitude, respectively. But the bulk of oceanic new production2 and a major fraction of vertical carbon flux is mediated by a few diatom genera whose ability to use DIG components other than CO2, which comprises < 1% of total DIC3, is unknown4. Here we show that under optimal light and nutrient conditions, diatom growth rate can in fact be limited by the supply of CO2. The doubling in surface water pCO2 levels since the last glaciation from 180 to 355 p.p.m.5,6 could therefore have stimulated marine productivity, thereby increasing oceanic carbon sequestration by the biological pump.

  3. Hydraulically-actuated operating system for an electric circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Barkan, Philip; Imam, Imdad

    1978-01-01

    This hydraulically-actuated operating system comprises a cylinder, a piston movable therein in an opening direction to open a circuit breaker, and an accumulator for supplying pressurized liquid to a piston-actuating space within the cylinder. A normally-closed valve between the accumulator and the actuating space is openable to allow pressurized liquid from the accumulator to flow through the valve into the actuating space to drive the piston in an opening direction. A vent is located hydraulically between the actuating space and the valve for affording communication between said actuating space and a low pressure region. Flow control means is provided for restricting leakage through said vent to a rate that prevents said leakage from substantially detracting from the development of pressure within said actuatng space during the period from initial opening of the valve to the time when said piston has moved through most of its opening stroke. Following such period and while the valve is still open, said flow control means allows effective leakage through said vent. The accumulator has a limited capacity that results in the pressure within said actuating space decaying promptly to a low value as a result of effective leakage through said vent after the piston has moved through a circuit-breaker opening stroke and while the valve is in its open state. Means is provided for resetting the valve to its closed state in response to said pressure decay in the actuating space.

  4. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  5. Rate limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Imaizumi, M.; Hieslmair, H.; Weberr, E.R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have performed studies on multicrystalline silicon used for solar cells in the as-grown state and after a series of processing and gettering steps. The principal goal of this work is to determine the rate limiting step for metal impurity gettering from multicrystalline silicon with an emphasis on the release of impurities from structural defects. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping was used to monitor the release process. Copper and nickel impurities were found to reside primarily at dislocations in the as-grown state of the material. Short annealing treatments rapidly dissolved the impurity agglomerates. Based on these results and modeling of the dissolution process, copper and nickel is in the form of small agglomerates (< 10 nm) clustered together over micron-scale regions in the as-grown material. Aluminum gettering further disintegrated the agglomerates to below the sensitivity of the system, 2--5 nm in radii. No significant barrier to release of copper or nickel from dislocations was observed.

  6. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  7. Thermally actuated mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae

    This thesis will discuss the generation of controlled sub-micron motions using novel micro actuators. Our research focuses on the development of an arm-type actuator and a free-motion locomotive walking device. Nano-science and nano-technology focuses on the creation of novel functional materials and also at the development of new fabrication techniques incorporating them. In the fields of novel fabrication techniques, manipulations of micron or sub-micron objects by micro actuators have been suggested in the science and engineering societies for mainly two reasons. From a scientific standpoint, new tools enable new prospective sciences, as is evident from the development of the atomic force microscope. From an engineering standpoint, the miniaturization of manipulation tools will require less material and less energy during a material's production. In spite of such importance, progress in the actuator miniaturization is in a primitive state, especially for the micro mobile devices. The thesis will be a key step in pursuit of this goal with an emphasis on generating motions. Our static actuator uses the excellent elastic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a template for a bimorph system. Deflections in response to temperature variations are demonstrated. The mobile device itself is a bimorph system consisting of thin metal films. Control mechanisms for its velocity and steering are discussed. Finally, fundamental limits on the capabilities of the two devices in a more general sense are discussed under via laws of physics.

  8. 14 CFR 33.7 - Engine ratings and operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...— (i) Rated maximum continuous power (relating to unsupercharged operation or to operation in each supercharger mode as applicable); and (ii) Rated takeoff power (relating to unsupercharged operation or to... continuous power or thrust (augmented); (ii) Rated maximum continuous power or thrust (unaugmented);...

  9. Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) piezo stepping actuator. Piezo stepping actuators are novel because they offer extreme dynamic range (centimeter stroke with nanometer resolution) with power, thermal, mass, and volume advantages over existing motorized actuation technology. These advantages come with the added benefit of greatly reduced complexity in the support electronics. The piezo stepping actuator consists of three fully redundant sets of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs), two sets of brake PZTs, and one set of extension PZTs. These PZTs are used to grasp and move a runner attached to the optic to be moved. By proper cycling of the two brake and extension PZTs, both forward and backward moves of the runner can be achieved. Each brake can be configured for either a power-on or power-off state. For SIM, the brakes and gate of the mechanism are configured in such a manner that, at the end of the step, the actuator is in a parked or power-off state. The control software uses asynchronous sampling of an optical encoder to monitor the position of the runner. These samples are timed to coincide with the end of the previous move, which may consist of a variable number of steps. This sampling technique linearizes the device by avoiding input saturation of the actuator and makes latencies of the plant vanish. The software also estimates, in real time, the scale factor of the device and a disturbance caused by cycling of the brakes. These estimates are used to actively cancel the brake disturbance. The control system also includes feedback and feedforward elements that regulate the position of the runner to a given reference position. Convergence time for smalland medium-sized reference positions (less than 200 microns) to within 10 nanometers can be achieved in under 10 seconds. Convergence times for large moves (greater than 1 millimeter) are limited by the step rate.

  10. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  11. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  12. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  13. Modeling of thermo-mechanical fatigue and damage in shape memory alloy axial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert W.; Hartl, Darren J.; Chemisky, Yves; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and energy industries have seen the potential benefits of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as solid state actuators. Thus far, however, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components or over-designed due to a lack of understanding regarding how SMAs undergo thermomechanical or actuation fatigue and the inability to accurately predict failure in an actuator during use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the actuation fatigue response of Nickel-Titanium-Hafnium (NiTiHf) axial actuators and, in turn, use this characterization to predict failure and monitor damage in dogbone actuators undergoing various thermomechanical loading paths. Calibration data was collected from constant load, full cycle tests ranging from 200-600MPa. Subsequently, actuator lifetimes were predicted for four additional loading paths. These loading paths consisted of linearly varying load with full transformation (300-500MPa) and step loads which transition from zero stress to 300-400MPa at various martensitic volume fractions. Thermal cycling was achieved via resistive heating and convective cooling and was controlled via a state machine developed in LabVIEW. A previously developed fatigue damage model, which is formulated such that the damage accumulation rate is general in terms of its dependence on current and local stress and actuation strain states, was utilized. This form allows the model to be utilized for specimens undergoing complex loading paths. Agreement between experiments and simulations is discussed.

  14. 49 CFR 33.38 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... priority rating authority, see § 33.41); or (vi) Any items related to the development of chemical or biological warfare capabilities or the production of chemical or biological weapons, unless such...

  15. 49 CFR 33.38 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... priority rating authority, see § 33.41); or (vi) Any items related to the development of chemical or biological warfare capabilities or the production of chemical or biological weapons, unless such...

  16. 49 CFR 33.38 - Limitations on placing rated orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... priority rating authority, see § 33.41); or (vi) Any items related to the development of chemical or biological warfare capabilities or the production of chemical or biological weapons, unless such...

  17. 40 CFR 228.8 - Limitations on times and rates of disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR OCEAN DUMPING § 228.8 Limitations on times and rates of disposal. Limitations as to time for and rates of dumping may be stated as part of...

  18. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  19. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Thermal behavior of ionic electroactive polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punning, Andres; Must, Indrek; Johanson, Urmas; Aabloo, Alvo

    2015-04-01

    The high spatial, temporal, and thermal resolution of the thermal imaging system Optotherm EL InfraSight 320 is used for investigation of the thermal behavior of the ionic electroactive polymer (IEAP) actuators. The resolution of 10-20 pixels in the direction of their thickness is close to the theoretical limit restrained by the infrared light wavelength registered by the imaging system. The videos, recorded with the frame rate of 30 fps, demonstrate showy the propagation of heat along the membrane. The analysis of the thermal images provides the foundation for precise modeling of the IEAP actuators, taking into account the thermally induced mechanical and electrochemical effects. Experiments conducted with the IEAP actuators of different types (ionic polymer-metal composite, carbon-polymer composite, conducting polymer actuators) allow comparing their efficiencies. The experiments show demonstrable, that the IEAPs, used improperly, overheat to the inadmissible temperatures within seconds only. This, in turn, evaporizes the volatile electrolyte, and shortens the life expectancy of the IEAP devices.

  1. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed. PMID:17124140

  2. Physical constraints, fundamental limits, and optimal locus of operating points for an inverted pendulum based actuated dynamic walker.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Lalit; Umanand, Loganathan

    2015-12-01

    The inverted pendulum is a popular model for describing bipedal dynamic walking. The operating point of the walker can be specified by the combination of initial mid-stance velocity (v0) and step angle (φm) chosen for a given walk. In this paper, using basic mechanics, a framework of physical constraints that limit the choice of operating points is proposed. The constraint lines thus obtained delimit the allowable region of operation of the walker in the v0-φm plane. A given average forward velocity vx,avg can be achieved by several combinations of v0 and φm. Only one of these combinations results in the minimum mechanical power consumption and can be considered the optimum operating point for the given vx,avg. This paper proposes a method for obtaining this optimal operating point based on tangency of the power and velocity contours. Putting together all such operating points for various vx,avg, a family of optimum operating points, called the optimal locus, is obtained. For the energy loss and internal energy models chosen, the optimal locus obtained has a largely constant step angle with increasing speed but tapers off at non-dimensional speeds close to unity. PMID:26502096

  3. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  4. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  5. Fail-safe electric actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.J.

    1988-07-19

    In combination with a control mechanism characterized by the ability to be moved from inoperative to operative position and back, a fail-safe actuator device for automatically returning the control mechanism to inoperative position when interruption of electric power occurs is described which comprises: a fluid-driven vaned torque actuator: electric-motor-driven fluid power means for operating the torque actuator; electrically operated valve means for controlling the power fluid flow between the torque actuator and the fluid power generating means; at least one shaft projecting from the torque actuator; coupling means for operatively connecting the shaft to the control mechanism to be operated by the failsafe actuator device; reversible means for storing energy, the reversible means being operatively connected to the shaft; a limit-switch operating cam mounted on and rotable with the shaft; a limit switch positioned for activation by the limit-switch operating cam; and electric circuitry means for interconnecting the motordriven fluid power generating means, the valve means, and the limit switch.

  6. Macro Fiber Piezocomposite Actuator Poling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Manos, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The performance and advantages of Piezocomposite Actuators are to provide a low cost, in-situ actuator/sensor that is flexible, low profile and high strain per volt performance in the same plane of poled voltage. This paper extends reported data for the performance of these Macrofiber Composite (MFC) Actuators to include 4 progressively narrower Intedigitized electrode configurations with several line widths and spacing ratios. Data is reported for max free strain, average strain per applied volt, poling (alignment of the electric dipoles of the PZT ceramic) voltage vs. strain and capacitance, time to poling voltage 95% saturation. The output strain per volt progressively increases as electrode spacing decreases, with saturation occurring at lower poling voltages. The narrowest spacing ratio becomes prone to voltage breakdown or short circuits limiting the spacing width with current fabrication methods. The capacitance generally increases with increasing poling voltage level but has high sensitivity to factors such as temperature, moisture and time from poling which limit its usefulness as a simple indicator. The total time of applied poling voltage to saturate or fully line up the dipoles in the piezoceramic was generally on the order of 5-20 seconds. Less sensitivity to poling due to the applied rate of voltage increase over a 25 to 500 volt/second rate range was observed.

  7. Constraints limiting the rate of human expansion into the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. G.

    1981-09-01

    It is pointed out that human expansion into a largely lifeless Galaxy will be constrained by ecological and engineering factors. Bringing a barren planet to a stable habitable state will require a long series of biological introductions, each tailored to the particular planet. The difficulties in transporting complete ecosystems will mean that even a first-generation colony will have no more than a skeleton ecology. Settlers will be hard put to it to persuade older colonies, or earth itself, to send them extra life forms. This will be difficult in view of the fact that information is the only commodity that can be traded easily in return. Colonization will therefore proceed more slowly after the first expansion from earth. It is thought that extraterrestrial civilizations are probably limited in the same ways.

  8. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  9. Mixing rates and limit theorems for random intermittent maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahsoun, Wael; Bose, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We study random transformations built from intermittent maps on the unit interval that share a common neutral fixed point. We focus mainly on random selections of Pomeu-Manneville-type maps {{T}α} using the full parameter range 0<α <∞ , in general. We derive a number of results around a common theme that illustrates in detail how the constituent map that is fastest mixing (i.e. smallest α) combined with details of the randomizing process, determines the asymptotic properties of the random transformation. Our key result (theorem 1.1) establishes sharp estimates on the position of return time intervals for the quenched dynamics. The main applications of this estimate are to limit laws (in particular, CLT and stable laws, depending on the parameters chosen in the range 0<α <1 ) for the associated skew product; these are detailed in theorem 3.2. Since our estimates in theorem 1.1 also hold for 1≤slant α <∞ we study a second class of random transformations derived from piecewise affine Gaspard-Wang maps, prove existence of an infinite (σ-finite) invariant measure and study the corresponding correlation asymptotics. To the best of our knowledge, this latter kind of result is completely new in the setting of random transformations.

  10. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a producing well completion, or set a Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) for a reservoir... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May the Regional Supervisor limit my well...

  11. 12 CFR 1270.5 - Leverage limit and credit rating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leverage limit and credit rating requirements... LIABILITIES Consolidated Obligations § 1270.5 Leverage limit and credit rating requirements. (a) Bank leverage... from an NRSRO and, at all times, maintain a current credit rating on the Banks'...

  12. 12 CFR 1270.5 - Leverage limit and credit rating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leverage limit and credit rating requirements... LIABILITIES Consolidated Obligations § 1270.5 Leverage limit and credit rating requirements. (a) Bank leverage... from an NRSRO and, at all times, maintain a current credit rating on the Banks'...

  13. 12 CFR 966.3 - Leverage limit and credit rating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leverage limit and credit rating requirements... CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.3 Leverage limit and credit rating requirements. (a) Bank leverage. (1) Except..., collectively, shall obtain from an NRSRO and, at all times, maintain a current credit rating on the...

  14. 12 CFR 1270.5 - Leverage limit and credit rating requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leverage limit and credit rating requirements... LIABILITIES Consolidated Obligations § 1270.5 Leverage limit and credit rating requirements. (a) Bank leverage... from an NRSRO and, at all times, maintain a current credit rating on the Banks'...

  15. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  16. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  17. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  18. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  19. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    in tactile display is investigated by the prototyping of a large scale refreshable Braille display device. Braille is a critical way for the vision impaired community to learn literacy and improve life quality. Current piezoelectrics-based refreshable Braille display technologies are limited to up to 1 line of Braille text, due to the bulky size of bimorph actuators. Based on the unique actuation feature of BSEP, refreshable Braille display devices up to smartphone-size have been demonstrated by polymer sheet laminates. Dots in the devices can be individually controlled via incorporated field-driven BSEP actuators and Joule heater units. A composite material consisting of silver nanowires (AgNW) embedded in a polymer substrate is brought up as a compliant electrode candidate for BSEP application. The AgNW composite is highly conductive (Rs: 10 Ω/sq) and remains conductive at strains as high as 140% (Rs: <10 3 Ω/sq). The baseline conductivity has only small changes up to 90% strain, which makes it low enough for both field driving and stretchable Joule heating. An out-of-plane bistable area strain up to 68% under Joule heating is achieved.

  20. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  1. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  2. Actuator lifetime predictions for Ni60Ti40 shape memory alloy plate actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert; Ottmers, Cade; Hewling, Brett; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), due to their ability to repeatedly recover substantial deformations under applied mechanical loading, have the potential to impact the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and energy industries as weight and volume saving replacements for conventional actuators. While numerous applications of SMA actuators have been flight tested and can be found in industrial applications, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components, are not widely implemented and frequently one-off designs, and are generally overdesigned due to a lack of understanding of the effect of the loading path on the fatigue life and the lack of an accurate method of predicting actuator lifetimes. Previous efforts have been effective at predicting actuator lifetimes for isobaric dogbone test specimens. This study builds on previous work and investigates the actuation fatigue response of plate actuators with various stress concentrations through the use of digital image correlation and finite element simulations.

  3. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Gas Production Requirements Production Rates § 250.1159 May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or... based on well tests and any limitations imposed by well and surface equipment, sand production... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the Regional Supervisor limit my well...

  4. Design of high performance piezo composites actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim A.

    Design of high performance piezo composites actuators are developed. Functionally Graded Microstructure (FGM) piezoelectric actuators are designed to reduce the stress concentration at the middle interface existed in the standard bimorph actuators while maintaining high actuation performance. The FGM piezoelectric laminates are composite materials with electroelastic properties varied through the laminate thickness. The elastic behavior of piezo-laminates actuators is developed using a 2D-elasticity model and a modified classical lamination theory (CLT). The stresses and out-of-plane displacements are obtained for standard and FGM piezoelectric bimorph plates under cylindrical bending generated by an electric field throughout the thickness of the laminate. The analytical model is developed for two different actuator geometries, a rectangular plate actuator and a disk shape actuator. The limitations of CLT are investigated against the 2D-elasticity model for the rectangular plate geometry. The analytical models based on CLT (rectangular and circular) and 2D-elasticity are compared with a model based on Finite Element Method (FEM). The experimental study consists of two FGM actuator systems, the PZT/PZT FGM system and the porous FGM system. The electroelastic properties of each layer in the FGM systems were measured and input in the analytical models to predict the FGM actuator performance. The performance of the FGM actuator is optimized by manipulating the thickness of each layer in the FGM system. The thickness of each layer in the FGM system is made to vary in a linear or non-linear manner to achieve the best performance of the FGM piezoelectric actuator. The analytical and FEM results are found to agree well with the experimental measurements for both rectangular and disk actuators. CLT solutions are found to coincide well with the elasticity solutions for high aspect ratios while the CLT solutions gave poor results compared to the 2D elasticity solutions for

  5. Bucky gel actuators optimization towards haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca; Hata, Kenji; Ricci, Davide

    2014-03-01

    An ideal plastic actuator for haptic applications should generate a relatively large displacement (minimum 0.2-0.6 mm, force (~50 mN/cm2) and a fast actuation response to the applied voltage. Although many different types of flexible, plastic actuators based on electroactive polymers (EAP) are currently under investigation, the ionic EAPs are the only ones that can be operated at low voltage. This property makes them suitable for applications that require inherently safe actuators. Among the ionic EAPs, bucky gel based actuators are very promising. Bucky gel is a physical gel made by grounding imidazolium ionic liquids with carbon nanotubes, which can then be incorporated in a polymeric composite matrix to prepare the active electrode layers of linear and bending actuators. Anyhow, many conflicting factors have to be balanced to obtain required performance. In order to produce high force a large stiffness is preferable but this limits the displacement. Moreover, the bigger the active electrode the larger the force. However the thicker an actuator is, the slower the charging process becomes (it is diffusion limited). In order to increase the charging speed a thin electrolyte would be desirable, but this increases the probability of pinholes and device failure. In this paper we will present how different approaches in electrolyte and electrode preparation influence actuator performance and properties taking particularly into account the device ionic conductivity (which influences the charging speed) and the electrode surface resistance (which influences both the recruitment of the whole actuator length and its speed).

  6. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND...

  8. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  9. Kinetic limitations on the diffusional control theory of the ablation rate of carbon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the theoretical maximum oxidation rate is limited in many cases even at temperatures much higher than 1650 deg K, not by oxygen transport, but by the kinetics of the carbon-oxygen reaction itself. Mass-loss rates have been calculated at air pressures of 0.01 atm, 1 atm, and 100 atm. It is found that at high temperatures the rate of the oxidation reaction is much slower than has generally been assumed on the basis of a simple linear extrapolation of Scala's 'fast' and 'slow' rate expressions. Accordingly it cannot be assumed that a transport limitation inevitably must be reached at high temperatures.

  10. Actuator selection for variable camber foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, John D.

    2004-07-01

    A number of polymer based actuator technologies have emerged over the past decade. How do these compare with traditional actuators and are there applications for which they are appropriate? Some of the answers to these questions are provided by outlining the rationale for employing an electroactive polymer to control hydrodynamic surfaces. The surfaces are sections of propeller blades whose trailing edges are deflected in order to change camber. The objective is to insert the actuators into the blades. High work per unit volume is required of the actuators. The ideal actuator technologies also feature relatively large strains in order to deflect the trailing edges with minimal mechanical amplification. It is argued that the high work densities, flexibility in shaping and the ability to hold a force without expending energy (catch state) provide electroactive polymers with advantages over electromagnetic actuators, which also lack the torque to directly drive the blade deflection. Candidate actuators are compared, including electroactive polymers, shape memory alloys, magnetostrictives and traditional piezoceramics. Selections are made on the bases of work density, strain, existence of a catch state, drive voltage and cost. It is suggested that conducting polymer actuators are best suited for the variable camber application. It is also argued that in general electroactive polymers are well-suited for applications in which actuator volume or mass are very limited, catch states are desired, cycle life is moderate to low, or noise cannot be tolerated. Some electroactive polymers also feature low voltage operation, and may be biocompatible.

  11. Low Mass Muscle Actuators (LoMMAs) Using Electroactive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Xue, T.; Joffe, B.; Lih, S. S.; Willis, P.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Clair, T.; Shahinpoor, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA is using actuation devices for many space applications and there is an increasing need to cut their cost as well as reduce their size, mass, and power consumption. Existing transducing actuators, such as piezoceramics, are inducing limited displacement levels. Potentially, electroactive polymers (so called EAP) can be formed as inexpensive, low-mass, low-power, miniature muscle actuators that are superior to the widely used actuators.

  12. 39 CFR 3010.11 - Limit on size of rate increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in any 12-month period are limited. (b) Rates of general applicability are subject to an inflation-based limitation computed using CPI-U values as detailed in § 3010.12. (c) An exception to the inflation... authority is measured separately for each class of mail. (d) In any 12-month period the...

  13. 39 CFR 3010.11 - Limit on size of rate increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in any 12-month period are limited. (b) Rates of general applicability are subject to an inflation-based limitation computed using CPI-U values as detailed in § 3010.12. (c) An exception to the inflation... authority is measured separately for each class of mail. (d) In any 12-month period the...

  14. 39 CFR 3010.11 - Limit on size of rate increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in any 12-month period are limited. (b) Rates of general applicability are subject to an inflation-based limitation computed using CPI-U values as detailed in § 3010.12. (c) An exception to the inflation... authority is measured separately for each class of mail. (d) In any 12-month period the...

  15. 39 CFR 3010.11 - Limit on size of rate increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in any 12-month period are limited. (b) Rates of general applicability are subject to an inflation-based limitation computed using CPI-U values as detailed in § 3010.12. (c) An exception to the inflation... authority is measured separately for each class of mail. (d) In any 12-month period the...

  16. 48 CFR 652.228-74 - Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... following provision: Defense Base Act Insurance Rates—Limitation (JUN 2006) (a) The Department of State has... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation. 652.228-74 Section 652.228-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  17. 48 CFR 652.228-74 - Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following provision: Defense Base Act Insurance Rates—Limitation (JUN 2006) (a) The Department of State has... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation. 652.228-74 Section 652.228-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  18. 48 CFR 652.228-74 - Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... following provision: Defense Base Act Insurance Rates—Limitation (JUN 2006) (a) The Department of State has... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation. 652.228-74 Section 652.228-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  19. 48 CFR 652.228-74 - Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... following provision: Defense Base Act Insurance Rates—Limitation (JUN 2006) (a) The Department of State has... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation. 652.228-74 Section 652.228-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  20. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  1. Temperature-memory polymer actuators

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Noechel, Ulrich; Sauter, Tilman; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reading out the temperature-memory of polymers, which is their ability to remember the temperature where they were deformed recently, is thus far unavoidably linked to erasing this memory effect. Here temperature-memory polymer actuators (TMPAs) based on cross-linked copolymer networks exhibiting a broad melting temperature range (ΔTm) are presented, which are capable of a long-term temperature-memory enabling more than 250 cyclic thermally controlled actuations with almost constant performance. The characteristic actuation temperatures Tacts of TMPAs can be adjusted by a purely physical process, guiding a directed crystallization in a temperature range of up to 40 °C by variation of the parameter Tsep in a nearly linear correlation. The temperature Tsep divides ΔTm into an upper Tm range (T > Tsep) forming a reshapeable actuation geometry that determines the skeleton and a lower Tm range (T < Tsep) that enables the temperature-controlled bidirectional actuation by crystallization-induced elongation and melting-induced contraction. The macroscopic bidirectional shape changes in TMPAs could be correlated with changes in the nanostructure of the crystallizable domains as a result of in situ X-ray investigations. Potential applications of TMPAs include heat engines with adjustable rotation rate and active building facades with self-regulating sun protectors. PMID:23836673

  2. Patch diameter limitation due to high chirp rates in focused SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    1994-10-01

    Polar-format processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images have a limited focused patch diameter that results from unmitigated phase errors. Very high chirp rates, encountered with fine-resolution short-pulse radars, exasperate the problem via a residual video phase error term. This letter modifies the traditional maximum patch diameter expression to include effects of very high chirp rates.

  3. 47 CFR 65.104 - Page limitations for rate of return submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Page limitations for rate of return submissions. 65.104 Section 65.104 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Procedures §...

  4. 47 CFR 65.104 - Page limitations for rate of return submissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Page limitations for rate of return submissions. 65.104 Section 65.104 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Procedures §...

  5. A Framework for a Supervisory Expert System for Robotic Manipulators with Joint-Position Limits and Joint-Rate Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutambara, Arthur G. O.; Litt, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the problem of path planning and control of robotic manipulators which have joint-position limits and joint-rate limits. The manipulators move autonomously and carry out variable tasks in a dynamic, unstructured and cluttered environment. The issue considered is whether the robotic manipulator can achieve all its tasks, and if it cannot, the objective is to identify the closest achievable goal. This problem is formalized and systematically solved for generic manipulators by using inverse kinematics and forward kinematics. Inverse kinematics are employed to define the subspace, workspace and constrained workspace, which are then used to identify when a task is not achievable. The closest achievable goal is obtained by determining weights for an optimal control redistribution scheme. These weights are quantified by using forward kinematics. Conditions leading to joint rate limits are identified, in particular it is established that all generic manipulators have singularities at the boundary of their workspace, while some have loci of singularities inside their workspace. Once the manipulator singularity is identified the command redistribution scheme is used to compute the closest achievable Cartesian velocities. Two examples are used to illustrate the use of the algorithm: A three link planar manipulator and the Unimation Puma 560. Implementation of the derived algorithm is effected by using a supervisory expert system to check whether the desired goal lies in the constrained workspace and if not, to evoke the redistribution scheme which determines the constraint relaxation between end effector position and orientation, and then computes optimal gains.

  6. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators.

  7. 35 Hz shape memory alloy actuator with bending-twisting mode

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung-Hyuk; Lee, Jang-Yeob; Rodrigue, Hugo; Choi, Ik-Seong; Kang, Yeon June; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) materials are widely used as an actuating source for bending actuators due to their high power density. However, due to the slow actuation speed of SMAs, there are limitations in their range of possible applications. This paper proposes a smart soft composite (SSC) actuator capable of fast bending actuation with large deformations. To increase the actuation speed of SMA actuator, multiple thin SMA wires are used to increase the heat dissipation for faster cooling. The actuation characteristics of the actuator at different frequencies are measured with different actuator lengths and results show that resonance can be used to realize large deformations up to 35 Hz. The actuation characteristics of the actuator can be modified by changing the design of the layered reinforcement structure embedded in the actuator, thus the natural frequency and length of an actuator can be optimized for a specific actuation speed. A model is used to compare with the experimental results of actuators with different layered reinforcement structure designs. Also, a bend-twist coupled motion using an anisotropic layered reinforcement structure at a speed of 10 Hz is also realized. By increasing their range of actuation characteristics, the proposed actuator extends the range of application of SMA bending actuators. PMID:26892438

  8. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  9. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  10. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  11. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  12. An investigation of electrochemomechanical actuation of conductive Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mark A.; Walter, Wayne W.

    2014-03-01

    A polymer-based nanofiber composite actuator designed for contractile actuation was fabricated by electrospinning, stimulated by electrolysis, and characterized by electrochemical and mechanical testing to address performance limitations and understand the activation processing effects on actuation performance. Currently, Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have provided uses in sensory and actuation technology, but have either low force output or expand rather than contract, falling short in capturing the natural kinetics and mechanics of muscle needed to provide breakthroughs in the bio-medical and robotic fields. In this study, activated Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers have demonstrated biomimetic functionalities similar to the sarcomere contraction responsible for muscle function. Activated PAN has also been shown to contract and expand by electrolysis when in close vicinity to the anode and cathode, respectively. PAN nanofibers (~500 nm) especially show faster response to changes in environmental pH and improved mechanical properties compared to larger diameter fibers. Tensile testing was conducted to examine changes in mechanical properties between annealing and hydrolysis processing. Voltage driven transient effects of localized pH were examined to address pHdefined actuation thresholds of PAN fibers. Electrochemical contraction rates of the PAN/Graphite composite actuator demonstrated up to 25%/min. Strains of 58.8%, ultimate stresses up to 77.1 MPa, and moduli of 0.21 MPa were achieved with pure PAN nanofiber mats, surpassing mechanical properties of natural muscles. Further improvements, however, to contraction rates and Young's moduli were found essential to capture the function and performance of skeletal muscles appropriately.

  13. Effects of driving mode on the performance of multiple-chamber piezoelectric pumps with multiple actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Kan, Junwu; Wang, Shuyun; Wang, Hongyun; Ma, Jijie; Jiang, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited output capability of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the driving voltage is frequently increased to obtain the desired output. However, the excessive voltage application may lead to a large deformation in the piezoelectric ceramics, which could cause it to breakdown or become damaged. Therefore, increasing the number of chambers to obtain the desired output is proposed. Using a check-valve quintuple-chamber pump with quintuple piezoelectric actuators, the characteristics of the pump under different driving modes are investigated through experiments. By changing the number and connection mode of working actuators, pump performances in terms of flow rate and backpressure are tested at a voltage of 150 V with a frequency range of 60 Hz -400 Hz. Experiment results indicate that the properties of the multiple-chamber pump change significantly with distinct working chambers even though the number of pumping chambers is the same. Pump performance declines as the distance between the working actuators increases. Moreover, pump performance declines dramatically when the working piezoelectric actuator closest to the outlet is involved. The maximum backpressures of the pump with triple, quadruple, and quintuple actuators are increased by 39%, 83%, and 128%, respectively, compared with the pump with double working actuators; the corresponding maximum flow rates of the pumps are simply increased by 25.9%, 49.2%, and 67.8%, respectively. The proposed research offers practical guidance for the effective utilization of the multiple-chamber pumps under different driving modes.

