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Sample records for acuity refractive error

  1. [Predicting visual acuity in media opacities and uncorrectable refractive errors. Assessing so-called "retinal visual acuity"].

    PubMed

    Lachenmayr, B

    1990-01-01

    Three different components contribute to the modulation transfer function of the visual system: (1) formation of the optical image (refractive media, pupil); (2) scattering of light in the prereceptoral layers of the retina; (3) neuronal processing in the retina und superior visual centers. In the presence of media opacities or non-correctable refractive errors, the clinical question often arises as to which macular function can be expected under the assumption of normal optical image formation (e.g. prior to cataract extraction, corneal transplantation, or vitrectomy). Simple tests such as light projection, color discrimination, and two-point discrimination cannot provide adequate information about macular function. The same holds true for the global luminance ERG. The X-ray phosphene is obsolete. The Maddox rod (with limitations), transilluminated Amsler grid, and various entoptic phenomena (Purkinje vascular phenomenon, foveal chagrin, Haidinger's brushes, blue field phenomenon) are available as qualitative subjective tests. Maxwellian view systems with pinhole aperture (potential acuity meter PAM) and the interferometers (retinometer, visometer, SITE-IRAS interferometer) provide quantitative subjective methods. The flash VECP is primarily a qualitative objective test that allows semiquantitative acuity prediction under special conditions (unilateral opacities). Psychophysical criteria that are less affected by the quality of the retinal image show promising developments in future subjective tests, e.g. optotypes in positive contrast, optotypes or targets superimposed on a background of optical noise, or hyperacuity. Future objective test developments are pattern VECP or even pattern ERG elicited by interferometric stimulation, speckle VECP and focal ERG. PMID:2083891

  2. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close ...

  3. Facts about Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lens can cause refractive errors. What is refraction? Refraction is the bending of light as it passes ... rays entering the eye, causing a more precise refraction or focus. In many cases, contact lenses provide ...

  4. Does Assessing Eye Alignment along with Refractive Error or Visual Acuity Increase Sensitivity for Detection of Strabismus in Preschool Vision Screening?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Preschool vision screenings often include refractive error or visual acuity (VA) testing to detect amblyopia, as well as alignment testing to detect strabismus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of combining screening for eye alignment with screening for refractive error or reduced VA on sensitivity for detection of strabismus, with specificity set at 90% and 94%. Methods Over 3 years, 4040 preschool children were screened in the Vision in Preschoolers (VIP) Study, with different screening tests administered each year. Examinations were performed to identify children with strabismus. The best screening tests for detecting children with any targeted condition were noncycloplegic retinoscopy (NCR), Retinomax autorefractor (Right Manufacturing, Virginia Beach, VA), SureSight Vision Screener (Welch-Allyn, Inc., Skaneateles, NY), and Lea Symbols (Precision Vision, LaSalle, IL and Good-Lite Co., Elgin, IL) and HOTV optotypes VA tests. Analyses were conducted with these tests of refractive error or VA paired with the best tests for detecting strabismus (unilateral cover testing, Random Dot “E” [RDE] and Stereo Smile Test II [Stereo Optical, Inc., Chicago, IL]; and MTI PhotoScreener [PhotoScreener, Inc., Palm Beach, FL]). The change in sensitivity that resulted from combining a test of eye alignment with a test of refractive error or VA was determined with specificity set at 90% and 94%. Results Among the 4040 children, 157 were identified as having strabismus. For screening tests conducted by eye care professionals, the addition of a unilateral cover test to a test of refraction generally resulted in a statistically significant increase (range, 15%–25%) in detection of strabismus. For screening tests administered by trained lay screeners, the addition of Stereo Smile II to SureSight resulted in a statistically significant increase (21%) in sensitivity for detection of strabismus. Conclusions The most efficient and low-cost ways to achieve

  5. Refractive errors in children.

    PubMed

    Tongue, A C

    1987-12-01

    Optical correction of refractive errors in infants and young children is indicated when the refractive errors are sufficiently large to cause unilateral or bilateral amblyopia, if they are impairing the child's ability to function normally, or if the child has accommodative strabismus. Screening for refractive errors is important and should be performed as part of the annual physical examination in all verbal children. Screening for significant refractive errors in preverbal children is more difficult; however, the red reflex test of Bruckner is useful for the detection of anisometropic refractive errors. The photorefraction test, which is an adaptation of Bruckner's red reflex test, may prove to be a useful screening device for detecting bilateral as well as unilateral refractive errors. Objective testing as well as subjective testing enables ophthalmologists to prescribe proper optical correction for refractive errors for infants and children of any age. PMID:3317238

  6. Uncorrected refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  7. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  8. Refractive Errors - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Refractive Errors URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Refractive Errors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  9. Influence of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive error on visual impairment in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) definitions of blindness and visual impairment are widely based on best-corrected visual acuity excluding uncorrected refractive errors (URE) as a visual impairment cause. Recently, URE was included as a cause of visual impairment, thus emphasizing the burden of visual impairment due to refractive error (RE) worldwide is substantially higher. The purpose of the present study is to determine the reversal of visual impairment and blindness in the population correcting RE and possible associations between RE and individual characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in nine counties of the western region of state of São Paulo, using systematic and random sampling of households between March 2004 and July 2005. Individuals aged more than 1 year old were included and were evaluated for demographic data, eye complaints, history, and eye exam, including no corrected visual acuity (NCVA), best corrected vision acuity (BCVA), automatic and manual refractive examination. The definition adopted for URE was applied to individuals with NCVA > 0.15 logMAR and BCVA ≤ 0.15 logMAR after refractive correction and unmet refractive error (UREN), individuals who had visual impairment or blindness (NCVA > 0.5 logMAR) and BCVA ≤ 0.5 logMAR after optical correction. Results A total of 70.2% of subjects had normal NCVA. URE was detected in 13.8%. Prevalence of 4.6% of optically reversible low vision and 1.8% of blindness reversible by optical correction were found. UREN was detected in 6.5% of individuals, more frequently observed in women over the age of 50 and in higher RE carriers. Visual impairment related to eye diseases is not reversible with spectacles. Using multivariate analysis, associations between URE and UREN with regard to sex, age and RE was observed. Conclusion RE is an important cause of reversible blindness and low vision in the Brazilian population. PMID:24965318

  10. Self correction of refractive error among young people in rural China: results of cross sectional investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Riping; He, Mingguang; Liang, Wanling; Li, Xiaofeng; She, Lingbing; Yang, Yunli; MacKenzie, Graeme; Silver, Joshua D; Ellwein, Leon; Moore, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes between adjustable spectacles and conventional methods for refraction in young people. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Rural southern China. Participants 648 young people aged 12-18 (mean 14.9 (SD 0.98)), with uncorrected visual acuity ≤6/12 in either eye. Interventions All participants underwent self refraction without cycloplegia (paralysis of near focusing ability with topical eye drops), automated refraction without cycloplegia, and subjective refraction by an ophthalmologist with cycloplegia. Main outcome measures Uncorrected and corrected vision, improvement of vision (lines on a chart), and refractive error. Results Among the participants, 59% (384) were girls, 44% (288) wore spectacles, and 61% (393/648) had 2.00 dioptres or more of myopia in the right eye. All completed self refraction. The proportion with visual acuity ≥6/7.5 in the better eye was 5.2% (95% confidence interval 3.6% to 6.9%) for uncorrected vision, 30.2% (25.7% to 34.8%) for currently worn spectacles, 96.9% (95.5% to 98.3%) for self refraction, 98.4% (97.4% to 99.5%) for automated refraction, and 99.1% (98.3% to 99.9%) for subjective refraction (P=0.033 for self refraction v automated refraction, P=0.001 for self refraction v subjective refraction). Improvements over uncorrected vision in the better eye with self refraction and subjective refraction were within one line on the eye chart in 98% of participants. In logistic regression models, failure to achieve maximum recorded visual acuity of 6/7.5 in right eyes with self refraction was associated with greater absolute value of myopia/hyperopia (P<0.001), greater astigmatism (P=0.001), and not having previously worn spectacles (P=0.002), but not age or sex. Significant inaccuracies in power (≥1.00 dioptre) were less common in right eyes with self refraction than with automated refraction (5% v 11%, P<0.001). Conclusions Though visual acuity was slightly worse with self refraction than automated or

  11. Refractive error among urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Dan; Feng, Ruifang; Zhao, Huashuo; Wang, Qinmei

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of refractive errors in urban preschool children in Xuzhou, China remains unknown. Children attending twelve randomly selected kindergartens participated in this study. Visual acuity, ocular alignment, cover-uncover test, cycloplegic refraction, slit-lamp and funduscopy were performed under a standardized testing environment. Cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed for all subjects. The mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error was the main outcome measure. Emmetropia was defined as refractive status between +1.75 diopters (D) and -0.75D. Myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism and anisometropia were defined as SE < -0.50D, SE > +2.0 D, cylindrical error > 1.0 D and SE difference ≥ 1 D between fellow eyes, respectively. Out of 2349 eligible children, 2255 (96%) children completed a refractive examination. Of the 2255 children, the mean SE of right eyes was +1.14 ± 0.95 diopters (D). Mean SE of the right eyes did not decline with age (r = -0.01; P = 0.56). The majority (86.6%) of children were emmetropia. The prevalence of myopia and hyperopia was 0.9% and 14.3%, respectively. The mean astigmatism for the right eyes was 0.87 ± 0.62 D. The prevalence of With-the-rule, against the rule and oblique astigmatism was 93.8%, 4.7% and 1.5%, respectively. The mean anisometropia between two eyes was 0.14 ± 0.38 D. The most common type of refractive error was hyperopia (14.3%), followed by astigmatism (8.8%), anisometropia (3.2%), and myopia (0.9%). The refractive status in this population of urban Xuzhou preschool children was stable and there was no evidence of a myopic refractive shift over this age range in our cross-sectional study. PMID:25674266

  12. Prevalence of Amblyopia and Refractive Errors Among Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh; Baghini, Ahmad Shojaei; Yaseri, Mehdi; Moein, Hamidreza; Akbarian, Shadi; Behradfar, Narges; Hosseini, Simin; Rabei, Hossein Mohammad; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of amblyopia and refractive errors among 7 to 12-year-old primary school children in Tehran, Iran. Methods: This population-based cross-sectional study included 2,410 randomly selected students. Visual acuity was tested using an E-chart on Yang vision tester. Refractive errors were measured by photorefractometry and cycloautorefraction. Strabismus was checked using cover test. Direct ophthalmoscopy was used to assess the anterior segment, lens opacities, red reflex and fundus. Functional amblyopia was defined as best corrected visual acuity ≤20/40 in one or both eyes with no anatomical problems. Results: Amblyopia was present in 2.3% (95% CI: 1.8% to 2.9%) of participants with no difference between the genders. Amblyopic subjects were significantly younger than non-amblyopic children (P=0.004). Overall, 15.9% of hyperopic and 5.9% of myopic cases had amblyopia. The prevalence of hyperopia ≥+2.00D, myopia ≤-0.50D, astigmatism ≥0.75D, and anisometropia (≥1.00D) was 3.5%, 4.9%, 22.6%, and 3.9%, respectively. With increasing age, the prevalence of myopia increased (P<0.001), that of hyperopia decreased (P=0.007), but astigmatism showed no change. Strabismus was found in 2.3% of cases. Strabismus (OR=17.9) and refractive errors, especially anisometropia (OR=12.87) and hyperopia (OR=11.87), were important amblyogenic risk factors. Conclusion: The high prevalence of amblyopia in our subjects in comparison to developed countries reveals the necessity of timely and sensitive screening methods. Due to the high prevalence of amblyopia among children with refractive errors, particularly high hyperopia and anisometropia, provision of glasses should be specifically attended by parents and supported by the Ministry of Health and insurance organizations. PMID:27051485

  13. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio. PMID:21149305

  14. Intraocular Pressure, Ethnicity, and Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Manny, Ruth E.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Cotter, Susan A.; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The ethnically-diverse Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study cohort provides a unique opportunity to explore associations among intraocular pressure (IOP), ethnicity, and refractive error while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Methods Mixed linear models were used to examine the effect of age, refractive error (cycloplegic autorefraction), ethnicity, sex, and measurement protocol on IOP (Tono-pen) in 3,777 children, aged 6-14 years at their first CLEERE visit (1995-2009). Children who became myopic during follow-up were used to examine the relationship between time since myopia onset and IOP. Clinically meaningful differences in IOP were preset at > 2 mm Hg. Results IOP differed among refractive error categories with higher IOP in children with low/moderate myopia than those with high hyperopia (differences < 1 mm Hg). There was a statistically significant relationship between age and IOP that depended on ethnicity (interaction p<0.0001) and measurement protocol (interaction p<0.0001). The relationship between sex and IOP depended on measurement protocol (interaction p=0.0004). For children who became myopic during follow-up, the adjusted mean IOP showed a significant decline for only Asian (p=0.024) and White children (p=0.004). As with other statistically significant results, these changes in mean adjusted IOPs from two years before to two years after myopia onset were < 2 mm Hg. Conclusions Small but significant differences in IOP by refractive error category were found in this ethnically diverse cohort of children. Relationships between IOP and age, ethnicity, sex, and measurement protocol were complicated by significant interactions between these parameters. Longitudinal analysis of children before and after myopia onset showed changes in IOP over time that varied by ethnicity. Higher IOPs before and at myopia onset were not present in all ethnic groups, with differences before and after

  15. Phakic Intraocular Lenses for the Treatment of Refractive Errors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to review the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs) for the treatment of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Refractive Errors Refractive errors occur when the eye cannot focus light properly. In myopia (near- or short-sightedness), distant objects appear blurry because the axis of the eye is too long or the cornea is too steep, so light becomes focused in front of the retina. Hyperopia (far sightedness) occurs when light is focused behind the retina causing nearby objects to appear blurry. In astigmatism, blurred or distorted vision occurs when light is focused at two points rather than one due to an irregularly shaped cornea or lens. Refractive errors are common worldwide, but high refractive errors are less common. In the United States, the prevalence of high myopia (≤ −5 D) in people aged 20 to 39, 40 to 59, and 60 years and older is 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5% – 8.3%), 7.8% (95% CI, 6.4% – 8.6%), and 3.1% (95% CI, 2.2% – 3.9%), respectively. The prevalence of high hyperopia (≥ 3 D) is 1.0% (95% CI, .6% – 1.4%), 2.4% (95% CI, 1.7% – 3.0%), and 10.0% (95% CI, 9.1% – 10.9%) for the same age groupings. Finally, the prevalence of astigmatism (≥ 1 D cylinder) is 23.1% (95% CI, 21.6% – 24.5%), 27.6% (95% CI, 25.8% – 29.3%) and 50.1% (48.2% – 52.0%). Low Vision According to the Ontario Schedule of Benefits, low visual acuity is defined by a best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) of 20/50 (6/15) or less in the better eye and not amenable to further medical and/or surgical treatment. Similarly, the Ontario Assistive Devices Program defines low vision as BSCVA in the better eye in the range of 20/70 or less that cannot be corrected medically, surgically, or with ordinary eyeglasses or contact lenses. Estimates of the prevalence of low vision vary. Using the criteria of

  16. Refractive Error, Axial Length, and Relative Peripheral Refractive Error before and after the Onset of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Hayes, John R.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones, Lisa A.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error before, during the year of, and after the onset of myopia in children who became myopic compared with emmetropes. Methods Subjects were 605 children 6 to 14 years of age who became myopic (at least −0.75 D in each meridian) and 374 emmetropic (between −0.25 D and + 1.00 D in each meridian at all visits) children participating between 1995 and 2003 in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Axial length was measured annually by A-scan ultrasonography. Relative peripheral refractive error (the difference between the spherical equivalent cycloplegic autorefraction 30° in the nasal visual field and in primary gaze) was measured using either of two autorefractors (R-1; Canon, Lake Success, NY [no longer manufactured] or WR 5100-K; Grand Seiko, Hiroshima, Japan). Refractive error was measured with the same autorefractor with the subjects under cycloplegia. Each variable in children who became myopic was compared to age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates of emmetrope values for each annual visit from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. Results In the sample as a whole, children who became myopic had less hyperopia and longer axial lengths than did emmetropes before and after the onset of myopia (4 years before through 5 years after for refractive error and 3 years before through 5 years after for axial length; P < 0.0001 for each year). Children who became myopic had more hyperopic relative peripheral refractive errors than did emmetropes from 2 years before onset through 5 years after onset of myopia (P < 0.002 for each year). The fastest rate of change in refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error occurred during the year before onset rather than in any year after onset. Relative peripheral refractive error remained at a consistent level of hyperopia each

  17. Prevalence and Pattern of Refractive Errors among Primary School Children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Wadaani, Fahd Abdullah Al; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Ali, Ayub; Khan, Ataur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Some 12.8 million in the age group 5–15 years are visually impaired from uncorrected or inadequately corrected refractive errors. In Saudi Arabia, the size of this public health problem is not well defined especially among primary schoolchildren. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. A total of 2246 Saudi primary school children aged 6 to 14 years of both genders were selected using multistage sampling method form 30 primary schools located in the three different areas of Al Hassa. School children were interviewed to collect demographics and vision data using a special data collection form followed by screening for refractive errors by trained optometrists within the school premises using a standardized protocol. Assessment of visual acuity and ocular motility evaluation were carried out and cover-uncover test was performed. Children detected with defective vision were referred for further examination employing subjective refraction with auto refractometer and objective refraction using streak retinoscopy after 1% cyclopentolate. Of the screened school children (N=2002), the overall prevalence of refractive errors was 13.7% (n=274), higher among females (Odds ratio, OR=1.39, P=0.012) and significantly more among students of rural residence (OR=2.40, P=0.001). The prevalence of refractive errors was disproportionately more among those aged 12-14 years (OR=9.02, P=0.001). Only 9.4% of students with poor vision were wore spectacles for correction. Myopia was the most commonly encountered refractive error among both genders (65.7% of the total errors encountered). Uncorrected refractive errors affected a sizable portion of primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Primary schoolchildren especially females, rural and older children represents high risk group for refractive errors for which the included children were unaware. PMID:23283044

  18. Prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among primary school children in Al Hassa , Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Wadaani, Fahd Abdullah; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Ali, Ayub; Khan, Atuar Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Some 12.8 million in the age group 5-15 years are visually impaired from uncorrected or inadequately corrected refractive errors. In Saudi Arabia, the size of this public health problem is not well defined especially among primary schoolchildren. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.  A total of 2246 Saudi primary school children aged 6 to 14 years of both genders were selected using multistage sampling method form 30 primary schools located in the three different areas of Al Hassa. School children were interviewed to collect demographics and vision data using a special data collection form followed by screening for refractive errors by trained optometrists within the school premises using a standardized protocol. Assessment of visual acuity and ocular motility evaluation were carried out and cover-uncover test was performed. Children detected with defective vision were referred for further examination employing subjective refraction with auto refractometer and objective refraction using streak retinoscopy after 1% cyclopentolate. Of the screened school children (N=2002), the overall prevalence of refractive errors was 13.7% (n=274), higher among females (Odds ratio, OR=1.39, P=0.012) and significantly more among students of rural residence (OR=2.40, P=0.001). The prevalence of refractive errors was disproportionately more among those aged 12-14 years (OR=9.02, P=0.001). Only 9.4% of students with poor vision were wore spectacles for correction. Myopia was the most commonly encountered refractive error among both genders (65.7% of the total errors encountered). Uncorrected refractive errors affected a sizable portion of primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. Primary schoolchildren especially females, rural and older children represents high risk group for refractive errors for which the included children were unaware. PMID:23283044

  19. Seven-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error among an elderly Chinese population in Shihpai, Taiwan: The Shihpai Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Kuang, T-M; Tsai, S-Y; Liu, C J-L; Ko, Y-C; Lee, S-M; Chou, P

    2016-04-01

    PurposeTo report the 7-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error in a metropolitan Chinese elderly population.MethodsThe Shihpai Eye Study 2006 included 460/824 (55.8%) subjects (age range 72-94 years old) of 1361 participants in the 1999 baseline survey for a follow-up eye examination. Visual acuity was assessed using a Snellen chart, uncorrected refractive error was defined as presenting visual acuity (naked eye if without spectacles and with distance spectacles if worn) in the better eye of <6/12 that improved to no impairment (≥6/12) after refractive correction.ResultsThe 7-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error was 10.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.6-13.4%). 92.7% of participants with uncorrection and 77.8% with undercorrection were able to improve at least two lines of visual acuity by refractive correction. In multivariate analysis controlling for covariates, uncorrected refractive error was significantly related to myopia (relative risk (RR): 3.15; 95% CI: 1.31-7.58) and living alone (RR: 2.94; 95% CI 1.14-7.53), whereas distance spectacles worn during examination was protective (RR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.14-0.88).ConclusionOur study indicated that the incidence of uncorrected refractive error was high (10.5%) in this elderly Chinese population. Living alone and myopia are predisposing factors, whereas wearing distance spectacles at examination is protective. PMID:26795416

  20. Prevalence of Uncorrected Refractive Error and Other Eye Problems Among Urban and Rural School Children

    PubMed Central

    Padhye, Amruta S.; Khandekar, Rajiv; Dharmadhikari, Sheetal; Dole, Kuldeep; Gogate, Parikshit; Deshpande, Madan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Uncorrected refractive error is an avoidable cause of visual impairment. Aim: To compare the magnitude and determinants of uncorrected refractive error, such as age, sex, family history of refractive error and use of spectacles among school children 6-15 years old in urban and rural Maharashtra, India. Study Design: This was a review of school-based vision screening conducted in 2004-2005. Materials and Methods: Optometrists assessed visual acuity, amblyopia and strabismus in rural children. Teachers assessed visual acuity and then optometrists confirmed their findings in urban schools. Ophthalmologists screened for ocular pathology. Data of uncorrected refractive error, amblyopia, strabismus and blinding eye diseases was analyzed to compare the prevalence and risk factors among children of rural and urban areas. Results: We examined 5,021 children of 8 urban clusters and 7,401 children of 28 rural clusters. The cluster-weighted prevalence of uncorrected refractive error in urban and rural children was 5.46% (95% CI, 5.44-5.48) and 2.63% (95% CI, 2.62-2.64), respectively. The prevalence of myopia, hypermetropia and astigmatism in urban children was 3.16%, 1.06% and 0.16%, respectively. In rural children, the prevalence of myopia, hypermetropia and astigmatism was 1.45%, 0.39% and 0.21%, respectively. The prevalence of amblyopia was 0.8% in urban and 0.2% in rural children. Thirteen to 15 years old children attending urban schools were most likely to have uncorrected myopia. Conclusion: The prevalence of uncorrected refractive error, especially myopia, was higher in urban children. Causes of higher prevalence and barriers to refractive error correction services should be identified and addressed. Eye screening of school children is recommended. However, the approach used may be different for urban and rural school children. PMID:20142964

  1. Uncorrected refractive error in older British adults: the EPIC-Norfolk Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Sherwin, Justin C; Khawaja, Anthony P; Broadway, David; Luben, Robert; Hayat, Shabina; Dalzell, Nichola; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the prevalence of, and demographic associations with, uncorrected refractive error (URE) in an older British population. Methods Data from 4428 participants, aged 48–89 years, who attended an eye examination in the third health check of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study and had also undergone an ophthalmic examination were assessed. URE was defined as ≥1 line improvement of visual acuity with pinhole-correction in the better eye in participants with LogMar presenting visual acuity (PVA) <0.3 (PVA <6/12). Refractive error was measured using an autorefractor without cycloplegia. Myopia was defined as spherical equivalent ≤−0.5 dioptre, and hypermetropia ≥0.5 dioptre. Results Adjusted to the 2010 midyear British population, the prevalence of URE in this Norfolk population was 1.9% (95% CI 0.6% to 3.1%). Lower self-rated distance vision was correlated with higher prevalence of URE (ptrend<0.001). In a multivariate logistic regression model adjusting for age, gender, retirement status, educational level and social class, independent significant associations with URE were increasing age (ptrend<0.001) and having hypermetropic or myopic refractive error. Wearing distance spectacles was inversely associated with URE (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.55, p<0.001). There were 3063 people (69.2%) who wore spectacles/contact lenses for distance vision. Spectacle wear differed according to type of refractive error (p<0.001), and use rose with increasing severity of refractive error (ptrend<0.001). Conclusion Although refractive error is common, the prevalence of URE was found to be low in this population reflecting a low prevalence of PVA<0.3. PMID:22535330

  2. Associations between Hyperopia and other Vision and Refractive Error Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Ying, Gui-shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen; Quinn, Graham; Ciner, Elise B.; Cyert, Lynn A.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah A.; Moore, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association of hyperopia >+3.25D with amblyopia, strabismus, anisometropia, astigmatism, and reduced stereoacuity in preschoolers. Methods 3- to 5-year old Head Start preschoolers (n=4040) underwent vision examination including monocular visual acuity (VA), cover testing, and cycloplegic refraction during the Vision In Preschoolers (VIP) study. VA was tested with habitual correction, and was retested with full cycloplegic correction when VA was reduced below age norms in the presence of significant refractive error. Stereoacuity testing (Stereo Smile II) was performed on 2898 children during study years 2 and 3. Hyperopia was classified into 3 levels of severity (based upon most positive meridian on cycloplegic refraction): Group 1:≥+5.00D, Group 2:>+3.25D to <+5.00D with interocular difference (IOD) in spherical equivalent (SE) ≥0.50D, and Group 3:>+3.25D to <+5.00D with IOD in SE<0.50D. “Without” hyperopia was defined as refractive error of +3.25 D or less in the most positive meridian in both eyes. Standard definitions were applied for amblyopia, strabismus, anisometropia, and astigmatism. Results Relative to children without hyperopia, children with hyperopia >+3.25D (N=472, Groups 1, 2, 3) had a higher proportion of amblyopia (34.5% vs. 2.8%, p<0.0001) and strabismus (17.0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001). More severe levels of hyperopia were associated with higher proportions of amblyopia (51.5% in Group 1 vs 13.2% in Group 3) and strabismus (32.9% in Group 1 vs 8.4% in Group 3; trend p<0.0001 for both). Presence of hyperopia >+3.25D also was associated with a higher proportion of anisometropia (26.9% vs. 5.1%, p<0.0001) and astigmatism (29.4% vs. 10.3%, p<0.0001). Median stereoacuity of non-strabismic, non-amblyopic children with hyperopia (N=206) (120″) was worse than that of children without hyperopia (60″) (p<0.0001) and more severe levels of hyperopia were associated with worse stereoacuity (480″ for Group 1, 120″ for

  3. Refractive Error Evaluation in Eccentric Photorefracation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K.; Tan, B.; Shi, L.; Chen, Y.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    2007-11-01

    Eccentric photorefraction (EPR) is a technique to measure eye refractive errors (RE) particularly in non-cooperative children. A camera and a decentered light source are used to illuminate eyes and photograph the reflex. Recently the National Eye Institute VIP study examined 10 methods to screen the crucial children eye disorders including RE. The 3 EPR based devices were found to have lower detection sensitivities. The deficiency is inherent in the current optical designs and a lack of knowledge of parameters that influence RE analysis. The new EPR experimental design includes multi-eccentric-meridian illuminations, pupil finding algorithm, and feedback loop data acquisition. NIR is used to prevent chromatic aberration. A novel integrated intensity analysis is developed to control multiple intraocular scattering/reflection. The RE is calculated from the 21 normalized related intensities of the 2-D array illuminations. Using computer eye modeling and simulations, error analysis is performed for monochromatic aberrations and eye orientation. Experimental data comparison is obtained from a physical model eye.

  4. Using neural nets to measure ocular refractive errors: a proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netto, Antonio V.; Ferreira de Oliveira, Maria C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose the development of a functional system for diagnosing and measuring ocular refractive errors in the human eye (astigmatism, hypermetropia and myopia) by automatically analyzing images of the human ocular globe acquired with the Hartmann-Schack (HS) technique. HS images are to be input into a system capable of recognizing the presence of a refractive error and outputting a measure of such an error. The system should pre-process and image supplied by the acquisition technique and then use artificial neural networks combined with fuzzy logic to extract the necessary information and output an automated diagnosis of the refractive errors that may be present in the ocular globe under exam.

  5. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  6. Statistics of the residual refraction errors in laser ranging data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for the range error covariance was derived by assuming that the residual refraction errors are due entirely to errors in the meteorological data which are used to calculate the atmospheric correction. The properties of the covariance function are illustrated by evaluating the theoretical model for the special case of a dense network of weather stations uniformly distributed within a circle.

  7. Refractive Errors Affect the Vividness of Visual Mental Images

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Piccardi, Laura; Zeri, Fabrizio; Babino, Antonio; Giusberti, Fiorella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that visual perception and mental imagery are equivalent has never been explored in individuals with vision defects not preventing the visual perception of the world, such as refractive errors. Refractive error (i.e., myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism) is a condition where the refracting system of the eye fails to focus objects sharply on the retina. As a consequence refractive errors cause blurred vision. We subdivided 84 individuals according to their spherical equivalent refraction into Emmetropes (control individuals without refractive errors) and Ametropes (individuals with refractive errors). Participants performed a vividness task and completed a questionnaire that explored their cognitive style of thinking before their vision was checked by an ophthalmologist. Although results showed that Ametropes had less vivid mental images than Emmetropes this did not affect the development of their cognitive style of thinking; in fact, Ametropes were able to use both verbal and visual strategies to acquire and retrieve information. Present data are consistent with the hypothesis of equivalence between imagery and perception. PMID:23755186

  8. Evaluation of Visual Acuity Measurements after Autorefraction versus Manual Refraction in Eyes with and without Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jennifer K.; Qin, Haijing; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Melia, Michele; Beck, Roy W.; Andreoli, Christopher M.; Edwards, Paul A.; Glassman, Adam R.; Pavlica, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare visual acuity (VA) scores after autorefraction versus research protocol manual refraction in eyes of patients with diabetes and a wide range of VA. Methods Electronic Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (E-ETDRS) VA Test© letter score (EVA) was measured after autorefraction (AR-EVA) and after Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) protocol manual refraction (MR-EVA). Testing order was randomized, study participants and VA examiners were masked to refraction source, and a second EVA utilizing an identical manual refraction (MR-EVAsupl) was performed to determine test-retest variability. Results In 878 eyes of 456 study participants, median MR-EVA was 74 (Snellen equivalent approximately 20/32). Spherical equivalent was often similar for manual and autorefraction (median difference: 0.00, 5th and 95th percentiles −1.75 to +1.13 Diopters). However, on average, MR-EVA results were slightly better than AR-EVA results across the entire VA range. Furthermore, variability between AR-EVA and MR-EVA was substantially greater than the test-retest variability of MR-EVA (P<0.001). Variability of differences was highly dependent on autorefractor model. Conclusions Across a wide range of VA at multiple sites using a variety of autorefractors, VA measurements tend to be worse with autorefraction than manual refraction. Differences between individual autorefractor models were identified. However, even among autorefractor models comparing most favorably to manual refraction, VA variability between autorefraction and manual refraction is higher than the test-retest variability of manual refraction. The results suggest that with current instruments, autorefraction is not an acceptable substitute for manual refraction for most clinical trials with primary outcomes dependent on best-corrected VA. PMID:22159173

  9. Uncorrected refractive error and associated factors among primary school children in Debre Markos District, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uncorrected Refractive Error is one of the leading cause amblyopia that exposes children to poor school performance. It refrain them from productive working lives resulting in severe economic and social loses in their latter adulthood lives. The objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of uncorrected refractive error and its associated factors among school children in Debre Markos District. Method A cross section study design was employed. Four hundred thirty two students were randomly selected using a multistage stratified sampling technique. The data were collected by trained ophthalmic nurses through interview, structured questionnaires and physical examinations. Snellens visual acuity measurement chart was used to identify the visual acuity of students. Students with visual acuity less than 6/12 had undergone further examination using auto refractor and cross-checked using spherical and cylindrical lenses. The data were entered into epi data statistical software version 3.1 and analyzed by SPSS version 20. The statistical significance was set at α ≤ 0.05. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were done using odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. Result Out of 432 students selected for the study, 420 (97.2%) were in the age group 7–15 years. The mean age was 12 ± 2.1SD. Overall prevalence of refractive error was 43 (10.2%). Myopia was found among the most dominant 5.47% followed by astigmatism 1.9% and hyperopia 1.4% in both sexes. Female sex (AOR: 3.96, 95% CI: 1.55-10.09), higher grade level (AOR: 4.82, 95% CI: 1.98-11.47) and using computers regularly (AOR: 4.53, 95% CI: 1.58-12.96) were significantly associated with refractive error. Conclusion The burden of uncorrected refractive errors is high among primary schools children. Myopia was common in both sexes. The potential risk factors were sex, regular use of computers and higher grade level of students. Hence, school health programs should work on health

  10. Effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan Akcay, Emine; Canan, Fatih; Simavli, Huseyin; Dal, Derya; Yalniz, Hacer; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Gecici, Omer; Cagil, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties using Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality. METHODS Using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), the temperament and character profiles of 41 participants with refractive errors (17 with myopia, 12 with hyperopia, and 12 with myopic astigmatism) were compared to those of 30 healthy control participants. Here, temperament comprised the traits of novelty seeking, harm-avoidance, and reward dependence, while character comprised traits of self-directedness, cooperativeness, and self-transcendence. RESULTS Participants with refractive error showed significantly lower scores on purposefulness, cooperativeness, empathy, helpfulness, and compassion (P<0.05, P<0.01, P<0.05, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION Refractive error might have a negative influence on some character traits, and different types of refractive error might have different temperament and character properties. These personality traits may be implicated in the onset and/or perpetuation of refractive errors and may be a productive focus for psychotherapy. PMID:25709911

  11. [Refractive development and form-deprivation induced myopic refractive error in CBA/CaJ mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Yun; Qian, Kang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2016-04-25

    Due to the advantages in genetic manipulation, mice have become one of the most commonly used mammalian models for the study of mechanisms underlying myopia development. However, the vast majority of laboratory mouse strains are incapable of synthesizing melatonin, a neurohormone that may play an important role in myopia generation in humans. The present study investigated refractive development profiles in the CBA/CaJ mouse, a strain proficient in melatonin, and determined whether and how its refractive development could be affected by form-deprivation. Eccentric infrared photoretinoscopy revealed that this animal could be stably refracted, and the refractive error underwent developmental changes, which increased with age in the hyperopic direction and eventually got stable approximately 9 weeks after birth. The absolute values of refractive error in CBA/CaJ mice were larger than those of age-matched C57BL/6 mice, whereas the time points when refractive error reached steady state were similar between the two strains. Five weeks of form-deprivation applied to 3-week-old CBA/CaJ mice by translucent occluder wear caused a significant myopic shift in refractive error, indicating that this strain could be adequately used as a myopia model. PMID:27108899

  12. Objective and Subjective Refractive Error Measurements in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Wensveen, Janice M.; Harwerth, Ronald S.; Smith, Earl L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To better understand the functional significance of refractive-error measures obtained using common objective methods in laboratory animals, we compared objective and subjective measures of refractive error in adolescent rhesus monkeys. Methods The subjects were 20 adolescent monkeys. Spherical-equivalent spectacle-plane refractive corrections were measured by retinoscopy and autorefraction while the animals were cyclopleged and anesthetized. The eye’s axial dimensions were measured by A-Scan ultrasonography. Subjective measures of the eye’s refractive state, with and without cycloplegia, were obtained using psychophysical methods. Specifically, we measured spatial contrast sensitivity as a function of spectacle lens power for relatively high spatial frequency gratings. The lens power that produced the highest contrast sensitivity was taken as the subjective refraction. Results Retinoscopy and autorefraction consistently yielded higher amounts of hyperopia relative to subjective measurements obtained with or without cycloplegia. The subjective refractions were not affected by cycloplegia and on average were 1.42 ± 0.61 D and 1.24 ± 0.62 D less hyperopic than the retinoscopy and autorefraction measurements, respectively. Repeating the retinoscopy and subjective measurements through 3 mm artificial pupils produced similar differences. Conclusions The results show that commonly used objective methods for assessing refractive errors in monkeys significantly overestimate the degree of hyperopia. It is likely that multiple factors contributed to the hyperopic bias associated with these objective measurements. However, the magnitude of the hyperopic bias was in general agreement with the “small-eye artifact” of retinoscopy. PMID:22198796

  13. Comparison of higher order aberrations in patients with various refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Saim; Humayun, Sadia; Fawad, Aisha; Ishaq, Mazhar; Arzoo, Sabahat; Mashhadi, Fawad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the mean root mean square (RMS) of total higher order aberrations (HOAs), coma and spherical aberrations in individuals with myopia, hypermetropia and myopic astigmatism. Methods: This prospective analytical study was conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from Jan 2014 to Dec 2014. Two hundred eyes of 121 patients with age ranging from 18-40 years were included in the study. Patients were divided into 4 group namely Low myopia, High myopia, Astigmatism and Hypermetropia on the basis of refractive error. Included were the patients who had refractive error more than ± 0.5D and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.00 or better. Patients who had history of surgery and / or eye disease were excluded from the study. Visual acuity (VA), Spherical equivalent (SE) of refractive error, RMS value of total HOAs, coma and spherical aberrations were evaluated. HOAs were measured with aberrometer (Wavelight analyzer version 1073) at 6 mm pupil size. Results: Age of the patients ranged from 18 years to 40 years with mean age of 29.10±10.6 years. Seventy one (35.5%) were males and 129 (64.5%) were female. Mean RMS value of HOAs, coma and spherical aberrations was calculated in all four groups. RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberrations in hypermetropia was 0.96±0.96 and 0.30±0.42 respectively and it was higher than other three groups. Conclusions: In overall comparison the mean RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberrations was significantly increased in hypermetropia group and there was a statistically significant negative correlation of SE of hypermetropia with RMS of total HOAs and spherical aberration. PMID:26430409

  14. Inter-tester Agreement in Refractive Error Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean T.; Quinn, Graham E.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Cyert, Lynn A.; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the inter-tester agreement of refractive error measurements between lay and nurse screeners using the Retinomax Autorefractor (Retinomax) and the SureSight Vision Screener (SureSight). Methods Trained lay and nurse screeners measured refractive error in 1452 preschoolers (3- to 5-years old) using the Retinomax and the SureSight in a random order for screeners and instruments. Inter-tester agreement between lay and nurse screeners was assessed for sphere, cylinder and spherical equivalent (SE) using the mean difference and the 95% limits of agreement. The mean inter-tester difference (lay minus nurse) was compared between groups defined based on child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, and the reading’s confidence number using analysis of variance. The limits of agreement were compared between groups using the Brown-Forsythe test. Inter-eye correlation was accounted for in all analyses. Results The mean inter-tester differences (95% limits of agreement) were −0.04 (−1.63, 1.54) Diopter (D) sphere, 0.00 (−0.52, 0.51) D cylinder, and −0.04 (1.65, 1.56) D SE for the Retinomax; and 0.05 (−1.48, 1.58) D sphere, 0.01 (−0.58, 0.60) D cylinder, and 0.06 (−1.45, 1.57) D SE for the SureSight. For either instrument, the mean inter-tester differences in sphere and SE did not differ by the child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, or the reading’s confidence number. However, for both instruments, the limits of agreement were wider when eyes had significant refractive error or the reading’s confidence number was below the manufacturer’s recommended value. Conclusions Among Head Start preschool children, trained lay and nurse screeners agree well in measuring refractive error using the Retinomax or the SureSight. Both instruments had similar inter-tester agreement in refractive error measurements independent of the child’s age. Significant refractive error and a reading with low confidence number were associated with worse inter

  15. Association between Childhood Strabismus and Refractive Error in Chinese Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong-Bin; Ding, Hui; Bai, Jing; Chen, Ji; Liu, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between concomitant esotropia or concomitant exotropia and refractive error in preschool children Methods A population-based sample of 5831 children aged 3 to 6 years was selected from all kindergartens in a representative county (Yuhuatai District, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province) of Nanjing, China. Clinical examinations including ocular alignment, ocular motility, visual acuity, optometry, stereopsis screening, slit lamp examination and fundus examination were performed by trained ophthalmologists and optometrists. Odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to evaluate the association of refractive error with concomitant esotropia and concomitant exotropia. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis, concomitant esotropia was associated independently with spherical equivalent anisometropia (OR, 3.15 for 0.50 to <1.00 diopter (D) of anisometropia, and 7.41 for > = 1.00 D of anisometropia) and hyperopia. There was a severity-dependent association of hyperopia with the development of concomitant esotropia, with ORs increasing from 9.3 for 2.00 to <3.00 D of hyperopia, to 180.82 for > = 5.00 D of hyperopia. Concomitant exotropia was associated with astigmatism (OR, 3.56 for 0.50 to 1.00 D of astigmatism, and 1.9 for <0.00 D of astigmatism), myopia (OR, 40.54 for -1.00 to <0.00 D of myopia, and 18.93 for <-1.00 D of myopia), and hyperopia (OR, 67.78 for 1.00 to <2.00 D of hyperopia, 23.13 for 2.00 to <3.00 D of hyperopia, 25.57 for 3.00 to <4.00 D of hyperopia, and 8.36 for 4.00 to <5.00 D of hyperopia). Conclusions This study highlights the close associations between refractive error and the prevalence of concomitant esotropia and concomitant exotropia, which should be considered when managing childhood refractive error. PMID:25793499

  16. Prevalence of vision impairment and refractive error in school children in Ba Ria – Vung Tau province, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Prakash; Ramson, Prasidh; Naduvilath, Thomas; Wilson, David; Phuong, Ha Thanh; Ho, Suit M; Giap, Nguyen V

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the prevalence of vision impairment and refractive error in school children 12–15 years of age in Ba Ria – Vung Tau province, Vietnam. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants 2238 secondary school children. Methods Subjects were selected based on stratified multistage cluster sampling of 13 secondary schools from urban, rural and semi-urban areas. The examination included visual acuity measurements, ocular motility evaluation, cycloplegic autorefraction, and examination of the external eye, anterior segment, media and fundus. Main Outcome Measures Visual acuity and principal cause of vision impairment. Results The prevalence of uncorrected and presenting visual acuity ≤6/12 in the better eye were 19.4% (95% confidence interval, 12.5–26.3) and 12.2% (95% confidence interval, 8.8–15.6), respectively. Refractive error was the cause of vision impairment in 92.7%, amblyopia in 2.2%, cataract in 0.7%, retinal disorders in 0.4%, other causes in 1.5% and unexplained causes in the remaining 2.6%. The prevalence of vision impairment due to myopia in either eye (–0.50 diopter or greater) was 20.4% (95% confidence interval, 12.8–28.0), hyperopia (≥2.00 D) was 0.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.0–0.7) and emmetropia with astigmatism (≥0.75 D) was 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.2–1.2). Vision impairment due to myopia was associated with higher school grade and increased time spent reading and working on a computer. Conclusions Uncorrected refractive error, particularly myopia, among secondary school children in Vietnam is a major public health problem. School-based eye health initiative such as refractive error screening is warranted to reduce vision impairment. PMID:24299145

  17. Prevalence and predictors of refractive error and spectacle coverage in Nakuru, Kenya: a cross-sectional, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bastawrous, Andrew; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Foster, Allen; Kuper, Hannah

    2013-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was undertaken in Nakuru, Kenya to assess the prevalence of refractive error and the spectacle coverage in a population aged ≥50 years. Of the 5,010 subjects who were eligible, 4,414 underwent examination (response rate 88.1 %). LogMAR visual acuity was assessed in all participants and refractive error was measured in both eyes using a Topcon auto refractor RM8800. Detailed interviews were undertaken and ownership of spectacles was assessed. Refractive error was responsible for 51.7 % of overall visual impairment (VI), 85.3 % (n = 191) of subjects with mild VI, 42.7 % (n = 152) of subjects with moderate VI, 16.7 % (n = 3) of subjects with severe VI and no cases of blindness. Myopia was more common than hyperopia affecting 59.5 % of those with refractive error compared to 27.4 % for hyperopia. High myopia (<-5.0 DS) was also more common than extreme hyperopia (>+5.0 DS). Of those who needed distance spectacles (spectacle coverage), 25.5 % owned spectacles. In conclusion, the oldest, most poor and least educated are most likely to have no spectacles and they should be specifically targeted when refractive services are put in place. PMID:23440405

  18. Global cost of correcting vision impairment from uncorrected refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, TR; Wilson, DA; Schlenther, G; Naidoo, KS; Resnikoff, S; Frick, KD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the global cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to provide care to all individuals who currently have vision impairment resulting from uncorrected refractive error (URE). Methods The global cost of correcting URE was estimated using data on the population, the prevalence of URE and the number of existing refractive care practitioners in individual countries, the cost of establishing and operating educational programmes for practitioners and the cost of establishing and operating refractive care facilities. The assumptions made ensured that costs were not underestimated and an upper limit to the costs was derived using the most expensive extreme for each assumption. Findings There were an estimated 158 million cases of distance vision impairment and 544 million cases of near vision impairment caused by URE worldwide in 2007. Approximately 47 000 additional full-time functional clinical refractionists and 18 000 ophthalmic dispensers would be required to provide refractive care services for these individuals. The global cost of educating the additional personnel and of establishing, maintaining and operating the refractive care facilities needed was estimated to be around 20 000 million United States dollars (US$) and the upper-limit cost was US$ 28 000 million. The estimated loss in global gross domestic product due to distance vision impairment caused by URE was US$ 202 000 million annually. Conclusion The cost of establishing and operating the educational and refractive care facilities required to deal with vision impairment resulting from URE was a small proportion of the global loss in productivity associated with that vision impairment. PMID:23109740

  19. Axial Length/Corneal Radius Ratio: Association with Refractive State and Role on Myopia Detection Combined with Visual Acuity in Chinese Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangui; Zou, Haidong; Lu, Lina; Zhao, Rong; Zhao, Huijuan; Li, Qiangqiang; Zhu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between the AL/CR ratio and refractive state and explore the effectiveness of this ratio in the assessment of myopia, especially when combined with uncorrected visual acuity in schoolchildren among whom myopia is common. Methods Cross sectional study. 4686 children from 6 primary schools, aged from 6 to 12 years were selected using the clustered-stratified random sampling method. Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), axial length (AL), corneal radius of curvature (CR), and cycloplegic refraction were tested. Refraction was measured as the spherical equivalent (SE). Results 3922 children were included in the analysis. The mean AL/CR ratio was 2.973±0.002, increased with age, and different in gender. The coefficients of correlations of the SE with the AL/CR ratio, AL, and CR were -0.811, -0.657, and 0.095, respectively. Linear regression showed a 10.72 D shift towards myopia with every 1 unit increase in the AL/CR ratio (P<0.001, r2 = 66.4%). The estimated SE values obtained by substituting the AL/CR ratio and gender back to the regression model that were within a difference of ±0.50 D in ATE/LER (allowable total error and limits for erroneous results) zones compared to the actual measured values was 51%. The area under the ROC curve of the AL/CR ratio, AL, and UCVA for myopia detection were 0.910, 0.822, and 0.889, respectively, and the differences between each pair were statistically significant (P<0.01). At a specificity of 90%, the sensitivities were 72.98%, 50.50%, 71.99%, and 82.96%, respectively, for the AL/CR ratio, AL, UCVA, and the combination of the AL/CR ratio and UCVA. Conclusions The AL/CR ratio was found to explain the total variance in SE better than AL alone. The effectiveness of the AL/CR ratio was statistically significantly better than UCVA for detecting myopia in children, and combining the two produced increased sensitivity without significantly decreasing specificity. PMID:25693186

  20. Association between Ocular Sensory Dominance and Refractive Error Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hua; Ekure, Edgar; Su, Binbin; Wu, Haoran; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between ocular sensory dominance and interocular refractive error difference (IRED). Methods A total of 219 subjects were recruited. The refractive errors were determined by objective refraction with a fixation target located 6 meters away. 176 subjects were myopic, with 83 being anisometropic (IRED ≥ 0.75 D). 43 subjects were hyperopic, with 22 being anisometropic. Sensory dominance was measured with a continuous flashing technique with the tested eye viewing a Gabor increasing in contrast and the fellow eye viewing a Mondrian noise decreasing in contrast. The log ratio of Mondrian to Gabor’s contrasts was recorded when a subject just detected the tilting direction of the Gabor during each trial. T-test was used to compare the 50 values collected from each eye, and the t-value was used as a subject’s ocular dominance index (ODI) to quantify the degree of ocular dominance. A subject with ODI ≥ 2 (p < 0.05) had clear dominance and the eye with larger mean ratio was the dominant one. Otherwise, a subject had an unclear dominance. Results The anisometropic subjects had stronger ocular dominance in comparison to non-anisometropic subjects (rank-sum test, p < 0.01 for both myopic and hyperopic subjects). In anisometropic subjects with clear dominance, the amplitude of the anisometropia was correlated with ODI values (R = 0.42, p < 0.01 in myopic anisometropic subjects; R = 0.62, p < 0.01 in hyperopic anisometropic subjects). Moreover, the dominant eyes were more myopic in myopic anisometropic subjects (sign-test, p < 0.05) and less hyperopic in hyperopic anisometropic subjects (sign-test, p < 0.05). Conclusion The degree of ocular sensory dominance is associated with interocular refractive error difference. PMID:26295803

  1. Atmospheric refraction effects on baseline error in satellite laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, K. E.; Gardner, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the mathematical complexities involved in exact analyses of baseline errors, it is not easy to isolate atmospheric refraction effects; however, by making certain simplifying assumptions about the ranging system geometry, relatively simple expressions can be derived which relate the baseline errors directly to the refraction errors. The results indicate that even in the absence of other errors, the baseline error for intercontinental baselines can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the refraction error.

