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Sample records for actuators corrosion protection

  1. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  2. CORROSION PROTECTION OF ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R.S.; Nelson, W.B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred. (D.C.W.)

  3. Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Dalrymple, R. S.; Nelson, W. B.

    1963-07-01

    Treatment of aluminum-base metal surfaces in an autoclave with an aqueous chromic acid solution of 0.5 to 3% by weight and of pH below 2 for 20 to 50 hrs at 160 to 180 deg C produces an extremely corrosion-resistant aluminum oxidechromium film on the surface. A chromic acid concentration of 1 to 2% and a pH of about 1 are preferred.

  4. Space Shuttle Corrosion Protection Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Cris E.

    2007-01-01

    The reusable Manned Space Shuttle has been flying into Space and returning to earth for more than 25 years. The launch pad environment can be corrosive to metallic substrates and the Space Shuttles are exposed to this environment when preparing for launch. The Orbiter has been in service well past its design life of 10 years or 100 missions. As part of the aging vehicle assessment one question under evaluation is how the thermal protection system and aging protective coatings are performing to insure structural integrity. The assessment of this cost resources and time. The information is invaluable when minimizing risk to the safety of Astronauts and Vehicle. This paper will outline a strategic sampling plan and some operational improvements made by the Orbiter Structures team and Corrosion Control Review Board.

  5. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  10. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-09-25

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack.

  11. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  12. Beryllium fluoride film protects beryllium against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O donnell, P. M.; Odonnell, P. M.

    1967-01-01

    Film of beryllium fluoride protects beryllium against corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in water containing chloride ion concentrations. The film is formed by exposing the beryllium to fluorine gas at 535 degrees C or higher and makes beryllium suitable for space applications.

  13. REDUCED-POLLUTION CORROSION-PROTECTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coating systems, designed to protect metallic components against corrosive attack using environmentally compatible materials and processes, were evaluated as potential alternatives for their higher polluting counterparts. Viable replacements were established for cyanide cadmium, ...

  14. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  15. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  16. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  17. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for active corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Dimitriya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G

    2011-03-22

    This work presents the synthesis of monodisperse, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and their application as nanocontainers loaded with corrosion inhibitor (1H-benzotriazole (BTA)) and embedded in hybrid SiOx/ZrOx sol-gel coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy. The developed porous system of mechanically stable silica nanoparticles exhibits high surface area (∼1000 m2·g(-1)), narrow pore size distribution (d∼3 nm), and large pore volume (∼1 mL·g(-1)). As a result, a sufficiently high uptake and storage of the corrosion inhibitor in the mesoporous nanocontainers was achieved. The successful embedding and homogeneous distribution of the BTA-loaded monodisperse silica nanocontainers in the passive anticorrosive SiOx/ZrOx film improve the wet corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy AA2024 in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution. The enhanced corrosion protection of this newly developed active system in comparison to the passive sol-gel coating was observed during a simulated corrosion process by the scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). These results, as well as the controlled pH-dependent release of BTA from the mesoporous silica nanocontainers without additional polyelectrolyte shell, suggest an inhibitor release triggered by the corrosion process leading to a self-healing effect. PMID:21344888

  19. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  20. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  1. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  2. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  3. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Protection for a Laser Diode Ignited Actuator

    SciTech Connect

    SALAS, FREDERICK J.; SANCHEZ, DANIEL H.; WEINLEIN, JOHN HARVEY

    2003-06-01

    The use of laser diodes in devices to ignite pyrotechnics provides unique new capabilities including the elimination of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses entering the device. The Faraday cage formed by the construction of these devices removes the concern of inadvertent ignition of the energetic material. However, the laser diode itself can be damaged by ESD pulses, therefore, to enhance reliability, some protection of the laser diode is necessary. The development of the MC4612 Optical Actuator has included a circuit to protect the laser diode from ESD pulses including the ''Fisher'' severe human body ESD model. The MC4612 uses a laser diode and is designed to replace existing hot-wire actuators. Optical energy from a laser diode, instead of electrical energy, is used to ignite the pyrotechnic. The protection circuit is described along with a discussion of how the circuit design addresses and circumvents the historic 1Amp/1Watt requirement that has been applicable to hot-wire devices.

  4. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  5. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  6. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  7. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  8. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  9. Molybdate Coatings for Protecting Aluminum Against Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion coatings that comprise mixtures of molybdates and several additives have been subjected to a variety of tests to evaluate their effectiveness in protecting aluminum and alloys of aluminum against corrosion. Molybdate conversion coatings are under consideration as replacements for chromate conversion coatings, which have been used for more than 70 years. The chromate coatings are highly effective in protecting aluminum and its alloys against corrosion but are also toxic and carcinogenic. Hexavalent molybdenum and, hence, molybdates containing hexavalent molybdenum, have received attention recently as replacements for chromates because molybdates mimic chromates in a variety of applications but exhibit significantly lower toxicity. The tests were performed on six proprietary formulations of molybdate conversion coatings, denoted formulations A through F, on panels of aluminum alloy 2024-T3. A bare alloy panel was also included in the tests. The tests included electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measurements of corrosion potentials, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  10. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  11. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion control... is an electrically insulating type must also have low moisture absorption and high...

  12. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  13. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  14. Protection of reinforcement with corrosion inhibitors, phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allyn, M.; Frantz, G.C.; Stephens, J.E.

    1998-11-01

    Costs due to corrosion in reinforcement in concrete caused by deicing salts has been estimated at up to $1 billion per year in the US alone. For most situations, corrosion inhibiting admixtures offer significant advantages over other protection methods to delay initiation of corrosion for the service life of the structure. Two new prototype corrosion inhibiting chemicals were evaluated and compared with two commercial corrosion inhibiting admixtures as well as with a typical air-entrained control concrete. Corrosion testing consisted of weekly wetting (with salt solution) and drying cycles applied to slab type specimens and to both 2-inch and 3-inch diameter lollipop specimens. Some lollipop specimens were also `pre-cracked` prior to corrosion testing. Linear polarization techniques measured corrosion rates. Reinforcing bar were removed and visually examined at completion of testing. Other concrete material test results included compression strength, freeze-thaw resistance, and absorption.

  15. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  16. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  17. The corrosion protection of metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Danford, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

  18. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  19. Corrosion protection by sonoelectrodeposited organic films on zinc coated steel.

    PubMed

    Et Taouil, Abdeslam; Mahmoud, Mahmoud Mourad; Lallemand, Fabrice; Lallemand, Séverine; Gigandet, Marie-Pierre; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    A variety of coatings based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole were deposited on zinc coated steel in presence or absence of ultrasound, and studied in terms of corrosion protection. Cr III and Cr VI commercial passivation were used as references. Depth profiling showed a homogeneous deposit for Cr III, while SEM imaging revealed good surface homogeneity for Cr VI layers. These chromium-based passivations ensured good protection against corrosion. Polypyrrole (PPy) was also electrochemically deposited on zinc coated steel with and without high frequency ultrasound irradiation in aqueous sodium tartrate-molybdate solution. Such PPy coatings act as a physical barrier against corrosive species. PPy electrosynthesized in silent conditions exhibits similar properties to Cr VI passivation with respect to corrosion protection. Ultrasound leads to more compact and more homogeneous surface structures for PPy, as well as to more homogeneous distribution of doping molybdate anions within the film. Far better corrosion protection is exhibited for such sonicated films. PMID:22516111

  20. Corrosion Protection for Space and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2007-01-01

    Florida is home to NASA's Launch Operations Center. Since its establishment in July 1962, the spaceport has served as the departure gate for every American manned mission and hundreds of advanced scientific spacecraft under the Launch Services Program. The center was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center in late 1963 to honor the president who put America on the path to the moon. Today, NASA is on the edge of a bold new chaIlenge: the ConsteIlation Program. ConsteIlation is a NASA program to create a new generation of spacecraft for human spaceflight, consisting primarily of the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles, the Orion crew capsule, the Earth Departure stage and the Lunar access module. These spacecraft will be capable of performing a variety of missions, from Space Station resupply to lunar landings. The ambitious new endeavor caIls for NASA to return human explorers to the moon and then venture even farther, to Mars and beyond. As the nation's premier spaceport, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) will playa critical role in this new chapter in exploration, particularly in the conversion of the launch facilities to accommodate the new launch vehicles. To prepare for this endeavor, the launch site and facilities for the next generation of crew and cargo vehicles must be redesigned, assembled and tested. One critical factor that is being carefuIly considered during the renovation is protecting the new facilities and structures from corrosion and deterioration.

  1. Biobased polymers for corrosion protection of metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anticorrosive biobased polymers were developed in our lab. We isolated an exopolysaccharide produced by a microbe that, when coated on metal substrates, exhibited unique corrosion inhibition. Corrosion is a worldwide problem and impacts the economy, jeopardizes human health and safety, and impedes t...

  2. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  3. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 hr. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  4. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  5. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  6. MOSFET Switching Circuit Protects Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A small-footprint, full surface-mount-component printed circuit board employs MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) power switches to switch high currents from any input power supply from 3 to 30 V. High-force shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators generally require high current (up to 9 A at 28 V) to actuate. SMA wires (the driving element of the actuators) can be quickly overheated if power is not removed at the end of stroke, which can damage the wires. The new analog driver prevents overheating of the SMA wires in an actuator by momentarily removing power when the end limit switch is closed, thereby allowing complex control schemes to be adopted without concern for overheating. Either an integral pushbutton or microprocessor-controlled gate or control line inputs switch current to the actuator until the end switch line goes from logic high to logic low state. Power is then momentarily removed (switched off by the MOSFET). The analog driver is suited to use with nearly any SMA actuator.

  7. Agricultural Polymers for Corrosion Protection of Metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. When metals come in contact with different environments such as air, water, chemical products and pollutants, they begin to degrade as the metal interacts with its environment. This research investigates the...

  8. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  9. The corrosion protection of aluminum by various anodizing treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion protection to 6061-T6 aluminum, afforded by both teflon-impregnated anodized coats (Polylube and Tufram) and hard-anodized coats (water sealed and dichromate sealed), was studied at both pH 5.5 and pH 9.5, with an exposure period of 28 days in 3.5 percent NaCl solution (25 C) for each specimen. In general, corrosion protection for all specimens was better at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5. Protection by a Tufram coat proved superior to that afforded by Polylube at each pH, with corrosion protection by the hard-anodized, water-sealed coat at pH 9.5 providing the best protection. Electrochemical work in each case was corroborated by microscopic examination of the coats after exposure. Corrosion protection by Tufram at pH 9.5 was most comparable to that of the hard-anodized samples, although pitting and some cracking of the coat did occur.

  10. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-07

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  11. The corrosion protection of 2219-T87 aluminum by anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    Various types of anodizing coatings were studied for 2219-T87 aluminum. These include both type II and type III anodized coats which were water sealed and a newly developed and proprietary Magnaplate HCR (TM) coat. Results indicate that type II anodizing is not much superior to type II anodizing as far as corrosion protection for 2219-T87 aluminum is concerned. Magnaplate HCR (TM) coatings should provide superior corrosion protection over an extended period of time using a coating thickness of 51 microns (2.0 mils).

  12. Protect nuclear plant fasteners from boric acid corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Moisidis, N.; Popescu, M.; Ratiu, M. )

    1992-03-01

    Boric acid corrosion of pump and valve fasteners in pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants can be prevented by implementing appropriate fastener steel replacement and extended inspections to detect and correct the cause of leakage. In this paper a three-phase corrosion protection program based on system operability, outage-related accessibility, and cost of fastener replacement versus maintenance frequency increase is presented. A selection criteria for fastener material is also presented. Degradation or failure of pressure retaining fasteners at pumps and valves has been reported in several areas exposed to leakage of closures in long-term service. The resulting boric acid corrosion experienced in PWR systems is defined as an accelerated process produced when water evaporates from leaking coolant. The primary detrimental effect of boric acid leakage is wastage (or general dissolution corrosion) of low-alloy carbon steel fasteners.

  13. Surface modification for corrosion protection of steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Ali

    Corrosion of carbon steel oil pipelines in the sweet environments has been a well- known problem in the oil industry all over the world and corrosion inhibitors of the film forming type have been widely used to combat this type of corrosion. In this project numerous effort has been made to devise a similar way of corrosion mitigation by producing an impermeable and protective coating made of precipitated iron carbonate scale. Based on the previous works it was suggested that iron carbonate scale as the corrosion product (of carbon steel and CO2) could to some extent offer protection to its substrate and reduce the corrosion rate effectively. However, precipitating an adherent and protective iron carbonate scale has not been an easy job. Our main objectives during this work have been firstly to define the favourable conditions under which an iron carbonate scale would precipitate in the system and then to investigate how the protective characteristics of the scale could be improved. The effects of several environmental variables like solution pH, solution temperature, additives (scale inhibitors), stirring and solution composition on the scale properties such as adhesion, surface coverage, stability and porosity (scale density) have been investigated. Simultaneously, the adverse effects of certain conditions or variables that tended to reduce the scale protectiveness or prevent its precipitation have been investigated and discussed. Some of the presented results are rather qualitative; nevertheless it is believed that they have contributed in the better understanding of the iron carbonate scale properties and its precipitation process. Based on the results and conclusions of this project few suggestions have been made at the end for the possible continuation of this work.

  14. 46 CFR 129.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 129.210... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a... exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction and must be resistant to corrosion....

  15. 46 CFR 129.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 129.210... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a... exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction and must be resistant to corrosion....

  16. 46 CFR 129.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 129.210... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a... exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction and must be resistant to corrosion....

  17. 46 CFR 129.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 129.210... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a... exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction and must be resistant to corrosion....

  18. 46 CFR 129.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 129.210... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a... exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction and must be resistant to corrosion....

  19. Renewal of corrosion protection of coated aluminum after welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Effectiveness of conversion coatings designed to protect aluminum alloys against atmospheric corrosion is reduced after exposure to high temperature or welding. Damaged coating should be manually stripped six inches from the weld and then recoated by sponge or spray with the original solution.

  20. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  1. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  2. Corrosion protection of aluminum by silane-based surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun

    treatment layers and their stability in the under-film corrosion environment. Salt spray test results showed that two-step BTSE/gamma-APS could provide the same or better corrosion protection than that offered by a standard chromate treatment. Polyester or polyurethane powder-painted Al panels, pretreated with this treatment, also displayed excellent corrosion performances in the salt spray test and filiform corrosion test. Thus, the advantage of this treatment is that is combines a temporary rust prevention and a permanent prepaint treatment into one simple approach. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to study the various pre-paint treatments under the polyester paint. It provides more detailed mechanistic information about corrosion processes than salt spray test and filiform corrosion test. However, combination of corrosion tests that involve different corrosion mechanisms may still be necessary to have a better understanding of corrosion behavior of a new treatment.

  3. 40 CFR 280.31 - Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operation and maintenance of corrosion... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.31 Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection. All owners and operators of steel UST systems with corrosion protection must comply with...

  4. 40 CFR 280.31 - Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operation and maintenance of corrosion... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.31 Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection. All owners and operators of steel UST systems with corrosion protection must comply with...

  5. 40 CFR 280.31 - Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operation and maintenance of corrosion... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.31 Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection. All owners and operators of steel UST systems with corrosion protection must comply with...

  6. 40 CFR 280.31 - Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation and maintenance of corrosion... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.31 Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection. All owners and operators of steel UST systems with corrosion protection must comply with...

  7. 40 CFR 280.31 - Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operation and maintenance of corrosion... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) General Operating Requirements § 280.31 Operation and maintenance of corrosion protection. All owners and operators of steel UST systems with corrosion protection must comply with...

  8. ''Ftorlon'' coats for corrosion protection of electrodialysis units

    SciTech Connect

    Shigorina, I.I.; Egorov, B.N.; Kalinkin, A.V.; Kapustin, A.F.; Shigorin, V.G.; Smirnova, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    This article examines the coats for protecting components of electrodialysis units (housing, frames, etc.) with respect to chemical stability, electric insulation properties, and with reference to atomic power station (APS) decontamination and radiation resistance. The physicomechanical properties of the coats were investigated by the standard methods. The radiation resistance of the coats was judged from the change in their physicomechanical and protective properties in corrosive media by placing the coat samples in the gamma-field of a Co/sup 60/ source at an intensity of 3.5-4 Gr/sec. Recommends the coat SP-CSPE-31 based on chlorosulfonated polythylene (TU-11-118-74) for corrosion protection of the EDU bulky equipment designed for desalination of sea water for industrial and household purposes.

  9. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  10. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  11. Corrosion-Induced Pitting Damage Detection Using Remote Actuation and Sensing of Vibration and Wave Propagation Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, N. C.; Adams, D. E.

    2008-02-01

    Pressurized air tanks installed in the front-driver side of a military ground vehicle can experience corrosion-induced pitting, which reduces the sidewall thickness in localized areas and results in lower burst strengths. Due to how the tank is mounted, corrosion consistently occurs on the bottom of the tanks at the end furthest from the driver seat making in situ visual inspection ineffective. A simple finite element model was created in order to facilitate the creation of methods that can provide an indication of which tanks must be replaced immediately and which tanks can continue to operate. The model was used to investigate the sensitivity of the tank's resonant frequencies to changes in cross-sectional properties. As a result of this simple model, an analysis method was formulated using a spectral coherence-based methodology for detecting corrosion from measurements taken at the opposite end of the tank from the damage. This analysis technique was then applied to impact response data collected from six canisters with varying levels of pitting. In order to obtain a more consistent input a piezoelectric actuator was adhered to the canister and then swept from 150 to 5000 Hz. Results from both of these methods showed a repeatable separation between the specimens with corrosion and the healthy air tanks.

  12. ''Ftorlon'' coats for corrosion protection of electrodialysis units

    SciTech Connect

    Shigorina, I.I.; Egorov, B.N.; Kapustin, A.F.; Katlinkin, A.V.; Shigorin, V.G.; Smirnova, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Electrodialysis units have been in ever wider use in recent times. Selection of polymer coats stable under the operating conditions prevalent in such units is an urgent task, as this will permit their use in place of scarce and costly metals. Various hot and cold dried dried ''Ftorlon'' coats were chosen for specific tests. Coats based on chlorosulfonated polyethylene were also investigated. The samples were tested on a specially fabricated apparatus in corrosive media with or without applying direct current. The tests show that the coats selected are distinguished by high adhesion and physicomechanical characteristics, can be easily decontaminated and have sufficient radiation resistance. The following coats have a high chemical stability and adhesion strength and were chosen for further testing: enamel SP-FL-12+lac SP-FL-1 and Ftorlon organodispersion SP-FL-13. Calculations show that the economic benefit from the protection of EDU's with Ftorlon coats is 18.8 rubles/m/sup 2/. Both coats may be recommended for corrosion protection of the various components of EDU's, while coats based on SP-FL-13 are suitable for corrosion protection of components submitted to the action of nitric acid to a concentration of 30% at a current density of up to 300 A/m/sup 2/ and temperatures up to 333/sup 0/K.

  13. 46 CFR 120.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 120.210... INSTALLATION General Requirements § 120.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a) Electrical... environments must be of suitable construction and corrosion-resistant....

  14. 46 CFR 120.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 120.210... INSTALLATION General Requirements § 120.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a) Electrical... environments must be of suitable construction and corrosion-resistant....

  15. 46 CFR 120.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 120.210... INSTALLATION General Requirements § 120.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a) Electrical... environments must be of suitable construction and corrosion-resistant....

  16. 46 CFR 120.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 120.210... INSTALLATION General Requirements § 120.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a) Electrical... environments must be of suitable construction and corrosion-resistant....

  17. 46 CFR 120.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 120.210... INSTALLATION General Requirements § 120.210 Protection from wet and corrosive environments. (a) Electrical... environments must be of suitable construction and corrosion-resistant....

  18. Corrosion protection pays off for coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.

    2006-11-15

    Zinc has long been used to hot-dip galvanise steel to deliver protection in harsh environments. Powder River Basin or eastern coal-fired plants benefit from using galvanized steel for conveyors, vibratory feeders, coal hoppers, chutes, etc. because maintenance costs are essentially eliminated. When life cycle costs for this process are compared to an alternative three-coal paint system for corrosion protection, the latter costs 5-10 times more than hot-dip galvanizing. An AEP Power Plant in San Juan, Puerto Rico and the McDuffie Coal Terminal in Mobile, AL, USA have both used hot-dip galvanized steel. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Corrosion protection of metals by silane surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Danqing

    2005-07-01

    The need for toxic chromate replacements in metal-finishing industries has prompted an intensive search for replacement technologies in recent years. Among the replacements that have been proposed, those that are based upon the use of organofunctional silanes rank very high in terms of performance, broad applicability as well as ease of application. This dissertation presents a four-part work: (1) structural characterization of silane films on metals, (2) mechanism studies of silane-treated metal systems, (3) development of water-based silane systems, and (4) measurements of other properties of silane films. In part 1, silane films, i.e., bis-[triethoxysilylpropyl]tetrasulfide (bis-sulfur silane) and bis-[trimethoxysilylpropyl]amine (bis-amino silane) were deposited on AA 2024-T3 and were characterized mainly using reflection-absorption Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-RA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. In part 2, the mechanistic study of corrosion protection of AA 2024-T3 by bis-sulfur silane film was carried out. In summation, the following two factors play critical roles in the corrosion protection of AA 2024-T3: (1) the formation of a highly crosslinked interfacial layer, and (2) high water resistance of silane films. The former inhibits corrosion in the following two ways: (1) blocking favorable sites for water adsorption by the formation of AlOSi bonds at the interface which effectively reduces the tendency of aqueous corrosion; and (2) bonding tightly to the metal and thus restricting transportation of the existing corrosion products away from their original sites which hinders pit growth. It should be noted that a high density of AlOSi bonds can be obtained employing bis-silanes rather than mono-silanes. A high water resistance makes water penetration difficult in silane films. This is essential for preventing AlOSi bonds from hydrolysis. In part 3, test results for newly-developed water-based silane systems were

  20. Corrosion protection mechanism of polyaniline blended organic coating on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaram, R.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2009-07-01

    Epoxy-coal tar coatings are widely used to protect steel structures exposed to marine atmosphere due to their good barrier property. However, the presence of micropores and microcracks formed during the coating formation leads to failure of the coating due to permeation of corrosive ions. In recent years, it has been established that the coatings containing polyaniline (PANI) is able to protect pinholes and defects due to its passivating ability. Hence, a study has been made on the effect of polyaniline content (1 and 3%) in epoxy-coal tar coating on the corrosion protection of steel in 3% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Both phosphate- and chloride-doped polyanilines were prepared by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. From EIS studies, it has been found that the resistance value of the coatings containing 1 and 3% phosphate-doped polyaniline and 3% chloride-doped polyaniline pigmented coatings are similar to 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} even after 90 days exposure to NaCl solution, which are two orders high in comparison to that of conventional coal tar epoxy coatings. Besides, the conducting state of polyaniline has been found to be decreased after exposure to NaCl solution due to redox property of PANI. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have shown that polyaniline forms a complex layer with iron beneath the coating along with iron oxide.

  1. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin IV : The Use of Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Although the corrosion resistance of sheet duralumin can be greatly improved by suitable heat treatment, protection of the surface is still necessary if long life under varied service conditions is to be insured. The coatings used for this purpose may be grouped into three classes: the varnish type of coating, the oxide type produced by a chemical treatment of the surface, and metallic coatings, of which aluminum appears to be the most promising. Since the necessary weather exposure tests are not complete, some of the conclusions regarding the value of various surface coatings are necessarily tentative.

  2. An Innovative Ceramic Corrosion Protection System for Zircaloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald H. Baney, Dr. D. Butt, Dr. P. Demkowicz, Dr. G. Fuchs Department of Materials Science; James S. Tulenko, Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering; University of Florida.

    2003-02-19

    Light Water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is currently limited by thermal, chemical and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of the fuel in incore operation. Corrosion of the zirconium based (Zircaloy-4) alloy cladding of the fuel is a primary limiting factor. Recent success at the University of Florida in developing thin ceramic films with great adhesive properties for metal substrates offers an innovative breakthrough for eliminating a major weakness of the Zircaloy clad. ?The University of Florida proposes to coat the existing Zircaloy clad tubes with a ceramic coating for corrosion protection. An added bonus of this approach would be the implementation of a boron-containing burnable poison outer layer will also be demonstrated as part of the ceramic coating development. In this proposed effort, emphasis will be on the ceramic coating with only demonstration of feasibility on the burnable outer coating approach. This proposed program i s expected to give a step change (approximately a doubling) in clad lifetime before failure due to corrosion. In the development of ceramic coatings for Zircaloy-4 clad, silicon carbide and zirconium carbide coatings will first be applied to Zircaloy-4 coupons and cladding samples by thermal assisted chemical vapor deposition, plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition or by laser ablation deposition. All of these processes are in use at the University of Florida and have shown great potential. The questions of adhesion and thermal expansion mismatch of the ceramic coating to the Zircaloy substrate will be addressed. Several solutions to these conditions will be examined, if needed. These solutions include the use of a zirconium oxide compliant layer, employment of a laser roughened surface and the use of a gradient composition interlayer. These solutions have already been shown to be effective for other high modulus coatings on metal substrates. Mechanical properties and adhesion of the

  3. 46 CFR 183.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 183.210... corrosive environments. (a) Electrical equipment used in the following locations must be dripproof: (1) A.... (c) Electrical equipment exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction...

  4. 46 CFR 183.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 183.210... corrosive environments. (a) Electrical equipment used in the following locations must be dripproof: (1) A.... (c) Electrical equipment exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction...

  5. 46 CFR 183.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 183.210... corrosive environments. (a) Electrical equipment used in the following locations must be dripproof: (1) A.... (c) Electrical equipment exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction...

  6. 46 CFR 183.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 183.210... corrosive environments. (a) Electrical equipment used in the following locations must be dripproof: (1) A.... (c) Electrical equipment exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction...

  7. 46 CFR 183.210 - Protection from wet and corrosive environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection from wet and corrosive environments. 183.210... corrosive environments. (a) Electrical equipment used in the following locations must be dripproof: (1) A.... (c) Electrical equipment exposed to corrosive environments must be of suitable construction...