  14. Deconvolution and IVIVC: Exploring the Role of Rate-Limiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Margolskee, Alison; Darwich, Adam S; Galetin, Aleksandra; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Aarons, Leon

    2016-03-01

    In vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) play an important role in formulation development and drug approval. At the heart of IVIVC is deconvolution, the method of deriving an in vivo "dissolution profile" for comparison with in vitro dissolution data. IVIVCs are generally believed to be possible for highly permeable and highly soluble compounds with release/dissolution as the rate-limiting step. In this manuscript, we apply the traditional deconvolution methods, Wagner-Nelson and numerical deconvolution, to profiles simulated using a simplified small intestine absorption and transit model. Small intestinal transit, dissolution, and absorption rate constants are varied across a range of values approximately covering those observed in the literature. IVIVC plots and their corresponding correlation coefficients are analyzed for each combination of parameters to determine the applicability of the deconvolution methods under a range of rate-limiting conditions. For highly absorbed formulations, the correlation coefficients obtained during IVIVC are comparable for both methods and steadily decline with decreasing dissolution rate and increasing transit rate. The applicability of numerical deconvolution to IVIVC is not greatly affected by absorption rate, whereas the applicability of Wagner-Nelson falls when dissolution rate overcomes absorption rate and absorption becomes the rate-limiting step. The discrepancy between the expected and deconvolved input arises from the violation of a key assumption of deconvolution that the unknown input and unit impulse enter the system in the same location. PMID:26667356

  15. Sequential growth and monitoring of a polypyrrole actuator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, J. C.; Mascaro, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) have emerged as viable materials in sensing and actuating applications, but the capability to mimic the structure and function of natural muscle is increased due to their ability to permit additional, sequential synthesis steps between stages of actuation. Current work is improving upon the mechanical performance in terms of achievable stresses, strains, and strain rates, but issues still remain with actuator lifetime and adaptability. This work seeks to create a bioinspired polymer actuation system that can be monitored using state estimation and adjusted in vivo during operation. The novel, time-saving process of sequential growth was applied to polymer actuator systems for the initial growth, as well as additional growth steps after actuation cycles. Synthesis of conducting polymers on a helical metal electrode directs polymer shape change during actuation, assists in charge distribution along the polymer for actuation, and as is described in this work, constructs a constant working electrode/polymer connection during operation which allows sequential polymer growth based on a performance need. The polymer system is monitored by means of a reduced-order, state estimation model that works between growth and actuation cycles. In this case, actuator stress is improved between growth cycles. The ability for additional synthesis of the polymer actuator not only creates an actuator system that can be optimized based on demand, but creates a dynamic actuator system that more closely mimics natural muscle capability.

  16. Data rate management and real time operation: recursive adaptive frame integration of limited data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-08-01

    Recursive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed to support conventional frame integration. The technique uses two thresholds -one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate, and places integration process between those thresholds. This configuration allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single-frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Limited Frame Integration was proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single-frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration. Adding the third threshold may help in managing real time operations. In the paper the Recursive Frame Integration is presented in form of multiple parallel recursive integration. Such an approach can help not only in data rate management but in mitigation of low single frame SNR issue for Recursive Integration as well as in real time operations with frame integration.

  17. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  18. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  19. Earthquake potential and magnitude limits inferred from a geodetic strain-rate model for southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Y.; Bird, P.; Jackson, D. D.

    2016-04-01

    The project Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe (SHARE), completed in 2013, presents significant improvements over previous regional seismic hazard modeling efforts. The Global Strain Rate Map v2.1, sponsored by the Global Earthquake Model Foundation and built on a large set of self-consistent geodetic GPS velocities, was released in 2014. To check the SHARE seismic source models that were based mainly on historical earthquakes and active fault data, we first evaluate the SHARE historical earthquake catalogues and demonstrate that the earthquake magnitudes are acceptable. Then, we construct an earthquake potential model using the Global Strain Rate Map data. SHARE models provided parameters from which magnitude-frequency distributions can be specified for each of 437 seismic source zones covering most of Europe. Because we are interested in proposed magnitude limits, and the original zones had insufficient data for accurate estimates, we combine zones into five groups according to SHARE's estimates of maximum magnitude. Using the strain rates, we calculate tectonic moment rates for each group. Next, we infer seismicity rates from the tectonic moment rates and compare them with historical and SHARE seismicity rates. For two of the groups, the tectonic moment rates are higher than the seismic moment rates of the SHARE models. Consequently, the rates of large earthquakes forecast by the SHARE models are lower than those inferred from tectonic moment rate. In fact, the SHARE models forecast higher seismicity rates than the historical rates, which indicate that the authors of SHARE were aware of the potentially higher seismic activities in the zones. For one group, the tectonic moment rate is lower than the seismic moment rates forecast by the SHARE models. As a result, the rates of large earthquakes in that group forecast by the SHARE model are higher than those inferred from tectonic moment rate, but lower than what the historical data show. For the other two

  20. Does Bioavailability Limit Biodegradability? A Comparison of Hydrocarbon Biodegradation and Desorption Rates in Aged Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine whether bioavailability limits the biodegradability of petroleum hydrocarbons in aged soils, both the biodegradation and abiotic desorption rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were measured at various time points in six different aged soils undergoing slurry bioremediation treatment. Alkane biodegradation rates were always much greater than the respective desorption rates, indicating that these saturated hydrocarbons do not need to be transferred into the aqueous phase prior to metabolism by soil microorganisms. The biodegradation of PAHs was generally not mass-transfer rate limited during the initial phase, while it often became so at the end of the treatment period when biodegradation rates equaled abiotic desorption rates. However, in all cases where PAH biodegradation was not observed or PAH removal temporarily stalled, bioavailability limitations were not deemed responsible for this recalcitrance since these PAHs desorbed rapidly from the soil into the aqueous phase. Consequently, aged PAHs that are often thought to be recalcitrant due to bioavailability limitations may not be so and therefore may pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  1. Generalised Central Limit Theorems for Growth Rate Distribution of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, Misako; Watanabe, Hayafumi; Takayasu, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a solvable model of randomly growing systems consisting of many independent subunits. Scaling relations and growth rate distributions in the limit of infinite subunits are analysed theoretically. Various types of scaling properties and distributions reported for growth rates of complex systems in a variety of fields can be derived from this basic physical model. Statistical data of growth rates for about 1 million business firms are analysed as a real-world example of randomly growing systems. Not only are the scaling relations consistent with the theoretical solution, but the entire functional form of the growth rate distribution is fitted with a theoretical distribution that has a power-law tail.

  2. Quadratic and rate-independent limits for a large-deviations functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaschi, Giovanni A.; Peletier, Mark A.

    2016-07-01

    We construct a stochastic model showing the relationship between noise, gradient flows and rate-independent systems. The model consists of a one-dimensional birth-death process on a lattice, with rates derived from Kramers' law as an approximation of a Brownian motion on a wiggly energy landscape. Taking various limits, we show how to obtain a whole family of generalized gradient flows, ranging from quadratic to rate-independent ones, connected via ` L log L' gradient flows. This is achieved via Mosco-convergence of the renormalized large-deviations rate functional of the stochastic process.

  3. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  4. Integrated piezoelectric actuators in deep drawing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, R.; Mainda, P.; Drossel, W.-G.; Kerschner, M.; Wolf, K.

    2011-04-01

    The production of car body panels are defective in succession of process fluctuations. Thus the produced car body panel can be precise or damaged. To reduce the error rate, an intelligent deep drawing tool was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in cooperation with Audi and Volkswagen. Mechatronic components in a closed-loop control is the main differentiating factor between an intelligent and a conventional deep drawing tool. In correlation with sensors for process monitoring, the intelligent tool consists of piezoelectric actuators to actuate the deep drawing process. By enabling the usage of sensors and actuators at the die, the forming tool transform to a smart structure. The interface between sensors and actuators will be realized with a closed-loop control. The content of this research will present the experimental results with the piezoelectric actuator. For the analysis a production-oriented forming tool with all automotive requirements were used. The disposed actuators are monolithic multilayer actuators of the piezo injector system. In order to achieve required force, the actuators are combined in a cluster. The cluster is redundant and economical. In addition to the detailed assembly structures, this research will highlight intensive analysis with the intelligent deep drawing tool.

  5. Electromechanical Actuator Ribbons Driven by Electrically Conducting Spring-Like Fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; He, Sisi; Xu, Yifan; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-09-01

    Electrically conducting fibers are woven into polymer ribbons to prepare electromechanical actuators. The ribbons generate a strain rate of more than 10(3) times that of typical electrochemical actuators, accompanied by a lower operating voltage and faster responsiveness compared to electrostatic and electrothermal actuators. Programmable actuation including bending, contraction, elongation, and rotation are shown with a high reversibility. PMID:26192453

  6. Characterization and modeling of electrostatically actuated polysilicon micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edward Keat Leem

    Sensors, actuators, transducers, microsystems and MEMS (MicroElertroMechanical Systems) are some of the terms describing technologies that interface information processing systems with the physical world. Electrostatically actuated micromechanical devices are important building blocks in many of these technologies. Arrays of these devices are used in video projection displays, fluid pumping systems, optical communications systems, tunable lasers and microwave circuits. Well-calibrated simulation tools are essential for propelling ideas from the drawing board into production. This work characterizes a fabrication process---the widely-used polysilicon MUMPs process---to facilitate the design of electrostatically actuated micromechanical devices. The operating principles of a representative device---a capacitive microwave switch---are characterized using a wide range of electrical and optical measurements of test structures along with detailed electromechanical simulations. Consistency in the extraction of material properties from measurements of both pull-in voltage and buckling amplitude is demonstrated. Gold is identified as an area-dependent source of nonuniformity in polysilicon thicknesses and stress. Effects of stress gradients, substrate curvature, and film coverage are examined quantitatively. Using well-characterized beams as in-situ surface probes, capacitance-voltage and surface profile measurements reveal that compressible surface residue modifies the effective electrical gap when the movable electrode contacts an underlying silicon nitride layer. A compressible contact surface model used in simulations improves the fit to measurements. In addition, the electric field across the nitride causes charge to build up in the nitride, increasing the measured capacitance over time. The rate of charging corresponds to charge injection through direct tunneling. A novel actuator that can travel stably beyond one-third of the initial gap (a trademark limitation of

  7. Solid-gas reaction with adsorption as the rate limiting step.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Rafał; Arabczyk, Walerian

    2006-07-27

    The model of nucleation where adsorption of reactant is a rate-limiting step has been considered. Assuming the adsorption range model, a numerical simulation has been made. The dependency of bulk concentration and surface coverage versus time and thermogravimetric curves are presented. The crystallite size is suggested to be the key factor of the nucleation rate. Theoretical considerations have been compared with the experimental results of the iron nitriding reaction. PMID:16854036

  8. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  9. Hysteresis compensation for piezoelectric actuators in single-point diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Hu, Dejin; Wan, Daping; Liu, Hongbin

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, interests have been growing for fast tool servo (FTS) systems to increase the capability of existing single-point diamond turning machines. Although piezoelectric actuator is the most universal base of FTS system due to its high stiffness, accuracy and bandwidth, nonlinearity in piezoceramics limits both the static and dynamic performance of piezoelectric-actuated control systems evidently. To compensate the nonlinear hysteresis behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid model coupled with Preisach model and feedforward neural network (FNN) has been described. Since the training of FNN does not require a special calibration sequence, it is possible for on-line identification and real-time implementation with general operating data of a specific piezoelectric actuator. To describe the rate dependent behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid dynamic model was developed to predict the response of piezoelectric actuators in a wider range of input frequency. Experimental results show that a maximal error of less than 3% was accomplished by this dynamic model.

  10. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  11. Refreshable Braille Displays Using EAP Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators..

  12. Development of a General Method for Determining Leak Rates from Limiting Enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zografos, A. I.; Blackwell, C. C.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a general method for the determination of very low leak rates from limiting enclosures. There are many methods that can be used to detect and repair leaks from enclosures. Many methods have also been proposed that allow the estimation of actual leak rates, usually expressed as enclosure volume turnover. The proposed method combines measurements of the state variables (pressure, temperature, and volume) as well as the change in the concentration of a tracer gas to estimate the leak rate. The method was applied to the containment enclosure of the Engineering Development Unit of the CELSS Test Facility, currently undergoing testing at the NASA Ames Research Center.

  13. Upper limits on production rate of NO per ion pair. [during solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Frederick, J. E.; Porter, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    The maximum production rate of NO per ion pair during a solar proton event has been calculated using an approach described by Porter et al. (1976). For altitudes between 80 and 120 km the calculation yields a limit of 2.68 NO per ion pair for 10 keV electrons, a value which is consistent with the rates implied by the measurements of Arnold (1978) as quoted by Fabian et al. (1979). For altitudes below 80 km the maximum rate of NO production is calculated to be 1.46 to 1.53 NO per ion pair.

  14. Study of Unsteady Flow Actuation Produced by Surface Plasma Actuator on 2-D Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Minh Khang; Shin, Jichul

    2014-10-01

    Effect of flow actuation driven by low current continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator is studied. Schlieren image of induced flow on flat plate taken at a high repetition rate reveals that the actuation is mostly initiated near the cathode. Assuming that the actuation is mostly achieved by ions in the cathode sheath region, numerical model for the source of flow actuation is obtained by analytical estimation of ion pressure force created in DC plasma sheath near the cathode and added in momentum equation as a body force term. Modeled plasma flow actuator is simulated with NACA0012 airfoil oscillating over a certain range of angle of attack (AoA) at specific reduced frequencies of airfoil. By changing actuation authority according to the change in AoA, stabilization of unsteady flow field is improved and hence steady aerodynamic performance can be maintained. Computational result shows that plasma actuation is only effective in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of separated flow. It turns out that plasma pulse frequency should be tuned for optimal performance depending on phase angle and rotating speed. The actuation authority can be parameterized by a ratio between plasma pulse frequency and reduced frequency.

  15. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas...

  16. The effect of receptor clustering on diffusion-limited forward rate constants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Wiegel, F W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of receptor clustering on the diffusion-limited forward rate constant (k+) is studied theoretically by modeling cell surface receptors by hemispheres distributed on a plane. We give both exact results and bounds. The exact results are obtained using an electrostatic analogue and applying the method of the images. Accurate upper bounds on k+ are found from a variational principle. PMID:6309261

  17. Spatial Moment Equations for a Groundwater Plume with Degradation and Rate-Limited Sorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this note, we analytically derive the solution for the spatial moments of groundwater solute concentration distributions simulated by a one-dimensional model that assumes advective-dispersive transport with first-order degradation and rate-limited sorption. Sorption kinetics...

  18. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  19. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-02-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  20. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  1. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  2. Peristaltic pump made of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Peter; Matysek, Marc; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    The functional principle of peristaltic motion is inspired by the pattern in which hollow organs move. The technology of dielectric elastomer actuators provides the possibility to design a very compact peristaltic pump. The geometries of the whole pump and the actuator elements have been determined by numerical simulations of the mechanical behaviour and the fluid dynamics. With eight independent actuators the pumping channel is self-sealing and there is no need for any valves. The first generation of this pump is able to generate flow rates up to 0.36 μl/min.

  3. Status of Electrical Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Taylor, Linda M.; Hansen, Irving G.

    1996-01-01

    An ever increasing number of actuation functions historically performed by hydraulics or pneumatics are being accomplished by electric actuation. If 'end to end' systems are considered, electric actuators (EA's) are potentially lighter and more efficient. In general, system redundancies may be more easily implemented and operationally monitored. Typically, electrical components exhibit longer mean times to failure and projected lifetime costs of EA's are potentially much lower than those of other options. EA's have certain characteristics which must be considered in their application. The actual mechanical loadings must be established, for the more easily controlled EA may be operated much closer to its full capabilities. At higher rates of motion, EA's are operating as constant power devices. Therefore, it may be possible to start a movement that can not be stopped. The incorporation of high power electronics into remote locations introduces new concerns of EMI and thermal control. It is the management of these and other characteristics that forms the engineering design challenges. Work is currently in progress on EA's for aircraft and expendable launch vehicles. These applications span from ten to 40+ horsepower. The systematics and status of these actuators will be reported along with current technical trends in this area.

  4. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  5. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  6. Modeling of kinetically limited growth rate for solution-synthesized germanium nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoop, Nicholas; Tribby, Louis J.; Han, Sang M.

    2015-08-01

    Solution synthesis is a common method for preparing semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). For such solution synthesis, many investigations have considered diffusion-limited growth, in which the diffusion of reactants through the boundary layer (BL) limits the NC growth rate. These studies often model the growth rate with a diffusion BL thickness much larger than the NC size and with unphysically low diffusion constants on the order of 10-12 cm2 s-1. In this work, we have examined the growth of Ge NCs synthesized by injecting Ge amide precursors into a solution of 1-octadecene, oleylamine, and hexadecylamine. We have previously established this low-temperature, low-pressure synthesis route. The resulting Ge growth rate compares well with our model, in which we consider both BL diffusion and surface kinetics of Ge precursors and organic ligand adsorbates. Our modeling results suggest that the NC growth is limited not by diffusion, but by the surface adsorption and desorption kinetics. The BL thickness in the stirred reaction vessel is calculated to be on the same order of magnitude as the crystal radius; therefore, the surface kinetics cannot be ignored. Furthermore, the synthesis temperature is near 300 °C, where the Ge monomer diffusion coefficient within the growth solution is substantially increased and estimated to be on the order of 10-5 cm2 s-1. These considerations agree well with our experimentally measured growth rate and strongly suggest that the NC size evolution is controlled primarily by the surface kinetics.

  7. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  8. Spooled packaging of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, John A.

    A vast cross-section of transportation, manufacturing, consumer product, and medical technologies rely heavily on actuation. Accordingly, progress in these industries is often strongly coupled to the advancement of actuation technologies. As the field of actuation continues to evolve, smart materials show significant promise for satisfying the growing needs of industry. In particular, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators present an opportunity for low-cost, high performance actuation, but until now, they have been limited or restricted from use in many otherwise suitable applications by the difficulty in packaging the SMA wires within tight or unusually shaped form constraints. To address this packaging problem, SMA wires can be spool-packaged by wrapping around mandrels to make the actuator more compact or by redirecting around multiple mandrels to customize SMA wire pathways to unusual form factors. The goal of this dissertation is to develop the scientific knowledge base for spooled packaging of low-cost SMA wire actuators that enables high, predictable performance within compact, customizable form factors. In developing the scientific knowledge base, this dissertation defines a systematic general representation of single and multiple mandrel spool-packaged SMA actuators and provides tools for their analysis, understanding, and synthesis. A quasi-static analytical model distills the underlying mechanics down to the three effects of friction, bending, and binding, which enables prediction of the behavior of generic spool-packaged SMA actuators with specifiable geometric, loading, frictional, and SMA material parameters. An extensive experimental and simulation-based parameter study establishes the necessary understanding of how primary design tradeoffs between performance, packaging, and cost are governed by the underlying mechanics of spooled actuators. A design methodology outlines a systematic approach to synthesizing high performance SMA wire actuators

  9. Personal viewpoint: Limiting maximum ultrafiltration rate as a potential new measure of dialysis adequacy.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2016-01-01

    While the solute clearance marker (Kt/Vurea ) is widely used, no effective marker for volume management exists. Two principles apply to acute volume change in hemodialysis: (1) the plasma refill rate, the maximum rate the extracellular fluid can replace a contracting intravascular volume (±5 mL/kg/hour) and (2) the rate of intravascular volume contraction where coronary hypoperfusion, myocardial stun, and vascular risk escalates (observed at ≥10 mL/kg/hour). In extended hour and higher frequency hemodialysis, intravascular contraction rates are usually equilibrated by the plasma refill rate, but in "conventional" in-center hemodialysis, volume contraction rates commonly exceed the capabilities of the plasma refill rate, resulting in inevitable hypovolemia. To minimize cardiovascular risk, fluid removal rates should ideally be ≤10 mL/kg/hour, acknowledging that this may be challenging in the in-center setting. Two options exist to limit volume removal to >10 mL/kg/hour: restricting interdialytic weight gain (always conflict-fraught, often unachievable) or extending sessional duration to allow additional removal time. Just as Kt/Vurea quantifies solute removal, a simple-to-apply rate variable should also apply for volume removal. As predialysis and target postdialysis weights are both known, a simple measure--a maximum rate for ultrafiltration (UFRmax )--would advise the sessional duration (T) required to minimize organ stun by removing the required fluid load (V) from any patient of predialysis weight (W). This would ensure a removal rate no greater than 10 mL/kg/hour-T (hours) = V (mL)/10 × W (kg). Used together, Kt/Vurea and UFRmax would form a solute and volume composite, each dialysis treatment continuing until both solute and volume requirements are fulfilled. PMID:25779217

  10. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 {times} 10{sup 5}pc{sup {minus}3}yr{sup {minus}1} at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  11. A new limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Data taken with the CYGNUS detector between 1989 and 1993 have been used to search for 1 second bursts of ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma rays from any point in the northern sky. There is no evidence for such bursts. Therefore the theory-dependent upper limit on the rate-density of evaporating black holes is 6.1 [times] 10[sup 5]pc[sup [minus]3]yr[sup [minus]1] at the 99% C.L.. After renormalizing previous direct searches to the same theory, this limit is the most restrictive by more than 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. Algorithm Optimally Allocates Actuation of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motaghedi, Shi

    2007-01-01

    A report presents an algorithm that solves the following problem: Allocate the force and/or torque to be exerted by each thruster and reaction-wheel assembly on a spacecraft for best performance, defined as minimizing the error between (1) the total force and torque commanded by the spacecraft control system and (2) the total of forces and torques actually exerted by all the thrusters and reaction wheels. The algorithm incorporates the matrix vector relationship between (1) the total applied force and torque and (2) the individual actuator force and torque values. It takes account of such constraints as lower and upper limits on the force or torque that can be applied by a given actuator. The algorithm divides the aforementioned problem into two optimization problems that it solves sequentially. These problems are of a type, known in the art as semi-definite programming problems, that involve linear matrix inequalities. The algorithm incorporates, as sub-algorithms, prior algorithms that solve such optimization problems very efficiently. The algorithm affords the additional advantage that the solution requires the minimum rate of consumption of fuel for the given best performance.

  13. Efficient Hybrid Actuation Using Solid-State Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, Donald J.; Cudney, Harley H.; Horner, Garnett (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Piezohydraulic actuation is the use of fluid to rectify the motion of a piezoelectric actuator for the purpose of overcoming the small stroke limitations of the material. In this work we study a closed piezohydraulic circuit that utilizes active valves to rectify the motion of a hydraulic end affector. A linear, lumped parameter model of the system is developed and correlated with experiments. Results demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the filtering of the piezoelectric motion caused by hydraulic compliance. Accurate results are also obtained for predicting the unidirectional motion of the cylinder when the active valves are phased with respect to the piezoelectric actuator. A time delay associated with the mechanical response of the valves is incorporated into the model to reflect the finite time required to open or close the valves. This time delay is found to be the primary limiting factor in achieving higher speed and greater power from the piezohydraulic unit. Experiments on the piezohydraulic unit demonstrate that blocked forces on the order of 100 N and unloaded velocities of 180 micrometers/sec are achieved.

  14. Study of the use of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter on pilot control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a filter on the pilot's control output could improve the performance of the pilot-aircraft system. What is needed is a filter with a sharp high frequency cut-off, no resonance peak, and a minimum of lag at low frequencies. The present investigation studies the usefulness of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter in performing the needed function. The nonlinear filter is compared with a linear, first order filter, and no filter. An analytical study using pilot models and a simulation study using experienced test pilots was performed. The results showed that the nonlinear filter does promote quick, steady maneuvering. It is shown that the nonlinear filter attenuates the high frequency remnant and adds less phase lag to the low frequency signal than does the linear filter. It is also shown that the rate limit in the nonlinear filter can be set to be too restrictive, causing an unstable pilot-aircraft system response.

  15. Physical Analysis and Scaling of a Jet and Vortex Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the Jet and Vortex Actuator generates free-jet, wall-jet, and near- wall vortex flow fields. That is, the actuator can be operated in different modes by simply varying the driving frequency and/or amplitude. For this study, variations are made in the actuator plate and wide-slot widths and sine/asymmetrical actuator plate input forcing (drivers) to further study the actuator induced flow fields. Laser sheet flow visualization, particle- image velocimetry, and laser velocimetry are used to measure and characterize the actuator induced flow fields. Laser velocimetry measurements indicate that the vortex strength increases with the driver repetition rate for a fixed actuator geometry (wide slot and plate width). For a given driver repetition rate, the vortex strength increases as the plate width decreases provided the wide-slot to plate-width ratio is fixed. Using an asymmetric plate driver, a stronger vortex is generated for the same actuator geometry and a given driver repetition rate. The nondimensional scaling provides the approximate ranges for operating the actuator in the free jet, wall jet, or vortex flow regimes. Finally, phase-locked velocity measurements from particle image velocimetry indicate that the vortex structure is stationary, confirming previous computations. Both the computations and the particle image velocimetry measurements (expectantly) show unsteadiness near the wide-slot opening, which is indicative of mass ejection from the actuator.

  16. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  17. Position and torque tracking: series elastic actuation versus model-based-controlled hydraulic actuation.

    PubMed

    Otten, Alexander; van Vuuren, Wieke; Stienen, Arno; van Asseldonk, Edwin; Schouten, Alfred; van der Kooij, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Robotics used for diagnostic measurements on, e.g. stroke survivors, require actuators that are both stiff and compliant. Stiffness is required for identification purposes, and compliance to compensate for the robots dynamics, so that the subject can move freely while using the robot. A hydraulic actuator can act as a position (stiff) or a torque (compliant) actuator. The drawback of a hydraulic actuator is that it behaves nonlinear. This article examines two methods for controlling a nonlinear hydraulic actuator. The first method that is often applied uses an elastic element (i.e. spring) connected in series with the hydraulic actuator so that the torque can be measured as the deflection of the spring. This torque measurement is used for proportional integral control. The second method of control uses the inverse of the model of the actuator as a linearizing controller. Both methods are compared using simulation results. The controller designed for the series elastic hydraulic actuator is faster to implement, but only shows good performance for the working range for which the controller is designed due to the systems nonlinear behavior. The elastic element is a limiting factor when designing a position controller due to its low torsional stiffness. The model-based controller linearizes the nonlinear system and shows good performance when used for torque and position control. Implementing the model-based controller does require building and validating of the detailed model. PMID:22275654

  18. Describing-function analysis of a ripple regulator with slew-rate limits and time delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of time delays and slew-rate limits on the steady-state operating points and performance of a free-running ripple regulator are evaluated using describing-function analysis. The describing function of an ideal comparator (no time delays or slew rate limits) has no phase shift and is independent of frequency. It is found that turn-on delay and turn-off delay have different effects on gain and phase and cannot be combined. Comparator hysteresis affects both gain and phase; likewise, time delays generally affect both gain and phase. It is found that the effective time delay around the feedback loop is one half the sum of turn-on and turn-off delays, regardless of whether the delays are caused by storage time or slew rate limits. Expressions are formulated for the switching frequency, switch duty ratio, dc output, and output ripple. For the case of no hysteresis, a simple, graphical solution for the switching frequency is possible, and the resulting switching frequency is independent of first-order variations of input or load.

  19. Effects of Rate-Limited Mass Transfer on Modeling Vapor Intrusion with Aerobic Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Hou, Deyi; Lu, Chunhui; Spain, Jim C; Luo, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Most of the models for simulating vapor intrusion accept the local equilibrium assumption for multiphase concentration distributions, that is, concentrations in solid, liquid and vapor phases are in equilibrium. For simulating vapor transport with aerobic biodegradation controlled by counter-diffusion processes, the local equilibrium assumption combined with dual-Monod kinetics and biomass decay may yield near-instantaneous behavior at steady state. The present research investigates how predicted concentration profiles and fluxes change as interphase mass transfer resistances are increased for vapor intrusion with aerobic biodegradation. Our modeling results indicate that the attenuation coefficients for cases with and without mass transfer limitations can be significantly different by orders of magnitude. Rate-limited mass transfer may lead to larger overlaps of contaminant vapor and oxygen concentrations, which cannot be simulated by instantaneous reaction models with local equilibrium mass transfer. In addition, the contaminant flux with rate-limited mass transfer is much smaller than that with local equilibrium mass transfer, indicating that local equilibrium mass transfer assumption may significantly overestimate the biodegradation rate and capacity for mitigating vapor intrusion through the unsaturated zone. Our results indicate a strong research need for field tests to examine the validity of local equilibrium mass transfer, a widely accepted assumption in modeling vapor intrusion. PMID:27486832

  20. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  1. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  2. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  3. Cellular Microcystin Content in N-Limited Microcystis aeruginosa Can Be Predicted from Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Long, Benedict M.; Jones, Gary J.; Orr, Philip T.

    2001-01-01

    Cell quotas of microcystin (QMCYST; femtomoles of MCYST per cell), protein, and chlorophyll a (Chl a), cell dry weight, and cell volume were measured over a range of growth rates in N-limited chemostat cultures of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa MASH 01-A19. There was a positive linear relationship between QMCYST and specific growth rate (μ), from which we propose a generalized model that enables QMCYST at any nutrient-limited growth rate to be predicted based on a single batch culture experiment. The model predicts QMCYST from μ, μmax (maximum specific growth rate), QMCYSTmax (maximum cell quota), and QMCYSTmin (minimum cell quota). Under the conditions examined in this study, we predict a QMCYSTmax of 0.129 fmol cell−1 at μmax and a QMCYSTmin of 0.050 fmol cell−1 at μ = 0. Net MCYST production rate (RMCYST) asymptotes to zero at μ = 0 and reaches a maximum of 0.155 fmol cell−1 day−1 at μmax. MCYST/dry weight ratio (milligrams per gram [dry weight]) increased linearly with μ, whereas the MCYST/protein ratio reached a maximum at intermediate μ. In contrast, the MCYST/Chl a ratio remained constant. Cell volume correlated negatively with μ, leading to an increase in intracellular MCYST concentration at high μ. Taken together, our results show that fast-growing cells of N-limited M. aeruginosa are smaller, are of lower mass, and have a higher intracellular MCYST quota and concentration than slow-growing cells. The data also highlight the importance of determining cell MCYST quotas, as potentially confusing interpretations can arise from determining MCYST content as a ratio to other cell components. PMID:11133456

  4. The implications of reduced metabolic rate in resource-limited corals.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lianne M; Edmunds, Peter J; Muller, Erik B; Nisbet, Roger M

    2016-03-01

    Many organisms exhibit depressed metabolism when resources are limited, a change that makes it possible to balance an energy budget. For symbiotic reef corals, daily cycles of light and periods of intense cloud cover can be chronic causes of food limitation through reduced photosynthesis. Furthermore, coral bleaching is common in present-day reefs, creating a context in which metabolic depression could have beneficial value to corals. In the present study, corals (massive Porites spp.) were exposed to an extreme case of resource limitation by starving them of food and light for 20 days. When resources were limited, the corals depressed area-normalized respiration to 37% of initial rates, and coral biomass declined to 64% of initial amounts, yet the corals continued to produce skeletal mass. However, the declines in biomass cannot account for the declines in area-normalized respiration, as mass-specific respiration declined to 30% of the first recorded time point. Thus, these corals appear to be capable of metabolic depression. It is possible that some coral species are better able to depress metabolic rates than others; such variation could explain differential survival during conditions that limit resources (e.g. shading). Furthermore, we found that maintenance of existing biomass, in part, supports the production of skeletal mass. This association could be explained if maintenance supplies needed energy (e.g. ATP) or inorganic carbon (i.e. CO2) that otherwise limits the production of skeletal mass. Finally, the observed metabolic depression can be explained as a change in pool sizes, and does not require a change in metabolic rules. PMID:26823098

  5. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  6. Rate-limiting processes during rapid deglaciation of marine ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, D. G.