  2. Visual outcome after correcting the refractive error of large pupil patients with wavefront-guided ablation

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Mounir A; Allam, Waleed A; Shaheen, Mohamed S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and predictability of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) treatments using the iris registration (IR) technology for the correction of refractive errors in patients with large pupils. Setting Horus Vision Correction Center, Alexandria, Egypt. Methods Prospective noncomparative study including a total of 52 eyes of 30 consecutive laser refractive correction candidates with large mesopic pupil diameters and myopia or myopic astigmatism. Wavefront-guided LASIK was performed in all cases using the VISX STAR S4 IR excimer laser platform. Visual, refractive, aberrometric and mesopic contrast sensitivity (CS) outcomes were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. Results Mean mesopic pupil diameter ranged from 8.0 mm to 9.4 mm. A significant improvement in uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA) (P < 0.01) was found postoperatively, which was consistent with a significant refractive correction (P < 0.01). No significant change was detected in corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) (P = 0.11). Efficacy index (the ratio of postoperative UCDVA to preoperative CDVA) and safety index (the ratio of postoperative CDVA to preoperative CDVA) were calculated. Mean efficacy and safety indices were 1.06 ± 0.33 and 1.05 ± 0.18, respectively, and 92.31% of eyes had a postoperative spherical equivalent within ±0.50 diopters (D). Manifest refractive spherical equivalent improved significantly (P < 0.05) from a preoperative level of −3.1 ± 1.6 D (range −6.6 to 0 D) to −0.1 ± 0.2 D (range −1.3 to 0.1 D) at 6 months postoperative. No significant changes were found in mesopic CS (P ≥ 0.08), except CS for three cycles/degree, which improved significantly (P = 0.02). Magnitudes of primary coma and trefoil did not change significantly (P ≥ 0.34), with a small but statistically significant increase in primary spherical aberration. Conclusion Wavefront-guided LASIK provides an effective correction of low to moderate myopia or

  3. Association between Refractive Errors and Ocular Biometry in Iranian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Miraftab, Mohammad; Yekta, Abbasali; Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between ocular biometrics such as axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), lens thickness (LT), vitreous chamber depth (VCD) and corneal power (CP) with different refractive errors. Methods: In a cross-sectional study on the 40 to 64-year-old population of Shahroud, random cluster sampling was performed. Ocular biometrics were measured using the Allegro Biograph (WaveLight AG, Erlangen, Germany) for all participants. Refractive errors were determined using cycloplegic refraction. Results: In the first model, the strongest correlations were found between spherical equivalent with axial length and corneal power. Spherical equivalent was strongly correlated with axial length in high myopic and high hyperopic cases, and with corneal power in high hyperopic cases; 69.5% of variability in spherical equivalent was attributed to changes in these variables. In the second model, the correlations between vitreous chamber depth and corneal power with spherical equivalent were stronger in myopes than hyperopes, while the correlations between lens thickness and anterior chamber depth with spherical equivalent were stronger in hyperopic cases than myopic ones. In the third model, anterior chamber depth + lens thickness correlated with spherical equivalent only in moderate and severe cases of hyperopia, and this index was not correlated with spherical equivalent in moderate to severe myopia. Conclusion: In individuals aged 40-64 years, corneal power and axial length make the greatest contribution to spherical equivalent in high hyperopia and high myopia. Anterior segment biometric components have a more important role in hyperopia than myopia. PMID:26730304

  4. Global Vision Impairment and Blindness Due to Uncorrected Refractive Error, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Leasher, Janet; Bourne, Rupert R; Flaxman, Seth R; Jonas, Jost B; Keeffe, Jill; Limburg, Hans; Pesudovs, Konrad; Price, Holly; White, Richard A; Wong, Tien Y; Taylor, Hugh R; Resnikoff, Serge

    2016-03-01

    : The purpose of this systematic review was to estimate worldwide the number of people with moderate and severe visual impairment (MSVI; presenting visual acuity <6/18, ≥3/60) or blindness (presenting visual acuity <3/60) due to uncorrected refractive error (URE), to estimate trends in prevalence from 1990 to 2010, and to analyze regional differences. The review focuses on uncorrected refractive error which is now the most common cause of avoidable visual impairment globally. : The systematic review of 14,908 relevant manuscripts from 1990 to 2010 using Medline, Embase, and WHOLIS yielded 243 high-quality, population-based cross-sectional studies which informed a meta-analysis of trends by region. The results showed that in 2010, 6.8 million (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.7-8.8 million) people were blind (7.9% increase from 1990) and 101.2 million (95% CI: 87.88-125.5 million) vision impaired due to URE (15% increase since 1990), while the global population increased by 30% (1990-2010). The all-age age-standardized prevalence of URE blindness decreased 33% from 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.2%) in 1990 to 0.1% (95% CI: 0.1-0.1%) in 2010, whereas the prevalence of URE MSVI decreased 25% from 2.1% (95% CI: 1.6-2.4%) in 1990 to 1.5% (95% CI: 1.3-1.9%) in 2010. In 2010, URE contributed 20.9% (95% CI: 15.2-25.9%) of all blindness and 52.9% (95% CI: 47.2-57.3%) of all MSVI worldwide. The contribution of URE to all MSVI ranged from 44.2 to 48.1% in all regions except in South Asia which was at 65.4% (95% CI: 62-72%). : We conclude that in 2010, uncorrected refractive error continues as the leading cause of vision impairment and the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting a total of 108 million people or 1 in 90 persons. PMID:26905537

  5. Nature of the Refractive Errors in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Experimentally Induced Ametropias

    PubMed Central

    Qiao-Grider, Ying; Hung, Li-Fang; Kee, Chea-su; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Smith, Earl L.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the contribution of individual ocular components to vision-induced ametropias in 210 rhesus monkeys. The primary contribution to refractive-error development came from vitreous chamber depth; a minor contribution from corneal power was also detected. However, there was no systematic relationship between refractive error and anterior chamber depth or between refractive error and any crystalline lens parameter. Our results are in good agreement with previous studies in humans, suggesting that the refractive errors commonly observed in humans are created by vision-dependent mechanisms that are similar to those operating in monkeys. This concordance emphasizes the applicability of rhesus monkeys in refractive-error studies. PMID:20600237

  6. Rasch Analysis of the Student Refractive Error and Eyeglass Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Crescioni, Mabel; Messer, Dawn H.; Warholak, Terri L.; Miller, Joseph M.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Harvey, Erin M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and refine a newly developed instrument, the Student Refractive Error and Eyeglasses Questionnaire (SREEQ), designed to measure the impact of uncorrected and corrected refractive error on vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) in school-aged children. Methods. A 38 statement instrument consisting of two parts was developed: Part A relates to perceptions regarding uncorrected vision and Part B relates to perceptions regarding corrected vision and includes other statements regarding VRQoL with spectacle correction. The SREEQ was administered to 200 Native American 6th through 12th grade students known to have previously worn and who currently require eyeglasses. Rasch analysis was conducted to evaluate the functioning of the SREEQ. Statements on Part A and Part B were analyzed to examine the dimensionality and constructs of the questionnaire, how well the items functioned, and the appropriateness of the response scale used. Results Rasch analysis suggested two items be eliminated and the measurement scale for matching items be reduced from a 4-point response scale to a 3-point response scale. With these modifications, categorical data were converted to interval level data, to conduct an item and person analysis. A shortened version of the SREEQ was constructed with these modifications, the SREEQ-R, which included the statements that were able to capture changes in VRQoL associated with spectacle wear for those with significant refractive error in our study population. Conclusions While the SREEQ Part B appears to be a have less than optimal reliability to assess the impact of spectacle correction on VRQoL in our student population, it is also able to detect statistically significant differences from pretest to posttest on both the group and individual levels to show that the instrument can assess the impact that glasses have on VRQoL. Further modifications to the questionnaire, such as those included in the SREEQ-R, could enhance its functionality

  7. A novel strategy for management of uncorrected refractive errors in urban slums

    PubMed Central

    Chande, Prema K.; Korani, Hiral; Shamanna, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blindness and Vision impairment remains a major public health issue not only in rural but also in urban areas. Concept of using peripheral health centers to render primary health care services to the community was a WHO proposed model. However, establishing them in urban slums is a challenge as most of the slums are illegal establishments. So, aim was to establish vision centers for providing primary eye care services in the urban slums of Mumbai, West India. Methods: Vision centers were established in various slum pockets of Mumbai from the year 2008 till 2009. Refraction and screening for ocular morbidity were carried out for those who attended this center and management for uncorrected refractive errors was done. Results: Data from 6 such vision centers located in various slum pockets of Mumbai city from April 9 to March 2011 were collected and analyzed. Of the 19,550 adults, 2270 (11.61%) had moderate vision impairment with presenting visual acuity of <0.5 LogMAR in both eyes. Severe Visual impairment was seen in (723) 3.70%. Blindness was seen in (357) 1.82%. Of the 2993, which were moderately and severely visually impaired, 1893 subjects that is, 63.24% of them improved to 0.2 LogMAR or better with spectacle correction Conclusions: About 63.24% of visual impairment was due to uncorrected refractive errors, these included both moderately and severely vision impaired. Totally, 357 (1.82%) were also identified as blind. This model of vision centers has a role in the identification and management of sight-threatening problems. PMID:26622138

  8. Prevalence of Refractive Errors among High School Students in Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Hassan; Rezvan, Farhad; Beiranvand, Asghar; Papi, Omid-Ali; Hoseini Yazdi, Hosein; Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Norouzirad, Reza; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive errors among high school students. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we applied stratified cluster sampling on high school students of Aligoudarz, Western Iran. Examinations included visual acuity, non-cycloplegic refraction by autorefraction and fine tuning with retinoscopy. Myopia and hyperopia were defined as spherical equivalent of -0.5/+0.5 diopter (D) or worse, respectively; astigmatism was defined as cylindrical error >0.5 D and anisometropia as an interocular difference in spherical equivalent exceeding 1 D. Results Of 451 selected students, 438 participated in the study (response rate, 97.0%). Data from 434 subjects with mean age of 16±1.3 (range, 14 to 21) years including 212 (48.8%) male subjects was analyzed. The prevalence of myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism was 29.3% [95% confidence interval (CI), 25-33.6%], 21.7% (95%CI, 17.8-25.5%), and 20.7% (95%CI, 16.9-24.6%), respectively. The prevalence of myopia increased significantly with age [odds ratio (OR)=1.30, P=0.003] and was higher among boys (OR=3.10, P<0.001). The prevalence of hyperopia was significantly higher in girls (OR=0.49, P=0.003). The prevalence of astigmatism was 25.9% in boys and 15.8% in girls (OR=2.13, P=0.002). The overall prevalence of high myopia and high hyperopia were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. The prevalence of with-the-rule, against-the-rule, and oblique astigmatism was 14.5%, 4.8% and 1.4%, respectively. Overall, 4.6% (95%CI, 2.6-6.6%) of subjects were anisometropic. Conclusion More than half of high school students in Aligoudarz had at least one type of refractive error. Compared to similar studies, the prevalence of refractive errors was high in this age group. PMID:25279126

  9. Refractive errors and ocular biometry components in thalassemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Heydarian, Samira; Jafari, Reza; Karami, Hosein

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine and compare biometric and refractive characteristics of thalassemia major patients and normal individuals. In this cross-sectional study, 54 thalassemia major patients were selected randomly as case group, and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were regarded as control group. Refractive errors, corneal curvature and ocular components were measured by autokeratorefractometery and A-scan ultrasonography, respectively. Mean spherical equivalent was -0.0093 ± 0.86 D in thalassemia patients and -0.22 ± 1.33 D in the normal group. The prevalence of myopia, Hyperopia, and emmetropia among thalassemia patients was 16.7, 19.4, and 63.9 %, respectively. While in the control group, 26.9 % were myopic, 25 % were hyperopic, and 48.1 % were emmetropic. The prevalence of astigmatism in case group was 22.2 %, which was not significantly different from that in control group, (27.8 %, p = 0.346). Mean axial length in thalassemia patients was 22.89 ± 0.70 which was significantly lower than that in normal group (23.37 ± 0.91, p = 0.000). The flattest meridian of the cornea (R1) was significantly steeper in thalassemia patients (7.77 ± 0.24) in comparison to normal individuals (7.85 ± 0.28). Although thalassemic patients had significantly smaller axial length and vitreous chamber depth in comparison to normal group, which could be due to their abnormal physical growth, there was no significant difference between the mean of spherical equivalent among two groups. This can be due to their steeper corneal curvature that overcomes the refractive disadvantage of their shorter axial length. PMID:26646775

  10. Macular edema in Asian Indian premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity: Impact on visual acuity and refractive status after 1-year

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Bauer, Noel; Munusamy, Sivakumar; Kemmanu, Vasudha; Kurian, Mathew; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Avadhani, Kavitha; Shetty, Bhujang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the impact of transient, self-resolving, untreated “macular edema” detected on spectral domain optical coherence tomography in Asian Indian premature infants with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) on visual acuity (VA) and refraction at 1-year of corrected age. Materials and Methods: Visual acuity and refraction of 11 infants with bilateral macular edema (Group A) was compared with gestational age-matched 16 infants with ROP without edema (Group B) and 17 preterms infants without ROP and without edema (Group C) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of corrected age using Teller Acuity Cards and cycloplegic retinoscopy. Sub-group analysis of the previously described pattern A and B macular edema was performed. Results: Visual acuity was lower in infants with macular edema compared with the other two control groups throughout the study period, but statistically significant only at 3 months. Visual improvement in these infants was highest between the 3rd and 6th month and plateaued by the end of the 1st year with acuity comparable to the other two groups. The edema cohort was more hyperopic compared to the other two groups between 3 and 12 months of age. Pattern A edema had worse VA compared to pattern B, although not statistically significant. Conclusion: Macular edema, although transient, caused reduced VA as early as 3 months of corrected age in Asian Indian premature infants weighing <2000 g at birth. The higher hyperopia in these infants is possibly due to visual disturbances caused at a critical time of fovealization. We hypothesize a recovery and feedback mechanism based on the principles of active emmetropization to explain our findings. PMID:26139806

  11. Accommodation functions: co-dependency and relationship to refractive error.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter M; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2006-02-01

    We assessed the extent to which different accommodative functions are correlated and whether accommodative functions predict the refractive error or the progression of myopia over a 12 month period in 64 young adults (30 myopes and 34 non-myopes). The functions were: amplitude of accommodation; monocular and binocular accommodative facility (6 m and 40 cm); monocular and binocular accommodative response to target distance; AC/A and CA/C ratios, tonic accommodation (dark focus and pinhole), accommodative hysteresis, and nearwork-induced transient myopia. Within groups of related accommodative functions (such as facility measures or open-loop measures) measurements on individuals were generally significantly correlated, however correlations between functions from different groups were generally not significant. Although accommodative amplitude and pinhole (open loop) accommodation were significantly different in myopes than in non-myopes, these functions were unrelated to myopia progression. Facility of accommodation and accommodative lag was independent predictors of myopia progression. PMID:16009391

  12. The albino chick as a model for studying ocular developmental anomalies, including refractive errors, associated with albinism.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Jodi; Choh, Vivian; Bharadwaj, Shrikant; Padmanabhan, Varuna; Modilevsky, Laura; Jovanovich, Elizabeth; Yeh, Brenda; Zhang, Zhan; Guan, Huanxian; Payne, W; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2007-10-01

    Albinism is associated with a variety of ocular anomalies including refractive errors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ocular development of an albino chick line. The ocular development of both albino and normally pigmented chicks was monitored using retinoscopy to measure refractive errors and high frequency A-scan ultrasonography to measure axial ocular dimensions. Functional tests included an optokinetic nystagmus paradigm to assess visual acuity, and flash ERGs to assess retinal function. The underlying genetic abnormality was characterized using a gene microarray, PCR and a tyrosinase assay. The ultrastructure of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was examined using transmission electron microscopy. PCR confirmed that the genetic abnormality in this line is a deletion in exon 1 of the tyrosinase gene. Tyrosinase gene expression in isolated RPE cells was minimally detectable, and there was minimal enzyme activity in albino feather bulbs. The albino chicks had pink eyes and their eyes transilluminated, reflecting the lack of melanin in all ocular tissues. All three main components, anterior chamber, crystalline lens and vitreous chamber, showed axial expansion over time in both normal and albino animals, but the anterior chambers of albino chicks were consistently shallower than those of normal chicks, while in contrast, their vitreous chambers were longer. Albino chicks remained relatively myopic, with higher astigmatism than the normally pigmented chicks, even though both groups underwent developmental emmetropization. Albino chicks had reduced visual acuity yet the ERG a- and b-wave components had larger amplitudes and shorter than normal implicit times. Developmental emmetropization occurs in the albino chick but is impaired, likely because of functional abnormalities in the RPE and/or retina as well as optical factors. In very young chicks the underlying genetic mutation may also contribute to refractive error and eye shape abnormalities

  13. Is the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Valid for Use in Preschool Children with Refractive Errors?

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Ecosse L.; Marella, Manjula; Chang, Benjamin; Dirani, Mohamed; Kah-Guan, Au Eong; Chia, Audrey; Young, Terry L.; Wong, Tien Y.; Saw, Seang Mei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the psychometric validity of the pediatric quality of life inventory (PedsQL 4.0) in assessing the impact of refractive errors on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in preschool children in Singapore. Methods Parents of toddlers (aged 25 to 48 months) and young children (49 to 72 months) completed the PedsQL 4.0, an HRQoL scale as part of population-based trial in Singapore. The outcome measures were the overall score, and the “physical”; “emotional”; “social”; and “school” functioning subscales. Rasch analysis was used to validate the PedsQL 4.0. Results Parents of 939 (48.9%) toddlers and 982 (51.1%) young children completed the PedsQL 4.0 survey. The overall mean (±standard deviation) spherical equivalence for the right eye was 0.47 ± 1.13 diopter (D) for toddlers and 0.74 ± 1.22 D for young children. One hundred forty-nine (15.9%) toddlers and 90 (9.2%) young children were considered myopic (≥−0.50 D). Most participants (n = 1286, 89.6%) had presenting visual acuity 6/9 or better. Rasch analysis showed evidence of disordered category thresholds and poor person-item targeting for both groups. The separation reliability was 0.00 for toddlers and 0.03 for young children, indicating there was no variance in both samples. The PedsQL 4.0 overall and subscale scores displayed substantial multidimensionality as the variance values explained by the measures was <25% in both groups. A minimum value of 60% is usually considering acceptable. Conclusions The PedsQL 4.0 in its current state is not a valid psychometric scale to effectively evaluate the impact of refractive errors on HRQoL in preschool children in Singapore. PMID:20852452

  14. Refractive-Error Quality of Life (RQL) in Patients with AcrySof IQ Aspherical Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Chan; Wang, I-Jong; Lei, Mei-Shu; Hu, Fung-Rong; Lin, Luke L-K

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare refractive-error quality of life, and spherical aberration in pseudophakic eyes with an aspherical intraocular lens (AcrySof IQ) vs. a conventional spherical intraocular lens (AcrySof Single-Piece). Methods 65 patients were randomized to implantation of either an aspherical IOL (Alcon AcrySof IQ) (30 eyes) or a spherical IOL (Alcon AcrySof Single-Piece (35 eyes). Three months postoperatively, complete ophthalmologic examinations including uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and a wavefront analysis were performed. Patients completed the National Eye Institute Refractive Error Quality of life Instrument (NEI RQL) to evaluate vision-related quality of life. Results The mean postoperative best-corrected visual acuity was 0.09±0.07 logMAR in the aspherical group and 0.12±0.08 in the spherical group, and the difference was not statistically significant. Spherical aberrations were significantly lower in the aspherical group (0.12±0.23 μm), than in the spherical group (0.33±0.20 μm) (P=0.001). Patients with aspherical AcrySof IQ IOLs implantation also experienced less difficulties driving at night (P=0.04), but the difference was not significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusion The NEI RQL instrument is sensitive enough to detect the visual benefit of cataract surgery. The aspherical AcrySof IQ IOL reduces both spherical aberration and total higher-order aberrations, compared with the performance achieved by the spherical AcrySof Single-Piece IOL. Although the difference between the two IOLs is not statistically significant, there is a tendency toward the association of objective optical performance of aspherical AcrySof IQ IOLs with a subjective improvement in patients’ night driving.

  15. Accuracy and Repeatability of Refractive Error Measurements by Photorefractometry

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh; Baghini, Ahmad Shojaei; Yaseri, Mehdi; Sheibani, Koroush; Norouzi, Ghazal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of photorefraction and autorefraction as compared to cycloautorefraction and to detect the repeatability of photorefraction. Methods: This diagnostic study included the right eyes of 86 children aged 7-12 years. Refractive status was measured using photorefraction (PlusoptiX SO4, GmbH, Nürnberg, Germany) and autorefraction (Topcon RM800, USA) with and without cycloplegia. Photorefraction for each eye was performed three times to assess repeatability. Results: The overall agreement between photorefraction and cycloautorefraction was over 81% for all refractive errors. Photorefractometry had acceptable sensitivity and specificity for myopia and astigmatism. There was no statistically significant difference considering myopia and astigmatism in all comparisons, while the difference was significant for hyperopia using both amblyogenic (P = 0.006) and nonamblyogenic criteria (P = 0.001). A myopic shift of 1.21 diopter (D) and 1.58 D occurred with photorefraction in nonamblyogenic and amblyogenic hyperopia, respectively. Using revised cut-off points of + 1.12 D and + 2.6 D instead of + 2.00 D and + 3.50 D improved the sensitivity of photorefractometry to 84.62% and 69.23%, respectively. The repeatability of photorefraction for measurement of myopia, astigmatism and hyperopia was acceptable (intra-cluster correlation [ICC]: 0.98, 0.94 and 0.77, respectively). Autorefraction results were significantly different from cycloautorefraction in hyperopia (P < 0.0001), but comparable in myopia and astigmatism. Also, noncycloglegic autorefraction results were similar to photorefraction in this study. Conclusion: Although photorefraction was accurate for measurement of myopia and astigmatism, its sensitivity for hyperopia was low which could be improved by considering revised cut-off points. Considering cut-off points, photorefraction can be used as a screening method. PMID:26730305

  16. Baseline peripheral refractive error and changes in axial refraction during one year in a young adult population

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Andreas; Charman, William Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the initial characteristics of individual patterns of peripheral refraction relate to subsequent changes in refraction over a one-year period. Methods 54 myopic and emmetropic subjects (mean age: 24.9 ± 5.1 years; median 24 years) with normal vision were recruited and underwent conventional non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. Peripheral refraction was also measured at 5° intervals over the central 60° of horizontal visual field, together with axial length. After one year, measurements of subjective refraction and axial length were repeated on the 43 subjects who were still available for examination. Results In agreement with earlier studies, higher myopes tended to show greater relative peripheral hyperopia. There was, however, considerable inter-subject variation in the pattern of relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) at any level of axial refraction. Across the group, mean one-year changes in axial refraction and axial length did not differ significantly from zero. There was no correlation between changes in these parameters for individual subjects and any characteristic of their RPRE. Conclusion No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the pattern of RPRE is predictive of subsequent refractive change in this age group. PMID:26188389

  17. Reducing visual deficits caused by refractive errors in school and preschool children: results of a pilot school program in the Andean region of Apurimac, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Latorre-Arteaga, Sergio; Gil-González, Diana; Enciso, Olga; Phelan, Aoife; García-Muñoz, Ángel; Kohler, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background Refractive error is defined as the inability of the eye to bring parallel rays of light into focus on the retina, resulting in nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (Hyperopia) or astigmatism. Uncorrected refractive error in children is associated with increased morbidity and reduced educational opportunities. Vision screening (VS) is a method for identifying children with visual impairment or eye conditions likely to lead to visual impairment. Objective To analyze the utility of vision screening conducted by teachers and to contribute to a better estimation of the prevalence of childhood refractive errors in Apurimac, Peru. Design A pilot vision screening program in preschool (Group I) and elementary school children (Group II) was conducted with the participation of 26 trained teachers. Children whose visual acuity was<6/9 [20/30] (Group I) and≤6/9 (Group II) in one or both eyes, measured with the Snellen Tumbling E chart at 6 m, were referred for a comprehensive eye exam. Specificity and positive predictive value to detect refractive error were calculated against clinical examination. Program assessment with participants was conducted to evaluate outcomes and procedures. Results A total sample of 364 children aged 3–11 were screened; 45 children were examined at Centro Oftalmológico Monseñor Enrique Pelach (COMEP) Eye Hospital. Prevalence of refractive error was 6.2% (Group I) and 6.9% (Group II); specificity of teacher vision screening was 95.8% and 93.0%, while positive predictive value was 59.1% and 47.8% for each group, respectively. Aspects highlighted to improve the program included extending training, increasing parental involvement, and helping referred children to attend the hospital. Conclusion Prevalence of refractive error in children is significant in the region. Vision screening performed by trained teachers is a valid intervention for early detection of refractive error, including screening of preschool children. Program

  18. Using Femtosecond Laser to Create Customized Corneal Flaps for Patients with Low and Moderate Refractive Error Differing in Corneal Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianhong; Yu, Linli; Yu, Dan; Zhao, Gangping

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the visual outcomes, accuracy, and predictability of corneal flaps with different thicknesses created by 60-kHz femtosecond laser according to different corneal thicknesses in the patients with low and moderate refractive error. A total of 182 eyes were divided according to the central corneal thickness (470μm–499 μm in Group A, 500μm–549 μm in Group B, and 550μm–599 μm in Group C) and underwent femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK for a target corneal flap thickness (100 μm for Group A, 110 μm for Group B, and 120 μm for Group C). Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and refractive status were examined. The flap thickness of each eye was measured by anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) on 30 points at 1-month follow-up to assess the accuracy and predictability. Postoperatively, at least 75% of eyes had a UDVA of 20/16 or better, less than 2% of eyes lost one line, over 30% of eyes gained one or more lines in CDVA, at least 95% of eyes had astigmatism of less than 0.25 D, all eyes achieved a correction within ±1.00 D from the target spherical equivalent refraction. The visual and refractive outcomes did not differ significantly in all groups (P >0.05). The mean flap thickness was 100.36± 4.32 μm (range: 95–113 μm) in Group A, 111.64 ± 3.62 μm (range: 108–125 μm) in Group B, and 122.32 ± 2.88 μm (range: 112–128 μm) in Group C. The difference at each measured point among the three groups was significant (P < 0.05). The accuracy and predictability were satisfactory in all three groups. In conclusion, this customized treatment yielded satisfactory clinical outcomes with accurate and predictable flap thickness for patients with low and moderate refractive error. PMID:25807232

  19. Accommodation, Acuity, and their Relationship to Emmetropization in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones, Lisa A.; Friedman, Nina E.; Frane, Sara L.; Lin, Wendy K.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Zadnik, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between accommodation, visual acuity, and emmetropization in human infancy. Methods Defocus at distance and near (57cm) was assessed using Mohindra and dynamic retinoscopy, respectively, in 262 normal birthweight infants at 3, 9, and 18 months of age. Preferential looking provided acuity data at the same ages. The spherical equivalent refractive error was measured by cycloplegic retinoscopy (cyclopentolate 1%). Results Univariate linear regression analyses showed no associations between the change in refractive error and defocus at distance or near. Change in refractive error was linearly related to the accommodative response at distance (R2 = 0.17, p<0.0001) and near (R2 = 0.13, p<0.0001). The ten subjects with the poorest emmetropization relative to the change predicted by the linear effects of their refractive error had higher average levels of hyperopic defocus at distance and near (p-values <0.043). Logistic regression showed a decrease in the odds of reaching +2.00D or less hyperopia by 18 months with increasing levels of hyperopia at 3 months, or if Mohindra retinoscopy was myopic combined with acuity better than the median level of 1.25 logMAR (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.78 (95% CI = 0.68, 0.88)). Conclusions The level of cycloplegic refractive error was the best single factor for predicting emmetropization by 18 months of age, with smaller contributions from visual acuity and Mohindra retinoscopy. The lack of correlation between defocus and change in refractive error does not support a simple model of emmetropization in response to the level of hyperopic defocus. Infants were capable of maintaining accurate average levels of accommodation across a range of moderate hyperopic refractive errors at 3 months of age. The association between the change in refractive error and accommodative response suggests that the amount of accommodation is a plausible visual signal for emmetropization. PMID

  20. Effect of Watching 3-Dimensional Television on Refractive Error in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Choi, Yong-Min; Han, Ji-Yoon; Nam, Gi-Tae; You, Eun-Joo; Cho, Yoonae A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of watching 3-dimensional (3D) television (TV) on refractive error in children. Methods Sixty healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 12 years, without any ocular abnormalities other than refractive error were recruited for this study. They watched 3D TV for 50 minutes at a viewing distance of 2.8 meters. The image disparity of the 3D contents was from -1 to 1 degree. Refractive errors were measured both before and immediately after watching TV and were rechecked after a 10-minute rest period. The refractive errors before and after watching TV were compared. The amount of refractive change was also compared between myopes and controls. The refractive error of the participants who showed a myopic shift immediately after watching TV were compared across each time point to assure that the myopic shift persisted after a 10-minute rest. Results The mean age of the participants was 9.23 ± 1.75 years. The baseline manifest refractive error was -1.70 ± 1.79 (-5.50 to +1.25) diopters. The refractive errors immediately after watching and after a 10-minute rest were -1.75 ± 1.85 and -1.69 ± 1.80 diopters, respectively, which were not different from the baseline values. Myopic participants (34 participants), whose spherical equivalent was worse than -0.75 diopters, also did not show any significant refractive change after watching 3D TV. A myopic shift was observed in 31 participants with a mean score of 0.29 ± 0.23 diopters, which resolved after a 10-minute rest. Conclusions Watching properly made 3D content on a 3D TV for 50 minutes with a 10-minute intermission at more than 2.8 meters of viewing distance did not affect the refractive error of children. PMID:25646061

  1. Refractive errors induced by displacement of intraocular lenses within the pseudophakic eye.

    PubMed

    Atchison, D A

    1989-03-01

    Simple methods were developed to estimate refractive errors when intraocular lenses are not fitted optimally within pseudophakic eyes. The accuracy of these methods was determined by comparing results obtained with them to results obtained by raytracing through a model eye. Accuracy was good for longitudinal displacement and tilting, and reasonable for transverse displacement. Refractive errors are related linearly to the magnitude of the longitudinal displacement, and are related to the square of the magnitude of tilt or transverse displacement. The refractive error upon transverse displacement is quadratically dependent upon lens shape. PMID:2717142

  2. A clinic-based study of refractive errors, strabismus, and amblyopia in pediatric age-group

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tamimi, Elham R.; Shakeel, Ayisha; Yassin, Sanaa A.; Ali, Syed I.; Khan, Umar A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional observational study was to determine the distribution and patterns of refractive errors, strabismus, and amblyopia in children seen at a pediatric eye care. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a Private Hospital in Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from March to July 2013. During this period, a total of 1350 children, aged 1–15 years were seen at this Center's Pediatric Ophthalmology Unit. All the children underwent complete ophthalmic examination with cycloplegic refraction. Results: Refractive errors accounted for 44.4% of the cases, the predominant refractive error being hypermetropia which represented 83%. Strabismus and amblyopia were present in 38% and 9.1% of children, respectively. Conclusions: In this clinic-based study, the focus was on the frequency of refractive errors, strabismus, and amblyopia which were considerably high. Hypermetropia was the predominant refractive error in contrast to other studies in which myopia was more common. This could be attributed to the criteria for sample selection since it was clinic-based rather than a population-based study. However, it is important to promote public education on the significance of early detection of refractive errors, and have periodic screening in schools. PMID:26392796

  3. Prevalence of visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive error: Results from Delhi-Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment Study

    PubMed Central

    Senjam, Suraj Singh; Vashist, Praveen; Gupta, Noopur; Malhotra, Sumit; Misra, Vasundhara; Bhardwaj, Amit; Gupta, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate the prevalence of visual impairment (VI) due to uncorrected refractive error (URE) and to assess the barriers to utilization of services in the adult urban population of Delhi. Materials and Methods: A population-based rapid assessment of VI was conducted among people aged 40 years and above in 24 randomly selected clusters of East Delhi district. Presenting visual acuity (PVA) was assessed in each eye using Snellen's E chart. Pinhole examination was done if PVA was <20/60 in either eye and ocular examination to ascertain the cause of VI. Barriers to utilization of services for refractive error were recorded with questionnaires. Results: Of 2421 individuals enumerated, 2331 (96%) individuals were examined. Females were 50.7% among them. The mean age of all examined subjects was 51.32 ± 10.5 years (standard deviation). VI in either eye due to URE was present in 275 individuals (11.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5–13.1). URE was identified as the most common cause (53.4%) of VI. The overall prevalence of VI due to URE in the study population was 6.1% (95% CI: 5.1 CI: 5.1–7.0). The elder population as well as females were more likely to have VI due to URE (odds ratio [OR] = 12.3; P < 0.001 and OR = 1.5; P < 0.02). Lack of felt need was the most common reported barrier (31.5%). Conclusions: The prevalence of VI due to URE among the urban adult population of Delhi is still high despite the availability of abundant eye care facilities. The majority of reported barriers are related to human behavior and attitude toward the refractive error. Understanding these aspects will help in planning appropriate strategies to eliminate VI due to URE. PMID:27380979

  4. Nature and Nurture: the complex genetics of myopia and refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The refractive errors, myopia and hyperopia, are optical defects of the visual system that can cause blurred vision. Uncorrected refractive errors are the most common causes of visual impairment worldwide. It is estimated that 2.5 billion people will be affected by myopia alone with in the next decade. Experimental, epidemiological and clinical research has shown that refractive development is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Animal models have demonstrated that eye growth and refractive maturation during infancy are tightly regulated by visually-guided mechanisms. Observational data in human populations provide compelling evidence that environmental influences and individual behavioral factors play crucial roles in myopia susceptibility. Nevertheless, the majority of the variance of refractive error within populations is thought to be due to hereditary factors. Genetic linkage studies have mapped two dozen loci, while association studies have implicated more than 25 different genes in refractive variation. Many of these genes are involved in common biological pathways known to mediate extracellular matrix composition and regulate connective tissue remodeling. Other associated genomic regions suggest novel mechanisms in the etiology of human myopia, such as mitochondrial-mediated cell death or photoreceptor-mediated visual signal transmission. Taken together, observational and experimental studies have revealed the complex nature of human refractive variation, which likely involves variants in several genes and functional pathways. Multiway interactions between genes and/or environmental factors may also be important in determining individual risks of myopia, and may help explain the complex pattern of refractive error in human populations. PMID:21155761

  5. Effects of Multiple Listenings on Error-Detection Acuity in Multivoice, Multitimbral Musical Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the effects of multiple listenings on error-detection identification and labeling accuracy among brass and woodwind instrumentalists. Examples derived from band music used balanced four-voice incipits performed with differing timbres, and errors that occurred in one or multiple voices. Response rates for correct…

  6. Ray tracing evaluation of a technique for correcting the refraction errors in satellite tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.; Hendrickson, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Errors may be introduced in satellite laser ranging data by atmospheric refractivity. Ray tracing data have indicated that horizontal refractivity gradients may introduce nearly 3-cm rms error when satellites are near 10-degree elevation. A correction formula to compensate for the horizontal gradients has been developed. Its accuracy is evaluated by comparing it to refractivity profiles. It is found that if both spherical and gradient correction formulas are employed in conjunction with meteorological measurements, a range resolution of one cm or less is feasible for satellite elevation angles above 10 degrees.

  7. Assumption-free estimation of the genetic contribution to refractive error across childhood

    PubMed Central

    St Pourcain, Beate; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Williams, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Studies in relatives have generally yielded high heritability estimates for refractive error: twins 75–90%, families 15–70%. However, because related individuals often share a common environment, these estimates are inflated (via misallocation of unique/common environment variance). We calculated a lower-bound heritability estimate for refractive error free from such bias. Methods Between the ages 7 and 15 years, participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) underwent non-cycloplegic autorefraction at regular research clinics. At each age, an estimate of the variance in refractive error explained by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic variants was calculated using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) using high-density genome-wide SNP genotype information (minimum N at each age=3,404). Results The variance in refractive error explained by the SNPs (“SNP heritability”) was stable over childhood: Across age 7–15 years, SNP heritability averaged 0.28 (SE=0.08, p<0.001). The genetic correlation for refractive error between visits varied from 0.77 to 1.00 (all p<0.001) demonstrating that a common set of SNPs was responsible for the genetic contribution to refractive error across this period of childhood. Simulations suggested lack of cycloplegia during autorefraction led to a small underestimation of SNP heritability (adjusted SNP heritability=0.35; SE=0.09). To put these results in context, the variance in refractive error explained (or predicted) by the time participants spent outdoors was <0.005 and by the time spent reading was <0.01, based on a parental questionnaire completed when the child was aged 8–9 years old. Conclusions Genetic variation captured by common SNPs explained approximately 35% of the variation in refractive error between unrelated subjects. This value sets an upper limit for predicting refractive error using existing SNP genotyping arrays, although higher-density genotyping in

  8. Empirical estimates of cumulative refraction errors associated with procedurally constrained levelings based on the Gaithersburg-Tucson Refraction Tests of the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Robert O.; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Mark, Robert K.; Shaw, Roger H.

    1985-05-01

    Analyses of results of the National Geodetic Survey's leveling refraction tests indicate that the standard deviation about the mean (σ) for high-scale minus low-scale rod readings closely correlates with measured refraction error. Use of this relation in conjunction with values for σ obtained from routinely constrained surveys provides a basis for estimating the refraction error associated with levelings of stipulated order and class.