  8. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  9. CRITICAL FACTORS FOR THE TRANSITION FROM CHROMATE TO CHROMATE-FREE CORROSION PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this research program is to acquire a fundamental understanding of the chemical and physical processes and mechanisms of corrosion protection by chromate-based coatings applied to metal surfaces with a specific focus on corrosion protection of aluminum al...

  10. Recent Developments on Autonomous Corrosion Protection Through Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Gillis, M.; Blanton, M.; Hanna, J.; Rawlins, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating, based on microencapsulation, for the autonomous detection and control of corrosion. Microencapsulation has been validated and optimized to incorporate desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition, through corrosion-initiated release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release triggered by mechanical damage. While proof-of-concept results have been previously reported, more recent research and development efforts have concentrated on improving coating compatibility and synthesis procedure scalability, with a targeted goal of obtaining easily dispersible pigment-grade type microencapsulated materials. The recent progress has resulted in the development of pH-sensitive microparticles as a corrosion-triggered delivery system for corrosion indicators and inhibitors. The synthesis and early corrosion indication results obtained with coating formulations that incorporate these microparticles are reported. The early corrosion indicating results were obtained with color changing and with fluorescent indicators.

  11. Cathodic protection against crevice corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, W.; Pimenta, G.

    1995-10-01

    Localized corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater, mainly under crevices, limits the alloys` use in such environments. An in-situ test program was conducted to study this corrosive process and possible protective measures. Attention focused on the resistance of several types of high-alloy steels under corrosive conditions and on the response of type 316 stainless steel to cathodic protection (CP) by carbon steel and zinc anodes. It was found that CP could effectively mitigate crevice corrosion in these subsea conditions.

  12. Recent Developments on Microencapsulation for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Jolley, Scott T.; Surma, Jan M.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns recent progress in the development of a multifunctional smart coating based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of desired corrosion control functionalities, such as early corrosion detection and inhibition through corrosion controlled release of corrosion indicators and inhibitors, as well as self-healing agent release when mechanical damage occurs.While proof-of-concept results have been reported previously, more recent efforts have been concentrated in technical developments to improve coating compatibility, synthesis procedure scalability, as well as fine tuning the release property of encapsulated active agents.

  13. Replacement of environmentally hazardous corrosion protection paints on the space shuttle main engine using wire arc sprayed aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.L.; Sanders, H.L.; Mendrek, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting hazardous emissions, environmentally safe thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against pitting corrosion leading to stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. Coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test, cryogenic flexibility and thermal cycle test results will be presented. Wire arc sprayed aluminum is proving to provide corrosion protection in cryogenic aerospace applications.

  14. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  15. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  16. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  17. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  18. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  19. Microbial Iron Respiration Can Protect Steel from Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Dubiel, M.; Hsu, C. H.; Chien, C. C.; Mansfeld, F.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  20. Microbial iron respiration can protect steel from corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, M; Hsu, C H; Chien, C C; Mansfeld, F; Newman, D K

    2002-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  1. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  2. The Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Mitchell, M. L.; Torres, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion rates for bare and coated Magnesium alloy AZ31B have been measured. Two coatings, Dow-23(Trademark) and Tagnite(Trademark), have been tested by electrochemical methods and their effectiveness determined. Electrochemical methods employed were the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR) and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS). In addition, general corrosion and stress corrosion methods were employed to examine the effectiveness of the above coatings in 90 percent humidity. Results from these studies are presented.

  3. Innovative microbial fuel cell for energy harvesting and corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Chih-Chien; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Yu, Xiong

    2011-06-01

    Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs) are batteries driven by bacteria. MFCs have the potential of powering small sensors in remote areas and disposing organic waste safely by harvesting the energy stored in the waste products. From previous research in this field, a few important factors for MFC performance have been identified. These include the internal resistance of MFC, the surface area of anode with catalyst for the biofilm development, the type and number of bacteria, and the abundance of nutritional supplies to the bacteria. This paper describes the design of a novel single chamber MFC (SMFC) with carbon electrodes. Experiments were conducted to establish the relationship between each parameter and the power production. It is shown here that this SCMFC can generate electrical current without the use of PEM membranes or additives; the maximum voltage of around 411 mV can be achieved at the room temperature. These results also measured a various parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen and solution conductivity during the operation of SMFC. Finally, experiment was conducted to evaluate an innovative concept of using MFC for corrosion protection.

  4. Trivalent chromium pre-treatment for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys -- an electrochemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, V.S.; Beckert, D.W.; Fabiszewski, A.S.; Pearlstein, F.

    1994-12-31

    A corrosion resistant chemical conversion coating on aluminum alloys was developed using a trivalent chromium bath. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dc-polarization measurements were made to determine the nature of the surface films formed. The results showed a 10 to 100 fold increase in the polarization resistance of the surface films compared to the untreated aluminum alloy. These electrochemical results compared well with the corrosion behavior in salt spray tests. The trivalent chromium-treated surfaces showed no corrosion for up to 200 hours in 5% salt spray. A post-treatment with an oxidizer even further improved its resistance which almost doubled its corrosion protection.

  5. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  6. Marine corrosion protective coatings of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Husain, Esam; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Taha-Tijerina, Jose Jaime; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-05-22

    Recently, two-dimensional, layered materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been identified as interesting materials for a range of applications. Here, we demonstrate the corrosion prevention applications of h-BN in marine coatings. The performance of h-BN/polymer hybrid coatings, applied on stainless steel, were evaluated using electrochemical techniques in simulated seawater media [marine media]. h-BN/polymer coating shows an efficient corrosion protection with a low corrosion current density of 5.14 × 10(-8) A/cm(2) and corrosion rate of 1.19 × 10(-3) mm/year and it is attributed to the hydrofobic, inert and dielectric nature of boron nitride. The results indicated that the stainless steel with coatings exhibited improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic analysis were used to propose a mechanism for the increased corrosion resistance of h-BN coatings. PMID:23618222

  7. Corrosion Protection of Launch Infrastructure and Hardware Through the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, has been a challenging and costly problem that has affected NASA's launch operations since the inception of the Space Program. Corrosion studies began at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term protective coatings for the atmospheric protection of carbon steel. NASA's KSC Beachside Corrosion Test Site, which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive natural conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acidic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous efforts at KSC identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosiye environment at the launch pads. Knowledge on materials degradation, obtained by facing the highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment, as well as limitations imposed by the environmental impact of corrosion control, have led researchers at NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory to establish a new technology development capability in the area of corrosion prevention, detection, and mitigation at KSC that is included as one of the "highest priority" technologies identified by NASA's integrated technology roadmap. A historical perspective highlighting the challenges encountered in protecting launch infrastructure and hardware from corrosion during the life of the Space Shuttle program and the new technological advances that have resulted from facing the unique and highly corrosive conditions of the Space Shuttle launch environment will be presented.

  8. Regenerative nano-hybrid coating tailored for autonomous corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Tran, The Hai; Vimalanandan, Ashokanand; Genchev, Georgi; Fickert, Johannes; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Rohwerder, Michael

    2015-07-01

    A novel bilayer coating system for autonomous corrosion-triggered self-healing is demonstrated. The storage of the encapsulated monomer and the catalyst is separated in two different layers. The encapsulated catalyst is stored inside a metallic coating, which ensures its activity even for an extended exposure time. The release from the capsules is triggered by corrosion and the correlated pH increase. PMID:26009860

  9. SQUID magnetometers for studying corrosion and corrosion protection in aircraft aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wikswo, J.P. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Studies at Vanderbilt and elsewhere have demonstrated that superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers can be utilized for quantitative measurements of both corrosion activity and material loss in aircraft aluminum alloys. SQUIDs provide sufficient spatial resolution the distribution of hidden corrosion currents can be mapped. The sensitivity of SQUIDs operating at 4 K in liquid helium is such that corrosion can be detected for salt concentrations as low as 1 part per million, and corrosion in 4% NaCl can be detected through 1.4 cm of aluminum. While measurements of the magnetic field from galvanic currents is straightforward in the laboratory, where ferromagnetic fasteners can be eliminated and low frequency noise and the earth`s magnetic field can be shielded, this technique has yet to be demonstrated on aircraft on the flight line. Advanced, low-frequency SQUID eddy current measurements utilizing sheet inducers and phase-sensitive detection offers a depth-selective technique to image material loss deep in aluminum structures. The size of the signal makes this approach highly suitable for implementation with 77 K, liquid- nitrogen cooled SQUIDs. Thus SQUIDs may be useful both for quantitative, laboratory assessment of the rate of hidden corrosion in aircraft samples, and for imaging the extent of second- and third-layer corrosion damage in aircraft. 56 refs.

  10. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 mW/ cm² in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm², respectively. PMID:26580661

  11. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 μW/ cm2 in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm2, respectively. PMID:26580661

  12. Corrosion of connectors used in equipment protecting against falls from a height.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Connectors are commonly found in personal equipment protecting against falls from a height. They are typically used outdoors and exposed to atmospheric factors, which can result in corrosion. This article presents the results of a study involving exposure of connectors to experimental corrosive media - neutral salt spray (NSS), acid salt spray (ASS), and seawater mist (for elements made of carbon steel and non-ferrous metals) - and to experimental conditions simulating the processes of pitting, stress, and intercrystalline corrosion (for equipment made of s`tainless steel). The results indicate that the main effects of corrosion on connectors include impaired operation and reduced strength of their mobile elements. The article presents methods of testing connector operation developed for this purpose. Corrosive damage to connectors has been presented in relation to potential hazards for their users. PMID:26647950

  13. Corrosion of connectors used in equipment protecting against falls from a height

    PubMed Central

    Jachowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Connectors are commonly found in personal equipment protecting against falls from a height. They are typically used outdoors and exposed to atmospheric factors, which can result in corrosion. This article presents the results of a study involving exposure of connectors to experimental corrosive media – neutral salt spray (NSS), acid salt spray (ASS), and seawater mist (for elements made of carbon steel and non-ferrous metals) – and to experimental conditions simulating the processes of pitting, stress, and intercrystalline corrosion (for equipment made of s`tainless steel). The results indicate that the main effects of corrosion on connectors include impaired operation and reduced strength of their mobile elements. The article presents methods of testing connector operation developed for this purpose. Corrosive damage to connectors has been presented in relation to potential hazards for their users. PMID:26647950

  14. Long-term corrosion protection by a thin nano-composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Lina; Tuominen, Mikko; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Pan, Jinshan; Swerin, Agne; Claesson, Per M.

    2015-12-01

    We report and discuss the corrosion protective properties of a thin nano-composite coating system consisting of an 11 μm thick polyester acrylate (PEA) basecoat, covered by an approximately 1-2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanoparticles carrying a 0.05 μm thick hexamethyl disiloxane (HMDSO) top coat. The corrosion protective properties were evaluated on carbon steel substrates immersed in 3 wt% NaCl solution by open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The protective properties of each layer, and of each pair of layers, were also evaluated to gain further understanding of the long-term protective properties offered by the nano-composite coating. The full coating system showed excellent corrosion protective properties in the corrosive environment of 3 wt% NaCl-solution for an extended period of 100 days, during which the coating impedance, at the lower frequency limit (0.01 Hz), remained above 108 Ω cm2. We suggest that the excellent corrosion protective properties of the complete coating system is due to a combination of (i) good adhesion and stability of the PEA basecoat, (ii) the surface roughness and the elongated diffusion path provided by the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles, and (iii) the low surface energy provided by the HMDSO top coat.

  15. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  16. Corrosion protection on copper by imidazole and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparac, R.; Stupnisek-Lisac, E.

    1999-11-01

    The efficiency of imidazole and its derivatives (4-methylimidazole, 4-methyl-5-hydroxymethylmidazone, 1 phenyl-4-methylimidazone, 1-[p-tolyl]-4-methylimidazone) for corrosion inhibition of copper in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated. Corrosion inhibition was studied using impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic methods. Polarization resistances calculated from the alternating current (AC) impedance measurements were in good agreement with those obtained from direct current (DC) polarization measurements. Copper samples also were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis. These studies showed that 1-(p-tolyl)-4 methylimidazone had the best inhibitory efficiency.

  17. The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 aluminum by a polyurethane-sealed anodized coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum afforded by a newly patented polyurethane seal was studied using the ac impedance technique. Values of the average corrosion rates over a 27-day exposure period in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions at pH 5.2 and pH 9.5 compared very favorably for Lockheed-prepared polyurethane-sealed and dichromate-sealed coats of the same thickness. Average corrosion rates for both specimens over the first 7 days of exposure compared well with those for a hard anodized, dichromate-sealed coat, but rose well above those for the hard anodized coat over the entire 27-day period. This is attributed both to the greater thickness of the hard anodized coat, and possibly to its inherently better corrosion protective capability.

  18. Corrosion product layers on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61: Surface chemistry and protective ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliu, S.; Llorente, I.

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the chemical composition of the corrosion product layers formed on magnesium alloys AZ31 and AZ61 following immersion in 0.6 M NaCl, with a view to better understanding their protective action. Relative differences in the chemical nature of the layers were quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDX) and low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). Corrosion behavior was investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and hydrogen evolution measurement. An inhibitive effect from the corrosion product layers was observed from EIS, principally in the case of AZ31, as confirmed by hydrogen evolution tests. A link was found between carbonate enrichment observed by XPS in the surface of the corrosion product layer, concomitant with the increase in the protective properties observed by EIS.

  19. High temperature corrosion-resistant protective coatings in stationary gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruenling, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Methods currently used to deposit protective coatings in gas turbines are reviewed, and the structure of the respective coatings is examined. The corrosion behavior of such coatings is discussed on the basis of experimental data. General trends in the preparation of protective coatings are noted.

  20. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  1. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... atmosphere, except pipelines under paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Coating material must be suitable...

  2. An alternate to chromate conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of aluminum 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruiguang

    Corrosion of high-strength aluminum alloys used for airspace application is an expensive and serious problem. The most significant environmental factor contributing to the corrosion of these alloys is water condensed from humid air and contaminated with soluble chloride salts. The Al 2024 series used for aircraft are particularly susceptible to corrosion in aqueous chloride solutions due to alloying constituents such as copper and other impurities. Chromates are efficient inhibitors of corrosion of aluminum in near neutral aqueous environments containing aggressive anions such as chlorides. Usually, aluminum alloys are initially protected by chromate conversion coatings. Additional polymer coatings are sometimes added during exposure to corrosive atmospheres such as marine environments. Although chromate coatings are widely used, they require the use of noxious solutions, so they have always presented effluent disposal problems. There are health and safety concerns over the use of chromates due to their toxicity and carcinogenic nature and, as a consequence, the environmental and health risks associated with the use of such coatings will be restricted in the future. It was these health and safety concerns that led to the development of alternative non-toxic coating processes with comparable adhesion properties and corrosion protection. A variety of process technologies are under development and are vying for acceptance in industrial markets. As an alternate conversion coating, a new titanate conversion coating was systematically researched and developed. Research concentrated on producing passive surfaces from a simple titanate solution using an immersion process. The corrosion resistance of the treated surface has been evaluated using simple, rapid electrochemical techniques as well as a more long-term salt spray test. Passivation by titanate conversion treatment exhibits many similarities to chromate conversion treatment. Based on this study of corrosion

  3. Corrosion behavior of rebar for intermittent cathodic protection of coastal bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M. | Cramer, S.D. | Covino, B.S., Jr. | Bullard, S.J. | Holcomb, G.R. | Russell, J.H. | Windisch, Jr., C.F.

    2001-02-01

    A number of reinforced concrete bridges on the Oregon coast are protected against chloride-induced corrosion damage by means of impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP). Thermal-sprayed Zn serves as the anode in these systems. Rebar in the concrete can remain passive and protected for some period of time after the CP system is turned off. The active-passive corrosion behavior of rebar in simulated pore solution (SPS) was investigated as a function of pH and Cl- concentration as part of a study of intermittent ICCP operation. Rebar corrosion rates in SPS were determined from polarization curves by fitting the Butler-Volmer equation and the linear polarization equation. Analysis of the passive film in SPS by x-ray diffraction and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed it to be largely Fe3O4. However, the Fe(OH)2 content increased with cathodic polarization time.

  4. A shape-recovery polymer coating for the corrosion protection of metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Alexander; van den Berg, Otto; Van Damme, Jonas; Verheyen, Karen; Bauters, Erwin; De Graeve, Iris; Du Prez, Filip E; Terryn, Herman

    2015-01-14

    Self-healing polymer coatings are a type of smart material aimed for advanced corrosion protection of metals. This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of two new UV-cure self-healing coatings based on acrylated polycaprolactone polyurethanes. On a macroscopic scale, the cured films all show outstanding mechanical properties, combining relatively high Young's modulus of up to 270 MPa with a strain at break above 350%. After thermal activation the strained films recover up to 97% of their original length. Optical and electron microscopy reveals the self-healing properties of these coatings on hot dip galvanized steel with scratches and microindentations. The temperature-induced closing of such defects restores the corrosion protection and barrier properties of the coating as shown by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique. Therefore, such coatings are a complementary option for encapsulation-based autonomous corrosion protection systems. PMID:25517028

  5. Anti-corrosion protection for structural members and buildings at metallurgical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Strebkov, V.T.

    2005-06-01

    This article describes anti-corrosion measures implemented by the contractor Ankor to protect the metal structures in existing shops at the Chelyabinsk Metallurgical Plant. The method used to choose the coating system and technology is described along with the practical application of an effective method for protecting metal structures from corrosion. The anti-corrosion protection given natural draft cooling tower No. 1 at the coke and coal chemicals plant is used as an example. At a low cost in materials, the coating application system proposed by the contractor made it possible to guarantee a service life of 6-7 years for the metal structures, decrease the consumption of paint and lacquer by 18%, reduce the job cost by 20%, and complete the repair on schedule.

  6. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  7. Criteria for Corrosion Protection of Aluminum-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel in Interim Wet Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.P.

    1999-09-14

    Storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other locations in the U. S. and around the world has been a concern over the past decade because of the long time interim storage requirements in water. Pitting corrosion of production aluminum-clad fuel in the early 1990''s at SRS was attributed to less than optimum quality water and corrective action taken has resulted in no new pitting since 1994. The knowledge gained from the corrosion surveillance testing and other investigations at SRS over the past 8 years has provided an insight into factors affecting the corrosion of aluminum in relatively high purity water. This paper reviews some of the early corrosion issues related to aluminum-clad spent fuel at SRS, including fundamentals for corrosion of aluminum alloys. It updates and summarizes the corrosion surveillance activities supporting the future storage of over 15,000 research reactor fuel assemblies from countries over the world during the next 15-20 years. Criteria are presented for providing corrosion protection for aluminum-clad spent fuel in interim storage during the next few decades while plans are developed for a more permanent disposition.

  8. Embedded reference electrodes for corrosion potential monitoring, electrochemical characterization, and controlled-potential cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Bobbi Jo Elizabeth

    A thin wire Ag/AgCl reference electrode was prepared using 50 mum Ag wire in dilute FeCl3. The wire was embedded beneath the polyurethane topcoat of two sacrificial coating systems to monitor their corrosion potential. This is the first report of a reference electrode embedded between organic coating layers to monitor substrate health. The embedded reference electrode (ERE) successfully monitored the corrosion potential of Mg primer on AA 2024-T3 for 800 days of constant immersion in dilute Harrison's solution. Zn primer on steel had low accuracy in comparison. This is in part due to short circuiting by Zn oxidation products, which are much more conductive than Mg corrosion products. Data interpretation was improved through statistical analysis. On average, ERE corrosion potentials are 0.1 to 0.2 V and 0.2 to 0.3 V more positive than a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in solution for AA 2024-T3 and steel coating systems, respectively. Further research may confirm that ERE obtains corrosion potential information not possible by an exterior, conventional reference electrode. The ERE is stable under polarization. AA 2024-T3 was polarized to -0.95 V vs ERE to emulate controlled potential cathodic protection (CPCP) applications. Polarizations of -0.75 V vs ERE are recommended for future experiments to minimize cathodic delamination. The ERE was utilized to analyze coating mixtures of lithium carbonate, magnesium nitrate, and Mg metal on AA2024-T3. Corrosion potential, low frequency impedance by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and noise resistance by electrochemical noise method (ENM) were reported. Coating performance ranking is consistent with standard electrochemical characterization and visual analyses. The results suggest anti-corrosion resistance superior to a standard Mg primer following 1600 hours of B117 salt spray. Both lithium carbonate and magnesium nitrate are necessary to achieve corrosion protection. Unique corrosion protective coatings for

  9. Corrosion and Protection of Lead Anodes in Acidic Copper Sulphate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, L.; Astete, E.; Crisotomo, G.; Simpson, J.; Cifuentes, G.; Pilleux, M.

    It is known that lead anodes used in the industrial extraction of copper by electrolysis (electrowinning) suffer corrosion as a result of accidental or intended current interruptions. In order to improve understanding of the corrosion and protection of such anodes, the effects of the concentrations of copper, sulphuric acid, cobalt, iron, manganese, chloride and an organic additive (guar) on the corrosion of lead have been studied by means of weight loss tests and surface analysis techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy). The rate of corrosion of lead during current interruptions increases with increasing concentration of sulphuric acid and copper, whereas it decreases markedly in the presence of cobalt and iron and, to a lesser extent, in the presence of chloride and the organic additive. Manganese is the only impurity whose presence does not reduce the rate of corrosion; it is also the only element which precipitates in significant amounts on the lead anode surface under the conditions studied. A method is proposed to establish the optimum anodic protection current density during current interruptions in electrowinning cells. Three current density ranges have been found, of which the 'high' protection range could be caused by the degree of compactness acquired by the PbO2 layer at applied anodic current densities in excess of 60 A m-2.

  10. TiO2 membranes for concurrent photocatalytic organic degradation and corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Robert; Hatat-Fraile, Melisa; He, Horatio; Arlos, Maricor; Servos, Mark R.; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2015-10-01

    Organic contaminants and corrosion in water treatment effluents are a current global problem and the development of effective methods to facilitate the removal of organic contaminants and corrosion control strategies are required to mitigate this problem. TiO2 nanomaterials that are exposed to UV light can generate electron-hole pairs, which undergo redox reactions to produce hydroxyl radicals from adsorbed molecular oxygen. They hydroxyl radicals are able to oxidize organic contaminants in water. This same process can be used in conjunction to protect metals from corrosion via cathodic polarization. In this work, TiO2 nanomaterials were synthesized and electrophoretically deposited on conductive substrates to serve as films or membranes. An illuminated TiO2 film on a conductive surface served as the photoanode and assisted in the cathodic protection of stainless steel (SS304) and the degradation of organic pollutants, in this case glucose. This proof-of-concept relied on photoelectrochemical experiments conducted using a potentiostat and a xenon lamp illumination source. The open-circuit potential changes that determine whether a metal is protected from corrosion under illumination was observed; and the electrical characteristics of the TiO2 film or membrane under dark and arc lamp illumination conditions were also analyzed. Furthermore, the effect of organic contaminants on the photocathodic protection mechanism and the oxidation of glucose during this process were explored.

  11. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide ion implantation in AISI 304 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, A.; Decker, M.; Klein, O.; Karl, H.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of highly chemically inert titanium dioxide synthesized by ion beam implantation for corrosion protection of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. More specifically, the prevention of galvanic corrosion between carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and AISI 304 was investigated. Corrosion performance of TiO2 implanted AISI 304 - examined for different implantation and annealing parameters - is strongly influenced by implantation fluence. Experimental results show that a fluence of 5 × 1016 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1017 cm-2 (O+) is sufficient to prevent pitting corrosion significantly, while galvanic corrosion with CFRP can already be noticeably reduced by an implantation fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 (Ti+) and 1 × 1016 cm-2 (O+). Surface roughness, implantation energy and annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C show only little influence on the corrosion behavior. TEM analysis indicates the existence of stoichiometric TiO2 inside the steel matrix for medium fluences and the formation of a separated metal oxide layer for high fluences.

  12. Electrochemical characterization of plasma polymer coatings in corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yenfong; Yu, Qingsong

    2005-07-01

    Low-temperature plasma polymerization is a promising pretreatment technique to create environmentally friendly coating systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. In this study, the pretreatment effects of plasma treatment and plasma polymerization on corrosion properties of alclad aluminum alloy 2024-T3 ([2A]) were investigated using electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic polarization (CP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The [2A] panels were coated with an ultrathin layer (~50 nm) of plasma polymers in a direct current (dc) glow discharge of trimethylsilane or its mixtures with one of two diatomic gases (O2 and N2). The CP measurement results showed that the plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited more negative corrosion potentials (Ecorr), smaller corrosion currents (Icorr), and no surface passivation when compared with uncoated [2A] control panels. The lower values of Icorr imply a higher corrosion resistance on the plasma polymer coated [2A]. When investigated using EIS, these plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited higher impedance (|Z|) at lower frequency when first immersed in electrolyte solution, yet degraded quickly to a similar level as uncoated controls within 1 day of immersion. These results illustrated that thin plasma polymer films provided a certain but very limited corrosion resistance to [2A] substrate; their dominant role in plasma interface engineered coating systems still relied mostly on their adhesion enhancement at metal/paint interface as observed in our previous studies.

  13. Corrosion protection of metals by conductive polymers III. Improved performance and inhibition in NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.K.; Elsenbaumer, R.L.; Chen, T.; Kulkarni, V.G.

    1998-07-01

    The use of conducting polymers for corrosion prevention is an area which has gained increasing attention during the last decade. This study explores the use of polyaniline based polymer coatings for corrosion prevention on mild steel. Data on coating degradation and passivation on electrochemically polarized painted metal specimens exposed to acid chloride solutions and artificial seawater at an ambient temperature are presented. A Systematic comparison between controls and designated coated sample sets has been made to demonstrate good corrosion protection efficiency with synergistic effects between conductive polymers and metals by classical DC monitoring techniques. Brief comparisons are made with data from simulated marine exposure. Meanwhile, in separate experiments, electrochemical data were obtained for conductive polymer primer coatings with epoxy top-coat under fully immersed conditions by using electrochemical noise (ECN) monitoring and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) techniques to discover the initial localized corrosion phenomena in order to achieve further understanding of the protection mechanism. Additionally, electrochemical impedance (EIS) spectra were utilized for the assessment of anti-corrosion performance provided by conducting polymers to mild steel.