    2009-04-01

    The debate concerning the stability of marine ice sheets has continued for many years. Recent contributions have advanced the debate substantially, and shown that under specific conditions, marine ice sheet margins could be unstable. This insight has reinforced widely held concerns that marine ice-sheet collapse could substantially add to sea-level rise in coming centuries. However, determination of the stability-condition of marine ice sheet margins is only one step towards evaluating the risk inherent in such ice sheets. This risk crucially depends on the rate at which collapse could occur. For example; if collapse occurred over several millennia then the additional rate of sea-level rise would be comparable to that arising from other sources, and would probably be considered manageable by many coastal defence planners; conversely, collapse of a major marine ice sheet in less than one millennia, would have profound and costly implications. In this paper, I will consider the most rapidly changing, and probably the most vulnerable marine ice sheet remaining on the planet; the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica. And in particular, ask what would be required to deglaciate this ice sheet within a period of around 500 years. This rate of collapse implies a loss of ice from the ice sheet, at roughly 10-times the current balance flux. To maintain such a retreat, would require that the extra ice-loss would either have to be melted in situ, or exported from the continental shelf as icebergs. I will argue that it is highly unlikely that ice-loss at this rate could be achieved while maintaining an ice-sheet configuration comparable to what we see today, and in particular, that the maintenance of ice shelves is unlikely. With this constraint in mind, I discuss two possible configurations that could maintain ice-loss at this rate, and discuss the rate-limiting processes that might govern the retreat rates that could be achieved. I conclude that the critical processes

  7. Phytoplankton growth rates in a light-limited environment, San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpine, Andrea E.; Cloern, James E.

    1988-01-01

    This study was motivated by the need for quantitative measures of phytoplankton population growth rate in an estuarine environment, and was designed around the presumption that growth rates can be related empirically to light exposure. We conducted the study in San Francisco Bay (California, USA), which has large horizontal gradients in light availability (Zp:Zm) typical of many coastal plain estuaries, and nutrient concentrations that often exceed those presumed to limit phytoplankton growth (Cloern et al. 1985). We tested the hypothesis that light availability is the primary control of phytoplankton growth, and that previous estimates of growth rate based on the ratio of productivity to biomass (Cloern et al. 1985) are realistic. Specifically, we wanted to verify that growth rate varies spatially along horizontal gradients of light availability indexed as Zp:Zm, such that phytoplankton turnover rate is rapid in shallow clear areas (high Zp:Zm) and slow in deep turbid areas (low Zp:Zm). We used an in situ incubation technique which simulated vertical mixing, and measured both changes in cell number and carbon production as independent estimates of growth rate across a range of Zp:Zm ratios.

  8. Towards compliant and wearable robotic orthoses: A review of current and emerging actuator technologies.

    PubMed

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Shane Quan

    2016-04-01

    Robotic orthoses, or exoskeletons, have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. However, current orthosis actuation systems use components designed for industrial applications, not specifically for interacting with humans. This can limit orthoses' capabilities and, if their users' needs are not adequately considered, contribute to their abandonment. Here, a user centered review is presented on: requirements for orthosis actuators; the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators currently used in orthoses and their advantages and limitations; the potential of new actuator technologies, including smart materials, to actuate orthoses; and the future of orthosis actuator research. PMID:26923385

  9. On Rate Limitations of Electron Transfer in the Photosynthetic Cytochrome b6f Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, S. Saif; Cramer, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Considering information in the crystal structures of the cytochrome b6f complex relevant to the rate-limiting step in oxygenic photosynthesis (1–5), it is enigmatic that electron transport in the complex is not limited by the large distance, approximately 26 Å, between the iron-sulfur cluster (ISP) and its electron acceptor, cytochrome f. This enigma has been explained for the respiratory bc1 complex by a crystal structure with a greatly shortened cluster-heme c1 distance (6), leading to a concept of ISP dynamics in which the ISP soluble domain undergoes a translation-rotation conformation change and oscillates between positions relatively close to the cyt c1 heme and a membrane-proximal position close to the ubiquinol electron-proton donor. Comparison of cytochrome b6f structures shows a variation in cytochrome f heme position that suggests the possibility of flexibility and motion of the extended cytochrome f structure that could entail a transient decrease in cluster-heme f distance. The dependence of cyt f turnover on lumen viscosity (7) is consistent with a role of ISP - cyt f dynamics in determination of the rate-limiting step under conditions of low light intensity. Under conditions of low light intensity and proton electrochemical gradient present, for example, under a leaf canopy, it is proposed that a rate limitation of electron transport in the b6f complex may also arise from steric constraints in the entry/exit portal for passage of the plastoquinol and -quinone to/from its oxidation site proximal to the iron-sulfur cluster. PMID:22890107

  10. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  11. Effects of Population Based Screening for Chlamydia Infections in The Netherlands Limited by Declining Participation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Boris V.; Over, Eelco A. B.; van den Broek, Ingrid V. F.; Op de Coul, Eline L. M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; Fennema, Johan S. A.; Götz, Hannelore M.; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.; de Wit, G. Ardine; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background A large trial to investigate the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections was conducted in the Netherlands in 2008–2012. The trial was register based and consisted of four rounds of screening of women and men in the age groups 16–29 years in three regions in the Netherlands. Data were collected on participation rates and positivity rates per round. A modeling study was conducted to project screening effects for various screening strategies into the future. Methods and Findings We used a stochastic network simulation model incorporating partnership formation and dissolution, aging and a sexual life course perspective. Trends in baseline rates of chlamydia testing and treatment were used to describe the epidemiological situation before the start of the screening program. Data on participation rates was used to describe screening uptake in rural and urban areas. Simulations were used to project the effectiveness of screening on chlamydia prevalence for a time period of 10 years. In addition, we tested alternative screening strategies, such as including only women, targeting different age groups, and biennial screening. Screening reduced prevalence by about 1% in the first two screening rounds and leveled off after that. Extrapolating observed participation rates into the future indicated very low participation in the long run. Alternative strategies only marginally changed the effectiveness of screening. Higher participation rates as originally foreseen in the program would have succeeded in reducing chlamydia prevalence to very low levels in the long run. Conclusions Decreasing participation rates over time profoundly impact the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections. Using data from several consecutive rounds of screening in a simulation model enabled us to assess the future effectiveness of screening on prevalence. If participation rates cannot be kept at a sufficient level, the effectiveness

  12. Rate-Limiting Steps of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts during Ontogeny and Senescence of Barley 1

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Peter J.; Maclean, Donald J.; Scott, Kenneth J.

    1983-01-01

    Partial photochemical activities and concentrations of electron carriers were measured relative to chlorophyll in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) thylakoids, isolated from primary leaves during ontogeny and senescence. Thylakoids from mature leaves generated somewhat higher quantum efficiencies than thylakoids from premature or senescing leaves; this phenomenon did not appear to be caused by any deficiency of water-splitting enzyme. Under conditions of saturating light, the noncyclic electron flux from water to the reducing side of photosystem I increased during leaf ontogeny, peaked at maturity, and declined during senescence. However, electron fluxes appeared to be limited at different steps before and after leaf maturity. Before leaf maturity, the rate-limiting step was located prior to the reoxidation of plastohydroquinone. After leaf maturity, the decline in noncyclic electron flux correlated with a decrease in the concentration of cytochromes f and b6. This correlation, together with a consideration of mechanisms of entry and exit of electrons in 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-treated thylakoids, suggests that the cytochrome f/b6-containing complex, and not plastocyanin or P700, is the site of entry of electrons from the reduced forms of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol and diaminodurene. It is therefore proposed that in senescing leaves the cytochrome f/b6-containing complex limited electron transport by constraining the rate of reduction of cytochrome f by plastohydroquinone. PMID:16663087

  13. How diversification rates and diversity limits combine to create large-scale species–area relationships

    PubMed Central

    Kisel, Yael; McInnes, Lynsey; Toomey, Nicola H.; Orme, C. David L.

    2011-01-01

    Species–area relationships (SARs) have mostly been treated from an ecological perspective, focusing on immigration, local extinction and resource-based limits to species coexistence. However, a full understanding across large regions is impossible without also considering speciation and global extinction. Rates of both speciation and extinction are known to be strongly affected by area and thus should contribute to spatial patterns of diversity. Here, we explore how variation in diversification rates and ecologically mediated diversity limits among regions of different sizes can result in the formation of SARs. We explain how this area-related variation in diversification can be caused by either the direct effects of area or the effects of factors that are highly correlated with area, such as habitat diversity and population size. We also review environmental, clade-specific and historical factors that affect diversification and diversity limits but are not highly correlated with region area, and thus are likely to cause scatter in observed SARs. We present new analyses using data on the distributions, ages and traits of mammalian species to illustrate these mechanisms; in doing so we provide an integrated perspective on the evolutionary processes shaping SARs. PMID:21807732

  14. Rate and Gain Limitations of MSGC's and MGC's Combined with GEM and other Preamplification Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonte, P.; Peskov, V.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the rate and gain limits of diamond-coated Microstrip Gas Counters (MSGC's) and Micro-Gap Counters (MGC's) when combined with various preamplification structures: Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM), Parallel-Plate Avalanche Chamber (PPAC) or a MICROMEGAS-type structure. Measurements were done both with X rays and alpha particles with various detector geometries and in different gas mixtures at pressures from 0.05 to 10 atm. The results obtained varied significantly with detector design, gas mixture and pressure, but some general features can be identified. We found that in all cases, bare MSGC'S, MGC'S, PPAC's and MICROMEGAS, the maximum achievable gain drops with rate. The addition of preamplification structures significantly increases the gain of MSGC's and MGC'S, but this gain is still rate dependent. There would seem to be a general rate-dependent effect governing the usable gain of all these detectors. We speculate on possible mechanisms for this effect, and identify a safe, spark-free, operation zone for each system (detector + preamplification structure) in the rate-gain coordinate plane.

  15. Development of the new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory, recently proposed by the author, is further developed on the base of a similar approach to Brownian coagulation. The traditional diffusion approach to calculation of the reaction rate is critically analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the traditional approach is applicable only in the special case of reactions with a large reaction radius and the mean inter-particle distances, and become inappropriate in calculating the reaction rate in the case of a relatively small reaction radius. In the latter case, most important for chemical reactions, particle collisions occur not in the diffusion regime but mainly in the kinetic regime characterized by homogeneous (random) spatial distribution of particles on the length scale of the mean inter-particle distance. The calculated reaction rate for a small reaction radius in three dimensions formally (and fortuitously) coincides with the expression derived in the traditional approach for reactions with a large reaction radius, but notably deviates at large times from the traditional result in the planar two-dimensional geometry. In application to reactions on discrete lattice sites, new relations for the reaction rate constants are derived for both three-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices.

  16. Kinetically limited weathering at low denudation rates in semiarid climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Christl, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Biogeochemical cycling within the Critical Zone depends on the interactions between minerals and fluids controlling chemical weathering and physical erosion rates. In this study, we explore the role of water availability in controlling soil chemical weathering in semiarid climatic conditions. Weathering rates and intensities were evaluated for nine soil profiles located on convex ridge crests of three mountain ranges in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. We combine a geochemical mass balance with 10Be cosmogenic nuclides to constrain chemical weathering intensities and long-term denudation rates. As such, this study presents new data on chemical weathering and 10Be-derived denudation for understudied semiarid climate systems. In the Betic Cordillera, chemical weathering intensities are relatively low (~5 to 30% of the total denudation of the soil) and negatively correlated with the magnitude of the water deficit in soils. Chemical mass losses are inversely related to denudation rates (14-109 mm/kyr) and positively to soil thickness (14-58 cm); these results are consistent with kinetic limitation of chemical weathering rates. A worldwide compilation of chemical weathering data suggests that soil water balance may regulate the coupling between chemical weathering and physical erosion by modulating soil solute fluxes. Therefore, future landscape evolution models that seek to link chemical weathering and physical erosion should include soil water flux as an essential driver of weathering.

  17. The RUBISCO to Photosystem II Ratio Limits the Maximum Photosynthetic Rate in Picocyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Allanach, Jessica R.; Murphy, Cole D.; Roodvoets, Mitchell S.; Campbell, Douglas A.; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are picocyanobacteria predominating in subtropical, oligotrophic marine environments, a niche predicted to expand with climate change. When grown under common low light conditions Synechococcus WH 8102 and Prochlorococcus MED 4 show similar Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I contents normalized to Photosystem II content, while Prochlorococcus MIT 9313 has twice the Cytochrome b6f content and four times the Photosystem I content of the other strains. Interestingly, the Prochlorococcus strains contain only one third to one half of the RUBISCO catalytic subunits compared to the marine Synechococcus strain. The maximum Photosystem II electron transport rates were similar for the two Prochlorococcus strains but higher for the marine Synechococcus strain. Photosystem II electron transport capacity is highly correlated to the molar ratio of RUBISCO active sites to Photosystem II but not to the ratio of cytochrome b6f to Photosystem II, nor to the ratio of Photosystem I: Photosystem II. Thus, the catalytic capacity for the rate-limiting step of carbon fixation, the ultimate electron sink, appears to limit electron transport rates. The high abundance of Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I in MIT 9313, combined with the slower flow of electrons away from Photosystem II and the relatively low level of RUBISCO, are consistent with cyclic electron flow around Photosystem I in this strain. PMID:25658887

  18. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  20. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  1. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators provide the highest force-to-weight ratio of any known actuator. They can be designed for a wide variety of form factors from flat, thin packages, to form-matching packages for existing actuators. SMA actuators can be operated many thousands of times, so that ground testing is possible. Actuation speed can be accurately controlled from milliseconds to position and hold, and even electronic velocity-profile control is possible. SMA actuators provide a high degree of operational flexibility, and are truly smart actuators capable of being accurately controlled by onboard microprocessors across a wide range of voltages. The Miga Aero actuator is a SMA actuator designed specifically for spaceflight applications. Providing 13 mm of stroke with either 20- or 40-N output force in two different models, the Aero actuator is made from low-outgassing PEEK (polyether ether ketone) plastic, stainless steel, and nickel-titanium SMA wires. The modular actuator weighs less than 28 grams. The dorsal output attachment allows the Aero to be used in either PUSH or PULL modes by inverting the mounting orientation. The SPA1 actuator utilizes commercially available SMA actuator wire to provide 3/8-in. (approx. =.1 cm) of stroke at a force of over 28 lb (approx. = .125 N). The force is provided by a unique packaging of the single SMA wire that provides the output force of four SMA wires mechanically in parallel. The output load is shared by allowing the SMA wire to slip around the output attachment end to adjust or balance the load, preventing any individual wire segment from experiencing high loads during actuation. A built-in end limit switch prevents overheating of the SMA element following actuation when used in conjunction with the Miga Analog Driver [a simple MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) switching circuit]. A simple 2D machined mechanical binary latch has been developed to complement the capabilities of SMA wire

  2. Critical transport rates that limit the performance of microbial electrochemistry technologies.

    PubMed

    Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I

    2016-09-01

    Microbial electrochemistry technologies (METs) take advantage of the connection of microorganisms with electrodes. In the classic case of a microbial anode, the maximization of current density produced is often the goal. But, current production is dependent on many transport processes occurring, which can be rate-limiting. These include the fluxes of electron donor and acceptor, the ionic flux, the acidity and alkalinity fluxes at anode and cathode respectively, the electron transport flux at the biofilm, and the reactant/product crossover flux. Associated with these fluxes are inherent concentration gradients that can affect performance. This critical review provides an analysis on how these transport processes have hindered the development of METs, and how MET designs have evolved as more knowledge of these transport limitations is gained. Finally, suggestions are provided on how to design MET systems taking into consideration critical transport processes that are intimately linked to the current produced. PMID:27211921

  3. Compact Binary Merger Rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo Upper Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-01

    We compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH-BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ˜2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH-BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z ≃ 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (\\lt 150 {M}⊙ ) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to {M}{{tot,z}}≃ 400 {M}⊙ . (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH-BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS-NS, BH-NS, BH-BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH-BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.

  4. Compact binary merger rates: Comparison with LIGO/Virgo upper limits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Repetto, Serena; Holz, Daniel E.; O'Shaugnessy, Richard; Bulik, Tomasz; Berti, Emanuele; Fryer, Christopher Lee; Dominik, Michal

    2016-03-03

    Here, we compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH–BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of ~2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH–BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z sime 2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (more » $$\\lt 150\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to $${M}_{{\\rm{tot,z}}}\\simeq 400\\;{M}_{\\odot }$$. (iv) High black hole (BH) natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH–BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high BH natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS–NS, BH–NS, BH–BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH–BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.« less

  5. Multi-input square iterative learning control with input rate limits and bounds.

    PubMed

    Driessen, B J; Sadegh, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple modification of the iterative learning control algorithm of Arimoto et al. (1984) for the case where the inputs are bounded and time-rate-limited. The Jacobian error condition for monotonicity of input-error, rather than output-error, norms, is specified, the latter being insufficient to assure convergence, as proved herein. To the best of our knowledge, these facts have not been previously pointed out in the iterative learning control literature. We present a new proof that the modified controller produces monotonically decreasing input error norms, with a norm that covers the entire time interval of a learning trial. PMID:18238150

  6. A central-limit theorem for a single-false match rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Zachariah; Schuckers, Michael E.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a central limit theorem (CLT) for the estimation of a false match rate for a single matching system. The false match rate is often a significant factor in an evaluation of such a matching system. To achieve the main result here we utilize the covariance/correlation structure for matching proposed by Schuckers. Along with the main result we present an illustration of the methodology here on biometric authentication data from Ross and Jain. This illustration is from resampling match decisions on three different biometric modalities: hand geometry, fingerprint and facial recognition and shows that as the number of matching pairs grows the sampling distribution for an FMR approaches a Gaussian distribution. These results suggest that statistical inference for a FMR based upon a Gaussian distribution is appropriate.

  7. Actuators for a space manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Brunson, P.

    1987-01-01

    The robotic manipulator can be decomposed into distinct subsytems. One particular area of interest of mechanical subsystems is electromechanical actuators (or drives). A drive is defined as a motor with an appropriate transmission. An overview is given of existing, as well as state-of-the-art drive systems. The scope is limited to space applications. A design philosophy and adequate requirements are the initial steps in designing a space-qualified actuator. The focus is on the d-c motor in conjunction with several types of transmissions (harmonic, tendon, traction, and gear systems). The various transmissions will be evaluated and key performance parameters will be addressed in detail. Included in the assessment is a shuttle RMS joint and a MSFC drive of the Prototype Manipulator Arm. Compound joints are also investigated. Space imposes a set of requirements for designing a high-performance drive assembly. Its inaccessibility and cryogenic conditions warrant special considerations. Some guidelines concerning these conditions are present. The goal is to gain a better understanding in designing a space actuator.

  8. Dielectric Elastomer Actuated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The system of the present invention includes an actuator having at least two electrodes, an elastomeric dielectric film disposed between the two electrodes, and a frame attached to the elastomeric dielectric film. The frame provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The displacement range is preferably the stroke of the actuator. The displacement range can be about 5 mm and greater. Further, the frame can include a plurality of configurations, for example, at least a rigid members coupled to a flexible member wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. In preferred embodiments, the rigid member can be, but is not limited to, curved beams, parallel beams, rods and plates. In a preferred embodiment the actuator can further include a passive element disposed between two flexible members such as, for example, links to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. Further, the actuator can include a plurality of layers of the elastomeric dielectric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of different materials such as, for example, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  9. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily

  10. Rate limiting processes in the bohr shift in human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Forster, R. E.; Steen, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. The rates of the Bohr shift of human red cells and some of its constituent reactions have been studied with a modified Hartridge—Roughton rapid reaction apparatus using an oxygen electrode to measure the progress of the reaction. 2. The rate of the Bohr shift was compatible with the hypothesis that the transfer of H+ across the membrane by means of CO2 exchange and reaction with buffers is generally the rate-limiting step. (a) When the Bohr off-reaction was produced by a marked increase in PCO2 around the cells, the half-time at 37° C was 0·12 sec. In this case CO2 was available initially to diffuse into the cells, the process being predominantly limited by the rate of intracellular CO2 hydration. (b) When the Bohr off-shift was produced by an increase of [H+] outside the cell, PCO2 being low and equal within and outside the cells, the half time became 0·31 sec. In this case, even at the start, the H2CO3 formed by the almost instantaneous neutralization reaction of H+ and HCO3- had to dehydrate to form CO2 and this in turn had to diffuse into and react within the red cell before the [HbO2] could change. When a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor was added to slow the CO2 reaction inside the cell, the half-time rose to 10 sec. (c) The Bohr off-shift in a haemolysed cell suspension produced by an increase in PCO2 appeared to be limited by the rate at which the CO2 could hydrate to form H+. 3. The Bohr off-shift has an average Q10 of 2·5 between 42·5 and 28° C with an activation energy of 8000 cal. 4. The pronounced importance of the CO2-bicarbonate system for rapid intracellular pH changes is discussed in connexion with some physiological situations. PMID:5664232

  11. Intermolecular electron transfer rate in diffusion limited region: Picosecond fluorescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Periasamy, N.; Modi, S.; Dutt, G. Bhaskar; Doraiswamy, S.

    1992-12-01

    The temporal profiles of the quenched fluorescence decay of the free base meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (H 2TPP) and its Zn derivative (ZnTPP) with quenchers such as quinones and m-dinitrobenzene have been analysed by methods developed for short time regimes which are known to be diffusion influenced [N. Periasamy et al., J. Chem. Phys.88, 1638 (1988); 89, 4799 (1988); Chem. Phys. Lett.160, 457 (1989); N. Periasamy, Biophys. J.. 54, 961 (1988); R. Das and N. Periasamy, Chem. Phys. 136, 361 (1989); G.C. Joshi et al., J. Phys. Chem.94, 2908 (1990)]. These quenchers are known to participate in an electron transfer reaction leading to a charge separation. The intrinsic rate constant ( ka) derived from the analysis is examined as a function of the change in free energy in the electron transfer reaction. Such a comparison indicates that ka can be related to the electron transfer rate, ket. The electron transfer rates measured in acetonitrile (solvent reorganization energy, λ s = 1.35) and toluene (λ s = 0.1) do not indicate the existence of an inverted region as predicted by Marcus. The trend agrees with the findings of Rehm and Weller [ Isr. J. Chem.8, 259 (1970)], except that the rate constants are at least one order of magnitude larger than the diffusion limited values.

  12. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-07-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  13. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  14. Actuators For A Segmented Mirror Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1983-11-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2µm/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  15. Actuators for a segmented mirror control system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1984-01-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2 m/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  16. Sweeping Jet Actuator in a Quiescent Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Melton, Latunia P.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of a sweeping jet (fluidic oscillator) actuator. The sweeping jet actuator promises to be a viable flow control actuator candidate due to its simple, no moving part structure and its high momentum, spatially oscillating flow output. Hot-wire anemometer and particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out with an emphasis on understanding the actuator flow field in a quiescent environment. The time averaged, fluctuating, and instantaneous velocity measurements are provided. A modified actuator concept that incorporates high-speed solenoid valves to control the frequency of oscillation enabled phase averaged measurements of the oscillating jet. These measurements reveal that in a given oscillation cycle, the oscillating jet spends more time on each of the Coanda surfaces. In addition, the modified actuator generates four different types of flow fields, namely: a non oscillating downward jet, a non oscillating upward jet, a non oscillating straight jet, and an oscillating jet. The switching from an upward jet to a downward jet is accomplished by providing a single pulse from the solenoid valve. Once the flow is switched, the flow stays there until another pulse is received. The oscillating jet is compared with a non oscillating straight jet, which is a typical planar turbulent jet. The results indicate that the oscillating jet has a higher (5 times) spreading rate, more flow entrainment, and higher velocity fluctuations (equal to the mean velocity).

  17. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  18. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  19. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  20. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  1. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  2. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  3. Limits on the Event Rates of Fast Radio Transients from the V-FASTR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam T.; Brisken, Walter F.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2012-07-01

    We present the first results from the V-FASTR experiment, a commensal search for fast transient radio bursts using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). V-FASTR is unique in that the widely spaced VLBA antennas provide a discriminant against non-astronomical signals and a mechanism for the localization and identification of events that is not possible with single dishes or short baseline interferometers. Thus, far V-FASTR has accumulated over 1300 hr of observation time with the VLBA, between 90 cm and 3 mm wavelength (327 MHz-86 GHz), providing the first limits on fast transient event rates at high radio frequencies (>1.4 GHz). V-FASTR has blindly detected bright individual pulses from seven known pulsars but has not detected any single-pulse events that would indicate high-redshift impulsive bursts of radio emission. At 1.4 GHz, V-FASTR puts limits on fast transient event rates comparable with the PALFA survey at the Arecibo telescope, but generally at lower sensitivities, and comparable to the "fly's eye" survey at the Allen Telescope Array, but with less sky coverage. We also illustrate the likely performance of the Phase 1 SKA dish array for an incoherent fast transient search fashioned on V-FASTR.

  4. LIMITS ON THE EVENT RATES OF FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS FROM THE V-FASTR EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wayth, Randall B.; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam T.; Brisken, Walter F.; Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2012-07-10

    We present the first results from the V-FASTR experiment, a commensal search for fast transient radio bursts using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). V-FASTR is unique in that the widely spaced VLBA antennas provide a discriminant against non-astronomical signals and a mechanism for the localization and identification of events that is not possible with single dishes or short baseline interferometers. Thus, far V-FASTR has accumulated over 1300 hr of observation time with the VLBA, between 90 cm and 3 mm wavelength (327 MHz-86 GHz), providing the first limits on fast transient event rates at high radio frequencies (>1.4 GHz). V-FASTR has blindly detected bright individual pulses from seven known pulsars but has not detected any single-pulse events that would indicate high-redshift impulsive bursts of radio emission. At 1.4 GHz, V-FASTR puts limits on fast transient event rates comparable with the PALFA survey at the Arecibo telescope, but generally at lower sensitivities, and comparable to the 'fly's eye' survey at the Allen Telescope Array, but with less sky coverage. We also illustrate the likely performance of the Phase 1 SKA dish array for an incoherent fast transient search fashioned on V-FASTR.

  5. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  6. Control of a flexible planar truss using proof mass actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minas, Constantinos; Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    A flexible structure was modeled and actively controlled by using a single space realizable linear proof mass actuator. The NASA/UVA/UB actuator was attached to a flexible planar truss structure at an optimal location and it was considered as both passive and active device. The placement of the actuator was specified by examining the eigenvalues of the modified model that included the actuator dynamics, and the frequency response functions of the modified system. The electronic stiffness of the actuator was specified, such that the proof mass actuator system was tuned to the fourth structural mode of the truss by using traditional vibration absorber design. The active control law was limited to velocity feedback by integrating of the signals of two accelerometers attached to the structure. The two lower modes of the closed-loop structure were placed further in the LHS of the complex plane. The theoretically predicted passive and active control law was experimentally verified.

  7. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  8. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  9. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  10. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  11. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  12. Relative impact of mate versus pollinator availability on pollen limitation and outcrossing rates in a mass-flowering species.

    PubMed

    Delmas, C E L; Escaravage, N; Cheptou, P-O; Charrier, O; Ruzafa, S; Winterton, P; Pornon, A

    2015-01-01

    Plant mating systems are driven by several pre-pollination factors, including pollinator availability, mate availability and reproductive traits. We investigated the relative contributions of these factors to pollination and to realized outcrossing rates in the patchily distributed mass-flowering shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum. We jointly monitored pollen limitation (comparing seed set from intact and pollen-supplemented flowers), reproductive traits (herkogamy, flower size and autofertility) and mating patterns (progeny array analysis) in 28 natural patches varying in the level of pollinator availability (flower visitation rates) and of mate availability (patch floral display estimated as the total number of inflorescences per patch). Our results showed that patch floral display was the strongest determinant of pollination and of the realized outcrossing rates in this mass-flowering species. We found an increase in pollen limitation and in outcrossing rates with increasing patch floral display. Reproductive traits were not significantly related to patch floral display, while autofertility was negatively correlated to outcrossing rates. These findings suggest that mate limitation, arising from high flower visitation rates in small plant patches, resulted in low pollen limitation and high selfing rates, while pollinator limitation, arising from low flower visitation rates in large plant patches, resulted in higher pollen limitation and outcrossing rates. Pollinator-mediated selfing and geitonogamy likely alleviates pollen limitation in the case of reduced mate availability, while reduced pollinator availability (intraspecific competition for pollinator services) may result in the maintenance of high outcrossing rates despite reduced seed production. PMID:24942604

  13. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  14. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  15. Self-contained hybrid electro-hydraulic actuators using magnetostrictive and electrostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban

    Hybrid electro-hydraulic actuators using smart materials along with flow rectification have been widely reported in recent years. The basic operation of these actuators involves high frequency bidirectional operation of an active material that is converted into unidirectional fluid motion by a set of valves. While theoretically attractive, practical constraints limit the efficacy of the solid-fluid hybrid actuation approach. In particular, inertial loads, fluid viscosity and compressibility combine with loss mechanisms inherent in the active material to limit the effective bandwidth of the driving actuator and the total output power. A hybrid actuator was developed by using magnetostrictive TerFeNOL-D as the active driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Tests, both with and without an external load, were carried out to measure the unidirectional performance of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and operating conditions. The maximum no-load output velocity was 84 mm/s with a 51 mm long rod and 88 mm/s with a 102 mm long rod, both noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency, while the blocked force was close to 89 N. Dynamic tests were performed to analyze the axial vibration characteristics of the Terfenol-D rods and frequency responses of the magnetic circuits. A second prototype actuator employing the same actuation principle was then designed by using the electrostrictive material PMN-32%PT as the driving element. Tests were conducted to measure the actuator performance for varying electrical input conditions and fluid bias pressures. The peak output velocity obtained was 330 mm/s while the blocked force was 63 N. The maximum volume flow rate obtained with the PMN-based actuator was more than double that obtained from the Terfenol-D--based actuator. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of the coupled structural-hydraulic system is extremely complex and several models have been proposed earlier. At high pumping frequencies, the fluid inertia

  16. Chatter active control in a lathe machine using magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosouhi, R.; Behbahani, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the chatter phenomena in lathe machines. Chatter is one of the main causes of inaccuracy, reduction of life cycle of the machine and tool wear in machine tools. This phenomenon limits the depth of cut as a function of the cutting speed, which consequently reduces the material removal rate and machining efficiency. Chatter control is therefore important since it increases the stability region in machining and increases the critical depth of cut in machining case. To control the chatter in lathe machines, a magnetostrictive actuator is used. The materials with magnetostriction properties are kind of smart materials of which their length changes as a result of applying an exterior magnetic field, which make them suitable for control applications. It is assumed that the actuator applies the proper force exactly at the point where the machining force is applied on the tool. In this paper the chatter stability lobes is excelled as a result of applying a PID controller on the magnetostrictive actuator equipped-tool in turning.

  17. Design of an innovative magnetostrictive patch actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Giberti, H.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetostrictive actuators can be profitably used to reduce vibration in structures. However, this technology has been exploited only to develop inertial actuators, while patches actuators have not been ever used in practice. Patches actuators consist on a layer of magnetostrictive material, which has to be stuck to the surface of the vibrating structure, and on a coil surrounding the layer itself. However, the presence of the winding severely limits the use of such devices. As a matter of fact, the scientific literature reports only theoretical uses of such actuators, but, in practice it does not seem they were ever used. This paper presents an innovative solution to improve the structure of the actuator patches, allowing their use in several practical applications. The principle of operation of these devices is rather simple. The actuator patch is able to generate a local deformation of the surface of the vibrating structure so as to introduce an equivalent damping that dissipates the kinetic energy associated to the vibration. This deformation is related to the behavior of the magnetostrictive material immersed in a variable magnetic field generated by the a variable current flowing in the winding. Contrary to what suggested in the theoretical literature, the designed device has the advantage of generating the variable magnetic field no longer in close proximity of the material, but in a different area, thus allowing a better coupling. The magnetic field is then conveyed through a suitable ferromagnetic structure to the magnetostrictive material. The device has been designed and simulated through FEA. Results confirm that the new configuration can easily overcome all the limits of traditional devices.