  9. Empirical estimates of cumulative refraction errors associated with procedurally constrained levelings based on the Gaithersburg- Tucson refraction tests of the National Geodetic Survey.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Gilmore, T.D.; Mark, R.K.; Shaw, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of results of the National Geodetic Survey's leveling refraction tests indicate that the standard deviation about the mean (sigma) for high-scale minus low-scale rod readings closely correlates with measured refraction error. Use of this relation in conjunction with values for sigma obtained from routinely constrainted surveys provides a basis for estimating the refraction error associated with levelings of stipulated order and class. -Authors

  10. Prevalence of refractive error in Europe: the European Eye Epidemiology (E(3)) Consortium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katie M; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Cumberland, Phillippa; Bertelsen, Geir; Wolfram, Christian; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Kuijpers, Robert W A M; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Khawaja, Anthony P; Luben, Robert N; Erke, Maja Gran; von Hanno, Therese; Mahroo, Omar; Hogg, Ruth; Gieger, Christian; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Bron, Alain; Dartigues, Jean-François; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Topouzis, Fotis; Delcourt, Cécile; Rahi, Jugnoo; Meitinger, Thomas; Fletcher, Astrid; Foster, Paul J; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Klaver, Caroline C W; Hammond, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of refractive error in adults across Europe. Refractive data (mean spherical equivalent) collected between 1990 and 2013 from fifteen population-based cohort and cross-sectional studies of the European Eye Epidemiology (E(3)) Consortium were combined in a random effects meta-analysis stratified by 5-year age intervals and gender. Participants were excluded if they were identified as having had cataract surgery, retinal detachment, refractive surgery or other factors that might influence refraction. Estimates of refractive error prevalence were obtained including the following classifications: myopia ≤-0.75 diopters (D), high myopia ≤-6D, hyperopia ≥1D and astigmatism ≥1D. Meta-analysis of refractive error was performed for 61,946 individuals from fifteen studies with median age ranging from 44 to 81 and minimal ethnic variation (98 % European ancestry). The age-standardised prevalences (using the 2010 European Standard Population, limited to those ≥25 and <90 years old) were: myopia 30.6 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 30.4-30.9], high myopia 2.7 % (95 % CI 2.69-2.73), hyperopia 25.2 % (95 % CI 25.0-25.4) and astigmatism 23.9 % (95 % CI 23.7-24.1). Age-specific estimates revealed a high prevalence of myopia in younger participants [47.2 % (CI 41.8-52.5) in 25-29 years-olds]. Refractive error affects just over a half of European adults. The greatest burden of refractive error is due to myopia, with high prevalence rates in young adults. Using the 2010 European population estimates, we estimate there are 227.2 million people with myopia across Europe. PMID:25784363

  11. The Association between Maternal Reproductive Age and Progression of Refractive Error in Urban Students in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Jin, Zi Bing; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J.; Jhanji, Vishal; Zhou, Hong Jia; Wang, Ning Li; Liang, Yuan Bo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between maternal reproductive age and their children’ refractive error progression in Chinese urban students. Methods The Beijing Myopia Progression Study was a three-year cohort investigation. Cycloplegic refraction of these students at both baseline and follow-up vision examinations, as well as non-cycloplegic refraction of their parents at baseline, were performed. Student’s refractive change was defined as the cycloplegic spherical equivalent (SE) of the right eye at the final follow-up minus the cycloplegic SE of the right eye at baseline. Results At the final follow-up, 241 students (62.4%) were reexamined. 226 students (58.5%) with completed refractive data, as well as completed parental reproductive age data, were enrolled. The average paternal and maternal age increased from 29.4 years and 27.5 years in 1993–1994 to 32.6 years and 29.2 years in 2003–2004, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, students who were younger (β = 0.08 diopter/year/year, P<0.001), with more myopic refraction at baseline (β = 0.02 diopter/year/diopter, P = 0.01), and with older maternal reproductive age (β = -0.18 diopter/year/decade, P = 0.01), had more myopic refractive change. After stratifying the parental reproductive age into quartile groups, children with older maternal reproductive age (trend test: P = 0.04) had more myopic refractive change, after adjusting for the children's age, baseline refraction, maternal refraction, and near work time. However, no significant association between myopic refractive change and paternal reproductive age was found. Conclusions In this cohort, children with older maternal reproductive age had more myopic refractive change. This new risk factor for myopia progression may partially explain the faster myopic progression found in the Chinese population in recent decades. PMID:26421841

  12. Effect of refractive error on visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Maehara, Seiya; Itoh, Yoshiki; Matsui, Ai; Hayashi, Miri; Kubo, Akira; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of refractive error on canine visual evoked potentials with pattern stimulation (P-VEP). Six normal beagle dogs were used. The refractive power of the recorded eyes was measured by skiascopy. The refractive power was corrected to -4 diopters (D) to +2 D using contact lens. P-VEP was recorded at each refractive power. The stimulus pattern size and distance were 50.3 arc-min and 50 cm. The P100 appeared at almost 100 msec at -2 D (at which the stimulus monitor was in focus). There was significant prolongation of the P100 implicit time at -4, -3, 0 and +1 D compared with -2 D, respectively. We concluded that the refractive power of the eye affected the P100 implicit time in canine P-VEP recording. PMID:26655769

  13. High Prevalence of Refractive Errors in 7 Year Old Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, Hassan; YEKTA, Abbasali; JAFARZADEHPUR, Ebrahim; OSTADIMOGHADDAM, Hadi; ETEMAD, Koorosh; ASHARLOUS, Amir; NABOVATI, Payam; KHABAZKHOOB, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The latest WHO report indicates that refractive errors are the leading cause of visual impairment throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism in 7 yr old children in Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study in 2013 with multistage cluster sampling, first graders were randomly selected from 8 cities in Iran. All children were tested by an optometrist for uncorrected and corrected vision, and non-cycloplegic and cycloplegic refraction. Refractive errors in this study were determined based on spherical equivalent (SE) cyloplegic refraction. Results: From 4614 selected children, 89.0% participated in the study, and 4072 were eligible. The prevalence rates of myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism were 3.04% (95% CI: 2.30–3.78), 6.20% (95% CI: 5.27–7.14), and 17.43% (95% CI: 15.39–19.46), respectively. Prevalence of myopia (P=0.925) and astigmatism (P=0.056) were not statistically significantly different between the two genders, but the odds of hyperopia were 1.11 (95% CI: 1.01–2.05) times higher in girls (P=0.011). The prevalence of with-the-rule astigmatism was 12.59%, against-the-rule was 2.07%, and oblique 2.65%. Overall, 22.8% (95% CI: 19.7–24.9) of the schoolchildren in this study had at least one type of refractive error. Conclusion: One out of every 5 schoolchildren had some refractive error. Conducting multicenter studies throughout the Middle East can be very helpful in understanding the current distribution patterns and etiology of refractive errors compared to the previous decade. PMID:27114984

  14. Effect of Age and Refractive Error on the Melanopsin Mediated Post-Illumination Pupil Response (PIPR).

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Prakash; Pearson, Candice A; Anderson, Alexandra M; Zele, Andrew J; Feigl, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive Retinal Ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate the pupil light reflex (PLR) during light onset and at light offset (the post-illumination pupil response, PIPR). Recent evidence shows that the PLR and PIPR can provide non-invasive, objective markers of age-related retinal and optic nerve disease; however there is no consensus on the effects of healthy ageing or refractive error on the ipRGC mediated pupil function. Here we isolated melanopsin contributions to the pupil control pathway in 59 human participants with no ocular pathology across a range of ages and refractive errors. We show that there is no effect of age or refractive error on ipRGC inputs to the human pupil control pathway. The stability of the ipRGC mediated pupil response across the human lifespan provides a functional correlate of their robustness observed during ageing in rodent models. PMID:26620343

  15. Effect of Age and Refractive Error on the Melanopsin Mediated Post-Illumination Pupil Response (PIPR)

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prakash; Pearson, Candice A.; Anderson, Alexandra M.; Zele, Andrew J.; Feigl, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive Retinal Ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate the pupil light reflex (PLR) during light onset and at light offset (the post-illumination pupil response, PIPR). Recent evidence shows that the PLR and PIPR can provide non-invasive, objective markers of age-related retinal and optic nerve disease; however there is no consensus on the effects of healthy ageing or refractive error on the ipRGC mediated pupil function. Here we isolated melanopsin contributions to the pupil control pathway in 59 human participants with no ocular pathology across a range of ages and refractive errors. We show that there is no effect of age or refractive error on ipRGC inputs to the human pupil control pathway. The stability of the ipRGC mediated pupil response across the human lifespan provides a functional correlate of their robustness observed during ageing in rodent models. PMID:26620343

  16. Comparing sports vision among three groups of soft tennis adolescent athletes: Normal vision, refractive errors with and without correction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Tsun; Liu, Yen-Hsiu; Lee, Jiahn-Shing; See, Lai-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of correcting static vision on sports vision is still not clear. Aim: To examine whether sports vision (depth perception [DP], dynamic visual acuity [DVA], eye movement [EM], peripheral vision [PV], and momentary vision [MV],) were different among soft tennis adolescent athletes with normal vision (Group A), with refractive error and corrected with (Group B) and without eyeglasses (Group C). Setting and Design: A cross-section study was conducted. Soft tennis athletes aged 10–13 who played softball tennis for 2–5 years, and who were without any ocular diseases and without visual training for the past 3 months were recruited. Materials and Methods: DPs were measured in an absolute deviation (mm) between a moving rod and fixing rod (approaching at 25 mm/s, receding at 25 mm/s, approaching at 50 mm/s, receding at 50 mm/s) using electric DP tester. A smaller deviation represented better DP. DVA, EM, PV, and MV were measured on a scale from 1 (worse) to 10 (best) using ATHLEVISION software. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test and Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the data among the three study groups. Results: A total of 73 athletes (37 in Group A, 8 in Group B, 28 in Group C) were enrolled in this study. All four items of DP showed significant difference among the three study groups (P = 0.0051, 0.0004, 0.0095, 0.0021). PV displayed significant difference among the three study groups (P = 0.0044). There was no significant difference in DVA, EM, and MV among the three study groups. Conclusions: Significant better DP and PV were seen among soft tennis adolescent athletes with normal vision than those with refractive error regardless whether they had eyeglasses corrected. On the other hand, DVA, EM, and MV were similar among the three study groups. PMID:26632127

  17. Effects of tropospheric and ionospheric refraction errors in the utilization of GEOS-C altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of tropospheric and ionospheric refraction errors are analyzed for the GEOS-C altimeter project in terms of their resultant effects on C-band orbits and the altimeter measurement itself. Operational procedures using surface meteorological measurements at ground stations and monthly means for ocean surface conditions are assumed, with no corrections made for ionospheric effects. Effects on the orbit height due to tropospheric errors are approximately 15 cm for single pass short arcs (such as for calibration) and 10 cm for global orbits of one revolution. Orbit height errors due to neglect of the ionosphere have an amplitude of approximately 40 cm when the orbits are determined from C-band range data with predominantly daylight tracking. Altimeter measurement errors are approximately 10 cm due to residual tropospheric refraction correction errors. Ionospheric effects on the altimeter range measurement are also on the order of 10 cm during the GEOS-C launch and early operation period.

  18. Evaluation of the orientation of the steepest meridian of regular astigmatism among highly myopic Egyptian patients seeking non-ablative surgical correction of the refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Refai, Tamer Adel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: LASIK surgery is currently the preferred procedure to correct low to moderate myopia. The aim of this study was to determine the orientation of the steepest meridian of regular astigmatism in order to determine the relative incidence of vertical, horizontal, and oblique regular astigmatism among highly myopic Egyptian patients seeking non-ablative surgical correction of the refractive error. Methods: One hundred and one eyes of 68 highly myopic patients who were seeking refractive surgery were included in this consecutive case series study. The refractive errors were measured using an autorefractometer and confirmed by trial. We measured the uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity in Snellen lines. Keratometry, central corneal thickness, and anterior chamber depth also were measured. The cylinder power in diopters and the axis in degrees were reported. Astigmatism was graded as with the rule (i.e., vertical meridian steeper), against the rule (i.e., horizontal meridian steeper), and oblique astigmatism. The number and the percentage of eyes with the rule, against the rule, and oblique astigmatism were calculated, and the chi-squared test was performed to analyze the data. Results: The spherical refractive error ranged from −6.5 to −24.5 diopters (−13.45 ± 4.60). The cylinder power (Cyl) ranged from −0.25 to −7.5 diopters (−2.23 ± 1.28). The uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) in Snellen lines ranged from 0.01 – 0.1 (0.03 ± 0.02). The mean for best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in Snellen lines was 0.40 (± 0.23). The steepest meridian was vertical (i.e., with-the-rule astigmatism) in 44 eyes (43.56%), horizontal (i.e., against-the-rule astigmatism) in 27 eyes (26.73%), and oblique (i.e., oblique astigmatism) in 30 eyes (29.70%). Conclusions: The incidence of with-the-rule astigmatism in patients with high myopia was found to be much lower than in previous studies for non-myopic patients, with a higher incidence for against

  19. An examination of the southern California field test for the systematic accumulation of the optical refraction error in geodetic leveling.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Brown, B.W., Jr.; Gilmore, T.D.; Mark, R.K.; Wilson, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Appraisals of the two levelings that formed the southern California field test for the accumulation of the atmospheric refraction error indicate that random error and systematic error unrelated to refraction competed with the systematic refraction error and severely complicate any analysis of the test results. If the fewer than one-third of the sections that met less than second-order, class I standards are dropped, the divergence virtually disappears between the presumably more refraction contaminated long-sight-length survey and the less contaminated short-sight-length survey. -Authors

  20. Change in visual acuity is well correlated with change in image-quality metrics for both normal and keratoconic wavefront errors

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Marsack, Jason D.; Bedell, Harold E.; Shi, Yue; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the degree to which change in visual acuity (VA) correlates with change in optical quality using image-quality (IQ) metrics for both normal and keratoconic wavefront errors (WFEs). VA was recorded for five normal subjects reading simulated, logMAR acuity charts generated from the scaled WFEs of 15 normal and seven keratoconic eyes. We examined the correlations over a large range of acuity loss (up to 11 lines) and a smaller, more clinically relevant range (up to four lines). Nine IQ metrics were well correlated for both ranges. Over the smaller range of primary interest, eight were also accurate and precise in estimating the variations in logMAR acuity in both normal and keratoconic WFEs. The accuracy for these eight best metrics in estimating the mean change in logMAR acuity ranged between ±0.0065 to ±0.017 logMAR (all less than one letter), and the precision ranged between ±0.10 to ±0.14 logMAR (all less than seven letters). PMID:24281244

  1. Ionospheric refraction effects on orbit determination using the orbit determination error analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, C. P.; Kelbel, D. A.; Lee, T.; Dunham, J. B.; Mistretta, G. D.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of ionospheric refraction on orbit determination was studied through the use of the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS). The results of a study of the orbital state estimate errors due to the ionospheric refraction corrections, particularly for measurements involving spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking links, are presented. In current operational practice at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF), the ionospheric refraction effects on the tracking measurements are modeled in the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) using the Bent ionospheric model. While GTDS has the capability of incorporating the ionospheric refraction effects for measurements involving ground-to-spacecraft tracking links, such as those generated by the Ground Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (GSTDN), it does not have the capability to incorporate the refraction effects for spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking links for measurements generated by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The lack of this particular capability in GTDS raised some concern about the achievable accuracy of the estimated orbit for certain classes of spacecraft missions that require high-precision orbits. Using an enhanced research version of GTDS, some efforts have already been made to assess the importance of the spacecraft-to-spacecraft ionospheric refraction corrections in an orbit determination process. While these studies were performed using simulated data or real tracking data in definitive orbit determination modes, the study results presented here were obtained by means of covariance analysis simulating the weighted least-squares method used in orbit determination.

  2. A Meta-Analysis for Association of Maternal Smoking with Childhood Refractive Error and Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Qi, Ya; Shi, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Wen; Hu, Man

    2016-01-01

    Background. We aimed to evaluate the association between maternal smoking and the occurrence of childhood refractive error and amblyopia. Methods. Relevant articles were identified from PubMed and EMBASE up to May 2015. Combined odds ratio (OR) corresponding with its 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to evaluate the influence of maternal smoking on childhood refractive error and amblyopia. The heterogeneity was evaluated with the Chi-square-based Q statistic and the I2 test. Potential publication bias was finally examined by Egger's test. Results. A total of 9 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled OR showed that there was no significant association between maternal smoking and childhood refractive error. However, children whose mother smoked during pregnancy were 1.47 (95% CI: 1.12–1.93) times and 1.43 (95% CI: 1.23-1.66) times more likely to suffer from amblyopia and hyperopia, respectively, compared with children whose mother did not smoke, and the difference was significant. Significant heterogeneity was only found among studies involving the influence of maternal smoking on children's refractive error (P < 0.05; I2 = 69.9%). No potential publication bias was detected by Egger's test. Conclusion. The meta-analysis suggests that maternal smoking is a risk factor for childhood hyperopia and amblyopia. PMID:27247800

  3. Decreasing Uncorrected Refractive Error in the Classroom through a Multifactorial Pilot Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Maliski, Sally; Yu, Fei; Oelrich, Faye; Coleman, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effectiveness of a pilot intervention to promote the use of eyeglasses in one school in California. The intervention used a one-group pretest, posttest design. Between January and June 2011, during the intervention, all first- and second-grade children received eye evaluations and the children with refractive error received…

  4. Modeling of mouse eye and errors in ocular parameters affecting refractive state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Gurinder

    Rodents eye are particularly used to study refractive error state of an eye and development of refractive eye. Genetic organization of rodents is similar to that of humans, which makes them interesting candidates to be researched upon. From rodents family mice models are encouraged over rats because of availability of genetically engineered models. Despite of extensive work that has been performed on mice and rat models, still no one is able to quantify an optical model, due to variability in the reported ocular parameters. In this Dissertation, we have extracted ocular parameters and generated schematics of eye from the raw data from School of Medicine, Detroit. In order to see how the rays would travel through an eye and the defects associated with an eye; ray tracing has been performed using ocular parameters. Finally we have systematically evaluated the contribution of various ocular parameters, such as radii of curvature of ocular surfaces, thicknesses of ocular components, and refractive indices of ocular refractive media, using variational analysis and a computational model of the rodent eye. Variational analysis revealed that variation in all the ocular parameters does affect the refractive status of the eye, but depending upon the magnitude of the impact those parameters are listed as critical or non critical. Variation in the depth of the vitreous chamber, thickness of the lens, radius of the anterior surface of the cornea, radius of the anterior surface of the lens, as well as refractive indices for the lens and vitreous, appears to have the largest impact on the refractive error and thus are categorized as critical ocular parameters. The radii of the posterior surfaces of the cornea and lens have much smaller contributions to the refractive state, while the radii of the anterior and posterior surfaces of the retina have no effect on the refractive error. These data provide the framework for further refinement of the optical models of the rat and mouse

  5. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read in Chinese How does the eye focus light? In order to see clearly, light rays from an object must focus onto the ... mechanism (the cornea and crystalline lens), and a light-sensing portion at the back (the retina). If ...

  6. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... glasses at the appropriate age. Updated 11/2014 Eye Terms & Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) Pink eye (defined) Retinopathy ...

  7. Short-duration transient visual evoked potential for objective measurement of refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Anand, Aashish; De Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V; Teng, Christopher C; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Tello, Celso

    2011-12-01

    This study examined effects of uncorrected refractive errors (RE) in a short-duration transient visual evoked potential (SD t-VEP) system and investigated their role for objective measurement of RE. Refractive errors were induced by means of trial lenses in 35 emmetropic subjects. A synchronized single-channel EEG was recorded for emmetropia, and each simulated refractive state to generate 21 VEP responses for each subject. P100 amplitude (N75 trough to P100 peak) and latency were identified by an automated post-signal processing algorithm. Induced hypermetropia and myopia correlated strongly with both P100 amplitude and latency. To minimize the effect of baseline shift and waveform fluctuations, a VEP scoring system, based on software-derived P100 latency, amplitude and waveform quality, was used to estimate the RE. Using the VEP scores, a single VEP response had a high sensitivity and specificity for discerning emmetropia, small RE (<2 diopter) within a 2 diopter range and large RE (2-14 diopter) within a 4 diopter range. The VEP scoring system has a potential for objective screening of RE and for a more accurate 3-step objective refraction. PMID:21931961

  8. Early Childhood Refractive Error and Parental History of Myopia as Predictors of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Manny, Ruth E.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the utility of a child's first grade refractive error and parental history of myopia as predictors of myopia onset between the second and eighth grades. Methods. Subjects were nonmyopic children in the first grade who were enrolled in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Myopia was defined as −0.75 D or more myopia in both meridians (by cycloplegic autorefraction). The children were classified as having a high (versus low) risk of myopia with a cycloplegic sphere cutoff of +0.75 D or less (versus more) of hyperopia. Parental myopia was determined by a parent-completed survey. Discrete-time survival models predicted the risk of myopia. Results. Of the 1854 nonmyopic first graders, 21.3% were at high risk of myopia. More high-risk subjects had two myopic parents, 25.4% compared with 16.5% in the low-risk group (P < 0.0001). The low-risk survival function was similar regardless of the number of myopic parents. Among high-risk eighth graders, the survival probability was lower than in the low-risk group, decreasing with an increase in the number of myopic parents. The sensitivity and specificity of first grade refractive error with the number of myopic parents as predictors for myopia onset were 62.5% and 81.9%, respectively. Conclusions. First grade refractive error and the number of myopic parents can predict a child's risk of myopia; however, because the sensitivity of these factors is low, these two predictors may not be sufficient at this young age when a more accurate prediction of myopia onset is needed. PMID:19737876

  9. Refracting type laser beam scanner with minimum across-scan error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, Anwar S.

    1993-11-01

    An economical refracting type laser beam scanning device, exhibiting a minimum across-scan error without corrective measures, is described. The main structural assembly of the device consists of a rotating prism, a fixed spherical lens, and a fixed convex spherical auxiliary reflector (SAR). Trigonometric equations are developed to determine the radius of curvature of the SAR and the size of the exit pupil. Resolution analyses are presented for a specific set of design parameters.

  10. A survey of the criteria for prescribing in cases of borderline refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Shneor, Einat; Evans, Bruce John William; Fine, Yael; Shapira, Yehudit; Gantz, Liat; Gordon-Shaag, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This research investigated the reported optometric prescribing criteria of Israeli optometrists. Methods An online questionnaire based on previous studies was distributed via email and social networking sites to optometrists in Israel. The questionnaire surveyed the level of refractive error at which respondents would prescribe for different types of refractive error at various ages with and without symptoms. Results 124 responses were obtained, yielding a response rate of approximately 12–22%, 92% of whom had trained in Israel. For all refractive errors, the presence of symptoms strongly influenced prescribing criteria. For example, for 10–20 year old patients the degree of hyperopia for which 50% of practitioners would prescribe is +0.75 D in the presence of symptoms but twice this value (+1.50 D) in the absence of symptoms. As might be expected, optometrists prescribed at lower degrees of hyperopia for older compared with younger patients. There was a trend for more experienced practitioners to be less likely to prescribe for lower degrees of myopia and presbyopia. Practitioner gender, country of training, the type of practice environment, and financial incentives were not strongly related to prescribing criteria. Conclusions The prescribing criteria found in this study are broadly comparable with those in previous studies and with published prescribing guidelines. Subtle indications suggest that optometrists may become more conservative in their prescribing criteria with experience. PMID:26520884

  11. Comparison the post operative refractive errors in same size corneal transplantation through deep lamellar keratoplasty and penetrating keratoplasty methods after sutures removing in keratoconus patients

    PubMed Central

    Razmjoo, Hasan; Ghoreishi, Seyed Mohammad; Ashtari, Alireza; Ghafouri, Iman; Mamousi, Bashir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Corneal transplantation is a surgery in which cornea is replaced by a donated one and can be completely penetrating keratoplasty (PK) or included a part of cornea deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLK). Although the functional results are limited by some complications, it is considered as one of the most successful surgeries. This study aimed to compare the refractive errors after same size corneal transplantation through DLK and PK methods in keratoconus patients over 20 years. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, analytical study was conducted in Feiz Hospital, Sadra and Persian Clinics of Isfahan in 2013–2014. In this study, 35 patients underwent corneal transplantation by PK and 35 patients by DLK, after removing the sutures, the patients were compared in terms of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and refractive errors. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and t Student tests by SPSS software. Results: The BCVA mean in DLK and PK groups was 6/10 ± 2/10 and 5/10 ± 2/10, respectively, with no significant difference (P = 0.4). The results showed 9 cases of DLK and 6 cases of PK had normal (8/10 ≤ BCVA) visual acuity (25.7% vs. 17.1%), 24 cases of DLK and 27 cases of PK had mild vision impairment (68.6% vs. 77.1%) and 2 cases of the DLK group and 2 cases of PK had moderate vision impairment, (5.7% vs. 5.7%), there was no significant difference in “BCVA” (P = 0.83). Conclusions: Both methods were acceptably effective in improving BCVA, but according to previous articles (5,9,10) the DLK method due to fewer complications and less risk of rejection was superior to another method and in the absence of any prohibition this method is recommended. PMID:27099852

  12. GEOS-2 refraction program summary document. [ionospheric and tropospheric propagation errors in satellite tracking instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data from an extensive array of collocated instrumentation at the Wallops Island test facility were intercompared in order to (1) determine the practical achievable accuracy limitations of various tropospheric and ionospheric correction techniques; (2) examine the theoretical bases and derivation of improved refraction correction techniques; and (3) estimate internal systematic and random error levels of the various tracking stations. The GEOS 2 satellite was used as the target vehicle. Data were obtained regarding the ionospheric and tropospheric propagation errors, the theoretical and data analysis of which was documented in some 30 separate reports over the last 6 years. An overview of project results is presented.

  13. Refractive Errors in Koreans: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Tyler Hyungtaek; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lim, Key Hwan; Choi, Moonjung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our study provides epidemiologic data on the prevalence of refractive errors in all age group ≥5 years in Korea. Methods In 2008 to 2012, a total of 33,355 participants aged ≥5 years underwent ophthalmologic examinations. Using the right eye, myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent (SE) less than -0.5 or -1.0 diopters (D) in subjects aged 19 years and older or as an SE less than -0.75 or -1.25 D in subjects aged 5 to 18 years according to non-cycloplegic refraction. Other refractive errors were defined as follows: high myopia as an SE less than -6.0 D; hyperopia as an SE larger than +0.5 D; and astigmatism as a cylindrical error less than -1.0 D. The prevalence and risk factors of myopia were evaluated. Results Prevalence rates with a 95% confidence interval were determined for myopia (SE <-0.5 D, 51.9% [51.2 to 52.7]; SE <-1.0 D, 39.6% [38.8 to 40.3]), high myopia (5.0% [4.7 to 5.3]), hyperopia (13.4% [12.9 to 13.9]), and astigmatism (31.2% [30.5 to 32.0]). The prevalence of myopia demonstrated a nonlinear distribution with the highest peak between the ages of 19 and 29 years. The prevalence of hyperopia decreased with age in subjects aged 39 years or younger and then increased with age in subjects aged 40 years or older. The prevalence of astigmatism gradually increased with age. Education was associated with all refractive errors; myopia was more prevalent and hyperopia and astigmatism were less prevalent in the highly educated groups. Conclusions In young generations, the prevalence of myopia in Korea was much higher compared to the white or black populations in Western countries and is consistent with the high prevalence found in most other Asian countries. The overall prevalence of hyperopia was much lower compared to that of the white Western population. Age and education level were significant predictive factors associated with all kinds of refractive errors. PMID:27247521

  14. Five-Year Progression of Refractive Errors and Incidence of Myopia in School-Aged Children in Western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Ye; Li, Hua; Wu, Yu-Fei; Xu, Ji; Lv, Sha; Li, Ge; Liu, Shi-Chun; Song, Sheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine the change in refractive error and the incidence of myopia among school-aged children in the Yongchuan District of Chongqing City, Western China. Methods A population-based cross-sectional survey was initially conducted in 2006 among 3070 children aged 6 to 15 years. A longitudinal follow-up study was then conducted 5 years later between November 2011 and March 2012. Refractive error was measured under cycloplegia with autorefraction. Age, sex, and baseline refractive error were evaluated as risk factors for progression of refractive error and incidence of myopia. Results Longitudinal data were available for 1858 children (60.5%). The cumulative mean change in refractive error was −2.21 (standard deviation [SD], 1.87) diopters (D) for the entire study population, with an annual progression of refraction in a myopic direction of −0.43 D. Myopic progression of refractive error was associated with younger age, female sex, and higher myopic or hyperopic refractive error at baseline. The cumulative incidence of myopia, defined as a spherical equivalent refractive error of −0.50 D or more, among initial emmetropes and hyperopes was 54.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 45.2%–63.5%), with an annual incidence of 10.6% (95% CI, 8.7%–13.1%). Myopia was found more likely to happen in female and older children. Conclusions In Western China, both myopic progression and incidence of myopia were higher than those of children from most other locations in China and from the European Caucasian population. Compared with a previous study in China, there was a relative increase in annual myopia progression and annual myopia incidence, a finding which is consistent with the increasing trend on prevalence of myopia in China. PMID:26875599

  15. Theoretical effect of refractive error and accommodation on longitudinal chromatic aberration of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Atchison, D A; Smith, G; Waterworth, M D

    1993-09-01

    Simple formulas based on reduced eyes have been developed to predict the variation in longitudinal chromatic aberration with variation in ametropia or accommodation. Two formulas were developed, one for axial ametropia and one for refractive ametropia. The latter also served as a model for accommodation. The results using the formulas are in close agreement with results obtained using raytracing through more sophisticated models. Combining the results of different methods gives the following predictions of change in chromatic difference of focus, between wavelengths of 400 and 700 nm, with change in each diopter of refractive error or accommodation: axial ametropia 0.012 to 0.017 D (0.6 to 0.9%), refractive ametropia 0.05 D (2.2 to 2.4%), and accommodation 0.04 to 0.05 D (2.1 to 2.6%). The chromatic aberration effects of correcting lenses with low dispersion are intermediate in effect and opposite in sign to the effects of corresponding degrees of axial ametropia and refractive ametropia. PMID:8233365

  16. APLP2 Regulates Refractive Error and Myopia Development in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Thinakaran, Gopal; Williams, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is the most common vision disorder and the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. However, gene variants identified to date explain less than 10% of the variance in refractive error, leaving the majority of heritability unexplained (“missing heritability”). Previously, we reported that expression of APLP2 was strongly associated with myopia in a primate model. Here, we found that low-frequency variants near the 5’-end of APLP2 were associated with refractive error in a prospective UK birth cohort (n = 3,819 children; top SNP rs188663068, p = 5.0 × 10−4) and a CREAM consortium panel (n = 45,756 adults; top SNP rs7127037, p = 6.6 × 10−3). These variants showed evidence of differential effect on childhood longitudinal refractive error trajectories depending on time spent reading (gene x time spent reading x age interaction, p = 4.0 × 10−3). Furthermore, Aplp2 knockout mice developed high degrees of hyperopia (+11.5 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) compared to both heterozygous (-0.8 ± 2.0 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) and wild-type (+0.3 ± 2.2 D, p < 1.0 × 10−4) littermates and exhibited a dose-dependent reduction in susceptibility to environmentally induced myopia (F(2, 33) = 191.0, p < 1.0 × 10−4). This phenotype was associated with reduced contrast sensitivity (F(12, 120) = 3.6, p = 1.5 × 10−4) and changes in the electrophysiological properties of retinal amacrine cells, which expressed Aplp2. This work identifies APLP2 as one of the “missing” myopia genes, demonstrating the importance of a low-frequency gene variant in the development of human myopia. It also demonstrates an important role for APLP2 in refractive development in mice and humans, suggesting a high level of evolutionary conservation of the signaling pathways underlying refractive eye development. PMID:26313004

  17. Antioxidant supplementation increases retinal responses and decreases refractive error changes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hernandez, Jerome; Moore, Cecil; Jackson, Janet; Narfström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine whether a nutritional antioxidant supplementation could improve visual function in healthy dogs as measured by electroretinography (ERG) and autorefraction. A total of twelve Beagles, 6 to 8 years of age, with normal eyes upon indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp biomicroscopy, were age and sex matched and randomly assigned to receive a feeding regimen for 6 months with or without a daily antioxidant supplementation. Portable, mini-Ganzfeld ERG and a Welch Allyn hand-held autorefractor were used to test retinal response and refractive error in the dogs at baseline and at the end of the supplementation period. All ERG a-wave amplitudes obtained were increased in the treatment group compared with those of dogs in the control group, with significant improvements in the scotopic high and photopic single flash cone ERG responses (P < 0·05 for both). For the b-wave amplitudes, all responses were similarly increased, with significant improvements in responses for the scotopic high light intensity stimulation (P < 0·05), and for photopic single flash cone and 30 Hz flicker (P < 0·01 for both) recordings. Change in refractive error was significantly less in the treatment group compared with that of the control group during the 6-month study (P < 0·05). Compared with the control group, the antioxidant-supplemented group showed improvement to varying degrees for retinal function and significantly less decline in refractive error. Dogs, like humans, experience retinal and lens functional decline with age. Antioxidant supplementation as demonstrated may be beneficial and effective in the long-term preservation and improvement of various functions of the canine eye. PMID:27293555

  18. Refraction test

    MedlinePlus

    ... purpose is to determine whether you have a refractive error (a need for glasses or contact lenses). ... glasses or contact lenses) is normal, then the refractive error is zero (plano) and your vision should ...

  19. Anthropometry, Amplitude of Accommodation, and Spherical Equivalent Refractive Error in a Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Iyamu, Eghosasere; Iyamu, Joy Edoghogho; Oghovwerha, Liticia

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anthropometry, amplitude of accommodation assessed by minus-lens to blur (AAPUB) and push-up to blur (AAMLB), and spherical equivalent refraction (SEQ). Method. A total of two hundred and one subjects aged between 17 and 70 years with mean age of 34.2 ± 13.3 years, consisting of 93 males and 108 females were recruited for this study. Anthropometric variables were measured with standard instruments like the free-standing rod for height, weighing balance for body weight, and body mass index (BMI) calculated. The refractive error was measured by static retinoscopy and subjective refraction. Result. An inverse correlation was found between age, AAMLB and AAPUB (r = −0.84, −0.81, both P < 0.0001). BMI increased with age (r = 0.32, P < 0.0001). There was an inverse correlation between BMI, AAPUB and AAMLB (r = −0.27, −0.25, both P < 0.0001), respectively. However, the association between SEQ and anthropometry was not significant (P > 0.05). The AAPUB and AAMLB decreased with age while BMI increased. AAPUB and AAMLB decreased with BMI, but were not affected by the SEQ. Conclusion. BMI increased with age while AA measured by the two methods decreased with age, and BMI increased with decreasing AA. PMID:24527232

  20. Software-based compensation of visual refractive errors of computer users.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Miguel; Barreto, Armando; Choudhury, Maroof; Jacko, Julie A; Adjouadi, Malek

    2005-01-01

    For human beings, vision is one of the most important senses in interacting with the surrounding environment, as well as with any tools that require visual communication. As such, the ability to interact effectively with computers through typical graphic user interfaces (GUIs) is greatly affected by any refractive errors present in an individual's visual system. If the refractive errors can be mathematically modeled, a system for overcoming these aberrations can be devised which can increase the effective human-computer interaction for these individuals. Several methods, such as Adaptive Optics, have been proposed that attempt to solve this problem using electro-mechanical devices. These methods are costly and impractical, preventing most visually impaired individuals from benefiting from their use. In contrast, an image-processing method, based on deconvolution techniques, has recently been proposed for the pre-compensation of images to be displayed in a computer. This method is much more practical, being completely implemented in software, and has achieved encouraging results. Previous results have yielded an average 50% increase in visual efficiency in the compensation of a known artificial aberration introduced into the field of vision of experimental subjects. This paper describes the difficulties encountered with the present software-only compensation and proposes several methods for overcoming these obstacles. The difficulties, as well as the proposed solutions, are described theoretically and followed by examples using a lens system showing the improvement over previous methods. PMID:15850110

  1. Manual intrastromal corneal keratotomy: An alternate encouraging approach for refractive error correction

    PubMed Central

    Kodandapani, Saravana; Saravana, Sukanya

    2014-01-01

    Results of femtosecond based intrastromal astigmatic keratotomy have been reported to be encouraging for correction of Astigmatism. We report a new surgical technique-manual intrastromal corneal keratotomy (MICK) for correction of simple refractive astigmatism (−1.5 DC against the rule). The technique involves the creation of a 100 μm thickness corneal flap creation using Moria M2 evolution LSK MicroKeratome and 300 μm depth, 4 mm long manual transverse astigmatic keratotomy on both sides of the steep axis 3 mm from the pupillary center along with four incision peripheral radial keratotomy outside the optic zone (based on the mesopic pupil). The flap was repositioned and routine post-operative regimen was followed. Patient achieved 20/20 vision in both eyes post-operatively on the first day, which was maintained even at the 1 month follow-up. This simple technique could be useful as an alternative method for correction of refractive errors in patients not suitable for excimer and/or femtosecond laser treatment. PMID:24799800

  2. Ethnicity‐specific prevalences of refractive errors vary in Asian children in neighbouring Malaysia and Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Saw, S‐M; Goh, P‐P; Cheng, A; Shankar, A; Tan, D T H; Ellwein, L B

    2006-01-01

    Aim To compare the prevalences of refractive errors in Malay, Chinese and Indian children in Malaysia and Singapore. Methods Children aged 7–9 years from three schools in the Singapore Cohort study of the Risk factors for Myopia (n = 1962) and similarly aged children from a random cluster sample in the metropolitan Kuala Lumpur area in the Malaysia Refractive Error Study in Children (n = 1752) were compared. Cycloplegic autorefraction was conducted in both countries. Results The prevalence of myopia (spherical equivalent of at least −0.5 diopters (D) in either eye) was higher in Singapore Malays (22.1%) than in Malays in Malaysia (9.2%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.2 to 14.7; p<0.001). Similarly, Singapore Chinese (40.1%) had higher prevalences than Malaysian Chinese (30.9%; 95% CI 1.5 to 16.9). Singapore Indians had a higher prevalence (34.1%) than Malaysian Indians (12.5%; 95% CI 17.4 to 25.9). The multivariate odds ratio of astigmatism (cylinder at least 0.75 D in either eye) in Singapore Malays compared with Malaysian Malays was 3.47 (95% CI 2.79 to 4.32). Ethnicity‐specific hyperopia rates did not differ in Singapore and Malaysia. Conclusion The ethnicity‐specific prevalences of myopia in Singapore Malays, Chinese and Indians are higher than those in Malaysian Malays, Chinese and Indians. As Malays, Chinese and Indians in Malaysia have genetic make‐up similar to that of Malays, Chinese and Indians in Singapore, environmental factors may contribute to the higher myopia rates. PMID:16809384

  3. The effect of machining error on the diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long; Xue, Changxi; Yang, Hongfang; Nie, Xin

    2014-08-01

    According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the diffractive optical elements(DOEs), the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the tilt and decenter error in fabrication process was presented in this paper. Analysis results show, in the wavelength band of 501nm-554nm, the cycle of 500μm, the center wavelength of 521nm, when the tilt angleα increases form 0° to9.8° , the diffraction efficiency is above 99%; when the tilt angleα increases form 9.8° to 29.7° , diffraction efficiency is above 92.5%; when the tilt angleα is above 29.7° , the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the tilt angleα is above 58° . When the decenter Δ increases form 0nm to 21.6μm,the diffraction efficiency is above 98%; when the decenter Δ increases form 21.6nm to 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency is above 90%; when the decenter Δ is above 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the he decenter Δ is above 241.7μm. To sum up the results of analysis,mathematical analysis model of the relationship between the decenter and tilt error of diffractive optical element in processing and the diffraction efficiency can be used to guide the design of the refraction and diffractive hybrid optical system comprising the diffractive optical element.