  14. Cathodic protection criteria for controlling microbially influenced corrosion in power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoksa, G. ); Gutherman, B. )

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate galvanic corrosion on coupled samples and to determine cathodic protection criteria and effectiveness on four materials in an untreated seawater cooling system with microbially influenced corrosion. Hydrogen embrittlement of two cathodically protected high performance condenser tube materials was also evaluated. The long-term field testing was conducted at the intake structure of Florida Power Corporation's Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant. The test results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel can be galvanically corroded when coupled to Cu/Ni and fully cathodically protected when coupled to a carbon steel anode. Cathodic protection did protect carbon steel, but less than expected from the literature. The cathodic protection effectiveness on carbon steel was approximately 82% at {minus}1.01 V (SCE). To prevent hydrogen embrittlement, the tested titanium or ferritic stainless steel should not be polarized to more negative potentials than {minus}0.75 V (SCE). This report consists of a literature search, preliminary laboratory polarization testing, laboratory testing to determine microbial effects caused by an interruption of cathodic current, development of exposure racks for long-term electrochemical testing and analyses of corrosion, metallurgical, microbial and chemical data. 44 refs., 26 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Conducting polymer/polyimide-clay nanocomposite coatings for corrosion protection of AA-2024 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kunal G.

    Corrosion of metals is a major problem in the aerospace and automobile industry. The current methods of corrosion protection such as chromate conversion coatings are under increased scrutiny from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) due to their carcinogenic nature. Intrinsically conducting polymers (ICPs) like polyaniline and polypyrrole have been considered as a potential replacement for chromate conversion coatings and have been under investigation since past decade. The goal of this study is to replace the chromate conversion coating by an environmentally friendly organic coating. Poly (N-ethyl aniline) coating was electrodeposited as the primer layer and polyimide-clay nanocomposite was solution cast as the barrier layer on AA-2024 alloy. This study will provide a better understanding of the corrosion protection mechanism of the conducting polymer coating. Various characterization techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the formation, chemical structure and morphology of the coatings. Electrodeposition parameters like monomer concentration, applied current density and the reaction time were varied in order to optimize the properties of the conducting polymer coating. The corrosion performance of the primer coating was evaluated by DC polarization studies. It was found that poly (N-ethyl aniline) reduces from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine form; reducing the rate of cathodic reaction, which reduces the rate of corrosion of AA-2024 alloy. Polyimide-clay nanocomposite coating was solution cast on the conducting polymer primer layer for enhancing the barrier and corrosion properties of the coating system. The concentration of polyimide (10--25 vol%) and clay (0.1 and 1 wt%) were varied in the coating formulation to optimize the barrier properties of topcoat. X-ray diffraction showed that the intergallery clay distance decreased from 17.2 A to 11.79 A after immidization of polyimide

  16. Silica mesoporous thin films as containers for benzotriazole for corrosion protection of 2024 aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recloux, Isaline; Mouanga, Maixent; Druart, Marie-Eve; Paint, Yoann; Olivier, Marie-Georges

    2015-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of a new environmentally friendly alternative pretreatment for 2024 aluminium alloys to replace hexavalent chromium based conversion layers in the aeronautical field. A silica mesoporous thin film, synthesized through the evaporation induced self-assembly process, was doped with benzotriazole to obtain active corrosion protection. Inhibitor loading contents were correlated with pore characteristics. The release kinetics was studied as function of pH. The application of the doped mesoporous film on 2024 aluminium alloy revealed a slowing down of corrosion processes, demonstrating its potential as an active inhibitor storage layer.

  17. Protection of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy by corrosion resistant phytic acid conversion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongwei; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Fuchun; Kallip, Silvar

    2013-09-01

    The corrosion protection properties of environmentally friendly phytic acid conversion coatings were studied on 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The films were prepared under acidic conditions with various pH values and characterised by SEM, EDS, ATR-FTIR and electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the conversion coatings obtained by immersing the alloy in phytic acid solutions at pH from 3 to 5.5 provide excellent corrosion resistance. ATR-FTIR confirms that the film is formed by deposition of reaction products between Al3+ and phosphate groups in phytic acid molecules. The conformation models of the deposition film are proposed.

  18. Vacuum Sputtered and Ion-Plated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1982-01-01

    The plasma or ion-assisted coating techniques such as sputtering and ion plating are discussed in view of wear and corrosion protection. The basic processes and the unique features of the technique are discussed in regard to the synthesis and development of high reliability wear and corrosion resistant films. The ions of the plasma which transfer energy, momentum, and charge to the substrate and the growing films can be beneficially used. As a result, coating adherence and cohesion is improved. Favorable morphological growth such as high density and porosity-free films can be developed, and residual stresses can be reduced.

  19. Enhancement of active corrosion protection via combination of inhibitor-loaded nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Tedim, J; Poznyak, S K; Kuznetsova, A; Raps, D; Hack, T; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainers loaded with different corrosion inhibitors (vanadate, phosphate, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazolate) and the characterization of the resulting pigments by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The anticorrosion activity of these nanocontainers with respect to aluminum alloy AA2024 was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bare metallic substrates were immersed in dispersions of nanocontainers in sodium chloride solution and tested to understand the inhibition mechanisms and efficiency. The nanocontainers were also incorporated into commercial coatings used for aeronautical applications to study the active corrosion protection properties in systems of industrial relevance. The results show that an enhancement of the active protection effect can be reached when nanocontainers loaded with different inhibitors are combined in the same protective coating system. PMID:20455547

  20. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  1. Peptide-based biocoatings for corrosion protection of stainless steel biomaterial in a chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Muruve, Noah G G; Cheng, Y Frank; Feng, Yuanchao; Liu, Tao; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J; Irvin, Randall T

    2016-11-01

    In this work, PEGylated D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4-PEG), derived from the type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coated on 304 stainless steel was investigated for its corrosion resistant properties in a sodium chloride solution by various electrochemical measurements, surface characterization and molecular dynamics simulation. As a comparison, stainless steel electrodes coated with non-PEGylated D-amino acid retroinverso peptide (RI-K122-4) and D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4) were used as control variables during electrochemical tests. It was found that the D-K122-4-PEG coating is able to protect the stainless steel from corrosion in the solution. The RI-K122-4 coating shows corrosion resistant property and should be investigated further, while the D-K122-4 peptide coating, in contrast, shows little to no effect on corrosion. The morphological characterizations support the corrosion resistance of D-K122-4-PEG on stainless steel. The adsorption of D-K122-4 molecules occurs preferentially on Fe2O3, rather than Cr2O3, present on the stainless steel surface. PMID:27524070

  2. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2014-09-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  3. Succinonitrile as a corrosion inhibitor of copper current collectors for overdischarge protection of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Seon-Ha; Son, Mi-Young; Jung, Young Mee; Song, Hyun-Kon; Lee, Hochun

    2014-02-12

    Succinonitrile (SN) is investigated as an electrolyte additive for copper corrosion inhibition to provide overdischarge (OD) protection to lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The anodic Cu corrosion, occurring above 3.5 V (vs Li/Li(+)) in conventional LIB electrolytes, is suppressed until a voltage of 4.5 V is reached in the presence of SN. The corrosion inhibition by SN is ascribed to the formation of an SN-induced passive layer, which spontaneously develops on the copper surface during the first anodic scan. The passive layer is composed mainly of Cu(SN)2PF6 units, which is evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. The effects of the SN additive on OD protection are confirmed by using 750 mAh pouch-type full cells of LiCoO2 and graphite with lithium metal as a reference electrode. Addition of SN completely prevents corrosion of the copper current collector in the full cell configuration, thereby tuning the LIB chemistry to be inherently immune to the OD abuses. PMID:24444831

  4. Corrosion control acceptance criteria for sacrificial anode type, cathodic protection systems (user guide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Vincent F.; Noble, Michael; McLeod, Malcolm E.

    1994-07-01

    The Army currently operates and maintains more than 20,000 underground storage tanks and over 3000 miles of underground gas pipelines, all of which require some form of corrosion control. Cathodic protection is one method of corrosion control used to prevent corrosion-induced leaks when a steel structure is exposed to an aggressive soil. The corrosion control acceptance criteria for sacrificial anode type CP systems provides guidelines for the DEH/DPW cathodic protection installation inspectors whose responsibilities are to ensure that the materials and equipment specified are delivered to the job site and subsequently installed in accordance with the engineering drawings and specifications. The sacrificial anode CP acceptance criteria includes all components for the sacrificial anode system such as insulated conductors, anodes, anode backfills, and auxiliary equipment. The sacrificial anode CP acceptance criteria is composed of a checklist that lists each component and that contains a space for the inspector to either check 'yes' or 'no' to indicate whether the component complies with the job specifications. In some cases, the inspector must measure and record physical dimensions or electrical output and compare the measurements to standards shown in attached tables.

  5. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Stratis V. Sotirchos

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this research project was the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Since alumina has excellent resistance to corrosion but coefficient than silicon carbide, the key idea of this project has been to develop graded coatings with composition varying smoothly along their thickness between an inner (base) layer of mullite in contact with the silicon carbide component and an outer layer of pure alumina, which would function as the actual protective coating of the component. (Mullite presents very good adhesion towards silicon carbide and has thermal expansion coefficient very close to that of the latter.)

  6. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:27359352

  7. Corrosion Protection Properties of PPy-ND Composite Coating: Sonoelectrochemical Synthesis and Design of Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Bagheri, R.; Rezaei-Moghadam, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this research, the nanocomposite coatings comprising the polypyrrole-nanodiamond, PPy-ND, on St-12 steel electrodes were electro-synthesized using in situ polymerization process under ultrasonic irradiation. The corrosion protection performance and morphology characterization of prepared coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscopy, SEM, respectively. Also, the experimental design was employed to determine the best values considering the effective parameters such as the concentration of nanoparticles, the applied current density and synthesis time to achieve the most protective films. A response surface methodology, RSM, involving a central composite design, CCD, was applied to the modeling and optimization of the PPy-ND nanocomposite deposition. Pareto graphic analysis of the parameters indicated that the applied current density and some of the interactions were effective on the response. The electrochemical results proved that the embedment of diamond nanoparticle, DNP, improves the corrosion resistance of PPy coatings significantly. Therefore, desirable correlation exists between predicted data and experimental results.

  8. Inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols for corrosion and freeze protection in water-based HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roo, A.M. de; Lee, B.W.

    1997-12-31

    Industrially inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols are used extensively to provide protection against equipment damage due to corrosion and freezing. This paper will describe the proper use of these glycols, including system preparation, fluid installation, and fluid maintenance. The impact of the use of these glycols on the operation of the system is discussed along with methods for overcoming any declines in heat transfer. From this discussion, it will become clear why automotive antifreeze formulations should not be used in heating, ventilating, and airconditioning (HVAC) systems. Also included are data on the physical properties of aqueous solutions of ethylene and propylene glycol, the concept of burst vs. freeze protection, typical results of corrosion tests, and methods to use to monitor the fluid for each application.

  9. Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mityagin, V.A.; Vigant, G.T.; Zakharova, N.N.

    1995-07-01

    Zinc-filled, sprayed-zinc, epoxy, and vinyl chloride coatings were comparatively studied as applied to corrosion protection of inner surfaces and tanks for clarified petroleum products. Tests were carried out by cycles of temperature variation from 60{degrees}C to - 25{degrees}C, on steel plates in vapor, in fuel, and in electrolyte, simulating sub-product water. The coatings KhS-5132, KhS-717 (vinyl chloride) and BEP-68, EP-525, EP-0010 (epoxy) are of the highest protective properties, resistant to steaming and washing with aqueous solutions of synthetic detergents, and are compatible with clarified petroleum products.

  10. Assessment of the factors affecting protective alumina formation under hot corrosion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, Michael Nathan

    In this study, the influence of microstructure, composition, and phase constitution on the Type I (900°C) and Type II (700°C) hot corrosion resistance of MCrAlY and β-NiAl base alloys was investigated. The Type II hot corrosion resistance of MCrAlY alloys is generally enhanced by microstructural refinement. This can be attributed to the more rapid establishment of a protective Al2O3-rich scale due to the higher density of short-circuit diffusion paths for Al (phase boundaries). However, it was shown that for a given bulk composition, the compositions of the individual phases is also extremely important. If one phase is lean in an element which is highly beneficial from a hot corrosion standpoint, e.g., Cr, Type II hot corrosion resistance is quite poor, regardless of the microstructural scale. In addition, coarse reactive-element-rich phases, which are commonly found in MCrAlY alloys, can be incorporated into the thermally grown Al2O 3 scale and act as initiation sites for Type II attack. This stresses the importance of reactive element content and distribution in MCrAlY coatings. During Type I hot corrosion exposure of β-Ni-36Al (at. %) base alloys, the incubation stage is greatly extended by the addition of 5% Pt, Co, or Cr. In each case, the beneficial effects can be linked to an enhanced ability to rapidly form a protective Al2O3 scale, and to heal this scale when it sustains damage during exposure. With regard to Type II hot corrosion, individual additions of 5 at. % Pt or Cr are beneficial, largely for the same reason; however, additions of 5 at. % Co and co-additions of 5 at. % Pt + 5 at. % Cr result in a decrease in the duration of the incubation stage. Subsurface phase transformations that occur in the latter systems prevent the alloy from maintaining the growth of the Al2O3 scale. This mechanism is discussed in detail. Finally, the influence of alloy composition and exposure environment on the kinetics of the θ→α Al2O3 transformation in scales

  11. POLYPHENYLENESULFIED/MONTOMORILLONITE CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE COATINGS: THEIR EFFICACY IN PROTECTING STEEL AGAINST CORROSION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.; GAWLIK, K.

    2006-06-01

    Nanoscale montomorillonite (MMT) clay fillers became dispersed in a polyphenylenesulfied (PPS) matrix through the processes of octadecylamine (ODA) intercalation {yields} molten PPS co-intercalation {yields} exfoliation. Cooling this molten exfoliated material led to the formation of a PPS/MMT nanocomposite. The MMT nanofiller conferred three advanced properties on the semi-crystalline PPS: First, it raised its melting point by nearly 40 C to 290 C; second, it increased its crystallization energy, implying that an excellent adherence of the nanofillers surfaces to PPS in terms of a good interfacial bond; and, third, it abated the degree of its hydrothermal oxidation due to sulfide {yields} sulfite linkage transformations. When this advanced PPS nanocomposite was used as a corrosion-preventing coating for carbon steel in a simulated geothermal environment at 300 C, a coating of {approx}150 {micro}m thickness adequately protected the steel against hot brine-caused corrosion. In contrast, an MMT-free PPS coating of similar thickness was not nearly as effective in mitigating corrosion as was the nanocompsite; in fact, the uptake of corrosive ionic electrolyte by the unmodified coating increased with an extending exposure time.

  12. Synthesis and corrosion protection properties of poly(o-phenylenediamine) nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Muthirulan, P.; Kannan, N.; Meenakshisundaram, M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows a novel method for the synthesis of uniformly-shaped poly(othophenylediamine) (PoPD) nanofibers by chemical oxidative polymerization method for application towards smart corrosion resistance coatings. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies confirm morphology of PoPD with three dimensional (3D) networked dendritic superstructures having average diameter of 50–70 nm and several hundred meters of length. UV–vis and FTIR spectral results shows the formation of PoPD nanofibers containing phenazine ring ladder-structure with benzenoid and quinoid imine units. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) of PoPD nanofibers possess good thermal stability. The anti-corrosion behavior of PoPD nanofibers on 316L SS was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements. The PoPD coated 316L SS exhibits higher corrosion potential when compared to uncoated specimen. EIS studies, clearly ascertain that PoPD nanofiber coatings exhibits excellent potential barrier to protect the 316L SS against corrosion in 3.5% NaCl. PMID:25685444

  13. Superhydrophobic surfaces on light alloy substrates fabricated by a versatile process and their corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junfei; Hu, Weihua; Xue, Mingshan; Wang, Fajun; Li, Wen

    2013-04-24

    After hydrothermally treated in H2O (for Mg alloy and Al alloy) or H2O2 (for Ti alloy), microstructured oxide or hydroxide layers were formed on light alloy substrates, which further served as the active layers to boost the self-assembling of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES) and finally endowed the substrates with unique wettability, that is, superhydrophobicity. For convenience, the so-fabricated superhyrdophobic surfaces (SHS) were abridged as HT-SHS. For comparison, SHS coded as CE-SHS were also prepared based on chemical etching in acid and succedent surface passivation with PFOTES. To reveal the corrosion protection of these SHS, potentiodynamic polarization measurements in NaCl solution (3.5 wt %) were performed. Moreover, to reflect the long-term stability of these SHS, SHS samples were immersed into NaCl solution and the surface wettability was monitored. Experimental results indicated that HT-SHS was much more stable and effective in corrosion protection as compared with CE-SHS. The enhancement was most likely due to the hydrothermally generated oxide layer by the following tow aspects: on one hand, oxide layer itself can lower the corrosion due to its barrier effect; on the other hand, stronger interfacial bonding is expected between oxide layer and PFOTES molecules. PMID:23496751

  14. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-01-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl−]/[OH−] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels. PMID:26673425

  15. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl-]/[OH-] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  16. Slippery liquid-infused porous surface based on perfluorinated lubricant/iron tetradecanoate: Preparation and corrosion protection application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengsheng; Qiu, Ri; Song, Hongqing; Wang, Peng; Shi, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanfang

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion and fouling have been two major enemies for materials immersed in seawater. Fluid including gas and liquid as coating for marine corrosion protection has attracted much attention, since it can also exert antifouling capability in seawater environment. Combining gas and solid phases, superhydrophobic surface is promising to protect the underlying metal from corrosion. However, the intrinsically short sustainability in underwater environment has hindered its practical application, so that its corrosion protection ability is only temporary. Originated from liquid and solid phases, slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS) has spurred wide interest due to its prominent performance in different fields. However, the exploration of corrosion protection efficiency from SLIPS remains rare. In this research, SLIPS is constructed onto steel surface via a facile two-step protocol. First, based on a dissolution-deposition strategy, iron tetradecanoate is formed by an electrochemical route. After that, fluid lubricant is infused onto the deposit, whose rough surface acts as the reservoir to entrap the fluid to form a static liquid coating. Compared to the bare and hydrophobic deposit covering low alloy steel, the SLIPS composed perfluorinated lubricant and iron tetradecanoate endows good corrosion protection property.

  17. Composite coatings for elevated temperature erosion-corrosion protection in fossil-fueled boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Verstak, A.; Wang, B.; Baranovski, V.; Beliaev, A.

    1998-12-31

    Fluidized bed combustors components suffer severe erosion, frequently accomplished by corrosive gases attack at elevated temperatures. The tubes damage rate depends on the boiler design bed constituents and combustion parameters, however an accelerated metal wastage is usually found in the same specific areas of different boilers. New HVOF sprayed coatings are developed for the tube erosion-corrosion protection, based on Cr{sub 2}C{sub 2}/Ni-Cr, Cr-Ti-C/Ni-Cr-Mo, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl composite materials. The combustion arc Fe-Cr-C coatings were found as an economical solution for relatively low erosion rate zones. The coatings properties and behavior under simulated elevated temperature erosion conditions and in the operating boilers are discussed.

  18. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS. PMID:23475060

  19. Interaction of Benzimidazoles and Benzotriazole: Its Corrosion Protection Properties on Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, K.; Mohan, Revathi; Joseph, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic hydrogen-bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and 1,2,3-benzotrizole and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies, and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach is used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect, and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, E HOMO, E LUMO, and gap energy (Δ E). 1,2,3-Benzotrizole interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99 Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazole derivatives offers extended inhibition efficiency toward mild steel in hydrochloric acid.

  20. Investigations of conductive polymer coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racicot, Robert James

    The anti-corrosion properties of a novel double strand conductive polymer coating on aluminum alloys in salt environments as a possible replacement for chromium conversion coatings was investigated. The conductive coating consisted of a double helix backbone structure of polyaniline wrapped with an esterified polyacrylic acid strand. This polymer complex offers advantages over other conductive polymer systems in material stability and processability. The polymer is soluble in single organic solvents and was sprayed onto square AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy samples. The coatings were investigated for corrosion protection properties using cyclic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and long term exposure in aggressive salt environments. The polymer coated samples were tested against two commercial chromate conversion coatings and uncoated alloy samples. The cyclic polarization tests show a two order of magnitude lowering of the corrosion current over the uncoated samples, a one order of magnitude lowering of Isbcorr over the second type of chromate coating and a one order of magnitude higher Isbcorr over the first type of chromate coating. Impedance results show a two order of magnitude higher impedance at low frequencies over the uncoated and equivalent performance for both types of chromate coatings. EIS and cyclic polarization tests of the conductive state (green colored) versus a non-conductive state (blue colored) of the polymer coating shows that the electrically conductive state is more effective than the insulating state for corrosion protection. This data indicates that the electro-active nature of the polymer coating plays a role in the protection of the alloys. After two months exposure in a.5N NaCl solution, there is no evidence of pitting at the alloy surface for the polymer coated samples under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, indicating a change in the typical corrosion mechanism for aluminum alloys. The

  1. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Protection of beryllium metal against microbial influenced corrosion using silane self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Deshpande, Alina; Hersman, Larry; Brozik, Susan M.; Butt, Darryl

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of a self-assembled silane monolayer as protection for beryllium against microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was demonstrated. Four-point bend tests on coated and uncoated beryllium samples were conducted after microbiological exposures, and the effectiveness of these coatings as MIC protection was reported through mechanical property evaluations. Application of the silane monolayer to the beryllium surfaces was found to prevent degradation of the failure strength and displacement-to-failure of beryllium in bending. In contrast, the uncoated beryllium samples exhibited a severe reduction in these mechanical properties in the presence of the marine Pseudomonas bacteria. The potentiodynamic measurements showed that both the uncoated and coated samples pitted at the open-circuit potential. However, the size and distribution of the corrosion pits formed on the surface of the beryllium samples were significantly different for the various cases (coated vs uncoated samples exposed to control vs inoculated medium). This study demonstrates the following: (1) the deleterious effects of MIC on the mechanical properties of beryllium and (2) the potential for developing fast, easy, and cost-effective MIC protection for beryllium metal using silane self-assemblies.

  3. Development of self-healing coatings for corrosion protection on metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Alicja; Barker, Michael B.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by biological systems, artificial self-healing materials are designed for repairing local damage caused by external factors. The rapidly expanding field of self-healing systems contains, among others, materials with well-defined surface properties. Undoubtedly, enhancing surface functionalisation, by applying smart coatings, enjoys an extensive interest. The self-healing ability is particularly essential property for corrosion protection strategies, especially when the use of one of the most effective corrosion systems, based on chromium(VI) compounds, is now banned by the current registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals legislation. Self-healing protective coatings are produced using macromolecular compounds, ceramics, metals and composites. Considering the wide range of available materials, the number of potential combinations seems to be unlimited. The self-healing action of such coatings is activated by appropriate stimuli: temperature changes, radiation, pH changes, pressure changes and mechanical action. In this paper, the research and practical implications of the various approaches to achieving self-healing functionality of protective coatings, as well as potential developments in this area, are explored.

  4. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M.

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  5. Protection of copper surface with phytic acid against corrosion in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Peca, Dunja; Pihlar, Boris; Ingrid, Milošev

    2014-01-01

    Phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) was tested as a corrosion inhibitor for copper in 3% sodium chloride. Phytic acid is a natural compound derived from plants, it is not toxic and can be considered as a green inhibitor. Electrochemical methods of linear polarization and potentiodynamic polarization were used to study the electrochemical behaviour and evaluate the inhibition effectiveness. To obtain the optimal corrosion protection the following experimental conditions were investigated: effect of surface pre-treatment (abrasion and three procedures of surface roughening), pre-formation of the layer of phytic acid, time of immersion and concentration of phytic acid. To evaluate the surface pre-treatment procedures the surface roughness and contact angle were measured. Optimal conditions for formation of phytic layer were selected resulting in the inhibition effectiveness of nearly 80%. Morphology and composition of the layer were further studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The layer of phytic acid with thickness in the nanometer range homogeneously covers the copper surface. The obtained results show that this natural compound can be used as a mildly effective corrosion inhibitor for copper in chloride solution. PMID:25286201

  6. The Corrosion Protection of 2219-T87 Aluminum by Organic and Inorganic Zinc-Rich Primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Walsh, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of zinc-rich primer-coated 2219-T87 aluminum in a 3.5-percent Na-Cl was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The alternating current (ac) method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in the frequency range of 0.001 to 40,000 Hz, and the direct current (dc) method of polarization resistance (PR) were used to evaluate the characteristics of an organic, epoxy zinc-rich primer and an inorganic, ethyl silicate zinc-rich primer. A dc electrochemical galvanic corrosion test was also used to determine the corrosion current of each zinc-rich primer anode coupled to a 2219-T87 aluminum cathode. Duration of the EIS/PR and galvanic testing was 21 days and 24 h, respectively. The galvanic test results demonstrated a very high galvanic current between the aluminum cathode and both zinc-rich primer anodes (37.9 pA/CM2 and 23.7 pA/CM2 for the organic and inorganic primers, respectively). The PR results demonstrated a much higher corrosion rate of the zinc in the inorganic primer than in the organic primer, due primarily to the higher porosity in the former. Based on this investigation, the inorganic zinc-rich primer appears to provide superior galvanic protection and is recommended for additional study for application in the solid rocket booster aft skirt.

  7. The corrosion protection of 2219-T87 aluminum by organic and inorganic zinc-rich primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.; Walsh, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of zinc-rich primer-coated 2219-T87 aluminum in a 3.5-percent Na-Cl was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The alternating current (ac) method of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in the frequency range of 0.001 to 40,000 Hz, and the direct current (dc) method of polarization resistance (PR) were used to evaluate the characteristics of an organic, epoxy zinc-rich primer and an inorganic, ethyl silicate zinc-rich primer. A dc electrochemical galvanic corrosion test was also used to determine the corrosion current of each zinc-rich primer anode coupled to a 2219-T87 aluminum cathode. Duration of the EIS/PR and galvanic testing was 21 days and 24 h, respectively. the galvanic test results demonstrated a very high galvanic current between the aluminum cathode and both zinc-rich primer anodes (37.9 micro A/cm(exp 2) and 23.7 micro A/cm(exp 2) for the organic and inorganic primers, respectively). The PR results demonstrated a much higher corrosion rate of the zinc in the inorganic primer than in the organic primer, due primarily to the higher porosity in the former. Based on this investigation, the inorganic zinc-rich primer appears to provide superior galvanic protection and is recommended for additional study for application in the solid rocket booster aft skirt.