  18. A new type of a direct-drive valve system driven by a piezostack actuator and sliding spool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Han, Chulhee; Han, Young-Min; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-07-01

    A direct-drive valve (DDV) system is a kind of electrohydraulic servo valve system, in which the actuator directly drives the spool of the valve. In conventional DDV systems, the spool is generally driven by an electromagnetic actuator. Performance characteristics such as frequency bandwidth of DDV systems driven by the electromagnetic actuator are limited due to the actuator response property. In order to improve the performance characteristics of conventional DDV systems, in this work a new configuration for a direct-drive valve system actuated by a piezostack actuator with a flexible beam mechanism is proposed (in short, a piezo-driven DDV system). Its benefits are demonstrated through both simulation and experiment. After describing the geometric configuration and operational principle of the proposed valve system, a governing equation of the whole system is obtained by combining the dynamic equations of the fluid part and the structural parts: the piezostack, the flexible beam, and the spool. In the structural parts of the piezostack and flexible beam, a lumped parameter modeling method is used, while the conventional rule of the fluid momentum is used for the fluid part. In order to evaluate valve performances of the proposed system, an experimental apparatus consisting of a hydraulic circuit and the piezo-driven DDV system is established. The performance characteristics are evaluated in terms of maximum spool displacement, flow rate, frequency characteristics, and step response. In addition, in order to advocate the feasibility of the proposed dynamic model, a comparison between simulation and experiment is undertaken.

  19. Rate limits in silicon sheet growth - The connections between vertical and horizontal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul D.; Brown, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Meniscus-defined techniques for the growth of thin silicon sheets fall into two categories: vertical and horizontal growth. The interactions of the temperature field and the crystal shape are analyzed for both methods using two-dimensional finite-element models which include heat transfer and capillarity. Heat transfer in vertical growth systems is dominated by conduction in the melt and the crystal, with almost flat melt/crystal interfaces that are perpendicular to the direction of growth. The high axial temperature gradients characteristic of vertical growth lead to high thermal stresses. The maximum growth rate is also limited by capillarity which can restrict the conduction of heat from the melt into the crystal. In horizontal growth the melt/crystal interface stretches across the surface of the melt pool many times the crystal thickness, and low growth rates are achievable with careful temperature control. With a moderate axial temperature gradient in the sheet a substantial portion of the latent heat conducts along the sheet and the surface of the melt pool becomes supercooled, leading to dendritic growth. The thermal supercooling is surpressed by lowering the axial gradient in the crystal; this configuration is the most desirable for the growth of high quality crystals. An expression derived from scaling analysis relating the growth rate and the crucible temperature is shown to be reliable for horizontal growth.

  20. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution

    PubMed Central

    Okie, Jordan G.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D.; Sibly, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow–fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generation time to predict a clade's evolutionary rate and asymptotic maximum body size, and the shape of macroevolutionary trajectories during diversifying phases of size evolution. We evaluate this theory using data on the evolution of clade maximum body sizes in mammals during the Cenozoic. As predicted, clade evolutionary rates and asymptotic maximum sizes are larger in more productive clades (e.g. baleen whales), which represent the fast end of the slow–fast lifestyle continuum, and smaller in less productive clades (e.g. primates). The allometric scaling exponent for generation time fundamentally alters the shape of evolutionary trajectories, so allometric effects should be accounted for in models of phenotypic evolution and interpretations of macroevolutionary body size patterns. This work highlights the intimate interplay between the macroecological and macroevolutionary dynamics underlying the generation and maintenance of morphological diversity. PMID:23760865

  1. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  2. 77 FR 71587 - Badger Creek Limited; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Badger Creek Limited; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate...-referenced proceeding, of Badger Creek Limited's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  3. 76 FR 44321 - Double “C” Limited; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Double ``C'' Limited; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate...-referenced proceeding of Double ``C'' Limited's application for market-based rate authority, with...

  4. Miniature Linear Actuator for Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Cliff E.; Hill, Stuart W.

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the development of a kit of mechanisms intended for use aboard future spacecraft having masses between 10 and 100 kg. The report focuses mostly on two prototypes of one of the mechanisms: a miniature linear actuator based on a shape-memory-alloy (SMA) wire. In this actuator, as in SMA-wire actuators described previously in NASA Tech Briefs, a spring biases a moving part toward one limit of its stroke and is restrained or pulled toward the other limit of the stroke by an SMA wire, which assumes a slightly lesser or greater "remembered" length, depending on whether or not an electric current is applied to the wire to heat it above a transition temperature. Topics addressed in the report include the need to develop mechanisms like these, the general approach to be taken in designing SMA actuators, tests of the two prototypes of the miniature linear actuators, and improvements in the second prototype over the first prototype resulting in reduced mass and increased stroke. The report also presents recommendations for future development, briefly discusses problems of tolerances and working with small parts, states a need for better understanding of behaviors of SMAs, and presents conclusions.

  5. Warming rate drives microbial limitation and enzyme expression during peat decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglett, P.; Sihi, D.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments of enzyme-based decomposition models highlight the importance of enzyme kinetics with warming, but most modeling exercises are based on studies with a step-wise warming. This approach may mask the effect of temperature in controlling in-situ activities as in most ecosystems soil temperature change more gradually than air temperature. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of contrasting warming rates on the kinetics of C, N, and P degradation enzymes in subtropical peat soils. We also wanted to evaluate if the stoichiometry of enzyme kinetics shifts under contrasting warming rates and if so, how does it relate to the stoichiometry in microbial biomass. Contrasting warming rates altered microbial biomass stoichiometry leading to differing patterns of enzyme expression and microbial nutrient limitation. Activity (higher Vmax) and efficiency (lower Km) of C acquisition enzymes were greater in the step treatment; however, expressions of nutrient (N and P) acquiring enzymes were enhanced in the ramp treatment at the end of the experiment. In the step treatment, there was a typical pattern of an initial peak in the Vmax and drop in the Km for all enzyme groups followed by later adjustments. On the other hand, a consistent increase in Vmax and decline in Km of all enzyme groups were observed in the slow warming treatment. These changes were sufficient to alter microbial identity (as indicated by enzyme Km and biomass stoichiometry) with two apparently stable endpoints under contrasting warming rates. This observation resembles the concept of alternate stable states and highlights a need for improved representation of warming in models.

  6. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  7. Alluvial Fan Records of Climatically Driven Changes in Hillslope Eerosion Rates: Successes, Limitations, and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, A. J.; Miller, D. M.; Reheis, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    overlain by a laterally continuous deposit possessing a Bt horizon, a capping Av, and moderately developed pavement that, based on microlamination stratigraphy, is at least 56 ky old. These observations, combined with preliminary 10Be interpretations, indicate that the top of the older alluvial sequence, which contains the stage IV calcic horizon, is at least 375 ka. Using this limiting age, two end-member models for the depositional history of the alluvial sequence, and our observations of soil development elsewhere in the region, we can use several different methods to arrive at the paleoerosion rates at the time of deposition of the oldest stratigraphic interval. These rates are between ~25 and ~135 m/My or between ~30 and ~850 m/My, depending on the preferred age model and interpretive method. Although the lack of tighter age control does not allow us to establish whether faster paleoerosion rates are the result of periods of dominantly more or less intense precipitation, our results do demonstrate that erosion rates may have varied by up to an order of magnitude through time. Perhaps more importantly, even though the results are broadly similar in this case, it appears that it is possible for one to arrive at completely different answers to the same question depending on how the cosmogenic nuclide data are interpreted.

  8. Artificial accelerators of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 facilitate rate-limiting conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Bettina K; Weiwad, Matthias; Rübbelke, Martin; Freiburger, Lee; Fischer, Gunter; Lorenz, Oliver R; Sattler, Michael; Richter, Klaus; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 undergoes an ATP-driven cycle of conformational changes in which large structural rearrangements precede ATP hydrolysis. Well-established small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 compete with ATP-binding. We wondered whether compounds exist that can accelerate the conformational cycle. In a FRET-based screen reporting on conformational rearrangements in Hsp90 we identified compounds. We elucidated their mode of action and showed that they can overcome the intrinsic inhibition in Hsp90 which prevents these rearrangements. The mode of action is similar to that of the co-chaperone Aha1 which accelerates the Hsp90 ATPase. However, while the two identified compounds influence conformational changes, they target different aspects of the structural transitions. Also, the binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy is distinct. This study demonstrates that small molecules are capable of triggering specific rate-limiting transitions in Hsp90 by mechanisms similar to those in protein cofactors. PMID:25244159

  9. The numerical response: rate of increase and food limitation in herbivores and predators.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Peter; Choquenot, David

    2002-01-01

    Two types of numerical response function have evolved since Solomon first introduced the term to generalize features of Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models: (i) the demographic numerical response, which links change in consumer demographic rates to food availability; and (ii) the isocline numerical response, which links consumer abundance per se to food availability. These numerical responses are interchangeable because both recognize negative feedback loops between consumer and food abundance resulting in population regulation. We review how demographic and isocline numerical responses have been used to enhance our understanding of population regulation of kangaroos and possums, and argue that their utility may be increased by explicitly accounting for non-equilibrium dynamics (due to environmental variability and/or biological interactions) and the existence of multiple limiting factors. Interferential numerical response functions may help bridge three major historical dichotomies in population ecology (equilibrium versus non-equilibrium dynamics, extrinsic versus intrinsic regulation and demographic versus isocline numerical responses). PMID:12396515

  10. Rate- and Extent-Limiting Factors of Oral Drug Absorption: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-09-01

    The oral absorption of drugs has been represented by various concepts such as the absorption potential, the maximum absorbable dose, the biopharmaceutics classification system, and in vitro-in vivo correlation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the theoretical relationships between these concepts. It shows how a simple analytical solution for the fraction of a dose absorbed (Fa equation) can offer a theoretical base to tie together the various concepts, and discusses how this solution relates to the rate-limiting cases of oral drug absorption. The article introduces the Fa classification system as a framework in which all the above concepts were included, and discusses its applications for food effect prediction, active pharmaceutical ingredient form selection, formulation design, and biowaiver strategy. PMID:25712830

  11. Optimal GSTDN/TDRSS bit error rate evaluation using limited sample sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, R. E.; Lawrence, G. M.; Stuart, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical studies of telemetry errors were made on data from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME). Examination of frame sync words, as received at the ground station, indicated a wide spread of Bit Error Rates (BER) among stations. A study of the distribution of errors per station pass, however, showed that there was a tendency for the station software to add an even number of spurious errors to the count. A count of wild points in science data, rejecting drop-outs and other system errors, yielded an average random BER of 3.1 x 10 to the -6 with 99% confidence limits of 2.6 and 3.8 x 10 to the -6. The system errors are typically 5 to 100 times more frequent than the truly random errors.

  12. Trade-offs limiting the evolution of coloniality: ecological displacement rates used to measure small costs

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Kiyoko; Sterner, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Multicellular organisms that benefit from division of labour are presumably descended from colonial species that initially derived benefits from larger colony size, before the evolution of specialization. Life in a colony can have costs as well as benefits, but these can be hard to measure. We measured physiological costs to life in a colony using a novel method based on population dynamics, comparing growth rates of unicells and kairomone-induced colonies of a green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus against a reference co-occurring species. Coloniality negatively affected growth during the initial log growth phase, while no adverse effect was detected under nutrient-limited competitive conditions. The results point to costs associated with traits involved in rapid growth rather than those associated with efficient growth under resource scarcity. Some benefits of coloniality (e.g. defence from herbivory) may be different from when this trait evolved, but our approach shows how costs would have depended on conditions. PMID:20739317

  13. Non-collinear valve actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A non-collinear valve actuator includes a primary actuating system and a return spring system with each applying forces to a linkage system in order to regulate the flow of a quarter-turn valve. The primary actuating system and return spring system are positioned non-collinearly, which simply means the primary actuating system and return spring system are not in line with each other. By positioning the primary actuating system and return spring system in this manner, the primary actuating system can undergo a larger stroke while the return spring system experiences significantly less displacement. This allows the length of the return spring to be reduced due to the minimization of displacement thereby reducing the weight of the return spring system. By allowing the primary actuating system to undergo longer strokes, the weight of the primary actuating system may also be reduced. Accordingly, the weight of the non-collinear valve actuator is reduced.

  14. Larger-Stroke Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    A proposed normally-closed microvalve would contain a piezoelectric bending actuator instead of a piezoelectric linear actuator like that of the microvalve described in the preceding article. Whereas the stroke of the linear actuator of the preceding article would be limited to approximately equal to 6 micrometers, the stroke of the proposed bending actuator would lie in the approximate range of 10 to 15 micrometers-large enough to enable the microvalve to handle a variety of liquids containing suspended particles having sizes up to 10 m. Such particulate-laden liquids occur in a variety of microfluidic systems, one example being a system that sorts cells or large biomolecules for analysis. In comparison with the linear actuator of the preceding article, the bending actuator would be smaller and less massive. The combination of increased stroke, smaller mass, and smaller volume would be obtained at the cost of decreased actuation force: The proposed actuator would generate a force in the approximate range of 1 to 4 N, the exact amount depending on operating conditions and details of design. This level of actuation force would be too low to enable the valve to handle a fluid at the high pressure level mentioned in the preceding article. The proposal encompasses two alternative designs one featuring a miniature piezoelectric bimorph actuator and one featuring a thick-film unimorph piezoelectric actuator (see figure). In either version, the valve would consume a power of only 0.01 W when actuated at a frequency of 100 Hz. Also, in either version, it would be necessary to attach a soft elastomeric sealing ring to the valve seat so that any particles that settle on the seat would be pushed deep into the elastomeric material to prevent or reduce leakage. The overall dimensions of the bimorph version would be 7 by 7 by 1 mm. The actuator in this version would generate a force of 1 N and a stroke of 10 m at an applied potential of 150 V. The actuation force would be

  15. Shape memory alloy micro-actuator performance prediction using a hybrid constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Franklin C.; Boissonneault, Olivier

    2006-03-01

    The volume and weight budgets in missiles and gun-launched munitions have decreased with the military forces' emphasis on soldier-centric systems and rapid deployability. Reduction in the size of control actuation systems employed in today's aerospace vehicles would enhance overall vehicle performance as long as there is no detrimental impact on flight performance. Functional materials such as shape memory alloys (SMA's) offer the opportunity to create compact, solid-state actuation systems for flight applications. A hybrid SMA model was developed for designing micro-actuated flow effectors. It was based on a combination of concepts originally presented by Likhatchev for microstructural modelling and Brinson for modelling of transformation kinetics. The phase diagram for a 0.1mm SMA wire was created by carrying out tensile tests in a Rheometrics RSA-II solids analyser over a range of temperatures from 30°C to 130°C. The characterization parameters were used in the hybrid model to predict the displacement-time trajectories for the wire. Experimental measurements were made for a SMA wire that was subjected to a constant 150g load and short, intense 4.5 to 10V pulses. Actuation frequency was limited by the cooling rate rather than the heating rate. A second set of experiments studied the performance of SMA wires in an antagonistic micro-actuator set-up. A series of 2 or 3V step inputs were alternately injected into each wire to characterize the peak to peak displacement and the motion time constant. A maximum frequency of 0.25Hz was observed. An antagonistic actuator model based on the hybrid SMA model predicted reasonably well the displacement-time results.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase induction in euryhaline crustaceans is rate-limited at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Reed T; Henry, Raymond P

    2014-03-01

    The transfer of euryhaline crustaceans from full-strength seawater to low salinity results in both a rapid up-regulation of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) mRNA and a slow induction of CA activity. There is a delay of several days between the two processes, which is attributed to the time required to synthesize new enzyme. These delays may also be due to limitations in the cellular uptake of Zn, which is a required post-translational active site modification to CA. To investigate these processes, the euryhaline crabs, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, were acclimated to salinities below their isosmotic points (22.5 and 25 ppt, respectively) for 7 days to activate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of osmoregulation. CA mRNA increased 90-fold in C. sapidus and 2-fold in C. maenas within 6h; whereas it took 48 h for the initial increases in CA activity (120% and 31%), and 4 to 7 days for new acclimated levels (300% and 100%, respectively). Crabs were then transferred to lower salinities (10 and 15 ppt) to induce further CA activity and to determine if previous increases in CA mRNA reduced the time required for subsequent CA induction. Additionally, the expression of the Zn transporter ZIP1 was examined in C. sapidus at 35 and 22.5 ppt. In both species, prior CA mRNA elevation failed to accelerate the rate of CA induction. Levels of CA mRNA did not change in either crab following transfer from intermediate to low salinity. Taken together, these results show that the timecourse of CA induction at low salinity is not limited by the expression of CA mRNA, but by the synthesis of new enzyme from an existing pool of mRNA. No increases in ZIP1 expression occurred at low salinity, therefore these delays may be due to the limits of cellular Zn uptake. PMID:24333600

  17. An upper limit on the contribution of accreting white dwarfs to the type Ia supernova rate.

    PubMed

    Gilfanov, Marat; Bogdán, Akos

    2010-02-18

    There is wide agreement that type Ia supernovae (used as standard candles for cosmology) are associated with the thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars. The nuclear runaway that leads to the explosion could start in a white dwarf gradually accumulating matter from a companion star until it reaches the Chandrasekhar limit, or could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs in a compact binary system. The X-ray signatures of these two possible paths are very different. Whereas no strong electromagnetic emission is expected in the merger scenario until shortly before the supernova, the white dwarf accreting material from the normal star becomes a source of copious X-rays for about 10(7) years before the explosion. This offers a means of determining which path dominates. Here we report that the observed X-ray flux from six nearby elliptical galaxies and galaxy bulges is a factor of approximately 30-50 less than predicted in the accretion scenario, based upon an estimate of the supernova rate from their K-band luminosities. We conclude that no more than about five per cent of type Ia supernovae in early-type galaxies can be produced by white dwarfs in accreting binary systems, unless their progenitors are much younger than the bulk of the stellar population in these galaxies, or explosions of sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs make a significant contribution to the supernova rate. PMID:20164924

  18. Mechanistic Insights into the Rate-Limiting Step in Purine-Specific Nucleoside Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhao; Zhao, Yuan; Lu, Jianing; Wu, Ruibo; Cao, Zexing

    2015-07-14

    A full enzymatic catalysis cycle in the inosine-adenosine-guanosine specific nucleoside hydrolase (IAG-NH) was assumed to be comprised of four steps: substrate binding, chemical reaction, base release, and ribose release. Nevertheless, the mechanistic details for the rate-limiting step of the entire enzymatic reaction are still unknown, even though the ribose release was likely to be the most difficult stage. Based on state-of-the-art quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the ribose release process can be divided into two steps: "ribose dissociation" and "ribose release". The "ribose dissociation" includes "cleavage" and "exchange" stages, in which a metastable 6-fold intermediate will recover to an 8-fold coordination shell of Ca(2+) as observed in apo- IAG-NH. Extensive random acceleration molecular dynamics and MD simulations have been employed to verify plausible release channels, and the estimated barrier for the rate-determining step of the entire reaction is 13.0 kcal/mol, which is comparable to the experimental value of 16.7 kcal/mol. Moreover, the gating mechanism arising from loop1 and loop2, as well as key residues around the active pocket, has been found to play an important role in manipulating the ribose release. PMID:26575755

  19. Limits on oxygen concentration in the prebiological atmosphere and the rate of abiotic fixation of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1981-02-01

    Two possible scenarios in early terrestrial atmospheric evolution are examined using a one-dimensional chemistry and flow model of the atmosphere. In each case the production of oxygen results from photolysis of H2O followed by the escape of hydrogen to space. In case 1 the rate of release of reduced volcanic gases is assumed to be greater than the oxygen production rate in leading to ground-level-oxygen concentrations on the order of 10 to the -13th PAL (present atmospheric level). In case 2, the volcanic reduced gas source is omitted, as in the case during an extended period of decreased tectonic activity. The oxygen concentration would then have been limited to about 4 x 10 to the -8th PAL by reaction with dissolved ferrous iron in the early oceans. The case 1 atmosphere is reducing, and the case 2 atmosphere oxidizing, based on the relative concentrations of reduced versus oxidized radical species present in the troposphere. The NO produced by lightning discharges is converted primarily to HNO in case 1 and to HNO3 in case 2.

  20. Catalytic characterization of human microsomal glutathione S-transferase 2: identification of rate-limiting steps.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Niegowski, Damian; Wetterholm, Anders; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Morgenstern, Ralf; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2013-03-12

    Microsomal glutathione S-transferase 2 (MGST2) is a 17 kDa trimeric integral membrane protein homologous to leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S). MGST2 has been suggested to catalyze the biosynthesis of the pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in cells devoid of LTC4S. A detailed biochemical study of MGST2 is critical for the understanding of its cellular function and potential role as an LTC4-producing enzyme. Here we have characterized the substrate specificity and catalytic properties of purified MGST2 by steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic experiments. In comparison with LTC4S, which has a catalytic efficiency of 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), MGST2, with a catalytic efficiency of 1.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), is considerably less efficient in producing LTC4. However, the two enzymes display a similar KM(LTA4) of 30-40 μM. While LTC4S has one activated glutathione (GSH) (forming a thiolate) per enzyme monomer, the MGST2 trimer seems to display only third-of-the-sites reactivity for thiolate activation, which in part would explain its lower catalytic efficiency. Furthermore, MGST2 displays GSH-dependent peroxidase activity of ∼0.2 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) toward several lipid hydroperoxides. MGST2, but not LTC4S, is efficient in catalyzing conjugation of the electrophilic substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal with GSH. Using stopped-flow pre-steady-state kinetics, we have characterized the full catalytic reaction of MGST2 with CDNB and GSH as substrates, showing an initial rapid equilibrium binding of GSH followed by thiolate formation. Burst kinetics for the CDNB-GSH conjugation step was observed only at low GSH concentrations (thiolate anion formation becoming rate-limiting under these conditions). Product release is rapid and does not limit the overall reaction. Therefore, in general, the chemical conjugation step is rate-limiting for MGST2 at physiological GSH concentrations. MGST2 and LTC4S

  1. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C - Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast...) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Subpt. C, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C—Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits Vessel length Capacity rating 400 311.80...

  2. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C - Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast...) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Subpt. C, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C—Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits Vessel length Capacity rating 400 311.80...

  3. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a...

  4. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a...

  5. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a...

  6. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a...

  7. 14 CFR 61.415 - What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certificate with a sport pilot rating? 61.415 Section 61.415 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS Flight Instructors With a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.415 What are the limits of a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating? If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a...

  8. Polymer-based actuators for virtual reality devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Hafez, Moustapha; Benali Khoudja, Mohamed; Bernardoni, Paul; Dubowsky, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is gaining more importance in our society. For many years, VR has been limited to the entertainment applications. Today, practical applications such as training and prototyping find a promising future in VR. Therefore there is an increasing demand for low-cost, lightweight haptic devices in virtual reality (VR) environment. Electroactive polymers seem to be a potential actuation technology that could satisfy these requirements. Dielectric polymers developed the past few years have shown large displacements (more than 300%). This feature makes them quite interesting for integration in haptic devices due to their muscle-like behaviour. Polymer actuators are flexible and lightweight as compared to traditional actuators. Using stacks with several layers of elatomeric film increase the force without limiting the output displacement. The paper discusses some design methods for a linear dielectric polymer actuator for VR devices. Experimental results of the actuator performance is presented.

  9. Effect of growth rate and substrate limitation on the composition and structure of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McMurrough, I.; Rose, A. H.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study was made of the composition and structure of walls isolated from yeast grown in continuous culture at different rates, under three conditions of glucose limitation in which the concentrations of glucose and ammonium sulphate in the medium and the oxygen-transfer rate in the culture were varied, and one condition of NH4+ limitation. 2. The contents of total glucan and total mannan in the walls were relatively little affected by the growth rate under any of the four sets of conditions. The phosphorus and protein contents of walls from yeast grown under each of the four conditions increased as the growth rate was decreased. Walls from yeast grown under NH4+ limitation contained only half as much protein as walls from cells grown under glucose limitation. The proportion of lipid was greatest in walls from yeast grown under NH4+ limitation. 3. A procedure was devised for fractionating isolated walls, based on the ease with which the glucan and mannan were extracted with water and with hot and cold 6% (w/v) potassium hydroxide solution. The percentage of glucan, mannan, protein and phosphorus in each of the fractions was affected by the rate of growth and by the nature of the substrate limitation. 4. The β-fructofuranosidase activities of yeast grown under glucose limitation increased as the growth rate was lowered, but decreased at very low growth rates. The effects at low growth rates were probably due to repression of enzyme synthesis by residual glucose in the culture filtrate. The β-fructofuranosidase activities of yeast grown under NH4+ limitation were much lower than those from yeast grown under any of the conditions of glucose limitation. 5. Yeast cells grown at any of the rates under NH4+ limitation were longer and thinner than those grown at the same rate under any of the conditions of glucose limitation. Mean cell volumes were dependent on growth rate but not on the nature of the substrate limitation. 6. Electron micrographs of thin sections of

  10. Actuator Feasibility Study for Active Control of Ducted Axial Fan Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed to investigate actuator technology which is relevant for a particular application of active noise control for gas turbine stator vanes. This study investigated many different classes of actuators and ranked them on the order of applicability. The most difficult requirements the actuators had to meet were high frequency response, large amplitude deflections, and a thin profile. Based on this assessment, piezoelectric type actuators were selected as the most appropriate actuator class. Specifically, Rainbows (a new class of high performance piezoelectric actuators), and unimorphs (a ceramic/metal composite) appeared best suited to the requirements. A benchtop experimental study was conducted. The performance of a variety of different actuators was examined, including high polymer films, flextensional actuators, miniature speakers, unimorphs, and Rainbows. The displacement/frequency response and phase characteristics of the actuators were measured. Physical limitations of actuator operation were also examined. This report includes the first known, high displacement, dynamic data obtained for Rainbow actuators. A new "hard" ceramic Rainbow actuator which does not appear to be limited in operation by self heating as "soft" ceramic Rainbows was designed, constructed and tested. The study concludes that a suitable actuator for active noise control in gas turbine engines can be achieved with state of the art materials and processing.

  11. Effects of noise variance model on optimal feedback design and actuator placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruan, Mifang; Choudhury, Ajit K.

    1994-01-01

    In optimal placement of actuators for stochastic systems, it is commonly assumed that the actuator noise variances are not related to the feedback matrix and the actuator locations. In this paper, we will discuss the limitation of that assumption and develop a more practical noise variance model. Various properties associated with optimal actuator placement under the assumption of this noise variance model are discovered through the analytical study of a second order system.

  12. Actuated Hybrid Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Ealey, Mark; Redding, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new, large, ultra-lightweight, replicated, actively controlled mirrors, for use in space telescopes. These mirrors utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. Called Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AHMs), they use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. They enable an Active Optics space telescope architecture that uses periodic image-based wavefront sensing and control to assure diffraction-limited performance, while relaxing optical system fabrication, integration and test requirements. The proposed International Space Station Observatory seeks to demonstrate this architecture in space.

  13. Bound plasminogen is rate-limiting for cell-surface-mediated activation of plasminogen by urokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Namiranian, S; Naito, Y; Kakkar, V V; Scully, M F

    1995-01-01

    The ability of U937 monocyte-like cells and KATO III cells (a human gastric carcinoma line) to potentiate activation of plasminogen by single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA), as mediated by the cell receptor for urokinase (u-PAR), was compared. It was observed that, although the concentration of u-PAR on these cell lines differed considerably (U937 cells: 5000 receptors/cell, Kd 0.35 nM; KATO III cells: 400 receptors/cell, Kd 0.85 nM), the rate of activation of plasminogen by scu-PA in the presence of the same density of each cell line was equivalent. From data generated in the presence of increasing concentrations of scu-PA, the kcat, for plasminogen activation in the presence of each cell line was calculated and found to differ by 26-fold (0.36 s-1 on U937 cells; 9.25 s-1 on KATO III cells). However, the Km for plasminogen with respect to the rate of formation of plasmin was lower than the Kd for binding (0.2 microM compared with 0.5 microM on U937 cells; 0.34 microM compared with 1.6 microM on KATO III cells). A rapid transformation from Glu-plasminogen (native plasminogen with N-terminal Glu) to Lys-plasminogen (plasmin-degraded plasminogen with primarily N-terminal Lys-77) occurred on the surface of U937 cells (unlike KATO III cells), but this transition did not coincide with faster rates of plasminogen activation. From this evidence it is concluded that the accessibility of bound plasminogen acts to limit the rate of activation by cell-bound urokinase. The significance of this proposal is that the proteolytic potential of the cell-mediated activation of plasminogen would be controlled by the accessibility of plasminogen for activation rather than by the concentration of u-PAR (the latter may act to localize proteolysis to appropriate domains on the surface of the cell). PMID:7639718

  14. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  15. 18 CFR 35.22 - Limits for percentage adders in rates for transmission services; revision of rate schedules...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that performs a transmission or purchase and resale function for electric power generated by another... Organization Act, 42 U.S.C. 7101-7352; E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142 (1978)) ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limits for...

  16. Design and control of dual servo actuator for near field optical recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Jun-Hee; Yoon, Hyoung-Kil; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2005-12-01

    Near field recording (NFR) has been introduced as a new optical data storage method to realize higher data density beyond the diffraction limit. As the data density increases, the track pitch is remarkably reduced to about 400nm. Thus, more precise actuator is required and we propose a dual servo actuator to improve the accuracy of actuator. The proposed dual servo actuator consists of a coarse actuator and a fine actuator, multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) voice coil motor (VCM) and PMN-PT actuator. In design of VCM actuator, a novel magnetic circuit of VCM with MSMA is proposed. It can generate higher air gap flux density than the magnetic circuit of VCM with the conventional magnet array. In design of fine actuator, the fine actuator including PMN-PT single crystal instead of the conventional PZT is proposed. The displacement gain of PMN-PT fine actuator is 26 nm/V and that of PZT fine actuator is 17 nm/V. The displacement gain is increased by 53 %. To evaluate tracking performance of the manufactured dual servo actuator and to assign the proper role to each actuator, the PQ method is selected. From experiment results, the total bandwidth of the dual servo actuator is increased to 2.5kHz and the resolution is 25 nm. Comparing with the resolution of one servo actuator, 70 nm, we can find that the accuracy of actuator is remarkably improved. And the proposed dual servo actuator shows satisfactory performances to be applied to NFR and it can be applied to other future disk drives.

  17. Accommodating Actuator Failures in Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Siwakosit, W.; Chung, J.

    1998-01-01

    A technique for the design of flight control systems that can accommodate a set of actuator failures is presented. As employed herein, an actuator failure is defined as any change in the parametric model of the actuator which can adversely affect actuator performance. The technique is based upon the formulation of a fixed feedback topology which ensures at least stability in the presence of the failures in the set. The fixed compensation is obtained from a loop-shaping design procedure similar to Quantitative Feedback Theory and provides stability robustness in the presence of uncertainty in the vehicle dynamics caused by the failures. System adaptation to improve performance after actuator failure(s) occurs through a static gain adjustment in the compensator followed by modification of the system prefilter. Precise identification of the vehicle dynamics is unnecessary. Application to a single-input, single-output design using a simplified model of the longitudinal dynamics of the NASA High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle is discussed. Non-real time simulations of the system including a model of the pilot demonstrate the effectiveness and limitations of the approach.