  4. Genome-wide association study for refractive astigmatism reveals genetic co-determination with spherical equivalent refractive error: the CREAM consortium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wojciechowski, Robert; Simpson, Claire L; Hysi, Pirro G; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Hewitt, Alex W; Oexle, Konrad; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; MacGregor, Stuart; Pirastu, Mario; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; St Pourcain, Beaté; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Northstone, Kate; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Martin, Nicholas G; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Lu, Yi; Wang, Ya Xing; Hayward, Caroline; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Bencic, Goran; Wright, Alan F; Wedenoja, Juho; Zeller, Tanja; Schillert, Arne; Mirshahi, Alireza; Lackner, Karl; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Murgia, Federico; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart; Oostra, Ben A; Zhou, Xin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tai, E Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Barathi, Veluchamy; Zheng, Yingfeng; Siantar, Rosalynn Grace; Neelam, Kumari; Shin, Youchan; Lam, Janice; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Venturini, Cristina; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Meitinger, Thomas; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul N; Mackey, David A; Wong, Tien Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pärssinen, Olavi; Stambolian, Dwight; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Williams, Cathy; Paterson, Andrew D; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2015-02-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with refractive astigmatism in the general population, meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies were performed for: White Europeans aged at least 25 years (20 cohorts, N = 31,968); Asian subjects aged at least 25 years (7 cohorts, N = 9,295); White Europeans aged <25 years (4 cohorts, N = 5,640); and all independent individuals from the above three samples combined with a sample of Chinese subjects aged <25 years (N = 45,931). Participants were classified as cases with refractive astigmatism if the average cylinder power in their two eyes was at least 1.00 diopter and as controls otherwise. Genome-wide association analysis was carried out for each cohort separately using logistic regression. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. In the older European group the most strongly associated marker was downstream of the neurexin-1 (NRXN1) gene (rs1401327, P = 3.92E-8). No other region reached genome-wide significance, and association signals were lower for the younger European group and Asian group. In the meta-analysis of all cohorts, no marker reached genome-wide significance: The most strongly associated regions were, NRXN1 (rs1401327, P = 2.93E-07), TOX (rs7823467, P = 3.47E-07) and LINC00340 (rs12212674, P = 1.49E-06). For 34 markers identified in prior GWAS for spherical equivalent refractive error, the beta coefficients for genotype versus spherical equivalent, and genotype versus refractive astigmatism, were highly correlated (r = -0.59, P = 2.10E-04). This work revealed no consistent or strong genetic signals for refractive astigmatism; however, the TOX gene region previously identified in GWAS for spherical equivalent refractive error was the second most strongly associated region. Analysis of additional markers provided evidence supporting widespread genetic co-susceptibility for spherical and astigmatic refractive errors. PMID:25367360

  5. Preliminary error budget for the reflected solar instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.; Gubbels, T.; Barnes, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI-traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables. The instrument suite includes emitted infrared spectrometers, global navigation receivers for radio occultation, and reflected solar spectrometers. The measurements will be acquired for a period of five years and will enable follow-on missions to extend the climate record over the decades needed to understand climate change. This work describes a preliminary error budget for the RS sensor. The RS sensor will retrieve at-sensor reflectance over the spectral range from 320 to 2300 nm with 500-m GIFOV and a 100-km swath width. The current design is based on an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of radiance while viewing the earth's surface to measurements of irradiance while viewing the sun. The requirement for the RS instrument is that the reflectance must be traceable to SI standards at an absolute uncertainty <0.3%. The calibration approach to achieve the ambitious 0.3% absolute calibration uncertainty is predicated on a reliance on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, and adherence to detector-based calibration standards. The design above has been used to develop a preliminary error budget that meets the 0.3% absolute requirement. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and

  6. Frequency and Distribution of Refractive Error in Adult Life: Methodology and Findings of the UK Biobank Study

    PubMed Central

    Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Bao, Yanchun; Hysi, Pirro G.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the methodology and findings of a large scale investigation of burden and distribution of refractive error, from a contemporary and ethnically diverse study of health and disease in adults, in the UK. Methods U K Biobank, a unique contemporary resource for the study of health and disease, recruited more than half a million people aged 40–69 years. A subsample of 107,452 subjects undertook an enhanced ophthalmic examination which provided autorefraction data (a measure of refractive error). Refractive error status was categorised using the mean spherical equivalent refraction measure. Information on socio-demographic factors (age, gender, ethnicity, educational qualifications and accommodation tenure) was reported at the time of recruitment by questionnaire and face-to-face interview. Results Fifty four percent of participants aged 40–69 years had refractive error. Specifically 27% had myopia (4% high myopia), which was more common amongst younger people, those of higher socio-economic status, higher educational attainment, or of White or Chinese ethnicity. The frequency of hypermetropia increased with age (7% at 40–44 years increasing to 46% at 65–69 years), was higher in women and its severity was associated with ethnicity (moderate or high hypermetropia at least 30% less likely in non-White ethnic groups compared to White). Conclusions Refractive error is a significant public health issue for the UK and this study provides contemporary data on adults for planning services, health economic modelling and monitoring of secular trends. Further investigation of risk factors is necessary to inform strategies for prevention. There is scope to do this through the planned longitudinal extension of the UK Biobank study. PMID:26430771

  7. Refractive errors and corrections for OCT images in an inflated lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Golabchi, Ali; Faust, J.; Golabchi, F. N.; Brooks, D. H.; Gouldstone, A.; DiMarzio, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Visualization and correct assessment of alveolar volume via intact lung imaging is important to study and assess respiratory mechanics. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a real-time imaging technique based on near-infrared interferometry, can image several layers of distal alveoli in intact, ex vivo lung tissue. However optical effects associated with heterogeneity of lung tissue, including the refraction caused by air-tissue interfaces along alveoli and duct walls, and changes in speed of light as it travels through the tissue, result in inaccurate measurement of alveolar volume. Experimentally such errors have been difficult to analyze because of lack of ’ground truth,’ as the lung has a unique microstructure of liquid-coated thin walls surrounding relatively large airspaces, which is difficult to model with cellular foams. In addition, both lung and foams contain airspaces of highly irregular shape, further complicating quantitative measurement of optical artifacts and correction. To address this we have adapted the Bragg-Nye bubble raft, a crystalline two-dimensional arrangement of elements similar in geometry to alveoli (up to several hundred μm in diameter with thin walls) as an inflated lung phantom in order to understand, analyze and correct these errors. By applying exact optical ray tracing on OCT images of the bubble raft, the errors are predicted and corrected. The results are validated by imaging the bubble raft with OCT from one edge and with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera in transillumination from top, providing ground truth for the OCT. PMID:22567599

  8. Racial Variations in the Prevalence of Refractive Errors in the United States: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    PAN, CHEN-WEI; KLEIN, BARBARA E.K.; COTCH, MARY FRANCES; SHRAGER, SANDI; KLEIN, RONALD; FOLSOM, AARON; KRONMAL, RICHARD; SHEA, STEVEN J.; BURKE, GREGORY L.; SAW, SEANG-MEI; WONG, TIEN Y.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe racial variations in the prevalence of refractive errors among adult white, Chinese, Hispanic, and black subjects in the United States. DESIGN Cross-sectional data from a prospective cohort study—the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). METHODS A total of 6000 adults aged 45 to 84 years living in the United States participated in the study. Refractive error was assessed, without cycloplegia, in both eyes of all participants using an autorefractor. After excluding eyes with cataract, cataract surgery, or previous refractive surgery, the eye with the larger absolute spherical equivalent (SE) value for each participant was used to classify refractive error. Any myopia was defined as SE of −1.0 diopters (D) or less; high myopia was defined as SE of −5.0 D or less; any hyperopia was defined as SE of +1.0 D or more; clinically significant hyperopia was defined as SE of +3.0 D or more. Astigmatism was defined as a cylinder value of +1.0 D or more. RESULTS After excluding 508 participants with cataracts in both eyes, 838 participants with cataract surgery, 90 participants with laser refractive surgery, and 134 participants who refused to remove their contact lenses for the refraction measurement, 4430 adults with refractive error assessment in at least 1 eye contributed to the analysis. The prevalence of myopia among MESA participants was 25.1%, with lowest rates in Hispanic participants (14.2%), followed by black (21.5%) and white participants (31.0%), and highest rates in Chinese participants (37.2%). The overall rates of high myopia and astigmatism were 4.6% and 45.0%, respectively, with Chinese subjects also having the highest rates of high myopia (11.8%) and astigmatism (53.4%). The overall prevalence of any hyperopia was 38.2% and clinically significant hyperopia was 6.1%, with Hispanic participants having the highest rates of hyperopia (50.2%) and clinically significant hyperopia (8.8%). In multivariate analyses adjusting for age

  9. Is Emmetropia the Natural Endpoint for Human Refractive Development? An Analysis of Population-based Data from the Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC)

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ian G.; Rose, Kathryn A.; Ellwein, Leon B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the natural end-point for refractive development during childhood. Methods Cycloplegic (1% cyclopentolate) autorefraction was performed on 38,811 children aged 5 and 15 in population-based samples at eight sites in the Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC). Refractions (right eye) were categorized as myopic (≤ −0.5D), emmetropic (> −0.5D to ≤ +0.5D), mildly hyperopic (> +0.5D to ≤ +2.0D and hyperopic (> +2.0D). Results At 5 sites (Jhapa – rural Nepal, New Delhi -urban India, Mahabubnagar - rural India, Durban - semi-urban South Africa, and La Florida – urban Chile), there was <20% myopia by age 15. Mild hyperopia was the most prevalent category at all ages, except for Mahabubnagar where emmetropia became the marginally most prevalent category at ages 14 and 15. At the other sites (Gombak – semi-urban Malaysia, Shunyi – semi-rural China, and Guangzhou - urban China) there was substantial (>35%) myopia by age 15. At these sites, mild hyperopia was the most prevalent category during early childhood, and myopia became the predominant category later. In Gombak district and Guangzhou, emmetropia was a minor category at all ages, with myopia increasing as mild hyperopia decreased. In Shunyi district, emmetropia was the most prevalent category over the ages 11-14. Conclusion Emmetropia was not the predominant outcome for refractive development in children. Instead, populations were either predominantly mildly hyperopic, or substantial amounts of myopia appeared. This suggests that mild hyperopia is the natural state of refractive development in children, and that emmetropia during childhood carries the risk of subsequent progression to myopia. PMID:19958289

  10. Influence of the prediction error of the first eye undergoing cataract surgery on the refractive outcome of the fellow eye

    PubMed Central

    Gorodezky, Ludmilla; Mazinani, Babac AE; Plange, Niklas; Walter, Peter; Wenzel, Martin; Roessler, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to measurement errors, individual anatomical conditions could be made responsible for unexpected prediction errors in the determination of the correct intraocular lens power for cataract surgery. Obviously, such anatomical conditions might be relevant for both eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the postoperative refractive error of the first eye has to be taken in account for the biometry of the second. Methods In this retrospective study, we included 670 eyes of 335 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and implantation of a foldable intraocular lens in both eyes. According to the SRK/T formula, the postoperative refractive error of each eye was determined and compared with its fellow eye. Results Of 670 eyes, 622 showed a postoperative refractive error within ±1.0 D (93%), whereas the prediction error was 0.5 D or less in 491 eyes (73%). The postoperative difference between both eyes was within 0.5 D in 71% and within 1.0 D in 93% of the eyes. Comparing the prediction error of an eye and its fellow eye, the error of the fellow eye was about half the value of the other. Conclusion Our results imply that substitution of half of the prediction error of the first eye into the calculation of the second eye may be useful to reduce the prediction error in the second eye. However, prospective studies should be initiated to demonstrate an improved accuracy for the second eye’s intraocular lens power calculation by partial adjustment. PMID:25382967

  11. Compensation of X-ray mirror shape-errors using refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Kawal; Laundy, David; Dhamgaye, Vishal; Pape, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Focusing of X-rays to nanometre scale focal spots requires high precision X-ray optics. For nano-focusing mirrors, height errors in the mirror surface retard or advance the X-ray wavefront and after propagation to the focal plane, this distortion of the wavefront causes blurring of the focus resulting in a limit on the spatial resolution. We describe here the implementation of a method for correcting the wavefront that is applied before a focusing mirror using custom-designed refracting structures which locally cancel out the wavefront distortion from the mirror. We demonstrate in measurements on a synchrotron radiation beamline a reduction in the size of the focal spot of a characterized test mirror by a factor of greater than 10 times. This technique could be used to correct existing synchrotron beamline focusing and nanofocusing optics providing a highly stable wavefront with low distortion for obtaining smaller focus sizes. This method could also correct multilayer or focusing crystal optics allowing larger numerical apertures to be used in order to reduce the diffraction limited focal spot size.

  12. Exploration and detection of potential regulatory variants in refractive error GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xuan; Lan, ChangJun; Liao, Dan; Tian, Jing; Huang, XiuQi

    2016-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex multifactorial disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided significant insight into the genetic architecture and identified plenty of robust genetic variations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex disease. A major current challenge is to convert those resources into causal variants and target genes. We used RegulomeDB and HaploReg to annotate regulatory information onto associated SNPs derived from the two largest RE GWAS, and additional SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with GWAS significant SNPs. Overall 868 SNPs were investigated, out of which 662 returned RegulomeDB scores of 1 to 6. It was observed that 36 out of those SNPs show strong evidence of regulatory effects with a RegulomeDB score of 1, while only four of them were GWAS significant SNPs (CD55/rs1652333, CNDP2/rs12971120, RDH5/rs3138142 and rs3138144). The results encourage us to explore those putative pathogenic variants, both GWAS significant SNPs as well as the SNPs in LD, for future discernment of functional consequence. This study offers the attractive approach for prioritizing potential functional variants by combining ENCODE data and GWAS information, and provide further insights into the pathogenesis and mechanism and ultimately therapeutics. PMID:27604318

  13. Exploration and detection of potential regulatory variants in refractive error GWAS.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xuan; Lan, ChangJun; Liao, Dan; Tian, Jing; Huang, XiuQi

    2016-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex multifactorial disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided significant insight into the genetic architecture and identified plenty of robust genetic variations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex disease. A major current challenge is to convert those resources into causal variants and target genes. We used RegulomeDB and HaploReg to annotate regulatory information onto associated SNPs derived from the two largest RE GWAS, and additional SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with GWAS significant SNPs. Overall 868 SNPs were investigated, out of which 662 returned RegulomeDB scores of 1 to 6. It was observed that 36 out of those SNPs show strong evidence of regulatory effects with a RegulomeDB score of 1, while only four of them were GWAS significant SNPs (CD55/rs1652333, CNDP2/rs12971120, RDH5/rs3138142 and rs3138144). The results encourage us to explore those putative pathogenic variants, both GWAS significant SNPs as well as the SNPs in LD, for future discernment of functional consequence. This study offers the attractive approach for prioritizing potential functional variants by combining ENCODE data and GWAS information, and provide further insights into the pathogenesis and mechanism and ultimately therapeutics. PMID:27604318

  14. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  15. Refractive Results: Safety and Efficacy of Secondary Piggyback Sensar™ AR40 Intraocular Lens Implantation to Correct Pseudophakic Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Alahmady Hamad Alsmman; Sayed, Khulood M.; ElAgooz, Mohammed; Elhawary, Ashraf Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the visual outcomes, safety, efficacy, and stability of implanting of second sulcus intraocular lens (IOL) to correct unsatisfied ametropic patients after phacoemulsification. Methods. Retrospective study of 15 eyes (15 patients) underwent secondary intraocular lens implanted into the ciliary sulcus. The IOL used was a Sensar IOL three-piece foldable hydrophobic acrylic IOL. The first IOL in all patients was acrylic intrabagal IOL implanted in uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery. Results. Fifteen eyes (15 patients) were involved in this study. Preoperatively, mean log⁡MAR UDVA and CDVA were 0.88 ± 0.22 and 0.19 ± 0.13, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 28 months (range: 24 to 36 months). At the end of the follow-up, all eyes achieved log⁡MAR UDVA of 0.20 ± 0.12 with postoperative refraction ranging from 0.00 to −0.50 D of attempted emmetropia. Conclusions. Implantation of the second sulcus SensarAR40 IOL was found to be safe, easy, and simple technique for management of ametropia following uncomplicated phacoemulsification. PMID:27313869

  16. Preliminary Error Budget for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Gubbels, Timothy; Barnes, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements. The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change projections such as those in the IPCC Report. A rigorously known accuracy of both decadal change observations as well as climate projections is critical in order to enable sound policy decisions. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables, including: 1) Surface temperature and atmospheric temperature profile 2) Atmospheric water vapor profile 3) Far infrared water vapor greenhouse 4) Aerosol properties and anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing 5) Total and spectral solar

  17. Psychometric properties of the national eye institute refractive error correction quality-of-life questionnaire among Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Zeidi, Isa Mohammadi; Saffari, Mohsen; Labiris, Georgios; Fridlund, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the national Eye Institute refractive error correction quality of life questionnaire (NEI-RQL-42) among Iranian patients with refractive errors. Materials and Methods: Two samples of patients (n1 = 296, n2 = 95) were consecutively selected from the eye clinic of the Boo-Ali Hospital, Qazvin. A forward-backward procedure was conducted to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Iranian version of the NEI-RQL-42. A homogeneity, stability, and reliability test was conducted for the first sample after a two-week interval. Convergent validity was computed using the correlation between the NEI-RQL-42 subscale scores, National Eye Institute-Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ-25), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Furthermore, Known-group analysis was performed, to determine the discriminant validity between the subgroups of patients with hyperopia, emmetropia, and myopia. Responsiveness to clinical change was tested by administering NEI-RQL-42 on the second sample that was scheduled for surgery. Results: Homogeneity was satisfactory with the Cronbach’s alpha coefficients ranging between 0.70 and 0.92. The 13 subscales of the NEI-RQL-42 showed a considerable stability in intra-class-correlation (ICC) ranging between 0.70 and 0.89. Positive correlation coefficients were found among all subscales of the NEI-RQL-42 and the other quality-of-life instruments (NEI-VFQ-25 and SF-36). The NEI-VFQ-25 displayed excellent discriminant validity to differentiate the subgroups of patients, and was found to be responsive to change after the surgical correction at three months. Conclusions: The Iranian version of the NEI-RQL-42 is a valid and reliable instrument to assess refractive error correction quality-of-life in Iranian patients. Moreover this questionnaire can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in patients with refractive errors. PMID:23772124

  18. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hysi, Pirro G; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; MacGregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Pourcain, Beate St; Simpson, Claire L; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W H; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ong, Rick T; Döring, Angela; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Verkerk, Annemieke J M H; Meitinger, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli; Hawthorne, Felicia; Spector, Tim D; Karssen, Lennart C; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Ang, Wei; Mishra, Aniket; Montgomery, Grant W; Pennell, Craig E; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Schache, Maria; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily; Iyengar, Sudha K; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Polasek, Ozren; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Zeller, Tanja; Mirshahi, Alireza; Müller, Christian; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Amin, Najaf; Bergen, Arthur A B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Vitart, Veronique; Williams, Cathy; Baird, Paul N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Young, Terri L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight; Klaver, Caroline C; Hammond, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide and is a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses, including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry and 8,376 from 5 Asian cohorts. We identified 16 new loci for refractive error in individuals of European ancestry, of which 8 were shared with Asians. Combined analysis identified 8 additional associated loci. The new loci include candidate genes with functions in neurotransmission (GRIA4), ion transport (KCNQ5), retinoic acid metabolism (RDH5), extracellular matrix remodeling (LAMA2 and BMP2) and eye development (SIX6 and PRSS56). We also confirmed previously reported associations with GJD2 and RASGRF1. Risk score analysis using associated SNPs showed a tenfold increased risk of myopia for individuals carrying the highest genetic load. Our results, based on a large meta-analysis across independent multiancestry studies, considerably advance understanding of the mechanisms involved in refractive error and myopia. PMID:23396134

  19. Analysis of the effects of Eye-Tracker performance on the pulse positioning errors during refractive surgery☆

    PubMed Central

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Aslanides, Ioannis M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the effects of Eye-Tracker performance on the pulse positioning errors during refractive surgery. Methods A comprehensive model, which directly considers eye movements, including saccades, vestibular, optokinetic, vergence, and miniature, as well as, eye-tracker acquisition rate, eye-tracker latency time, scanner positioning time, laser firing rate, and laser trigger delay have been developed. Results Eye-tracker acquisition rates below 100 Hz correspond to pulse positioning errors above 1.5 mm. Eye-tracker latency times to about 15 ms correspond to pulse positioning errors of up to 3.5 mm. Scanner positioning times to about 9 ms correspond to pulse positioning errors of up to 2 mm. Laser firing rates faster than eye-tracker acquisition rates basically duplicate pulse-positioning errors. Laser trigger delays to about 300 μs have minor to no impact on pulse-positioning errors. Conclusions The proposed model can be used for comparison of laser systems used for ablation processes. Due to the pseudo-random nature of eye movements, positioning errors of single pulses are much larger than observed decentrations in the clinical settings. There is no single parameter that ‘alone’ minimizes the positioning error. It is the optimal combination of the several parameters that minimizes the error. The results of this analysis are important to understand the limitations of correcting very irregular ablation patterns.

  20. Refractive Error and Ocular Parameters: Comparison of Two SD-OCT Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ostrin, Lisa A.; Yuzuriha, Jill; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to examine the influence of refractive error (RE) on foveal retinal and choroidal thicknesses and scleral canal width (SCW). The performance of the Cirrus and Bioptigen SD-OCT instruments was compared in the same eyes. Methods Both eyes of forty healthy human subjects, ages 22 to 38 years, were dilated and imaged, with the Cirrus OCT, using 6 mm 5-line rasters collapsed into one line, one centered on the fovea and one bisecting the optic nerve head. Seventy-two of the same eyes were imaged with the Bioptigen OCT, using 6 mm × 6 mm scans, one centered on the fovea and one on the optic nerve head. Subfoveal retinal and choroidal thicknesses and SCW were measured. Axial lengths (AL) and REs were obtained using an IOLMaster and a Grand Seiko autorefractor, respectively. Results Only right eyes were included in analyses. Spherical equivalent REs ranged from −12.18 to +8.12 D (mean: −3.44 ± 4.06 D), and ALs ranged from 20.56 to 29.17 mm (mean: 24.86 ± 1.91 mm). Myopia was associated with relatively thin choroids at the fovea (p<0.05) but normal retinal thickness. SCW was significantly correlated with AL as measured with the Bioptigen OCT (p<0.05). Retinal and choroidal thicknesses recorded with the Bioptigen OCT tended to be smaller than values obtained with the Cirrus OCT (mean difference: 5.63 and 24.76 µm, respectively), while the converse was true for the SCW (mean difference: 25.45 µm). Conclusions The finding that high myopes tend to have a thinner subfoveal choroid is consistent with previous studies. That high myopia was linked to enlarged scleral canals may help to explain the increased risk of glaucoma in myopia. Observed differences obtained with the Cirrus and Bioptigen instruments urge caution in comparing results collected with different instruments. PMID:25785537

  1. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  2. Nine loci for ocular axial length identified through genome-wide association studies, including shared loci with refractive error.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M Kamran; Young, Terri L; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Montgomery, Grant W; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Wilson, James F; Pennell, Craig E; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Vingerling, Johannes R; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Iyengar, Sudha K; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily Y; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N

    2013-08-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  3. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  4. Assessing the Accuracy and Feasibility of a Refractive Error Screening Program Conducted by School Teachers in Pre-Primary and Primary Schools in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Teerawattananon, Kanlaya; Myint, Chaw-Yin; Wongkittirux, Kwanjai; Teerawattananon, Yot; Chinkulkitnivat, Bunyong; Orprayoon, Surapong; Kusakul, Suwat; Tengtrisorn, Supaporn; Jenchitr, Watanee

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As part of the development of a system for the screening of refractive error in Thai children, this study describes the accuracy and feasibility of establishing a program conducted by teachers. Objective To assess the accuracy and feasibility of screening by teachers. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive and analytical study was conducted in 17 schools in four provinces representing four geographic regions in Thailand. A two-staged cluster sampling was employed to compare the detection rate of refractive error among eligible students between trained teachers and health professionals. Serial focus group discussions were held for teachers and parents in order to understand their attitude towards refractive error screening at schools and the potential success factors and barriers. Results The detection rate of refractive error screening by teachers among pre-primary school children is relatively low (21%) for mild visual impairment but higher for moderate visual impairment (44%). The detection rate for primary school children is high for both levels of visual impairment (52% for mild and 74% for moderate). The focus group discussions reveal that both teachers and parents would benefit from further education regarding refractive errors and that the vast majority of teachers are willing to conduct a school-based screening program. Conclusion Refractive error screening by health professionals in pre-primary and primary school children is not currently implemented in Thailand due to resource limitations. However, evidence suggests that a refractive error screening program conducted in schools by teachers in the country is reasonable and feasible because the detection and treatment of refractive error in very young generations is important and the screening program can be implemented and conducted with relatively low costs. PMID:24926993

  5. Visual acuity and associated factors. The Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B; Sinha, Ajit; Gupta, Rajesh; Agarwal, Shubhra

    2011-01-01

    Visual acuity is a major parameter for quality of vision and quality of life. Information on visual acuity and its associated factors in rural societies almost untouched by any industrialization is mostly non-available. It was, therefore, the purpose of our study to determine the distribution of visual acuity and its associated factors in a rural population not marked influenced by modern lifestyle. The population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study included 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years), who underwent a detailed ophthalmologic examination including visual acuity measurement. Visual acuity measurements were available for 4706 subjects with a mean age of 49.5±13.4 years (range: 30-100 years). BCVA decreased significantly (P<0.001) from the moderately hyperopic group (0.08±0.15 logMAR) to the emmetropic group (0.16±0.52 logMAR), the moderately myopic group (0.28±0.33 logMAR), the highly hyperopic group (0.66±0.62 logMAR) and finally the highly myopic group (1.32±0.92 logMAR). In multivariate analysis, BCVA was significantly associated with the systemic parameters of lower age (P<0.001), higher level of education (P<0.001), higher body stature (P<0.001) and higher body mass index (P<0.001), and with the ophthalmic parameters of more hyperopic refractive error (spherical equivalent) (P<0.001), shorter axial length (P<0.001), lower degree of nuclear cataract (P<0.001), and lower intraocular pressure (P = 0.006). The results suggest that in the rural population of Central India, major determinants of visual acuity were socioeconomic background, body stature and body mass index, age, refractive error, cataract and intraocular pressure. PMID:21829503

  6. Refractive Error and Risk of Early or Late Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Wang, JiWen; Zhong, XiaoJing; Tian, Zhen; Wu, Peipei; Zhao, Wenbo; Jin, Chenjin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize relevant evidence investigating the associations between refractive error and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched Medline, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases as well as the reference lists of retrieved articles to identify studies that met the inclusion criteria. Extracted data were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. Studies that were pertinent to our topic but did not meet the criteria for quantitative analysis were reported in a systematic review instead. Main outcome measures Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between refractive error (hyperopia, myopia, per-diopter increase in spherical equivalent [SE] toward hyperopia, per-millimeter increase in axial length [AL]) and AMD (early and late, prevalent and incident). Results Fourteen studies comprising over 5800 patients were eligible. Significant associations were found between hyperopia, myopia, per-diopter increase in SE, per-millimeter increase in AL, and prevalent early AMD. The pooled ORs and 95% CIs were 1.13 (1.06–1.20), 0.75 (0.56–0.94), 1.10 (1.07–1.14), and 0.79 (0.73–0.85), respectively. The per-diopter increase in SE was also significantly associated with early AMD incidence (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02–1.10). However, no significant association was found between hyperopia or myopia and early AMD incidence. Furthermore, neither prevalent nor incident late AMD was associated with refractive error. Considerable heterogeneity was found among studies investigating the association between myopia and prevalent early AMD (P = 0.001, I2 = 72.2%). Geographic location might play a role; the heterogeneity became non-significant after stratifying these studies into Asian and non-Asian subgroups. Conclusion Refractive error is associated with early AMD but not with late AMD. More large-scale longitudinal studies are needed to further investigate such

  7. Development of Refractive Error in Individual Children With Regressed Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyun; Ren, Xiaowei; Shen, Li; Yanni, Susan E.; Leffler, Joel N.; Birch, Eileen E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated longitudinally the refraction development in children with regressed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), including those with and those without a history of peripheral retinal laser photocoagulation. Methods. Longitudinal (0–7 years) cycloplegic refraction data were collected prospectively for two groups of preterm children: severe ROP group included those with regressed ROP following bilateral panretinal laser photocoagulation (n = 37; median gestational age [GA] = 25.2; range, 22.7–27.9 weeks) and mild/no ROP group included those with spontaneously regressed ROP or no ROP (n = 27; median GA = 27.1; range, 23.1–32.0 weeks). Analyses were based on spherical equivalent (SEQ), anisometropia, astigmatism, and age (corrected for gestation). Results. The prevalence, magnitude, and rate of myopic progression all were significantly higher in the severe ROP group than in the mild/no ROP group. Longitudinal SEQ in the severe ROP group were best fit with a bilinear model. Before 1.3 years old, the rate of myopic shift was −4.7 diopters (D)/y; after 1.3 years, the rate slowed to −0.15 D/y. Longitudinal SEQ in the mild/no ROP group was best fit with a linear model, with a rate of −0.004 D/y. Anisometropia in the severe ROP group increased approximately three times faster than in the mild/no ROP group. In the severe ROP group, with-the-rule astigmatism increased significantly with age. Conclusions. The severe ROP group progressed rapidly toward myopia, particularly during the first 1.3 years; anisometropia and astigmatism also increased with age. The mild/no ROP group showed little change in refraction. Infants treated with laser photocoagulation for severe ROP should be monitored with periodic cycloplegic refractions and provided with early optical correction. PMID:23920368

  8. Visual acuity test

    MedlinePlus

    Eye test -- acuity; Vision test -- acuity; Snellen test ... from your face. This will test your near vision. ... examination, particularly if there is a change in vision or a problem with vision. In children, the ...

  9. Meta-analysis of gene–environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W.; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E.; Williams, Katie M.; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M.; Simpson, Claire L.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S.; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M. Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E. H.; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W.; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N.; Foster, Paul J.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A.; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G.; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O.; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L.; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L.; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10−5), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  10. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  11. The Contributions of Near Work and Outdoor Activity to the Correlation Between Siblings in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Graham, Nicholas D.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined the correlation between sibling refractive errors adjusted for shared and unique environmental factors using data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Methods. Refractive error from subjects' last study visits was used to estimate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between siblings. The correlation models used environmental factors (diopter-hours and outdoor/sports activity) assessed annually from parents by survey to adjust for shared and unique environmental exposures when estimating the heritability of refractive error (2*ICC). Results. Data from 700 families contributed to the between-sibling correlation for spherical equivalent refractive error. The mean age of the children at the last visit was 13.3 ± 0.90 years. Siblings engaged in similar amounts of near and outdoor activities (correlations ranged from 0.40–0.76). The ICC for spherical equivalent, controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, and site was 0.367 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.304, 0.420), with an estimated heritability of no more than 0.733. After controlling for these variables, and near and outdoor/sports activities, the resulting ICC was 0.364 (95% CI = 0.304, 0.420; estimated heritability no more than 0.728, 95% CI = 0.608, 0.850). The ICCs did not differ significantly between male–female and single sex pairs. Conclusions. Adjusting for shared family and unique, child-specific environmental factors only reduced the estimate of refractive error correlation between siblings by 0.5%. Consistent with a lack of association between myopia progression and either near work or outdoor/sports activity, substantial common environmental exposures had little effect on this correlation. Genetic effects appear to have the major role in determining the similarity of refractive error between siblings. PMID:25205866

  12. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  13. Preschool visual acuity screening tests.

    PubMed Central

    Friendly, D S

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative merits of two screening tests used for visual acuity assessment of preschool children. The tests that were compared were the Good-Lite Company versions of the E-Test and of the STYCAR (Screening Test for Young Children and Retardates). The former is the most popular method for evaluating central acuity in young children in this nation; the STYCAR is a relatively new letter-matching-test developed in England, where it is widely employed. The E-Test poses left-right orientation problems which are eliminated by the symmetrical letters H, T, O and V utilized in the Letter-Matching-Test. Both visual acuity tests were administered on two separate occasions by personnel from the Prevention of Blindness Society of Metropolitan Washington to 633 preschool children in Washington, D.C. By random selection, 150 of the children received the E-Test at both sessions, 162 children received the Letter-Matching-Test at both sessions, 160 chilt athe the second session, and 161 children received the Letter-Matching-Test at the first session and the E-Test at the second session. The author medically examined the eyes of 408 of the 633 children without knowledge of which test had been initially administered. Statistical analysis of the data obtained from the study indicated that the Letter-Matching-Test was significantly better in terms of testability rates, group and individual instruction time, and performance time. The E-Test was more reliable in terms of test-retest acuity scores and was also more valid in terms of agreement between pass-fail results obtained at the first screening session and two levels of pass-fail refraction criteria. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B PMID:754379

  14. A comparison of visual acuity, predictability, and visual function outcomes after intracorneal ring segments and laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, B G; Twa, M D; Ruckhofer, J; Schanzlin, D J

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare correction of low myopia by intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS) and by laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with respect to early visual recovery and refractive outcomes. METHODS: Eighty-two eyes implanted with ICRS in a phase III study for US Food and Drug Administration review were matched with 133 eyes treated with LASIK by criteria of age (> 18 years, < 65 years), preoperative myopia (-1.00 to -3.50 diopters [D]), astigmatism (< or = 1.00 D), single treatment, and attempted full correction. Examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at days 1 and 7 and months 1 and 3. Visual acuity and manifest refraction data were collected retrospectively. Visual function scores were assigned, and summarized results were compared. RESULTS: Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 or better at day 1 in 24% of eyes (20/82) after ICRS and in 55% of eyes (73/133) after LASIK, and at month 3 in 75% of eyes (58/77) after ICRS and in 67% of eyes (84/126) after LASIK. Spherical equivalent refraction at month 3 was within +/- 1.00 D of intended correction in 99% of eyes (76/77) after ICRS and in 96% of eyes (121/126) after LASIK. Excellent visual function scores were noted at month 3 in 90% of eyes (69/77) after ICRS and in 78% of eyes (98/126) after LASIK. CONCLUSION: Patients treated with LASIK showed better uncorrected visual acuity immediately following surgery; however, beyond 1 month, patients treated with ICRS achieved better uncorrected visual acuity that continued to improve with time. Visual function scores indicate that ICRS eyes see at higher levels of uncorrected visual acuity than LASIK eyes do with the same refractive error. The ICRS and LASIK were comparable in the correction of mild myopia. PMID:11190040

  15. Error budget for a calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument for the climate absolute radiance and refractivity observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  16. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  17. Comparative Study of Refractive Errors, Strabismus, Microsaccades, and Visual Perception Between Preterm and Full-Term Children With Infantile Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Kozeis, Nikolaos; Panos, Georgios D; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I; de Gottrau, Philippe; Gatzioufas, Zisis

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the refractive status, orthoptic status and visual perception in a group of preterm and another of full-term children with cerebral palsy, in order to investigate whether prematurity has an effect on the development of refractive errors and binocular disorders. A hundred school-aged children, 70 preterm and 30 full-term, with congenital cerebral palsy were examined. Differences for hypermetropia, myopia, and emmetropia were not statistically significant between the 2 groups. Astigmatism was significantly increased in the preterm group. The orthoptic status was similar for both groups. Visual perception was markedly reduced in both groups, but the differences were not significant. In conclusion, children with cerebral palsy have impaired visual skills, leading to reading difficulties. The presence of prematurity does not appear to represent an additional risk factor for the development of refractive errors and binocular disorders. PMID:25296927

  18. Accuracy of Noncycloplegic Retinoscopy, Retinomax Autorefractor, and SureSight Vision Screener for Detecting Significant Refractive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Ying, Gui-shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen; Quinn, Graham; Ciner, Elise B.; Cyert, Lynn A.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah A.; Moore, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate, by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the ability of noncycloplegic retinoscopy (NCR), Retinomax Autorefractor (Retinomax), and SureSight Vision Screener (SureSight) to detect significant refractive errors (RE) among preschoolers. Methods. Refraction results of eye care professionals using NCR, Retinomax, and SureSight (n = 2588) and of nurse and lay screeners using Retinomax and SureSight (n = 1452) were compared with masked cycloplegic retinoscopy results. Significant RE was defined as hyperopia greater than +3.25 diopters (D), myopia greater than 2.00 D, astigmatism greater than 1.50 D, and anisometropia greater than 1.00 D interocular difference in hyperopia, greater than 3.00 D interocular difference in myopia, or greater than 1.50 D interocular difference in astigmatism. The ability of each screening test to identify presence, type, and/or severity of significant RE was summarized by the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and calculated from weighted logistic regression models. Results. For detection of each type of significant RE, AUC of each test was high; AUC was better for detecting the most severe levels of RE than for all REs considered important to detect (AUC 0.97–1.00 vs. 0.92–0.93). The area under the curve of each screening test was high for myopia (AUC 0.97–0.99). Noncycloplegic retinoscopy and Retinomax performed better than SureSight for hyperopia (AUC 0.92–0.99 and 0.90–0.98 vs. 0.85–0.94, P ≤ 0.02), Retinomax performed better than NCR for astigmatism greater than 1.50 D (AUC 0.95 vs. 0.90, P = 0.01), and SureSight performed better than Retinomax for anisometropia (AUC 0.85–1.00 vs. 0.76–0.96, P ≤ 0.07). Performance was similar for nurse and lay screeners in detecting any significant RE (AUC 0.92–1.00 vs. 0.92–0.99). Conclusions. Each test had a very high discriminatory power for detecting children with any significant RE. PMID:24481262

  19. The measurement of patient-reported outcomes of refractive surgery: the refractive status and vision profile.

    PubMed Central

    Schein, O D

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a questionnaire, the Refractive Status and Vision Profile (RSVP), to assess health-related quality of life associated with refractive error and its correction. METHODS: The published literature on patient report of visual and overall function was reviewed, and the RSVP was self-administered by 550 participants with refractive error. Cross-sectional validation was performed using standard psychometric techniques. The responsiveness of the RSVP to surgical intervention was assessed prospectively in a subset of 176 patients. The principal outcomes measures were scores on the overall RSVP scale (S) and on 8 RSVP subscales (functioning, driving, concern, expectations, symptoms, glare, optical problems, problems with corrective lenses). RESULTS: The RSVP (S) and its subscales demonstrated very good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.70-0.93). S and several subscale scores were independently associated with satisfaction with vision and were more correlated with satisfaction with vision than with either visual acuity or refractive error. Higher refractive error was associated with lower scores on S and on 5 subscales. In the prospective surgical cohort, 15% of patients had some worsening in their total RSVP score; however, substantial variation was seen in the individual subscales where worsening ranged from 7% (problems with corrective lenses) to 41% (driving). The effect size (measure of responsiveness) of the RSVP and most of its subscales was very high. Approximately 14% of patients had significant worsening in 3 or more subscales, and this outcome was found to be independently associated with being dissatisfied with vision following surgery (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 1.88, 8.13). CONCLUSIONS: The RSVP has been validated as a questionnaire that measures patient-reported quality of life related to refractive error and its correction. It is responsive to surgical intervention and provides important information regarding patient outcomes not available

  20. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Williams, Katie M.; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Howe, Laura D.; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G.; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B.; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L.; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J.; Mackey, David A.; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Meguro, Akira; Wright, Alan F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Young, Alvin L.; Veluchamy, Amutha Barathi; Metspalu, Andres; Paterson, Andrew D.; Döring, Angela; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Klein, Barbara E.; Pourcain, Beate St; Fleck, Brian; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Williams, Cathy; Delcourt, Cécile; Pang, Chi Pui; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Gieger, Christian; Hammond, Christopher J.; Simpson, Claire L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mackey, David A.; Evans, David M.; Stambolian, Dwight; Chew, Emily; Tai, E-Shyong; Krapohl, Eva; Mihailov, Evelin; Smith, George Davey; McMahon, George; Biino, Ginevra; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Seppälä, Ilkka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F.; Craig, Jamie E.; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Ried, Janina S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Wang, Jie Jin; Liao, Jiemin; Zhao, Jing Hua; Xie, Jing; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Kemp, John P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Jonas, Jost B.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Wedenoja, Juho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Williams, Katie M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oexle, Konrad; Howe, Laura D.; Chen, Li Jia; Xu, Liang; Farrer, Lindsay; Ikram, M. Kamran; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Schache, Maria; Pirastu, Mario; Miyake, Masahiro; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Fossarello, Maurizio; Kähönen, Mika; Tedja, Milly S.; He, Mingguang; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Wareham, Nick J.; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Pärssinen, Olavi; Raitakari, Olli; Polasek, Ozren; Tam, Pancy O.; Foster, Paul J.; Mitchell, Paul; Baird, Paul Nigel; Chen, Peng; Hysi, Pirro G.; Cumberland, Phillippa; Gharahkhani, Puya; Fan, Qiao; Höhn, René; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Luben, Robert N.; Igo Jr, Robert P.; Plomin, Robert; Wojciechowski, Robert; Klein, Ronald; Mohsen Hosseini, S.; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Saw, Seang-Mei; Yazar, Seyhan; Ping Yip, Shea; Feng, Sheng; Vaccargiu, Simona; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; MacGregor, Stuart; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Rantanen, Taina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Young, Terri L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Wong, Tien-Yin; Aung, Tin; Haller, Toomas; Vitart, Veronique; Nangia, Vinay; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Jhanji, Vishal; Zhao, Wanting; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Xiangtian; Guo, Xiaobo; Ding, Xiaohu; Wang, Ya Xing; Lu, Yi; Teo, Yik-Ying; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7–15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E–08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E–21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E–04). PMID:27174397

  1. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J Willem L; Williams, Katie M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Howe, Laura D; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Paterson, Andrew D; Klaver, Caroline C W; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J; Mackey, David A; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7-15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E-08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E-21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E-04). PMID:27174397

  2. Tactile Acuity Charts: A Reliable Measure of Spatial Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Patrick; Camargo, Carlos J.; Campanella, Humberto; Esteve, Jaume; Dinse, Hubert R.; Röder, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    For assessing tactile spatial resolution it has recently been recommended to use tactile acuity charts which follow the design principles of the Snellen letter charts for visual acuity and involve active touch. However, it is currently unknown whether acuity thresholds obtained with this newly developed psychophysical procedure are in accordance with established measures of tactile acuity that involve passive contact with fixed duration and control of contact force. Here we directly compared tactile acuity thresholds obtained with the acuity charts to traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds in a group of young healthy adults. For this purpose, two types of charts, using either Braille-like dot patterns or embossed Landolt rings with different orientations, were adapted from previous studies. Measurements with the two types of charts were equivalent, but generally more reliable with the dot pattern chart. A comparison with the two-point and grating orientation task data showed that the test-retest reliability of the acuity chart measurements after one week was superior to that of the passive methods. Individual thresholds obtained with the acuity charts agreed reasonably with the grating orientation threshold, but less so with the two-point threshold that yielded relatively distinct acuity estimates compared to the other methods. This potentially considerable amount of mismatch between different measures of tactile acuity suggests that tactile spatial resolution is a complex entity that should ideally be measured with different methods in parallel. The simple test procedure and high reliability of the acuity charts makes them a promising complement and alternative to the traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds. PMID:24504346

  3. Error induced by the estimation of the corneal power and the effective lens position with a rotationally asymmetric refractive multifocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, David P.; Camps, Vicente J.; Ramón, María L.; Mateo, Verónica; Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prediction error in intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation for a rotationally asymmetric refractive multifocal IOL and the impact on this error of the optimization of the keratometric estimation of the corneal power and the prediction of the effective lens position (ELP). METHODS Retrospective study including a total of 25 eyes of 13 patients (age, 50 to 83y) with previous cataract surgery with implantation of the Lentis Mplus LS-312 IOL (Oculentis GmbH, Germany). In all cases, an adjusted IOL power (PIOLadj) was calculated based on Gaussian optics using a variable keratometric index value (nkadj) for the estimation of the corneal power (Pkadj) and on a new value for ELP (ELPadj) obtained by multiple regression analysis. This PIOLadj was compared with the IOL power implanted (PIOLReal) and the value proposed by three conventional formulas (Haigis, Hoffer Q and Holladay I). RESULTS PIOLReal was not significantly different than PIOLadj and Holladay IOL power (P>0.05). In the Bland and Altman analysis, PIOLadj showed lower mean difference (-0.07 D) and limits of agreement (of 1.47 and -1.61 D) when compared to PIOLReal than the IOL power value obtained with the Holladay formula. Furthermore, ELPadj was significantly lower than ELP calculated with other conventional formulas (P<0.01) and was found to be dependent on axial length, anterior chamber depth and Pkadj. CONCLUSION Refractive outcomes after cataract surgery with implantation of the multifocal IOL Lentis Mplus LS-312 can be optimized by minimizing the keratometric error and by estimating ELP using a mathematical expression dependent on anatomical factors. PMID:26085998

  4. Visual and refractive outcomes of laser cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heather; Hyatt, Thomas; Afshari, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Femtosecond laser is a promising new technology for the field of cataract surgery. Early studies have investigated many factors including visual outcomes, complication rates, and financial overhead costs. This review analyzes the most recent clinical studies of visual and refractive outcomes in laser cataract surgery, including those that make comparisons to outcomes found in conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Recent findings As femtosecond laser cataract surgery has only emerged recently, there is limited literature available regarding visual outcomes. Most but not all existing studies showed no statistically significant difference in visual acuity and mean absolute refractive error between laser and conventional cataract surgery cases. Summary The majority of studies examined found visual acuity or refractive outcomes of femtosecond laser to be statistically equivalent to those of conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery. However, the learning curve involved with laser use may account for these early results, which could potentially improve as better technology and surgical techniques are developed. Further long-term outcomes studies are necessary to more accurately evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of femtosecond laser cataract surgery. PMID:24285124

  5. Acuity of mental representations of pitch.

    PubMed

    Janata, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Singing in one's mind or forming expectations about upcoming notes both require that mental images of one or more pitches will be generated. As with other musical abilities, the acuity with which such images are formed might be expected to vary across individuals and may depend on musical training. Results from several behavioral tasks involving intonation judgments indicate that multiple memory systems contribute to the formation of accurate mental images for pitch, and that the functionality of each is affected by musical training. Electrophysiological measures indicate that the ability to form accurate mental images is associated with greater engagement of auditory areas and associated error-detection circuitry when listeners imagine ascending scales and make intonation judgments about target notes. A view of auditory mental images is espoused in which unified mental image representations are distributed across multiple brain areas. Each brain area helps shape the acuity of the unified representation based on current behavioral demands and past experience. PMID:22524362

  6. The refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus implant in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Patrick J; Quah, Say A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus intraocular lens (IOL) implant. METHODS This is a retrospective case series. Consecutive patients with corneal astigmatism of at least 1.5 D had Toric Lentis Mplus IOL implant during cataract surgery. The exclusion criteria included irregular astigmatism on corneal topography, large scotopic pupil diameter (>6 mm), poor visual potential and significant ocular comorbidity. Postoperative manifest refraction, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA), uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA) at 3/4 m and uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) were obtained. RESULTS There were 70 eyes from 49 patients in this study. Patients were refracted at a median of 8.9wk (range 4.0 to 15.5) from the operation date. Sixty-five percent of eyes had 6/7.5 (0.10 logMAR) or better, and 99% 6/12 (0.30 logMAR) or better postoperative UDVA. Eighty-nine percent could read Jaeger (J) 3 (0.28 logMAR) and 95% J5 (0.37 logMAR) at 40 cm. The median magnitude of astigmatism decreased from 1.91 D to 0.49 D (Wilcoxon, P<0.001) after the operation. The range of the cylindrical error was reduced from 1.5-3.95 D (keratometric) preoperatively to 0.00-1.46 D (subjective refraction transposed to corneal plane) postoperatively. CONCLUSION Toric Lentis Mplus IOL has good predictability in reducing preexisting corneal astigmatism. PMID:27275424

  7. Prognostic factors for stereopsis in refractive accommodative esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Guclu, Hande; Gurlu, Vuslat Pelitli; Ozal, Sadik Altan; Ozkurt, Zeynep Gursel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prognostic factors affecting stereoacuity in patients with refractive accommodative esotropia (RAE) according to the results of long follow- up period. Methods: We reviewed the charts of 70 patients with RAE between the years 1985-2014. Patients were classified into three groups. G-1: Stereoacuity score 40 second/arc. G-2: Stereoacuity score >40 second/arc (50-3000). G-3: No binocular vision. Initiation age of RAE, duration of deviation, refractive error, amblyopia, amblyopia treatment, anisometropia, visual acuity, family history, angle of deviation for distance and near at each group and the prognostic factors affecting stereoacuity were analyzed. Results: The mean initiation age of RAE was 2.7±1.5 years, the mean age at first visit was 6.4±4.2 years. The mean follow up time was 7.3±4.4 years. Seven patients had 40 second/arc, 48 patients had 50 to 3000 second/arc stereoacuity, 15 patients had no binocular vision. Mean deviation for near was statistically higher in group 2 and 3. Visual acuity levels were higher in group 1 and 2 and was statistically significant. Low visual acuity (p=0.001, 0.008), higher angle of deviation at near (p=0.01), increased duration of deviation (p=0.01), presence of amblyopia (p=0.001) and irregularity of amblyopia treatment (p=0.01) were significantly related with poor stereoacuity. Conclusion: According to the prognostic factors low stereoacuity was mostly related with amblyopia as a result the late presentation of the patients in seeking care. Appropriate treatment as full refractive correction and amblyopia treatment during the RAE is important for development of good stereopsis. Also angle of deviation at near and duration of deviation can be a useful predictor for poor stereoacuity levels. PMID:26430408

  8. Acuity-driven gigapixel visualization.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Kaufman, Arie E

    2013-12-01

    We present a framework for acuity-driven visualization of super-high resolution image data on gigapixel displays. Tiled display walls offer a large workspace that can be navigated physically by the user. Based on head tracking information, the physical characteristics of the tiled display and the formulation of visual acuity, we guide an out-of-core gigapixel rendering scheme by delivering high levels of detail only in places where it is perceivable to the user. We apply this principle to gigapixel image rendering through adaptive level of detail selection. Additionally, we have developed an acuity-driven tessellation scheme for high-quality Focus-and-Context (F+C) lenses that significantly reduces visual artifacts while accurately capturing the underlying lens function. We demonstrate this framework on the Reality Deck, an immersive gigapixel display. We present the results of a user study designed to quantify the impact of our acuity-driven rendering optimizations in the visual exploration process. We discovered no evidence suggesting a difference in search task performance between our framework and naive rendering of gigapixel resolution data, while realizing significant benefits in terms of data transfer overhead. Additionally, we show that our acuity-driven tessellation scheme offers substantially increased frame rates when compared to naive pre-tessellation, while providing indistinguishable image quality. PMID:24051856

  9. Comparability of ophthalmic diagnoses by clinical and Reading Center examiners in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sperduto, R D; Hiller, R; Podgor, M J; Palmberg, P; Ferris, F L; Wentworth, D

    1986-12-01

    Technologic advances in ophthalmic equipment offer the possibility of replacing direct clinical examinations with Reading Center evaluations of data recorded in epidemiologic studies. Clinical and Reading Center examiners made independent ophthalmic diagnoses of 133 right and 132 left eyes of 138 adults in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study, carried out in three US cities, Boston, Detroit, and Minneapolis, in August 1981-December 1982. The Reading Center diagnosed eye conditions using only photographic and visual field data collected at the time of the clinical examination. In the comparisons of clinical and Reading Center evaluations reported here, only eyes judged by the examiners to have pathology severe enough to reduce visual acuity to 6/9 or worse were classified as having pathology. (No visual acuity criterion was required for the diagnosis of glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy.) There was agreement in diagnostic assessments between clinical and Reading Center examiners in about 80% of eyes. The kappa statistic, which adjusts for chance agreement, was in the fair to good range: 0.60 for 133 right eyes and 0.62 for 132 left eyes. When the Reading Center examiners were provided with additional information on medical history, refractive error and best corrected visual acuity, the agreement between clinical and Reading Center assessments among the subset of eyes with 6/9 or worse vision again was in the fair to good range, with kappas of 0.61 for 45 right eyes and 0.68 for 48 left eyes. Inter-observer agreement between Reading Center examiners in diagnosing pathology was in the good to excellent range. Use of Reading Centers in future epidemiologic studies should be considered, but elimination of the clinical examinations is not recommended until modifications in the protocol described here have been made and shown to improve levels of agreement between clinical and Reading Center examiners. PMID:3776982

  10. Corneal refractive surgery: Is intracorneal the way to go and what are the needs for technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjortdal, Jesper; Ivarsen, Anders

    2014-02-01

    Corneal refractive surgery aims to reduce or eliminate refractive errors of the eye by changing the refractive power of the cornea. For the last 20 years controlled excimer laser ablation of corneal tissue, either directly from the corneal stromal surface or from the corneal interior after creation of a superficial corneal flap has become widely used to correct myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Recently, an intrastromal refractive procedure whereby a tissue lenticule is cut free in the corneal stroma by a femtosecond laser and removed through a small peripheral incision has been introduced. This procedure avoids creation of a corneal flap and the potential associated risks while avoiding the slow visual recovery of surface ablation procedures. Precise intrastromal femtosecond laser cutting of the fine lenticule requires very controlled laser energy delivery in order to avoid lenticule irregularities, which would compromise the refractive result and visual acuity. This newly introduced all-femtosecond based flap-free intracorneal refractive procedure has been documented to be a predictable, efficient, and safe procedure for correction of myopia and astigmatism. Technological developments related to further improved cutting quality, hyperopic and individualized treatments are desirable.