  8. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jianqiang; Sun, Kai; Zhu, Yukun; Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.

  9. PVC flexible liners as corrosion protection for brine treatment tanks in chlor-alkali plants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Obanos, M.; Marin, S.

    1999-11-01

    Three flexible PVC sheets were evaluated to determine their suitability as liners to protect existing steel tanks handling treated brine at 55 C in a membrane technology Chlor-Alkali plants. The evaluation included: characterization of liners and plasticizers (by Soxhlet technique, Infrared Spectroscopy (IRS), Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC)); quantification of brine pollutants by Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AES) and weight-loss/volume ratios; observation of the superficial damage produced by extended immersion in acid hot brine by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); and the estimation of remaining properties in high temperature oxidative atmospheres (per ASTM D 3045). As a result of this evaluation, remaining property curves as a function of time and temperature are presented for high temperature atmospheric exposure. These curves are related to actual service and to changes in liner hardness. Economics of using flexible PVC liners are compared to flakeglass filled thermosetting coatings. The conclusions are that, even though flexible PVC linings are disposable, they protect steel against hot acid brine corrosion, and they are economically attractive compared to flakeglass filled coatings. In addition PVC linings may be more reliable because remaining PVC properties can be measured using nondestructive hardness measurements. PVC linings are not recommended above 65 C in corrosive service because life is notably reduced.

  10. Waterborne chitosan-epoxysilane hybrid pretreatments for corrosion protection of zinc.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Solis, Christian; Erbe, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Biopolymer-based systems are extensively studied as green alternatives for traditional polymer coatings, e.g., in corrosion protection. Chitosan-epoxysilane hybrid films are presented in this work as a chitosan-based protective system, which could, e.g., be applied in a pretreatment step. For the preparation of the chitosan-epoxysilane hybrid systems, a sol-gel procedure was applied. The function of the silane is to ensure adhesion to the substrate. On zinc substrates, homogeneous thin films with thickness of 50-70 nm were obtained after thermal curing. The hybrid-coated zinc substrates were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. As model corrosion experiments, linear polarization resistance was measured, and cathodic delamination of the weak polymer coating poly(vinylbutyral) (PVB) was studied using scanning Kelvin probe. Overall, chitosan-epoxysilane hybrid pretreated samples showed lower delamination rates than unmodified chitosan coatings and pure PVB. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed a reduced ion permeability and water uptake by chitosan-epoxysilane films compared to that of a nonmodified chitosan coating. Even though the coatings are hydrophobic and contain water, they slow down cathodic delamination by limiting ion transport. PMID:27009436

  11. Effect of chelating agent acetylacetone on corrosion protection properties of silane-zirconium sol-gel coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mei; Liang, Min; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei; Xue, Bing; Zhao, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid sol-gel coatings on AA2024-T3 were prepared with a silane coupling agent 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and a metal alkoxide tetra-n-propoxyzirconium (TPOZ) as precursors. The effect of acetylacetone (AcAc) as a chelating agent on the corrosion protection properties of sol-gel coatings were evaluated and the optimal AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio was obtained. The sol-gel coatings were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion protection properties of the coatings were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization study (PDS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is demonstrated that AcAc avoids fast hydrolysis of TPOZ and benefits to form stable sols. The coating with AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio of 3 shows the best corrosion protection performance in 0.05 M NaCl solution.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and corrosion protection properties of poly( N-(methacryloyloxymethyl) benzotriazole- co-methyl methacrylate) on mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srikanth, A. P.; Lavanya, A.; Nanjundan, S.; Rajendran, N.

    2006-12-01

    The copolymers from different feed ratios of N-(methacryloyloxymethyl) benzotriazole (MMBT) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been synthesised using free radical solution polymerization technique and characterized using FT-IR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the polymers was studied using theremogravimetrtic analysis (TGA). The corrosion behaviors of mild steel specimens dip coated with different composition of copolymers have been evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) method. These electrochemical properties were observed in 0.1 M HCl medium. The polarization and impedance measurements showed different corrosion protection efficiency with change in composition of the copolymers. It was found that the corrosion protection properties are owing to the barrier effect of the polymer layer covered on the mild steel surfaces. However, it was observed that the copolymer obtained from 1:1 mole ratio of MMBT and MMA exhibited better protection efficiency than other combinations.

  13. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Flame Deflector Protection System Life Cycle Cost Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Trejo, David; Reinschmidt, Ken; Kim, Hyung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    A 20-year life cycle cost analysis was performed to compare the operational life cycle cost, processing/turnaround timelines, and operations manpower inspection/repair/refurbishment requirements for corrosion protection of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad flame deflector associated with the existing cast-in-place materials and a newer advanced refractory ceramic material. The analysis compared the estimated costs of(1) continuing to use of the current refractory material without any changes; (2) completely reconstructing the flame trench using the current refractory material; and (3) completely reconstructing the flame trench with a new high-performance refractory material. Cost estimates were based on an analysis of the amount of damage that occurs after each launch and an estimate of the average repair cost. Alternative 3 was found to save $32M compared to alternative 1 and $17M compared to alternative 2 over a 20-year life cycle.

  14. Evaluation of alternatives to chromates for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twite, Rebecca Lee

    Electrochemical and high resolution surface analyses were used to characterize and compare the properties of corrosion protective coatings on aluminum 2024-T3 alloys to chromate-containing systems. The performance of plasma-state polymerized trimethylsilane (TMS) compares to corrosion protection of chromate conversion coatings. The ability of the systems to protect Al-2024-T3 alloys is based on capacitive and resistive properties derived from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical noise methods (ENM), and d.c. polarization. An experimental method was proposed to rapidly determine the performance of high impedance ({>}10sp9\\ Omega\\ cmsp2) systems such as the experimental epoxy/blocked-isocyanate electrodeposition coatings applied to TMS plasma polymers on 2024-T3. The experimental method incorporates electrochemical analysis with accelerated weathering (salt fog/dry heat cycles). An analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure was performed on EIS and ENM data, which indicate that the methods correlate well with each other, but quantitative data from EIS were shown to be more precise than the ENM data. The error due to the methods was attributed to the drift in the open circuit potential of the samples over time. Because of this drift, ENM methods may be more sensitive to electrochemical changes at short times compared to EIS. Ultra high vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to monitor the surface state of chemically treated aluminum coupons. The treatments were based on actual use within the United States Air Force. It was found that treatments based on phosphoric acid and nitric acid solutions are predicted to be the best for surface cleaning and corrosion protection due to the formation of a passivating CuO over exposed copper sites and passive phosphate layer over the entire surface. The surface state of plasma polymerized TMS before and after exposure to a dilute solution of NaCl and (NHsb4)sb2SOsb4

  15. Replacement of corrosion protection chromate primers and paints used in cryogenic applications on the Space Shuttle with wire arc sprayed aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. L.; Sanders, H. L.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting volatile organic compounds and hexavalent chrome emissions, 'environmentally safe' thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against corrosion pitting and stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. The wire are sprayed aluminum coating has been found to have good potential to provide corrosion protection for flight hardware in cryogenic applications. The coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test and cryogenic flexibility test results will be presented.

  16. Replacement of corrosion protection chromate primers and paints used in cryogenic applications on the Space Shuttle with wire arc sprayed aluminum coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.L.; Sanders, H.L.; Zimmerman, F.R.

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting volatile organic compounds and hexavalent chrome emissions, `environmentally safe` thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against corrosion pitting and stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. The wire arc sprayed aluminum coating has been found to have good potential to provide corrosion protection for flight hardware in cryogenic applications. The coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test and cryogenic flexibility test results will be presented.

  17. Smart epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites for corrosion protection of Mg-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Yanhao; Li, Chao; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Xinran; Yan, Yongde; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Jun; Shchukin, Dmitry G.

    2016-04-01

    The epoxy coatings containing MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites were prepared by coating method on the Mg-Li alloy surface. The influence of MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on corrosion protection of the epoxy coating was studied. The epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites showed high corrosion resistance. Artificial defects in the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on the Mg-Li surface were produced by the needle punching. The results show that the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites exhibits self-healing corrosion inhibition capabilities. It is ascribed to the fact that the Ce3+ ions are released from MCM-22 zeolites based on ion exchange of zeolite in the corrosion process of the Mg-Li alloy substrate. MCM-22 zeolites as reservoirs provided a prolonged release of cerium ions.

  18. Corrosion protection of high-copper aluminum alloys using green technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The concept of surface modification as a new method of corrosion protection using chemicals without toxic problems is described for the Al alloys Al 6061, Al 7075-T6 and Al 2024-T3. In the Ce-Mo process Ce and Mo are incorporated into the original oxide film by chemical and electrochemical processes. The resulting surfaces are resistant to pitting in aggressive solutions such as 0.5 N NaCl. Surface modified Al 6013 has passed the salt spray test according to ASTM B 117. For Al 6061 and 7075, hot solutions of CeCl{sub 3} and Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} are used, while for Al 2024 CeCl{sub 3} is replaced by Ce acetate. For all alloys anodic polarization is carried out in Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}. For Al 2024 and Al 7075 a Cu removal pre-treatment step is used in which Cu intermetallic compounds are removed from the outer surface layers. The resistance to localized corrosion has been evaluated by recording of impedance spectra in 0.5 N NaCl for 30 days. Surface analysis data suggest that Ce and Mo are concentrated at sites where local cathodes such as Cu intermetallic compounds are located. Polarization curves show that both the cathodic and the anodic reaction are inhibited on modified surfaces. The pitting potential E{sub pit} is increased for surface modified samples at constant corrosion potential E{sub corr}. This result could be due to a decrease of the amount of Cl adsorbed at a given potential for oxide layers containing Ce and Mo.

  19. Evaluation of aquifer protective capacity of overburden unit and soil corrosivity in Makurdi, Benue state, Nigeria, using electrical resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiora, Daniel N.; Ajala, Adeolu E.; Ibuot, Johnson C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents result of 30 vertical electrical soundings carried out in Makurdi, Benue state capital, north-central Nigeria to evaluate aquifer protective capacity and soil corrosivity of overburden units in the study area. This was done using the Schlumberger electrode array to obtain the data and was modelled using computer iteration (Winresist software). The field data gives a resolution with 3-4 geoelectric layers and the observed frequencies in curve types include: 30% of KQ, 16.67% of QH, 6.67% of AA and K, 3.33% of HA, Q and A, 10% of H, KH and HK. Using the longitudinal unit conductance (S), the protective capacities of the study area were classified as 36.67% weak, 10% poor, 40% moderate, and 13.33% as good. The corrosivity ratings of the study area show that 10% is strongly corrosive, 23% moderately corrosive, 37% slightly corrosive, and 30% noncorrosive The results reasonably provide information on areas where industries can be sited and iron pipes can be laid in order to safeguard the hydrological setting for resident's safety in the study area. Regions with moderate/good protective capacity are good sites for locating boreholes.

  20. Atmospheric corrosion of Cu, Zn, and Cu-Zn alloys protected by self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Forslund, Mattias; Johnson, C. Magnus; Pan, Jinshan; Leygraf, Christofer

    2016-06-01

    In this article results from earlier studies have been compiled in order to compare the protection efficiency of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of alkanethiols for copper, zinc, and copper-zinc alloys exposed to accelerated indoor atmospheric corrosion conditions. The results are based on a combination of surface spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. The protection efficiency of investigated SAMs increases with chain length which is attributed to transport hindrance of the corrosion stimulators in the atmospheric environment, water, oxygen and formic acid, towards the copper surface. The transport hindrance is selective and results in different corrosion products on bare and on protected copper. Initially the molecular structure of SAMs on copper is well ordered, but the ordering is reduced with exposure time. Octadecanethiol (ODT), the longest alkanethiol investigated, protects copper significantly better than zinc, which may be attributed to the higher bond strength of Cu-S than of Zn-S. Despite these differences, the corrosion protection efficiency of ODT for the single phase Cu20Zn brass alloy is equally efficient as for copper, but significantly less for the heterogeneous double phase Cu40Zn brass alloy.

  1. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  2. Silver deposition on polypyrrole films electrosynthesised onto Nitinol alloy. Corrosion protection and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Saugo, M; Flamini, D O; Brugnoni, L I; Saidman, S B

    2015-11-01

    The electrosynthesis of polypyrrole films onto Nitinol from sodium salicylate solutions of different concentrations is reported. The morphology and corrosion protection properties of the resulting coatings were examined and they both depend on the sodium salicylate concentration. The immobilisation of silver species in PPy films constituted by hollow rectangular microtubes was studied as a function of the polymer oxidation degree. The highest amount of silver was deposited when the coated electrode was prepolarised at -1.00V (SCE) before silver deposition, suggesting an increase in the amount of non-oxidised segments in the polymer. Finally, the antibacterial activity of the coating against the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria was evaluated. Both strains resulted sensitive to the modified coatings, obtaining a slightly better result against S. aureus. PMID:26249570

  3. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  4. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  5. Machine Protection System for the Stepper Motor Actuated SyLMAND Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, V. R.; Achenbach, S.; Dolton, W.; Wells, G.; Hallin, E.; Klymyshyn, D. M.; Augustin, M.

    2010-06-01

    SyLMAND, the Synchrotron Laboratory for Micro and Nano Devices at the Canadian Light Source, consists of a dedicated X-ray lithography beamline on a bend magnet port, and process support laboratories in a clean room environment. The beamline includes a double mirror system with flat, chromium-coated silicon mirrors operated at varying grazing angles of incidence (4 mrad to 45 mrad) for spectral adjustment by high energy cut-off. Each mirror can be independently moved by two stepper motors to precisely control the pitch and vertical position. We present in this paper the machine protection system implemented in the double mirror system to allow for safe operation of the two mirrors and to avoid consequences of potential stepper motor malfunction.

  6. Machine Protection System for the Stepper Motor Actuated SyLMAND Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, V. R.; Dolton, W.; Wells, G.; Hallin, E.; Achenbach, S.; Klymyshyn, D. M.; Augustin, M.

    2010-06-23

    SyLMAND, the Synchrotron Laboratory for Micro and Nano Devices at the Canadian Light Source, consists of a dedicated X-ray lithography beamline on a bend magnet port, and process support laboratories in a clean room environment. The beamline includes a double mirror system with flat, chromium-coated silicon mirrors operated at varying grazing angles of incidence (4 mrad to 45 mrad) for spectral adjustment by high energy cut-off. Each mirror can be independently moved by two stepper motors to precisely control the pitch and vertical position. We present in this paper the machine protection system implemented in the double mirror system to allow for safe operation of the two mirrors and to avoid consequences of potential stepper motor malfunction.

  7. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  8. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  9. An electrochemical study of corrosion protection by primer-topcoat systems on 4130 steel with ac impedance and dc methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendrek, M. J.; Higgins, R. H.; Danford, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate metal surface corrosion and the breakdown of metal protective coatings, the ac impedance method is applied to six systems of primer coated and primer topcoated 4130 steel. Two primers were used: a zinc-rich epoxy primer and a red lead oxide epoxy primer. The epoxy-polyamine topcoat was used in four of the systems. The EG and G-PARC Model 368 ac impedance measurement system, along with dc measurements with the same system using the polarization resistance method, were used to monitor changing properties of coated 4230 steel disks immersed in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions buffered at pH 5.4 over periods of 40 to 60 days. The corrosion system can be represented by an electronic analog called an equivalent circuit consisting of resistors and capacitors in specific arrangements. This equivalent circuit parallels the impedance behavior of the corrosion system during a frequency scan. Values for the resistors and capacitors, that can be assigned in the equivalent circuit following a least-squares analysis of the data, describe changes that occur on the corroding metal surface and in the protective coatings. Two equivalent circuits have been determined that predict the correct Bode phase and magnitude of the experimental sample at different immersion times. The dc corrosion current density data are related to equivalent circuit element parameters. Methods for determining corrosion rate with ac impedance parameters are verified by the dc method.

  10. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  11. Effects of selected water treatments and cathodic protection on corrosion and embrittlement of condenser tubes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year laboratory study investigating: (1) the interaction and effect of sulfide, dissolved oxygen, and temperature on the corrosion of copper alloy condenser tubes; (2) the effectiveness of selected cooling water treatments in mitigating sulfide-accelerated corrosion; (3) the effects of various parameters on the hydriding susceptibility of titanium tubing under cathodic protection conditions; and (4) the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic stainless steels under cathodic protection conditions. The selected cooling water treatments included ferrous sulfate, benzotriazole, sodium dimethyl dithiocarbamate, high molecular weight polyacrylamide, and Calgon CL-5. Much of the work was carried out utilizing seawater test loops designed to simulate condenser tube flow. The results of the study demonstrated that: (1) sulfide contamination of a copper alloy condenser tube can trigger rapid perforation of the tube; (2) ferrous sulfate treatement may be effective in mitigating sulfide-accelerated attack if initiated prior to and during any sulfide exposure; and (3) cathodic protection at high electronegative potentials will embrittle titanium and ferritic stainless steel condenser tubes. The report recommends further research directed at: (1) the long-term effectiveness of ferrous sulfate treatement in retarding sulfide-promoted pitting; (2) corrosion-accelerating mechanisms associated with chlorination and silt build-up; (3) an appropriate method for cleaning condenser tubes contaminated with a corrosion accelerant; (4) a more effective method of on-line monitoring of condenser tube corrosion; and (5) an update of recent electric utility experience concerning corrosion of copper alloy condenser tubes. 32 refs., 39 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Corrosion protection and galvanic corrosion prevention for 7075 Al and Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, F.A.

    1980-07-01

    Sulfuric-acid-anodized and electroless-nickel-plated 7075 aluminum alloy panels successfully passed 96 hours of salt spray testing when galvanically coupled to duplex-annealed Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy panels. Adherent paint deposits were produced on the titanium alloy and electroless nickel surfaces using a wash primer, an epoxy primer, and a urethane paint coating. A painted part survived 35 cycles of alternating salt spray and hot and freezing environments without blistering. A low chloride cutting fluid was selected for production machining of Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn, based on chemical analysis and stress-corrosion tests. A cleaning process was developed to remove both titanium and aluminum cutting fluids. Modified wedge-opening-loading specimens were used to verify that no stress-corrosion cracking problems occurred with the duplex-annealed Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy because of residual titanium or aluminum cutting fluids.

  13. Shop primer as part of the corrosion protective coating for submerged steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjordal, M.; Steinsmo, U.

    1998-12-31

    In Norwegian workshops the standard pre-treatment procedures for steel structures intended for sub-sea use, normally include removal of shop primer by blast cleaning to Sa 2 1/2 before application of corrosion protective coatings. This is also stated in the Norwegian offshore standard NORSOK. Omitting this stage in fabrication will represent large reductions in both time consumption and costs, and reduce the volume of waste from the blast cleaning. This report presents results from investigations of how a shop primer will influence on the coating properties. The aim of the investigation was to test whether the systems are good enough if the shop primer is left on the surface. Two different zinc silicate shop primers have been included in the investigation. As protective coatings the authors have used three different epoxy mastic systems with Al pigments. In addition to panels with original shop primer, they have also tested shop primed panels pre-treated in various ways, such as heated, corroded and blast cleaned to various degrees before coating. The coatings have been tested in the ASTM-G8 121 test and in a long term test in sea water polarized with a Zn anode. They have found that coatings including the zinc silicate shop primer are more susceptible to cathodic disbonding than the coating applied directly on blast cleaned steel. It is however possible to meet the NORSOK criteria with a zinc silicate shop primer as first coat.

  14. Study of corrosion protection of alumimium by siliconoxid-polymer coatings deposited by a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J. F.; Sonnenfeld, A.; Ivanova, O.; Hippler, R.; To, T. X. H.; Pham, G. V.; Vu, K. O.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2003-10-01

    Aluminum surfaces were treated with the plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure in air and in nitrogen. Tetraethoxysilan (TEOS) was used as the precursor for the deposition of a thin SiOx polymer film with an anticorrosive and an adhesive characteristics. The substrate temperature was varied from 25 C to 50 C. The coated aluminum surface was provided with a painting of primer. The corrosion performance of the layers was evaluated by adhesion measurements, by salt spraying test and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the layers depends on the substrate temperature. The results of the impedance measurements show that a surface treatment with a substrate temperature of 50 C supplies the best corrosion protection. The same results were found by using the salt spaying test.

  15. Cathodic protection of pre-tensioned concrete. Part 1: Brittle fracture propensity of corrosion damaged prestressing tendon wire

    SciTech Connect

    Stauder, A.L.; Hartt, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    Constant extension rate tests were performed upon prestressing wire specimens in air and in saturated Ca(OH), solution at {minus}0.90 and {minus}1.30 v (SCE) in order to investigate the influence of various levels of precorrosion upon mechanical properties and fracture behavior. It was determined that ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was reduced to a greater extent in the case of specimens which exhibited layer corrosion compared to those with simulated pits. The UTS of layer corroded specimens was not significantly influenced by corrosion morphology acuity but, instead, correlated with the magnitude of cross sectional area reduction. The results are discussed within the context of the previously proposed negative potential limit of {minus}0.90 v (SCE) for cathodic protection of prestressing steel, and a modified qualification criterion is introduced based upon a relationship between fracture load (alternatively, prestress level) and the magnitude of cross section reduction by corrosion.

  16. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suning; Wang, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Ying; Fu, Jiajun

    2012-04-01

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol-gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions.

  17. A new dioxime corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper: synthesis, characterization and evaluation in acidic chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Baker, Ahmad N.; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A.

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate a new dioxime compound as a corrosion inhibitor for copper. The compound (4,6-dihydroxy benzene-1,3-dicarbaldehyde dioxime) was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to compare the dioxime compound with benzotriazole for their effectiveness as corrosion inhibitors for copper in 0.1 M HCl solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the bonding mechanisms and morphological changes of the two inhibitors on the copper surface. The electrochemical techniques showed that the new dioxime compound was more effective than benzotriazole in inhibiting copper corrosion in the acidic chloride medium. The FTIR and SEM results indicated that the dioxime compound was able to coordinate with copper ions and formed a protective film on the copper surface. It was concluded that the new dioxime compound proved effectiveness to be used as a corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper.

  18. Corrosion Protection of Nd-Fe Magnets via Phophatization, Silanization and Electrostatic Spraying with Organic Resin Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xia; Li, Jingjie; Li, Musen; Ge, Shengsong; Wang, Xiuchun; Ding, Kaihong; Cui, Shengli; Sun, Yongcong

    2014-09-01

    Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets possess excellent properties. However, they are highly sensitive to the attack of corrosive environment. The aim of this work is to improve the corrosion resistance of the magnets by phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying with organic resin composite coatings. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) tests showed that uniform phosphate conversion coatings and spray layers were formed on the surface of the Nd-Fe-B magnets. Neutral salt spray tests exhibited that, after treated by either phosphating, silanization or electrostatic spraying, the protectiveness of Nd-Fe-B alloys was apparently increased. And corrosion performance of magnets treated with silane only was slightly inferior to those of phosphatized ones. However, significant improvement in corrosion protection was achieved after two-step treatments, i.e. by top-coating spray layer with phosphate or silane films underneath. Grid test indicated that the phosphate and silane coating were strongly attached to the substrate while silane film was slightly weaker than the phosphate-treated ones. Magnetic property analysis revealed phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying caused decrease in magnetism, but silanization had the relatively smaller effect.

  19. Corrosion protection and improved cytocompatibility of biodegradable polymeric layer-by-layer coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Nicole; Lee, Boeun; Enick, Nathan; Carlson, Benjamin; Kunjukunju, Sangeetha; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    Composite coatings of electrostatically assembled layer-by-layer anionic and cationic polymers combined with an Mg(OH)2 surface treatment serve to provide a protective coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy substrates. These ceramic conversion coating and layer-by-layer polymeric coating combinations reduced the initial and long-term corrosion progression of the AZ31 alloy. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the successful application of coatings. Potentiostatic polarization tests indicate improved initial corrosion resistance. Hydrogen evolution measurements over a 2 week period and magnesium ion levels over a 1 week period indicate longer range corrosion protection and retention of the Mg(OH)2 passivation layer in comparison to the uncoated substrates. Live/dead staining and DNA quantification were used as measures of biocompatibility and proliferation while actin staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the cellular morphology and integration with the coated substrates. The coatings simultaneously provided improved biocompatibility, cellular adhesion and proliferation in comparison to the uncoated alloy surface utilizing both murine pre-osteoblast MC3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. The implementation of such coatings on magnesium alloy implants could serve to improve the corrosion resistance and cellular integration of these implants with the native tissue while delivering vital drugs or biological elements to the site of implantation. PMID:23684762

  20. Corrosion protection of metallic waste packages using thermal sprayed ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Hopper, R W; Shell, T E; Wilfinger, K R

    1998-11-01

    Ceramic coated carbon steel coupons were corrosion tested in water with dissolved salts to simulate exposure to evaporation concentrated groundwater in an underground nuclear repository. Metallography revealed no corrosion at the ceramic metal interface of dense coatings, even though electrical measurements demonstrated that the coatings were slightly porous. Experimental results and a model to predict corrosion rates influenced by a porous ceramic coating and coating lifetimes are presented

  1. Application of Terahertz Radiation to the Detection of Corrosion under the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Walker, James L.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Winfree, William P.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    There is currently no method for detecting corrosion under Shuttle tiles except for the expensive process of tile removal and replacement; hence NASA is investigating new NDE methods for detecting hidden corrosion. Time domain terahertz radiation has been applied to corrosion detection under tiles in samples ranging from small lab samples to a Shuttle with positive results. Terahertz imaging methods have been able to detect corrosion at thicknesses of 5 mils or greater under 1" thick Shuttle tiles and 7-12 mils or greater under 2" thick Shuttle tiles.