  18. Tetherless thermobiochemically actuated microgrippers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Randall, Christina L.; Benson, Bryan R.; Bassik, Noy; Stern, George M.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate mass-producible, tetherless microgrippers that can be remotely triggered by temperature and chemicals under biologically relevant conditions. The microgrippers use a self-contained actuation response, obviating the need for external tethers in operation. The grippers can be actuated en masse, even while spatially separated. We used the microgrippers to perform diverse functions, such as picking up a bead on a substrate and the removal of cells from tissue embedded at the end of a capillary (an in vitro biopsy). PMID:19139411

  19. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  20. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  1. Kinetic Mechanism and the Rate-limiting Step of Plasmodium vivax Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Maenpuen, Somchart; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Krasatong, Pasupat; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Palfey, Bruce A.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chitnumsub, Penchit; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2015-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes a hydroxymethyl group transfer from l-serine to tetrahydrofolate (H4folate) to yield glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2-H4folate). SHMT is crucial for deoxythymidylate biosynthesis and a target for antimalarial drug development. Our previous studies indicate that PvSHMT catalyzes the reaction via a ternary complex mechanism. To define the kinetic mechanism of this catalysis, we explored the PvSHMT reaction by employing various methodologies including ligand binding, transient, and steady-state kinetics as well as product analysis by rapid-quench and HPLC/MS techniques. The results indicate that PvSHMT can bind first to either l-serine or H4folate. The dissociation constants for the enzyme·l-serine and enzyme·H4folate complexes were determined as 0.18 ± 0.08 and 0.35 ± 0.06 mm, respectively. The amounts of glycine formed after single turnovers of different preformed binary complexes were similar, indicating that the reaction proceeds via a random-order binding mechanism. In addition, the rate constant of glycine formation measured by rapid-quench and HPLC/MS analysis is similar to the kcat value (1.09 ± 0.05 s−1) obtained from the steady-state kinetics, indicating that glycine formation is the rate-limiting step of SHMT catalysis. This information will serve as a basis for future investigation on species-specific inhibition of SHMT for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25678710

  2. Droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Praveen Priyaranjan; Kar, Durga Prasanna; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan

    2016-01-01

    A new technique of droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation has been proposed and experimentally investigated in this work. The proposed method is based on the principle of resonant inductive coupling and piezoelectric resonance. When a mechanical vibration is excited in a piezoelectric plate, the ultrasonic vibration transmitted to the droplets placed on its surface and induces merging. It has been observed that the merging rate of water droplets depends on the operating frequency, mechanical vibration of piezoelectric plate, separation distance between the droplets, and volume of droplets. The investigated technique of droplets merging through piezoelectric actuation is quite useful for microfluidics, chemical and biomedical engineering applications. PMID:26299402

  3. Dielectric elastomer actuators for active microfluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Murray, Coleman; Di Carlo, Dino; Pei, Qibing

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers with low modulus and large actuation strain have been investigated for applications in which they serve as "active" microfluidic channel walls. Anisotropically prestrained acrylic elastomer membranes are bonded to cover open trenches formed on a silicone elastomer substrate. Actuation of the elastomer membranes increases the cross-sectional area of the resulting channels, in turn controlling hydraulic flow rate and pressure. Bias voltage increases the active area of the membranes, allowing intrachannel pressure to alter channel geometry. The channels have also demonstrated the ability to actively clear a blockage. Applications may include adaptive microfilters, micro-peristaltic pumps, and reduced-complexity lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. Low-Shock Pyrotechnic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature 1-ampere, 1-watt pyrotechnic actuator enclosed in flexible metal bellows. Bellows confines outgassing products, and pyrotechnic shock reduction achieved by action of bellows, gas cushion within device, and minimum use of pyrotechnic material. Actuator inexpensive, compact, and lightweight.

  5. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  6. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  7. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carraminana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. Leon; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; J. A.J. Matthews; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafa, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Perez-Perez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Riviere, C.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villasenor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  8. Fluctuations and the Rate-Limiting Step of Peptide-Induced Membrane Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, C.; Orioni, B.; Coletta, M.; Formaggio, F.; Toniolo, C.; Maulucci, G.; De Spirito, M.; Pispisa, B.; Venanzi, M.; Stella, L.

    2010-01-01

    Peptide-induced vesicle leakage is a common experimental test for the membrane-perturbing activity of antimicrobial peptides. The leakage kinetics is usually very slow, requiring minutes to hours for complete release of vesicle contents, and exhibits a biphasic behavior. We report here that, in the case of the peptaibol trichogin GA IV, all processes involved in peptide-membrane interaction, such as peptide-membrane association, peptide aggregation, and peptide translocation, take place on a timescale much shorter than the leakage kinetics. On the basis of these findings, we propose a stochastic model in which the leakage kinetics is determined by the discrete nature of a vesicle suspension: peptides are continuously exchanging among vesicles, producing significant fluctuations over time in the number of peptide molecules bound to each vesicle, and in the formation of pores. According to this model, the fast initial leakage is caused by vesicles that contain at least one pore after the peptides are randomly distributed among the liposomes, whereas the slower release is associated with the time needed to occasionally reach in an intact vesicle the critical number of bound peptides necessary for pore formation. Fluctuations due to peptide exchange among vesicles therefore represent the rate-limiting step of such a slow mechanism. PMID:20858423

  9. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; et al

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 tomore » 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.« less

  10. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Álvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carramiñana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; León Vargas, H.; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafá, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Pérez-Pérez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Rivière, C.; Rosa-González, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villaseñor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ∼5.0 × 1014 g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV-TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  11. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins.

    PubMed

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-22

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  12. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, J.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Credico, A.; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Luna, M.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Spjeld, O.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Tanner, D. B.; Tariq, H.

    2005-12-01

    We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3×10-19Hz-1/2 in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background.

  13. Milagro Limits and HAWC Sensitivity for the Rate-Density of Evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Rosales, M. Bonilla; Braun, J.; Hays, E.

    2014-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of approx.5.0 x 10(exp 14) g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV-TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  14. Milagro Limits and HAWC Sensitivity for the Rate-Density of Evaporating Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B.T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; Ayala Solares, H. A.; Hays, E.

    2014-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of approximately 5.0 x 10 (sup 14) grams should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the gigaelectronvolt - teraelectronvolt energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90 percent duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 teraelectronvolt gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  15. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-01

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. PMID:27052834

  16. Acoustofluidic actuation of in situ fabricated microrotors.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nama, Nitesh; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-09-21

    We have demonstrated in situ fabricated and acoustically actuated microrotors. A polymeric microrotor with predefined oscillating sharp-edge structures is fabricated in situ by applying a patterned UV light to polymerize a photocrosslinkable polyethylene glycol solution inside a microchannel around a polydimethylsiloxane axle. To actuate the microrotors by oscillating the sharp-edge structures, we employed piezoelectric transducers which generate tunable acoustic waves. The resulting acoustic streaming flows rotate the microrotors. The rotation rate is tuned by controlling the peak-to-peak voltage applied to the transducer. A 6-arm microrotor can exceed 1200 revolutions per minute. Our technique is an integration of single-step microfabrication, instant assembly around the axle, and easy acoustic actuation for various applications in microfluidics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). PMID:27466140

  17. Autonomous control system reconfiguration for spacecraft with non-redundant actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Walter

    1995-01-01

    The Small Satellite Technology Initiative (SSTI) 'CLARK' spacecraft is required to be single-failure tolerant, i.e., no failure of any single component or subsystem shall result in complete mission loss. Fault tolerance is usually achieved by implementing redundant subsystems. Fault tolerant systems are therefore heavier and cost more to build and launch than non-redundent, non fault-tolerant spacecraft. The SSTI CLARK satellite Attitude Determination and Control System (ADACS) achieves single-fault tolerance without redundancy. The attitude determination system system uses a Kalman Filter which is inherently robust to loss of any single attitude sensor. The attitude control system uses three orthogonal reaction wheels for attitude control and three magnetic dipoles for momentum control. The nominal six-actuator control system functions by projecting the attitude correction torque onto the reaction wheels while a slower momentum management outer loop removes the excess momentum in the direction normal to the local B field. The actuators are not redundant so the nominal control law cannot be implemented in the event of a loss of a single actuator (dipole or reaction wheel). The spacecraft dynamical state (attitude, angular rate, and momentum) is controllable from any five-element subset of the six actuators. With loss of an actuator the instantaneous control authority may not span R(3) but the controllability gramian integral(limits between t,0) Phi(t, tau)B(tau )B(prime)(tau) Phi(prime)(t, tau)d tau retains full rank. Upon detection of an actuator failure the control torque is decomposed onto the remaining active axes. The attitude control torque is effected and the over-orbit momentum is controlled. The resulting control system performance approaches that of the nominal system.

  18. Power Actuation and Switching Module Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W.; Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Sauers, Jim; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Space Avionics (DSA) Project is developing a Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM). This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an A SIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development includes two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs, It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Threeway majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper describes the development process used to design, model, fabricate, and test these compact and versatile power switches. Preliminary test results from prototype HDI PASM hardware are also discussed.

  19. Angular-Momentum-Compensating Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktor, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Reactionless actuator developed for instrument-pointing platforms on flexible spacecraft; by eliminating reactions, actuator changes aiming angle of platform without inducing vibrations in spacecraft, eliminateing vibrations in point angle of instrument platform. Actuator used on Earth in such systems as helicopter platforms for television cameras in law enforcement and news telecasts.

  20. 14 CFR 399.41 - Zones of limited suspension for international cargo rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (GCR's and SCR's) in the Atlantic region, 20 percent above the standard foreign rate level. (2) For all bulk rates (GCR's and SCR's) in the Pacific region, 15 percent above the standard foreign rate level. (3) For all bulk rates (GCR's and SCR's) in the Western Hemisphere region (except Mexico and...

  1. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  2. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  3. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  4. Actuators Acting without Actin.

    PubMed

    Geitmann, Anja

    2016-06-30

    Plant actuators move organs, allowing the plant to respond to environmental cues or perform other mechanical tasks. In Cardamine hursuta the dispersal of seeds is accomplished by explosive opening of the fruit. The biomechanical mechanism relies on a complex interplay between turgor regulation and cell wall mechanical properties. PMID:27368097

  5. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  6. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  7. Mesenchymal cell activation is the rate-limiting step of granulation tissue induction.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, S. A.; Simon, M.; Jones, E.; Nandi, A.; Gailit, J. O.; Tonnesen, M. G.; Newman, D.; Clark, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    During wound repair a 3-day lag occurs between injury and granulation tissue development. When full-thickness, 8-mm-round, excisional wounds were made in the paravertebral skin of outbred Yorkshire pigs and harvested at various times, no granulation tissue was observed before day 4. Day 4 wounds were 3% filled with granulation tissue, day 5 wounds 48% filled, and day 7 wounds 88% filled. The prerequisites for granulation tissue induction are not known but hypothetically include fibrin matrix maturation or cell activation. To examine whether matrix maturation was necessary, wounds were allowed to heal for 5 or 7 days and then aggressively curetted, resulting in the formation of fresh fibrin clots in the newly formed wound spaces. In contrast to original wounds, no lag phase was observed; wounds curetted on day 5 were 23% filled with granulation tissue 1 day later and 99% filled 3 days later, whereas wounds curetted on day 7 were 47% filled 1 day later and completely filled within 2 days. Thus, granulation tissue formation resumed promptly and independently of fibrin clot matrix maturation. This observation suggested that mesenchymal cell activation might be the rate-limiting step in granulation tissue formation. To address this hypothesis more directly, cultured porcine or human fibroblasts, grown to 80% confluence in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium plus 10% fetal calf serum, were added to new wounds. These wounds were sealed with a freshly made exogenous fibrin clot. In some wounds, platelet releasate was added to the fibrin clot. Granulation tissue did not form in day 3 wounds, which had received either fibrin alone, fibrin and platelet releasate, or fibrin and fibroblasts. In contrast, granulation tissue was observed in wounds receiving fibrin, human fibroblasts, and platelet releasate. By day 4, wounds receiving cultured human fibroblasts, fibrin, and platelet releasate were 14% filled with granulation tissue compared with less than 4% granulation tissue in

  8. Experimental design for estimating parameters of rate-limited mass transfer: Analysis of stream tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Tracer experiments are valuable tools for analyzing the transport characteristics of streams and their interactions with shallow groundwater. The focus of this work is the design of tracer studies in high-gradient stream systems subject to advection, dispersion, groundwater inflow, and exchange between the active channel and zones in surface or subsurface water where flow is stagnant or slow moving. We present a methodology for (1) evaluating and comparing alternative stream tracer experiment designs and (2) identifying those combinations of stream transport properties that pose limitations to parameter estimation and therefore a challenge to tracer test design. The methodology uses the concept of global parameter uncertainty analysis, which couples solute transport simulation with parameter uncertainty analysis in a Monte Carlo framework. Two general conclusions resulted from this work. First, the solute injection and sampling strategy has an important effect on the reliability of transport parameter estimates. We found that constant injection with sampling through concentration rise, plateau, and fall provided considerably more reliable parameter estimates than a pulse injection across the spectrum of transport scenarios likely encountered in high-gradient streams. Second, for a given tracer test design, the uncertainties in mass transfer and storage-zone parameter estimates are strongly dependent on the experimental Damkohler number, DaI, which is a dimensionless combination of the rates of exchange between the stream and storage zones, the stream-water velocity, and the stream reach length of the experiment. Parameter uncertainties are lowest at DaI values on the order of 1.0. When DaI values are much less than 1.0 (owing to high velocity, long exchange timescale, and/or short reach length), parameter uncertainties are high because only a small amount of tracer interacts with storage zones in the reach. For the opposite conditions (DaI >> 1.0), solute exchange

  9. Liquid rocket actuators and operators. [in spacecraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    All the types of actuators and associated operators used in booster, upper stage, and spacecraft propulsion and reaction-control systems except for chemical-explosive actuators and turbine actuators are discussed. Discussion of static and dynamic seals, mechanical transmission of motion, and instrumentation is included to the extent that actuator or operator design is affected. Selection of the optimum actuator configuration is discussed for specific application which require a tradeoff study that considers all the relevant factors: available energy sources, load capacity, stroke, speed of response, leakage limitations, environmental conditions, chemical compatibility, storage life and conditions, size, weight, and cost. These factors are interrelated with overall control-system design evaluations that are beyond the scope of this monograph; however, literature references are cited for a detailed review of the general considerations. Perinent advanced-state-of-the-art design concepts are surveyed briefly.

  10. Polymeric blends for sensor and actuation dual functionality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The invention described herein supplies a new class of electroactive polymeric blend materials which offer both sensing and actuation dual functionality. The blend comprises two components, one component having a sensing capability and the other component having an actuating capability. These components should be co-processable and coexisting in a phase separated blend system. Specifically, the materials are blends of a sensing component selected from the group consisting of ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and photoelectric polymers and an actuating component that responds to an electric field in terms of dimensional change. Said actuating component includes, but is not limited to, electrostrictive graft elastomers, dielectric electroactive elastomers, liquid crystal electroactive elastomers and field responsive polymeric gels. The sensor functionality and actuation functionality are designed by tailoring the relative fraction of the two components. The temperature dependence of the piezoelectric response and the mechanical toughness of the dual functional blends are also tailored by the composition adjustment.

  11. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems. PMID:27139677

  12. Optimization of Actuating Origami Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Joo, James; Gregory, Reich; Vaia, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. By leveraging design concepts from action origami, a subset of origami art focused on kinematic mechanisms, reversible folding patterns for applications such as solar array packaging, tunable antennae, and deployable sensing platforms may be designed. However, the enormity of the design space and the need to identify the requisite actuation forces within the structure places a severe limitation on design strategies based on intuition and geometry alone. The present work proposes a topology optimization method, using truss and frame element analysis, to distribute foldline mechanical properties within a reference crease pattern. Known actuating patterns are placed within a reference grid and the optimizer adjusts the fold stiffness of the network to optimally connect them. Design objectives may include a target motion, stress level, or mechanical energy distribution. Results include the validation of known action origami structures and their optimal connectivity within a larger network. This design suite offers an important step toward systematic incorporation of origami design concepts into new, novel and reconfigurable engineering devices. This research is supported under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funding, LRIR 13RQ02COR.

  13. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  14. Finite element analysis of multilayer DEAP stack-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhring, Stefan; Uhlenbusch, Dominik; Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) are thin polymer films belonging to the class of electroactive polymers (EAP). They are coated with compliant and conductive electrodes on each side, which make them performing a relative high amount of deformation with considerable force generation under the influence of an electric field. Because the realization of high electric fields with a limited voltage level requests single layer polymer films to be very thin, novel multilayer actuators are utilized to increase the absolute displacement and force. In case of a multilayer stack-actuator, many actuator films are mechanically stacked in series and electrically connected in parallel. Because there are different ways to design such a stack-actuator, this contribution considers an optimization of some design parameters using the finite element analysis (FEA), whereby the behavior and the actuation of a multilayer dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) stack-actuator can be improved. To describe the material behavior, first different material models are compared and necessary material parameters are identified by experiments. Furthermore, a FEA model of a DEAP film is presented, which is expanded to a multilayer DEAP stack-actuator model. Finally, the results of the FEA are discussed and conclusions for design rules of optimized stack-actuators are outlined.

  15. Active Control of Fan Noise by Vane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1999-01-01

    An active noise control system for ducted fan noise was built that uses actuators located in stator vanes. The actuators were piezoelectric benders manufactured using the THUNDER technology and were custom designed for the application. The active noise control system was installed in the NASA ANCF rig. Four actuator array with a total of 168 actuators in 28 stator vanes were used. Simultaneous reductions of acoustic power in both the inlet and exhaust duct were demonstrated for a fan disturbance that contained two radial mode orders in both inlet and exhaust. Total power levels in the target modes were reduced by up to 9 dB in the inlet and total tone levels by over 6 dB while exhaust power levels were reduced by up to 3 dB. Far field sound pressure level reductions of up to 17 dB were observed. A simpler control system, matched to the location of the disturbance with two radial actuator arrays, was demonstrated to control total acoustic power in four disturbance modes simultaneously in inlet and exhaust. The vane actuator met the requirements given for the ANCF, although in practice the performance of the system was limited by the constraints of the power amplifiers and the presence of control spillover. The vane actuators were robust. None of the 168 vane actuators failed during the tests.

  16. Minimizing actuator-induced errors in active space telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew W.; Miller, David W.

    2010-07-01

    The trend in future space telescopes points toward increased primary mirror diameter, which improves resolution and sensitivity. However, given the constraints on mass and volume deliverable to orbit by current launch vehicles, creative design solutions are needed to enable increased mirror size while keeping mass and volume within acceptable limits. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors have emerged as a potential solution. Embedded surface-parallel actuators can be used to change the mirror prescription onorbit, lowering mirror mass overall by enabling lighter substrate materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) and relaxing manufacturing constraints. However, the discrete nature of the actuators causes high spatial frequency residual errors when commanding low-order prescription changes. A parameterized finite element model is used to simulate actuator-induced residual error and investigate design solutions that mitigate this error source. Judicious specification of mirror substrate geometry and actuator length is shown to reduce actuator-induced residual while keeping areal density constant. Specifically, a sinusoidally-varying rib shaping function is found to increase actuator influence functions and decrease residual. Likewise, longer actuators are found to offer reduced residual. Other options for geometric shaping are discussed, such as rib-to-facesheet blending and the use of two dimensional patch actuators.

  17. Advanced high performance horizontal piezoelectric hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, horizontal, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a horizontal piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The present invention is capable of installation in the wing surface as well as embedding in the wetted surfaces of a supersonic inlet. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the SJA-H will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  18. Advanced high performance vertical hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, vertical, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a vertical piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the present invention will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators.

  19. A thermopneumatically actuated bistable microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bocong; Wang, Boxiong; Schomburg, Werner Karl

    2010-09-01

    A bistable polymer microvalve with a thermopneumatic actuator has been developed. The microvalve was fabricated by micro milling of a polymer combined with sputtering and photolithography. The valve comprises two 2/2-way valves which are alternately switched such that they can be connected to serve as a 3/2-way valve. Two permanent magnets work with a movable soft magnet to keep the valve in its current state, resulting in bistable switching with a minimum energy of 320 mJ. An air flow rate of 1.36 L min-1 is achieved at 20 °C with a pressure difference of 200 kPa. No leakage is observed up to a differential pressure of 350 kPa. Flowing and switching performances were also tested at different temperatures. Sealing the flow channels from the actuator chamber makes the valve less sensitive to the temperature and other properties of the fluid to be switched. An initial gap between the valve seat and the silicone sealing membrane at least reduces the sticking problem. Switching time is found to be significantly influenced by the thickness of the heating membrane. With an 8 µm thick heating membrane, a response time of 10 ms can be achieved.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Fluidic Actuators for Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasta, Veer N.; Koklu, Mehti; Wygnanski, Israel L.; Fares, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Active flow control technology is finding increasing use in aerospace applications to control flow separation and improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper we examine the characteristics of a class of fluidic actuators that are being considered for active flow control applications for a variety of practical problems. Based on recent experimental work, such actuators have been found to be more efficient for controlling flow separation in terms of mass flow requirements compared to constant blowing and suction or even synthetic jet actuators. The fluidic actuators produce spanwise oscillating jets, and therefore are also known as sweeping jets. The frequency and spanwise sweeping extent depend on the geometric parameters and mass flow rate entering the actuators through the inlet section. The flow physics associated with these actuators is quite complex and not fully understood at this time. The unsteady flow generated by such actuators is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann based solver PowerFLOW R . Computed mean and standard deviation of velocity profiles generated by a family of fluidic actuators in quiescent air are compared with experimental data. Simulated results replicate the experimentally observed trends with parametric variation of geometry and inflow conditions.

  1. Insulin transport across capillaries is rate limiting for insulin action in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y J; Hope, I D; Ader, M; Bergman, R N

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between transcapillary insulin transport and insulin action in vivo. During euglycemic clamps (n = 7) in normal conscious dogs we simultaneously measured plasma and thoracic duct lymph insulin and glucose utilization (Rd). Clamps consisted of an activation phase with constant insulin infusion (0.6 mU/kg per min) and a deactivation phase. [14C]Inulin was infused as a passively transported control substance. While [14C]inulin reached an equilibrium between plasma and lymph, steady-state (ss) plasma insulin was higher than lymph (P less than 0.05) and the ratio of 3:2 was maintained during basal, activation, and deactivation phases: 18 +/- 2 vs. 12 +/- 1, 51 +/- 2 vs. 32 +/- 1, and 18 +/- 3 vs. 13 +/- 1 microU/ml. In addition, it took longer for lymph insulin to reach ss than plasma insulin during activation and deactivation: 11 +/- 2 vs. 31 +/- 5 and 8 +/- 2 vs. 32 +/- 6 min (P less than 0.02). Rd increased from 2.6 +/- 0.1 to a ss of 6.6 +/- 0.4 mg/kg per min within 50 +/- 8 min. There was a remarkable similarity in the dynamics of insulin in lymph and Rd: the time to reach ss for Rd was not different from lymph insulin (P greater than 0.1), and the relative increases of the two measurements were similar, 164 +/- 45% and 189 +/- 29% (P greater than 0.05). While there was only a modest correlation (r = 0.78, P less than 0.01) between Rd and plasma insulin, the dynamic changes of lymph insulin and Rd showed a strong correlation (r = 0.95, P less than 0.01). The intimate relationship between lymph insulin and Rd suggests that the transcapillary insulin transport is primarily responsible for the delay in Rd. Thus, transcapillary transport may be rate limiting for insulin action, and if altered, it could be an important component of insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes mellitus. PMID:2681272

  2. Kinetic Mechanism and Rate-Limiting Steps of Focal Adhesion Kinase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, Jessica L.; Briand, Jacques; Chen, Stephanie; Lehr, Ruth; McDevitt, Patrick; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Concha, Nestor; Oza, Khyati; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yan, Kang; Villa, James P.; Meek, Thomas D.; Thrall, Sara H.

    2010-12-07

    structural data it may be concluded that enzyme turnover (k{sub cat}) is rate-limited by both reversible phosphoryl group transfer (k{sub forward} {approx} 0.2 s{sup -1} and k{sub reverse} {approx} 0.04 s{sup -1}) and a slow step (k{sub conf} {approx} 0.1 s{sup -1}) which is probably the opening of the activation loop after phosphoryl group transfer but preceding product release.

  3. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  4. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  5. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  6. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  7. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  8. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  9. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  10. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  11. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  12. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  13. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  14. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  15. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  16. 40 CFR 227.8 - Limitations on the disposal rates of toxic wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS... acceptable for ocean dumping unless such wastes can be dumped so as not to exceed the limiting...

  17. Quasi-Static Analysis of LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  18. OBSERVATIONAL LIMITS ON TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACCRETION RATE IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared; Kelly, Brandon C.; Elvis, Martin; Hao Heng; Huchra, John P.; Merloni, Andrea; Bongiorno, Angela; Brusa, Marcella; Cappelluti, Nico; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Koekemoer, Anton; Nagao, Tohru; Salvato, Mara; Scoville, Nick Z.

    2009-07-20

    We present black hole masses and accretion rates for 182 Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in COSMOS. We estimate masses using the scaling relations for the broad H {beta}, Mg II, and C IV emission lines in the redshift ranges 0.16 < z < 0.88, 1 < z < 2.4, and 2.7 < z < 4.9. We estimate the accretion rate using an Eddington ratio L{sub I}/L{sub Edd} estimated from optical and X-ray data. We find that very few Type 1 AGNs accrete below L{sub I} /L{sub Edd} {approx} 0.01, despite simulations of synthetic spectra which show that the survey is sensitive to such Type 1 AGNs. At lower accretion rates the broad-line region may become obscured, diluted, or nonexistent. We find evidence that Type 1 AGNs at higher accretion rates have higher optical luminosities, as more of their emission comes from the cool (optical) accretion disk with respect to shorter wavelengths. We measure a larger range in accretion rate than previous works, suggesting that COSMOS is more efficient at finding low accretion rate Type 1 AGNs. However, the measured range in accretion rate is still comparable to the intrinsic scatter from the scaling relations, suggesting that Type 1 AGNs accrete at a narrow range of Eddington ratio, with L{sub I} /L{sub Edd} {approx} 0.1.

  19. Growth rates, grazing, sinking, and iron limitation of equatorial Pacific phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, F.P.; Buck, K.R. ); Coale, K.H.; Martin, J.H.; DiTullio, G.R.; Welschmeyer, N.A. ); Barber, R.T. ); Jacobson, A.C.

    1991-12-01

    Concentrations of phytoplankton and NO{sub 3} are consistently low and high in surface waters of the oceanic eastern and central equatorial Pacific, and phytoplankton populations are dominated by small solitary phytoplankton. Growth rates of natural phytoplankton populations, needed to assess the relative importance of many of the processes considered in the equatorial Pacific, were estimated by several methods. The growth rates of natural phytoplankton populations were found to be {approximately}0.7 d{sup {minus}1} or 1 biomass doubling d{sup {minus}1} and were similar for all methods. To keep this system in its observed balance requires that loss rates approximate observed growth rates. Grazing rates, measured with a dilution grazing experiment, were high, accounting for a large fraction of the daily production. Additions of various forms of Fe to 5-7-d incubations utilizing ultraclean techniques resulted in significant shifts in autotrophic and heterotrophic assemblages between initial samples, controls, and Fe enrichments, which were presumably due to Fe, grazing by both protistan and metazoan components, and incubation artifacts. Estimated growth rates of small pennate diatoms showed increases in Fe enrichments with respect to controls. The growth rates of the pennate diatoms were similar to those estimated for the larger size fraction of the natural populations.

  20. Exciton formation as a rate limiting step for charge recombination in disordered organic molecules or polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Preezant, Yevgeni; Tessler, Nir

    2011-01-01

    The exciton formation (direct charge recombination) is studied and quantified as a function of material physical-properties such as the exciton binding energy, the exciton lifetime, and the mechanism causing the electronic disorder. By using a model that is an extension of a charge transport model [Y. Preezant and N. Tessler, Phys. Rev. B 74, 235202 (2006)] we are able to compare the direct exciton formation rate with the one predicted by the Langevin model. Using reasonable material parameters we find that in many cases the overall balance between free charge carrier and excitons is significantly affected by the exciton formation rate with its values being significantly low compared to the Langevin rate. We also find that in order to describe the complete recombination process it is important to introduce an intermediate state which we term exciton-precursor. This is in contrast to the common practice of using the Langevin model which embeds the assumption that the exciton formation rate is negligibly fast. The relations found between the physical-properties and the recombination rate can explain why certain materials exhibit Langevin rate while others exhibit significantly suppressed rates. This would eventually lead to the design of new materials better suited for either photocells or light-emitting diodes.

  1. Miniature osmotic actuators for controlled maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Hsien; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2010-06-01

    We have successfully demonstrated miniature actuators that are capable of converting chemical potential directly into steady mechanical movements for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis. Pistons and diaphragms powered by osmosis are employed to provide the desired linear and volumetric displacements for bone distraction and potentially the release of bone morphogenetic proteins, respectively. The cylindrical-shaped miniature actuators are composed of polymeric materials and fabricated by molding and assembly processes. In the prototype demonstration, vapor-permeable thermoplastic polyurethane was employed as the semi-permeable material. 3 cm long actuators with piston and diaphragm radii of 1 mm and 500 µm, respectively, were fabricated and characterized. The maximum distraction force from the piston-type actuator is found to be 6 N while the piston travels at a constant velocity of 32 µm h-1 (or 0.77 mm/day) for about 1 week. Meanwhile, the release rate from the diaphragm-type actuator is measured to be constant, 0.15 µl h-1 (or 3.6 µl/day), throughout the experiment. Moreover, the sizes and output characteristics of the self-regulating actuators could readily be tailored to realize optimal distraction rate, rhythm and osteogenic activity. As such, the demonstrated miniature osmotic actuators could potentially serve as versatile apparatuses for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis and fulfill the needs of a variety of implantable and biomedical applications.

  2. A novel lightweight piezo-composite actuator micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Goo, Nam Seo; Yoon, Young Soo; Yoon, Kwang Joon

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we focus on improving the performance of the piezoelectric diaphragms of micropumps. A novel circular lightweight piezoelectric composite actuator (LIPCA) with a high level of displacement and output force has been developed for piezoelectrically actuated micropumps. The actuator was designed and fabricated with oxide-based piezoelectric material in combination with carbon/epoxy fabric and glass/epoxy fabric. We used numerical and experimental methods to analyze the characteristics of the actuator. In addition, we used the developed circular LIPCA in conjunction with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material and PDMS molding techniques to design, model and fabricate a valveless micropump. We then used a circular LIPCA bonded to a thin layer of PDMS as an actuator diaphragm. The actuator diaphragm can provide a comparatively high level of displacement, about twice that of conventional piezoelectric diaphragms that are commonly used in micropumps. The displacement of the diaphragm, the flow rate and the backpressure of the micropump were evaluated and discussed. With water, the pump reaches a maximum flow rate of 1.3 ml/min and a maximum backpressure of 4.1 kPa. The test results confirm that the circular LIPCA is a promising candidate for micropump application and can be used as a substitute for a conventional piezoelectric actuator diaphragm.

  3. R/D task plan: Response of fish to different simulated temperature rate limits

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the program is to determine the maximum temperature rate increase that can be tolerated by fish without loss of the ability to escape rising water temperatures. These data will form the basis for recommended power ascension rates during reactor restart. Activities required to meet the program objective include the task of simulating a range of possible temperature rate increases in the laboratory and analyzing the response of fish in an experimental environment. In addition to the primary task, scoping activities will be conducted to evaluate laboratory process control equipment, behavioral data collection equipment, and collect specific behavioral energetics data. 2 refs.

  4. Field emission microplasma actuation for microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashank Tholeti, Siva; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2016-06-01

    Microplasmas offer attractive flow control methodology for gas transport in microsystems where large viscous losses make conventional pumping methods highly inefficient. We study microscale flow actuation by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) with field emission (FE) of electrons, which allows lowering the operational voltage from kV to a few hundred volts and below. A feasibility study of FE-DBD for flow actuation is performed using 2D particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) at 10 MHz in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The free diffusion dominated, high velocity field emission electrons create a large positive space charge and a body force on the order of 106 N m‑3. The body force and Joule heat decrease with increase in dielectric thickness and electrode thickness. The body force also decreases at lower pressures. The plasma body force distribution along with the Joule heating is then used in the Navier–Stokes simulations to quantify the flow actuation in a microchannel. Theoretical analysis and simulations for plasma actuated planar Poiseuille flow show that the gain in flow rate is inversely proportional to Reynolds number. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with the simulations for a microchannel with closely placed actuators under incompressible conditions. Flow rate of FE-DBD driven 2D microchannel is around 100 ml min‑1 mm‑1 for an input power of 64 μW mm‑1. The gas temperature rises by 1500 K due to the Joule heating, indicating FE-DBD’s potential for microcombustion, micropropulsion and chemical sensing in addition to microscale pumping and mixing applications.