  11. Refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, I.R. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the titles are: Perspectives on refractive surgery; Radial keratotomy; The refractive aspects of corneal transplantation; Wedge resection and relating incisions; Laser surgery of the cornea; and All plastic corneal lenses.

  12. Visual Acuity and the Eye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beynon, J.

    1985-01-01

    Shows that visual acuity is a function of the structure of the eye and that its limit is set by the structure of the retina, emphasizing the role of lens aberrations and difraction on image quality. Also compares human vision with that of other vertebrates and insects. (JN)

  13. Indication of advanced orthokeratology as an additional treatment after refractive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshida

    2005-04-01

    Ortho-K was indicated for twenty-three eyes of thirteen patients after refractive surgeries such as RK(1) ,PRK(2), and LASIK(3). The average of their Uncorrective Visual Acuity (UCVA) after surgeries was 20/30 or worse, and mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -2.42D. They were followed at least two years wearing of Advanced Ortho-K lenses during night. The following studies were examined on their auto-refraction, auto-keratometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, corneal endothelium, corneal thickness, corneal curvature, and corneal shape for more than two years. 95% of the patients improved in UCVA up to 20/20 or better, 86% of them improved up to 20/15 or better, and 76% of them improved up to 20/10. The mean SEs improved to -1.20+/-1.02D during six months, - 1.03+/-0.83D during one year, and -0.73+/-0.64D during two years. Astigmatism also slightly decreased. Ophthalmologic examinations showed no abnormalities including flap formation, intra-ocular pressure, and endothelium. Among the refractive surgeries as well as RK and PRK, LASIK has been most popularly spread all over the world. However, patient's quality of vision is not always satisfied during and/or after refractive surgeries, because of several complications such as instability of flap formation, unexpected keratoectasia, diffuse lamellar keratitis, epithelial ingrowth, irregularity of corneal surface which caused myopia regression. In such cases, additional surgical procedures should not be indicated easily. However, Ortho-K is safe and effective enough to correct refractive errors still remained or re-appeared after refractive surgeries. It enables to restore the corneal irregularity to the ideal shape.

  14. Visual, refractive, and keratometric results of epikeratophakia in children. A two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Uusitalo, R J; Lehtosalo, J

    1989-03-01

    Fifty-two patients under the age of 16 years (68 eyes) received epikeratophakia grafts for the correction of aphakia. In 27 eyes, epikeratophakia was a primary procedure combined with lensectomy. Fifteen children underwent bilateral surgery. Overall, the success rate was 91%, and with repeated surgery it was 94%. The average change in refractive error was 15.9 diopters (D) and the average spectacle overcorrection was +0.3 D. Sixty-one percent (35/57) of the eyes were within 1 D of emmetropia and 97% (55/57) were within 3 D of emmetropia. Overall, the refraction was stable in the follow-up between six months and 1 1/2 years following surgery. However, a myopic shift of 2.0 D occurred between six months and 1 1/2 years in very young children following refractive surgery. The corneal curvature was measured only in older children and showed an average increase of 10.7 D. Visual acuity results in verbal patients were comparable to those in patients with contact lenses. The majority of smaller children demonstrated improvement in visual acuity with a combination of epikeratophakia and amblyopia therapy. PMID:2647066

  15. The prevalence of refractive conditions in Puerto Rican adults attending an eye clinic system

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Neisha M.; Romero, Angel. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of refractive conditions in the adult population that visited primary care optometry clinics in Puerto Rico. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study of patients examined at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico School of Optometry Eye Institute Clinics between 2004 and 2010. Subjects considered had best corrected visual acuity by standardized subjective refraction of 20/40 or better. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE): sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia was classified as a SE>−0.50 D, hyperopia as a SE>+0.50  D, and emmetropia as a SE between −0.50 and +0.50, both included. Astigmatism equal or higher than 0.25 D in minus cylinder form was used. Patients with documented history of cataract extraction (pseudophakia or aphakia), amblyopia, refractive surgery or other corneal/ocular surgery were excluded from the study. Results A total of 784 randomly selected subjects older than 40 years of age were selected. The estimated prevalence (95%, confidence interval) among all subjects was hyperopia 51.5% (48.0–55.0), emmetropia 33.8% (30.5–37.2), myopia 14.7% (12.1–17.2) and astigmatism 69.6% (68.8–73.3). Hyperopia was more common in females than males although the difference was not statistically significant. The mean spherical equivalent values was hyperopic until 70 y/o and decreased slightly as the population ages. Conclusion Hyperopia is the most common refractive error and its prevalence and seems to increase among the aging population who visited the clinics. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the adult Puerto Rican population. PMID:25000872

  16. Visual Acuity Outcomes of Toric Lens Implantation in Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery at a Residency Training Program.

    PubMed

    Sundy, Meryl; McKnight, Dustin; Eck, Craig; Rieger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmology residents must become competent in the use of a variety of intraocular lenses (IOLs) and refractive technologies designed to reduce spectacle use after cataract surgery. Our study of visual acuity outcomes with toric IOLs at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital revealed that residents achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better in 88% of the surgeries they performed, a rate comparable to that reported by other residency programs and by cataract surgeons. PMID:27039489

  17. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  18. Treatment of Anisometropic Amblyopia in Children with Refractive Correction

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of refractive correction alone for the treatment of untreated anisometropic amblyopia in children 3 to <7 years old. Design: Prospective, multicenter, noncomparative intervention. Participants: 84 children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia ranging from 20/40 to 20/250. Methods: Optimal refractive correction was provided and visual acuity was measured with the new spectacle correction at baseline, and at 5-week intervals until visual acuity stabilized or amblyopia resolved. Main Outcome Measures: Maximum improvement in best-corrected visual acuity in the amblyopic eye and proportion of children whose amblyopia resolved (interocular difference of 1 line or less) with refractive correction alone. Results: Amblyopia improved with optical correction by 2 or more lines in 77% of the patients and resolved in 27%. Improvement took up to 30 weeks for stabilization criteria to be met. After stabilization, additional improvement occurred with spectacles alone in 21 of 34 patients followed in a control group of a subsequent randomized trial, with amblyopia resolving in 6. Treatment outcome was not related to age, but was related to better baseline visual acuity and lesser amounts of anisometropia. Conclusion: Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of 3 to <7-year-old children with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. While most cases of resolution occur with moderate (20/40 to 20/100) amblyopia, the average 3-line improvement in visual acuity resulting from treatment with spectacles may lessen the burden of subsequent amblyopia therapy for those with denser levels of amblyopia. Precis Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in many cases and results in resolution of amblyopia in at least one third of children 3 to <7 years old with untreated anisometropic amblyopia. PMID:16751032

  19. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  20. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  1. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  2. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  3. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  4. New mobile technologies and visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, I A T; Lok, A S L; Tarbert, C

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices have shown promise in visual assessment. Traditional acuity measurement involves retro-illuminated charts or card-based modalities. Mobile platforms bring potential to improve on both portability and objectivity. The present research activity relates to design and validation of a novel tablet-based infant acuity test. Early results in an adult cohort, with various levels of artificially degraded vision, suggest improved test-retest reliability compared with current standards for infant acuity. Future pragmatic trials will assess the value of this emerging technology in pediatric visual screening. PMID:25570420

  5. Recovery of Upper Extremity Sensorimotor System Acuity in Baseball Athletes After a Throwing-Fatigue Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Brady L; Yochem, Eric M; Uhl, Timothy L

    2007-01-01

    Context: Research indicates that upper extremity fatigue hampers sensorimotor system acuity. However, no investigators have observed recovery of upper extremity acuity after fatigue. Objective: To observe recovery of active position reproduction acuity in overhead throwers after a throwing-fatigue protocol. Design: Single-session, repeated-measures design. Setting: University musculoskeletal laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy collegiate baseball players (age = 21.0 ± 1.6 years, height = 175.8 ± 10.2 cm, mass = 82.8 ± 4.3 kg). Intervention(s): Subjects threw a baseball with maximum velocity (every 5 seconds) from a single knee. Every 20 throws, subjects rated their upper extremity exertion on a Borg scale until reporting a level of more than 14. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used an electromagnetic tracking system to measure active multijoint position reproduction acuity at 5 intervals: prefatigue; immediately postfatigue; and after 4, 7, and 10 minutes of recovery. Blindfolded subjects reproduced their arm-cocked and ball-release positions. Dependent variables were 3-dimensional variable errors of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, elbow, and wrist joints; endpoint (ie, hand) position error represented overall upper extremity acuity. The independent variable was time (measured prefatigue and at 4 postfatigue intervals). Results: Fatigue significantly affected acuity of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, and elbow joints and endpoint error for both positions (P < .001). Fatigue significantly affected wrist acuity only for ball release (P < .001). For arm-cocked reproduction, each measure of acuity, except that of the glenohumeral joint, recovered by 7 minutes; for ball release, each measure of acuity recovered within 4 minutes (P > .05). Conclusions: The sensorimotor system deficits that we observed after fatigue recovered within 7 minutes in most upper extremity joints. Glenohumeral arm-cocked position reproduction acuity failed to recover within

  6. Acuity assessment of non-verbal infants and children: clinical experience with the acuity card procedure.

    PubMed

    Mohn, G; van Hof-van Duin, J; Fetter, W P; de Groot, L; Hage, M

    1988-04-01

    The acuity card procedure was used to assess the visual acuity of 510 neurologically normal and abnormal infants and children. Acuity estimates were obtained for 93 per cent of 842 binocular and 279 monocular tests. The observed development of binocular acuity of normal fullterm and preterm infants agreed well with previous reports using the traditional forced-choice preferential looking technique. Monocular tests seemed to support earlier suggestions that grating acuity may be relatively insensitive to strabismic amblyopia. Infants at risk of later neurological deficits but developing normally had only a slight delay in development of acuity, but there was a high incidence of acuity deficits (54 per cent) among those with severe neurological defects. The great majority of a group of multiply handicapped children had low acuity for age. Repeat tests showed a high degree of test-retest consistency. The acuity card procedure was a successful and useful method for assessing the acuity of infants and children who cannot be tested with standard ophthalmological methods. PMID:3384203

  7. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  8. Strong tilt illusions always reduce orientation acuity.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Joshua A; Morgan, Michael J

    2009-03-01

    The apparent spatial orientation of an object can differ from its physical orientation when differently oriented objects surround it. This is the "tilt illusion". Previously [Solomon, J. A., & Morgan, M. J. (2006). Stochastic re-calibration: Contextual effects on perceived tilt. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 273, 2681-2686], we reported a loss of orientation acuity whenever a large physical tilt was required to compensate for the tilt illusion and make a target appear horizontal. Since all of those targets appeared to be at least approximately horizontal, we concluded that orientation acuity was not wholly determined by the target's apparent orientation. In the present study, we used oblique (i.e. neither horizontal nor vertical) reference orientations to more directly examine the effect of perceived orientation on orientation acuity. The results show that when surround and reference were parallel, there was no tilt illusion and acuity was high. Acuity suffered whenever the tilt illusion caused a large discrepancy between the target's physical and perceived tilts. Since this was true even for tilted references, context-induced acuity loss cannot be simply an "oblique effect" of the target's physical orientation. PMID:19268684

  9. Determine the effect of neck muscle fatigue on dynamic visual acuity in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Al Saif, Amer A.; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether neck muscle fatigue affects dynamic visual acuity in healthy young participants. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a double-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Thirty healthy young subjects (ages 21 to 30 years) participated in the study. Participants were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group performed an exercise designed to induce neck muscle fatigue and the control group preformed non-fatiguing sham exercises. [Results] There were significant differences in mean dynamic visual acuity between the two groups (0.26±0.11 LogMar versus 0.003±0.02 LogMar). Subjects in the experimental group showed a significant decline in their dynamic visual acuity compared with the control group. Dynamic visual acuity strongly correlated with neck muscle fatigue (r = 0.79). No significant differences in joint position error were observed between the two groups and no significant correlations between joint position error and neck muscle fatigue were observed (r = 0.23). [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that neck muscle fatigue negatively impacts dynamic visual acuity. Although not statistically significant, cervical spine proprioception as measured by the joint position error in the experimental group was diminished after fatigue. PMID:25642087

  10. Correction of satellite laser ranging for atmospheric refraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, N. T.

    Atmospheric refraction causes significant errors in satellite laser ranging (SLR) systems. Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. These formulas were derived under the assumption that atmospheric refraction is spherically symmetric. The accuracy of the Marini-Murray's spherical correction formula are checked. The residual errors in the spherical model are thought to be primarily caused by horizontal gradients in the refractivity. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles.

  11. The importance of measuring dynamic visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Muzdalo, Natasa Vujko

    2013-04-01

    In their everyday life, people interact with different objects, static as well as those in motion. However, dynamic acuity is rarely checked in medical examinations, even those preceding the issue of driving license. In order for driving to be safe, good eyesight or good correction with visual aids is imperative. Beside good eyesight, drivers also have to have good reflexes and short reaction span. The aim of this study was to compare dynamic and static visual acuity in order to observe how they vary among individuals. Twenty female and male participants, 65 years of age, took part in the study and the comparison was made with the results provided by 20 20-year old participants. Dynamic acuity was tested using the Landolt-ring optotype which was simulating movement velocity of 72 km/h. T-test demonstrated the presence of a statistically significant difference between dynamic and static acuity among the participants from 62 to 68 years of age (t = 15.852; df = 39; p < 0.01). Within the same group, dynamic acuity (mean = 0.887; std. deviation = 0.297) proved to be significantly worse than static acuity (mean = 1.40; std. deviation = 0.317). By comparing the results measured within the older group of participants with those measured in the younger group, it was shown that there exists a statistically significant difference (t = 0.275; df = 58; p < 0,05) between the older and younger group in their dynamic binocular acuity with correction. Younger participants had better dynamic binocular acuity with correction (mean = 1.063; std. deviation = 0.259) than the older participants (mean = 0.884; std. deviation = 0.298). The differences between dynamic and static acuity and its degradation in the older age groups have to be taken into account when issuing driving licenses. The future of research lies within the study of correlation between the age and acuity in order that the results can be applied in practice. PMID:23837257

  12. Creation of an Accurate Algorithm to Detect Snellen Best Documented Visual Acuity from Ophthalmology Electronic Health Record Notes

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Gill, Manjot; Mitchell, Christopher; Jackson, Kathryn; Kho, Abel; Bryar, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background Visual acuity is the primary measure used in ophthalmology to determine how well a patient can see. Visual acuity for a single eye may be recorded in multiple ways for a single patient visit (eg, Snellen vs. Jäger units vs. font print size), and be recorded for either distance or near vision. Capturing the best documented visual acuity (BDVA) of each eye in an individual patient visit is an important step for making electronic ophthalmology clinical notes useful in research. Objective Currently, there is limited methodology for capturing BDVA in an efficient and accurate manner from electronic health record (EHR) notes. We developed an algorithm to detect BDVA for right and left eyes from defined fields within electronic ophthalmology clinical notes. Methods We designed an algorithm to detect the BDVA from defined fields within 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes with visual acuity data present. About 5668 unique responses were identified and an algorithm was developed to map all of the unique responses to a structured list of Snellen visual acuities. Results Visual acuity was captured from a total of 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes during the study dates. The algorithm identified all visual acuities in the defined visual acuity section for each eye and returned a single BDVA for each eye. A clinician chart review of 100 random patient notes showed a 99% accuracy detecting BDVA from these records and 1% observed error. Conclusions Our algorithm successfully captures best documented Snellen distance visual acuity from ophthalmology clinical notes and transforms a variety of inputs into a structured Snellen equivalent list. Our work, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first attempt at capturing visual acuity accurately from large numbers of electronic ophthalmology notes. Use of this algorithm can benefit research groups interested in assessing visual acuity for patient centered outcome. All codes used for this study are currently

  13. Color improves "visual" acuity via sound.

    PubMed

    Levy-Tzedek, Shelly; Riemer, Dar; Amedi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Visual-to-auditory sensory substitution devices (SSDs) convey visual information via sound, with the primary goal of making visual information accessible to blind and visually impaired individuals. We developed the EyeMusic SSD, which transforms shape, location, and color information into musical notes. We tested the "visual" acuity of 23 individuals (13 blind and 10 blindfolded sighted) on the Snellen tumbling-E test, with the EyeMusic. Participants were asked to determine the orientation of the letter "E." The test was repeated twice: in one test, the letter "E" was drawn with a single color (white), and in the other test, with two colors (red and white). In the latter case, the vertical line in the letter, when upright, was drawn in red, with the three horizontal lines drawn in white. We found no significant differences in performance between the blind and the sighted groups. We found a significant effect of the added color on the "visual" acuity. The highest acuity participants reached in the monochromatic test was 20/800, whereas with the added color, acuity doubled to 20/400. We conclude that color improves "visual" acuity via sound. PMID:25426015

  14. Potential acuity meter for predicting visual acuity after Nd:YAG posterior capsulotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Smiddy, W.E.; Radulovic, D.; Yeo, J.H.; Stark, W.J.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    We studied 30 patients with opacifications of the posterior capsule to determine if the potential acuity meter (PAM) could accurately predict final visual outcome after Nd:YAG discussion. The final visual acuity was within one line of the PAM prediction in 22 of 30 patients (73%), better by two or more lines in seven patients (23%), and worse in one patient (4%) by two lines. Although in thicker capsules the final acuity was occasionally better than the PAM prediction, the rates of false negative and false positive predictions were very low. Mild cystoid macular edema (3 patients), age-related macular degeneration (3 patients), intraocular lens status, and level of initial acuity did not diminish PAM accuracy. The PAM effectively predicts final visual acuity after YAG posterior capsulotomy, when used in a patient, unhurried manner.

  15. Treatment of Bilateral Refractive Amblyopia in Children 3 to <10 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Chandler, Danielle L.; Beck, Roy W.; Arnold, Robert W.; Bacal, Darron A.; Birch, Eileen E.; Felius, Joost; Frazier, Marcela; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Hoover, Darren; Klimek, Deborah A.; Lorenzana, Ingryd; Quinn, Graham E.; Repka, Michael X.; Suh, Donny W.; Tamkins, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the amount and time course of binocular visual acuity improvement during treatment of bilateral refractive amblyopia in children age 3 to <10 years old Design Prospective, multicenter noncomparative intervention Methods 113 children (mean age = 5.1 years) with previously untreated bilateral refractive amblyopia were enrolled at 27 community- and university-based sites and were provided optimal spectacle correction. Bilateral refractive amblyopia was defined as 20/40 to 20/400 best-corrected binocular acuity in the presence of ≥ 4.00 D hypermetropia by spherical equivalent and/or ≥ 2.00 D astigmatism in each eye. Best-corrected binocular and monocular visual acuities were measured at baseline and at 5, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. The primary study outcome was binocular acuity at one year. Results Mean binocular visual acuity improved from 0.50 logMAR (20/63) at baseline to 0.11 logMAR (20/25) at one year (mean improvement 3.9 lines, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5 to 4.2). Mean improvement at one year for the 84 children with baseline binocular acuity of 20/40 to 20/80 was 3.4 lines (95% CI = 3.2 to 3.7) and for the 16 children with baseline binocular acuity of 20/100 to 20/320 was 6.3 lines (95% CI = 5.1 to 7.5). The cumulative probability of binocular acuity of 20/25 or better was 21% at 5 weeks, 46% at 13 weeks, 59% at 26 weeks, and 74% at 52 weeks. Conclusions Treatment of bilateral refractive amblyopia with spectacle correction improves binocular visual acuity in children age 3 to <10 years old, with most improving to 20/25 or better within one year. PMID:17707330

  16. Visual Acuity of Children: United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    National estimates based on the findings from the Health Examination Survey in 1963 to 1965 of uncorrected monocular and binocular visual-acuity levels of children were studied. A nationwide sample of 7,417 children was selected to represent the approximately 24 million noninstitutionalized American children between ages 6 and 11 years. Testing…

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in five cohorts reveals common variants in RBFOX1, a regulator of tissue-specific splicing, associated with refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Stambolian, Dwight; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Li, Xiaohui; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily Y.; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Simpson, Claire L.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Baird, Paul N.; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Schache, Maria; Richardson, Andrea; Xie, Jing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Hosseini, S.M.; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Vatavuk, Zoran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Foster, Paul J.; Topouzis, Fotis; McGuffin, Peter; Sim, Xueling; Inouye, Michael; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Visual refractive errors (REs) are complex genetic traits with a largely unknown etiology. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of moderate size have identified several novel risk markers for RE, measured here as mean spherical equivalent (MSE). We performed a GWAS using a total of 7280 samples from five cohorts: the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS); the KORA study (‘Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg’); the Framingham Eye Study (FES); the Ogliastra Genetic Park-Talana (OGP-Talana) Study and the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Genotyping was performed on Illumina and Affymetrix platforms with additional markers imputed to the HapMap II reference panel. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 16 (rs10500355, P = 3.9 × 10−9) in a combined discovery and replication set (26 953 samples). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is located within the RBFOX1 gene which is a neuron-specific splicing factor regulating a wide range of alternative splicing events implicated in neuronal development and maturation, including transcription factors, other splicing factors and synaptic proteins. PMID:23474815

  18. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    PubMed

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  19. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  20. Variable acuity remote viewing system flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Variable Acuity Remote Viewing System (VARVS), originally developed under contract to the Navy (ONR) as a laboratory brassboard, was modified for flight demonstration. The VARVS system was originally conceived as a technique which could circumvent the acuity/field of view/bandwidth tradeoffs that exists in remote viewing to provide a nearly eye limited display in both field of view (160 deg) and resolution (2 min arc) while utilizing conventional TV sensing, transmission, and display equipment. The modifications for flight demonstration consisted of modifying the sensor so it could be installed and flow in a Piper PA20 aircraft, equipped for remote control and modifying the display equipment so it could be integrated with the NASA Research RPB (RPRV) remote control cockpit.

  1. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  6. Development of refraction and strabismus.

    PubMed

    Thorn, F

    2000-10-01

    Research on the etiology and causes of refractive errors has become a very active field of study during the past few years. Most of this research has focused on myopia. But hyperopia and astigmatism are also being examined both in comparison to myopia and in their own right. Animal models have also been developed for the study of experimentally induced myopia and hyperopia. These studies demonstrate the chain of neural and molecular events that occurs in induced myopia and hyperopia with increasing precision. In the future, these results may elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the refractive errors seen in human populations. Research into the development of strabismus has not progressed with the same vigor. The links among hyperopia, accommodative convergence, and strabismus are well established. Numerous neural, oculomotor, and subjective correlates of strabismus are now well established, but there has been a failure to develop the experimental paradigms needed to demonstrate the causal relations among these different factors. PMID:11148693

  7. [The deterioration of refractive accommodative esotropia].

    PubMed

    Yan, J; Yang, S; Wang, Y

    1995-09-01

    137 patients with refractive accommodative esotropia who were followed for at least 5 years were investigated. The results showed that in 23 of the 137 patients (16.8%) occurred the deterioration of esotropia that means esotropia can no longer be controlled by wearing a pair of complete corrective spectacles. The deterioration develops most likely in patients with delay of anti-accommodative therapy or with malfunction of binocular vision. The age of onset, refractive status and the visual acuity difference between bilateral eyes are not etiologic factors in the process of deterioration. We consider that early diagnosis of accommodative esotropia, timely prescription of optical correction and maintenance of normal binocular vision play important roles in preventing the deterioration. PMID:8706583

  8. Comparison of acuity tests and pattern evoked potential criteria: two mechanisms underly acuity maturation in man.

    PubMed

    Spekreijse, H

    1983-10-01

    A comparative study of acuity tests and pattern evoked potential (EP) criteria was performed on a total of 307 subjects, 214 of them at an age between 2 months post-term and 12 years. All were examined ophthalmologically prior to testing. It was shown that both psychophysical and EP estimated acuity improve in the same way until puberty. From birth to about 6 months a rapid improvement is found. This fast phase can probably be attributed to retinal morphological maturation. During this period a fair estimate of acuity can be obtained by determining the checksize that yields the largest EP; a conclusion of practical importance for screening. The subsequent slow improvement phase, which ends around puberty, is reflected in the development of the waveform of the pattern onset EP. Since it correlates with the growth of a spatial contrast specific component of extrastriate origin in the EP, the slow improvement phase most likely reflects maturation of central processes. PMID:6639719

  9. Cataract Surgery with a Refractive Corneal Inlay in Place

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, N. R.; Panagopoulou, S. I.; Pallikaris, I. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case of cataract surgery performed in a patient with a refractive corneal inlay in place. Methods. A 48-year-old female patient presented to our institute with bilateral cataract. The patient had undergone refractive corneal inlay implantation three years ago in her right, nondominant eye for presbyopia correction. Biometry and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation were performed without removing the inlay. Phacoemulsification and IOL insertion were carried out in both eyes in a usual manner. Results. On day one postoperatively, the patient achieved binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 and uncorrected near visual acuity J1. The vision remained stable during the one-year follow-up period. Conclusion. Cataract surgery was performed in a standard manner in a patient with Presbia Microlens corneal inlay in place. Visual outcomes for both near and distance vision were satisfactory. PMID:26171265

  10. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, I. A. T.; Tarbert, C. M.; Giardini, M. E.; Bastawrous, A.; Middleton, D.; Hamilton, R.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer’s recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  11. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, I A T; Tarbert, C M; Giardini, M E; Bastawrous, A; Middleton, D; Hamilton, R

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  12. Response Classification Images in Vernier Acuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Beard, B. L.; Ellis, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Orientation selective and local sign mechanisms have been proposed as the basis for vernier acuity judgments. Linear image features contributing to discrimination can be determined for a two choice task by adding external noise to the images and then averaging the noises separately for the four types of stimulus/response trials. This method is applied to a vernier acuity task with different spatial separations to compare the predictions of the two theories. Three well-practiced observers were presented around 5000 trials of a vernier stimulus consisting of two dark horizontal lines (5 min by 0.3 min) within additive low-contrast white noise. Two spatial separations were tested, abutting and a 10 min horizontal separation. The task was to determine whether the target lines were aligned or vertically offset. The noises were averaged separately for the four stimulus/response trial types (e.g., stimulus = offset, response = aligned). The sum of the two 'not aligned' images was then subtracted from the sum of the 'aligned' images to obtain an overall image. Spatially smoothed images were quantized according to expected variability in the smoothed images to allow estimation of the statistical significance of image features. The response images from the 10 min separation condition are consistent with the local sign theory, having the appearance of two linear operators measuring vertical position with opposite sign. The images from the abutting stimulus have the same appearance with the two operators closer together. The image predicted by an oriented filter model is similar, but has its greatest weight in the abutting region, while the response images fall to nonsignificance there. The response correlation image method, previously demonstrated for letter discrimination, clarifies the features used in vernier acuity.

  13. Modeling acuity for optotypes varying in complexity.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew B; Ahumada, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Watson and Ahumada (2008) described a template model of visual acuity based on an ideal-observer limited by optical filtering, neural filtering, and noise. They computed predictions for selected optotypes and optical aberrations. Here we compare this model's predictions to acuity data for six human observers, each viewing seven different optotype sets, consisting of one set of Sloan letters and six sets of Chinese characters, differing in complexity (Zhang, Zhang, Xue, Liu, & Yu, 2007). Since optical aberrations for the six observers were unknown, we constructed 200 model observers using aberrations collected from 200 normal human eyes (Thibos, Hong, Bradley, & Cheng, 2002). For each condition (observer, optotype set, model observer) we estimated the model noise required to match the data. Expressed as efficiency, performance for Chinese characters was 1.4 to 2.7 times lower than for Sloan letters. Efficiency was weakly and inversely related to perimetric complexity of optotype set. We also compared confusion matrices for human and model observers. Correlations for off-diagonal elements ranged from 0.5 to 0.8 for different sets, and the average correlation for the template model was superior to a geometrical moment model with a comparable number of parameters (Liu, Klein, Xue, Zhang, & Yu, 2009). The template model performed well overall. Estimated psychometric function slopes matched the data, and noise estimates agreed roughly with those obtained independently from contrast sensitivity to Gabor targets. For optotypes of low complexity, the model accurately predicted relative performance. This suggests the model may be used to compare acuities measured with different sets of simple optotypes. PMID:23024356

  14. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects ...

  15. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  16. The Effect of 3D Visual Simulator on Children’s Visual Acuity - A Pilot Study Comparing Two Different Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Mariko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Miyao, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the efficacy of two non-surgical interventions of vision improvement in children. Methods : A prospective, randomized, pilot study to compare fogging method and the use of head mounted 3D display. Subjects were children, between 5 to 15 years old, with normal best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and up to -3D myopia. Subjects played a video game as near point work, and received one of the two methods of treatments. Measurements of uncorrected far visual acuity (UCVA), refraction with autorefractometer, and subjective accommodative amplitude were taken 3 times, at the baseline, after the near work, and after the treatment. Results : Both methods applied after near work, improved UCVA. Head mounted 3D display group showed significant improvement in UCVA and resulted in better UCVA than baseline. Fogging group showed improvement in subjective accommodative amplitude. While 3D display group did not show change in the refraction, fogging group’s myopic refraction showed significant increase indicating the eyes showed myopic change of eyes after near work and treatment. Discussion : Despite our lack of clear knowledge in the mechanisms, both methods improved UCVA after the treatments. The improvement in UCVA was not correlated to measured refraction values. Conclusion : UCVA after near work can be improved by repeating near and distant accommodation by fogging and 3D image viewing, although at the different degrees. Further investigation on mechanisms of improvements and their clinical significance are warranted. PMID:24222810

  17. Refractive surgery and strabismus.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Lionel; Battu, Ravindra; Kushner, Burton

    2005-02-01

    This review discusses the potential for strabismic complications after refractive surgery for hyperopia, myopia, anisomyopia, astigmatism and monovision, and how to avoid these complications. Guidelines are given for assessing patients with strabismus seeking refractive surgery. Screening tests are suggested that lead to stratification of refractive surgery patients into different risk groups each warranting a different intensity of evaluation. PMID:15670088

  18. Acoustic basis of directional acuity in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Amanda M; Slee, Sean J; May, Bradford J

    2011-10-01

    The acoustic basis of auditory spatial acuity was investigated in CBA/129 mice by relating patterns of behavioral errors to directional features of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Behavioral performance was assessed by training the mice to lick a water spout during sound presentations from a "safe" location and to suppress the response during presentations from "warning" locations. Minimum audible angles (MAAs) were determined by delivering the safe and warning sounds from different locations in the inter-aural horizontal and median vertical planes. HRTFs were measured at the same locations by implanting a miniature microphone and recording the gain of sound energy near the ear drum relative to free field. Mice produced an average MAA of 31° when sound sources were located in the horizontal plane. Acoustic measures indicated that binaural inter-aural level differences (ILDs) and monaural spectral features of the HRTF change systematically with horizontal location and therefore may have contributed to the accuracy of behavioral performance. Subsequent manipulations of the auditory stimuli and the directional properties of the ear produced errors that suggest the mice primarily relied on ILD cues when discriminating changes in azimuth. The MAA increased beyond 80° when the importance of ILD cues was minimized by testing in the median vertical plane. Although acoustic measures demonstrated a less robust effect of vertical location on spectral features of the HRTF, this poor performance provides further evidence for the insensitivity to spectral cues that was noted during behavioral testing in the horizontal plane. PMID:21717290

  19. Set shot shooting performance and visual acuity in basketball.

    PubMed

    Applegate, R A; Applegate, R A

    1992-10-01

    Common sense suggests that decreasing visual acuity will have a negative effect on basketball shooting performance. To test the hypothesis that basketball shooting performance monotonically decreases with decreasing acuity, 19 subjects attempted 25 set shots from a fixed location at each of 5 different acuity levels: 6/6 or better and vision blurred (by optical defocus) to visual acuities of 6/12, 6/24, 6/48, and 6/75. Our results revealed a small but statistically nonsignificant decrease in shooting performance between the 6/6+ and 6/12 conditions. For visual acuities between 6/12 and 6/75, the number of baskets made remained constant. We conclude that decreases in visual acuity over the range of 6/6+ to 6/75 resulting from defocus do not significantly reduce set shot shooting performance. PMID:1436997

  20. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  1. Relation between uncorrected astigmatism and visual acuity in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Pesala, Veerendranath; Garg, Prashant; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R

    2013-04-01

    PURPOSE.: The end point of astigmatic correction after cataract surgery will depend on how uncorrected astigmatism impacts distance and near vision of pseudophakic eyes. This study determined the impact of induced astigmatism and pupil size on the distance and near acuity of otherwise emmetropic pseudophakic eyes implanted with monofocal intraocular lenses. METHODS.: Monocular high-contrast distance (4 m) and near (40 cm) logMAR acuity was determined in 15 subjects (mean ± 1 SD, 57.9 ± 9.0 years) without astigmatism and with 2.5 diopters (D) myopic to 2.0 D hyperopic astigmatic lenses induced in 0.5-D steps at 0-, 45-, 90-, and 135-degree axes. This experiment was repeated for the same range of induced astigmatism with 1.5-, 3-, and 6-mm artificial pupil diameters placed before one eye of 10 subjects dilated with 10% phenylephrine HCl. RESULTS.: Distance acuity deteriorated with astigmatism for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Near acuity deteriorated with hyperopic astigmatism (p < 0.1), whereas it improved with up to 1 D of myopic astigmatism before saturating for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Distance and near acuity improved with a reduction in pupil diameter (p < 0.01). The change in distance and near acuity with induced astigmatism was smaller for 1.5-mm than for 3-mm and 6-mm pupil diameters (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS.: Partial restoration of near acuity with uncorrected myopic astigmatism comes with a proportional loss of distance acuity in pseudophakic eyes. Uncorrected myopic astigmatism more than 1 D results in a large loss of distance acuity at no additional benefit to near acuity. Both distance and near acuities with and without astigmatism are benefited with a reduction in pupil diameter. Uncorrected hyperopic astigmatism results in deterioration of both distance and near acuities of pseudophakic eyes. PMID:23458979

  2. Functional Visual Acuity of Early Presbyopia

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Shigeno, Yuta; Saiki, Megumi; Torii, Hidemasa; Kaido, Minako; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual function in patients with early presbyopia using the functional visual acuity (FVA) test. Methods This study included 27 eyes of 27 healthy older volunteers (mean age, 44.1 ± 2.6 years) and 14 eyes of 14 healthy young volunteers (mean age, 28.4±4.8 years). The distance-corrected visual acuity (DCVA), distance-corrected near VA (DCNVA), subjective amplitude of accommodation (AA), and distance and near pupillary diameters were measured. The distance FVA and distance-corrected near FVA (DCNFVA) were measured using the FVA Measurement System. The standard Schirmer test and standard tear break-up time measurement also were performed. Results The logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) DCVA was better than 0 in all subjects. The percentages of subjects with logMAR DCNVA below 0 was significantly lower in the presbyopia group than in the young group. The DCNFVA in the presbyopia group was significantly (P < 0.001) poorer than the DCNVA in that group. Significant linear negative correlations were seen between the DCNVA and AA (r = -0.507, P < 0.001) and the DCNFVA and AA (r = -0.681, P < 0.001) in the older subjects. Stepwise regression analysis showed that only the AA was a significant factor predictive of the DCNFVA in the presbyopia group. Tear function parameters were not adopted in the regression model. Conclusions Measurement of the DCNFVA can detect decreased AA in early presbyopia better than measurement of the conventional near VA. The DCNFVA is a good index for early presbyopia. PMID:26959362

  3. Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Matthew A.; Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Falkmer, Marita; Ordqvist, Anna; Leung, Denise; Foster, Jonathan K.; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in "J Autism Dev Disord"…

  4. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane

    2004-12-01

    Research involving college-age students and women fast pitch softball players indicated that coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity are different visual abilities. This study used an alternative procedure to measure dynamic visual acuity to re-examine their relationship. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity were measured in 24 young adolescents (12 boys, 12 girls) 11 to 14 years of age. During the dynamic visual acuity procedure, the subject tracked an object of a constant size while the researcher manipulated the object's velocity. Analysis indicated that they are different visual abilities. Findings indicated that the dynamic visual acuity of boys was significantly better than that of girls, and coincidence anticipation between boys and girls did not differ. PMID:15739838

  5. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  6. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  7. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  8. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  9. Retinal Glial Cells Enhance Human Vision Acuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labin, A. M.; Ribak, E. N.

    2010-04-01

    We construct a light-guiding model of the retina outside the fovea, in which an array of glial (Muller) cells permeates the depth of the retina down to the photoreceptors. Based on measured refractive indices, we propagate light to obtain a significant increase of the intensity at the photoreceptors. For pupils up to 6 mm width, the coupling between neighboring cells is only a few percent. Low cross talk over the whole visible spectrum also explains the insensitivity to chromatic aberrations of the eye. The retina is revealed as an optimal structure designed for improving the sharpness of images.