  2. Corrosion protection of steel by thin coatings of starch-oil dry lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. Dry lubricants reduce friction between two metal surfaces. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior a dry lubricant formulation consisting of jet-cooked corn starch and soyb...

  3. Corrosion Protection of Steel by Thin Coatings of Starch-oil Emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior by jet-cooked starch-soybean oil composites on SAE 1010 steel. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate t...

  4. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge.

  5. The corrosion protection of AISI(TM) 1010 steel by organic and inorganic zinc-rich primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of zinc-rich primer-coated AISI 1010 steel in 3.5-percent Na-Cl was investigated using electrochemical techniques. The alternating current (ac) method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in the frequency range of 0.001 to 40,000 Hz, and the direct current (dc) method of polarization resistance (PR), were used to evaluate the characteristics of an organic, epoxy zinc-rich primer and an inorganic, ethyl silicate zinc-rich primer. A dc electromechanical galvanic corrosion test was also used to determine the corrosion current of each zinc-rich primer anode coupled to a 1010 steel cathode. Duration of the EIS/PR and galvanic testing was 21 days and 24 h, respectively. The galvanic test results demonstrated a very high current between the steel cathode and both zinc-rich primer anodes (38.8 and 135.2 microns A/sq cm for the organic and inorganic primers, respectively). The results of corrosion rate determinations demonstrated a much higher corrosion rate of the zinc in the inorganic primer than in the organic primer, due primarily to the higher porosity in the former. EIS equivalent circuit parameters confirmed this conclusion. Based on this investigation, the inorganic zinc-rich primer appears to provide superior galvanic protection and is recommended for additional study for application on solid rocket booster steel hardware.

  6. The corrosion protection of AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy by leaching of lithium-containing salts from organic coatings.

    PubMed

    Visser, Peter; Liu, Yanwen; Zhou, Xiaorong; Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Lyon, Stuart B; van der Ven, Leendert G J; Mol, Arjan J M C; Terryn, Herman A

    2015-01-01

    Lithium carbonate and lithium oxalate were incorporated as leachable corrosion inhibitors in model organic coatings for the protection of AA2024-T3. The coated samples were artificially damaged with a scribe. It was found that the lithium-salts are able to leach from the organic coating and form a protective layer in the scribe on AA2024-T3 under neutral salt spray conditions. The present paper shows the first observation and analysis of these corrosion protective layers, generated from lithium-salt loaded organic coatings. The scribed areas were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy before and after neutral salt spray exposure (ASTM-B117). The protective layers typically consist of three different layered regions, including a relatively dense layer near the alloy substrate, a porous middle layer and a flake-shaped outer layer, with lithium uniformly distributed throughout all three layers. Scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry surface roughness measurements demonstrate that the formation of the layer occurs rapidly and, therefore provides an effective inhibition mechanism. Based on the observation of this work, a mechanism is proposed for the formation of these protective layers. PMID:25927079

  7. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Horstemeyer, Mark R.; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  8. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  9. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V.

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  10. Experimental Design for the Evaluation of Detection Techniques of Hidden Corrosion Beneath the Thermal Protective System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, Catherine C.; Jacoby, Joseph A.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of corrosion beneath Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protective system is traditionally accomplished by removing the Reusable Surface Insulation tiles and performing a visual inspection of the aluminum substrate and corrosion protection system. This process is time consuming and has the potential to damage high cost tiles. To evaluate non-intrusive NDE methods, a Proof of Concept (PoC) experiment was designed and test panels were manufactured. The objective of the test plan was three-fold: establish the ability to detect corrosion hidden from view by tiles; determine the key factor affecting detectability; roughly quantify the detection threshold. The plan consisted of artificially inducing dimensionally controlled corrosion spots in two panels and rebonding tile over the spots to model the thermal protective system of the orbiter. The corrosion spot diameter ranged from 0.100" to 0.600" inches and the depth ranged from 0.003" to 0.020". One panel consisted of a complete factorial array of corrosion spots with and without tile coverage. The second panel consisted of randomized factorial points replicated and hidden by tile. Conventional methods such as ultrasonics, infrared, eddy current and microwave methods have shortcomings. Ultrasonics and IR cannot sufficiently penetrate the tiles, while eddy current and microwaves have inadequate resolution. As such, the panels were interrogated using Backscatter Radiography and Terahertz Imaging. The terahertz system successfully detected artificially induced corrosion spots under orbiter tile and functional testing is in-work in preparation for implementation.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of novel coatings for corrosion protection and hydrogen embrittlement inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, Anand

    The degradation of metallic materials under the effect of corrosion is a costly problem, which nearly every industry is confronted with. By using electrochemical plating, one can alter the characteristics of a surface so as to provide improved appearance, ability to withstand corrosive agents, resistance to abrasion, improved electrocatalytic properties or other desired properties or a combination of them. The primary goal of this dissertation is to use electrochemical deposition (electrolytic and electroless) as a surface modification technique to obtain corrosion resistant high performance electrode materials for different electrochemical applications. Metal hydride alloys, which reversibly absorb/desorb hydrogen, have been used in battery applications. The continuous decrease in the absorb/desorbing capacity of these alloys has been attributed to the corrosion of the alloy. Cobalt encapsulation (electroless) has been used as a surface modification method to obtain high performance AB5 type metal hydride alloy. The coated material has a higher capacity and longer cycle life compared to the bare alloy. Pulverization and alloy oxidation---two prime reasons for capacity fading of MH alloys have been studied in greater detail using unique electrochemical and physical characterization methods. The harmful effects of hydrogen permeation (ingress) and related stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can limit the use of metals and alloys in aqueous environments. In the present work, a new Zn-Ni-Cd plating process which offers a unique way of controlling and optimizing the Zn and Cd contents in the final deposit, has been developed. The Zn Ni-Cd alloy coatings has a more anodic corrosion potential than that of Cd but higher than the corrosion potential of iron. The coatings have superior corrosion resistance (10 times higher) and barrier properties than the conventional Cd coatings. Zn-Ni-Cd coatings also inhibit the hydrogen entry into the underlying steel. The kinetic

  12. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  13. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  14. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  15. Friction surfacing for enhanced surface protection of marine engineering components: erosion-corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Good mechanical properties combined with outstanding corrosion-resistance properties of cast nickel-aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy lead to be a specific material for many marine applications, including ship propellers. However, the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast-NAB alloy is not as good as wrought NAB alloy. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast NAB alloy by depositing wrought (extruded) NAB alloy applying the friction surfacing (FS) technique. Erosion-corrosion tests were carried out in slurries composed of sand particles of 3.5% NaCl solution. Silica sand having a nominal size range of 250-355 μm is used as an erodent. Specimens were tested at 30° and 90° impingement angles. It is observed that the erosion and erosion-corrosion resistance of friction surfaced NAB alloy exhibited an improvement as compared to cast NAB alloy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that the erosion tracks developed on the cast NAB alloy were wider and deeper than those formed on the friction surfaced extruded NAB alloy.

  16. Electrofabrication of multilayer Fe-Ni alloy coatings for better corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullal, Yathish; Hegde, A. Chitharanjan

    2014-09-01

    Electrofabrication of multilayer Fe-Ni alloy coatings were accomplished successfully on mild steel and their corrosion behaviors were studied. Multilayer comprised of alternatively formed `nano-size' layers of Fe-Ni alloy of different composition have been produced from a single bath having Fe2+and Ni2+ ions using modulated (i.e. periodic pulse control) current density (cd). The deposition conditions were optimized for both composition and thickness of individual layers for best performance of the coatings against corrosion. The deposits were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Hardness Tester, electrochemical AC and DC methods respectively. The multi layered deposits showed better corrosion resistances compared to the monolayer Fe-Ni (CR = 3.77 mm year-1) coating deposited using DC from the same bath; the maximum corrosion resistance being shown by the coating having 300 layers, deposited at cyclic cathodic current densities of 2.0 and 4.0 A dm-2 (CR = 0.03 mm year-1). Drastic improvement in the corrosion performance of multilayer coatings were explained in the light of changed kinetics of mass transfer at cathode and increased surface area due to modulation and layering.

  17. Electrochemical corrosion testing: An effective tool for corrosion inhibitor evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Van de Ven, P.; Mowlem, J.K.

    1996-10-01

    Corrosivity of an Antifreeze/Coolant can lead to localized attacks which are a major cause for metal failure. To prevent this phenomenon, specific corrosion inhibitors are used to protect the different metals in service. This paper will discuss the electrochemical principles behind corrosion, Realized corrosion and corrosion inhibition. It will also discuss electrochemical techniques which allow for the evaluation of these inhibitors.

  18. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability. PMID:27474635

  19. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  20. Corrosion Protection of Electro-Galvanized Steel by Ceria-Based Coatings: Effect of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlaoui, Y.; Tifouti, L.; Pedraza, F.

    2013-09-01

    A cerium oxide thin layer was deposited onto galvanized steel by cathodic electrodeposition from 0.1 M concentrated cerium nitrate solution. In this work, the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) addition on the composition and morphology of the deposits is examined. The results showed that the addition of PEG to the cerium nitrate solutions leads to a decrease in the cracks in the deposits by decreasing the hydrogen reduction reaction and by decreasing the film thickness which provided enhanced corrosion protection. Moreover, the substrate dissolution reaction is inhibited.

  1. Sputter-ion plating of coatings for protection of gas-turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coad, J. P.; Restall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable effort is being devoted to the development of overlay coatings for protecting critical components such as turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion damage in service. The most commercially advanced methods for depositing coatings are electron-beam evaporation and plasma spraying. Sputter-ion plating (SIP) offers a potentially cheaper and simpler alternative method for depositing overlays. Experimental work on SIP of Co-Cr-Al-Y and Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloy coatings is described. Results are presented of metallographic assessment of these coatings, and of the results obtained from high-velocity testing using a gas-turbine simulator rig.

  2. Development and evaluation of two PVD-coated β-titanium orthodontic archwires for fluoride-induced corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod; Krishnan, Anand; Remya, R; Ravikumar, K K; Nair, S Asha; Shibli, S M A; Varma, H K; Sukumaran, K; Kumar, K Jyothindra

    2011-04-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires capable of protection against fluoride-induced corrosion. Cathodic arc physical vapor deposition PVD (CA-PVD) and magnetron sputtering were utilized to deposit thin films of titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) and tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Uncoated and coated specimens were immersed in a high fluoride ion concentration mouth rinse, following a specially designed cycle simulating daily use. All specimens thus obtained were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as electrochemical corrosion behaviour, surface analysis, mechanical testing, microstructure, element release, and toxicology. The results confirm previous research that β titanium archwires undergo a degradation process when in contact with fluoride mouth rinses. The study confirmed the superior nature of the TiAlN coating, evident as many fewer changes in properties after fluoride treatment when compared with the WC/C coating. Thus, coating with TiAlN is recommended in order to reduce the corrosive effects of fluorides on β titanium orthodontic archwires. PMID:21111072

  3. Research on Protective Measures to High-Temperature Corrosion of a Novel Energy-Saving Phosphorus Reaction Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Q.; Qin, F. L.; Jiang, J. L.; Jin, Z. J.

    2012-03-01

    To recycle and utilize the reaction heat in the production of furnace grade phosphoric acid and to improve the security and economy of the whole production system, a novel phosphorus reaction tower with circulating water wall was developed on the basis of the analysis of present manufacturing process and equipment, and the mechanism of high-temperature corrosion was also analyzed according to experimental tests and operating conditions. Meanwhile, the measures of the whole life cycle anti-corrosion taken to new phosphorus reaction tower were proposed, considering multiple factors including design, manufacture, and operation. The research suggested that the fins close to phosphorus burner, heat exchange tubes toward phosphorus burner and the welds between fin and tube were dangerous zones to be corroded and should be given special protection. In addition, it has been proved that 390-440 °C surface temperature of water wall, local water cooling jacket around the oblique burner, plasma-sprayed ZrO2 ceramic coating on heating surface, ultralow carbon austenitic stainless steel rich in Cr and Ni elements are beneficial to avoid the corrosion of high-temperature phosphoric acid and its polymer.

  4. Protection of NdFeB magnets by corrosion resistance phytic acid conversion film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Haiyang; Zhu, Liqun; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Phytic acid conversion film was prepared on NdFeB magnets by dipping the NdFeB into phytic acid solution. The morphology, composition, structure and corrosion resistance of the film were systematically investigated. The results showed that the phytic acid film was effective in improving the corrosion resistance of NdFeB magnets. XRD, TEM and FT-IR analyses revealed that the film was amorphous and had a strong peak of phosphate radical (PO43-). The formation mechanism of the film was also explored by XPS and the potential of zero charge (Epzc) measurement at the solution-metal interface.

  5. Method for protecting stainless steel pipe and the like in geothermal brine service from stress corrosion cracking, and articles made thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Amend, W.E.; Kitz, K.R.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a method for protecting a stainless steel flow-conducting component used in hot geothermal brine service from chloride stress corrosion caused by contact of geothermal brine with an exterior surface of the component. It comprises: thermally coating the exterior surface with a metal having an electrode potential more negative than that of the stainless steel being protected.

  6. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, we continued the work on the development and construction of the thermogravimetric chemical vapor deposition system that we intend to employ for studying the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of metal chlorides in H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Specifically, we worked on the development of the tubular flow reactor that will be used for producing aluminum chloride for delivery to the chemical vapor deposition system and of the vapor and gas supply system. Various problems arising from condensation of aluminum chlorides in some sections of the supply line were resolved, and we expect to perform experiments using mixtures containing AlCl{sub 3} in the next reporting period. Preliminary experiments on the

  7. FUNCTIONALY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    PROF. STRATIS V. SOTIRCHOS

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO2 and H2 will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, the experimental work on the investigation of the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates from mixtures of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), aluminum trichloride, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen was continued. Experiments were also conducted on the deposition processes of the simple oxides, alumina and silica, from mixtures containing only one chloride (AlCl3 and MTS, respectively). Deposition rate data were obtained in a relatively broad range of operating conditions: temperatures in the range 800-1000 o C, 100 Torr pressure, 0.006-0.015 AlCl3 feed mole fraction, 0.011- 0.027 CH3SiCl3 feed mole fraction, and 0.004-0.07 CO2 feed mole fraction, and various positions along the axis of the deposition reactor. Since the effect of temperature had been

  8. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this reporting period, the construction and development of the chemical vapor deposition system was completed, and experiments were conducted on the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of AlCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3} in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Work was mainly done on the investigation of the effects of the reaction temperature on the deposition kinetics. It was found that the temperature had a positive effect on the single oxides deposition rates and the codeposition rate. The apparent activation energy values extracted from the deposition rate vs. temperature curves in the high temperature region were similar for the three deposition processes, having a value around 20 kcal/mol. The codeposition rates were higher, by a

  9. Corrosion Resistance Characterization of Coating Systems Used to Protect Aluminum Alloys Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambina, Federico

    In this study, the corrosion protection provided by of a number of chromate and chromate-free coatings systems was characterized in detail. High-solids SrCrO4-pigmented epoxy primers applied to 2024 and 7075 substrates were subject to salt spray exposure testing for 30 days. Samples were removed periodically and an electrochemical impedance measurement (EIS) was made. Although none of the coatings tested showed visual evidence of corrosion, the total impedance of the samples decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude. An analysis of capacitance showed that the primer coatings rapidly took up water from the exposure environment, but the coating-metal remained passive despite the fact that it was wet. These results support the idea that chromate coatings protect by creating a chromate-rich electrolyte within the coating that is passivating to the underlying metal substrate. They also suggest that indications of metal substrate passivity found in the low-frequency capacitive reactance of the impedance spectra are a better indicator of corrosion protection than the total impedance. The low-frequency capacitive reactance from EIS measurements is also good at assessing the protectiveness of chromate-free coatings systems. Fifteen different coatings systems comprising high-solids, chromate-free primers and chromate-free conversion coatings were applied to 2024 and 7075 substrates. These coatings were subject to salt spray exposure and EIS measurements. All coatings were inferior to coating systems containing chromate, but changes in the capacitive reactance measured in EIS was shown to anticipate visual indications of coating failure. A predictive model based on neural networks was trained to recognize the pattern in the capacitive reactance in impedance spectra measured after 48 hours of exposure and make an estimate of remaining coating life. A sensitivity analysis was performed to prune the impedance inputs. As a result of this analysis, a very simple but highly

  10. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  11. Corrosion protection of copper by polypyrrole film studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the electrochemical quartz microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yanhua; Ohtsuka, Toshiaki; Sheng, Nan

    2015-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films were synthesized on copper in solution of sodium di-hydrogen phosphate and phytate for corrosion protection. The protection properties of PPy films were comparatively investigated in NaCl solution. During two months immersion, the PPy film doped with phytate anions, working as a cationic perm-selective membrane, inhibited the dissolution of copper to 1% of bare copper. Differently, the PPy film doped with di-hydrogen phosphate anions, possessing anionic perm-selectivity, was gradually reduced, and inhibited the dissolution to 7.8% of bare copper. Degradation of the PPy films was studied by comparing the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy change at different immersion time and Raman spectra change after immersion.

  12. Restraint deformation and corrosion protection of gold deposited aluminum mirrors for cold optics of mid-infrared instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Mizuho; Miyata, Takashi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Kamizuka, Takafumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Asano, Kentaro; Okada, Kazushi; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Kataza, Hirokazu; Sarugaku, Yuki; Kirino, Okiharu; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Okada, Norio; Mitsui, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    We report the restraint deformation and the corrosion protection of gold deposited aluminum mirrors for mid-infrared instruments. To evaluate the deformation of the aluminum mirrors by thermal shrinkage, monitoring measurement of the surface of a mirror has been carried out in the cooling cycles from the room temperature to 100 K. The result showed that the effect of the deformation was reduced to one fourth if the mirror was screwed with spring washers. We have explored an effective way to prevent the mirror from being galvanically corroded. A number of samples have been prepared by changing the coating conditions, such as inserting an insulation layer, making a multi-layer and overcoating water blocking layer, or carrying out precision cleaning before coating. Precision cleaning before the deposition and protecting coat with SiO over the gold layer seemed to be effective in blocking corrosion of the aluminum. The SiO over-coated mirror has survived the cooling test for the mid-infrared use and approximately 1 percent decrease in the reflectance has been detected at 6-25 microns compared to gold deposited mirror without coating.

  13. Enhancing the force capability of permanent magnet latching actuators for electromechanical valve actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rens, J.; Clark, R. E.; Jewell, G. W.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    This article introduces a topology of parallel-polarized permanent magnet latching actuator for use in electromagnetic valve actuation systems for internal combustion engines. The actuator has a number of advantages over reluctance actuators, commonly employed in such systems, in terms of reduced starting currents and fail-safe capability. The influence of a number of design features on actuator performance, such as tooth tapering, additional magnets to improve the main magnet flux path and prevent the onset of saturation, and mechanical clearances required to protect the permanent magnet from shock loads are investigated. The design study findings are verified by measurements on a prototype actuator.

  14. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  15. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  16. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVDMullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Auger, M.

    1997-05-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics are the leading candidate materials for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants because of their unique combination of high temperature strength, high thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, and good high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. Ceramic coatings are being considered for diesel engine cylinder liners, piston caps, valve faces and seats, piston rings, and for turbine components such as combustors, blades, stators, seals, and bearings. Under such conditions ceramics are better suited to high temperature environments than metals. For the first time, adherent crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion/oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments. These corrosive environments include thermal, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and coal slag.

  17. Organosilane self-assembled layers (SAMs) and hybrid silicate magnesium-rich primers for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy 2024 T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duhua

    Although current chromate coatings function very well in corrosion protection for aircraft alloys, such as aluminum alloy 2024 T3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is planning to totally ban the use of chromates as coating materials in the next decade or so because of their extremely toxic effect. For this purpose, both self-assembled layers and silicate magnesium-rich primers were tested to provide the corrosion protection for aluminum alloy. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a coating system to replace the current chromate coating for aircraft corrosion protection. Aluminum alloy 2024 T3 substrates were modified with self-assembled monolayer or multilayer thin films from different alkylsilane compounds. Mono-functional silanes, such as octadecyltrichlorosilane (C18SiCl3), can form a mixed hydrophobic monolayer or multilayer thin film on the aluminum oxide surface to provide a barrier to water and other electrolytes, so the corrosion resistance of the SAMs modified surface was increased significantly. On the other hand, the bi-functional silane self-assembly could attach the aluminum surface through the silicon headgroup while using its functional tailgroup to chemically bond the polymer coating, thus improving the adhesion between the aluminum substrate and coating substantially, and seems to contribute more to corrosion protection of aluminum substrate. Organosilanes were also combined with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in propel ratios to form a sol-gel binder to make silicate magnesium-rich primers. Analogue to the inorganic zinc-rich coatings, the silicate magnesium-rich primers also showed excellent adhesion and solvent resistance. The sacrificial magnesium pigments and the chemically inert silicate binder both contribute to the anti-corrosion properties. Future studies will be focused on the formula optimization for better toughness, chemical resistance and anticorrosion performance.

  18. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  19. Photoelectrochemical protection of stainless alloys from the stress-corrosion cracking in BWR primary coolant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Masatsune; Iso-o, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Takanori; Ayabe, Muneo; Hirano, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of counteracting or preventing the stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR core internals by the photoelectrochemical method has been examined. For the purpose TiO{sub 2} semiconductor is noted for its capability of photo electrochemically inducing the water-oxidizing anodic reaction in low enough potential domain if supplied with a light of a wavelength shorter than 410 nm. This paper offers an empirical proof by showing that Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 stainless alloy that have been plasma-spray coated with TiO{sub 2} film will do quite well in environments of BWR primary coolant.

  20. Multilayer graphene for long-term corrosion protection of stainless steel bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoot, Adam C.; Camilli, Luca; Spiegelhauer, Susie-Ann; Yu, Feng; Bøggild, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by similar investigations recently published (Pu et al., 2015), we report a comparative corrosion study of three sets of samples relevant as bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: stainless steel, stainless steel with a nickel seed layer (Ni/SS) and stainless steel with Ni seed layer coated by a multi-layered graphene thin film (G/Ni/SS). The graphene film, synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), has a moderate amount of defects according to Raman spectroscopy. Short/medium-term corrosion test shows no significant advantage of using G/Ni/SS rather than Ni/SS, both samples exhibiting a similar trend, thus questioning the short-term positive effect of graphene coatings. However, partial immersion in boiling seawater for three weeks reveals a clear superiority of the graphene coating with respect to steel just protected by Ni. After the test, the graphene film is still intact with unchanged defect density. Our results show that even non-perfect multilayer graphene films can considerably increase the lifetime of future-generation bipolar plates for fuel cells.

  1. Intermetallic-ceramic coatings for metals protection against erosion-corrosion at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.; Verstak, A.; Beliaev, A.

    1999-07-01

    A series of erosion-corrosion (E-C) tests was carried out on the NiAl-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} intermetallic-ceramic coatings deposited with high-velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF). The tests attempted to simulate the erosion conditions at the heat exchanger tubes in coal-fired boilers. The E-C behavior of these coatings was investigated and compared with other thermal sprayed coatings. It was found that in comparison to other coatings, eroded by the bed ash at 300 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} coating exhibited the lowest thickness loss at a 90{degree} impact angle, and was the second best at a 30{degree} impact angle. Eroded by the fly ash under test temperatures 450--600 C, the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating demonstrated the highest erosion-corrosion resistance at all impact angles of testing. At temperatures below 200 C, the E-C wastage of the HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating had essentially no dependence on temperature. From 200 C to 600 C the coating thickness loss increased and from 600 to 800 C the thickness loss decreased with temperature. The HVOF NiAl-40Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating eroded by cracking and chipping brittle mechanism.

  2. Protection of carbon steel against hot corrosion using thermal spray Si- and Cr-base coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Martinez, L.

    1998-02-01

    A Fe75Si thermal spray coating was applied on the surface of a plain carbon steel baffle plate. Beneath this coating, a Ni20Cr coating was applied to give better adherence to the silicon coating. The baffle was installed in the high-temperature, fireside, corrosion zone of a steam generator. At the same time, an uncoated 304 stainless steel baffle was installed nearby for comparison. For 13 months the boiler burned heavy fuel oil with high contents of vanadium. The samples were studied employing scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction techniques. After that, it was possible to inspect the structural state of the components, and it was found that the stainless steel baffle plates were destroyed almost completely by corrosion, whereas the carbon steel coated baffle plate did not suffer a significant attack, showing that the performance of the thermal spray coating was outstanding and that the coating was not attacked by vanadium salts of the molten slag.

  3. Preparation of crosslinked amphiphilic silver nanogel as thin film corrosion protective layer for steel.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdelrahman O

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized by a new developed method via reaction of AgNO3 and oleic acid with the addition of a trace amount of Fe3+ ions. Emulsion polymerization at room temperature was employed to prepare a core-shell silver nanoparticle with controllable particle size. N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and potassium peroxydisulfate (KPS) were used as a crosslinker, and as redox initiator system, respectively for crosslinking polymerization. The structure and morphology of the silver nanogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM). The effectiveness of the synthesized compounds as corrosion inhibitors for steel in 1 M HCl was investigated by various electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Monolayers of silver nanoparticle were self-assembled on the fresh active surface of the steel electrode and have been tested as a corrosion inhibitor for steel in 1 M HCl solution. The results of polarization measurements showed that nanogel particles act as a mixed type inhibitor. PMID:25036152

  4. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  5. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  6. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  7. Evaluation of soil corrosivity and aquifer protective capacity using geoelectrical investigation in Bwari basement complex area, Abuja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniji, A. E.; Omonona, O. V.; Obiora, D. N.; Chukudebelu, J. U.