  5. 12 CFR 226.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Workout and temporary hardship arrangement exception. A card issuer may increase an annual percentage rate... to the consumer's completion of a workout or temporary hardship arrangement or the consumer's...

  6. Upper-limit mutation rate estimation for a plant RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Elena, Santiago F.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that mutation rates of RNA viruses are inherently high due to the lack of proofreading mechanisms. However, direct estimates of mutation rate are surprisingly scarce, in particular for plant viruses. Here, based on the analysis of in vivo mutation frequencies in tobacco etch virus, we calculate an upper-bound mutation rate estimation of 3×10−5 per site and per round of replication; a value which turns out to be undistinguishable from the methodological error. Nonetheless, the value is barely on the lower side of the range accepted for RNA viruses, although in good agreement with the only direct estimate obtained for other plant viruses. These observations suggest that, perhaps, differences in the selective pressures operating during plant virus evolution may have driven their mutation rates towards values lower than those characteristic of other RNA viruses infecting bacteria or animals. PMID:19324646

  7. Is the Oort A-value a universal growth rate limit for accretion disk shear instabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Hawley, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A weak-field local MHD instability that is of importance to accretion disks is examined. The maximum growth rate of the instability is found to be not only independent of the magnetic field strength but independent of field geometry as well. In particular, all Keplerian disks are unstable in the presence of any weak poloidal field, with the ratio of the maximum growth rate to disk angular velocity given by 3/4. The maximum growth rate of any weak field configuration that is not purely toroidal is given by the local Oort A-value of the disk. The behavior is studied by using a form of the dynamical Hill equations. It is conjectured that the Oort A-value is an upper bound to the growth rate of any instability feeding upon the free energy of differential rotation.

  8. 48 CFR 652.228-74 - Defense Base Act insurance rates-Limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Department of State covered contractor employees at a contracted rate. For the purposes of this provision... covered contractor employees and the cost of the DBA insurance in their bid/offer using the foregoing...

  9. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  10. Modeling Piezoelectric Stack Actuators for Control of Micromanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, Michael; Celanovic, Nikola

    1997-01-01

    A nonlinear lumped-parameter model of a piezoelectric stack actuator has been developed to describe actuator behavior for purposes of control system analysis and design, and, in particular, for microrobotic applications requiring accurate position and/or force control. In formulating this model, the authors propose a generalized Maxwell resistive capacitor as a lumped-parameter causal representation of rate-independent hysteresis. Model formulation is validated by comparing results of numerical simulations to experimental data. Validation is followed by a discussion of model implications for purposes of actuator control.

  11. Investigation of Creep Properties in RAINBOW High Displacement Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Furman, Eugene; Li, Guang; Barron, Bret; Moon, Youngwoo

    1997-01-01

    Results from this study on fatigue in Rainbow and Cerambow actuators show that these high displacement actuators have definite fatigue rates and lifetimes depending upon (1) the amount of displacement generated, (2) how hard they are driven electrically, and (3) the microstructure (grain size) of the ceramic material. Lifetimes for some actuators were on the order of 10(exp 7) cycles at near dc (1 Hz) frequencies while others still retained up to 74% of their displacement at 2.1 x 10(exp 7) Hz.

  12. 40 HP Electro-Mechanical Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulmer, Chris

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 40 BP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract NAS3-25799 for the NASA National Launch System and Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Programs. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELA's for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, high frequency power source, drive electronics and a linear actuator. The power source is a 25kVA 20 kHz Mapham inverter. The drive electronics are based on the pulse population modulation concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 40 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response and step response tests were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  13. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-06-06

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

  14. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-11-13

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

  15. Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

  16. Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-11-13

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

  17. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  18. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  19. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  20. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  1. Challenges and New Trends for Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2008-01-01

    BiScO3-PbTiO3 ceramics with TC greater than 400 C has been successfully processed. Despite the increase in TC, excess Pb addition increases both the bulk conductivity and the grain boundary contribution to conductivity at elevated temperatures. Conductivity at elevated temperatures, that limits the operating temperature for actuators, has been greatly reduced by excess Bi additions. Excess Bi doping improves poling conditions resulting in enhanced piezoelectric coefficient (d(sub 33) = 408 pC/N).

  2. 12 CFR 226.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End Credit Offered to College Students § 226.55 Limitations on... required to be disclosed under § 226.6(b)(2)(ii), (b)(2)(iii), or (b)(2)(xii) on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan. (b) Exceptions. A card issuer may increase...

  3. 12 CFR 226.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End Credit Offered to College Students § 226.55 Limitations on... required to be disclosed under § 226.6(b)(2)(ii), (b)(2)(iii), or (b)(2)(xii) on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan. (b) Exceptions. A card issuer may increase...

  4. Pregnancy limits lung function during exercise and depresses metabolic rate in the skink Tiliqua nigrolutea.

    PubMed

    Munns, Suzanne L; Edwards, Ashley; Nicol, Stewart; Frappell, Peter B

    2015-03-01

    High gestational loads have been associated with a range of ecological costs, such as decreased locomotor ability; however, the physiological mechanisms that underpin these changes are poorly understood. In this study, breathing patterns, metabolic rates, lung volume and lung diffusing capacity were measured at rest and during exercise in the pregnant skink Tiliqua nigrolutea. Breathing patterns were largely unaffected by gestation; however, decreases in metabolic rate (rate of oxygen consumption) in the late stages of pregnancy induced a relative hyperventilation. The reductions in metabolic rate during late pregnancy prevent the calculation of the maintenance cost of pregnancy based on post-partum and neonatal metabolic rates. Despite the high relative litter mass of 38.9±5.3%, lung diffusing capacity was maintained during all stages of pregnancy, suggesting that alterations in diffusion at the alveolar capillary membrane were not responsible for the relative hyperventilation. Lung volume was increased during pregnancy compared with non-pregnant females, but lung volume was significantly lower during pregnancy compared with post-partum lung volume. Pregnant females were unable to produce the same metabolic and ventilatory changes induced by exercise in non-pregnant females. This lack of ability to respond to increased respiratory drive during exercise may underpin the locomotor impairment measured during gestation in previous studies. PMID:25788728

  5. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: Potential rate limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate-limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from 7 healthy exclusively breastfe...

  6. Assessing the effect of grain-scale sorption rate limitations on the fate of hydrophobic organic groundwater pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Sabatini, David A.

    2012-03-01

    Subsurface pollutant transport models accounting for sorption rate limitations are computationally more demanding than those assuming local sorption equilibrium. We combine batch and column tests with modeling for a comparative assessment of different sorption models. For the relatively hydrophobic compound naphthalene, a model assuming local sorption equilibrium was unable to reproduce breakthrough curves in column studies with Canadian River Alluvium sediment which contains carbonaceous particles. Fully calibrated independent forward predictions of a first-order kinetic and two diffusion kinetic sorption models were in much better agreement with the experimental data. Predictions using a diffusion-limited kinetic sorption model assuming concentration-independent sorption coefficients performed equally well as a model using the Freundlich isotherm. Both diffusion-based kinetic sorption models were superior to the first-order rate approach. In the present study, the validity of the local sorption equilibrium assumption is discussed based on a Damköhler number and thus, the compound's sorption properties, the aquifer properties, and the scale of the process. Relatively high groundwater velocities in combination with a low sorption coefficient Kd and slow diffusion limited sorption kinetic rates are necessary conditions to justify the implementation of grain-scale sorption rate limitations in groundwater contaminant fate models. Such conditions exist when a low amount of carbonaceous particles is present in aquifers with high permeability.

  7. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  8. Research Trends of Soft Actuators based on Electroactive Polymers and Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneto, K.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial muscles (or soft actuators) based on electroactive polymers (EAPs) are attractive power sources to drive human-like robots in place of electrical motor, because they are quiet, powerful, light weight and compact. Among EAPs for soft actuators, conducting polymers are superior in strain, stress, deformation form and driving voltage compared with the other EAPs. In this paper, the research trends of EAPs and conducting polymers are reviewed by retrieval of the papers and patents. The research activity of EAP actuators showed the maximum around 2010 and somehow declining now days. The reasons for the reducing activity are found to be partly due to problems of conducting polymer actuators for the practical application. The unique characteristics of conducting polymer actuators are mentioned in terms of the basic mechanisms of actuation, creeping, training effect and shape retention under high tensile loads. The issues and limitation of conducting polymer soft actuators are discussed.

  9. Test Cases for Modeling and Validation of Structures with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    2001-01-01

    A set of benchmark test articles were developed to validate techniques for modeling structures containing piezoelectric actuators using commercially available finite element analysis packages. The paper presents the development, modeling, and testing of two structures: an aluminum plate with surface mounted patch actuators and a composite box beam with surface mounted actuators. Three approaches for modeling structures containing piezoelectric actuators using the commercially available packages: MSC/NASTRAN and ANSYS are presented. The approaches, applications, and limitations are discussed. Data for both test articles are compared in terms of frequency response functions from deflection and strain data to input voltage to the actuator. Frequency response function results using the three different analysis approaches provided comparable test/analysis results. It is shown that global versus local behavior of the analytical model and test article must be considered when comparing different approaches. Also, improper bonding of actuators greatly reduces the electrical to mechanical effectiveness of the actuators producing anti-resonance errors.

  10. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    Lofgren (1989) and the further analysis of Lofgren's 1989 experiments by Jones and Lofgren (1993) established that cooling rates as slow as 5 C/hour produced analog textures and major and minor element zoning profiles in minerals, implying that a lower limit on chondrule cooling rate may be approximately 5 C/hour These results, however, are in conflict with those reported by Radomsky and Hewins (1990). In their paper, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) established a lower limit on chondrule cooling rates of I 100 C/hour a factor of 20 higher than that suggested by Jones and Lofgren (1993). The higher cooling rates suggested by Radomsky and Hewins (1990) have gained considerable favor within the meteoritic community largely because it appears more consistent with the preservation of Na in chondrules, which tends to volatilize at the slower cooling rates. In their study, however, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) did not use Pt hang wires that were coated or saturated with Fe. The lack of such techniques likely facilitated Fe loss from their experimental chondrules to the hang wire during formation (Jones and Lofgren, 1993). The effect of Fe loss could produce an inaccurate determination of cooling rates since these rates are largely determined by the Mg-Fe distributions in individual crystals.

  11. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-01-01

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms. PMID:25253019

  12. Biodegradable and edible gelatine actuators for use as artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. D.; Winfield, J.; Ieropoulos, I.; Rossiter, J.

    2014-03-01

    The expense and use of non-recyclable materials often requires the retrieval and recovery of exploratory robots. Therefore, conventional materials such as plastics and metals in robotics can be limiting. For applications such as environmental monitoring, a fully biodegradable or edible robot may provide the optimum solution. Materials that provide power and actuation as well as biodegradability provide a compelling dimension to future robotic systems. To highlight the potential of novel biodegradable and edible materials as artificial muscles, the actuation of a biodegradable hydrogel was investigated. The fabricated gelatine based polymer gel was inexpensive, easy to handle, biodegradable and edible. The electro-mechanical performance was assessed using two contactless, parallel stainless steel electrodes immersed in 0.1M NaOH solution and fixed 40 mm apart with the strip actuator pinned directly between the electrodes. The actuation displacement in response to a bias voltage was measured over hydration/de-hydration cycles. Long term (11 days) and short term (1 hour) investigations demonstrated the bending behaviour of the swollen material in response to an electric field. Actuation voltage was low (<10 V) resulting in a slow actuation response with large displacement angles (<55 degrees). The stability of the immersed material decreased within the first hour due to swelling, however, was recovered on de-hydrating between actuations. The controlled degradation of biodegradable and edible artificial muscles could help to drive the development of environmentally friendly robotics.

  13. Bio-inspired wooden actuators for large scale applications.

    PubMed

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules. PMID:25835386

  14. Bio-Inspired Wooden Actuators for Large Scale Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules. PMID:25835386

  15. Solar-wind tritium limit and the mixing rate of the solar atmosphere. [from recovered Surveyor 3 parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium has been measured, in Surveyor 3 samples, some of which were adjacent to those in which solar-wind-implanted He-4 had previously been measured. Little of the H-3 can be attributed to solar-wind implantation. The upper limit for the H-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind is four times ten to the minus tenth power and corresponds to a H-3/H-1 limit of two times ten to the minus eleventh power. This limit imposes a requirement on the mixing rate in the solar atmosphere if the H-3 production rate in solar-surface nuclear reactions is greater than 160 sq cm/sec.

  16. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  17. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  18. 12 CFR 1026.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Special Rules Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End...)(2)(iii), or (b)(2)(xii) on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan. (b) Exceptions. A card issuer may increase an annual percentage rate or a fee or...

  19. 12 CFR 1026.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Special Rules Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End...)(2)(iii), or (b)(2)(xii) on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan. (b) Exceptions. A card issuer may increase an annual percentage rate or a fee or...

  20. 12 CFR 1026.55 - Limitations on increasing annual percentage rates, fees, and charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Special Rules Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End...)(2)(iii), or (b)(2)(xii) on a credit card account under an open-end (not home-secured) consumer credit plan. (b) Exceptions. A card issuer may increase an annual percentage rate or a fee or...

  1. Capitalizing on the Dynamic Features of Excel to Consider Growth Rates and Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Daniel; Moore-Russo, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    It is common for both algebra and calculus instructors to use power functions of various degrees as well as exponential functions to examine and compare rates of growth. This can be done on a chalkboard, with a graphing calculator, or with a spreadsheet. Instructors often are careful to connect the symbolic and graphical (and occasionally the…

  2. Printing low-voltage dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of fully printed thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the operation voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation strain. DEAs are soft actuators capable of strains greater than 100% and response times below 1 ms, but they require driving voltage in the kV range, limiting the possible applications. One way to reduce the driving voltage of DEAs is to decrease the dielectric membrane thickness, which is typically in the 20-100 μm range, as reliable fabrication becomes challenging below this thickness. We report here the use of pad-printing to produce μm thick silicone membranes, on which we pad-print μm thick compliant electrodes to create DEAs. We achieve a lateral actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick pad-printed membrane. This corresponds to a ratio of 125%/kV2, by far the highest reported value for DEAs. To quantify the increasing stiffening impact of the electrodes on DEA performance as the membrane thickness decreases, we compare two circular actuators, one with 3 μm- and one with 30 μm-thick membranes. Our experimental measurements show that the strain uniformity of the 3 μm-DEA is indeed affected by the mechanical impact of the electrodes. We developed a simple DEA model that includes realistic electrodes of finite stiffness, rather than assuming zero stiffness electrodes as is commonly done. The simulation results confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes is an important parameter that should not be neglected in the design of thin-DEAs. This work presents a practical approach towards low-voltage DEAs, a critical step for the development of real world applications.

  3. Electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators for planetary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Leary, Sean P.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, J.

    1999-05-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper.

  4. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  5. Compact valve actuation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A valve actuation device. The device may include a free floating valve bridge movably supported within a cavity in the engine housing. The bridge may be provided with a cavity and an orifice arrangement for pumping gases entrained with lubricating fluid toward the piston stems as the bridge reciprocates back and forth. The device may also include a rocker arm that has a U-shaped cross-sectional shape for receiving at least a portion of the valve bridge, valve stem valve spring and spring retainer therein. The rocker arm may be provided with lubrication passages for directing lubrication to the point wherein it is pivotally affixed to the engine housing.

  6. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  7. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  8. Robotic Arm Actuated by Electroactie Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Xue, T.; Shaninpoor, M.; Simpson, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    Actuators are used for many planetary and space applications. To meet the NASA goal to reduce the actuators size, mass, cost and power consumption, electroactie polymers (EAP) are being developed to induce large bending and longitudinal actuation strains.

  9. Respiration and heart rate complexity: Effects of age and gender assessed by band-limited transfer entropy

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Shamim; Edwards, Bradley A.; Lee, Joon; Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Aging and disease are accompanied with a reduction of complex variability in the temporal patterns of heart rate. This reduction has been attributed to a break down of the underlying regulatory feedback mechanisms that maintain a homeodynamic state. Previous work has established the utility of entropy as an index of disorder, for quantification of changes in heart rate complexity. However, questions remain regarding the origin of heart rate complexity and the mechanisms involved in its reduction with aging and disease. In this work we use a newly developed technique based on the concept of band-limited transfer entropy to assess the aging-related changes in contribution of respiration and blood pressure to entropy of heart rate at different frequency bands. Noninvasive measurements of heart beat interval, respiration, and systolic blood pressure were recorded from 20 young (21–34 years) and 20 older (68–85 years) healthy adults. Band-limited transfer entropy analysis revealed a reduction in high-frequency contribution of respiration to heart rate complexity (p < 0.001) with normal aging, particularly in men. These results have the potential for dissecting the relative contributions of respiration and blood pressure-related reflexes to heart rate complexity and their degeneration with normal aging. PMID:23811194

  10. Quantum limits on optical phase estimation accuracy from classical rate-distortion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Ranjith

    2014-12-04

    The classical information-theoretic lower bound on the distortion of a random variable upon transmission through a noisy channel is applied to quantum-optical phase estimation. An approach for obtaining Bayesian lower bounds on the phase estimation accuracy is described that employs estimates of the classical capacity of the relevant quantum-optical channels. The Heisenberg limit for lossless phase estimation is derived for arbitrary probe state and prior distributions of the phase, and shot-noise scaling of the phase accuracy is established in the presence of nonzero loss for a parallel entanglement-assisted strategy with a single probe mode.

  11. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  12. Rate-limiting step analysis of the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene in a model oil system.

    PubMed

    Abin-Fuentes, Andres; Leung, James C; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Wang, Daniel I C; Prather, Kristala L J

    2014-05-01

    A mechanistic analysis of the various mass transport and kinetic steps in the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 in a model biphasic (oil-water), small-scale system was performed. The biocatalyst was distributed into three populations, free cells in the aqueous phase, cell aggregates and oil-adhered cells, and the fraction of cells in each population was measured. The power input per volume (P/V) and the impeller tip speed (vtip ) were identified as key operating parameters in determining whether the system is mass transport controlled or kinetically controlled. Oil-water DBT mass transport was found to not be limiting under the conditions tested. Experimental results at both the 100 mL and 4 L (bioreactor) scales suggest that agitation leading to P/V greater than 10,000 W/ m(3) and/or vtip greater than 0.67 m/s is sufficient to overcome the major mass transport limitation in the system, which was the diffusion of DBT within the biocatalyst aggregates. PMID:24284557

  13. Rate-limiting step analysis of the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene in a model oil system

    PubMed Central

    Abin-Fuentes, Andres; Leung, James C.; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Wang, Daniel IC; Prather, Kristala LJ

    2014-01-01

    A mechanistic analysis of the various mass transport and kinetic steps in the microbial desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) by Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8 in a model biphasic (oil-water), small-scale system was performed. The biocatalyst was distributed into three populations, free cells in the aqueous phase, cell aggregates and oil-adhered cells, and the fraction of cells in each population was measured. The power input per volume (P/V) and the impeller tip speed (vtip) were identified as key operating parameters in determining whether the system is mass transport controlled or kinetically controlled. Oil-water DBT mass transport was found to not be limiting under the conditions tested. Experimental results at both the 100 mL and 4L (bioreactor) scales suggest that agitation leading to P/V greater than 10,000 W/ m3 and/or vtip greater than 0.67 m/s is sufficient to overcome the major mass transport limitation in the system, which was the diffusion of DBT within the biocatalyst aggregates. PMID:24284557

  14. Implementation of a pressure and rate dependent Forming Limit Diagram model into NIKE and DYNA

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Thomas, D.B.; Young, G.K.

    1995-06-01

    The Forming Limit Diagram (FLD) has been used for decades as an aid to successful sheet metal forming. In this work, we describe the incorporation of the FLD technique into the DYNA and NIKE codes at LLNL along with applications that led to the developments. The algorithm is currently available in the public version of DYNA3D. Several augmentations of the basic technique have been made available due to the necessity of their incorporation to solve programmatic problems of interest at LLNL. Illustration of the use of the FLD model is shown for a dome geometry similar to that used in the Limiting Dome Height (LDH) test. This early example uses the simplest FLD option (analogous to circle grid) and shows the relative merits of this method versus scalar plastic work in prediction of tearing. In a phenomenological extension of the method, a pressure-dependent (FLD+P) method is used to successfully predict the relative design merits of stainless steel forgings. A final application to sheet stamping of a Boeing 757 door frame shows how the scatter plot circle grid option and strain path plots can be used to predict when preforms and intermediate anneals are necessary. The phenomenological nature of the FLD model as implemented is discussed relative to alternative approaches of calculating the FLD and its path dependence.

  15. Disk-to-disk transfer as the rate-limiting step for energy flow in phycobilisomes

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N.; Yeh, S.W.; Webb, S.P.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-25

    A broadly tunable picosecond laser source and an ultrafast streak camera were used to measure temporally and spectrally resolved emission from intact phycobilisomes and from individual phycobiliproteins as a function of excitation wavelength. Both wild-type and mutant phycobilisomes of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6701 were examined, as well as two biliproteins, R-phycoerythrin (240 kilodaltons, 34 bilins) and allophycocyanin (100 kilodaltons, 6 bilins). Measurements of intact phycobilisomes with known structural differences showed that the addition of an average of 1.6 phycoerythrin disks in the phycobilisome rod increased the overall energy transfer time by 30 +/- 5 picoseconds. In the isolated phycobiliproteins the onset of emission was as prompt as that of a solution of rhodamine B laser dye and was independent of excitation wavelength. This imposes an upper limit of 8 picoseconds (instrument-limited) on the transfer time from sensitizing to fluorescing chromophores in these biliproteins. These results indicate that disk-to-disk transfer is the slowest energy transfer process in phycobilisomes and, in combination with previous structural analyses, show that with respect to energy transfer the lattice of approximately 625 light-harvesting chromophores in the Synechocystis 6701 wild-type phycobilisome functions as a linear five-point array.

  16. Global synchronization of complex dynamical networks through digital communication with limited data rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Wu; Bian, Tao; Xiao, Jiang-Wen; Wen, Changyun

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the global synchronization of complex dynamical network (CDN) under digital communication with limited bandwidth. To realize the digital communication, the so-called uniform-quantizer-sets are introduced to quantize the states of nodes, which are then encoded and decoded by newly designed encoders and decoders. To meet the requirement of the bandwidth constraint, a scaling function is utilized to guarantee the quantizers having bounded inputs and thus achieving bounded real-time quantization levels. Moreover, a new type of vector norm is introduced to simplify the expression of the bandwidth limit. Through mathematical induction, a sufficient condition is derived to ensure global synchronization of the CDNs. The lower bound on the sum of the real-time quantization levels is analyzed for different cases. Optimization method is employed to relax the requirements on the network topology and to determine the minimum of such lower bound for each case, respectively. Simulation examples are also presented to illustrate the established results. PMID:25706890

  17. Power Actuation and Switching Module Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene

    2006-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for use on future deep-space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems. All X2000 avionics components and modules are designed for use in centralized or distributed spacecraft architectures. The Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM) has been developed under the X2000 program. This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an ASIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development included two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs. It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Three-way majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper is a follow up to the one presented at he IECEC 2004 conference that will include the lessons learned and test results from the development.

  18. A new plasma-driven pulsed jet actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Jean-Paul; Acher, Gwenael; Lebedev, Anton; Benard, Nicolas; Moreau, Eric; Electro-Fluido Group Team

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control requires actuators with enough authority and high frequency response. Synthetic jets can have high frequency response but are rather limited in terms of authority providing the exit velocity is limited. Pressurized (flowing) jets have a very high potential in terms of authority particularly for high velocity flow control purposes. However, for most purposes, high frequency modulation (of order of several kHz) is required in order to excite most unstable modes and to operate in closed mode. Rapid mechanical valves are limited in terms of frequency (up to typically a few hundred of Hz). We develop a new generation of plasma-driven pulsation of flowing jet. The principle is to increase the temperature at the sonic throat through a plasma discharge located at the throat. The flow rate being proportional to the square root of the temperature for a perfect gas, for the same settling chamber pressure, the actuator flow rate can be varied. The frequency is then no limited by any mechanical constraint. A demonstrator has been tested with a 1mm sonic throat. The electric discharge is created by a 10 kV voltage applied between the anode and the throat acting as the cathode. Within these conditions, a 30% modulation of the flow rate can be obtained.

  19. An arm wrestling robot driven by dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Lochmatter, Patrick; Wissler, Michael

    2007-04-01

    The first arm wrestling match between a human arm and a robotic arm driven by electroactive polymers (EAP) was held at the EAPAD conference in 2005. The primary objective was to demonstrate the potential of the EAP actuator technology for applications in the field of robotics and bioengineering. The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (Empa) was one of the three organizations participating in this competition. The robot presented by Empa was driven by a system of rolled dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. Based on the calculated stress condition in the rolled actuator, a low number of pre-strained DE film wrappings were found to be preferential for achieving the best actuator performance. Because of the limited space inside the robot body, more than 250 rolled actuators with small diameters were arranged in two groups according to the human agonist-antagonist muscle configuration in order to achieve an arm-like bidirectional rotation movement. The robot was powered by a computer-controlled high voltage amplifier. The rotary motion of the arm was activated and deactivated electrically by corresponding actuator groups. The entire development process of the robot is presented in this paper where the design of the DE actuators is of primary interest. Although the robot lost the arm wrestling contest against the human opponent, the DE actuators have demonstrated very promising performance as artificial muscles. The scientific knowledge gained during the development process of the robot has pointed out the challenges to be addressed for future improvement in the performance of rolled dielectric elastomer actuators.

  20. Evidence That the Pi Release Event Is the Rate-Limiting Step in the Nitrogenase Catalytic Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Ledbetter, Rhesa; Shaw, Sudipta; Pence, Natasha; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Eilers, Brian; Guo, Qingjuan; Pokhrel, Nilisha; Cash, Valerie L; Dean, Dennis R; Antony, Edwin; Bothner, Brian; Peters, John W; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogenase reduction of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3) involves a sequence of events that occur upon the transient association of the reduced Fe protein containing two ATP molecules with the MoFe protein that includes electron transfer, ATP hydrolysis, Pi release, and dissociation of the oxidized, ADP-containing Fe protein from the reduced MoFe protein. Numerous kinetic studies using the nonphysiological electron donor dithionite have suggested that the rate-limiting step in this reaction cycle is the dissociation of the Fe protein from the MoFe protein. Here, we have established the rate constants for each of the key steps in the catalytic cycle using the physiological reductant flavodoxin protein in its hydroquinone state. The findings indicate that with this reductant, the rate-limiting step in the reaction cycle is not protein-protein dissociation or reduction of the oxidized Fe protein, but rather events associated with the Pi release step. Further, it is demonstrated that (i) Fe protein transfers only one electron to MoFe protein in each Fe protein cycle coupled with hydrolysis of two ATP molecules, (ii) the oxidized Fe protein is not reduced when bound to MoFe protein, and (iii) the Fe protein interacts with flavodoxin using the same binding interface that is used with the MoFe protein. These findings allow a revision of the rate-limiting step in the nitrogenase Fe protein cycle. PMID:27295169

  1. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone Due to a Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper, I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  2. Microbial Factors Rather Than Bioavailability Limit the Rate and Extent of PAH Biodegradation in Aged Crude Oil Contaminated Model Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.

    2002-08-01

    The rate and extent of PAH biodegradation in a set of aged, crude oil contaminated model soils were measured in 90-week slurry bioremediation experiments. Soil properties such as organic matter content, mineral type, particle diameter, surface area, and porosity did not significantly influence the PAH biodegradation kinetics among the ten different model soils. A comparison of aged and freshly spiked soils indicates that aging affects the biodegradation rates and extents only for higher molecular weight PAHs while the effects of aging are insignificant for 3-ring PAHs and total PAHs. In all model soils with the exception of kaolinite clay, the rate of abiotic desorption was faster than the rate of biodegradation during the initial phase of bioremediation treatment indicating that PAH biodegradation was limited by microbial factors. Similarly, any of the higher molecular weight PAHs that were still present after 90 weeks of treatment were released rapidly during abiotic desorption tests which demonstrates that bioavailability limitations were not responsible for the recalcitrance of these hydrocarbons. Indeed, an analysis of microbial counts indicates that a severe reduction in hydrocarbon degrader populations may be responsible for the observed incomplete PAH biodegradation. It can therefore be concluded that the recalcitrance of PAHs during bioremediation is not necessarily due to bioavailability limitations and that these residual contaminants might, therefore, pose a greater risk to environmental receptors than previously thought.

  3. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  4. GTPase acceleration as the rate-limiting step in Arabidopsis G protein-coupled sugar signaling.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Taylor, J Philip; Gao, Yajun; Kimple, Adam J; Grigston, Jeffrey C; Chen, Jin-Gui; Siderovski, David P; Jones, Alan M; Willard, Francis S

    2007-10-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is important for cell-proliferative and glucose-sensing signal transduction pathways in the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRGS1 is a seven-transmembrane, RGS domain-containing protein that is a putative membrane receptor for d-glucose. Here we show, by using FRET, that d-glucose alters the interaction between the AtGPA1 and AtRGS1 in vivo. AtGPA1 is a unique heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit that is constitutively GTP-bound given its high spontaneous nucleotide exchange coupled with slow GTP hydrolysis. Analysis of a point mutation in AtRGS1 that abrogates GTPase-accelerating activity demonstrates that the regulation of AtGPA1 GTP hydrolysis mediates sugar signal transduction during Arabidopsis development, in contrast to animals where nucleotide exchange is the limiting step in the heterotrimeric G protein nucleotide cycle. PMID:17951432

  5. Optical limiting of high-repetition-rate laser pulses by carbon nanofibers suspended in polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videnichev, Dmitry A.; Belousova, Inna M.

    2014-06-01

    The optical limiting (OL) behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was studied and compared with that of CNFs in water, and polyhedral multi-shell fullerene-like nanostructures (PMFNs) also in water. It was shown that when switching from single-shot to pulse-periodic regime of laser pulses (10 Hz), the CNF in PDMS suspension retains its OL characteristics, while in the aqueous suspensions, considerable degradation of OL characteristics is observed. It was also observed that a powerful laser pulse causes the CNF in PDMS suspension to become opaque for at least three seconds, while such a pulse brings out a bleaching effect in aqueous PMFN and CNF suspensions. The processes of OL degradation in aqueous suspensions, bleaching and darkening of the studied materials are discussed herein.

  6. Development of an acoustic actuator for launch vehicle noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Benjamin K; Lane, Steven A; Gussy, Joel; Griffin, Steve; Farinholt, Kevin M

    2002-01-01

    In many active noise control applications, it is necessary that acoustic actuators be mounted in small enclosures due to volume constraints and in order to remain unobtrusive. However, the air spring of the enclosure is detrimental to the low-frequency performance of the actuator. For launch vehicle noise control applications, mass and volume constraints are very limiting, but the low-frequency performance of the actuator is critical. This work presents a novel approach that uses a nonlinear buckling suspension system and partial evacuation of the air within the enclosure to yield a compact, sealed acoustic driver that exhibits a very low natural frequency. Linear models of the device are presented and numerical simulations are given to illustrate the advantages of this design concept. An experimental prototype was built and measurements indicate that this design can significantly improve the low-frequency response of compact acoustic actuators. PMID:11831792

  7. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for active flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are limited to relatively low speed flows and atmospheric conditions. This results in low feasibility of the DBDs for aerospace applications. For active flow control at turbine blades, fixed wings, and rotary wings and on hypersonic vehicles, DBD plasma actuators must perform at a wide range of conditions, including rarified flows and combustion mixtures. An efficient, comprehensive, physically based DBD simulation tool can optimize DBD plasma actuators for different operation conditions. Researchers are developing a DBD plasma actuator simulation tool for a wide range of ambient gas pressures. The tool will treat DBD using either kinetic, fluid, or hybrid models, depending on the DBD operational condition.