  10. Visual acuity and magnification devices in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Philippe; Eichenberger, Martina; Neuhaus, Klaus W; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses visual acuity in dentistry and the influence of optical aids. Studies based on objective visual tests at a dental working distance were included. These studies show dramatic individual variation independent of the dentists’ age. The limitations due to presbyopia begin at an age of 40 years. Dental professionals should have their near vision tested regularly. Visual deficiencies can be compensated with magnification aids. It is important to differentiate between Galilean and Keplerian loupes. The lightweight Galilean loupes allow an almost straight posture and offer improved ergonomics. Younger dentists profit more from the ergonomic aspects, while dentists over the age of 40 can compensate their age-related visual deficiencies when using this type of loupe. Keplerian loupes, with their superior optical construction, improve the visual performance for dentists of all age groups. The optical advantages come at the cost of ergonomic constraints due to the weight of these loupes. The microscope is highly superior visually and ergonomically, and it is indispensable for the visual control of endodontic treatments. PMID:27023468

  11. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  12. The Frequency of Decreased Visual Acuity in Orbital Fractures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Joo Ho; Hwang, Kun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and evaluate the effect of orbital fractures (blowout fractures and nonblowout fractures) on visual acuity. In PubMed search and Scopus search, the terms "orbital fracture OR maxillofacial injury OR facial trauma OR craniofacial fracture," and "visual acuity OR functional outcome OR visual outcome OR improving document of visual acuity OR blindness OR optic nerve neuropathy" were used, which resulted in 1634 and 1152 papers, respectively. Of the 2226 titles excluding 560 duplicated titles, 227 abstracts were reviewed. Of the 227 abstracts reviewed, the authors found 56 potentially relevant full-text articles, of which 5 studies met our inclusion criteria. The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals from each study were abstracted. The statistical analysis was performed with review manager (The Nordic Cochrane Centre). A summary of 5 studies affirmed that 43 patients among 532 orbital fractures (8.1%) had decreased visual acuity. Twelve patients among 159 blowout fractures (7.5%) had decreased visual acuity. Thirty-one patients among 373 orbital fractures other than pure blowout fractures (8.3%) had decreased visual acuity. In orbital fractures other than pure blowout fractures, the frequency of decreased visual acuity was higher than pure blowout fractures (n = 532, odds ratio, 2.23, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-4.70). Surgeons should acknowledge this with patients before surgery. PMID:26114513

  13. Visual acuity in the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, James C.; Nguyen, Hoang; Seelke, Adele M. H.; Krubitzer, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Monodelphis domestica (short-tailed opossum) is an emerging animal model for studies of neural development due to the extremely immature state of the nervous system at birth and its subsequent rapid growth to adulthood. Yet little is known about its normal sensory discrimination abilities. In the present investigation, visual acuity was determined in this species using the optokinetic test (OPT), which relies on involuntary head tracking of a moving stimulus and can be easily elicited using a rotating visual stimulus of varying spatial frequencies. Using this methodology, we determined that the acuity of Monodelphis is 0.58 cycles per degree (cpd), which is similar to the acuity of rats using the same methodology, and higher than in mice. However, acuity in the short-tailed opossum is lower than in other marsupials. This is in part due to the methodology used to determine acuity, but may also be due to differences in diel patterns, lifestyle and phylogeny. We demonstrate that for the short-tailed opossum, the OPT is a rapid and reliable method of determining a baseline acuity and can be used to study enhanced acuities due to cortical plasticity. PMID:22871523

  14. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  15. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-06-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  16. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits. PMID:26905952

  17. Normal Visual Acuity and Electrophysiological Contrast Gain in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Bach, Michael; Blessing, Julia; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    A common neurodevelopmental disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is defined by specific patterns in social perception, social competence, communication, highly circumscribed interests, and a strong subjective need for behavioral routines. Furthermore, distinctive features of visual perception, such as markedly reduced eye contact and a tendency to focus more on small, visual items than on holistic perception, have long been recognized as typical ASD characteristics. Recent debate in the scientific community discusses whether the physiology of low-level visual perception might explain such higher visual abnormalities. While reports of this enhanced, "eagle-like" visual acuity contained methodological errors and could not be substantiated, several authors have reported alterations in even earlier stages of visual processing, such as contrast perception and motion perception at the occipital cortex level. Therefore, in this project, we have investigated the electrophysiology of very early visual processing by analyzing the pattern electroretinogram-based contrast gain, the background noise amplitude, and the psychophysical visual acuities of participants with high-functioning ASD and controls with equal education. Based on earlier findings, we hypothesized that alterations in early vision would be present in ASD participants. This study included 33 individuals with ASD (11 female) and 33 control individuals (12 female). The groups were matched in terms of age, gender, and education level. We found no evidence of altered electrophysiological retinal contrast processing or psychophysical measured visual acuities. There appears to be no evidence for abnormalities in retinal visual processing in ASD patients, at least with respect to contrast detection. PMID:26379525

  18. Normal Visual Acuity and Electrophysiological Contrast Gain in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Bach, Michael; Blessing, Julia; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    A common neurodevelopmental disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is defined by specific patterns in social perception, social competence, communication, highly circumscribed interests, and a strong subjective need for behavioral routines. Furthermore, distinctive features of visual perception, such as markedly reduced eye contact and a tendency to focus more on small, visual items than on holistic perception, have long been recognized as typical ASD characteristics. Recent debate in the scientific community discusses whether the physiology of low-level visual perception might explain such higher visual abnormalities. While reports of this enhanced, “eagle-like” visual acuity contained methodological errors and could not be substantiated, several authors have reported alterations in even earlier stages of visual processing, such as contrast perception and motion perception at the occipital cortex level. Therefore, in this project, we have investigated the electrophysiology of very early visual processing by analyzing the pattern electroretinogram-based contrast gain, the background noise amplitude, and the psychophysical visual acuities of participants with high-functioning ASD and controls with equal education. Based on earlier findings, we hypothesized that alterations in early vision would be present in ASD participants. This study included 33 individuals with ASD (11 female) and 33 control individuals (12 female). The groups were matched in terms of age, gender, and education level. We found no evidence of altered electrophysiological retinal contrast processing or psychophysical measured visual acuities. There appears to be no evidence for abnormalities in retinal visual processing in ASD patients, at least with respect to contrast detection. PMID:26379525

  19. Under-correction of human myopia – Is it myopigenic?: A retrospective analysis of clinical refraction data

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Esposito, Christina; Peterson, Cody; Coronado, Cory; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate retrospectively, based on routine clinical records in an optometric office, the effect of refractive under-correction of the myopic spectacle prescription on myopic progression in children and young adults. Methods Patient records of children and young-adult myopes in a private optometric practice in Glendale, Arizona, USA, were initially reviewed to identify those that met the criteria. Information collected from the patient records included: age, gender, the dates and number of their visits (more than one visit was required for use of the data), final prescription, and non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. For each patient visit, the difference in spherical equivalent (SE) between the subjective refraction for maximum visual acuity and the final prescription was calculated for both the left and right eyes. Myopia progression was defined as the difference in SE between the final subjective refraction of the previous visit and that of the subsequent visit. Based on the study criteria, a total of 275 patient visits were obtained from the data collected in 76 patients. Results A significant positive correlation was found between the magnitude of under-correction of the refractive error and myopic progression (r = 0.301, p < 0.01); that is, the greater the under-correction, the greater the myopic progression. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between myopia progression and subjective refraction (r = 0.166, p = 0.006); that is, the greater the degree of myopia, the greater the effect of under-correction. However, there was no significant correlation between myopia progression and either age (r = −0.11, p = 0.86) or gender (r = −0.82, p = 0.17). Conclusion Under-correction of myopia produced a small but progressively greater degree of myopic progression than did full correction. The present finding is consistent with earlier clinical trials and modeling of human myopia. PMID:25000870

  20. Cycloplegic refraction is the gold standard for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian G; Iribarren, Rafael; Fotouhi, Akbar; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Many studies on children have shown that lack of cycloplegia is associated with slight overestimation of myopia and marked errors in estimates of the prevalence of emmetropia and hyperopia. Non-cycloplegic refraction is particularly problematic for studies of associations with risk factors. The consensus around the importance of cycloplegia in children left undefined at what age, if any, cycloplegia became unnecessary. It was often implicitly assumed that cycloplegia is not necessary beyond childhood or early adulthood, and thus, the protocol for the classical studies of refraction in older adults did not include cycloplegia. Now that population studies of refractive error are beginning to fill the gap between schoolchildren and older adults, whether cycloplegia is required for measuring refractive error in this age range, needs to be defined. Data from the Tehran Eye Study show that, without cycloplegia, there are errors in the estimation of myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia in the age range 20-50, just as in children. Similar results have been reported in an analysis of data from the Beaver Dam Offspring Eye Study. If the only important outcome measure of a particular study is the prevalence of myopia, then cycloplegia may not be crucial in some cases. But, without cycloplegia, measurements of other refractive categories as well as spherical equivalent are unreliable. In summary, the current evidence suggests that cycloplegic refraction should be considered as the gold standard for epidemiological studies of refraction, not only in children, but in adults up to the age of 50. PMID:25597549

  1. Tobias Mayer--experiments on visual acuity (1755).

    PubMed

    Scheerer, E

    1987-01-01

    The pioneering experimental work of Tobias Mayer (1723-1762) on visual acuity, published in 1755 in Latin, is presented in English translation. Mayer distinguished between two kinds of visual acuity, the one (30 arc sec) for single objects seen against a uniform background, the other (1 arc min) for more complex objects such as gratings, grids, or checkerboards. Strong illumination did not improve visual acuity. For targets seen in the light of a candle, the visual angle needed for resolution was inversely proportional to the cube root of the distance of the candle and therefore to the sixth root of 'brightness'. The historical significance of Mayer's work on visual acuity is briefly outlined. PMID:3154942

  2. The development of an obstetric triage acuity tool.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Kathleen S; Wallace, Ruth; DuRant, Patricia G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the journey a multicampus hospital system took to improve the obstetric triage process. A review of literature revealed no current comprehensive obstetric acuity tool, and thus our team developed a tool with a patient flow process, revised and updated triage nurse competencies, and then educated the nurses about the new tool and process. Data were collected to assess the functionality of the new process in assigning acuity upon patient arrival, conveying appropriate acuities based on patient complaints, and initiating the medical screening examination, all within prescribed time intervals. Initially data indicated that processes were still not optimal, and re-education was provided for all triage nurses. This improved all data points. The result of this QI project is that our patients are now seen based on their acuity within designated time frames. PMID:21857199

  3. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  4. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  5. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  6. Etiology of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Spierer, A

    1991-10-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the etiologic factor of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus. Fourteen children with congenital nystagmus and reduced visual acuity were examined, using a modified "E" game test. Their success rate in identifying vertical lines was compared with their success rate in identifying horizontal lines. The children identified both vertical and horizontal lines with a similar rate of success. These results may indicate that poor vision in congenital nystagmus patients is partly the result of amblyopia. PMID:1755616

  7. Olfactory acuity in theropods: palaeobiological and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Zelenitsky, Darla K.; Therrien, François; Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    This research presents the first quantitative evaluation of the olfactory acuity in extinct theropod dinosaurs. Olfactory ratios (i.e. the ratio of the greatest diameter of the olfactory bulb to the greatest diameter of the cerebral hemisphere) are analysed in order to infer the olfactory acuity and behavioural traits in theropods, as well as to identify phylogenetic trends in olfaction within Theropoda. A phylogenetically corrected regression of olfactory ratio to body mass reveals that, relative to predicted values, the olfactory bulbs of (i) tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids are significantly larger, (ii) ornithomimosaurs and oviraptorids are significantly smaller, and (iii) ceratosaurians, allosauroids, basal tyrannosauroids, troodontids and basal birds are within the 95% CI. Relative to other theropods, olfactory acuity was high in tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids and therefore olfaction would have played an important role in their ecology, possibly for activities in low-light conditions, locating food, or for navigation within large home ranges. Olfactory acuity was the lowest in ornithomimosaurs and oviraptorids, suggesting a reduced reliance on olfaction and perhaps an omnivorous diet in these theropods. Phylogenetic trends in olfaction among theropods reveal that olfactory acuity did not decrease in the ancestry of birds, as troodontids, dromaeosaurids and primitive birds possessed typical or high olfactory acuity. Thus, the sense of smell must have remained important in primitive birds and its presumed decrease associated with the increased importance of sight did not occur until later among more derived birds. PMID:18957367

  8. Visual acuity in mammals: effects of eye size and ecology.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Kirk, E Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Previous comparative research has attributed interspecific variation in eye size among mammals to selection related to visual acuity. Mammalian species have also been hypothesized to differ in visual acuity partly as a result of differences in ecology. While a number of prior studies have explored ecological and phylogenetic effects on eye shape, a broad comparative analysis of the relationships between visual acuity, eye size and ecology in mammals is currently lacking. Here we use phylogenetic comparative methods to explore these relationships in a taxonomically and ecologically diverse sample of 91 mammal species. These data confirm that axial eye length and visual acuity are significantly positively correlated in mammals. This relationship conforms to expectations based on theoretical optics and prior analyses of smaller comparative samples. Our data also demonstrate that higher visual acuity in mammals is associated with: (1) diurnality and (2) predatory habits once the effects of eye size and phylogeny have been statistically controlled. These results suggest that interspecific variation in mammalian visual acuity is the result of a complex interplay between phylogenetic history, visual anatomy and ecology. PMID:24603494

  9. Preferential looking and recognition acuities in clinical amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mandava, N; Simon, J W; Jenkins, P L

    1991-01-01

    Although others have noted a correlation between grating and recognition acuities (RA) when both tests are performed on the same day, the value of preferential looking (PL) in predicting eventual visual outcome has not been studied. PL acuities of 64 preverbal patients considered at risk of amblyopia were measured. When these children became verbal, their visual acuities were determined using standard recognition acuity tests. Based on intervening amblyopia treatment between PL and RA measures, 40 patients were designated the minimal treatment group (MTG) and 24 the intensive treatment group (ITG). Chi-square analysis for the MTG showed agreement (P less than .005) between PL and RA in identifying better, equal, and worse eyes. Interocular ratios of PL and RA were significantly correlated for the MTG (P less than .001), but not for the ITG. Monocularly, a consistent correlation between PL and RA was not found. Our data suggest that PL is predictive of recognition acuity in patients whose visual acuity was expected to remain stable. PMID:1757857

  10. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect). PMID:16201423

  11. Seismic refraction exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1980-12-30

    In seismic exploration, refracted seismic energy is detected by seismic receivers to produce seismograms of subsurface formations. The seismograms are produced by directing seismic energy from an array of sources at an angle to be refracted by the subsurface formations and detected by the receivers. The directivity of the array is obtained by delaying the seismic pulses produced by each source in the source array.

  12. Nonlinear Refractive Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    2001-01-01

    Using nonlinear refractive properties of a salt-water solution at two wavelengths, numerical analysis has been performed to extract temperature and concentration from interferometric fringe data. The theoretical study, using a commercially available equation solving software, starts with critical fringe counting needs and the role of nonlinear refractive properties in such measurements. Finally, methodology of the analysis, codes, fringe counting accuracy needs, etc. is described in detail.

  13. Meterological correction of optical beam refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, V.P.; Melamud, A.E.; Mironov, V.L.

    1986-02-01

    At the present time laser reference systems (LRS's) are widely used in agrotechnology and in geodesy. The demands for accuracy in LRS's constantly increase, so that a study of error sources and means of considering and correcting them is of practical importance. A theoretical algorithm is presented for correction of the regular component of atmospheric refraction for various types of hydrostatic stability of the atmospheric layer adjacent to the earth. The algorithm obtained is compared to regression equations obtained by processing an experimental data base. It is shown that within admissible accuracy limits the refraction correction algorithm obtained permits construction of correction tables and design of optical systems with programmable correction for atmospheric refraction on the basis of rapid meteorological measurements.

  14. Refractive status of mountain aborigine schoolchildren in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shiuh-Liang; Chang, Cheng-Hsien; Lai, Yu-Hung; Wen, Mei-Hong; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Ho, Chi-Kung

    2008-03-01

    Myopia is an epidemic health problem in Taiwan's schoolchildren. The prevalence of myopia has been increasing yearly, and the average age at which myopia develops has also become younger. Due to insufficient eye care in remote areas, the refractive status of aboriginal schoolchildren has not been well established. In 2005 and 2006, under the sponsorship of the Bureau of Health Promotion, we surveyed the ocular refraction of aboriginal schoolchildren in southern Taiwan mountain townships. From five primary schools in two townships, 371 children aged from 7 to 13 years of age were enrolled in our study. Refractive status under cycloplegia and subjective visual acuity were obtained. The crude prevalence of myopia (< -0.25 diopter [D]) was 25.6%. Although the prevalence increased with age, the annual change in mean refractive status was slower in the schoolchildren of mountain aborigines. The spherical equivalents of 93% of children were within +/- 1 D. The highest myopia was only -2.50 D. Seven children (1.82%) were refractive amblyopic, for which high hyperopia, astigmatism or anisometropia were the main causes. As aboriginal children were noted to be more myopic in this study than in the past, better eye care should be implemented in these remote areas. PMID:18364272

  15. Atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric refraction can cause significant errors in satellite laser ranging (SLR) systems. There are two techniques which can be used to correct for these errors. Atmospheric models based upon surface measurements of pressure, temperature, and relative humidity have been shown by ray tracing to be accurate to within a few centimeters at 20 deg elevation angle. The residual errors in the models are thought to be primarily caused by horizontal gradients in the refractivity. Although models have been developed to predict the gradient effects, initial studies show that they can be sensitive to local topographic effects. Atmospheric turbulence can introduce random fluctuations in the refractivity, but only introduces centimeter level errors at elevation angles below 10 deg. Pulsed two-color ranging systems can directly measure the atmospheric delay in satellite ranging. These systems require mode-locked multiple-frequency lasers and streak-camera-based receivers and currently appear capable of measuring the atmospheric delay with an accuracy of 0.5 cm or better.

  16. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  17. Generalized ray tracing method for the calculation of the peripheral refraction induced by an ophthalmic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Pilar; Royo, Santiago; Caum, Jesus; Ramírez, Jorge; Madariaga, Ines

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral refraction, the refractive error present outside the main direction of gaze, has lately attracted interest due to its alleged relationship with the progression of myopia. The ray tracing procedures involved in its calculation need to follow an approach different from those used in conventional ophthalmic lens design, where refractive errors are compensated only in the main direction of gaze. We present a methodology for the evaluation of the peripheral refractive error in ophthalmic lenses, adapting the conventional generalized ray tracing approach to the requirements of the evaluation of peripheral refraction. The nodal point of the eye and a retinal conjugate surface will be used to evaluate the three-dimensional distribution of refractive error around the fovea. The proposed approach enables us to calculate the three-dimensional peripheral refraction induced by any ophthalmic lens at any direction of gaze and to personalize the lens design to the requirements of the user. The complete evaluation process for a given user prescribed with a -5.76D ophthalmic lens for foveal vision is detailed, and comparative results obtained when the geometry of the lens is modified and when the central refractive error is over- or undercorrected. The methodology is also applied for an emmetropic eye to show its application for refractive errors other than myopia.

  18. Assessing the utility of visual acuity measures in visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Avi; Zivotofsky, Ari Z

    2015-03-01

    There are presently several ongoing clinical trials to provide usable sight to profoundly visually impaired patients by means of electrical stimulation of the retina. Some of the blind patients implanted with retinal prosthesis reported un-patterned perception and yet benefit from the device in many activities of daily living, seemingly because they adopt active scanning strategies. The aim of the present work is to evaluate if and under what conditions a measured visual acuity level is truly an indication that the brain perceived a patterned image from the electrical stimulation of the visual prosthesis. Sighted subjects used a pixelized simulator in which they perceived either a low resolution sub-sampling of the original image ("normal mode"--patterned vision) or an image that was solely a function of the brightness and size of the original image ("brightness mode"--no patterned vision). Results show that subjects were able to adopt a head scanning strategy that enabled acuity beyond the resolution set by a static view of the stimulus. In brightness mode, i.e. without patterned vision, most subjects achieved a measurable acuity level better than the limit set by the geometrical resolution of the entire array but worse than the limit set by the distance between neighboring simulated pixels. In normal mode all subject achieved acuity level that is better than the geometrical resolution of the simulated pixels. Thus, visual acuity levels comparable with the electrodes/pixels resolution implies that the patient perceives an image with spatial patterns. PMID:25637855

  19. Autonomous satellite navigation using starlight refraction angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaolin; Wang, Longhua; Bai, Xinbei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2013-05-01

    An on-board autonomous navigation capability is required to reduce the operation costs and enhance the navigation performance of future satellites. Autonomous navigation by stellar refraction is a type of autonomous celestial navigation method that uses high-accuracy star sensors instead of Earth sensors to provide information regarding Earth's horizon. In previous studies, the refraction apparent height has typically been used for such navigation. However, the apparent height cannot be measured directly by a star sensor and can only be calculated by the refraction angle and an atmospheric refraction model. Therefore, additional errors are introduced by the uncertainty and nonlinearity of atmospheric refraction models, which result in reduced navigation accuracy and reliability. A new navigation method based on the direct measurement of the refraction angle is proposed to solve this problem. Techniques for the determination of the refraction angle are introduced, and a measurement model for the refraction angle is established. The method is tested and validated by simulations. When the starlight refraction height ranges from 20 to 50 km, a positioning accuracy of better than 100 m can be achieved for a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite using the refraction angle, while the positioning accuracy of the traditional method using the apparent height is worse than 500 m under the same conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the factors that affect navigation accuracy, including the measurement accuracy of the refraction angle, the number of visible refracted stars per orbit and the installation azimuth of star sensor, is presented. This method is highly recommended for small satellites in particular, as no additional hardware besides two star sensors is required.

  20. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  1. Emmetropization, visual acuity, and strabismus outcomes among hyperopic infants followed with partial hyperopic corrections given in accordance with dynamic retinoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Somer, D; Karabulut, E; Cinar, F G; Altiparmak, U E; Unlu, N

    2014-01-01

    Object To record emmetropization, visual acuity, and strabismus outcomes among hyperopic infants followed with partial hyperopic corrections given in accordance with dynamic retinoscopy (DR). Methods Infants (3.5–12 months of age) with ≥5 D hyperopia were followed without glasses or partial hyperopic corrections prescribed according to their near dynamic accommodative abilities determined by DR responses at the initial visit and follow-ups. Refraction and binocular accommodative ability assessments were made at 3-month intervals up to the age of 1 and at 6-month intervals afterwards for a mean 35.4±2.1 months; main outcome measures being the development of esotropia, emmetropization rate, and visual acuity level after emmetropization period. Results Among 211, 146 were normal accommodators initially (Group 1). These infants were followed without treatment and none presented with strabismus. Sixty-five infants were hypo-accommodators (Group 2) and received minimum DR-based corrections. Of the 65 infants 31 (48%) developed strabismus (Group 2B). The remaining 34 constituted Group 2A. Each of the three groups showed an overall reduction of hyperopia by 0.37±0.25 days per year, 0.50±0.28 days per year, and 0.60±0.20 days per year, respectively. Visual acuity assessments among Groups 1 and 2A revealed normal values (0.2–0.0 LogMAR); among Group 2B 19% were within normal range. Conclusions Binocular accommodative behavior at the initial visit seems to be one of the indicators for pointing out infants at risk of developing strabismus and amblyopia. Prescription of DR-based corrections to hyperopic orthotropic infants does not impede emmetropization and result in normal visual acuities after emmetropization period. PMID:25033902

  2. Image Quality Analysis of Eyes Undergoing LASER Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Samrat; Vaddavalli, Pravin Krishna; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    Laser refractive surgery for myopia increases the eye’s higher-order wavefront aberrations (HOA’s). However, little is known about the impact of such optical degradation on post-operative image quality (IQ) of these eyes. This study determined the relation between HOA’s and IQ parameters (peak IQ, dioptric focus that maximized IQ and depth of focus) derived from psychophysical (logMAR acuity) and computational (logVSOTF) through-focus curves in 45 subjects (18 to 31yrs) before and 1-month after refractive surgery and in 40 age-matched emmetropic controls. Computationally derived peak IQ and its best focus were negatively correlated with the RMS deviation of all HOA’s (HORMS) (r≥-0.5; p<0.001 for all). Computational depth of focus was positively correlated with HORMS (r≥0.55; p<0.001 for all) and negatively correlated with peak IQ (r≥-0.8; p<0.001 for all). All IQ parameters related to logMAR acuity were poorly correlated with HORMS (r≤|0.16|; p>0.16 for all). Increase in HOA’s after refractive surgery is therefore associated with a decline in peak IQ and a persistence of this sub-standard IQ over a larger dioptric range, vis-à-vis, before surgery and in age-matched controls. This optical deterioration however does not appear to significantly alter psychophysical IQ, suggesting minimal impact of refractive surgery on the subject’s ability to resolve spatial details and their tolerance to blur. PMID:26859302

  3. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  4. The Effect of Zeaxanthin on the Visual Acuity of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, Eric A.; Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; Cameron, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Oral supplementation of carotenoids such as zeaxanthin or lutein which naturally occur in human retina have been shown to improve vision and prevent progression of damage to advanced AMD in some studies. The zebrafish eye shares many physiological similarities with the human eye and is increasingly being used as model for vision research. We hypothesized that injection of zeaxanthin into the zebrafish eye would improve the visual acuity of the zebrafish over time. Visual acuity, calculated in cycles per degree, was measured in adult zebrafish to establish a consistent baseline using the optokinetic response. Zeaxanthin dissolved into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS only was injected into the anterior chamber of the right and left eyes of the Zebrafish. Visual acuities were measured at 1 week and 3, 8 and 12 weeks post-injection to compare to baseline values. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare visual acuities between fish injected with PBS and zeaxanthin. A significant improvement in visual acuity, 14% better than before the injection (baseline levels), was observed one week after injection with zeaxanthin (p = 0.04). This improvement peaked at more than 30% for some fish a few weeks after the injection and improvement in vision persisted at 3 weeks after injection (p = 0.006). The enhanced visual function was not significantly better than baseline at 8 weeks (p = 0.19) and returned to baseline levels 12 weeks after the initial injection (p = 0.50). Zeaxanthin can improve visual acuity in zebrafish eyes. Further studies are required to develop a better understanding of the role zeaxanthin and other carotenoids play during normal visual function. PMID:26267864

  5. Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  6. Visual acuity and pupillary reactions after peribulbar anaesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Talks, S J; Chong, N H; Gibson, J M; Francis, I R

    1994-01-01

    The effect of peribulbar anaesthesia on optic nerve function in 20 patients, before and after cataract surgery, was measured. All the patients had decreased visual acuity. Five (25%) had no perception of light. Seventeen (85%) developed a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD). No patients saw the operating instruments. Seven (35%) had improved visual acuity immediately postoperatively. Patients should be warned that they may lose vision completely on being given a peribulbar anaesthetic; however their vision will improve, but not necessarily immediately, postoperatively. Examination for an RAPD is a good method of providing reassurance that the operating instruments will not be seen. PMID:8110698

  7. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  8. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  9. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense.

    PubMed

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5-17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18-25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: -2.85° in early childhood; -2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  10. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M.; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5–17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18–25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: −2.85° in early childhood; −2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  11. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  12. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  13. Astronaut Charles Conrad during visual acuity experiments over Laredo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., pilot for the prime crew on the Gemini 5 space flight, takes pictures of predetermined land areas during visual acuity experiments over Laredo, Texas. The experiments will aid in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions.

  14. Astronauts Cooper and Conrad prepare cameras during visual acuity tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. (left), command pilot, and Charles Conrad Jr., pilot, the prime crew of the Gemini 5 space flight, prepare their cameras while aboard a C-130 aircraft flying near Laredo. The two astronauts are taking part in a series of visual acuity experiments to aid them in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions.

  15. Acuity systems dialogue and patient classification system essentials.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kelle; McCully, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining resources for quality patient care is a major responsibility of nurse leaders and requires accurate information in the political world of budgeting. Patient classification systems (PCS) assist nurse managers in controlling cost and improving patient care while appropriately using financial resources. This paper communicates acuity systems development, background, flaws, and components while discussing a few tools currently available. It also disseminates the development of a new acuity tool, the Patient Classification System. The PCS tool, developed in a small rural hospital, uses 5 broad concepts: (1) medications, (2) complicated procedures, (3) education, (4) psychosocial issues, and (5) complicated intravenous medications. These concepts embrace a 4-tiered scale that differentiates significant patient characteristics and assists in staffing measures for equality in patient staffing and improving quality of care and performance. Data obtained through use of the PCS can be used by nurse leaders to effectively and objectively lobby for appropriate patient care resources. Two questionnaires distributed to registered nurses on a medical-surgical unit evaluated the nurses' opinion of the 5 concepts and the importance for establishing patient acuity for in-patient care. Interrater reliability among nurses was 87% with the author's acuity tool. PMID:17909428

  16. A Comparison of Patched HOTV Visual Acuity and Photoscreening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leman, Rachel; Clausen, Michelle M.; Bates, Janice; Stark, Lee; Arnold, Koni K.; Arnold, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Early detection of significant vision problems in children is a high priority for pediatricians and school nurses. Routine vision screening is a necessary part of that detection and has traditionally involved acuity charts. However, photoscreening in which "red eye" is elicited to show whether each eye is focusing may outperform routine acuity…

  17. The Approximate Number System Acuity Redefined: A Diffusion Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonkoo; Starns, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    While all humans are capable of non-verbally representing numerical quantity using so-called the approximate number system (ANS), there exist considerable individual differences in its acuity. For example, in a non-symbolic number comparison task, some people find it easy to discriminate brief presentations of 14 dots from 16 dots while others do not. Quantifying individual ANS acuity from such a task has become an essential practice in the field, as individual differences in such a primitive number sense is thought to provide insights into individual differences in learned symbolic math abilities. However, the dominant method of characterizing ANS acuity—computing the Weber fraction (w)—only utilizes the accuracy data while ignoring response times (RT). Here, we offer a novel approach of quantifying ANS acuity by using the diffusion model, which accounts both accuracy and RT distributions. Specifically, the drift rate in the diffusion model, which indexes the quality of the stimulus information, is used to capture the precision of the internal quantity representation. Analysis of behavioral data shows that w is contaminated by speed-accuracy tradeoff, making it problematic as a measure of ANS acuity, while drift rate provides a measure more independent from speed-accuracy criterion settings. Furthermore, drift rate is a better predictor of symbolic math ability than w, suggesting a practical utility of the measure. These findings demonstrate critical limitations of the use of w and suggest clear advantages of using drift rate as a measure of primitive numerical competence. PMID:26733929

  18. Effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging to satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. All the formulas assume the atmospheric refractivity profile is spherically symmetric. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles are constructed from radiosonde data. The results indicate that the horizontal gradients introduce an rms error of approximately 3 cm when the satellite is near 10 deg elevation. The error decreases to a few millimeters near zenith.

  19. Bandwidth of the contrast sensitivity function as an index of spatial vision with application to refraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B C; Scialfa, C T; Tyrrell, R A; Garvey, P M; Leibowitz, H W

    1990-04-01

    The contrast sensitivity function (CSF), although containing more information than traditional measures of acuity, has found difficulty gaining clinical acceptance. The hesitancy of clinicians to adopt the CSF stems, in part, from the fact that it is not as readily interpreted as is acuity. In order to facilitate such interpretation, five indices of spatial vision which are derivable from the CSF were examined in a sample of 287 persons aged 5 to 85 years. All indices were found to be both age-sensitive and strongly related to each other, but bandwidth of the CSF was chosen as a practical index for clinical settings. In a second study, acuity and CSF bandwidth were measured under 0 to +/- 1 D optical blur. It was found that the correction providing best acuity also maximized CSF bandwidth, and that bandwidth was more sensitive to optical blur than was acuity. Results support the assertion that CSF bandwidth is a readily interpreted index of spatial vision that can be measured efficiently within the context of clinical refraction. PMID:2342788

  20. Dynamic Visual Acuity: a Functionally Relevant Research Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; Brady, Rachel A.; Miller, Chris A.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Wood, Scott J.; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    Coordinated movements between the eyes and head are required to maintain a stable retinal image during head and body motion. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays a significant role in this gaze control system that functions well for most daily activities. However, certain environmental conditions or interruptions in normal VOR function can lead to inadequate ocular compensation, resulting in oscillopsia, or blurred vision. It is therefore possible to use acuity to determine when the environmental conditions, VOR function, or the combination of the two is not conductive for maintaining clear vision. Over several years we have designed and tested several tests of dynamic visual acuity (DVA). Early tests used the difference between standing and walking acuity to assess decrements in the gaze stabilization system after spaceflight. Supporting ground-based studies measured the responses from patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction and explored the effects of visual target viewing distance and gait cycle events on walking acuity. Results from these studies show that DVA is affected by spaceflight, is degraded in patients with vestibular dysfunction, changes with target distance, and is not consistent across the gait cycle. We have recently expanded our research to include studies in which seated subjects are translated or rotated passively. Preliminary results from this work indicate that gaze stabilization ability may differ between similar active and passive conditions, may change with age, and can be affected by the location of the visual target with respect to the axis of motion. Use of DVA as a diagnostic tool is becoming more popular but the functional nature of the acuity outcome measure also makes it ideal for identifying conditions that could lead to degraded vision. By doing so, steps can be taken to alter the problematic environments to improve the man-machine interface and optimize performance.

  1. Analysis of visual acuity and motion resolvability as measures for optimal visual perception of the workspace.

    PubMed

    Janabi-Sharifi, Farrokh; Vakanski, Aleksandar

    2011-03-01

    For working tasks with high visual demand, ergonomic design of the working stations requires defining criteria for comparative evaluation and analysis of the visual perceptibility in different regions of the workspace. This paper provides kinematic models of visual acuity and motion resolvability as adopted measures of visual perceptibility of the workspace. The proposed models have been examined through two sets of experiments. The first experiment is designed to compare the models outputs with those from experiments. Time measurements of the participants' response to visual events are employed for calculation of the perceptibility measures. The overall comparison results show similar patterns and moderate statistical errors of the measured and kinematically modeled values of the parameters. In the second experiment, the proposed set of visual perceptibility measures are examined for a simulated industrial task of inserting electronic chips into slots of a working table, resembling a fine assembly line of transponders manufacturing. The results from ANOVA tests for the visual acuity and the motion resolvability justify the postures adopted by the participants using visual perceptibility measures for completing the insertion tasks. PMID:20947063

  2. Photon-Refracting Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    A threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is being constructed at CUA to allow for the study of kaons in experiments at the Jefferson Laboratory. These subatomic particles move faster than light through the aerogel material, emitting Cherenkov radiation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) convert the photons from the Cherenkov radiation into electrons and multiply the electrons sufficiently to get a readable electronic signal, which can be analyzed. An important part of a threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is its use of aerogel material of several refractive indices to cover the full dynamic range over which one wants to detect the particles of interest (in this case the kaon). Uniform coverage in refractive index is important as the location of the incoming particle will not be constant throughout the testing. In addition to testing for uniform coverage, we must also verify these refractive indices to ensure that the particles we are detecting are in fact kaons. The last test on the aerogel that needs to be performed is the measurement of transparency. Although aerogel is highly transparent, it is still necessary to find the amount of light being absorbed, reflected, or scattered versus how much will actually be measured by the PMTs used.

  3. [Complications of corneal lamellar refractive surgery].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Remy, M

    2015-12-01

    Techniques available for corneal lamellar refractive surgery are laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using a microkeratome or femtosecond laser incision followed by excimer laser corneal ablation, and femtosecond laser-assisted refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). These treatments are nowadays considered to be safe and effective standard procedures for surgical correction of mild to moderate ametropia. Possible complications include too small or decentered optical zones, intraoperative flap cutting errors and postoperative inflammation (e.g. diffuse lamellar keratitis, DLK), epithelial or flap folds, epithelial ingrowths or iatrogenic ectasia. The occurrence of complications may be significantly reduced by compliance to corresponding standards of indication and treatment that are based on current scientific knowledge. PMID:26613941

  4. [Prediction of postoperative visual acuity in retinal detachment with macular involvement].

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, T; Fukuda, T; Kishimoto, M; Ogura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We used laser interferometry (LI) and a potential acuity meter (PAM) to predict visual acuity after surgery for patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with macular involvement. Thirty one eyes of 31 patients with retinal detachment were treated with scleral buckling procedures. Postoperative visual acuity was correlated with preoperative measurements of the LI and PAM, preoperative visual acuity by Landort's ring, and the estimated duration of macular detachment. The correlation between the duration of macular detachment and the postoperative visual acuity was not good (r = 0.55, p < 0.01). Although the preoperative visual acuity showed a relatively good correlation with postoperative visual acuity (r = 0.62, p < 0.01), the results of the LI and PAM provided a better correlation (LI; r = 0.73, PAM; r = 0.71). Our results suggest that the LI and PAM are useful to predict the visual acuity after retinal reattachment in patients with preoperative macular detachment. PMID:7732924

  5. Peripheral Refraction with and without Contact Lens Correction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Clark, Christopher A.; Soni, P. Sarita; Thibos, Larry N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral refractive error degrades the quality of retinal images and has been hypothesized to be a stimulus for the development of refractive error. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in refractive error across the horizontal visual field produced by contact lenses (CLs) and to quantify the effect of CLs on peripheral image blur. Methods A commercial Shack-Hartmann aberrometer measured ocular wavefront aberrations in 5° steps across the central 60° of visual field along the horizontal meridian before and after CLs correction. Wavefront refractions for peripheral lines-of-sight were based on the full elliptical pupil encountered in peripheral measurements. Curvature of field is the change in peripheral spherical equivalent relative to the eye’s optical axis. Results Hyperopic curvature of field in the naked eye increases with increasing amounts central myopic refractive error as predicted by Atchison (2006). For an eccentricity of E degrees, field curvature is approximately E percent of foveal refractive error. Rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses changed field curvature in the myopic direction twice as much as soft contact lenses (SCLs). Both of these effects varied with CLs power. For all lens powers, SCL cut the degree of hyperopic field curvature in half whereas RGP lenses nearly eliminated field curvature. The benefit of reduced field curvature was partially offset by increased oblique astigmatism. The net reduction of retinal blur due to CLs is approximately constant across the visual field. Conclusions Both SCL and RGP lenses reduced the degree of hyperopic field curvature present in myopic eyes, with RGP lenses having greater effect. The tradeoff between field curvature and off-axis astigmatism with RGP lenses may limit their effectiveness for control of myopia progression. These results suggest that axial growth mechanisms that depend on retinal image quality will be affected more by RGP than by SCL lenses. PMID:20601913

  6. Evaluation of visual acuity with Gen 3 night vision goggles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Using laboratory simulations, visual performance was measured at luminance and night vision imaging system (NVIS) radiance levels typically encountered in the natural nocturnal environment. Comparisons were made between visual performance with unaided vision and that observed with subjects using image intensification. An Amplified Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS6) binocular image intensifier was used. Light levels available in the experiments (using video display technology and filters) were matched to those of reflecting objects illuminated by representative night-sky conditions (e.g., full moon, starlight). Results show that as expected, the precipitous decline in foveal acuity experienced with decreasing mesopic luminance levels is effectively shifted to much lower light levels by use of an image intensification system. The benefits of intensification are most pronounced foveally, but still observable at 20 deg eccentricity. Binocularity provides a small improvement in visual acuity under both intensified and unintensified conditions.

  7. Panic attacks and interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, G J; Sandler, L S; Wilson, K G; Norton, G R

    1993-02-01

    It has been suggested that perception of visceral changes, and cognitive reactions to such changes, may be important for triggering panic attacks. It remains to be determined, however, whether people with panic attacks are actually characterized by enhanced perceptual acuity for interoceptive stimuli. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between panic attacks and awareness for cardiac sensations using an objective heartbeat discrimination procedure. Twenty panickers and 20 nonpanickers were given 60 trials of the Whitehead heartbeat discrimination procedure. Thirty trials were given during rest and 30 following hyperventilation. Results indicated that panic attacks were not related to enhanced interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations, either at rest or following hyperventilation. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to cognitive models of panic. PMID:8442744

  8. Influence of loupes and age on the near visual acuity of practicing dentists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenberger, Martina; Perrin, Philippe; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Bringolf, Ueli; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the near visual acuity of 40 dentists and its improvement by using different magnification devices. The acuity was tested with miniaturized E-optotype tests on a negatoscope under the following conditions: 1. natural visual acuity, 300 mm; 2. single lens loupe, 2×, 250 mm; 3. Galilean loupe, 2.5×, 380 mm; and 4. Keplerian loupe, 4.3×, 400 mm. In part 1, the influence of the magnification devices was investigated for all dentists. The Keplerian loupe obtained the highest visual acuity (4.64), followed by the Galilean loupe (2.43), the single lens loupe (1.42), and natural visual acuity (1.19). For part 2, the dentists were classified according to their age (=40 years). The younger dentists' group achieved a significantly higher visual acuity with all magnification devices (p<0.001). For part 3, the dentists were grouped according to their natural visual acuity. The group with the higher natural visual acuity achieved significantly higher visual acuity with all magnification devices than did the group of dentists with the lower natural visual acuity (p<0.01). It can be concluded that near visual acuity varies highly between individuals and decreases during the lifetime. Independent of age or natural vision, visual acuity can be significantly improved by using magnification devices.