    2014-04-01

    Bwari is one of the six municipal area councils of the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Abuja with its attendant growing population and infrastructural developments. Groundwater is the main source of water supply in the area, and urbanization and industrialization are the predominant contributors of contaminants to the hydrological systems. In order to guarantee a continuous supply of potable water, there is a need to investigate the vulnerability of the aquifers to contaminants emanating from domestic and industrial wastes. A total of 20 vertical electrical soundings using Schlumberger electrode array with a maximum half current electrodes separation of 300 m was employed. The results show that the area is characterized by 3-6 geoelectric subsurface layers. The measured overburden thickness ranges from 1.0 to 24.3 m, with a mean value of 7.4 m. The resistivity and longitudinal conductance of the overburden units range from 18 to 11,908 Ωm and 0.047 to 0.875 mhos, respectively. Areas considered as high corrosivity are the central parts with ρ < 180 Ωm. The characteristic longitudinal unit conductance was used to classify the area into zones of good (0.7-4.49 mhos), moderate (0.2-0.69 mhos), weak (0.1-0.19 mhos), and poor (<0.1) aquifer protective capacity. Zones characterized by materials of moderate to good protective capacity serve as sealing potential for the underlying hydrogeological system in the area. This study is aimed at delineating zones that are very prone to groundwater contamination from surface contaminants and subsurface soils that are corrosive to utility pipes buried underground. Hence the findings of this work will constitute part of the tools for groundwater development and management and structural/infrastructural development planning of the area.

  8. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Temporary protection of metals against atmospheric corrosion by saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates. Mechanisms of inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Kapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.

    1998-12-31

    This work was devoted to the investigations of the ability of saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates to inhibit corrosion of mild steel and zinc in aerated aqueous solutions. Performances of inhibitors were shown to be dependent on their chain length, their concentration and the immersion duration. Both crystallographic parameters and solubilities of iron and zinc carboxylates were determined. Then potential-pH diagrams of iron and zinc in water were built taking the presence of metallic soaps into account. According to these diagrams, the passivation of metals was attributed to the growth of films containing metallic soaps. This model confirms that previously proposed for inhibition of copper and magnesium by the same carboxylates.

  10. The use of surface modification techniques for the corrosion protection of aluminum and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natishan, P.M.; McCafferty, E.; Donovon, E.P.; Hubler, G.K.

    1995-12-31

    Surface modification techniques such as ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) offer a means to produce surfaces with unique and improved properties. This paper reviews the advantages of the IBAD and PECVD processes and discusses the preparation and pitting corrosion behavior of IBAD modified aluminum surfaces and PECVD coatings on a 7075 aluminum alloy. Pitting potential values for the base materials and for the base materials with silicon nitride IBAD, tantalum oxide IBAD, or PECVD diamond-like carbon coatings were determined in deaerated 0.1M NaCl solutions. The thickness of the modified region ranged from 0.01 to 5.0 {micro}m. All three coatings improved the resistance to pit initiation.

  11. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  12. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  13. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering. PMID:27433719

  14. Applications of advanced electrochemical techniques in the study of microbial fuel cells and corrosion protection by polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aswin Karthik

    determined by the sum of the polarization resistance of the anode (Rap) and the cathode (Rcp), and therefore Rint depends on V. The ohmic contribution to the Rint was very small. It has been found that Rint decreased with decreasing cell voltage as the increasing current flow decreased R ap and Rcp. In the presence of MR-1, Rint was lower by a factor of about 100 than Rint of the MFC with buffer and lactate as anolyte. Additions of SS balls to the anode compartment produced a very large decrease of Rint. For the MFC containing SS balls in the anode compartment no significant further decrease of Rint could be observed when MR-1 was added to the anolyte. In Chapter 2, EIS has been used to determine the properties and stability of polymer coatings based on different chromate or chromate-free pretreatments and primers. Five sets of coated aluminum 2024 samples were exposed to 0.5N NaCl for a period of 31 days. Impedance spectra of the samples were measured during this period and the changes of the properties of the different coatings were studied as a function of time. From the analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra, it was found that the corrosion protection of the coated samples depended on the type of primer used. The coating with the chromate based primer provided better corrosion protection than the coating with the chromate free primer. After 31 days of exposure, one sample from each set was scribed and exposed to 0.5N NaCl. The corrosion behavior of the scribed coatings was found to be dependent upon the type of pretreatment employed. The samples with the chromate conversion coating pretreatment showed better corrosion resistance in the scribed area than the samples that were treated by the trivalent chromium based method.

  15. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  17. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C. PMID:23845106

  18. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  19. Hybrid organic-inorganic network coatings for protecting metal substrates from abrasion and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramers or Ormocers are hybrid organic-inorganic materials first created a decade ago, and are the subject of a recent review article. Recent research from the authors laboratory in this area of materials science has focused on synthesizing protective coatings for (soft) polymeric substrates, i.e. polycarbonate. The authors have now extended the application of such coatings to metallic substrates.

  20. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  1. Effect of amino-modified silica nanoparticles on the corrosion protection properties of epoxy resin-silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chin; Lin, Hui-Fen; Lin, Chang-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Hung; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Yang, Jen-Chang; Yu, Yuan-Hsiang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, a series of organic-inorganic hybrid materials consisting of epoxy resin frameworks and dispersed nanoparticles of amino-modified silica (AMS) were successfully prepared. First of all, the AMS nanoparticles were synthesized by carrying out the conventional acid-catalyzed sol-gel reactions of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in the presence of (3-aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (APTES) molecules. The as-prepared AMS nanoparticles were then characterized by FTIR, 13C-NMR and 29Si-NMR spectroscopy. Subsequently, a series of hybrid materials were prepared by performing in-situ thermal ring-opening polymerization reactions of epoxy resin in the presence of as-prepared AMS nanoparticles and raw silica (RS) particles. The as-prepared epoxy-silica hybrid materials with AMS nanoparticles were found to show better dispersion capability than that of RS particles existed in hybrid materials based on the morphological observation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hybrid materials containing AMS nanoparticles in the form of coating on cold-rolled steel (CRS) were found to be much superior in corrosion protection over those of hybrid materials with RS particles when tested by a series of electrochemical measurements of potentiodynamic and impedance spectroscopy in 5 wt% aqueous NaCI electrolyte. The increase of corrosion protection effect of hybrid coatings may have probably resulted from the enhancement of the adhesion strength of the hybrid coatings on CRS coupons, which may be attributed to the formation of Fe-O-Si covalent bond at the interface of coating/CRS system based on the FTIR-RAS (reflection absorption spectroscopy) studies. The better dispersion capability of AMS nanoparticles in hybrid materials were found to lead more effectively enhanced molecular barrier property, mechanical strength, surface hydrophobicity and optical clarity as compared to that of RS particles, in the form of coating and membrane, based on the measurements of molecular

  2. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol–gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron–hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions. PMID:22515192

  3. Development of improved lacv-30 propeller blade coatings for protection against sand and rain erosion and marine environment corrosion. Final report 4 Jan 1982-4 Mar 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.

    1983-05-10

    An investigation was conducted of candidate systems offering potential erosion and corrosion protection when applied as coatings to Aluminum 7075 alloy propeller blades used to propel air cushioned vehicles operating in severe environments. This work focused on (1) special hard anodized and (2) hard nickel electroplated coatings as candidate protective systems with sand/rain erosion testing to evaluate their merits. Attributes of the coating systems developed and studied included: For (1) Ways and means to produce and control deposit hardness for optimum erosion resistance, methods of bonding to blades for high integrity adhesion, and inclusion of sacrificial corrosion protection electroplates in the coating systems (zinc and zinc-nickel alloy). For (2) Incorporation of dry film lubricant systems on sealed hardcoats of various anodic coating thicknesses to enhance erosion performance. Study results indicated that anodized coatings did not provide suitable erosion protection to Aluminum 7075 in sand/rain environments, even with dry film lubricant supplemental films. Electroplated hard nickel coatings, Vickers hardnesses in the range of 380 to 440, appeared better for combined sand/rain erosion resistance based on comparisons with prior work. Dilute phosphoric anodizing the aluminum substrates led to excellent bonds and improved corrosion resistance when subsequently plated with ductile nickel from a low pH bath, followed by hard nickel electroplate.

  4. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  5. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  6. Zirconia-alumina nanolaminate for perforated pitting corrosion protection of stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, W. F.; Hoppe, E. E.; Omari, M. A.; Sorbello, R. S.; Aita, C. R.

    2004-03-01

    The subject of this article is control of perforated pit growth in 316L stainless steel by application of an artificial overlayer film. The protection afforded by 250 nm thick films with two ZrO2-Al2O3 nanolaminate architectures, single-layer ZrO2, and single-layer Al2O3 under cyclic polarization in saline electrolyte is reported here. The post-exposure morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy with in situ electron energy dispersive spectroscopy. The films' diverse behavior is analyzed in terms of a model for perforated pit growth that requires partial pit occlusion until an autocatalytic geometry is established. The results show that the key property a film must have to arrest the development of autocatalytic geometry is the capability to fracture locally so that the electrolyte from the pit freely mixes with the bulk electrolyte and the pit interior becomes passivated. We show how a nanolaminate with 5.0 nm tetragonal ZrO2-5.0 nm amorphous Al2O3 bilayers sustains local fracture (blow holes) without widespread cracking and is protective against perforated pit growth. .

  7. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  8. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; Trejo, David

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  9. Steel corrosion protection by means of alkyd paints pigmented with calcium acid phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Amo, B. del; Romagnoli, R.; Vetere, V.F.

    1999-06-01

    The use of classic anticorrosive pigments is becoming more and more restricted by increasing environmental concerns; they are gradually being replaced by zinc phosphate and related compounds. Other anticorrosive pigments such as surface-exchanged silicas were also proposed. The object of this research is to study the anticorrosive properties of calcium acid phosphate as an inhibitive pigment, introducing a careful selection of complementary pigments in order to achieve an efficient anticorrosive protection. Several alkyd paints were prepared and evaluated through accelerated and electrochemical tests. The nature of the passive film formed was also studied. Paint containing zinc oxide and calcium carbonate (50/50) as complementary pigments showed the best performance in the salt spray test. Zinc oxide and calcium carbonate decreased film permeability and improved steel passivation. The passive film was composed of ferric oxyhydroxide, the pores of which became plugged by ferric phosphate.

  10. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  11. Corrosion and Protection of Metallic Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2007-12-09

    Energy security and increased concern over environmental protection have spurred a dramatic world-wide growth in research and development of fuel cells, which electrochemically convert incoming fuel into electricity with no or low pollution. Fuel cell technology has become increasingly attractive to a number of sectors, including utility, automotive, and defense industries. Among the various types of fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operate at high temperature (typically 650-1,000 C) and have advantages in terms of high conversion efficiency and the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuels, in addition to hydrogen. The high temperature operation, however, can lead to increased mass transport and interactions between the surrounding environment and components that are required to be stable during a lifetime of thousands of hours and up to hundreds of thermal cycles. For stacks with relatively low operating temperatures (<800 C), the interconnects that are used to electrically connect a number of cells in series are typically made from cost-effective metals or alloys. The metallic interconnects must demonstrate excellent stability in a very challenging environment during SOFC operation, as they are simultaneously exposed to both an oxidizing (air) environment on the cathode side and a reducing environment (hydrogen or a reformed hydrocarbon fuel) on the anode side. Other challenges include the fact that water vapor is likely to be present in both of these environments, and the fuel is likely to contain impurities, such as sulfides. Since the fuel is usually a reformed hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas, coal gas, biogas, gasoline, etc., the interconnect is exposed to a wet carbonaceous environment at the anode side. Finally, the interconnect must be stable towards any adjacent components, such as electrodes, seals and electrical contact materials, with which it is in physical contact.

  12. Electrodeposited conductive polypyrrole/polyaniline composite film for the corrosion protection of copper bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Zuo, X. W.; Wang, T.; Hu, J.; Chen, Z. D.; Ren, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    A conductive composite coating consisting of an inner polypyrrole (PPY) layer and an outer polyaniline (PANI) layer is prepared on a copper substrate by an electrochemical synthesis. Potential application of these composite coatings in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is evaluated. The corrosion performance of the copper substrate without and with the polymer coatings in the acidic solutions containing H2SO4 (0.2 M), HCl (0.1 M) and HF (3 ppm) is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, polarization and open-circuit potential measurements. The results indicate that both the bilayered PPY/PANI and the single PPY coating can increase the corrosion potential of copper substrate by more than 250 mV (SCE), and effectively decrease the corrosion current density by an order of magnitude in comparison with the uncoated copper substrate. Long-term test further confirms that the bilayered PPY/PANI coating with acceptable contact resistance provides better protection for the substrate than the single PPY coating. The bilayered structure with different ion-permselective nature may serve as an effective physical barrier to the inward penetration of corrosive species.

  13. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  14. An evaluation of corrosion protection by two epoxy primers on 2219-T87 and 7075-T73 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendrek, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the corrosion protection provided by two amine epoxy primers was made using salt fog, alternate immersion, and total immersion as exposure media. The study is the result of a request to use an unqualified low volatile organic carbon (VOC) primer (AKZO 463-6-78) in place of the current primer (AKZO 463-6-3) because environmental regulations have eliminated use of the current primer in many states. Primed, scribed samples of 2219-T87 and 7075-T73 aluminum were exposed to 5-percent NaCl salt fog and 3.5-percent NaCl alternate immersion for a period of 90 days. In addition, electrode samples immersed in 3.5-percent NaCl were tested using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EG&G model 368 ac impedance measurement system was used to monitor changing properties of AKZO 463-6-78 and AKZO 463-6-3 primed 2219-T87 aluminum for a period of 30 days. The response of the corroding system of a frequency scan can be modeled in terms of an equivalent circuit consisting of resistors and capacitors in a specific arrangement. Each resistor/capacitor combination represents physical processes taking place within the electrolyte, at the electrolyte/primer surface, within the coating, and at the coating/substrate surface. Values for the resistors and capacitors are assigned following a nonlinear least squares fit of the data to the equivalent circuit. Changes in the values of equivalent circuit parameters during the 30-day exposure allow assessment of the time to and mechanism of coating breakdown.

  15. Corrosion protection of solar-collctor heat exchangers with electrochemically deposited films. Final report, 15 May 1978-15 November 1979. [Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.R.; Schnaper, G.H.; Brummer, S.B.

    1980-05-01

    The goal of this program was the demonstration of a novel corrosion protection technique for the common solar collector metals: Al, Cu, and Fe as mild steel. This involves the electrochemical deposition of thin, adherent polymer films on the interior of heat-exchanger tubes by application of a current in the presence of a suitable organic monomer. Polyphenylene oxide (PPO) films were anodically deposited onto Cu and Fe coupons from methanolic media. However, defects in these films afforded poor corrosion protection. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, suitably functionalized PPO films were cross-linked via Schiff base formation in a subsequent chemical step. While these chemically modified PPO films were demonstrably more resistant to ethylene glycol H/sub 2/O media at elevated temperatures, they were eventually undetermined by the thermal transfer fluid. Cinnamaldehyde, a styrene-type monomre, has been successfully electrodeposited onto Al coupons. This process involved a constant, albeit unreferenced potential technique in which the Al is made the negative electrode. Cathodic deposition onto Al avoids passivating Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ barrier coating formation, and is amenable to the cross-linking technique. Filmed and cross-linked Al samples stored at elevated temperatures resisted corrosive processes compared to unfilmed control samples. Pitting, however, was the ultimate fate of all filmed samples.

  16. Demonstration of multifunctional DNBM corrosion inhibitors in protective coatings for Naval Air/Weapon Systems. Final report, September 1989-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bailin, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    The corrosion protective properties of multifunctional DNBM salts (quaternary ammonium dichromate, nitrate, borate, and molybdate) have been demonstrated on high-strength steel and aluminum alloys found in prototype aerospace weapon systems. The 100% DNBM mixture added to MIL-P-23377 epoxy-polyamide, minus strontium chromate inhibitor, on bare 7075-T6 aluminum alloy resisted 1000 h ASTM B-117 salt spray. However, the coatings were not resistant to hydraulic fluid immersion at the higher concentrations required for the corrosion inhibition. Microencapsulation of the reactive DNBM mixture was adopted as a means to prevent this susceptibility, as well as the destructive oxidation of the hydroxyl groups in the epoxy resin during cure. In the scale-up operation, approximately 20 gallons of DNBM weighing 64 kg (141 lb) was prepared from the four starting quarternary salts synthesized in a chemical process pilot plant. The salts were mixed by dissolving in toluene. Following removal of solvent, the resultant dark-brown liquid, approximating molasses in viscosity, was microencapsulated by the following method: The DNBM was dispersed to form an oil-in-water emulsion in an aqueous colloidal solution of low-viscosity, high-purity methyl cellulose using a Gifford-Wood homogenizer, followed by spray drying in an Anhydro spray dryer. The maximum practicable payload was 75% DNBM. After spray drying, the capsules Corrosion inhibitors, DNBM, Microencapsulation, Epoxy primers, Protective coatings.

  17. OTEC biofouling-control and corrosion-protection study at the Seacoast Test Facility: 1981-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Larsen-Basse, J.; Berger, L.R.; Berger, J.A.; Little, B.J.; Stevens, H.C.; Darby, J.B.; Genens, L.E.; Hillis, D.L.

    1985-07-01

    Results from the first two years of operation of the OTEC Seacoast Test Facility in Hawaii are presented. No detectable biofouling from cold water in smooth tubes has been observed. Intermittent, low-level chlorination appears to control biofouling from warm water in smooth tubes. Uniform corrosion of all aluminum alloys is low in warm water, with no pitting observed. In cold water, preliminary data indicate pitting of all alloys, but corrosion is considerably less uniform than in warm water.

  18. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  19. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  20. Environmental Friendly Coatings and Corrosion Prevention For Flight Hardware Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Identify, test and develop qualification criteria for environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and corrosion preventative compounds (CPC's) for flight hardware an ground support equipment.

  1. Note: A heated-air curtain design using the Coanda effect to protect optical access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gustavious Paul; Keenan, Thomas L; Herning, James; Kimblin, Clare; DiBenedetto, John; Anthony, Glen

    2011-01-01

    We present an air knife design for creating a heated air curtain to protect optical infrared access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments. The design uses the Coanda effect to turn the air curtain and to attach the air curtain to the window surface. The design was tested and verified on our 24 m stack and used extensively over a 6 yr period on several release stacks. During testing and subsequent use no detrimental changes to access window materials have been noted. This design allows stack monitoring without significantly affecting the stack flow profile or chemical concentration. PMID:21280868

  2. Note: A heated-air curtain design using the Coanda effect to protect optical access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gustavious Paul; Keenan, Thomas L.; Herning, James; Kimblin, Clare; DiBenedetto, John; Anthony, Glen

    2011-01-01

    We present an air knife design for creating a heated air curtain to protect optical infrared access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments. The design uses the Coanda effect to turn the air curtain and to attach the air curtain to the window surface. The design was tested and verified on our 24 m stack and used extensively over a 6 yr period on several release stacks. During testing and subsequent use no detrimental changes to access window materials have been noted. This design allows stack monitoring without significantly affecting the stack flow profile or chemical concentration.

  3. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  4. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  5. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  6. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  7. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  8. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Hovis, V.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Pullen, W.C.

    1983-05-31

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  9. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  10. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  11. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  12. Triboelectric Charging at the Nanostructured Solid/Liquid Interface for Area-Scalable Wave Energy Conversion and Its Use in Corrosion Protection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Jiao; Zhu, Guang; Fan, You Jun; Li, Hua Yang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-07-28

    We report a flexible and area-scalable energy-harvesting technique for converting kinetic wave energy. Triboelectrification as a result of direct interaction between a dynamic wave and a large-area nanostructured solid surface produces an induced current among an array of electrodes. An integration method ensures that the induced current between any pair of electrodes can be constructively added up, which enables significant enhancement in output power and realizes area-scalable integration of electrode arrays. Internal and external factors that affect the electric output are comprehensively discussed. The produced electricity not only drives small electronics but also achieves effective impressed current cathodic protection. This type of thin-film-based device is a potentially practical solution of on-site sustained power supply at either coastal or off-shore sites wherever a dynamic wave is available. Potential applications include corrosion protection, pollution degradation, water desalination, and wireless sensing for marine surveillance. PMID:26154990

  13. Application of a quartz crystal microbalance to the study of copper corrosion in acid solution inhibited by triazole-iodide protective films

    SciTech Connect

    Jope, D.; Sell, J.; Pickering, H.W.; Weil, K.G.

    1995-07-01

    When one uses one side of a quartz crystal microbalance as the working electrode in electrochemical experiments, mass changes can be monitored continuously with a sensitivity of a few nanograms per square centimeter. In this study the working electrode consisted of electrolytically deposited copper, exposed to 0.1M sodium sulfate at pH 3, open to the atmosphere and in some cases containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Upon addition of one of the inhibitors, benzotriazole (BTA), tolyltriazole (TTA), carboxy-benzotriazole (CBT), or these inhibitors plus potassium iodide, the rate of frequency change decreases markedly. After removal of the inhibitors from the corrosive medium by fast solution exchange there is a marked continuing protective effect of the inhibitor films in the cases of BTA + KI and TTA + KI with the latter being the most stable and protective of all of the films. The results were qualitatively the same in the more corrosive solution containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  14. Microencapsulation Technology for Corrosion Mitigation by Smart Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhrow, Jerry; Li, Wenyan; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion is being developed based on micro-encapsulation technology. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection effectiveness. This paper summarizes the development, optimization, and testing of microcapsules specifically designed to be incorporated into a smart coating that will deliver corrosion inhibitors to mitigate corrosion autonomously. Key words: smart coating, corrosion inhibition, microencapsulation, microcapsule, pH sensitive microcapsule, corrosion inhibitor, corrosion protection pain

  15. Optimizing NiCr and FeCr HVOF Coating Structures for High Temperature Corrosion Protection Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve a desired dense structure for coatings employed in high temperature corrosion conditions, thermal spray process optimization with diagnostic tools can be applied. In this study, NiCr (51Ni-46Cr-2Si-1Fe) and FeCr (Fe-19Cr-9W-7Nb-4Mo-5B-2C-2Si-1Mn) powders were sprayed with HVOFGF (gas-fueled) and HVOFLF (liquid-fueled) systems, and the spray processes were monitored with diagnostic tools, including SprayWatch for measuring the temperature and velocity of the spray stream, and in situ coating property (ICP measurement) for measuring the stress state. Various spray parameters were applied to attain the best coating characteristics for high temperature applications. Selected coatings were exposed to high temperature corrosion conditions both in laboratory and actual power plant. The coatings were analyzed by microscopic means and mechanical testing. The application of process-structure-properties-performance methodology with the process monitoring, analysis of the coating characteristics, and results of corrosion performance are presented in this paper.

  16. Corrosion protection of untreated AA-2024-T3 in chloride solution by a chromate conversion coating monitored with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Frankel, G.; McCreery, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands to an initially untreated alloy sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated alloy sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion products.

  17. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    Research is presently being initiated to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituents` size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. During the last quarter, model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder cermet composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) technique. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a nickel matrix with an average size of alumina particles of 12 micrometers. The increase in volume fraction of alumina in the nickel matrix from 0 to 45% led to an increase in hardness of these composites from 85 to 180 HV{sub 1000}. The experimental procedure and preliminary microstructural characterization of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites are presented in this progress report along with plans for the research in coming year. 3 figs.

  18. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  19. Self-actuating reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Brummond, Willian A; Peterson, Leslie F.

    1988-01-01

    A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

  20. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  1. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  2. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  3. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  4. Corrosion and protection of heterogeneous cast Al-Si (356) and Al-Si-Cu-Fe (380) alloys by chromate adn cerium inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Syadwad

    In this study, the localized corrosion and conversion coating on cast alloys 356 (Al-7.0Si-0.3Mg) and 380 (Al-8.5Si-3.5Cu-1.6Fe) were characterized. The intermetallic phases presence in the permanent mold cast alloy 356 are primary-Si, Al5FeSi, Al8Si6Mg3Fe and Mg2Si. The die cast alloy 380 is rich in Cu and Fe elements. These alloying elements result in formation of the intermetallic phases Al 5FeSi, Al2Cu and Al(FeCuCr) along with primary-Si. The Cu- and Fe-rich IMPS are cathodic with respect to the matrix phase and strongly govern the corrosion behavior of the two cast alloys in an aggressive environment due to formation of local electrochemical cell in their vicinity. Results have shown that corrosion behavior of permanent mould cast alloy 356 is significantly better than the die cast aluminum alloy 380, primarily due to high content of Cu- and Fe-rich phases such as Al2Cu and Al 5FeSi in the latter. The IMPS also alter the protection mechanism of the cast alloys in the presence of inhibitors in an environment. The presence of chromate in the solution results in reduced cathodic activity on all the phases. Chromate provides some anodic inhibition by increasing pitting potentials and altering corrosion potentials for the phases. Results have shown that performance of CCC was much better on 356 than on 380, primarily due to inhomogeneous and incomplete coating deposition on Cu- and Fe- phases present in alloy 380. XPS and Raman were used to characterize coating deposition on intermetallics. Results show evidence of cyanide complex formation on the intermetallic phases. The presence of this complex is speculated to locally suppress CCC formation. Formation and breakdown of cerium conversion coatings on 356 and 380 was also analyzed. Results showed that deposition of cerium hydroxide started with heavy precipitation on intermetallic particles with the coatings growing outwards onto the matrix. Electrochemical analysis of synthesized intermetallics compounds in the

  5. Synthesis and application of hybrid polymer composites based on silver nanoparticles as corrosion protection for line pipe steel.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdurrahman O

    2014-01-01

    A facile method was developed to synthesize in high yield dispersed silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with small particle sizes of less than 10 nm. Silver nitrate was reduced to silver nanoparticles by p-chloroaniline in the presence of polyoxyethylene maleate 4-nonyl-2-propylene-phenol (NMA) as a stabilizer. The produced AgNPs were used to prepare hybrid polymer based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm), 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS), N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and potassium persulfate (KPS) using a semi-batch solution polymerization method. The prepared AgNPs and hybrid polymer were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The corrosion inhibition activity of the AgNPs and hybrid polymer towards steel corrosion in the presence of hydrochloric acid has been investigated by polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. Polarization measurements indicate that the AgNPs and hybrid polymer acts as a mixed type-inhibitor and the inhibition efficiency increases with inhibitor concentration. The results of potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements clearly showed that the inhibition mechanism involves blocking of the steel surface by inhibitor molecules via adsorption. PMID:24840897

  6. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  7. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  8. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  9. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  10. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  15. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  17. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  18. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  19. Virtual Instrumentation Corrosion Controller for Natural Gas Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, J.; Agnihotri, G.; Deshpande, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion is an electrochemical process. Corrosion in natural gas (methane) pipelines leads to leakages. Corrosion occurs when anode and cathode are connected through electrolyte. Rate of corrosion in metallic pipeline can be controlled by impressing current to it and thereby making it to act as cathode of corrosion cell. Technologically advanced and energy efficient corrosion controller is required to protect natural gas pipelines. Proposed virtual instrumentation (VI) based corrosion controller precisely controls the external corrosion in underground metallic pipelines, enhances its life and ensures safety. Designing and development of proportional-integral-differential (PID) corrosion controller using VI (LabVIEW) is carried out. When the designed controller is deployed at field, it maintains the pipe to soil potential (PSP) within safe operating limit and not entering into over/under protection zone. Horizontal deployment of this technique can be done to protect all metallic structure, oil pipelines, which need corrosion protection.