  8. Actuation of shape-memory colloidal fibres of Janus ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Aayush A.; Schultz, Benjamin; Zhang, Wenjia; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Many natural micrometre-scale assemblies can be actuated to control their optical, transport and mechanical properties, yet such functionality is lacking in colloidal structures synthesized thus far. Here, we show with experiments and computer simulations that Janus ellipsoids can self-assemble into self-limiting one-dimensional fibres with shape-memory properties, and that the fibrillar assemblies can be actuated on application of an external alternating-current electric field. Actuation of the fibres occurs through a sliding mechanism that permits the rapid and reversible elongation and contraction of the Janus-ellipsoid chains by ~36% and that on long timescales leads to the generation of long, uniform self-assembled fibres. Colloidal-scale actuation might be useful in microrobotics and in applications of shape-memory materials.

  9. Influence of methanol/sorbitol co-feeding rate on pAOX1 induction in a Pichia pastoris Mut+ strain in bioreactor with limited oxygen transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Carly, F; Niu, H; Delvigne, F; Fickers, P

    2016-04-01

    High Pichia pastoris biomass density could be obtained using high co-feeding rate of methanol and sorbitol in a fed-batch or continuous culture, while further higher feeding rate finally leads to oxygen limitation in bioreactor. In the literature, there is lack of report about AOX1 promoter regulation with regard to dissolved oxygen level (DO). Therefore, in this work, chemostat cultures were performed to investigate the cell growth, metabolism and regulation of the AOX1 promoter (pAOX1) regarding co-feeding rate of optimized methanol/sorbitol mixture (methanol fraction 0.60 C-mol/C-mol) using a P. pastoris Mut+/pAOX1-lacZ strain. The oxygen transfer rates (OTR) in bioreactor were kept in the range of typical values of large bioreactor, i.e., 4-8 g/(L h) if DO equals 30 % saturation or 5-10 g/(L h) if DO nears zero. For DO >0, an increase of the carbon fed led to an increase of pAOX1 induction. By contrast, when dissolved oxygen was completely depleted, methanol accumulated, causing a 30 % decrease of pAOX1 induction. However, this decrease is more likely to be lined to methanol accumulation than to low level of dissolved oxygen (<4 % DO). Methanol/sorbitol co-feeding allowed cells to adapt to oxygen transient limitations that often occur at industrial scale with reduced effect on pAOX1 induction. The optimal feeding rate tested here was 6.6 mmol C (DCW h)(-1) at an OTR of 8.28 g O2(L h)(-1) with over fivefold pAOX1 induction (probably directly associated with target protein productivity) compared with previous work. PMID:26790417

  10. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  11. Robotic insects: Manufacturing, actuation, and power considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Robert

    2015-12-01

    As the characteristic size of a flying robot decreases, the challenges for successful flight revert to basic questions of fabrication, actuation, fluid mechanics, stabilization, and power - whereas such questions have in general been answered for larger aircraft. When developing a robot on the scale of a housefly, all hardware must be developed from scratch as there is nothing "off-the-shelf" which can be used for mechanisms, sensors, or computation that would satisfy the extreme mass and power limitations. With these challenges in mind, this talk will present progress in the essential technologies for insect-like robots with an emphasis on multi-scale manufacturing methods, high power density actuation, and energy-efficient power distribution.

  12. Asymmetric-hysteresis compensation in piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Gorka; Janssens, Thierry; Van Brussel, Hendrik; Al-Bender, Farid

    2012-07-01

    The advantages of using piezoelectric actuators in ultra-precision applications are often impaired by nonlinear effects, in particular hysteresis, which may lead to positioning uncertainties of up to 15% of the actuator's stroke. Model-based compensation strategies are often prescribed in order to overcome this limitation and achieve better dynamical accuracy. This comes, however, at the expense of increasing identification and implementation complexity, especially when hysteresis is of the asymmetric type, such as prevalent in hard piezoceramic materials. This paper proposes a new compensation strategy based upon (i) treating hysteresis as being separate from other dynamical effects and (ii) formulating a new, simplified model to deal with asymmetric hysteresis, based on applying a linear operator to the conventional hysteresis models. After developing the theoretical background of the compensation strategy, the accuracy improvement due to the new hysteresis-compensation method is demonstrated experimentally.

  13. Limiting options: Sex ratios, incarceration rates and sexual risk behavior among people on probation and parole

    PubMed Central

    Green, Traci C.; Pouget, Enrique R.; Harrington, Magdalena; Taxman, Faye S.; Rhodes, Anne G.; O’Connell, Daniel; Martin, Steven S.; Prendergast, Michael; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate how incarceration may affect risk of acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, we tested associations of ex-offenders’ sexual risk behavior with the male-female sex ratio and the male incarceration rate. Methods Longitudinal data from 1287 drug-involved persons on probation and parole as part of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies were matched by county of residence with population factors, and stratified by race/ethnicity and gender. Generalized estimating equations assessed associations of having unprotected sex with a partner who had HIV risk factors, and having more than 1 sex partner in the past month. Results Among non-Hispanic Black men and women, low sex ratios were associated with greater risk of having unprotected sex with a risky partner (Adjusted relative risk (ARR) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29, 2.42; ARR = 2.48, 95% CI = 1.31, 4.73, respectively). Among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White women, low sex ratios were associated with having more than 1 sex partner (ARR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.02, 3.94; ARR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.06, 2.75, respectively). High incarceration rates were associated with greater risk of having a risky partner for all men (non-Hispanic Black: ARR= 2.14, 95% CI=1.39, 3.30; non-Hispanic White: ARR= 1.39, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.85; Hispanic: ARR = 3.99, 95% CI =1.55, 10.26) and having more than one partner among non-Hispanic White men (ARR= 1.92, 95% CI = 1.40, 2.64). Conclusions Low sex ratios and high incarceration rates may influence the number and risk characteristics of sex partners of ex-offenders. HIV-prevention policies and programs for ex-offenders could be improved by addressing structural barriers to safer sexual behavior. PMID:22592827

  14. Perceptual and Cognitive Factors Imposing "Speed Limits" on Reading Rate: A Study with the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Primativo, Silvia; Spinelli, Donatella; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi; De Luca, Maria; Martelli, Marialuisa

    2016-01-01

    Adults read at high speed, but estimates of their reading rate vary greatly, i.e., from 100 to 1500 words per minute (wpm). This discrepancy is likely due to different recording methods and to the different perceptual and cognitive processes involved in specific test conditions. The present study investigated the origins of these notable differences in RSVP reading rate (RR). In six experiments we investigated the role of many different perceptual and cognitive variables. The presence of a mask caused a steep decline in reading rate, with an estimated masking cost of about 200 wpm. When the decoding process was isolated, RR approached values of 1200 wpm. When the number of stimuli exceeded the short-term memory span, RR decreased to 800 wpm. The semantic context contributed to reading speed only by a factor of 1.4. Finally, eye movements imposed an upper limit on RR (around 300 wpm). Overall, data indicate a speed limit of 300 wpm, which corresponds to the time needed for eye movement execution, i.e., the most time consuming mechanism. Results reconcile differences in reading rates reported by different laboratories and thus provide suggestions for targeting different components of reading rate. PMID:27088226

  15. Revealing rate-limiting steps in complex disease biology: The crucial importance of studying rare, extreme-phenotype families.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Aravinda; Turner, Tychele N

    2016-06-01

    The major challenge in complex disease genetics is to understand the fundamental features of this complexity and why functional alterations at multiple independent genes conspire to lead to an abnormal phenotype. We hypothesize that the various genes involved are all functionally united through gene regulatory networks (GRN), and that mutant phenotypes arise from the consequent perturbation of one or more rate-limiting steps that affect the function of the entire GRN. Understanding a complex phenotype thus entails unraveling the details of each GRN, namely, the transcription factors that bind to cis regulatory elements affected by sequence variants altering transcription of specific genes, and their mutual feedback relationships. These GRNs can be identified through their rate-limiting steps and are best uncovered by genomic analyses of rare, extreme phenotype families, thus providing a coherent molecular basis to complex traits and disorders. PMID:27062178

  16. Formation Rate-Limited Pharmacokinetics of Biologically Active Epoxy Transformers of Prodrug Treosulfan.

    PubMed

    Romański, Michał; Kasprzyk, Anna; Karbownik, Agnieszka; Szałek, Edyta; Główka, Franciszek K

    2016-05-01

    A prodrug treosulfan (TREO) is being evaluated in clinical trials as a myeloablative agent before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The active derivatives of TREO, monoepoxide (EBDM), and diepoxide (DEB) are formed in a pH-dependent nonenzymatic reaction. The aim of the study was to investigate pharmacokinetics of the TREO epoxy transformers in a rabbit model and explain the causes of low plasma concentrations of EBDM and DEB observed in patients receiving high-dose TREO before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. New Zealand white rabbits (n = 5 per cohort) received an intravenous infusion of TREO (group I), injection of DEB (group II), and injection of a solution containing EBDM (group III). When EBDM and DEB were administered to the rabbits, they underwent a very rapid elimination (half-life 0.069 and 0.046 h) associated with a high systemic clearance (10.0 and 14.0 L h(-1) kg(-1)). After administration of TREO, the t1/2 of EBDM was statistically equal to the t1/2 of the prodrug (1.6 h). To conclude, after administration of TREO, its epoxy transformers demonstrate a formation-limited elimination. Then EBDM and DEB have the same elimination half-life as TREO, but the levels of EBDM and DEB in the body, including plasma, are much lower than TREO on account of their inherently high clearance. PMID:27044946

  17. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.; Young, J.R.; Lu, An

    1993-08-01

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  18. Diffusion Rate Limitations in Actin-Based Propulsion of Hard and Deformable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Richard B.; Purich, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism by which actin polymerization propels intracellular vesicles and invasive microorganisms remains an open question. Several recent quantitative studies have examined propulsion of biomimetic particles such as polystyrene microspheres, phospholipid vesicles, and oil droplets. In addition to allowing quantitative measurement of parameters such as the dependence of particle speed on its size, these systems have also revealed characteristic behaviors such a saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory deformation of soft particles. Such measurements and observations provide tests for proposed mechanisms of actin-based motility. In the actoclampin filament end-tracking motor model, particle-surface-bound filament end-tracking proteins are involved in load-insensitive processive insertion of actin subunits onto elongating filament plus-ends that are persistently tethered to the surface. In contrast, the tethered-ratchet model assumes working filaments are untethered and the free-ended filaments grow as thermal ratchets in a load-sensitive manner. This article presents a model for the diffusion and consumption of actin monomers during actin-based particle propulsion to predict the monomer concentration field around motile particles. The results suggest that the various behaviors of biomimetic particles, including dynamic saltatory motion of hard particles and oscillatory vesicle deformations, can be quantitatively and self-consistently explained by load-insensitive, diffusion-limited elongation of (+)-end-tethered actin filaments, consistent with predictions of the actoclampin filament-end tracking mechanism. PMID:16731556

  19. Rewetting Rate of Dry Rhizosphere Limited by Mucilage Viscosity and Mucilage Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, Stacey; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea; Kostka, Stanley

    2015-04-01

    During root water uptake from dry soils, the highly nonlinear relation between hydraulic conductivity and water content as well as the radial root geometry result in steep water potential gradients close to the root surface. The hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere - the interface between root and soil - are one of the most important and least understood components in controlling root water uptake. Previous research using young lupine plants revealed that after irrigation it took 1-2 days for the water content of the dry rhizosphere to increase. How can this delay be explained? Our hypotheses are that: a) mucilage - a polymeric plant exudate - alters rhizosphere hydraulic properties, b) its hydrophobic moieties make the rhizosphere water repellent when dry, c) mucilage is a highly viscous, gelatinous material, the dryer it gets the more viscous it becomes, d) mucilage viscosity reduces rhizosphere hydraulic conductivity. To test our hypotheses we used mucilage extracted from chia seed as an analogue for root mucilage. We measured: 1) the contact angle between water and pure dry and wet mucilage, dry soil treated with various concentrations of mucilage, 2) mucilage viscosity as function of concentration and shear rate, 3) saturated hydraulic conductivity as function of mucilage concentration, 4) swelling of dry mucilage in water. Finally, to mimic flow of water across the rhizosphere, we measured the capillary rise in soils treated with different mucilage concentrations. The results showed that: 1) dry mucilage has a contact angle > 90° while it loses its water repellency when it gets wet, 2) viscosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity can change several orders of magnitude with a small change in mucilage concentration, 3) 1g of dry mucilage absorbs 300g water in its fully swollen state, 4) the swelling rate of mucilage showed an exponential behavior with half time of 5 hours. Capillary rise became slower in soils with higher mucilage concentration, while the

  20. Rewetting Rate of Dry Rhizosphere Limited by Mucilage Viscosity and Mucilage Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, S.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.; Kostka, S.

    2014-12-01

    During root water uptake from dry soils, the highly nonlinear relation between hydraulic conductivity and water content as well as the radial root geometry result in steep water potential gradients close to the root surface. The hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere - the interface between root and soil - are one of the most important and least understood components in controlling root water uptake. Previous research using young lupine plants revealed that after irrigation it took 1-2 days for the water content of the dry rhizosphere to increase. How can this delay be explained? Our hypotheses: a) mucilage - a polymeric plant exudate - alters rhizosphere hydraulic properties, b) its hydrophobic moieties make the rhizosphere water repellent when dry, c) mucilage is a highly viscous, gelatinous material, the dryer it gets the more viscous it becomes, d) mucilage viscosity reduces rhizosphere hydraulic conductivity. To test our hypotheses we used mucilage extracted from chia seed as an analogue for root mucilage. We measured: 1) the contact angle between water and pure dry and wet mucilage, dry soil treated with various concentrations of mucilage, 2) mucilage viscosity as function of concentration and shear rate, 3) saturated hydraulic conductivity as function of mucilage concentration, 4) swelling of dry mucilage in water. Finally, to mimic flow of water across the rhizosphere, we measured the capillary rise in soils treated with different mucilage concentrations. The results showed that: 1) dry mucilage has a contact angle >90° while it loses its water repellency when it gets wet, 2) viscosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity can change several orders of magnitude with a small change in mucilage concentration, 3) 1g of dry mucilage absorbs 300g water in its fully swollen state, 4) the swelling rate of mucilage showed an exponential behavior with half time of 5 hours. Capillary rise became slower in soils with higher mucilage concentration, while the final

  1. A MEMS Electrochemical Bellows Actuator for Fluid Metering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Roya; Gensler, Heidi; Meng, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    We present a high efficiency wireless MEMS electrochemical bellows actuator capable of rapid and repeatable delivery of boluses for fluid metering and drug delivery applications. Nafion®-coated Pt electrodes were combined with Parylene bellows filled with DI water to form the electrolysis-based actuator. The performance of actuators with several bellows configurations was compared for a range of applied currents (1-10 mA). Up to 75 boluses were delivered with an average pumping flow rate of 114.40 ± 1.63 μL/min. Recombination of gases into water, an important factor in repeatable and reliable actuation, was studied for uncoated and Nafion®-coated actuators. Real-time pressure measurements were conducted and the effects of temperature, physiological back pressure, and drug viscosity on delivery performance were investigated. Lastly, we present wireless powering of the actuator using a class D inductive powering system that allowed for repeatable delivery with less than 2% variation in flow rate values. PMID:22833156

  2. A MEMS electrochemical bellows actuator for fluid metering applications.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Roya; Gensler, Heidi; Meng, Ellis

    2013-02-01

    We present a high efficiency wireless MEMS electrochemical bellows actuator capable of rapid and repeatable delivery of boluses for fluid metering and drug delivery applications. Nafion®-coated Pt electrodes were combined with Parylene bellows filled with DI water to form the electrolysis-based actuator. The performance of actuators with several bellows configurations was compared for a range of applied currents (1-10 mA). Up to 75 boluses were delivered with an average pumping flow rate of 114.40 ± 1.63 μL/min. Recombination of gases into water, an important factor in repeatable and reliable actuation, was studied for uncoated and Nafion®-coated actuators. Real-time pressure measurements were conducted and the effects of temperature, physiological back pressure, and drug viscosity on delivery performance were investigated. Lastly, we present wireless powering of the actuator using a class D inductive powering system that allowed for repeatable delivery with less than 2 % variation in flow rate values. PMID:22833156

  3. Spatial statistical point prediction guidance for heating-rate-limited aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto; Conway, Bruce A.

    2015-06-01

    Feedback control of constrained non-linear dynamical systems satisfying a certain optimality criterion and meeting a specified transfer objective in the state space is recognized as one of the most challenging problems in control theory. One approach to computing optimal feedback policies is the dynamic programming route of numerically solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) partial differential equation directly. In this paper an alternate and more tractable dynamic programming approach, the optimal feedback synthesis method, is utilized. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through an explicit guidance scheme for the heating-rate-constrained maneuver of an Aeroassisted Transfer Vehicle (AOTV). In optimal feedback synthesis, a feedback chart is constructed from a family of open-loop extremals, thus ensuring optimality with respect to any initial condition in the family. This paper presents a solution to the AOTV optimal feedback synthesis problem using the Gaussian process spatial prediction method of universal kriging. A closed-form expression for a near-optimal guidance law is derived. Its performance is found to be very promising; initial atmospheric entry errors due to simulated thruster misfiring are seen to be accurately corrected while the algebraic state-inequality constraint is closely respected.

  4. Determination of optimal lot size and production rate for multi-production channels with limited capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yeu-Shiang; Wang, Ruei-Pei; Ho, Jyh-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Due to the constantly changing business environment, producers often have to deal with customers by adopting different procurement policies. That is, manufacturers confront not only predictable and regular orders, but also unpredictable and irregular orders. In this study, from the perspective of upstream manufacturers, both regular and irregular orders are considered in coping with the situation in which an uncertain demand is faced by the manufacturer, and a capacity confirming mechanism is used to examine such demand. If the demand is less than or equal to the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the general supply channel is utilised to fully account for the manufacturing process, but if the demand is greater than the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the contingency production channel would be activated along with the ordinary channel to satisfy the upcoming high demand. Besides, the reproductive property of the probability distribution is employed to represent the order quantity of the two types of demand. Accordingly, the optimal production rates and lot sizes for both channels are derived to provide managers with insights for further production planning.

  5. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  6. Adsorption and transport of arsenate in carbonate-rich soils: coupled effects of nonlinear and rate-limited sorption.

    PubMed

    Yolcubal, Irfan; Akyol, Nihat Hakan

    2008-11-01

    The transport and fate of arsenate in carbonate-rich soil under alkaline conditions was investigated with multiple approaches combining batch, sequential extraction and column experiments as well as transport modeling studies. Batch experiments indicated that sorption isotherm was nonlinear over a wide range of concentration (0.1-200 mg L(-1)) examined. As(V) adsorption to the calcareous soil was initially fast but then continued at a slower rate, indicating the potential effect of rate-limited sorption on transport. Column experiments illustrated that transport of As(V) was significantly retarded compared to a non-reactive tracer. The degree of retardation decreased with increasing As(V) concentration. As(V) breakthrough curves exhibited nonideal transport behavior due to the coupled effects of nonlinear and rate-limited sorption on arsenate transport, which is consistent with the results of modeling studies. The contribution of nonlinear sorption to the arsenate retardation was negligible at low concentration but increased with increasing As(V) concentration. Sequential extraction results showed that nonspecifically sorbed (easily exchangeable, outer sphere complexes) fraction of arsenate is dominant with respect to the inner-sphere surface bound complexes of arsenate in the carbonate soil fraction, indicating high bioavailability and transport for arsenate in the carbonate-rich soils of which Fe and Al oxyhydroxide fractions are limited. PMID:18718636

  7. Solvent and viscosity effects on the rate-limiting product release step of glucoamylase during maltose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sierks, M R; Sico, C; Zaw, M

    1997-01-01

    Release of product from the active site is the rate-limiting step in a number of enzymatic reactions, including maltose hydrolysis by glucoamylase (GA). With GA, an enzymatic conformational change has been associated with the product release step. Solvent characteristics such as viscosity can strongly influence protein conformational changes. Here we show that the rate-limiting step of GA has a rather complex dependence on solvent characteristics. Seven different cosolvents were added to the GA/maltose reaction solution. Five of the cosolvents, all having an ethylene glycol base, resulted in an increase in activity at low concentration of cosolvent and variable decreases in activity at higher concentrations. The increase in enzyme activity was dependent on polymer length of the cosolvent; the longer the polymer, the lower the concentration needed. The maximum increase in catalytic activity at 45 degrees C (40-45%) was obtained with the three longest polymers (degree of polymerization from 200 to 8000). A further increase in activity to 60-65% was obtained at 60 degrees C. The linear relationship between ln(kcat) and (viscosity)2 obtained with all the cosolvents provides further evidence that product release is the rate-limiting step in the GA catalytic mechanism. A substantial increase in the turnover rate of GA by addition of relatively small amounts of a cosolvent has potential applications for the food industry where high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is one of the primary products produced with GA. Since maltodextrin hydrolysis by GA is by far the slowest step in the production of HFCS, increasing the catalytic rate of GA can substantially reduce the process time. PMID:9336980

  8. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  9. The rate-limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Imaizumi, M.

    1997-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is a very interesting material for terrestrial solar cells. Its low cost and respectable energy conversion efficiency (12-15%) makes it arguably the most cost competitive material for large-volume solar power generation. However, the solar cell efficiency of this material is severely degraded by regions of high minority carrier recombination which have been shown to possess both dislocations and microdefects. These structural defects are known to increase in recombination activity with transition metal decoration. Therefore, gettering of metal impurities from the material would be expected to greatly enhance solar cell performance. Contrary to this rationale, experiments using frontside phosphorus and/or backside aluminum treatments have been found to improve regions with low recombination activity while having little or no effect on the high recombination regions and in turn only slightly improving the overall cell performance. The goal of this research is to determine the mechanism by which gettering is ineffectual on these high recombination regions. The authors have performed studies on integrated circuit (IC) quality single crystal and multicrystalline solar cell silicon (mc-silicon) in the as-grown state and after a variety of processing/gettering steps. With Surface Photovoltage measurements of the minority carrier diffusion length which is inversely proportional to carrier recombination, they have seen that aluminum gettering is effective for improving IC quality material but ineffective for improving the regions of initially low diffusion lengths (high recombination rates) in mc-silicon. Of particular interest is the great increase in diffusion length for IC material as compared to the mc-silicon. Clearly the IC material has benefited to a greater extent from the gettering procedure than the mc-silicon.

  10. Axonal neuregulin 1 is a rate limiting but not essential factor for nerve remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Florence R.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Galino, Jorge; Paramsothy, Remi; La Russa, Federica; Perkins, James; Goldberg, Rebecca; Brelstaff, Jack; Zhu, Ning; McMahon, Stephen B.; Orengo, Christine; Garratt, Alistair N.; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 acts as an axonal signal that regulates multiple aspects of Schwann cell development including the survival and migration of Schwann cell precursors, the ensheathment of axons and subsequent elaboration of the myelin sheath. To examine the role of this factor in remyelination and repair following nerve injury, we ablated neuregulin 1 in the adult nervous system using a tamoxifen inducible Cre recombinase transgenic mouse system. The loss of neuregulin 1 impaired remyelination after nerve crush, but did not affect Schwann cell proliferation associated with Wallerian degeneration or axon regeneration or the clearance of myelin debris by macrophages. Myelination changes were most marked at 10 days after injury but still apparent at 2 months post-crush. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated reduced expression of myelin-related genes during nerve repair in animals lacking neuregulin 1. We also studied repair over a prolonged time course in a more severe injury model, sciatic nerve transection and reanastamosis. In the neuregulin 1 mutant mice, remyelination was again impaired 2 months after nerve transection and reanastamosis. However, by 3 months post-injury axons lacking neuregulin 1 were effectively remyelinated and virtually indistinguishable from control. Neuregulin 1 signalling is therefore an important factor in nerve repair regulating the rate of remyelination and functional recovery at early phases following injury. In contrast to development, however, the determination of myelination fate following nerve injury is not dependent on axonal neuregulin 1 expression. In the early phase following injury, axonal neuregulin 1 therefore promotes nerve repair, but at late stages other signalling pathways appear to compensate. PMID:23801741

  11. Light-Limited Growth Rate Modulates Nitrate Inhibition of Dinitrogen Fixation in the Marine Unicellular Cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nathan S.; Hutchins, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation is the dominant supply of new nitrogen (N) to the oceans, but is often inhibited in the presence of fixed N sources such as nitrate (NO3−). Anthropogenic fixed N inputs to the ocean are increasing, but their effect on marine N2 fixation is uncertain. Thus, global estimates of new oceanic N depend on a fundamental understanding of factors that modulate N source preferences by N2-fixing cyanobacteria. We examined the unicellular diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii (strain WH0003) to determine how the light-limited growth rate influences the inhibitory effects of fixed N on N2 fixation. When growth (µ) was limited by low light (µ = 0.23 d−1), short-term experiments indicated that 0.4 µM NH4+ reduced N2-fixation by ∼90% relative to controls without added NH4+. In fast-growing, high-light-acclimated cultures (µ = 0.68 d−1), 2.0 µM NH4+ was needed to achieve the same effect. In long-term exposures to NO3−, inhibition of N2 fixation also varied with growth rate. In high-light-acclimated, fast-growing cultures, NO3− did not inhibit N2-fixation rates in comparison with cultures growing on N2 alone. Instead NO3− supported even faster growth, indicating that the cellular assimilation rate of N2 alone (i.e. dinitrogen reduction) could not support the light-specific maximum growth rate of Crocosphaera. When growth was severely light-limited, NO3− did not support faster growth rates but instead inhibited N2-fixation rates by 55% relative to controls. These data rest on the basic tenet that light energy is the driver of photoautotrophic growth while various nutrient substrates serve as supports. Our findings provide a novel conceptual framework to examine interactions between N source preferences and predict degrees of inhibition of N2 fixation by fixed N sources based on the growth rate as controlled by light. PMID:25503244

  12. PAHs in soils: Sorption versus degradation - elucidation of rate-limiting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, Ilka; Gocht, Tilman; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    soil are capable to degrade PAHs. Nevertheless strong sorption and high organic carbon content in this soil prevent these microorganisms from degrading the native PAHs. The results were implemented into a mass balance model considering both, sorption and degradation. The calculations were conducted with first order rate constant λ taken from the non-soil-containing experiment, and revealed a half-life of phenanthrene up to almost one century. Keywords: PAH, degradation, sorption

  13. Ultrasonically Actuated Tools for Abrading Rock Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rainen, Richard; Askin, Steve; Bickler, Donald; Lewis, Donald; Carson, John; Dawson, Stephen; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Peterson, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    An ultrasonic rock-abrasion tool (URAT) was developed using the same principle of ultrasonic/sonic actuation as that of the tools described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. Hence, like those tools, the URAT offers the same advantages of low power demand, mechanical simplicity, compactness, and ability to function with very small axial loading (very small contact force between tool and rock). Like a tool described in the second of the cited previous articles, a URAT includes (1) a drive mechanism that comprises a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator, an amplification horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range and (2) an abrasion tool bit. A URAT tool bit is a disk that has been machined or otherwise formed to have a large number of teeth and an overall shape chosen to impart the desired shape (which could be flat or curved) to the rock surface to be abraded. In operation, the disk and thus the teeth are vibrated in contact with the rock surface. The concentrated stresses at the tips of the impinging teeth repeatedly induce microfractures and thereby abrade the rock. The motion of the tool induces an ultrasonic transport effect that displaces the cuttings from the abraded area. The figure shows a prototype URAT. A piezoelectric-stack/horn actuator is housed in a cylindrical container. The movement of the actuator and bit with respect to the housing is aided by use of mechanical sliders. A set of springs accommodates the motion of the actuator and bit into or out of the housing through an axial range between 5 and 7 mm. The springs impose an approximately constant force of contact between the tool bit and the rock to be abraded. A dust shield surrounds the bit, serving as a barrier to reduce the migration of rock debris to

  14. Pneumatic actuator with hydraulic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R., Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The present invention provides a pneumatically powered actuator having hydraulic control for both locking and controlling the velocity of an output rod without any sponginess. The invention includes a double-acting pneumatic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a control rod connected to the piston. The double-acting pneumatic actuator is mounted to a frame. A first double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a follower rod mounted to the piston is mounted to the frame such that the follower rod is fixedly connected to the control rod. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the first double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V1. The present invention also includes a second double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and an output rod mounted to the piston. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the second double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V2, where V2=V1. A pair of fluid ports in each of the first and second double-acting hydraulic cylinders are operably connected by fluid conduits, one of which includes a valve circuit which may be used to control the velocity of the output rod or to lock the output rod in a static position by regulating the flow of hydraulic fluid between the double-acting cylinders.

  15. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  16. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  17. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  18. Constraint of the limited information content of discharge measurements on the benefits of rating curve models with increased complexities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Katrien; Verhoest, Niko; De Mulder, Tom

    2015-04-01

    accounting for backwater effects. The GLUE evaluation based on available measurements however does not demonstrate this increased performance. The evaluation further reveals that complex rating curve models face parameterization problems when using field data. This inconsistency between evaluations based on the model and on in situ data should be attributed to the limited information content of the water level and discharge measurements. Despite of a measurement station with a highly stable cross section in time and more than 200 available measurements, these in situ data do not include every flow condition and the measurements contain errors. Consequently, the information content of the measured data turns out to be inadequate to distinguish the effects of increased complexity of rating curve models. This study reveals the importance of evaluating rating curve model formulations with regard to the informative content of their input and calibration data and demonstrates the usefulness of the GLUE methodology in this respect.

  19. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    seconds for resetting. Thus, this design allows the actuator to work at a frequency of up to 0.1 Hz. The actuator does not make use of the whole range of motion of the SMA material, allowing for large margins on the mechanical parameters of the design. The efficiency of the actuator is of the order of 10%, including the margins. The average dissipated power while driving at full speed is of the order of 1 W, and can be scaled down linearly if the rate of cycling is reduced. This design produces an extremely quiet actuator; it can generate a force greater than 2 N and a stroke greater than 1 cm. The operational duration of SMA materials is of the order of millions of cycles with some reduced stroke over a wide temperature range up to 150 C.

  20. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    for resetting. Thus, this design allows the actuator to work at a frequency of up to 0.1 Hz. The actuator does not make use of the whole range of motion of the SMA material, allowing for large margins on the mechanical parameters of the design. The efficiency of the actuator is of the order of 10%, including the margins. The average dissipated power while driving at full speed is of the order of 1 W, and can be scaled down linearly if the rate of cycling is reduced. This design produces an extremely quiet actuator; it can generate a force greater than 2 N and a stroke greater than 1 cm. The operational duration of SMA materials is of the order of millions of cycles with some reduced stroke over a wide temperature range up to 150 C.