  9. Assessment of Visual Acuity in Relation to Central Nervous System Activation in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Karl; Grottland, Havar; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity, using Teller Acuity Cards, was combined with observations of behavioral state to indicate central nervous system activation in 24 individuals with mental retardation. Results indicate that forced-choice preferential-looking technique can be used to test visual acuity in this population unless the participant is drowsy.…

  10. Relationship among fMRI, contrast sensitivity and visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Leguire, L E; Algaze, A; Kashou, N H; Lewis, J; Rogers, G L; Roberts, C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether visual acuity or contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is proportional to visual cortical function based on fMRI volume and level of activation or Z-score. Forced choice procedures were utilized to measure the monocular log minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity and CSF. The CSF data were collapsed into a single index by the use of weighted mean contrast sensitivity (WMCS), being defined as the mean of the products of each spatial frequency multiplied by its corresponding contrast sensitivity. fMRI data had been obtained with a 1.5 T GE Signa scanner with visual stimuli including 1.0 and 2.0 c/deg vertical sinusoidal gratings. Subjects consisted of eight normal adults and five amblyopic patients, with the amblyopic subjects added to gauge whether the outcome was due to a restricted range of scores or the small number of study participants. In normal subjects, the fMRI volume and level of activation exhibited no statistically significant correlation with visual acuity at P<0.05. Statistically significant correlations were obtained between WMCS and fMRI volume (R=0.765, P=0.027) and fMRI level of activation (R=0.645, P=0.007), with right eye stimulation using the 1.0 c/deg grating. On the whole, statistically significant correlations between WMCS and fMRI parameters were maintained when subject age was held constant and when data from the five amblyopic subjects were included to expand the range of values and increase the number of data sets for analysis. fMRI volume and Z-score were more closely associated with the CSF, as defined by WMCS, than visual acuity. The results suggest that the CSF reflects the underlying visual cortical cells responsible for fMRI volume and the level of activation. PMID:21035430

  11. Effects of Horizontal Acceleration on Human Visual Acuity and Stereopsis

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tsai, Ming-Ling; Chang, Wei-Kang; Yang, Tzu-Hung; Yauan, Chien-Han; Wang, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years) were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (< and >0.1 g) were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration <0.1 g in the X- or Y-axis did not affect dynamic vision and stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR) and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc) when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR) and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc) when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy. PMID:25607601

  12. Effects of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tsai, Ming-Ling; Chang, Wei-Kang; Yang, Tzu-Hung; Yauan, Chien-Han; Wang, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years) were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (< and >0.1 g) were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration <0.1 g in the X- or Y-axis did not affect dynamic vision and stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR) and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc) when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR) and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc) when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy. PMID:25607601

  13. Assessment of imaging with extended depth-of-field by means of the light sword lens in terms of visual acuity scale

    PubMed Central

    Kakarenko, Karol; Ducin, Izabela; Grabowiecki, Krzysztof; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Mira-Agudelo, Alejandro; Petelczyc, Krzysztof; Składowska, Aleksandra; Sypek, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We present outcomes of an imaging experiment using the refractive light sword lens (LSL) as a contact lens in an optical system that serves as a simplified model of the presbyopic eye. The results show that the LSL produces significant improvements in visual acuity of the simplified presbyopic eye model over a wide range of defocus. Therefore, this element can be an interesting alternative for the multifocal contact and intraocular lenses currently used in ophthalmology. The second part of the article discusses possible modifications of the LSL profile in order to render it more suitable for fabrication and ophthalmological applications. PMID:26137376

  14. Assessment of imaging with extended depth-of-field by means of the light sword lens in terms of visual acuity scale.

    PubMed

    Kakarenko, Karol; Ducin, Izabela; Grabowiecki, Krzysztof; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Mira-Agudelo, Alejandro; Petelczyc, Krzysztof; Składowska, Aleksandra; Sypek, Maciej

    2015-05-01

    We present outcomes of an imaging experiment using the refractive light sword lens (LSL) as a contact lens in an optical system that serves as a simplified model of the presbyopic eye. The results show that the LSL produces significant improvements in visual acuity of the simplified presbyopic eye model over a wide range of defocus. Therefore, this element can be an interesting alternative for the multifocal contact and intraocular lenses currently used in ophthalmology. The second part of the article discusses possible modifications of the LSL profile in order to render it more suitable for fabrication and ophthalmological applications. PMID:26137376

  15. Higher-order aberrations and best-corrected visual acuity in Native American children with a high prevalence of astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph M.; Harvey, Erin M.; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether higher-order aberrations (HOAs) in children from a highly astigmatic population differ from population norms and whether HOAs are associated with astigmatism and reduced best-corrected visual acuity. Methods Subjects were 218 Tohono O’odham Native American children 5–9 years of age. Noncycloplegic HOA measurements were obtained with a handheld Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS). Signed (z06s to z14s) and unsigned (z06u to z14u) wavefront aberration Zernike coefficients Z(3,−3) to Z(4,4) were rescaled for a 4 mm diameter pupil and compared to adult population norms. Cycloplegic refraction and best-corrected logMAR letter visual acuity (BCVA) were also measured. Regression analyses assessed the contribution of astigmatism (J0) and HOAs to BCVA. Results The mean root-mean-square (RMS) HOA of 0.191 ± 0.072 μm was significantly greater than population norms (0.100 ± 0.044 μm. All unsigned HOA coefficients (z06u to z14u) and all signed coefficients except z09s, z10s, and z11s were significantly larger than population norms. Decreased BCVA was associated with astigmatism (J0) and spherical aberration (z12u) but not RMS coma, with the effect of J0 about 4 times as great as z12u. Conclusions Tohono O’odham children show elevated HOAs compared to population norms. Astigmatism and unsigned spherical aberration are associated with decreased acuity, but the effects of spherical aberration are minimal and not clinically significant. PMID:26239206

  16. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  17. Visual and Refractive Outcomes of a Toric Presbyopia-Correcting Intraocular Lens.

    PubMed

    Epitropoulos, Alice T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate outcomes in astigmatic patients implanted with the Trulign (Bausch + Lomb) toric presbyopia-correcting intraocular lens (IOL) during cataract surgery in a clinical practice setting. Methods. Retrospective study in 40 eyes (31 patients) that underwent cataract extraction and IOL implantation in a procedure using intraoperative wavefront aberrometry guidance (ORA system). Endpoints included uncorrected visual acuity (VA), reduction in refractive cylinder, accuracy to target, axis orientation, and safety. Results. At postoperative month 1, refractive cylinder was ≤0.50 D in 97.5% of eyes (≤1.00 D in 100%), uncorrected distance VA was 20/25 or better in 95%, uncorrected intermediate VA was 20/25 or better in 95%, and uncorrected near VA was 20/40 (J3 equivalent) or better in 92.5%. Manifest refraction spherical equivalent was within 1.00 D of target in 95% of eyes and within 0.50 D in 82.5%. Lens rotation was <5° and best-corrected VA was 20/25 or better in all eyes. Conclusion. The IOL effectively reduced refractive cylinder and provided excellent uncorrected distance and intermediate vision and functional near vision. Refractive predictability and rotational stability were exceptional. Implantation of this toric presbyopia-correcting IOL using ORA intraoperative aberrometry provides excellent refractive and visual outcomes in a standard of care setting. PMID:26885382

  18. Visual and Refractive Outcomes of a Toric Presbyopia-Correcting Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Epitropoulos, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate outcomes in astigmatic patients implanted with the Trulign (Bausch + Lomb) toric presbyopia-correcting intraocular lens (IOL) during cataract surgery in a clinical practice setting. Methods. Retrospective study in 40 eyes (31 patients) that underwent cataract extraction and IOL implantation in a procedure using intraoperative wavefront aberrometry guidance (ORA system). Endpoints included uncorrected visual acuity (VA), reduction in refractive cylinder, accuracy to target, axis orientation, and safety. Results. At postoperative month 1, refractive cylinder was ≤0.50 D in 97.5% of eyes (≤1.00 D in 100%), uncorrected distance VA was 20/25 or better in 95%, uncorrected intermediate VA was 20/25 or better in 95%, and uncorrected near VA was 20/40 (J3 equivalent) or better in 92.5%. Manifest refraction spherical equivalent was within 1.00 D of target in 95% of eyes and within 0.50 D in 82.5%. Lens rotation was <5° and best-corrected VA was 20/25 or better in all eyes. Conclusion. The IOL effectively reduced refractive cylinder and provided excellent uncorrected distance and intermediate vision and functional near vision. Refractive predictability and rotational stability were exceptional. Implantation of this toric presbyopia-correcting IOL using ORA intraoperative aberrometry provides excellent refractive and visual outcomes in a standard of care setting. PMID:26885382

  19. Refractive cylinder outcomes after calculating toric intraocular lens cylinder power using total corneal refractive power

    PubMed Central

    Davison, James A; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the total corneal refractive power (TCRP) value, which is based on measurement of both anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism, is effective for toric intraocular lens (IOL) calculation with AcrySof® Toric IOLs. Patients and methods A consecutive series of cataract surgery cases with AcrySof toric IOL implantation was studied retrospectively. The IOLMaster® was used for calculation of IOL sphere, the Pentacam® TCRP 3.0 mm apex/ring value was used as the keratometry input to the AcrySof Toric IOL Calculator and the VERION™ Digital Marker for surgical orientation. The keratometry readings from the VERION reference unit were recorded but not used in the actual calculation. Vector differences between expected and actual residual refractive cylinder were calculated and compared to simulated vector errors using the collected VERION keratometry data. Results In total, 83 eyes of 56 patients were analyzed. Residual refractive cylinder was 0.25 D or lower in 58% of eyes and 0.5 D or lower in 80% of eyes. The TCRP-based calculation resulted in a statistically significantly lower vector error (P<0.01) and significantly more eyes with a vector error ≤0.5 D relative to the VERION-based calculation (P=0.02). The TCRP and VERION keratometry readings suggested a different IOL toric power in 53/83 eyes. In these 53 eyes the TCRP vector error was lower in 28 cases, the VERION error was lower in five cases, and the error was equal in 20 cases. When the anterior cornea had with-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was more likely to suggest a higher toric power and when the anterior cornea had against-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was less likely to suggest a higher toric power. Conclusion Using the TCRP keratometry measurement in the AcrySof toric calculator may improve overall postoperative refractive results. Consideration of measured posterior corneal astigmatism, rather than a population-averaged value, appears advantageous. PMID:26316693

  20. GRAVSAT/GEOPAUSE refraction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A ground station network tracked a high altitude spacecraft which in turn tracked a low orbiting satellite. Orbit data are relayed back to the ground stations. A refraction study was performed on this configuration to compute ionospheric and tropospheric refraction effects along the satellite and ground links.

  1. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian T.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients’ scores were significantly worse than normals’ scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  2. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  3. Temporal perceptual coding using a visual acuity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adzic, Velibor; Cohen, Robert A.; Vetro, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes research and results in which a visual acuity (VA) model of the human visual system (HVS) is used to reduce the bitrate of coded video sequences, by eliminating the need to signal transform coefficients when their corresponding frequencies will not be detected by the HVS. The VA model is integrated into the state of the art HEVC HM codec. Compared to the unmodified codec, up to 45% bitrate savings are achieved while maintaining the same subjective quality of the video sequences. Encoding times are reduced as well.

  4. Associations of Anisometropia with Unilateral Amblyopia, Interocular Acuity Difference and Stereoacuity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Gui-shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen; Quinn, Graham; Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Ciner, Elise; Cyert, Lynn; Orel-Bixler, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relation of anisometropia with unilateral amblyopia, interocular acuity difference (IAD) and stereoacuity, among Head Start preschoolers, using both clinical notation and vector notation analyses. Design Multicenter, cross-sectional study. Participants 3- to 5-year-old participants in the Vision In Preschoolers (VIP) Study (N=4040). Methods Secondary analysis of VIP data from participants who had comprehensive eye examinations including monocular visual acuity (VA) testing, stereoacuity testing, and cycloplegic refraction. VA was retested with full cycloplegic correction when retest criteria were met. Unilateral amblyopia was defined as IAD ≥2 lines in logarithm of the Minimum Angle of Resolution (logMAR). Anisometropia was defined as ≥0.25 D (diopter) difference in spherical equivalent (SE) or in cylinder power, and also two approaches using power vector notation. The percentage with unilateral amblyopia, mean IAD, and mean stereoacuity were compared between anisometropic and isometropic children. Main Outcomes Measures The percentage with unilateral amblyopia, mean IAD, and mean stereoacuity. Results Compared with isometropic children, anisometropic children had a higher percentage of unilateral amblyopia (8% vs. 2%), larger mean IAD (0.07 vs. 0.05 logMAR) and worse mean stereoacuity (145 vs.117 arc sec) (all p<0.0001). Larger amounts of anisometropia were associated with higher percentages of unilateral amblyopia, larger IAD, and worse stereoacuity (trend p<0.001). Percentage of unilateral amblyopia was significantly increased with spherical equivalent (SE) anisometropia >0.5 D, cylindrical anisometropia >0.25 D, the vertical/horizontal meridian (J0) or oblique meridian (J45) >0.125 D, or vector dioptric distance (VDD) >0.35 D (all p<0.001). VDD had higher ability in detecting unilateral amblyopia than cylinder, SE, J0 and J45 (p<0.001). Conclusions The presence of and amount of anisometropia were associated with the presence of

  5. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  6. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-01-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a through review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction. PMID:16521625

  7. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-07-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction. PMID:16939159

  8. Functional Visual Acuity in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yohei; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Shinoda, Hajime; Uchida, Atsuro; Mochimaru, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Sasaki, Mariko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We evaluated whether a functional visual acuity (FVA) system can detect subtle changes in central visual acuity that reflect pathological findings associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with unilateral AMD and logMAR monocular best corrected VA better than 0 in both eyes, as measured by conventional chart examination, were analyzed between November 2012 and April 2013. After measuring conventional VA, FVA, and contrast VA with best correction, routine eye examinations including spectral domain–optical coherence tomography were performed. Standard Schirmer test was performed, and corneal and lens densities were measured. Results The FVA score (p < 0.001) and visual maintenance ratio (p < 0.001) measured by the FVA system, contrast VA (p < 0. 01), and conventional VA (p < 0.01) were significantly worse in the AMD-affected eyes than in the fellow eyes. No significant differences were observed in the anterior segment conditions. Forward stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that the length of interdigitation zone disruption, as visualized by optical coherence tomography imaging, correlated with the FVA score (p < 0.01) but not with any other parameters investigated. Conclusions The FVA system detects subtle changes in best corrected VA in AMD-affected eyes and reflects interdigitation zone disruption, an anatomical change in the retina recorded by optical coherence tomography. Further studies are required to understand the value of the FVA system in detecting subtle changes in AMD. PMID:26583795

  9. Influences of multiple memory systems on auditory mental image acuity.

    PubMed

    Navarro Cebrian, Ana; Janata, Petr

    2010-05-01

    The influence of different memory systems and associated attentional processes on the acuity of auditory images, formed for the purpose of making intonation judgments, was examined across three experiments using three different task types (cued-attention, imagery, and two-tone discrimination). In experiment 1 the influence of implicit long-term memory for musical scale structure was manipulated by varying the scale degree (leading tone versus tonic) of the probe note about which a judgment had to be made. In experiments 2 and 3 the ability of short-term absolute pitch knowledge to develop was manipulated by presenting blocks of trials in the same key or in seven different keys. The acuity of auditory images depended on all of these manipulations. Within individual listeners, thresholds in the two-tone discrimination and cued-attention conditions were closely related. In many listeners, cued-attention thresholds were similar to thresholds in the imagery condition, and depended on the amount of training individual listeners had in playing a musical instrument. The results indicate that mental images formed at a sensory/cognitive interface for the purpose of making perceptual decisions are highly malleable. PMID:21117767

  10. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  11. Changes in brain morphology in albinism reflect reduced visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth A H; Davies, George; Chambers, Claire; Gouws, Andre; Hoffmann, Michael; Morland, Antony B

    2014-07-01

    Albinism, in humans and many animal species, has a major impact on the visual system, leading to reduced acuity, lack of binocular function and nystagmus. In addition to the lack of a foveal pit, there is a disruption to the routing of the nerve fibers crossing at the optic chiasm, resulting in excessive crossing of fibers to the contralateral hemisphere. However, very little is known about the effect of this misrouting on the structure of the post-chiasmatic visual pathway, and the occipital lobes in particular. Whole-brain analyses of cortical thickness in a large cohort of subjects with albinism showed an increase in cortical thickness, relative to control subjects, particularly in posterior V1, corresponding to the foveal representation. Furthermore, mean cortical thickness across entire V1 was significantly greater in these subjects compared to controls and negatively correlated with visual acuity in albinism. Additionally, the group with albinism showed decreased gyrification in the left ventral occipital lobe. While the increase in cortical thickness in V1, also found in congenitally blind subjects, has been interpreted to reflect a lack of pruning, the decreased gyrification in the ventral extrastriate cortex may reflect the reduced input to the foveal regions of the ventral visual stream. PMID:23039995

  12. Refractive lens exchange in modern practice: when and when not to do it?

    PubMed

    Alió, Jorge L; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Cataract surgery due to advances in small incision surgery evolved from a procedure concerned with the primary focus on the safe removal of cataractous lens to a procedure focused on the best possible postoperative refractive result. As the outcomes of cataract surgery became better, the use of lens surgery as a refractive modality in patients without cataracts has increased in interest and in popularity. Removal of the crystalline lens for refractive purposes or refractive lens exchange (RLE) presents several advantages over corneal refractive surgery. Patients with high degrees of myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism are still not good candidates for laser surgery. Moreover, presbyopia can currently only be corrected with monovision or reading spectacles. RLE supplemented with multifocal or accommodating intraocular lenses (IOLs) in combination with corneal astigmatic procedures might address all refractive errors including presbyopia, and eliminate the future need for cataract surgery. PMID:26605356

  13. Smartphone-Based Visual Acuity Measurement for Screening and Clinical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Christopher J.; Eghrari, Allen O.; Labrique, Alain B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Visual acuity is the most frequently performed measure of visual function in clinical practice and most people worldwide living with visual impairment are living in low- and middle-income countries. OBJECTIVE To design and validate a smartphone-based visual acuity test that is not dependent on familiarity with symbols or letters commonly used in the English language. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Validation study conducted from December 11, 2013, to March 4, 2014, comparing results from smartphone-based Peek Acuity to Snellen acuity (clinical normal) charts and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) logMAR chart (reference standard). This study was nested within the 6-year follow-up of the Nakuru Eye Disease Cohort in central Kenya and included 300 adults aged 55 years and older recruited consecutively. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcome measures were monocular logMAR visual acuity scores for each test: ETDRS chart logMAR, Snellen acuity, and Peek Acuity. Peek Acuity was compared, in terms of test-retest variability and measurement time, with the Snellen acuity and ETDRS logMAR charts in participants’ homes and temporary clinic settings in rural Kenya in 2013 and 2014. RESULTS The 95%CI limits for test-retest variability of smartphone acuity data were ±0.029 logMAR. The mean differences between the smartphone-based test and the ETDRS chart and the smartphone-based test and Snellen acuity data were 0.07 (95%CI, 0.05–0.09) and 0.08 (95%CI, 0.06–0.10) logMAR, respectively, indicating that smartphone-based test acuities agreed well with those of the ETDRS and Snellen charts. The agreement of Peek Acuity and the ETDRS chart was greater than the Snellen chart with the ETDRS chart (95%CI, 0.05–0.10; P = .08). The local Kenyan community health care workers readily accepted the Peek Acuity smartphone test; it required minimal training and took no longer than the Snellen test (77 seconds vs 82 seconds; 95%CI, 71–84 seconds vs 73–91

  14. Visual acuity in an opportunistic raptor, the chimango caracara (Milvago chimango).

    PubMed

    Potier, Simon; Bonadonna, Francesco; Kelber, Almut; Duriez, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Raptors are always considered to have an extraordinary resolving power of their eyes (high visual acuity). Nevertheless, raptors differ in their diet and foraging tactics, which could lead to large differences in visual acuity. The visual acuity of an opportunist bird of prey, the Chimango caracara (Mivalgo chimango) was estimated by operant conditioning. Three birds were trained to discriminate two stimuli, a positive grey uniform pattern and a negative grating pattern stimulus. The visual acuity range from 15.08 to 39.83cycles/degrees. When compared to other birds, they have a higher visual acuity than non-raptorial birds, but they have the lowest visual acuity found in bird of prey so far. We discuss this result in the context of the ecology of the bird, with special focus on it is foraging tactic. PMID:26821187

  15. High refractive index photocurable resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morford, Robert V.; Mercado, Ramil L.; Planje, Curtis E.; Flaim, Tony D.

    2005-04-01

    The performance of optoelectronic devices can be increased by incorporating a high refractive index layer into the system. This paper describes several potential high refractive index resin candidates. Our materials include the added advantages over other systems because the new materials are cationically photocurable and free flowing, have low shrinkage upon cure, have no (or little) volatile organic components, are applicable by a variety of methods (dip coating, roller coating, injection molding, or film casting), can be applied in a variety of thicknesses (10-100 m), are fast-curing, and possess robust physical properties. Particular attention focuses on the refractive index in the visible spectrum, light transmission, and formulation viscosity.

  16. Vitrectomy combined with silicone oil tamponade in the treatment of severely traumatized eyes with the visual acuity of no light perception

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment of vitrectomy combined with silicone oil tamponade in the treatment of severely traumatized eyes with the visual acuity of no light perception (NLP). METHODS This was a retrospective uncontrolled interventional case-series of 19 patients of severely traumatized eyes with NLP who underwent vitrectomy surgery at the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Qingdao University (Qingdao, China) during a 3-year period. We recorded perioperative factors with the potential to influence functional outcome including duration from the injury to intervention; causes for ocular trauma; open globe or closed globe injury; grade of vitreous hemorrhage; grade of endophthalmitis; grade of retinal detachment; size and location of intraocular foreign body (IOFB); extent and position of retinal defect; grade of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR); type of surgery; perioperative complications and tamponade agent. The follow-up time was from 3 to 18 months, and the mean time was 12 months. RESULTS After a mean follow-up period of 12 months (3-18 months) 10.53% (2/19) of eyes had visual acuity of between 20/60 and 20/400, 52.63% (10/19) had visual acuity less than 20/400 but more than NLP, and 36.84% (7/19) remained NLP. Visual acuity was improved from NLP to light perception (LP) or better in 63.16% (12/19) of eyes and the rate of complete retinal reattachment was 73.68% (14/19). Good visual acuity all resulted from those patients of blunt trauma with intact eyewall (closed globe injury). The perioperative factors of poor visual acuity prognosis included delayed intervention; open globe injury; endophthalmitis; severe retinal detachment; large IOFB; macular defect; a wide range of retinal defects and severe PVR. CONCLUSION The main reasons of NLP after ocular trauma are severe vitreous hemorrhage opacity; refractive media opacity; retinal detachment; retinal and uveal damages and defects, especially defects of the macula; PVR and

  17. The Relationship between OCT-measured Central Retinal Thickness and Visual Acuity in Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare optical coherence tomography (OCT)-measured retinal thickness and visual acuity in eyes with diabetic macular edema (DME) both before and after macular laser photocoagulation. Design Cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Participants 210 subjects (251 eyes) with DME enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of laser techniques. Methods Retinal thickness was measured with OCT and visual acuity was measured with the electronic-ETDRS procedure. Main Outcome Measures OCT-measured center point thickness and visual acuity Results The correlation coefficients for visual acuity versus OCT center point thickness were 0.52 at baseline and 0.49, 0.36, and 0.38 at 3.5, 8, and 12 months post-laser photocoagulation. The slope of the best fit line to the baseline data was approximately 4.4 letters (95% C.I.: 3.5, 5.3) better visual acuity for every 100 microns decrease in center point thickness at baseline with no important difference at follow-up visits. Approximately one-third of the variation in visual acuity could be predicted by a linear regression model that incorporated OCT center point thickness, age, hemoglobin A1C, and severity of fluorescein leakage in the center and inner subfields. The correlation between change in visual acuity and change in OCT center point thickening 3.5 months after laser treatment was 0.44 with no important difference at the other follow-up times. A subset of eyes showed paradoxical improvements in visual acuity with increased center point thickening (7–17% at the three time points) or paradoxical worsening of visual acuity with a decrease in center point thickening (18%–26% at the three time points). Conclusions There is modest correlation between OCT-measured center point thickness and visual acuity, and modest correlation of changes in retinal thickening and visual acuity following focal laser treatment for DME. However, a wide range of visual acuity may be observed for a given degree of retinal edema and paradoxical

  18. Errors, error detection, error correction and hippocampal-region damage: data and theories.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Donald G; Johnson, Laura W

    2013-11-01

    This review and perspective article outlines 15 observational constraints on theories of errors, error detection, and error correction, and their relation to hippocampal-region (HR) damage. The core observations come from 10 studies with H.M., an amnesic with cerebellar and HR damage but virtually no neocortical damage. Three studies examined the detection of errors planted in visual scenes (e.g., a bird flying in a fish bowl in a school classroom) and sentences (e.g., I helped themselves to the birthday cake). In all three experiments, H.M. detected reliably fewer errors than carefully matched memory-normal controls. Other studies examined the detection and correction of self-produced errors, with controls for comprehension of the instructions, impaired visual acuity, temporal factors, motoric slowing, forgetting, excessive memory load, lack of motivation, and deficits in visual scanning or attention. In these studies, H.M. corrected reliably fewer errors than memory-normal and cerebellar controls, and his uncorrected errors in speech, object naming, and reading aloud exhibited two consistent features: omission and anomaly. For example, in sentence production tasks, H.M. omitted one or more words in uncorrected encoding errors that rendered his sentences anomalous (incoherent, incomplete, or ungrammatical) reliably more often than controls. Besides explaining these core findings, the theoretical principles discussed here explain H.M.'s retrograde amnesia for once familiar episodic and semantic information; his anterograde amnesia for novel information; his deficits in visual cognition, sentence comprehension, sentence production, sentence reading, and object naming; and effects of aging on his ability to read isolated low frequency words aloud. These theoretical principles also explain a wide range of other data on error detection and correction and generate new predictions for future test. PMID:23999403

  19. Refraction effects and wavelength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, J.; Dion, D.

    2006-09-01

    The performances of Electro-Optical (EO) systems such as visible or infrared cameras, lasers, operating within the Marine Surface Boundary Layer (MSBL), i.e. at heights up to a few tens of meters above the sea surface, are disturbed by various propagation mechanisms: molecular attenuation, aerosol extinction, refraction and turbulence. Refraction is responsible for focusing and defocusing of rays, detection range limitations, mirage formation and angular deviation. The refractive index depends on atmospheric pressure, air temperature and air humidity. Within the optical transmission bands, it also depends on the wavelength. In this paper, the results provided by two different formulations of the refractive index associated with the same ray tracing program are compared and discussed.

  20. Refraction characteristics of phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-08-01

    Some of the most interesting refraction properties of phononic crystals are revealed by examining the anti-plane shear waves in doubly periodic elastic composites with unit cells containing rectangular and/or elliptical multi-inclusions. The corresponding band structure, group velocity, and energy-flux vector are calculated using a powerful mixed variational method that accurately and efficiently yields all the field quantities over multiple frequency pass-bands. The background matrix and the inclusions can be anisotropic, each having distinct elastic moduli and mass densities. Equifrequency contours and energy-flux vectors are readily calculated as functions of the wave-vector components. By superimposing the energy-flux vectors on equifrequency contours in the plane of the wave-vector components, and supplementing this with a three-dimensional graph of the corresponding frequency surface, a wealth of information is extracted essentially at a glance. This way it is shown that a composite with even a simple square unit cell containing a central circular inclusion can display negative or positive energy and phase velocity refractions, or simply performs a harmonic vibration (standing wave), depending on the frequency and the wave-vector. Moreover, that the same composite when interfaced with a suitable homogeneous solid can display: (1) negative refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (2) negative refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; (3) positive refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (4) positive refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; or even (5) complete reflection with no energy transmission, depending on the frequency, and direction and the wavelength of the plane-wave that is incident from the homogeneous solid to the interface. For elliptical and rectangular inclusion geometries, analytical expressions are given for the key calculation quantities. Expressions for displacement, velocity, linear momentum

  1. Nonlinear refraction in vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, B A; Roach, W P; Rogers, M E; Mayo, M W; Toth, C A; Cain, C P; Noojin, G D

    1993-11-01

    We extend the application of the z-scan technique to determine the nonlinear refractive index (n(2)) for human and rabbit vitreous humor, water, and physiological saline. In these measurements there were nonlinear contributions to the measured signal from the aqueous samples and the quartz cell that held the sample. Measurements were made with 60-ps pulses at 532 nm. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of the nonlinear refractive properties of biological material. PMID:19829406

  2. Cataract and Refractive Surgery in ; a Survey of KSCRS Members From 1995~2006

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Chul; Jung, Jee Woong; Sohn, Hee Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This purpose of this report was to study trends in cataract and refractive surgeries conducted during the past twelve years and to compare results to previous reports from the ASCRS and New Zealand (NZ) in order to forecast future medical services. Methods We surveyed members of the Korean Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (KSCRS) every year from 1995 to 2006, and studied changes in cataract and refractive surgeries (RS). Results The duration of hospitalization has been gradually decreasing to the point that a one day hospitalization following surgery has become common. The rate of topical anesthesia use has significantly increased since 1998. Sutureless incision methods are now commonly practiced. The use of acryl IOL as an optic material has been gradually increasing for cataract surgeries. KSCRS members showed an interest in the special intraocular lenses as multifocal IOL. While Excimer laser PRK was the most popular refractive surgery during the first stage, KSCRS members increasingly prefer LASIK to the Excimer laser PRK. Regression of the corrected visual acuity, dry eye, night halo, and flashes were the most common complications following refractive surgeries. Medical disputes related to PRK and LASIK have been gradually increasing throughout the study period. Conclusions We confirm that the KSCRS practice styles for cataract and RS are similar to those of the ASCRS and NZ. We infer a world-wide trend from the comparison of these three societies. PMID:19794938

  3. Predicting visual acuity from the structure of visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shyam; Carlo, C. Nikoosh; Stevens, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Three decades ago, Rockel et al. proposed that neuronal surface densities (number of neurons under a square millimeter of surface) of primary visual cortices (V1s) in primates is 2.5 times higher than the neuronal density of V1s in nonprimates or many other cortical regions in primates and nonprimates. This claim has remained controversial and much debated. We replicated the study of Rockel et al. with attention to modern stereological precepts and show that indeed primate V1 is 2.5 times denser (number of neurons per square millimeter) than many other cortical regions and nonprimate V1s; we also show that V2 is 1.7 times as dense. As primate V1s are denser, they have more neurons and thus more pinwheels than similar-sized nonprimate V1s, which explains why primates have better visual acuity. PMID:26056277

  4. Recovery of stereo acuity in adults with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Astle, Andrew T; McGraw, Paul V; Webb, Ben S

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of visual input to one eye during early development leads to marked functional impairments of vision, commonly referred to as amblyopia. A major consequence of amblyopia is the inability to encode binocular disparity information leading to impaired depth perception or stereo acuity. If amblyopia is treated early in life (before 4 years of age), then recovery of normal stereoscopic function is possible. Treatment is rarely undertaken later in life (adulthood) because declining levels of neural plasticity are thought to limit the effectiveness of standard treatments. Here, the authors show that a learning-based therapy, designed to exploit experience-dependent plastic mechanisms, can be used to recover stereoscopic visual function in adults with amblyopia. These cases challenge the long-held dogma that the critical period for visual development and the window for treating amblyopia are one and the same. PMID:22707543

  5. Collective enhancement of numerical acuity by meritocratic leadership in fish.

    PubMed

    Bisazza, Angelo; Butterworth, Brian; Piffer, Laura; Bahrami, Bahador; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Agrillo, Christian

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for more than a century that interacting people can generally achieve more accurate decisions than single individuals. Here we show that interacting guppy fish (Poecilia reticulata) achieve a superior level of numerosity discrimination well beyond the average ability of the isolated individual fish. This enhancement of numerical acuity was observed in dyadic interactions when (Experiment 1) the dyad chose which larger shoal of guppies to join and when (Experiment 2) the dyad chose the higher or the lower numerosity among two decision options after having learned the task individually. Dyadic accuracy and that of the more competent member of each dyad matched closely, supporting the hypothesis that meritocratic leadership arises spontaneously between dyadically interacting fish, rather than the 'many wrongs' principle that has been used to explain group superiority in many species. PMID:24691116

  6. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Lorach, Henri; Goetz, Georges; Smith, Richard; Lei, Xin; Mandel, Yossi; Kamins, Theodore; Mathieson, Keith; Huie, Philip; Harris, James; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. We demonstrate that subretinal arrays with 70 μm photovoltaic pixels provide highly localized stimulation, with electrical and visual receptive fields of comparable sizes in rat retinal ganglion cells. Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibits flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images and non-linear spatial summation. In rats with retinal degeneration, these photovoltaic arrays provide spatial resolution of 64 ± 11 μm, corresponding to half of the normal visual acuity in pigmented rats. Ease of implantation of these wireless and modular arrays, combined with their high resolution opens the door to functional restoration of sight. PMID:25915832

  7. Sensitivity of The Dynamic Visual Acuity Test To Sensorimotor Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob; Elizalde, Elizabeth; Fregia, Melody

    1999-01-01

    Post-flight astronauts, acutely post-vestibular nerve section patients, and patients with severe chronic bilateral vestibular deficits have oscillopsia caused by reduced vestibulocular reflex gains and decreased postural stability. Therefore, as previous work has shown, a test of dynamic visual acuity (DVA), in which the subject must read numbers from a computer screen while standing still or walking in place provides a composite measure of sensorimotor integration. This measure may be useful for determining the level of recovery, post-flight, post-operatively, or after vestibular rehabilitation. To determine the sensitivity of DVA to change in impaired populations we have tested patients with acoustic neuromas before and during the first post-operative week after resection of the tumors, and with bilaterally labyrinthine deficient subjects before and after six weeks of balance rehabilitation therapy.

  8. Change in peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the human eye with accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Arthur; Zimmermann, Frederik; Whatham, Andrew; Martinez, Aldo; Delgado, Stephanie; Lazon de la Jara, Percy; Sankaridurg, Padmaja

    2009-02-01

    Recent research showed that the peripheral refractive state is a sufficient stimulus for myopia progression. This finding led to the suggestion that devices that control peripheral refraction may be efficacious in controlling myopia progression. This study aims to understand whether the optical effect of such devices may be affected by near focus. In particular, we seek to understand the influence of accommodation on peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the eye. Refraction was measured in twenty young subjects using an autorefractor at 0° (i.e. along visual axis), and 20°, 30° and 40° field angles both nasal and temporal to the visual axis. All measurements were conducted at 2.5 m, 40 cm and 30 cm viewing distances. Refractive errors were corrected using a soft contact lens during all measurements. As field angle increased, refraction became less hyperopic. Peripheral refraction also became less hyperopic at nearer viewing distances (i.e. with increasing accommodation). Astigmatism (J180) increased with field angle as well as with accommodation. Adopting a third-order aberration theory approach, the position of the Petzval surface relative to the retinal surface was estimated by considering the relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) and J180 terms of peripheral refraction. Results for the estimated dioptric position of the Petzval surface relative to the retina showed substantial asymmetry. While temporal field tended to agree with theoretical predictions, nasal response departed dramatically from the model eye predictions. With increasing accommodation, peripheral refraction becomes less hyperopic while the Petzval surface showed asymmetry in its change in position. The change in the optical components (i.e. cornea and/or lens as opposed to retinal shape or position) is implicated as at least one of the contributors of this shift in peripheral refraction during accommodation.

  9. Tactile Spatial Acuity in Childhood: Effects of Age and Fingertip Size

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ryan M.; Goldreich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Tactile acuity is known to decline with age in adults, possibly as the result of receptor loss, but less is understood about how tactile acuity changes during childhood. Previous research from our laboratory has shown that fingertip size influences tactile spatial acuity in young adults: those with larger fingers tend to have poorer acuity, possibly because mechanoreceptors are more sparsely distributed in larger fingers. We hypothesized that a similar relationship would hold among children. If so, children’s tactile spatial acuity might be expected to worsen as their fingertips grow. However, concomitant CNS maturation might result in more efficient perceptual processing, counteracting the effect of fingertip growth on tactile acuity. To investigate, we conducted a cross-sectional study, testing 116 participants ranging in age from 6 to 16 years on a precision-controlled tactile grating orientation task. We measured each participant's grating orientation threshold on the dominant index finger, along with physical properties of the fingertip: surface area, volume, sweat pore spacing, and temperature. We found that, as in adults, children with larger fingertips (at a given age) had significantly poorer acuity, yet paradoxically acuity did not worsen significantly with age. We propose that finger growth during development results in a gradual decline in innervation density as receptive fields reposition to cover an expanding skin surface. At the same time, central maturation presumably enhances perceptual processing. PMID:24454612

  10. Vernier Acuity and the Magnocellular System Revisited: Response to Skottun and Skoyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keri, Szabolcs; Benedek, Gyorgy

    2010-01-01

    Skottun and Skoyles (2009) recently presented a comment on Vernier acuity and magnocellular dysfunctions in fragile X premutation carriers (Keri & Benedek, 2009). The authors concluded that our finding that the magnocellular deficit, as revealed by luminance-contrast sensitivity measurements, is associated with impaired Vernier acuity for…

  11. An investigation of the relation between sibilant production and somatosensory and auditory acuity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Matthies, Melanie L.; Maas, Edwin; Hanson, Alexandra; Tiede, Mark; Ménard, Lucie; Guenther, Frank H.; Lane, Harlan; Perkell, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    The relation between auditory acuity, somatosensory acuity and the magnitude of produced sibilant contrast was investigated with data from 18 participants. To measure auditory acuity, stimuli from a synthetic sibilant continuum ([s]-[ʃ]) were used in a four-interval, two-alternative forced choice adaptive-staircase discrimination task. To measure somatosensory acuity, small plastic domes with grooves of different spacing were pressed against each participant’s tongue tip and the participant was asked to identify one of four possible orientations of the grooves. Sibilant contrast magnitudes were estimated from productions of the words ‘said,’ ‘shed,’ ‘sid,’ and ‘shid’. Multiple linear regression revealed a significant relation indicating that a combination of somatosensory and auditory acuity measures predicts produced acoustic contrast. When the participants were divided into high- and low-acuity groups based on their median somatosensory and auditory acuity measures, separate ANOVA analyses with sibilant contrast as the dependent variable yielded a significant main effect for each acuity group. These results provide evidence that sibilant productions have auditory as well as somatosensory goals and are consistent with prior results and the theoretical framework underlying the DIVA model of speech production. PMID:21110603

  12. Comparison of Dynamic Visual Acuity between Water Polo Players and Sedentary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo-Junyent, Lluisa; Aznar-Casanova, Jose Antonio; Merindano-Encina, Dolores; Cardona, Genis; Sole-Forto, Joan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined differences in dynamic visual acuity between elite and subelite water polo players and sedentary students. To measure dynamic visual acuity binocularly, we asked participants to indicate the orientation of a broken ring, similar to the Landolt C, which increased in size as it moved across a computer screen. Two different…

  13. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  14. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  15. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  16. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  17. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  18. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  19. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  20. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  1. Acuity of the Approximate Number System and Preschoolers' Quantitative Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Marle, Kristy; Chu, Felicia W.; Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the relations among acuity of the inherent approximate number system (ANS), performance on measures of symbolic quantitative knowledge, and mathematics achievement for a sample of 138 (64 boys) preschoolers. The Weber fraction (a measure of ANS acuity) and associated task accuracy were significantly correlated with mathematics…

  2. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  3. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  4. Tritan colour contrast sensitivity function in refractive multifocal intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    Pieh, S.; Hanselmayer, G.; Lackner, B.; Marvan, P.; Grechenig, A.; Weghaupt, H.; Vass, C.; Skorpik, C.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To compare tritan colour contrast sensitivity (CCS), without and with glare, in patients with refractive multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and with monofocal intraocular lenses.
METHODS—Tritan CCS was determined (Moorfields Vision System, CH Electronics) in 15 eyes (14 patients, 75.7 (±6.6) years) with a refractive multifocal IOL (Allergan SA 40N) and in 11 eyes (10 patients, 73.7 (±6.4) years) with a monofocal IOL (Allergan SI 40 NB). Measurements were made monocularly under mesopic conditions at a distance of 2 metres from the monitor with best distance refraction plus 0.5 D at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 11.4, and 22.8 cycles per degree (cpd). The test was then repeated for the multifocal IOLs, adding minus 2.5 D to the best distance refraction to force the patient to use the near focus. Both lenses were also investigated under glare conditions with the same set-up and using the brightness acuity tester (BAT).
RESULTS—The tritan CCS function without glare in multifocal lenses through the distance focus was nearly identical to that through the near focus. The following statistically significant differences were measured: the CCS function without glare for the multifocal lens was worse at 0.5 cpd and 1.0 cpd than that of the monofocal lens. In CCS testing of the multifocal group with glare at 6 cpd, the results through the distance focus were better than the results through the near focus. For the CCS function with glare, the values for the distance focus in the multifocal lens were worse than the values for the monofocal lens at 0.5 cpd and 1 cpd. In CCS testing with glare through the near focus and CCS testing through the monofocal lens, the monofocal lens performed better at 0.5 cpd, 1 cpd, 3 cpd, and 6 cpd.
CONCLUSION—Refractive multifocal intraocular lenses influence tritan CCS function compared to monofocal lenses.

 PMID:11423455

  5. [Refraction after Implantation of Multifocal and Presbyopia-Correcting Intraocular Lenses].

    PubMed

    Kretz, F T A; Linz, K; Mueller, M; Gerl, M; Koss, M J; Gerl, R H; Auffarth, G U

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, further developments in the field of intraocular lenses offer a higher level of spectacle independence for our patients. As light gets scattered on different focal points a wider range of defocus is created. This greater defocus area makes it more difficult for us to determine the objective or subjective refraction. This contribution is concerned with the difficulties of measuring visual acuity in different intraocular lens designs and different measurement distances. Measuring refraction after implantation of a multifocal intraocular lens is a complex procedure and the experience of the examiner plays a crucial role. Retinoscopy, keratometry and the defocus curve are reliable methods for testing, while the auto refractometer, bichromatic testing and the cross-cylinder have limitations. PMID:25927177

  6. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control. PMID:25490654

  7. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  8. Improved Atmospheric Refraction Correction Models in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn

    2004-03-01

    The primary source of unmodeled error in space geodetic techniques such as VLBI, GPS and SLR is atmospheric refraction. SLR uses lasers (532 nm) to measure very precise ranges from ground tracking stations to spaceborne geodetic satellites with accuracies at the millimeter level. Improved refraction modeling is essential in reducing errors in SLR measurements that study variations in the Earth's gravitational field and vertical crustal motion as well as monitoring sea-level rise, post-glacial rebound and earthquake predictions. The Marini and Murray model developed in the 1970's has primarily been used for data analysis, but recent work by Mendes et al., 2002 provides significant improvement in modeling the elevation dependency of the zenith atmospheric delay. The elevation dependency is modeled by what are known as mapping functions. Improvements in modeling the zenith delay itself where achieved by computing the group refractivity using a procedure described by Ciddor [1996] and by including the non-hydrostatic (wet) zenith delay. Two color SLR can also be used to determine the zenith delay by measuring the dispersive delay of two laser pulses each at a different wavelength. By comparing the Mendes and Marini Murray models to this experimental technique, one is able to evaluate the accuracy of the two models. We have found errors between the two models when compared to two color SLR at the centimeter level, which increases significantly at 355 nm, indicating the need for an improvement of existing dispersion formulae.

  9. The Optics of Refractive Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Newly recognized effects of refractive scattering in the ionized interstellar medium have broad implications for very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at extreme angular resolutions. Building upon work by Blandford & Narayan, we present a simplified, geometrical optics framework, which enables rapid, semi-analytic estimates of refractive scattering effects. We show that these estimates exactly reproduce previous results based on a more rigorous statistical formulation. We then derive new expressions for the scattering-induced fluctuations of VLBI observables such as closure phase, and we demonstrate how to calculate the fluctuations for arbitrary quantities of interest using a Monte Carlo technique.

  10. Malingering or simulation in ophthalmology-visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Incesu, Ali Ihsan; Sobacı, Güngör

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as malingering, or sometimes functional visual loss (FVL). It manifests as either simulating an ophthalmic disease (positive simulation), or denial of ophthalmic disease (negative simulation). Conscious behavior and compensation or indemnity claims are prominent features of simulation. Since some authors suggest that this is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, even conversion is included in this context. In today's world, every ophthalmologist can face with simulation of ophthalmic disease or disorder. In case of simulation suspect, the physician's responsibility is to prove the simulation considering the disease/disorder first, and simulation as an exclusion. In simulation examinations, the physician should be firm and smart to select appropriate test(s) to convince not only the subject, but also the judge in case of indemnity or compensation trials. Almost all ophthalmic sensory and motor functions including visual acuity, visual field, color vision and night vision can be the subject of simulation. Examiner must be skillful in selecting the most appropriate test. Apart from those in the literature, we included all kinds of simulation in ophthalmology. In addition, simulation examination techniques, such as, use of OCT (optical coherence tomography), frequency doubling perimetry (FDP), and modified polarization tests were also included. In this review, we made a thorough literature search, and added our experiences to give the readers up-to-date information on malingering or simulation in ophthalmology. PMID:22553721

  11. Insects groom their antennae to enhance olfactory acuity

    PubMed Central

    Böröczky, Katalin; Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Batchelor, Dale; Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Schal, Coby

    2013-01-01

    Grooming, a common behavior in animals, serves the important function of removing foreign materials from body surfaces. When antennal grooming was prevented in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy images revealed that an unstructured substance accumulated on nongroomed antennae, covering sensillar pores, but not on groomed antennae of the same individuals. Gas chromatography analysis of antennal extracts showed that over a 24-h period nongroomed antennae accumulated three to four times more cuticular hydrocarbons than groomed antennae. Moreover, nongroomed antennae accumulated significantly more environmental contaminants from surfaces (stearic acid) and from air (geranyl acetate) than groomed antennae. We hypothesized that the accumulation of excess native cuticular hydrocarbons on the antennae would impair olfactory reception. Electroantennogram experiments and single-sensillum recordings supported this hypothesis: antennae that were prevented from being groomed were significantly less responsive than groomed antennae to the sex pheromone component periplanone-B, as well as to the general odorants geranyl acetate and hexanol. We therefore conclude that antennal grooming removes excess native cuticular lipids and foreign chemicals that physically and/or chemically interfere with olfaction, and thus maintains the olfactory acuity of the antennae. Similar experimental manipulations of the German cockroach (Blattella germanica), carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus), and the housefly (Musca domestica), which use different modes of antennal grooming, support the hypothesis that antennal grooming serves a similar function in a wide range of insect taxa. PMID:23382193

  12. From innervation density to tactile acuity: 1. Spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul B; Koerber, H Richard; Millecchia, Ronald

    2004-06-11

    We tested the hypothesis that the population receptive field representation (a superposition of the excitatory receptive field areas of cells responding to a tactile stimulus) provides spatial information sufficient to mediate one measure of static tactile acuity. In psychophysical tests, two-point discrimination thresholds on the hindlimbs of adult cats varied as a function of stimulus location and orientation, as they do in humans. A statistical model of the excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields of spinocervical, postsynaptic dorsal column and spinothalamic tract neurons was used to simulate the population receptive field representations in this neural population of the one- and two-point stimuli used in the psychophysical experiments. The simulated and observed thresholds were highly correlated. Simulated and observed thresholds' relations to physiological and anatomical variables such as stimulus location and orientation, receptive field size and shape, map scale, and innervation density were strikingly similar. Simulated and observed threshold variations with receptive field size and map scale obeyed simple relationships predicted by the signal detection model, and were statistically indistinguishable from each other. The population receptive field representation therefore contains information sufficient for this discrimination. PMID:15140641

  13. Objective evaluation of the visual acuity in human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, M. A.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Varillas, G.; Tepichín, E.