  20. Measurement and mitigation of corrosion on self-contained fluid filled (SCFF) submarine circuits for New York Power Authority: Volume 2 -- Stray electrical current measurements and preliminary design of the cathodic protection system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) installed a 345-kV submarine cable circuit across Long Island Sound between substations at Davenport Neck and Hempstead Harbor. During design and installation of the cable circuit, utility and cable manufacturers engineers identified corrosion as a possible problem for the cable system. They considered such effects in the cable design and discussed preliminary requirements for a cathodic protection system on Long Island Sound circuit. EPRI cosponsored this review of the corrosion effects with NYPA and Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp. (ESEERCO). Volume 1 of this report discusses the results from an in-depth evaluation of the self-contained fluid-filled (SCFF) cable construction materials and their susceptibility to corrosion. Volume 2 provides extended stray current field measurements and a preliminary design for a cathodic protection system to ensure cable service reliability. This study provides a blueprint for East or West Coast utilities evaluating site-specific corrosion processes and cable circuit protection methods suitable for underwater environments.

  1. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  2. Corrosion beneath disbonded coatings: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbandment and CP current flow within the disbanded region. This paper addresses these issues but also considers corrosion associated with disbanded areas that are distant from holidays.

  3. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  4. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  5. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  6. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  7. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  8. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  9. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  10. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  11. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  12. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  13. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  14. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  15. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What`s All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  16. Experimental Design for the Evaluation of Detection Techniques of Hidden Corrosion Beneath the Thermal Protective System of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.; Jacoby, Joseph A.; Lomness, Janice K.; Hintze, Paul E.; Russell, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    The United States Space Operational Space Shuttle Fleet Consists of three shuttles with an average age of 19.7 years. Shuttles are exposed to corrosive conditions while undergoing final closeout for missions at the launch pad and extreme conditions during ascent, orbit, and descent that may accelerate the corrosion process. Structural corrosion under TPS could progress undetected (without tile removal) and eventually result in reduction in structural capability sufficient to create negative margins of . safety and ultimate loss of local structural capability.

  17. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  18. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  3. Non-collinear valve actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A non-collinear valve actuator includes a primary actuating system and a return spring system with each applying forces to a linkage system in order to regulate the flow of a quarter-turn valve. The primary actuating system and return spring system are positioned non-collinearly, which simply means the primary actuating system and return spring system are not in line with each other. By positioning the primary actuating system and return spring system in this manner, the primary actuating system can undergo a larger stroke while the return spring system experiences significantly less displacement. This allows the length of the return spring to be reduced due to the minimization of displacement thereby reducing the weight of the return spring system. By allowing the primary actuating system to undergo longer strokes, the weight of the primary actuating system may also be reduced. Accordingly, the weight of the non-collinear valve actuator is reduced.

  4. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  5. Arc-Sprayed Iron-Based Coatings for Erosion-Corrosion Protection of Boiler Tubes at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhmurskii, Vasyl; Student, Mykhailo; Gvozdeckii, Volodymyr; Stypnutskyy, Taras; Student, Oleksandra; Wielage, Bernhard; Pokhmurska, Hanna

    2013-06-01

    Wire arc spraying is an economically attractive thermal spray process that is especially interesting for the protection of large-scale parts or constructions. This study presents the results of the development and investigation of a number of cored wires based on the Fe-Cr-Al system with minor addition of alloying elements (B, Mn, Ni, Si, Ti, Mg, etc.). The microstructure of the coatings, their electrochemical behavior, and isothermal oxidation performance over a temperature range of 20-700 °C were investigated. Erosion resistance at elevated temperatures was determined with a laboratory test unit under test conditions that have simulated the work conditions in fossil-fuel-fired boilers. It was established that the oxidation resistance and the gas-abrasive wear resistance of arc-sprayed coatings depend mostly on the coating microstructure and homogeneity of element distribution rather than on the general alloying level and microhardness of the coating. A new parameter for coating characterization, namely, the coefficient of chemical microheterogeneity, K CMH, is introduced to quantify this influence. Formation of the coating microstructure at elevated temperatures and its influence on the protection ability of the coating are discussed.

  6. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Similar Industries and/or Launch Facilities Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Perusich, Stephen A.; Trejo, David; Whitten, Mary C.; Zidek, Jason

    2009-01-01

    A trade study and litera ture survey of refractory materials (fi rebrick. refractory concrete. and si licone and epoxy ablatives) were conducted to identify candidate replacement materials for Launch Complexes 39A and 398 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In addition, site vis its and in terviews with industry expens and vendors of refractory materials were conducted. As a result of the si te visits and interviews, several products were identified for launch applications. Firebrick is costly to procure and install and was not used in the si tes studied. Refractory concrete is gunnable. adheres well. and costs less 10 install. Martyte. a ceramic fi lled epoxy. can protect structural stccl but is costly. difficullto apply. and incompatible with silicone ablatives. Havanex, a phenolic ablative material, is easy to apply but is costly and requires frequent replacement. Silicone ablatives are ineJ[pensive, easy to apply. and perl'onn well outside of direct rocket impingement areas. but refractory concrete and epoxy ablatives provide better protection against direcl rocket exhaust. None of the prodUCIS in this trade study can be considered a panacea for these KSC launch complexes. but the refractory products. individually or in combination, may be considered for use provided the appropriate testing requirements and specifications are met.

  7. Separation Control using Lorentz Force Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Tucker, A.; Thomas, S.

    2003-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of Lorentz force actuators for separation control, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. Salt was added to the tunnel to yield an electrical conductivity of one half of seawater. The setup consisted of a 1.3 m long flat plate followed by a 15^o ramp. The boundary layer was tripped near the flat plate leading edge, resulting in a fully turbulent 2D boundary layer. The Lorentz force actuator had 3 mm wide surface mounted electrodes and permanent magnets. The actuator, which was placed just upstream of the ramp, could be used to produce forces in the streamwise or spanwise direction. To reduce electrolysis and subsequent corrosion, the input power was modulated thus producing pulsatile forcing. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and ramp length was ˜ 10^4. The flow separated shortly after the ramp and vortex shedding at a dimensionless frequency of ˜ 2 was observed. Although both streamwise and spanwise forcing were successful in reducing the separated region, the latter was much more effective. The spanwise forcing was most effective at frequencies 10 to 20 times the natural shedding frequency, whereas the streamwise forcing was effective at frequencies closer to the natural shedding frequency. The effectiveness of spanwise forcing is attributed to the generation of streamwise vorticity. Forcing in the direction opposite to the freestream resulted in complete separation at the start of the ramp.

  8. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  9. Corrosion potential analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  10. Thermally actuated mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae

    This thesis will discuss the generation of controlled sub-micron motions using novel micro actuators. Our research focuses on the development of an arm-type actuator and a free-motion locomotive walking device. Nano-science and nano-technology focuses on the creation of novel functional materials and also at the development of new fabrication techniques incorporating them. In the fields of novel fabrication techniques, manipulations of micron or sub-micron objects by micro actuators have been suggested in the science and engineering societies for mainly two reasons. From a scientific standpoint, new tools enable new prospective sciences, as is evident from the development of the atomic force microscope. From an engineering standpoint, the miniaturization of manipulation tools will require less material and less energy during a material's production. In spite of such importance, progress in the actuator miniaturization is in a primitive state, especially for the micro mobile devices. The thesis will be a key step in pursuit of this goal with an emphasis on generating motions. Our static actuator uses the excellent elastic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a template for a bimorph system. Deflections in response to temperature variations are demonstrated. The mobile device itself is a bimorph system consisting of thin metal films. Control mechanisms for its velocity and steering are discussed. Finally, fundamental limits on the capabilities of the two devices in a more general sense are discussed under via laws of physics.

  11. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  12. Drywell corrosion stopped at Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Lipford, B.L. ); Flynn, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    This article describes the detection of corrosion on the drywell containment vessel of Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant and the application of a protective coating to repair the drywell. The topics of the article include drywell design features, identification of the problem, initial action, drywell corrosion, failure of cathodic protection, long-term repair, and repair results.

  13. Tetherless thermobiochemically actuated microgrippers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Randall, Christina L.; Benson, Bryan R.; Bassik, Noy; Stern, George M.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate mass-producible, tetherless microgrippers that can be remotely triggered by temperature and chemicals under biologically relevant conditions. The microgrippers use a self-contained actuation response, obviating the need for external tethers in operation. The grippers can be actuated en masse, even while spatially separated. We used the microgrippers to perform diverse functions, such as picking up a bead on a substrate and the removal of cells from tissue embedded at the end of a capillary (an in vitro biopsy). PMID:19139411

  14. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  15. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  16. Corrosion of retractable type fall arresters.

    PubMed

    Baszczyński, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    Retractable type fall arresters constitute a most effective group of components used in personal protection systems protecting against falls from a height. They are designed primarily for outdoor use, which results in exposure to atmospheric factors associated with risk of corrosion of metal elements. This paper presents the results of a study, in which retractable type fall arresters were exposed to a simulated corrosive environment, a neutral salt spray. It discusses the development of corrosion processes depending on the duration of exposure to corrosive conditions. Tests demonstrated that corrosion of elements decreased their strength and impaired the functioning of mobile parts. The article presents methods of testing the correct functioning of devices, necessary for assessing their resistance to corrosion, which have been developed for this purpose. It also analyzes the correlation between corrosion-related damage of retractable type fall arresters and potential hazards for their users. PMID:19744368

  17. Conceptual hermetically sealed elbow actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuenscher, H. F.

    1968-01-01

    Electrically or hydraulically powered, hermetically sealed angular or rotary actuator deflects mechanical members over a range of plus or minus 180 degrees. The actuator design provides incremental flexures which keep the local deflection rate within elastic limits.

  18. Low-Shock Pyrotechnic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature 1-ampere, 1-watt pyrotechnic actuator enclosed in flexible metal bellows. Bellows confines outgassing products, and pyrotechnic shock reduction achieved by action of bellows, gas cushion within device, and minimum use of pyrotechnic material. Actuator inexpensive, compact, and lightweight.

  19. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  20. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  1. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  2. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  3. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  4. Angular-Momentum-Compensating Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktor, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Reactionless actuator developed for instrument-pointing platforms on flexible spacecraft; by eliminating reactions, actuator changes aiming angle of platform without inducing vibrations in spacecraft, eliminateing vibrations in point angle of instrument platform. Actuator used on Earth in such systems as helicopter platforms for television cameras in law enforcement and news telecasts.

  5. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  6. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  7. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  8. Actuators Acting without Actin.

    PubMed

    Geitmann, Anja

    2016-06-30

    Plant actuators move organs, allowing the plant to respond to environmental cues or perform other mechanical tasks. In Cardamine hursuta the dispersal of seeds is accomplished by explosive opening of the fruit. The biomechanical mechanism relies on a complex interplay between turgor regulation and cell wall mechanical properties. PMID:27368097

  9. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  11. Waste of cleaning emulsion sewage as inhibitors of steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazullin, D. D.; Mavrin, G. V.; Shaikhiev, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the corrosion test of steel of the brand 20 in the stratal water. To increase corrosion resistance as a corrosion inhibitor the concentrate waste emulsion of the mark "Incam- 1" was provided. The article presents studies of the corrosion rate with different dosages of corrosion inhibitor in the stratal water. Based on these research results are revealed that the degree of protection of steel is 27% at a dosage of 3.8 g / dm3.

  12. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  13. Corrosion inhibitor selection for wet pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1995-12-31

    Selection of corrosion inhibitors for wet pipelines is based on laboratory testing and field confirmation. Both the use and selection of corrosion inhibitors are driven by economics. Economics of alternative corrosion protection methods is not treated in this paper, but the economics of proper inhibitor selection are. The key to successful inhibitor selection is careful analysis of pipeline flow conditions and experimental emulation of its corrosive environment. Transportation of inhibitor to the corroding interface must be explicitly considered in the emulation. Standard corrosion rate measurement methods are used to evaluate inhibitors. Inhibitor properties tabulated during evaluation form a core database for continuing quality control.

  14. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe2O4-SiO2) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozlou, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Baradaran, Z.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe2O4 and NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  15. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  16. Microbial corrosion of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C

    1992-11-01

    Stainless steel, developed because of their greater resistance to corrosion in different aggressive environments, have proved to be affected, however, by various processes and types of corrosion. Some of these types of corrosion, mainly pitting, is activated and developed in the presence of microorganisms, which acting in an isolated or symbiotic way, according to their adaptation to the environment, create a favorable situation for the corrosion of these steel. The microorganisms that are involved, mainly bacteria of both the aerobic and anaerobic type, modify the environment where the stainless steel is found, creating crevices, differential aeration zones or a more aggressive environment with the presence of metabolites. In these circumstances, a local break of the passive and passivating layer is produced, which is proper to these types of steel and impedes the repassivation that is more favorable to corrosion. In the study and research of these types of microbiologically influenced corrosion are found electrochemical techniques, since corrosion is fundamentally an electrochemical process, and microbiological techniques for the identification, culture, and evaluation of the microorganisms involved in the process, as well as in the laboratory or field study of microorganism-metal pairs. Microstructural characterization studies of stainless steel have also been considered important, since it is known that the microstructure of steel can substantially modify their behavior when faced with corrosion. As for surface analysis studies, it is known that corrosion is a process that is generated on and progresses from the surface. The ways of dealing with microbiologically influenced corrosion must necessarily include biocides, which are not always usable or successful, the design of industrial equipment or components that do not favor the adherence of microorganisms, using microstructures in steel less sensitive to corrosion, or protecting the materials. PMID:1492953

  17. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  18. Performance and Analysis of Perfluoropolyalkyl Ether Grease Used on Space Shuttle Actuators--A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2013-01-01

    Actuators used on the United States space shuttle fleet are lubricated with unspecified amounts of Braycote 601 (Castrol Braycote) grease consisting of a perfluoropolyalkyl ether (PFPAE) base oil thickened with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filler. Each shuttle has four body flap actuators (BFAs) (two on each wing) on a common segmented shaft and four rudder speed brake (RSB) actuators. The actuators were designed to operate for 10 years and 100 flights without periodic relubrication. Visible inspection of two partially disassembled RSB actuators in continuous use for 19 years raised concerns over possible grease degradation due to discoloration of the grease on several places on the surfaces of the gears. Inspection revealed fretting, micropitting, wear and corrosion of the bearings and gears. A small amount of oil dripped from the disassembled actuators. Whereas new grease is beige in appearance, the discolored grease consisted of both grey and reddish colors. Grease samples taken from the actuators together with representative off-the-shelf new and unused grease samples were analyzed by gravimetry for oil content; by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) for metals content; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for base oil decomposition; and by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) for determination of the molecular weight distributions of the grease oil. The Braycote 601 grease was stable after 19 years of continuous use in the sealed RSB actuators and was fit for its intended purpose. There were no significant chemical differences between the used grease samples and new and unused samples. Base oil separation was not significant within the sealed actuators. No corrosive effect in the form of iron fluoride was detected. The grey color of grease samples was due to metallic iron. The red color was due to oxidation of the metallic wear particles from the gears and the bearings comprising the actuators.

  19. CORROSION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1999-10-01

    Five alloys were tested in the presence of water vapor and water vapor with HCl for 1000 hours using simulated combustion gas. Samples were removed at intervals during each test and measured for determination of corrosion rates. One sample of each alloy was examined with a SEM after the completion of each test. Cumulative corrosion depths were similar for the superstainless alloys. Corrosion for Alloy TP310 roughly doubled. Corrosion for the enhanced stainless alloys changed dramatically with the addition of chlorine. Corrosion for Alloy RA85H increased threefold, whereas Alloy TP347HFG showed an eightfold increase. SEM examination of the alloys revealed that water vapor alone allowed the formation of chromium oxide protective layers on the superstainless alloys. The enhanced stainless alloys underwent more corrosion due to greater attack of sulfur. Iron-rich oxide layers were more likely to form, which do not provide protection from further corrosion. The addition of chlorine further increased the corrosion because of its ability to diffuse through the oxide layers and react with iron. This resulted in a broken, discontinuous, and loose oxide layer that offered less protection. Niobium, although added to aid in creep strength, was found to be detrimental to corrosion resistance. The niobium tended to be concentrated in nodules and was easily attacked through sulfidation, providing conduits for further corrosion deep into the alloy. The alloys that displayed the best corrosion resistance were those which could produce chromium oxide protective layers. The predicted microstructure of all alloys except Alloy HR3C is the same and provided no further information relating to corrosion resistance. No correlation can be found relating corrosion resistance to the quantity of minor austenite-or ferrite-stabilizing elements. Also, there does not appear to be a correlation between corrosion resistance and the Cr:Ni ratio of the alloy. These alloys were tested for their

  20. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  1. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  2. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  3. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  4. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  5. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  6. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  7. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  8. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  9. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  10. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  11. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  12. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  13. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  14. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  15. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  16. Electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators for planetary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Leary, Sean P.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Smith, J.

    1999-05-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper.

  17. Electrochemical Fabrication and Characterization of Corrosion-Resistant, Ternary, Lead-Based Alloys as a New Material for Steel Surface Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyev, A. Sh.; Tahirli, H. M.; Elrouby, Mahmoud; Soltanova, N. Sh.; Tagiev, D. B.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents the study of the synthesis of the ternary Pb-Sb-Te alloy on the stainless steel substrate via electrochemical method. The corrosion resistance of the electrodeposited alloy has been investigated via subjecting the electro-synthesized alloy to a corrosive medium containing sulfide ions; this medium is similar to the petroleum refining environment. The resulting film of the electrodeposited alloy was analyzed by the scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction to determine the morphology and the phase structure of the electrodeposited film. It was found that the electrodeposited Pb-Sb-Te alloy thin film is a multiphase composition. The obtained data reveal that the most corrosion-resistant phase is the PbSb2Te4 alloy.

  18. Electrochemical Fabrication and Characterization of Corrosion-Resistant, Ternary, Lead-Based Alloys as a New Material for Steel Surface Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliyev, A. Sh.; Tahirli, H. M.; Elrouby, Mahmoud; Soltanova, N. Sh.; Tagiev, D. B.

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the study of the synthesis of the ternary Pb-Sb-Te alloy on the stainless steel substrate via electrochemical method. The corrosion resistance of the electrodeposited alloy has been investigated via subjecting the electro-synthesized alloy to a corrosive medium containing sulfide ions; this medium is similar to the petroleum refining environment. The resulting film of the electrodeposited alloy was analyzed by the scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction to determine the morphology and the phase structure of the electrodeposited film. It was found that the electrodeposited Pb-Sb-Te alloy thin film is a multiphase composition. The obtained data reveal that the most corrosion-resistant phase is the PbSb2Te4 alloy.

  19. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  20. PRINCIPLES OF CORROSION AND CORROSION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent amendments to the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations deal with corrosion and require utilities to assess corrosion in their distribution and home plumbing systems. Problems caused by corrosion can be grouped into 3 categories: health, aesthetics and econom...

  1. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen Joel; Doll, Gary Lynn

    2002-01-01

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  2. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen Joel; Doll, Gary Lynn

    2001-07-17

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  3. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Y.; Meng, W.J.; Swathirajan, S.; Harris, S.J.; Doll, G.L.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell`s operating environment. Stainless steels rich in Cr, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers. 6 figs.

  4. Corrosion resistant PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yang; Meng, Wen-Jin; Swathirajan, Swathy; Harris, Stephen J.; Doll, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention contemplates a PEM fuel cell having electrical contact elements (including bipolar plates/septums) comprising a titanium nitride coated light weight metal (e.g., Al or Ti) core, having a passivating, protective metal layer intermediate the core and the titanium nitride. The protective layer forms a barrier to further oxidation/corrosion when exposed to the fuel cell's operating environment. Stainless steels rich in CR, Ni, and Mo are particularly effective protective interlayers.

  5. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  6. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  7. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  8. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  9. Liquefaction corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this program is to provide screening data on the susceptibility to corrosion of commercial base metals and welds that are candidate materials of construction for large coal liquefaction plants. Specimens are exposed in operating environments of liquefaction pilot plants and under controlled laboratory conditions to establish acceptable conditions of stress, temperature, time, and environment for candidate alloys. Chemical analyses have been carried out to identify the corrosion-causing constituents of the liquids. The behavior of potential containment materials is being assessed on the basis of results from both in-plant exposure of test specimens as well as results from laboratory tests at ORNL. One portion of the in-plant tests includes exposing stress corrosion cracking specimens in critical areas of liquefaction plants. The critical areas include the dissolver vessel, the pressure letdown vessels, and the factionation columns. Other in-plant tests consist of exposure of corrosion coupons in areas where general corrosion has been severe. These areas include the fractionation columns used for recovery of process and wash solvents. Laboratory tests are being conducted using selected liquid process streams from the pilot plants to simulate SRC environments. Sample materials include the full range of austenitic stainless steels, most of the Inconel, Incoloy and Hastelloy high-nickel alloys, ferritic stainless steels, and Cr-Mo steels, as well as pure materials such as titanium, aluminum and nickel.

  10. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  11. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  12. Compact valve actuation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A valve actuation device. The device may include a free floating valve bridge movably supported within a cavity in the engine housing. The bridge may be provided with a cavity and an orifice arrangement for pumping gases entrained with lubricating fluid toward the piston stems as the bridge reciprocates back and forth. The device may also include a rocker arm that has a U-shaped cross-sectional shape for receiving at least a portion of the valve bridge, valve stem valve spring and spring retainer therein. The rocker arm may be provided with lubrication passages for directing lubrication to the point wherein it is pivotally affixed to the engine housing.

  13. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  14. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  15. Magnetron Sputtering Deposits Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.; Williams, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Dense, amorphous, metallic film resists corrosion attack by acid. Coatings thermally stable up to 800 degrees C and made corrosion resistant by proper choice of sputtering deposition conditions. Protective, corrosionresistant coatings applied to process equipment that comes in contact with aqueous, neutral, or acidic solutions in chemical, petroleum, and paper industries, in wastewater treatment, and in heat exchangers.

  16. Robotic Arm Actuated by Electroactie Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Xue, T.; Shaninpoor, M.; Simpson, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    Actuators are used for many planetary and space applications. To meet the NASA goal to reduce the actuators size, mass, cost and power consumption, electroactie polymers (EAP) are being developed to induce large bending and longitudinal actuation strains.

  17. 40 CFR 261.22 - Characteristic of corrosivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Characteristic of corrosivity. 261.22... Characteristic of corrosivity. (a) A solid waste exhibits the characteristic of corrosivity if a representative... Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods,” EPA Publication SW-846, as incorporated...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  2. Evaluation of EMP/EMI requirements versus corrosion prevention methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, Jan W.; Hawley, Paul M.; Daher, John K.; Lagesse, Daniel M.

    1992-10-01

    Final report covers the application of conductive sealants on an E-3 aircraft for nine months and evaluating the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) / Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Requirements and corrosion damage. Also, additional testing was performed on three conductive sealants for corrosion protection via the salt fog chambers. Using conductive sealants will meet both EMP/EMI and corrosion requirements.

  3. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  4. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  5. Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  7. Atmospheric Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Henry; Robertson, Blake; Chu, Chih Chien; Andersen, Terrell

    1974-01-01

    A model of electrolytic corrosion is developed. It is shown that electrically conducting channels threading through the oxide layer and connecting anodic and cathodic areas, obey the equation for a reactant being catalyzed by its product. The resulting autocatalytic equation is compared with available experimental data and found to be widely applicable and capable of unifying many experimental observations. PMID:16592135

  8. Atmospheric corrosion.

    PubMed

    Eyring, H; Robertson, B; Chu, C C; Andersen, T

    1974-02-01

    A model of electrolytic corrosion is developed. It is shown that electrically conducting channels threading through the oxide layer and connecting anodic and cathodic areas, obey the equation for a reactant being catalyzed by its product. The resulting autocatalytic equation is compared with available experimental data and found to be widely applicable and capable of unifying many experimental observations. PMID:16592135

  9. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  10. Galvanic corrosion reduced in aluminum fabrications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Titanium alloy fasteners dipped at zinc chromate primer are installed while wet in protective coated aluminum panels to reduce galvanic corrosion. Moisture tight seals at fastener points are also provided.

  11. Corrosion protection of aluminum bipolar plates with polyaniline coating containing carbon nanotubes in acidic medium inside the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the corrosion resistance of conductive polymer coating (polyaniline) that coated aluminum bipolar plates in acidic environment inside the PEM fuel cell (0.1 M H2SO4) was investigated using electrical conductivity, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the coating morphology. The results show that the addition of CNTs to polyaniline coating enhanced the electrical conductivity and the corrosion resistance of polyaniline polymer. The inhibition efficiency of polyaniline polymer increased with increasing CNTs concentration. The best inhibition was generally obtained at 0.8% CNTs concentration in the acidic medium. This was further confirmed by decreasing the oxygen and water permeability and increasing coating adhesion in the presence of CNTs. EIS measurements indicated that the incorporation of CNTs in coating increased both the charge transfer and pore resistances while reducing the double layer capacitance.

  12. The 43rd annual corrosion survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Applying the science of corrosion prevention to energy (petroleums, oil, LNG) pipelines in actual field operating conditions is a vital aspect of safely and efficiently operating a pipeline system. Ignoring corrosion prevention will allow this never-sleeping enemy to steal the strength from steel pipelines, turning them into dangerous junk. Various methods, techniques and technologies are available to the corrosion control department of cross-country pipelines and gas distribution utilities around the world. Every year, billions of dollars on corrosion control, including everything from coatings to cathodic protection facilities to pigging, are spent to keep these energy pipeline systems in peak operational efficiency. This paper reports that for more than 4 decades, this corrosion survey has sought out the opinions of corrosion control experts, asking them what are the problems they face daily and innovative solutions they have tried to help solve these problems.