  1. MOSFET Switching Circuit Protects Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A small-footprint, full surface-mount-component printed circuit board employs MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) power switches to switch high currents from any input power supply from 3 to 30 V. High-force shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators generally require high current (up to 9 A at 28 V) to actuate. SMA wires (the driving element of the actuators) can be quickly overheated if power is not removed at the end of stroke, which can damage the wires. The new analog driver prevents overheating of the SMA wires in an actuator by momentarily removing power when the end limit switch is closed, thereby allowing complex control schemes to be adopted without concern for overheating. Either an integral pushbutton or microprocessor-controlled gate or control line inputs switch current to the actuator until the end switch line goes from logic high to logic low state. Power is then momentarily removed (switched off by the MOSFET). The analog driver is suited to use with nearly any SMA actuator.

  2. Flexible low-mass robotic arm actuated by electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Xue, T.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, Joseph G.

    1998-07-01

    Miniature, lightweight, low-cost actuators that consume low- power can be used to develop unmatched robotic devices to make an impact on many technology areas. Electroactive polymers (EAP) actuators offer the potential to produce such devices and they induce relatively large bending and longitudinal actuation strains. This reported study is concentrating on the development of effective EAPs and the resultant enabling mechanisms employing their unique characteristics. Several EAP driven mechanisms, which emulate human hand, were developed including a gripper, manipulator arm and surface wiper. The manipulator arm was made of a composite rod with a lifting actuator consisting of a scrolled rope that is activated longitudinally by an electrostatic field. A gripper was made to serve as an end effector and it consisted of multiple bending EAP fingers for grabbing and holding such objects as rocks. An EAP surface wiper was developed to operate like a human finger and to demonstrate the potential to remove dust from optical and IR windows as well as solar cells. These EAP driven devices are taking advantage of the large actuation displacement of these materials for applications that have limited requirement for actuation force capability.

  3. Strategies for Self-Repairing Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, Sven; Czechowicz, Alexander Jaroslaw; Meier, Horst

    2011-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are thermally activated smart materials. Due to their ability to change into a previously imprinted actual shape by the means of thermal activation, they are suitable as actuators for microsystems and, within certain limitations, macroscopic systems. A commonly used shape memory actuator type is an alloy of nickel and titanium (NiTi), which starts to transform its inner phase from martensitic to austenitic structure at a certain austenite start temperature. Retransformation starts at martensitic start temperature after running a hysteresis cycle. Most SMA-systems use straight wire actuators because of their simple integration, the occurring cost reduction and the resulting miniaturization. Unfortunately, SMA-actuators are only seldom used by constructors and system developers. This is due to occurring functional fatigue effects which depend on boundary conditions like system loads, strains, and number of cycles. The actuating stroke does not reduce essentially during the first thousand cycles. Striking is the elongation of the wire while maintaining the stroke during cycling (walking). In order to create a system which adjusts and repairs itself, different concepts to solve this problem are presented. They vary from smart control methods to constructive solutions with calibration systems. The systems are analyzed due to their effective, life cycle, and system costs showing outstanding advantages in comparison to commonly used SMA actuators.

  4. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  5. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry Florievich

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena are being widely studied for aerodynamic applications. The major effects of these phenomena are heating of the gas, body force generation, and enthalpy addition or extraction, [1, 2, 3]. In particular, asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are known to be effective EHD device in aerodynamic control, [4, 5]. Experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness in separation control, acoustic noise reduction, and other aeronautic applications. In contrast to conventional DBD actuators driven by sinusoidal voltages, we proposed and used a voltage profile consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage. This produces what is essentially a non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The advantage of this non-self-sustained discharge is that the parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in a quiescent room air by a single DBD actuator. A new approach for non-intrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low

  6. Light stop mass limits from Higgs rate measurements in the MSSM: is MSSM electroweak baryogenesis still alive after all?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebler, Stefan; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the implications of the Higgs rate measurements from Run 1 of the LHC for the mass of the light scalar top partner (stop) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We focus on light stop masses, and we decouple the second, heavy stop and the gluino to the multi-TeV range in order to obtain a Higgs mass of ˜ 125 GeV. We derive lower mass limits for the light stop within various scenarios, taking into account the effects of a possibly light scalar tau partner (stau) or chargino on the Higgs rates, of additional Higgs decays to undetectable "new physics", as well as of non-decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector. Under conservative assumptions, the stop can be as light as 123 GeV. Relaxing certain theoretical and experimental constraints, such as vacuum stability and model-dependent bounds on sparticle masses from LEP, we find that the light stop mass can be as light as 116 GeV. Our indirect limits are complementary to direct limits on the light stop mass from collider searches and have important implications for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM as a possible explanation for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.

  7. Kinetic evidence for the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction of ferric hemoproteins with anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Coletta, M; Angeletti, M; De Sanctis, G; Cerroni, L; Giardina, B; Amiconi, G; Ascenzi, P

    1996-01-15

    The kinetics of azide and fluroide binding to various monomeric and tetrameric ferric hemoproteins (sperm whale Mb, isolated alpha and beta chains of human Hb reacted with p-chloromercuribenzoate, dromeday, ox and human Hb) has been investigated (at pH 6.5 and 20 degrees C over a large range (20 microM to 2 M) of ligand concentration. It has been observed that the pseuo-first-order rate constant for azide binding to the hemoproteins investigated does not increase linearly with ligand concentration, but tends to level off toward an asymptomatic concentration-independent value typical for each hemoprotein. This behavior, which has been detected only by an investigation covering an unusually large range of ligand concentrations appears to be independent of the ionic strength, and it underlies the existence of a rate-limiting step in the dynamic pathway of azide binding to ferric hemoproteins, which is detectable whenever the observed pseudo- first-order rate constant becomes faster than a given value characteristic of the specific hemoprotein. Such a behavior is not observed in the case of fluroide binding probably because the pesudo- first-order rate constant for this ligand is much slower and never attains a value faster than that of the rate-limiting step. In general terms, this feature should involve a conformational equilibrium between at least two forms (possibly related to the interaction of H2O with distal histidine and its exchange with the bulk solvent) which modulates the access of the anionic ligand into the heme pocket and its reaction with the ferric iron. PMID:8631366

  8. Renewable Interfaces: Surface Topography Actuation for Complex Biological Adhesion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Ye, Sangho; Cao, Kathleen; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Velankar, Sachin; Wagner, William

    2015-03-01

    Controlling adhesion at biological interfaces is a complex problem with great biomedical importance. We use dynamic wrinkling, generated with PDMS/UVO chemistry under different macroscopic strains (ɛij ~ 0 . 3), to create a mechanical interfacial term that frustrates particle adhesion. This device actuates surface topography between flat (zero surface confinement χij) and wrinkled surfaces (χij ~(A / λ) 2 , where A and λ are wrinkle amplitude and wavelength, respectively), with a maximum rate of 0.6 Hz. Un-actuated PDMS placed in contact with whole sheep blood shows near total surface coverage with adhered platelets over 90 min. Actuation showed a nearly 100-fold decrease in platelet adhesion. Interestingly, topographic actuation is four times as effective compared to flat surface actuation in controlling platelet adhesion. Our model explores the competition between surface tension terms (Uγ = γɛij) and interfacial elastic terms (Uχ =Eij (t .ɛij2 +t3 . (χij /λ2)) generated because of actuation and wrinkling, where Eij is platelet modulus and t is characteristic platelet length scale. The condition for de-adhesion is Uχ >Uγ .

  9. Probabilistic Analysis of Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Zaretsky, Erin V.

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis, using the 2-parameter Weibull-Johnson method, was performed on experimental life test data from space shuttle actuator bearings. Experiments were performed on a test rig under simulated conditions to determine the life and failure mechanism of the grease lubricated bearings that support the input shaft of the space shuttle body flap actuators. The failure mechanism was wear that can cause loss of bearing preload. These tests established life and reliability data for both shuttle flight and ground operation. Test data were used to estimate the failure rate and reliability as a function of the number of shuttle missions flown. The Weibull analysis of the test data for a 2-bearing shaft assembly in each body flap actuator established a reliability level of 99.6 percent for a life of 12 missions. A probabilistic system analysis for four shuttles, each of which has four actuators, predicts a single bearing failure in one actuator of one shuttle after 22 missions (a total of 88 missions for a 4-shuttle fleet). This prediction is comparable with actual shuttle flight history in which a single actuator bearing was found to have failed by wear at 20 missions.

  10. Probabilistic Analysis of Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis, using the 2-parameter Weibull-Johnson method, was performed on experimental life test data from space shuttle actuator bearings. Experiments were performed on a test rig under simulated conditions to determine the life and failure mechanism of the grease lubricated bearings that support the input shaft of the space shuttle body flap actuators. The failure mechanism was wear that can cause loss of bearing preload. These tests established life and reliability data for both shuttle flight and ground operation. Test data were used to estimate the failure rate and reliability as a function of the number of shuttle missions flown. The Weibull analysis of the test data for the four actuators on one shuttle, each with a 2-bearing shaft assembly, established a reliability level of 96.9 percent for a life of 12 missions. A probabilistic system analysis for four shuttles, each of which has four actuators, predicts a single bearing failure in one actuator of one shuttle after 22 missions (a total of 88 missions for a 4-shuttle fleet). This prediction is comparable with actual shuttle flight history in which a single actuator bearing was found to have failed by wear at 20 missions.

  11. A MEMS-Based Micro Biopsy Actuator for the Capsular Endoscope Using LiGA Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sunkil; Koo, Kyo-In; Kim, Gil-Sub; Bang, Seoung Min; Song, Si Young; Chu, Chong Nam; Jeon, Doyoung; Cho, Dongil ``Dan''

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a LiGA (German acronym for LIthografie, Galvanoformung, Abformung) based micro biopsy actuator for the capsular endoscope. The proposed fabricated actuator aims to extract sample tissues inside small gastric intestines, that cannot be reached by conventional biopsy. The actuator size is 10 mm in diameter and 1.8 mm in length. The mechanism is of a slider-crank type. The actuator consists of trigger, rotational module, and micro biopsy tool. The core components are fabricated using the LiGA process, for overcoming the limitations in accuracy of conventional precision machining.

  12. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  13. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  14. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  15. Understanding the Space Shuttle Main Engine Hydraulic Actuation System and Reviewing Its Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWade, Robert J.; Minor, Robert B.; McNutt, Leslie M.

    2010-01-01

    The complex engine start and thrust control requirements of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) require unique valve, actuator and control system hardware. The Hydraulic Actuation System (HAS) was designed, developed, and now operates to meet tight engine control requirement limits to assure safe, reliable and correct engine thrust at all times. The actuator is designed to be fail safe and fail operate in the areas where redundancy is important. The HAS has an additional pneumatic operating capability that insures a safe sequential closure of all actuators and propellant valves in the event of the loss of hydraulic system pressure or loss of electrical closed loop control of the actuator. The objective of this paper is to provide a complete description of the actuator s internal operating system, along with its interaction with all SSME system interfaces. Additionally the paper addresses the challenges, problems identified, and corrected, and lessons learned, during the course of the almost 35 years of engine operation.

  16. Shape-memory alloy micro-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, John D. (Inventor); Johnson, Alfred D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing an integral piece of thermo-sensitive material, which is responsive to a shift in temperature from below to above a phase transformation temperature range to alter the material's condition to a shape-memory condition and move from one position to another. The method is characterized by depositing a thin film of shape-memory material, such as Nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) onto a substrate by vacuum deposition process such that the alloy exhibits an amorphous non-crystalline structure. The coated substrate is then annealed in a vacuum or in the presence of an inert atmosphere at a selected temperature, time and cool down rate to produce an ordered, partially disordered or fully disordered BCC structure such that the alloy undergoes thermoelastic, martinsetic phase transformation in response to alteration in temperature to pass from a martinsetic phase when at a temperature below a phase transformation range and capable of a high level of recoverable strain to a parent austenitic phase in a memory shape when at a temperature above the phase transformation range. Also disclosed are actuator devices employing shape-memory material actuators that deform from a set shape toward an original shape when subjected to a critical temperature level after having been initially deformed from the original shape into the set shape while at a lower temperature. The actuators are mechanically coupled to one or more movable elements such that the temperature-induce deformation of the actuators exerts a force or generates a motion of the mechanical element(s).

  17. Rate-limiting steps of a stereochemistry retaining β-d-xylosidase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus acting on four substrates.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Braker, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Kinetic experiments of GSXynB2, a GH52 retaining β-xylosidase, acting on 2-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (2NPX), 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (4NPX), 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (MuX) and xylobiose (X2) were conducted at pH 7.0 and 25 °C. Catalysis proceeds in two steps (xylodidation followed by dexylosidation): E + substrate TO E-xylose + leaving group TO E + xylose. kcat falls into two groups: 4NPX (1.95 s(-1)) and 2NPX, MuX and X2 (15.8 s(-1), 12.6 s(-1), 12.8 s(-1), respectively). Dexylosylation (E-xylose to E + xylose), the common step for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the four substrates, must exceed 15.8 s(-1). kcat of 4NPX would seem mainly limited by xylosylation (step 1) and the other three substrates would seem mainly limited by dexylosylation (step 2) - a conclusion that critically lacks chemical justification (compare 4NPX and 2NPX). Presteady-state rates indicate rapid xylosidation rates for all substrates so a later step (not dexylosidation) is rate-limiting for 4NPX. That 2NPX is an onlier and 4NPX is an outlier (both leaving group pKa of 7.2) of the Brønsted plot pattern (logkcat vs pKa of phenol leaving group) is thus possibly explained by 4NP release. The pH dependency of kcat 2NPX encompasses 2 bell-shaped curves with peaks of pH 3 and pH 7. PMID:26271441

  18. Sensors, actuators, and smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiler-McKinstry, S.; Newnham, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    Electroceramic materials are presently noted to have a wide array of sensing and actuating functions which can be incorporated into smart-material designs. The sensor types extend to temperature, piezoelectricity and piezoresistivity, and the presence of oxygen. Attention is given to the prospects for developing composite smart materials that encompass various sensing and actuating functions; these may ultimately reach a level of complexity and sophistication that may be termed 'biomimetric' in its approximation to the functions of the living tissues of organisms.

  19. Limits on the star formation rates of z>2 damped Lyα systems from Hα spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Andrew J.; Warren, Stephen J.; Clements, D. L.; Williger, Gerard M.; Hewett, Paul C.

    1999-11-01

    We present the results of a long-slit K-band spectroscopic search for Hα emission from eight damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z>2 with the goal of measuring the star formation rates in these systems. For each system we searched for compact sources of Hα emission within a solid angle 11x2.5arcsec2 (44x10h-2kpc2, for q0=0.5, H0=100hkms-1Mpc-1). No Hα emission was detected above 3σ limits in the range (6.5-16)x10-20Wm-2, equivalent to star formation rates of 5.6-18h-2Msolaryr-1, for a standard initial mass function, assuming the lines are spectrally unresolved (<650kms-1 FWHM). We compare these results against the predictions of the models of Pei & Fall of the global history of star formation, under two different simplifying hypotheses: (i) the space density of DLAs at z=2.3 is equal to the space density of spiral galaxies today (implying DLA discs were larger in the past, the `large-disc' hypothesis); (ii) the sizes of DLAs at z=2.3 were the same as the gas sizes of spiral galaxies today (implying DLA discs were more common in the past, the `hierarchical' hypothesis). Compared with the previous most sensitive spectroscopic search, our sample is twice as large, our limits are a factor greater than two deeper, and the solid angle surveyed is over three times as great. Despite this, our results are not in conflict with either the large-disc hypothesis, because of the limited solid angle covered by the slit, or the hierarchical hypothesis, because of the limited sensitivity.

  20. Estimating the Collision Rate of Inertial Particles in a Turbulent Flow: Limitations of the "Ghost Collision" Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voßkuhle, Michel; Pumir, Alain; Lévêque, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Most studies of collisions in turbulent flows are based on the "ghost collision" approximation, whereby one follows a number of particles, and simply counts the number of times the distance between two particles becomes less than the sum of their radii; particles are kept in the flow after they collided. We discuss here the limitations of this approximation, and demonstrate, using a simple model flow, that it leads to overestimates of the real collision rate by as much as ~ 30% at small Stokes numbers.

  1. Upper limits for the rate constant for the reaction Br + H2O2 yields HB2 + HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Upper limits for the rate constant for the reaction Br + H2O2 yields HBr + HO2 have been measured over the temperature range 298 to 417 K in a discharge flow system using a mass spectrometer as a detector. Results are k sub 1 less than 1.5 x 10 to the -15th power cu cm/s at 298 K and k sub 1 less than 3.0 x 10 to the -15th power cu cm/s at 417 K, respectively. The implication to stratospheric chemistry is discussed.

  2. The rate of protein synthesis in hematopoietic stem cells is limited partly by 4E-BPs

    PubMed Central

    Signer, Robert A.J.; Qi, Le; Zhao, Zhiyu; Thompson, David; Sigova, Alla A.; Fan, Zi Peng; DeMartino, George N.; Young, Richard A.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Morrison, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells must limit their rate of protein synthesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Differences in protein synthesis among hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells did not correlate with differences in proteasome activity, total RNA content, mRNA content, or cell division rate. However, adult HSCs had more hypophosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 as compared with most other hematopoietic progenitors. Deficiency for 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 significantly increased global protein synthesis in HSCs, but not in other hematopoietic progenitors, and impaired their reconstituting activity, identifying a mechanism that promotes HSC maintenance by attenuating protein synthesis. PMID:27492367

  3. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  4. Nanotube Nano-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennifer, Sippel; Arnason, Steve; Baughman, Ray; Rinzler, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    In 1999 it was found that a thin sheet of single wall carbon nanotubes (buckypaper) can act as an electromechanical transducer (an actuator), converting an applied voltage into a dimensional change, with the potential to do work.[1] The mechanism proposed for the effect is quite fundamental, relying on modification of the nearest neighbor carbon-carbon distance due to charge injected into the nanotube pi-orbital system. Because the experiment relied on buckypaper, which possesses nanoscale pores (where gas generation might also account for dimensional changes), as well as creep (where ropes sliding against one another make it difficult to determine the magnitude of the effect in the fundamental unit), the demonstration was less than ideal. Using an atomic force microscope for detection, we have now performed corresponding measurements on individual ropes of nanotubes tethered across micromachined trenches in silicon substrates. The experiment and results will be described. 1. R. H. Baughman, C. X. Cui, A. A. Zakhidov, Z. Iqbal, J. N. Barisci, G. M. Spinks, G. G. Wallace, A. Mazzoldi, D DeRossi, A. G. Rinzler, O. Jaschinski, S. Roth, M. Kertesz, Science, 284, 1340 (1999).

  5. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  6. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  7. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  8. Sleep stage assessment using power spectral indices of heart rate variability with a simple algorithm: limitations clarified from preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Keiko; Shibata, Masashi; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2013-07-01

    Clinical researchers do not typically assess sleep with polysomnography (PSG) but rather with observation. However, methods relying on observation have limited reliability and are not suitable for assessing sleep depth and cycles. The purpose of this methodological study was to compare a sleep analysis method based on power spectral indices of heart rate variability (HRV) data to PSG. PSG and electrocardiography data were collected synchronously from 10 healthy women (ages 20-61 years) over 23 nights in a laboratory setting. HRV was analyzed for each 60-s epoch and calculated at 3 frequency band powers (very low frequency [VLF]-hi: 0.016-0.04 Hz; low frequency [LF]: 0.04-0.15 Hz; and high frequency [HF]: 0.15-0.4 Hz). Using HF/(VLF-hi + LF + HF) value, VLF-hi, and heart rate (HR) as indices, an algorithm to categorize sleep into 3 states (shallow sleep corresponding to Stages 1 & 2, deep sleep corresponding to Stages 3 & 4, and rapid eye movement [REM] sleep) was created. Movement epochs and time of sleep onset and wake-up were determined using VLF-hi and HR. The minute-by-minute agreement rate with the sleep stages as identified by PSG and HRV data ranged from 32 to 72% with an average of 56%. Longer wake after sleep onset (WASO) resulted in lower agreement rates. The mean differences between the 2 methods were 2 min for the time of sleep onset and 6 min for the time of wake-up. These results indicate that distinguishing WASO from shallow sleep segments is difficult using this HRV method. The algorithm's usefulness is thus limited in its current form, and it requires additional modification. PMID:22531367

  9. Optoelectrowetting for continuous microdroplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Christopher M.; Hill, Kyle A.; DeWachter, Mark A.; Huizing, Alex M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2014-05-01

    Microfluidics technologies have received great attention and appear in many bioanalyses applications. A recent microfluidics subset has appeared as droplet-based digital microfluidics (DMF). Here, microdroplets are manipulated in a two-dimensional on-chip plane using electric fields, contrasting the one-dimensional pressure-based channel flow of continuous flow microfluidics. These DMF systems fundamentally offer reconfigurability, whereby one device performs many bioanalysis tasks. A subset of DMF systems called optoelectrowetting is also of recent interest due to its ability for intricate microdroplet routing processes in the on-chip plane. For an optoelectrowetting chip, the DMF structure is modified with optically triggered electrodes with arrayed photoconductive switches. The arrayed photoconductive switches are optically-activated so microdroplets in the vicinity are routed to the illuminated switch. Unfortunately, such systems still require intricate electrode arrays, limiting microdroplet actuation resolution by the electrode size. This work proposes an on-chip optofluidic device with a continuous and planar semiconductor layer as the photoconductive mechanism. An illuminated section of the semiconductor layer acts as a localized electrode, with the photogenerated charge-carriers attracting nearby microdroplets. Given this planar topology, the illuminating beam is used to move the microdroplets continuously over the on-chip plane with precise optical control. The resolution for such a process is ultimately limited by charge-carrier diffusion, so an alternative material, a nanocomposite, is introduced to the on-chip device design. The nanocomposite consists of 20 nm semiconductor nanoparticles embedded in an insulative polymer host. This gives restricted diffusion length, being on the nanometer-scale of the nanoparticle diameter. Experimental device operation is demonstrated.

  10. Progress toward EAP actuators for biomimetic social robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D.

    2013-04-01

    Social robotics and artificial intelligence have progressed steadily in recent years, appearing in a variety of useful applications and products as well as breakthrough research. However, limitations in conventional motors continue to limit the possibilities of bio-inspired robotics. Such motors are needed for locomotion, grasping and manipulation, and social expressions and gestures. EAP actuators, being more like biological muscle in key regards, could revolutionize the hardware for such robots, if made robust, powerful, and manufacturable at reasonable prices. The author presents a survey of the progress and opportunities for EAP actuators in these fields, and discusses the latest work of his team in developing and manufacturing social robots that could benefit from EAP actuators.

  11. Nanophotonic implementation of optoelectrowetting for microdroplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Christopher M.; Hill, Kyle A.; DeWachter, Mark A.; Huizing, Alexander M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-02-01

    The development and ultimate operation of a nanocomposite high-aspect-ratio photoinjection (HARP) device is presented in this work. The device makes use of a nanocomposite material as the optically active layer and the device achieves a large optical penetration depth with a high aspect ratio which provides a strong actuation force far away from the point of photoinjection. The nanocomposite material can be continuously illuminated and the position of the microdroplets can, therefore, be controlled to diffraction limited resolution. The nanocomposite HARP device shows great potential for future on-chip applications.

  12. Optimal number of minimal repairs with cumulative repair cost limit for a two-unit system with failure rate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Min-Tsai; Yan, Huey

    2016-01-01

    A discrete replacement model is presented that includes a cumulative repair cost limit for a two-unit system with failure rate interactions between the units. We assume a failure in unit 1 causes the failure rate in unit 2 to increase, whereas a failure in unit 2 causes a failure in unit 1, resulting in a total system failure. If unit 1 fails and the cumulative repair cost till to this failure is less than a limit L, then unit 1 is repaired. If there is a failure in unit 1 and the cumulative repair cost exceeds L or the number of failures equals n, the entire system is preventively replaced. The system is also replaced at a total failure, and such replacement cost is higher than the preventive replacement cost. The long-term expected cost per unit time is derived using the expected costs as the optimality criterion. The minimum-cost policy is derived, and existence and uniqueness are proved.

  13. Electroactive nanostructured polymer actuators fabricated using sulfonated styrenic pentablock copolymer/montmorillonite/ionic liquid nanocomposite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang-Woo; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2014-08-01

    High-bendable, air-operable ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators composed of electroactive nanostructured middle-block sulfonated styrenic pentablock copolymer (SSPB)/sulfonated montmorillonite (s-MMT) nanocomposite electrolyte membranes with bulky imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) incorporated were fabricated and their bending actuation performances were evaluated. The SSPB-based IPMC actuators showed larger air-operable bending displacements, higher displacement rates, and higher energy efficiency of actuations without conventional IPMC bottlenecks, including back relaxation and actuation instability during actuation in air, than the Nafion counterpart. Incorporation of s-MMT into the SSPB matrix further enhanced the actuation performance of the IPMC actuators in terms of displacement, displacement rate, and energy efficiency. The remarkably high performance of the SSPB/s-MMT/IL IPMCs was considered to be due to the microphase-separated large ionic domains of the SSPB (the average diameter of the ionic domain: ca. 20 nm) and the role of s-MMT as an ionic bridge between the ionic domains, and the ion pumping effect of the bulky imidazolium cations of the ILs as well. The microphase-separated nanostructure of the composite membranes caused a high dimensional stability upon swelling in the presence of ILs, which effectively preserved the original electrode resistance against swelling, leading to a high actuation performance of IPMC.

  14. Development and characterization of high-frequency resonance-enhanced microjet actuators for control of high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Gustavsson, Jonas P. R.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    For flow control applications requiring high-frequency excitation, very few actuators have sufficient dynamic response and/or control authority to be useful in high-speed flows. Due to this reason, experiments involving high-frequency excitation, attempted in the past, have been limited to either low-frequency actuation with reasonable control authority or moderate-frequency actuation with limited control authority. The current work expands on the previous development of the resonance-enhanced microactuators to design actuators that are capable of producing high-amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies [{O} (10 kHz)]. Using lumped element modeling, two actuators have been designed with nominal frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz. Extensive benchtop characterization using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high-resolution micro-schlieren setup is employed to characterize the dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators performed at a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performance at various operating conditions, this study serves to develop easy-to-integrate high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets. Preliminary testing of these actuators is performed by implementing the 20-kHz actuator on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field for noise reduction. Acoustic measurements in the jet near field demonstrate attenuation of radiated noise at all observation angles.

  15. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1998-01-01

    It is unlikely that the presence of chondrules, and thus their formation, within the protoplanetary nebula would be predicted if it were not for their ubiquitous presence in most chondritic meteorites. The study of these enigmatic, igneous objects has a direct influence on how meteoritic and solar system researchers model the processes operating and the materials present within our protoplanetary nebula. Key to understanding chondrule formation is a determination of constraints on their thermal histories. The three important variables in this history are their peak melting temperatures, the duration of their melting at peak temperatures, and the rate at which these object cool. Although these three variables are interdependent, it is cooling rate that provides the most powerful constraint. Cooling rate has a direct affect on the development of both crystal morphology and the elemental distributions within these grains. To date, experiments have indicated that chondrule cooling rates are in the range of 10's to 100's of degrees per hour for porphyritic chondrules (the most abundant type). The cooling rate for radial and barred chondrules is thought to be more rapid. To generate these cooling rates (rapid relative to the cooling of the nebula as a whole, but slow compared to simple black body radiation) the environment of chondrule formation must have been localized, and the abundance of solid materials must have been greatly enhanced above a gas of solar composition. Thus accurate determinations of chondrule cooling rates is critical in understanding both their formation and the nebular environment in which they formed. In a quest to more accurately determine the lower limit on cooling rates and to determine in more detail the effects of Fe loss from a molten sample to Pt wire loops, Weinbruch et al. have explored this issue experimentally and reevaluated the findings of Radomsky and Hewins in light of their new results. The basic conclusions of their paper are an

  16. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  17. Behavioral Implications of Piezoelectric Stack Actuators for Control of Micromanipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, Michael; Celanovic, Nikola

    1996-01-01

    A lumped-parameter model of a piezoelectric stack actuator has been developed to describe actuator behavior for purposes of control system analysis and design, and in particular for microrobotic applications requiring accurate position and/or force control. In addition to describing the input-output dynamic behavior, the proposed model explains aspects of non-intuitive behavioral phenomena evinced by piezoelectric actuators, such as the input-output rate-independent hysteresis and the change in mechanical stiffness that results from altering electrical load. The authors incorporate a generalized Maxwell resistive capacitor as a lumped-parameter causal representation of rate-independent hysteresis. Model formulation is validated by comparing results of numerical simulations to experimental data.

  18. Multigenerational exposure to ocean acidification during food limitation reveals consequences for copepod scope for growth and vital rates.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sindre A; Håkedal, Ole Jacob; Salaberria, Iurgi; Tagliati, Alice; Gustavson, Liv Marie; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Olsen, Anders J; Altin, Dag

    2014-10-21

    The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a key component of northern Atlantic food webs, linking energy-transfer from phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. We examined the effect of different ocean acidification (OA) scenarios (i.e., ambient, 1080, 2080, and 3080 μatm CO2) over two subsequent generations under limited food availability. Determination of metabolic and feeding rates, and estimations of the scope for growth, suggests that negative effects observed on vital rates (ontogenetic development, somatic growth, fecundity) may be a consequence of energy budget constraints due to higher maintenance costs under high pCO2-environments. A significant delay in development rate among the parental generation animals exposed to 2080 μatm CO2, but not in the following F1 generation under the same conditions, suggests that C. finmarchicus may have adaptive potential to withstand the direct long-term effects of even the more pessimistic future OA scenarios but underlines the importance of transgenerational experiments. The results also indicate that in a more acidic ocean, increased energy expenditure through rising respiration could lower the energy transfer to higher trophic levels and thus hamper the productivity of the northern Atlantic ecosystem. PMID:25225957

  19. Raised Speed Limits, Speed Spillover, Case-Fatality Rates, and Road Deaths in Israel: A 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elihu D.; Barach, Paul; Friedman, Lee; Krikler, Samuel; Israeli, Abraham

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the 5-year, nationwide impact on road deaths of the raise in the speed limit (November 1, 1993) on 3 major interurban highways in Israel from 90 to 100 kph. Methods. We compared before–after trends in deaths as well as case fatality—an outcome independent of exposure (defined as vehicle-kilometers traveled). Results. After the raise, speeds rose by 4.5%–9.1%. Over 5 years, there was a sustained increase in deaths (15%) and case fatality rates (38%) on all interurban roads. Corresponding increases in deaths (13%) and case fatality (24%) on urban roads indicated “speed spillover.” Conclusions. Immediate increases in case fatality predicted and tracked the sustained increase in deaths from increased speeds of impact. Newtonian fourth power models predicted the effects of “small” increases in speed on large rises in case fatality rates. Countermeasures and congestion reduced the impact on deaths and case-fatality rates by more than half. PMID:15054007

  20. A probabilistic analysis reveals fundamental limitations with the environmental impact quotient and similar systems for rating pesticide risks

    PubMed Central

    Schleier, Jerome J.

    2014-01-01

    Comparing risks among pesticides has substantial utility for decision makers. However, if rating schemes to compare risks are to be used, they must be conceptually and mathematically sound. We address limitations with pesticide risk rating schemes by examining in particular the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) using, for the first time, a probabilistic analytic technique. To demonstrate the consequences of mapping discrete risk ratings to probabilities, adjusted EIQs were calculated for a group of 20 insecticides in four chemical classes. Using Monte Carlo simulation, adjusted EIQs were determined under different hypothetical scenarios by incorporating probability ranges. The analysis revealed that pesticides that have different EIQs, and therefore different putative environmental effects, actually may be no different when incorporating uncertainty. The EIQ equation cannot take into account uncertainty the way that it is structured and provide reliable quotients of pesticide impact. The EIQ also is inconsistent with the accepted notion of risk as a joint probability of toxicity and exposure. Therefore, our results suggest that the EIQ and other similar schemes be discontinued in favor of conceptually sound schemes to estimate risk that rely on proper integration of toxicity and exposure information. PMID:24795854