  13. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical report, January 14, 1997--August 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, B.S.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-08-31

    Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. Bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. Also, to deposit model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings, an electrodeposition technique was developed and coatings with various volume fractions (0-35%) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced. The powder and electrodeposition processing of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Composites provide the ability to produce two phase microstructure without changing the microstructure of the matrix material. Therefore, the effect of hard second phase particles size and volume fraction on erosion resistance could be analyzed.

  14. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  15. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  16. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  17. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  18. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  19. 49 CFR 193.2629 - External corrosion control: buried or submerged components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: buried or submerged... corrosion control: buried or submerged components. (a) Each buried or submerged component that is subject to external corrosive attack must be protected from external corrosion by— (1) Material that has been...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2629 - External corrosion control: buried or submerged components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: buried or submerged... corrosion control: buried or submerged components. (a) Each buried or submerged component that is subject to external corrosive attack must be protected from external corrosion by— (1) Material that has been...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2629 - External corrosion control: buried or submerged components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: buried or submerged... corrosion control: buried or submerged components. (a) Each buried or submerged component that is subject to external corrosive attack must be protected from external corrosion by— (1) Material that has been...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2629 - External corrosion control: buried or submerged components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: buried or submerged... corrosion control: buried or submerged components. (a) Each buried or submerged component that is subject to external corrosive attack must be protected from external corrosion by— (1) Material that has been...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2629 - External corrosion control: buried or submerged components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: buried or submerged... corrosion control: buried or submerged components. (a) Each buried or submerged component that is subject to external corrosive attack must be protected from external corrosion by— (1) Material that has been...

  4. Pneumatic actuator with hydraulic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R., Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The present invention provides a pneumatically powered actuator having hydraulic control for both locking and controlling the velocity of an output rod without any sponginess. The invention includes a double-acting pneumatic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a control rod connected to the piston. The double-acting pneumatic actuator is mounted to a frame. A first double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a follower rod mounted to the piston is mounted to the frame such that the follower rod is fixedly connected to the control rod. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the first double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V1. The present invention also includes a second double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and an output rod mounted to the piston. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the second double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V2, where V2=V1. A pair of fluid ports in each of the first and second double-acting hydraulic cylinders are operably connected by fluid conduits, one of which includes a valve circuit which may be used to control the velocity of the output rod or to lock the output rod in a static position by regulating the flow of hydraulic fluid between the double-acting cylinders.

  5. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  6. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  7. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  8. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  9. Analysis of corrosion layers on protective coatings and high temperature materials in simulated service environments of modern power plants using SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, RBS and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, H; Quadakkers, W J; Singheiser, L

    2002-10-01

    In three different examples, the effects of the oxidation behaviour as well as the microstructural stability of high temperature materials and protective coatings was determined by combining the results of kinetic studies with extensive analytical investigations using, among other techniques, SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, Rutherford back scattering (RBS) as well as X-ray diffraction. 1). The effect of water vapour on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steels in simulated combustion gases has been determined. The effects of O2 and H2O content on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steel in the temperature range 600-800 degrees C showed that in dry oxygen a protective scale was formed with an oxidation rate controlled by diffusion in the protective scale. In the presence of water vapour, after an incubation period, the scales became non-protective as a result of a change in the oxidation limiting process. The destruction of the protective scale by water vapour does not only depend on H2O content but also on the H2O/O2-ratio. 2). The increase of component surface temperature in modern gas turbines leads to an enhanced oxidation attack of the blade coating. Improvements in corrosion resistance and longer lifetime thermal barrier coatings in gas turbines have been achieved by improvement of the high temperature properties of MCrAlY coatings by additions of minor alloying elements such as yttrium, silicon and titanium. 3). The use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys provides excellent creep resistance up to much higher temperatures than can be achieved with conventional wrought or cast alloys in combination with suitable high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance. Investigation of the growth mechanisms of protective chromia and alumina scales were examined by a two-stage oxidation method with 18O tracer. The distribution of the oxygen isotopes in the oxide scale was determined by SIMS and SNMS. The results show the positive influence of a Y2O3 dispersion on the

  10. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  11. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  12. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  13. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  14. Sensors, actuators, and smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiler-McKinstry, S.; Newnham, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    Electroceramic materials are presently noted to have a wide array of sensing and actuating functions which can be incorporated into smart-material designs. The sensor types extend to temperature, piezoelectricity and piezoresistivity, and the presence of oxygen. Attention is given to the prospects for developing composite smart materials that encompass various sensing and actuating functions; these may ultimately reach a level of complexity and sophistication that may be termed 'biomimetric' in its approximation to the functions of the living tissues of organisms.

  15. The role of NaCl in flame chemistry, in the deposition process, and in its reactions with protective oxides as related to hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium chloride is believed to be the primary source of turbine engine contamination that contributes to hot corrosion. The behavior of NaCl-containing aerosols ingested with turbine intake air is very complex; some of the NaCl may vaporize during combustion while some may remain as particulates. The NaCl can lead to Na2SO4 formation by several possible routes or it can contribute to corrosion directly. Hydrogen or oxygen atom reaction with NaCl(c) was shown to result in the release of Na(g). Gaseous NaCl in flames can be partially converted to gaseous Na2SO4 by homogeneous reactions. The remaining gaseous NaCl and other Na-containing molecules can act as sodium carriers for condensate deposition of Na2SO4 on cool surfaces. A frozen boundary layer theory was developed to predict the rates of deposition. The condensed phase NaCl can be converted directly to condensed Na2SO4 by reaction with sulfur oxides and O2. Reaction of gaseous NaCl with Cr2O3 results in the vapor phase transport of chromium by the formation of complex Cr-containing gaseous molecules. Similar gaseous complexes are formed with molybdenum. The presence of gaseous NaCl was shown to affect the oxidation kinetics of Ni-Cr alloys. It also causes changes in the surface morphology of Al2O3 scales formed on Al-containing alloys.

  16. Method for inhibiting corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    Nickel-containing alloys are protected against corrosion by contacting the alloy with a molten alkali metal having dissolved therein aluminum, silicon or manganese to cause the formation of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic layer. Components can be protected by applying the coating after an apparatus is assembled.

  17. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  18. Fail-safe electric actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.J.

    1988-07-19

    In combination with a control mechanism characterized by the ability to be moved from inoperative to operative position and back, a fail-safe actuator device for automatically returning the control mechanism to inoperative position when interruption of electric power occurs is described which comprises: a fluid-driven vaned torque actuator: electric-motor-driven fluid power means for operating the torque actuator; electrically operated valve means for controlling the power fluid flow between the torque actuator and the fluid power generating means; at least one shaft projecting from the torque actuator; coupling means for operatively connecting the shaft to the control mechanism to be operated by the failsafe actuator device; reversible means for storing energy, the reversible means being operatively connected to the shaft; a limit-switch operating cam mounted on and rotable with the shaft; a limit switch positioned for activation by the limit-switch operating cam; and electric circuitry means for interconnecting the motordriven fluid power generating means, the valve means, and the limit switch.

  19. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  20. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  1. Nanotube Nano-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennifer, Sippel; Arnason, Steve; Baughman, Ray; Rinzler, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    In 1999 it was found that a thin sheet of single wall carbon nanotubes (buckypaper) can act as an electromechanical transducer (an actuator), converting an applied voltage into a dimensional change, with the potential to do work.[1] The mechanism proposed for the effect is quite fundamental, relying on modification of the nearest neighbor carbon-carbon distance due to charge injected into the nanotube pi-orbital system. Because the experiment relied on buckypaper, which possesses nanoscale pores (where gas generation might also account for dimensional changes), as well as creep (where ropes sliding against one another make it difficult to determine the magnitude of the effect in the fundamental unit), the demonstration was less than ideal. Using an atomic force microscope for detection, we have now performed corresponding measurements on individual ropes of nanotubes tethered across micromachined trenches in silicon substrates. The experiment and results will be described. 1. R. H. Baughman, C. X. Cui, A. A. Zakhidov, Z. Iqbal, J. N. Barisci, G. M. Spinks, G. G. Wallace, A. Mazzoldi, D DeRossi, A. G. Rinzler, O. Jaschinski, S. Roth, M. Kertesz, Science, 284, 1340 (1999).

  2. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  3. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  4. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  5. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  6. pH Responsive Microcapsules for Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Muehlberg, Aaron; Boraas, Samuel; Webster, Dean; JohnstonGelling, Victoria; Croll, Stuart; Taylor, S Ray; Contu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The best coatings for corrosion protection provide not only barriers to the environment, but also a controlled release of a corrosion inhibitor, as demanded by the presence of corrosion or mechanical damage. NASA has developed pH sensitive microcapsules (patent pending) that can release their core contents when corrosion starts. The objectives of the research presented here were to encapsulate non-toxic corrosion inhibitors, to incorporate the encapsulated inhibitors into paint formulations, and to test the ability of the paints to control corrosion. Results showed that the encapsulated corrosion inhibitors, specifically Ce(NO3)3 , are effective to control corrosion over long periods of time when incorporated at relatively high pigment volume concentrations into a paint formulation.

  7. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  8. Preceedings of the International Congress (12th), corrosion control for low-cost reliability, held in Houston, Texas on September 19 -24, 1993. Volume 5a. Corrosion: Specific issues

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-24

    Partial contents include: (1) The role of corrosion in aging aircraft; (2) Hidden corrosion - needs and requirements; (3) Corrosion control as a necessary treatment; (4) Computer assisted aircraft paint stripping technology; (5) Reducing aircraft corrosion with desiccant dehumidifiers; (6) Corrosion contribution to environmental cracking failures of critical aircraft parts; (7) Designing metallic surface coatings for improved corrosion resistance; (8) Development of chromium based composite coatings; (9) In-situ analysis of corrosion in the crevice of automotive body by A.C. impedance measurement; (10) Designing a reinforced concrete against corrosion in chloride containing environments; (11) Carbonation of flyash-containing concrete electrochemical studies; (12) Evaluation of concrete corrosion inhibitors; (13) Cathodic protection of new steel reinforced concrete structure; (14) Reliability and corrosion testing of electronic components and assemblies; (15) Corrosion study of polymer-on-metal systems modified by processing conditions; (16) How to formulate corrosion knowledge for expert systems; and (17) Corrosion prediction form laboratory tests using artificial neural networks.

  9. Parylene coated carbon nanotube actuators for tactile stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Gendron, David; Brayda, Luca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ricci, Davide

    2015-04-01

    Ionic liquid/carbon nanotube based actuators have been constantly improved in recent years owing to their suitability for applications related to human-machine interaction and robotics thanks to their light-weight and low voltage operation. However, while great attention has been paid to the development of better electrodes and electrolytes, no adequate efforts were made to develop actuators to be used in direct contact with the human skin. Herein, we present our approach, based on the use of parylene-C coating. Indeed, owning to its physicochemical properties such as high dielectric strength, resistance to solvents, biological and chemical inactivity/inertness, parylene fulfils the requirements for use in biocompatible actuator fabrication. In this paper, we study the influence of the parylene coating on the actuator performance. To do so, we analyzed its mechanical and electrochemical properties. We looked into the role of parylene as a protection layer that can prevent alteration of the actuator performance likely caused by external conditions. In order to complete our study, we designed a haptic device and investigated the generated force, displacement and energy usage.

  10. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  11. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  12. Compatibility of repair mortar with migrating corrosion inhibiting admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Ukrainczyk, V.; Ukrainczyk, B.; Miksic, B.

    1997-08-01

    One of the methods for corrosion protection of reinforced concrete is the use of migrating corrosion inhibitor as an admixture in repair mortars. The admixture must be effective for corrosion protection and compatible with polymers added to repair mortar to improve properties of fresh and hardened mortar. This paper presents experimental results on compatibility of a migrating corrosion inhibitor added to two repair mortars based on an inorganic binder modified with polymers. The influence of a migrating inhibitor on the properties of fresh and hardened mortars was tested. The effectiveness on reinforcement corrosion protection has been tested according to ASTM G 109. Test results prove that the investigated migrating inhibitor is compatible with repair mortars and that it delays corrosion of the reinforcement.

  13. Migrating corrosion inhibitor blend for reinforced concrete: Part 1 -- Prevention of corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Elsener, B.; Buechler, M.; Stalder, F.; Boehni, H.

    1999-12-01

    The efficiency of a migrating corrosion inhibitor in preventing corrosion of mild steel was investigated in saturated calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]{sub 2}) solutions and in mortar. The protective effect of the inhibitor against pitting corrosion caused by chloride attack and against uniform corrosion as a result of carbonation was determined. Results showed that high concentrations ({approx}10%) allowed the inhibition of pitting corrosion tritiation in solution containing 1 M/L sodium chloride (NaCl). However, inhibiting properties can be lost by evaporation of the volatile constituent of the inhibitor or by the precipitation of the nonvolatile fraction of the inhibitor in presence of calcium ions. Addition of the inhibitor blend to mortar yielded a retardation of the corrosion initiation in the case of chloride-induced corrosion, but o significant reduction in corrosion rate. No effect was found in carbonated samples, and no influence on the corrosion rate was detected. Additionally, the estimation of the extent of the retarding effect on corrosion initiation on real structures was difficult, as the inhibitor was found to evaporate from the mortar. This evaporation resulted in a loss of inhibiting properties. Hence, the long-term efficiency of the inhibitor could not be guaranteed.

  14. Development of Simultaneous Corrosion Barrier and Optimized Microstructure in FeCrAl Heat-Resistant Alloy for Energy Applications. Part 1: The Protective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Chao, J.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Capdevila, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse-grained Fe-based oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are a class of advanced materials for combined cycle gas turbine systems to deal with operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100°C and 15-30 bar in aggressive environments, which would increase biomass energy conversion efficiencies up to 45% and above. This two-part paper reports the possibility of the development of simultaneous corrosion barrier and optimized microstructure in a FeCrAl heat-resistant alloy for energy applications. The first part reports the mechanism of generating a dense, self-healing α-alumina layer by thermal oxidation, during a heat treatment that leads to a coarse-grained microstructure with a potential value for high-temperature creep resistance in a FeCrAl ODS ferritic alloy, which will be described in more detail in the second part.

  15. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  16. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  17. Corrosion and Environmental Degradation, 2 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Michael; Cahn, Robert W.; Haasen, Peter; Kramer, E. J.

    2001-06-01

    Corrosion and corrosion protection is one of most important topics in applied materials science. Corrosion science is not only important from an economic point of view, but, due to its interdisciplinary nature combining metallurgy, materials physics and electrochemistry, it is also of high scientific interest. Nowadays corrosion science even gets new impetus from surface science and polymer chemistry. This two-volume reference work belonging to the well renown series Materials Science and Tehcnology provides the reader with a sound and broad survey on the whole subject - from the fundamentals to the latest research results. Written by a team of international top-experts it will become an indispensable reference for any materials scientist, physicist or chemist involved in corrosion science.

  18. Cooling tower hardware corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1983-01-31

    The data presented in this report are interim results of a continuing investigation into the corrosion resistance of metals in the environment of a large cooling tower. Some of the significant observations are as follows: the corrosion of susceptible metals occurs most rapidly in the warm fog conditions between the deck and mist filters; the application of stainless steel must be made on the basis of alloy chemistry and processing history. Some corrosion resistant alloys may develop cracking problems after improper heat treating or welding; combinations of aluminum bronze, stainless steel, and silicon bronze hardware were not susceptible to galvanic corrosion; the service life of structural steel is extended by coal tar epoxy coatings; aluminum coatings appear to protect structural steel on the tower deck and below the distribution nozzles. The corrosion of cooling tower hardware can be easily controlled through the use of 316 stainless steel and silicon bronze. The use of other materials which exhibit general resistance should be specified only after they have been tested in the form of structural assemblies such as weldments and bolted joints in each of the different tower zones.

  19. Cryogenic actuator for subnanometer positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, B. v.; Janssen, H.; Paalvast, S.; Albers, R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization, and qualification of a positioning actuator concept specifically for cryogenic environments. Originally developed for quantum physics research, the actuator also has many applications in astronomic cryogenic instruments to position optical elements with nanometer level accuracy and stability. Typical applications include the correction of thermally induced position errors of optical components after cooling down from ambient to cryogenic temperatures or sample positioning in microscopes. The actuator is nicknamed the ‘PiezoKnob’ because it is piezo based and it is compatible with the typical manipulator knob often found in standard systems for optical benches, such as linear stages or tip/tilt lens holders. Actuation with high stiffness piezo elements enables the Piezoknob to deliver forces up to 50 Newton which allows relatively stiff guiding mechanisms or large pre-loads. The PiezoKnob has been qualified at 77 Kelvin and was shown to work down to 2 Kelvin. As part of the qualification program, the custom developed driving electronics and set point profile have been fine-tuned, by combing measurements with predictions from a dynamic model, thus maximizing efficiency and minimizing power dissipation. Furthermore, the actuator holds its position without power and thanks to its mechanical layout it is absolutely insensitive to drift of the piezo elements or the driving electronics.

  20. Temperature-memory polymer actuators

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Noechel, Ulrich; Sauter, Tilman; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reading out the temperature-memory of polymers, which is their ability to remember the temperature where they were deformed recently, is thus far unavoidably linked to erasing this memory effect. Here temperature-memory polymer actuators (TMPAs) based on cross-linked copolymer networks exhibiting a broad melting temperature range (ΔTm) are presented, which are capable of a long-term temperature-memory enabling more than 250 cyclic thermally controlled actuations with almost constant performance. The characteristic actuation temperatures Tacts of TMPAs can be adjusted by a purely physical process, guiding a directed crystallization in a temperature range of up to 40 °C by variation of the parameter Tsep in a nearly linear correlation. The temperature Tsep divides ΔTm into an upper Tm range (T > Tsep) forming a reshapeable actuation geometry that determines the skeleton and a lower Tm range (T < Tsep) that enables the temperature-controlled bidirectional actuation by crystallization-induced elongation and melting-induced contraction. The macroscopic bidirectional shape changes in TMPAs could be correlated with changes in the nanostructure of the crystallizable domains as a result of in situ X-ray investigations. Potential applications of TMPAs include heat engines with adjustable rotation rate and active building facades with self-regulating sun protectors. PMID:23836673

  1. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  2. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  3. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  4. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  5. Corrosion of electronic materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, R B; Frankenthal, R P; Milner, P C; Sinclair, J D

    1986-10-17

    Electronic materials and devices corrode in the same ways as automobiles, bridges, and pipelines, but their typically small dimensions make them orders of magnitude more susceptible to corrosion failure. As elsewhere, the corrosion involves interactions with the environment. Under control, these interactions can be put to use, as in the formation of protective and functional oxide films for superconducting devices. Otherwise, they cause damage, as in the electrolytic dissolution of conductors, even gold, in the presence of humidity and ionic contamination from atmospheric particles and gases. Preventing corrosion entails identifying the damaging interactions and excluding species that allow them to occur. PMID:17834532

  6. Polyelectrolyte-diffused zinc phosphate conversion coatings and polyacid coupling primers for corrosion protection of steel and aluminum, and alkali-catalyzed hydrolysis of polyimide-based materials: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.; Warren, J.B.; Clayton, C.R.

    1989-08-01

    Under US Army Research Office (ARO) sponsorship, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed research on three topics: (1) polyelectrolyte-modified zinc phosphate (Zn/center dot/Ph) conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of steel, (2) water-soluble polyacid coupling primers for improving the corrosion resistance and adherence of polymeric paints, and (3) high-temperature lightweight polyimide material systems. In the first topic, it was found that insoluble crystalline zinc phosphate (Zn/center dot/Ph) conversion coatings can be produced on steel surfaces by immersing a surface-cleaned cold-rolled steel substrate into a BNL-developed phosphating solution containing three components, zinc orthophosphate dihydrate (Zn/sub 3/(PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/sup /minus////center dot/2H/sub 2/O), H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, and water. The major phase in the conversion coating derived from this simple phosphating solution is the same zinc phosphate dihydrate as that used in the converting solution. Referring to the second topic, it was found that the poly(itaconic acid), p(IA), which contains two functional COOH groups located on the same backbone carbon, has potential for use as a water-soluble intermediate coupling primer for polymer adhesive/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ adherend joint systems. Emphasis in the third topic was placed on understanding the reaction processes and degradation mechanisms of PI polymers which occur at the interfaces between the PI and inorganic pigments in hydrothermal environments at /ge/150/degree/C.

  7. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  8. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  9. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environment. Semi-annual report, August 14, 1996--January 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-02-01

    Research is being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The cermet composites will be produced using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition. Model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermet coatings with varying alumina fractions were produced. During this period, powder processed and electrodeposited composites were tested in the erosion simulator (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} erodent, 40 m/s velocity, 90{degree} impact angle) and their relative erosion resistances were determined. It was found that electrodeposited Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites containing small Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (1{mu}m)s showed better erosion resistance than powder processed composites with large Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (12{mu}m). Also, an increase in volume fraction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in powder processed alloys led to decreased erosion resistance. For both powder processed and electrodeposited Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites, addition of hard Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles did not improve erosion resistance compared with pure Ni.

  10. Corrosion intelligence: An application to oil and gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Calvarano, M.; Condanni, D.; Bazzoni, B.

    1997-08-01

    The transfer of sound corrosion knowledge from human experts to dedicated software tools has been individuated as a strategic activity, and, accordingly, a number of applications have been developed in recent years. This approach to corrosion, which represents a new phase, coming after those of corrosion science and corrosion engineering, has been labelled corrosion intelligence, and it matches several needs of an oil company, as: standardization of design procedures; capitalization of available knowledge in programs easy to update; decentralization of the expertise. The paper illustrates an expert system dealing with all aspects related to oil and gas pipeline corrosion, including: internal and external corrosion; material selection and corrosion control requirements; internal corrosion monitoring; coatings; cathodic protection; corrosion in transient phases; intelligent pig inspection; costs comparison. In particular, the modules for internal and external corrosion assessment are described. The general architecture of the application, based on independent expert modules, is discussed in detail and examples of results, with relevant interfaces, are shown. The expert system is also evaluated with respect to another software application for the assessment of corrosion risks.

  11. Method and apparatus for actuating vehicle transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Ishihara, M.; Uriuhara, M.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of actuating a vehicle parallel-gear transmission having gears and an internal lever for moving shift blocks connected with shift rods and shift forks for changing gear ratios of the transmission, a hydraulically controlled select actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a select direction, a hydraulically controlled shift actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a shift direction substantially normal to the select direction, a hydraulically controlled clutch actuator for connecting and disconnecting a clutch of the transmission, and a common fluid discharge passage connected to fluid discharge ports of the select and shift actuators and a fluid discharge port of the clutch actuator, the select and shift actuators being alternately actuatable to effect a gear changing operation.

  12. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  13. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  14. Electrodynamic actuators for rocket engine valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiet, O.; Doshi, D.

    1972-01-01

    Actuators, employed in acoustic loudspeakers, operate liquid rocket engine valves by replacing light paper cones with flexible metal diaphragms. Comparative analysis indicates better response time than solenoid actuators, and improved service life and reliability.

  15. 49 CFR 192.455 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed after July 31, 1971.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Buried or submerged... SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.455 External corrosion control: Buried or... against external corrosion, including the following: (1) It must have an external protective...

  16. 49 CFR 192.455 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed after July 31, 1971.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Buried or submerged... SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.455 External corrosion control: Buried or... against external corrosion, including the following: (1) It must have an external protective...

  17. 49 CFR 192.455 - External corrosion control: Buried or submerged pipelines installed after July 31, 1971.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Buried or submerged... SAFETY STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.455 External corrosion control: Buried or... against external corrosion, including the following: (1) It must have an external protective...

  18. Volatile corrosion inhibitor film formation on carbon steel surface and its inhibition effect on the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-quan; An, Zhong-xun; Pan, Qing-yi; Gao, Li-xin; Zhou, Guo-ding

    2006-11-01

    A novel volatile corrosion inhibitor (VCI), bis-piperidiniummethyl-urea (BPMU), was developed for temporary protection of carbon steel. Its vapor corrosion inhibition property was evaluated under simulated operational conditions. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was applied to study the inhibition effect of BPMU on the corrosion of carbon steel with a thin stimulated atmospheric corrosion water layers. Adsorption of BPMU on carbon steel surfaces was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that BPMU can form a protective film on the metal surface, which protects the metal against further corrosion. The structure of the protective film was suggested as one BPMU molecule chelated with one Fe atom to form a complex with two hexa-rings.

  19. Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) Actuators for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Shahinpoor, M.; Harrison, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper. Keywords: Miniature Robotics, Electroactive Polymers, Electroactive Actuators, EAP

  20. Hot corrosion of the B2 nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The hot corrosion behavior of the B2 nickel aluminides was studied to determine the inherent hot corrosion resistance of the beta nickel aluminides and to develop a mechanism for the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides. The effects of the prior processing of the material, small additions of zirconium, stoichiometry of the materials, and preoxidation of the samples were also examined. Additions of 2, 5, and 15 w/o chromium were used to determine the effect of chromium on the hot corrosion of the beta nickel aluminides and the minimum amount of chromium necessary for good hot corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the beta nickel aluminides have inferior inherent hot corrosion resistance despite their excellent oxidation resistance. Prior processing and zirconium additions had no discernible effect on the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys. Preoxidation extended the incubation period of the alloys only a few hours and was not considered to be an effective means of stopping hot corrosion. Stoichiometry was a major factor in determining the hot corrosion resistance of the alloys with the higher aluminum alloys having a definitely superior hot corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the alloys stopped the hot corrosion attack in the alloys tested. From a variety of experimental results, a complex hot corrosion mechanism was proposed. During the early stages of the hot corrosion of these alloys the corrosion is dominated by a local sulphidation/oxidation form of attack. During the intermediate stages of the hot corrosion, the aluminum depletion at the surface leads to a change in the oxidation mechanism from a protective external alumina layer to a mixed nickel-aluminum spinel and nickel oxide that can occur both externally and internally. The material undergoes extensive cracking during the later portions of the hot corrosion.