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the quality of the human vision is evaluated by a subjective test in which the examiner asks the patient to read a series of characters of different sizes, located at a certain distance of the patient. Typically, we need to ensure a subtended angle of vision of 5 minutes, which implies an object of 8.8 mm high located at 6 meters (normal or 20/20 visual acuity). These characters constitute what is known as the Snellen chart, universally used to evaluate the spatial resolution of the human eyes. The mentioned process of identification of characters is carried out by means of the eye - brain system, giving an evaluation of the subjective visual performance. In this work we consider the eye as an isolated image-forming system, and show that it is possible to isolate the function of the eye from that of the brain in this process. By knowing the impulse response of the eye´s system we can obtain, in advance, the image of the Snellen chart simultaneously. From this information, we obtain the objective performance of the eye as the optical system under test. This type of results might help to detect anomalous situations of the human vision, like the so called "cerebral myopia".

  14. Insects groom their antennae to enhance olfactory acuity.

    PubMed

    Böröczky, Katalin; Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Batchelor, Dale; Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Schal, Coby

    2013-02-26

    Grooming, a common behavior in animals, serves the important function of removing foreign materials from body surfaces. When antennal grooming was prevented in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy images revealed that an unstructured substance accumulated on nongroomed antennae, covering sensillar pores, but not on groomed antennae of the same individuals. Gas chromatography analysis of antennal extracts showed that over a 24-h period nongroomed antennae accumulated three to four times more cuticular hydrocarbons than groomed antennae. Moreover, nongroomed antennae accumulated significantly more environmental contaminants from surfaces (stearic acid) and from air (geranyl acetate) than groomed antennae. We hypothesized that the accumulation of excess native cuticular hydrocarbons on the antennae would impair olfactory reception. Electroantennogram experiments and single-sensillum recordings supported this hypothesis: antennae that were prevented from being groomed were significantly less responsive than groomed antennae to the sex pheromone component periplanone-B, as well as to the general odorants geranyl acetate and hexanol. We therefore conclude that antennal grooming removes excess native cuticular lipids and foreign chemicals that physically and/or chemically interfere with olfaction, and thus maintains the olfactory acuity of the antennae. Similar experimental manipulations of the German cockroach (Blattella germanica), carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus), and the housefly (Musca domestica), which use different modes of antennal grooming, support the hypothesis that antennal grooming serves a similar function in a wide range of insect taxa. PMID:23382193

  15. Malingering or simulation in ophthalmology-visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Incesu, Ali Ihsan; Sobacı, Güngör

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as malingering, or sometimes functional visual loss (FVL). It manifests as either simulating an ophthalmic disease (positive simulation), or denial of ophthalmic disease (negative simulation). Conscious behavior and compensation or indemnity claims are prominent features of simulation. Since some authors suggest that this is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, even conversion is included in this context. In today's world, every ophthalmologist can face with simulation of ophthalmic disease or disorder. In case of simulation suspect, the physician's responsibility is to prove the simulation considering the disease/disorder first, and simulation as an exclusion. In simulation examinations, the physician should be firm and smart to select appropriate test(s) to convince not only the subject, but also the judge in case of indemnity or compensation trials. Almost all ophthalmic sensory and motor functions including visual acuity, visual field, color vision and night vision can be the subject of simulation. Examiner must be skillful in selecting the most appropriate test. Apart from those in the literature, we included all kinds of simulation in ophthalmology. In addition, simulation examination techniques, such as, use of OCT (optical coherence tomography), frequency doubling perimetry (FDP), and modified polarization tests were also included. In this review, we made a thorough literature search, and added our experiences to give the readers up-to-date information on malingering or simulation in ophthalmology. PMID:22553721

  16. Cognitive aging and hearing acuity: modeling spoken language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Arthur; Amichetti, Nicole M.; Lash, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The comprehension of spoken language has been characterized by a number of “local” theories that have focused on specific aspects of the task: models of word recognition, models of selective attention, accounts of thematic role assignment at the sentence level, and so forth. The ease of language understanding (ELU) model (Rönnberg et al., 2013) stands as one of the few attempts to offer a fully encompassing framework for language understanding. In this paper we discuss interactions between perceptual, linguistic, and cognitive factors in spoken language understanding. Central to our presentation is an examination of aspects of the ELU model that apply especially to spoken language comprehension in adult aging, where speed of processing, working memory capacity, and hearing acuity are often compromised. We discuss, in relation to the ELU model, conceptions of working memory and its capacity limitations, the use of linguistic context to aid in speech recognition and the importance of inhibitory control, and language comprehension at the sentence level. Throughout this paper we offer a constructive look at the ELU model; where it is strong and where there are gaps to be filled. PMID:26124724

  17. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  18. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  19. Effect of refraction parallax on the accuracy of measuring the angular coordinates of artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vygon, V. G.; Deryugina, A. I.

    1994-03-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of optical refraction in the earth's atmosphere on the accuracy of astronometric measurements, and presents the results of calculations that were used to investigate the accuracy with which the orbits of artificial satellites are reconstructed from the data of goniometric observations. It is shown that, in a number of cases, neglecting the effect of refraction parallax results in fundamental errors in the character of the reconstructed trajectories.

  20. Effects of Form Deprivation on Peripheral Refractions and Ocular Shape in Infant Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Juan; Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Blasdel, Terry L.; Humbird, Tammy L.; Bockhorst, Kurt H.; Smith, Earl L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether visual experience can alter ocular shape and peripheral refractive error pattern, the authors investigated the effects of form deprivation on refractive development in infant rhesus monkeys. Methods Monocular form deprivation was imposed in 10 rhesus monkeys by securing diffuser lenses in front of their treated eyes between 22 ± 2 and 163 ± 17 days of age. Each eye's refractive status was measured longitudinally by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at 15° intervals along the horizontal meridian to eccentricities of 45°. Control data for peripheral refraction were obtained from the nontreated fellow eyes and six untreated monkeys. Near the end of the diffuser-rearing period, the shape of the posterior globe was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Central axial dimensions were also determined by A-scan ultrasonography. Results Form deprivation produced interocular differences in central refractive errors that varied between +2.69 and –10.31 D (treated eye–fellow eye). All seven diffuser-reared monkeys that developed at least 2.00 D of relative central axial myopia also showed relative hyperopia in the periphery that increased in magnitude with eccentricity. Alterations in peripheral refraction were highly correlated with eccentricity-dependent changes in vitreous chamber depth and the shape of the posterior globe. Conclusions Like humans with myopia, monkeys with form-deprivation myopia exhibit relative peripheral hyperopia and eyes that are less oblate and more prolate. Thus, in addition to producing central refractive errors, abnormal visual experience can alter the shape of the posterior globe and the pattern of peripheral refractive errors in infant primates. PMID:19420338

  1. Preserved Visual Acuity in Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Giant Cell (temporal) Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Antonio-Santos, Aileen A.; Murad-Kejbou, Sally J.; Foroozan, Rod; Yedavally, Sunita; Kaufman, David I.; Eggenberger, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of patients with biopsy-proven arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presenting with preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better and those with an initial poor visual acuity of 20/50 or worse through a retrospective chart review RESULTS Nine of 37 patients with arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presented with a preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better in the affected eye. All patients with preserved visual acuity had initial visual field defects that spared the central field. All 37 patients immediately received high-dose corticosteroid therapy. Visual acuity worsened by > 2 lines in one of nine patients (11%) with preserved visual acuity, with a corresponding progression of visual field constriction. CONCLUSION Although preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better has traditionally been associated with the nonarteritic form of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, giant cell arteritis should still be strongly considered, especially if they have giant cell arteritis systemic symptoms. PMID:26958148

  2. Radar error statistics for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Radar error statistics of C-band and S-band that are recommended for use with the groundtracking programs to process space shuttle tracking data are presented. The statistics are divided into two parts: bias error statistics, using the subscript B, and high frequency error statistics, using the subscript q. Bias errors may be slowly varying to constant. High frequency random errors (noise) are rapidly varying and may or may not be correlated from sample to sample. Bias errors were mainly due to hardware defects and to errors in correction for atmospheric refraction effects. High frequency noise was mainly due to hardware and due to atmospheric scintillation. Three types of atmospheric scintillation were identified: horizontal, vertical, and line of sight. This was the first time that horizontal and line of sight scintillations were identified.

  3. The use of Kotel'nikov's theorem to determine the regularization conditions of the inverse refraction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel'Ev, A. G.

    1987-07-01

    Kotel'nikov's theorem is used to determine the frequency range in which the inverse refraction problem is well-posed. Inside this range, small errors in the solution correspond to small experimental errors. Outside this range, regularization should be carried out with a differential technique involving the determination of the difference between the exact solution and the experimentally measured refraction relationship. The proposed approach is confirmed through an analysis of bistatic radar sounding data for Venus.

  4. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  5. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  6. Refractive surgery: keratomileusis and keratophakia.

    PubMed

    Werner, D L

    1986-08-01

    This paper reviews the non-radial keratotomy surgeries that are being performed. The author reviews the literature and suggests an approach toward counseling patients who may be considering these approaches. The paucity of reported studies makes the choice of these alternate procedures somewhat risky, particularly in their refractive predictability. PMID:3528269

  7. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  8. Effects of refractive index mismatch in optical CT imaging of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki S, Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proposing an image reconstruction technique, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc). The proposed method takes care of refractive index mismatches present in gel dosimeter scanner at the boundary, and also corrects for the interior ray refraction. Polymer gel dosimeters with high dose regions have higher refractive index and optical density compared to the background medium, these changes in refractive index at high dose results in interior ray bending. Methods: The inclusion of the effects of refraction is an important step in reconstruction of optical density in gel dosimeters. The proposed ray tracing algorithm models the interior multiple refraction at the inhomogeneities. Jacob’s ray tracing algorithm has been modified to calculate the pathlengths of the ray that traverses through the higher dose regions. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along its path and is used as the weight matrix. Algebraic reconstruction technique and pixel based reconstruction algorithms are used for solving the reconstruction problem. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The experimental dosimetric results are also presented. Results: The results show that the proposed scheme ART-rc is able to reconstruct optical density inside the dosimeter better than the results obtained using filtered backprojection and conventional algebraic reconstruction approaches. The quantitative improvement using ART-rc is evaluated using gamma-index. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive indices are discussed. The effects of modeling of interior refraction in the dose region are presented. Conclusions: The errors propagated due to multiple refraction effects have been modeled and the improvements in reconstruction using proposed model is presented. The refractive index of the dosimeter has a mismatch with the surrounding medium (for dry air or water scanning). The algorithm

  9. Sporadic Visual Acuity Loss in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Benjamin J.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Huang, Jiayan; Levy, Nicole E.; Maguire, Maureen G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate transient, large visual acuity (VA) decreases, termed sporadic vision loss, during anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Cohort within a randomized clinical trial. Methods Setting Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT). Study Population 1185 CATT patients. Main Outcome Measures incidence of sporadic vision loss and odds ratio (OR) for association with patient and ocular factors. Sporadic vision loss was a decline of ≥ 15 letters from the previous visit, followed by a return at the next visit to no more than 5 letters worse than the visit before the VA loss. Results There were 143 sporadic vision loss events in 122/1185 (10.3%) patients. Mean VA at two years for those with and without sporadic vision loss was 58.5 (~20/63) and 68.4 (~20/40) letters, respectively (P < 0.001). Among patients treated pro re nata, no injection was given for 27.6% (27/98) of sporadic vision loss events. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that baseline predictors for sporadic vision loss included worse baseline VA (OR 2.92, 95%CI:1.65–5.17 for ≤ 20/200 compared with ≥ 20/40), scar (OR 2.21, 95%CI:1.22–4.01), intraretinal foveal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OR 1.80, 95%CI:1.11–2.91), and medical history of anxiety (OR 1.90, 95%CI:1.12–3.24) and syncope (OR 2.75, 95%CI:1.45–5.22). Refraction decreased the likelihood of sporadic vision loss (OR 0.62, 95%CI:0.42–0.91). Conclusions Approximately 10% of CATT patients had sporadic vision loss. Baseline predictors included AMD-related factors and factors independent of AMD. These data are relevant for clinicians in practice and those involved in clinical trials. PMID:24727261

  10. Night vision goggle visual acuity assessment: results of an interagency test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. Lee

    2001-08-01

    There are several parameters that are used to characterize the quality of a night vision goggle (NVG) such as resolution, gain, field-of-view, visual acuity, etc. One of the primary parameters is visual acuity or resolution of the NVG. These two terms are often used interchangeably primarily because of the measurement methods employed. The objectives of this paper are to present: (1) an argument as to why NVG visual acuity and resolution should be considered as distinctly different parameters, (2) descriptions of different methods of measuring visual acuity and resolution, and (3) the results of a blind test by several agencies to measure the resolution of the same two NVGs (four oculars).

  11. A single cohort prospective trial of the immediate effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Athaide, Michelle; Rego, Carol; Budgell, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is no high quality evidence on which to judge the generalizability of isolated reports of improvement in vision following manipulation. The current paucity of research results also precludes the thoughtful design of a controlled, prospective clinical study. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to test the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial of the acute effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity. Methods: New adult patients presenting to a community based chiropractic clinic were recruited into a single cohort prospective trial to determine the immediate effects of cervical spinal manipulation on visual acuity. Results: The experimental protocol was well accepted by patients and caused minimal or no disruption of the clinic routine. By some measures, chiropractic treatment was accompanied by statistically significant improvements in visual acuity. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that it is quite feasible to conduct a prospective, community based clinical study of the acute effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity. PMID:27069271

  12. Ocular motility, visual acuity and dysfunction of neuropsychological impairment in children with shunted uncomplicated hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, H K; Prigatano, G P; Pollay, M; Biscoe, C B; Smith, R V

    1985-01-01

    Children with shunted, uncomplicated, communicating hydrocephalus were tested to determine (1) the persistence of neuropsychological impairment and (2) the relationship between neuropsychological functioning, ocular motility, and acuity abnormalities. Eighteen hydrocephalic and 18 individually age- and sex-matched controls were given a neuropsychological battery, repeated after an interval of 1 year. Hydrocephalic children were also tested at the beginning of the second year for strabismus, amblyopia and visual acuity. Their medical records were reviewed for history of ocular motility and/or acuity abnormalities. Hydrocephalic children with normal range IQ were found to have lower verbal IQ, memory, and fine motor skills compared to controls. A history of ocular motility and acuity abnormalities was associated with impaired visuospatial and verbal problem-solving skills. PMID:4005882

  13. Airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    1992-01-01

    Proper interpretation of airborne gravimetry and altimetry requires good knowledge of aircraft trajectory. Recent advances in precise navigation with differential GPS have made it possible to measure gravity from the air with accuracies of a few milligals, and to obtain altimeter profiles of terrain or sea surface correct to one decimeter. These developments are opening otherwise inaccessible regions to detailed geophysical mapping. Navigation with GPS presents some problems that grow worse with increasing distance from a fixed receiver: the effect of errors in tropospheric refraction correction, GPS ephemerides, and the coordinates of the fixed receivers. Ionospheric refraction and orbit error complicate ambiguity resolution. Optimal navigation should treat all error sources as unknowns, together with the instantaneous vehicle position. To do so, fast and reliable numerical techniques are needed: efficient and stable Kalman filter-smoother algorithms, together with data compression and, sometimes, the use of simplified dynamics.

  14. The Effect of State Medicaid Case-Mix Payment on Nursing Home Resident Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between Medicaid case-mix payment and nursing home resident acuity. Data Sources Longitudinal Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessments from 1999 to 2002 and Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996 to 2002, for all freestanding nursing homes in the 48 contiguous U.S. states. Study Design We used a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effect of introducing state case-mix payment on changes in nursing home case-mix acuity. Facility acuity was measured by aggregating the nursing case-mix index (NCMI) from the MDS using the Resource Utilization Group (Version III) resident classification system, separately for new admits and long-stay residents, and by an OSCAR-derived index combining a range of activity of daily living dependencies and special treatment measures. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We followed facilities over the study period to create a longitudinal data file based on the MDS and OSCAR, respectively, and linked facilities with longitudinal data on state case-mix payment policies for the same period. Principal Findings Across three acuity measures and two data sources, we found that states shifting to case-mix payment increased nursing home acuity levels over the study period. Specifically, we observed a 2.5 percent increase in the average acuity of new admits and a 1.3 to 1.4 percent increase in the acuity of long-stay residents, following the introduction of case-mix payment. Conclusions The adoption of case-mix payment increased access to care for higher acuity Medicaid residents. PMID:16899009

  15. Grating Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare grating (resolution) visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment (ET) for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) versus eyes that were managed conventionally (CM). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, infants with bilateral, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye treated early at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, and treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either ET or CM. Main Outcome Measures Grating visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers using Teller acuity cards. Results Monocular grating acuity results were obtained from 317 (86%) of 370 surviving children. Analysis of grating acuity results for all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant overall benefit for early treatment (18.1% vs 22.8% unfavorable outcome, P=0.08). When the 6-year grating acuity results were analyzed according to a clinical algorithm (high-risk Type 1 and high-risk Type 2 prethreshold ROP), a benefit was seen in Type 1 eyes (16.4% vs 25.2%, P=0.004) that were treated early, but not in Type 2 eyes (21.3% vs 15.9%, P=0.29). Conclusion Early treatment for eyes with Type 1 ROP improved grating acuity outcomes but early treatment for eyes with Type 2 ROP did not. Application to Clinical Medicine Type I eyes should be treated early; however, based on acuity results at age 6 years, Type 2 eyes should be cautiously monitored for progression to Type 1 ROP. Trial Registration NCT00027222 PMID:21746974

  16. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, acuity threshold was measured with an adaptive staircase procedure. In an ABCDDCBA scheme, trial-by-trial feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  17. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier.

    PubMed

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, acuity threshold was measured with an adaptive staircase procedure. In an ABCDDCBA scheme, trial-by-trial feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants' comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)-no feedback-was on average "slightly uncomfortable", the other three conditions were "slightly comfortable" (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  18. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  19. Crowding and visual acuity measured in adults using paediatric test letters, pictures and symbols.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Sarah J H; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Crowding refers to the degradation of visual acuity for target optotypes with, versus without, surrounding features. Crowding is important clinically, however the effect of target-flanker spacing on acuity for symbols and pictures, compared to letters, has not been investigated. Five adults with corrected-to-normal vision had visual acuity measured for modified single target versions of Kay Pictures, Lea Symbols, HOTV and Cambridge Crowding Cards, tests. Single optotypes were presented in isolation and with surrounding features placed 0-5 stroke-widths away. Visual acuity measured with Kay Picture optotypes is 0.13-0.19logMAR better than for other test optotypes and varies significantly across picture. The magnitude of crowding is strongest when the surrounding features abut, or are placed 1 stroke-width away from the target optotype. The slope of the psychometric function is steeper in the region just beyond maximum crowding. Crowding is strongest and the psychometric function steepest, with the Cambridge Crowding Cards arrangement, than when any single optotype is surrounded by a box. Estimates of crowding extent are less variable across test when expressed in units of stroke-width, than optotype-width. Crowding for single target presentations of letters, symbols and pictures used in paediatric visual acuity tests can be maximised and made more sensitive to change in visual acuity, by careful selection of optotype, by surrounding the target with similar flankers, and by using a closer target-flanker separation than half an optotype-width. PMID:26878696

  20. Refraction near the horizon-an empirical approach. Part 1: terrestrial refraction of the dip.

    PubMed

    Tschudin, Marcel E

    2016-04-20

    This study aims at providing improved closed-form refraction estimates for observations near the horizon. In this first part, over 1800 previously published direct measurements of the horizon's depression (dip) over the sea are reanalyzed using a nonconventional robust procedure for coping with numerous real, large, and asymmetric outliers from abnormal dips. The derived 1-parameter function agrees with those proposed in modern almanacs and for land surveying. It is found that the dips of warmer and colder sea surfaces vs. air are best described with two different functions. The two proposed 3-parameter functions, also using temperature difference between air and sea and wind speed, reduce the estimated error of the 1-parameter function by ∼⅓ and the number of outliers by ∼⅔. PMID:27140075

  1. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  2. Refractive index and birefringence of 2H silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The refractive indices of 2H SiC were measured over the wavelength range 435.8 to 650.9 nm by the method of minimum deviation. At the wavelength lambda = 546.1 nm, the ordinary index n sub 0 was 2.6480 and the extraordinary index n sub e was 2.7237. The estimated error (standard deviation) in the measured values is 0.0006 for n sub 0 and 0.0009 for n sub e. The experimental data were curve fitted to the Cauchy equation for the index of refraction as a function of wavelength. The birefringence of 2H SiC was found to vary from 0.0719 at lambda = 650.9 nm to 0.0846 at lambda = 435.8 nm.

  3. Early Quick Acuity Score Provides More Complete Data on Emergency Department Walkouts

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, Paris B.; Kahn, J. Akiva; Greene, Stuart E.; Bloch, Matthew A.; Brandt, Daniel R.; Minckler, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many prior studies have compared the acuity of Emergency Department (ED) patients who have Left Without Being Seen (LWBS) against non-LWBS patients. A weakness in these studies is that patients may walk out prior to the assignment of a triage score, biasing comparisons. We report an operational change whereby acuity was assessed immediately upon patient arrival. We hypothesized more patients would receive acuity scores with EQAS. We also sought to compare LWBS and non-LWBS patient characteristics with reduced bias. Methods Setting: urban, academic medical center. Retrospective cohort study, electronic chart review, collecting data on all ED patients presenting between 4/1/2010 and 10/31/2011 (“Traditional Acuity Score” period, TAS) and from 11/1/2011 to 3/31/2012 (“Early Quick Acuity Score” period, EQAS). We recorded disposition (LWBS versus non-LWBS), acuity and demographics. For each subject during the EQAS period, we calculated how many prior ED visits and how many prior walkouts the subject had had during the TAS period. Results Acuity was recorded in 92,275 of 94,526 patients (97.6%) for TAS period, and 25,577 of 25,760 patients (99.3%) for EQAS period, a difference of 1.7% (1.5%, 1.8%). LWBS patients had acuity scores recorded in 5,180 of 7,040 cases (73.6%) during TAS period, compared with 897 of 1,010 cases (88.8%) during the EQAS period, a difference of 15.2% (14.8%, 15.7%). LWBS were more likely than non-LWBS to be male, were younger and had lower acuity scores. LWBS averaged 5.3 prior ED visits compared with 2.8 by non-LWBS, a difference of 2.5 (1.5, 3.5). LWBS averaged 1.3 prior ED walkouts compared with 0.2 among non-LWBS, a difference of 1.1 (0.8, 1.3). Conclusions EQAS resulted in a higher proportion of patients receiving acuity scores, particularly among LWBS. This offers more complete data when comparing LWBS and non-LWBS patient characteristics. The comparison reinforced findings from prior studies. PMID:24465699

  4. Refraction corrected calibration for aquatic locomotion research: application of Snell's law improves spatial accuracy.

    PubMed

    Henrion, Sebastian; Spoor, Cees W; Pieters, Remco P M; Müller, Ulrike K; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2015-08-01

    Images of underwater objects are distorted by refraction at the water-glass-air interfaces and these distortions can lead to substantial errors when reconstructing the objects' position and shape. So far, aquatic locomotion studies have minimized refraction in their experimental setups and used the direct linear transform algorithm (DLT) to reconstruct position information, which does not model refraction explicitly. Here we present a refraction corrected ray-tracing algorithm (RCRT) that reconstructs position information using Snell's law. We validated this reconstruction by calculating 3D reconstruction error-the difference between actual and reconstructed position of a marker. We found that reconstruction error is small (typically less than 1%). Compared with the DLT algorithm, the RCRT has overall lower reconstruction errors, especially outside the calibration volume, and errors are essentially insensitive to camera position and orientation and the number and position of the calibration points. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the RCRT, we tracked an anatomical marker on a seahorse recorded with four cameras to reconstruct the swimming trajectory for six different camera configurations. The RCRT algorithm is accurate and robust and it allows cameras to be oriented at large angles of incidence and facilitates the development of accurate tracking algorithms to quantify aquatic manoeuvers. PMID:26151159

  5. Determination of myopes' visual acuity using stimuli with different contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikaunieks, G.; Caure, E.; Kassaliete, E.; Meskovska, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The influence of different contrast stimuli on the myopes’ visual acuity (VA) was studied using positive (35.7), negative (-0.97) and low contrast (-0.11) Landolt optotypes. Test subjects were 13 myopes with corrected eyesight and 8 emmetropes, all of them being 20-22 years old. For VA determination the FrACT computer program was employed. In the tests it was found that for emmetropes the positive and negative contrast VA values do not differ significantly, while for myopes the respective values are better with positive than with negative contrast stimuli. These differences were the same in the measurements taken with spectacles or contact lenses. Our results also show that the retinal straylight created by clean spectacles or soft contact lenses is similar in both cases. Dažu autoru pētījumi rāda, ka miopijas gadījumā redzes asums ir labāks ar pozitīva Vēbera kontrasta stimuliem (balts stimuls uz melna fona) nekā negatīva kontrasta stimuliem (melns stimuls uz balta fona). Šis fenomens tiek saistītas ar neirālām izmaiņām ON un OFF ceļos un miopiskās acīs. Citi pētījumi rāda, ka arī acī izkliedētās gaismas ietekmē labāks redzes asums ir ar pozitīviem kontrasta stimuliem nekā negatīva. Miopijas gadījumā papildus gaismas izkliedi rada briļļu lēcas vai kontaktlēcas. Mēs savā pētījumā vēlējāmies noskaidrot, cik lielā mērā labāks redzes asums ar pozitīva kontrasta stimuliem miopiskās acīs ir saistāms ar optiskās korekcijas radīto gaismas izkliedi. Pētījumā piedalījās 21 dalībnieks - 8 emetropi un 13 miopi ar sfērisko refrakcijas lielumu no -1.25 līdz -6,25 D. Dalībnieku vecums bija no 20 līdz 22 gadi. Izmantojot FrACT datorprogrammu, tika noteiks monokulārais redzes asums VA ar Landolta gredzeniem pie pozitīva, negatīva un zema kontrasta fotopiskos apstākļos. Vēbera kontrasti stimuliem attiecīgi bija 35.7, -0.97 un -0.11. Miopiem mērījumi tika veikti gan ar brillēm, gan

  6. Visual Acuity Using Head-fixed Displays During Passive Self and Surround Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Black, F. Owen; Stallings, Valerie; Peters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The ability to read head-fixed displays on various motion platforms requires the suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflexes. This study examined dynamic visual acuity while viewing a head-fixed display during different self and surround rotation conditions. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to report the orientation of Landolt C optotypes presented on a micro-display fixed to a rotating chair at 50 cm distance. Acuity thresholds were determined by the lowest size at which the subjects correctly identified 3 of 5 optotype orientations at peak velocity. Visual acuity was compared across four different conditions, each tested at 0.05 and 0.4 Hz (peak amplitude of 57 deg/s). The four conditions included: subject rotated in semi-darkness (i.e., limited to background illumination of the display), subject stationary while visual scene rotated, subject rotated around a stationary visual background, and both subject and visual scene rotated together. Visual acuity performance was greatest when the subject rotated around a stationary visual background; i.e., when both vestibular and visual inputs provided concordant information about the motion. Visual acuity performance was most reduced when the subject and visual scene rotated together; i.e., when the visual scene provided discordant information about the motion. Ranges of 4-5 logMAR step sizes across the conditions indicated the acuity task was sufficient to discriminate visual performance levels. The background visual scene can influence the ability to read head-fixed displays during passive motion disturbances. Dynamic visual acuity using head-fixed displays can provide an operationally relevant screening tool for visual performance during exposure to novel acceleration environments.

  7. Effect of Target Location on Dynamic Visual Acuity During Passive Horizontal Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Meghan; DeDios, Yiri; Kulecz, Walter; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) generates eye rotation to compensate for potential retinal slip in the specific plane of head movement. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) has been utilized as a functional measure of the VOR. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in accuracy and reaction time when performing a DVA task with targets offset from the plane of rotation, e.g. offset vertically during horizontal rotation. Visual acuity was measured in 12 healthy subjects as they moved a hand-held joystick to indicate the orientation of a computer-generated Landolt C "as quickly and accurately as possible." Acuity thresholds were established with optotypes presented centrally on a wall-mounted LCD screen at 1.3 m distance, first without motion (static condition) and then while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (DVA, peak velocity 60 deg/s). The effect of target location was then measured during horizontal rotation with the optotypes randomly presented in one of nine different locations on the screen (offset up to 10 deg). The optotype size (logMar 0, 0.2 or 0.4, corresponding to Snellen range 20/20 to 20/50) and presentation duration (150, 300 and 450 ms) were counter-balanced across five trials, each utilizing horizontal rotation at 0.8 Hz. Dynamic acuity was reduced relative to static acuity in 7 of 12 subjects by one step size. During the random target trials, both accuracy and reaction time improved proportional to optotype size. Accuracy and reaction time also improved between 150 ms and 300 ms presentation durations. The main finding was that both accuracy and reaction time varied as a function of target location, with greater performance decrements when acquiring vertical targets. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of motion. Both reaction time and accuracy are functionally relevant DVA parameters of VOR function.

  8. A double dissociation of the acuity and crowding limits to letter identification, and the promise of improved visual screening.

    PubMed

    Song, Shuang; Levi, Dennis M; Pelli, Denis G

    2014-01-01

    Here, we systematically explore the size and spacing requirements for identifying a letter among other letters. We measure acuity for flanked and unflanked letters, centrally and peripherally, in normals and amblyopes. We find that acuity, overlap masking, and crowding each demand a minimum size or spacing for readable text. Just measuring flanked and unflanked acuity is enough for our proposed model to predict the observer's threshold size and spacing for letters at any eccentricity. We also find that amblyopia in adults retains the character of the childhood condition that caused it. Amblyopia is a developmental neural deficit that can occur as a result of either strabismus or anisometropia in childhood. Peripheral viewing during childhood due to strabismus results in amblyopia that is crowding limited, like peripheral vision. Optical blur of one eye during childhood due to anisometropia without strabismus results in amblyopia that is acuity limited, like blurred vision. Furthermore, we find that the spacing:acuity ratio of flanked and unflanked acuity can distinguish strabismic amblyopia from purely anisometropic amblyopia in nearly perfect agreement with lack of stereopsis. A scatter diagram of threshold spacing versus acuity, one point per patient, for several diagnostic groups, reveals the diagnostic power of flanked acuity testing. These results and two demonstrations indicate that the sensitivity of visual screening tests can be improved by using flankers that are more tightly spaced and letter like. Finally, in concert with Strappini, Pelli, Di Pace, and Martelli (submitted), we jointly report a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Two clinical conditions-anisometropic amblyopia and apperceptive agnosia-each selectively impair either acuity A or the spacing:acuity ratio S/A, not both. Furthermore, when we specifically estimate crowding, we find a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Models of human object recognition will need to

  9. A double dissociation of the acuity and crowding limits to letter identification, and the promise of improved visual screening

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shuang; Levi, Dennis M.; Pelli, Denis G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we systematically explore the size and spacing requirements for identifying a letter among other letters. We measure acuity for flanked and unflanked letters, centrally and peripherally, in normals and amblyopes. We find that acuity, overlap masking, and crowding each demand a minimum size or spacing for readable text. Just measuring flanked and unflanked acuity is enough for our proposed model to predict the observer's threshold size and spacing for letters at any eccentricity. We also find that amblyopia in adults retains the character of the childhood condition that caused it. Amblyopia is a developmental neural deficit that can occur as a result of either strabismus or anisometropia in childhood. Peripheral viewing during childhood due to strabismus results in amblyopia that is crowding limited, like peripheral vision. Optical blur of one eye during childhood due to anisometropia without strabismus results in amblyopia that is acuity limited, like blurred vision. Furthermore, we find that the spacing:acuity ratio of flanked and unflanked acuity can distinguish strabismic amblyopia from purely anisometropic amblyopia in nearly perfect agreement with lack of stereopsis. A scatter diagram of threshold spacing versus acuity, one point per patient, for several diagnostic groups, reveals the diagnostic power of flanked acuity testing. These results and two demonstrations indicate that the sensitivity of visual screening tests can be improved by using flankers that are more tightly spaced and letter like. Finally, in concert with Strappini, Pelli, Di Pace, and Martelli (submitted), we jointly report a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Two clinical conditions—anisometropic amblyopia and apperceptive agnosia—each selectively impair either acuity A or the spacing:acuity ratio S/A, not both. Furthermore, when we specifically estimate crowding, we find a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Models of human object recognition will need

  10. Exact relativistic expressions for wave refraction in a generally moving fluid.

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, G; Tonni, E; Barbero, F

    2013-04-01

    The law for the refraction of a wave when the two fluids and the interface are moving with relativistic velocities is given in an exact form, at the same time correcting a first order error in a previous paper [Cavalleri and Tonni, Phys. Rev. E 57, 3478 (1998)]. The treatment is then extended to a generally moving fluid with variable refractive index, ready to be applied to the refraction of acoustic, electromagnetic, or magnetohydrodynamic waves in the atmosphere of rapidly rotating stars. In the particular case of a gas cloud receding because of the universe expansion, our result can be applied to predict observable micro- and mesolensings. The first order approximation of our exact result for the deviation due to refraction of the light coming from a further quasar has a relativistic dependence equal to the one obtained by Einsteins' linearized theory of gravitation. PMID:23679540

  11. Diffractively Coupled, Refractively Guided Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Cser, Jim; Marshall, William K.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor-laser arrays more reliable, more powerful, and easier to make. Improved design intended to eliminate undesired electromagnetic modes and mode shifts sometimes occuring in gain-guided variety. Reflected from mirror/window at end of common resonator section of laser, energy refracted from each laser enters adjacent laser. Mutual coupling establishes phase relationships among lasers. Monolithic laser array made by standard epitaxial techniques. Made in part with polymeric materials to mitigate some deleterious effects of all-expitaxial processing. Potential applications include optical communications, ranging, printing, and recording.

  12. The Flex Track: Flexible Partitioning between Low- and High-Acuity Areas of an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Laker, Lauren F.; Froehle, Craig M.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Ward, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective EDs with both low- and high-acuity treatment areas often have fixed allocation of resources, regardless of demand. We demonstrate the utility of discrete-event simulation to evaluate flexible partitioning between low- and high-acuity ED areas to identify the best operational strategy for subsequent implementation. Methods A discrete-event simulation was used to model patient flow through a 50-bed, urban, teaching ED that handles 85,000 patient visits annually. The ED has historically allocated ten beds to a Fast Track for low-acuity patients. We estimated the effect of a Flex Track policy, which involved switching up to five of these Fast Track beds to serving both low- and high-acuity patients, on patient waiting times. When the high-acuity beds were not at capacity, low-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Otherwise, high-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Wait times were estimated for patients by disposition and emergency severity index (ESI) score. Results A Flex Track policy using three flexible beds produced the lowest mean patient waiting of 30.9 (95% CI 30.6–31.2) minutes. The typical Fast Track approach of rigidly separating high- and low–acuity beds produced a mean patient wait time of 40.6 (95% CI 40.2–50.0) minutes, 31% higher than the three-bed Flex Track. A completely flexible ED, where all beds can accommodate any patient, produced mean wait times of 35.1 (95% CI 34.8–35.4) minutes. The results from the three-bed Flex Track scenario were robust, performing well across a range of scenarios involving higher and lower patient volumes and care durations. Conclusion Using discrete-event simulation, we have shown that adding some flexibility into bed allocation between low- and high-acuity can provide substantial reductions in overall patient waiting and a more efficient ED. PMID:24954578

  13. The Effects of Age, Refractive Status, and Luminance on Pupil Size

    PubMed Central

    Guillon, Michel; Dumbleton, Kathryn; Theodoratos, Panagiotis; Gobbe, Marine; Wooley, C. Benjamin; Moody, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Pupil size is critical for optimal performance of presbyopic contact lenses. Although the effect of luminance is well known, little information is available regarding other contributing factors such as aging and refractive status. Methods The cohort population comprised 304 patients (127 male, 177 female) aged 18 to 78 years. Pupils were photographed at three controlled luminance levels 250, 50, and 2.5 cd/m2 using an infra-red macro video camera. Measurements of pupil diameter were conducted after transforming pixel values to linear values in millimeters. Results Luminance was the most influential factor with pupil diameter increasing with decreased luminance (p < 0.001, all comparisons). Age was also found to be a significant factor with a smaller diameter in the older groups, but overall the difference was only significant between the pre-presbyopes and the established presbyopes (p = 0.017). Pupil diameter decreased significantly with increasing age, the effect being most marked at low luminance (<0.001). The smallest pupil diameters were measured for hyperopes and the largest for myopes and although refractive error was not a significant factor alone, there was a significant interaction between luminance and refractive error with the greatest differences in pupil diameter between myopes and emmetropes at low luminance (p < 0.001). Pupil diameter changes modeled by multilinear regression (p < 0.001) identified age, luminance, best sphere refraction, and refractive error as significant factors accounting for just over 70% of the average variation in pupil diameter. Conclusions Both age and refractive status were found to affect pupil size with larger pupils measured for younger patients and myopes. Designs for multifocal contact lens corrections should take both age and refractive status into consideration; a faster progression from distance to near corrections across the optical zone of the lens is expected to be required for established

  14. Dynamic Visual Acuity and Landing Sickness in Crewmembers Returning from Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Peters, B. T.; Reschke, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity causes sensorimotor adaptations that result in functional deficits upon returning to a gravitational environment. At landing the vestibular system and the central nervous system, responsible for coordinating head and eye movements, are adapted to microgravity and must re-adapt to the gravitational environment. This re-adaptation causes decrements in gaze control and dynamic visual acuity, with astronauts reporting oscillopsia and blurred vision. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is assessed using an oscillating chair (Figure 1) developed in the Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC. This chair is lightweight and easily portable for quick deployment in the field. The base of the chair is spring-loaded and allows for manual oscillation of the subject. Using a metronome, the chair is vertically oscillated +/- 2 cm at 2 Hz by an operator, to simulate walking. While the subject is being oscillated, they are asked to discern the direction of Landolt-C optotypes of varying sizes presented on a screen 1 m from the subject and record their direction using a gamepad. The visual acuity thresholds are determined using an algorithm that alters the size of the optotype based on the previous responses of the subject using a forced-choice best parameter estimation that is able to rapidly converge on the threshold value. Visual acuity thresholds are determined both for static (seated) and dynamic (oscillating) conditions. Dynamic visual acuity is defined as the difference between the dynamic and static conditions.

  15. Dot Display Affects Approximate Number System Acuity and Relationships with Mathematical Achievement and Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jade Eloise; Castronovo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Much research has investigated the relationship between the Approximate Number System (ANS) and mathematical achievement, with continued debate surrounding the existence of such a link. The use of different stimulus displays may account for discrepancies in the findings. Indeed, closer scrutiny of the literature suggests that studies supporting a link between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement in adults have mostly measured the ANS using spatially intermixed displays (e.g. of blue and yellow dots), whereas those failing to replicate a link have primarily used spatially separated dot displays. The current study directly compared ANS acuity when using intermixed or separate dots, investigating how such methodological variation mediated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement. ANS acuity was poorer and less reliable when measured with intermixed displays, with performance during both conditions related to inhibitory control. Crucially, mathematical achievement was significantly related to ANS accuracy difference (accuracy on congruent trials minus accuracy on incongruent trials) when measured with intermixed displays, but not with separate displays. The findings indicate that methodological variation affects ANS acuity outcomes, as well as the apparent relationship between the ANS and mathematical achievement. Moreover, the current study highlights the problem of low reliabilities of ANS measures. Further research is required to construct ANS measures with improved reliability, and to understand which processes may be responsible for the increased likelihood of finding a correlation between the ANS and mathematical achievement when using intermixed displays. PMID:27195749

  16. Experience Modifies Olfactory Acuity: Acetylcholine-Dependent Learning Decreases Behavioral Generalization between Similar Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Max L.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptual learning has been demonstrated in several thalamocortical sensory systems wherein experience enhances sensory acuity for trained stimuli. This perceptual learning is believed to be dependent on changes in sensory cortical receptive fields. Sensory experience and learning also modifies receptive fields and neural response patterns in the mammalian olfactory system; however, to date there has been little reported evidence of learned changes in behavioral olfactory acuity. The present report used a bradycardial orienting response and cross-habituation paradigm that allowed assessment of behavioral discrimination of nearly novel odorants, and then used the same paradigm to examine odorant discrimination after associative olfactory conditioning with similar or dissimilar odorants. The results demonstrate that associative conditioning can enhance olfactory acuity for odors that are the same as or similar to the learned odorant, but not for odors dissimilar to the learned odorant. Furthermore, scopolamine injected before associative conditioning can block the acquisition of this learned enhancement in olfactory acuity. These results could have important implications for mechanisms of olfactory perception and memory, as well as for correlating behavioral olfactory acuity with observed spatial representations of odorant features in the olfactory system. PMID:11784813

  17. Accommodative Lag and Juvenile-Onset Myopia Progression in Children Wearing Refractive Correction

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, David A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Mutti, Donald O.; Zadnik, Karla

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between accommodative lag and annual myopia progression was investigated using linear models in 592 myopic children wearing a full refractive correction in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. The mean (± SD) age and spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline were 10.4 ± 1.8 years and −2.13 ± 1.24 D, respectively. The mean annual progression of myopia was −0.45 ± 0.32 D, and the mean accommodative lag (for a 4-D Badal stimulus) was 1.59 ± 0.63 D. Neither lag at the beginning nor at the end of a yearly progression interval was associated with annual myopia progression (all p ≥ 0.12). These data suggest that foveal hyperopic retinal blur during near viewing may not drive juvenile-onset myopia progression. PMID:21342658

  18. Estimating index of refraction for material identification in comparison to existing temperature emissivity separation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2016-05-01

    As off-nadir viewing platforms become increasingly prevalent in remote sensing, material identification techniques must be robust to changing viewing geometries. Current identification strategies generally rely on estimating reflectivity or emissivity, both of which vary with viewing angle. Presented here is a technique, leveraging polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI), to estimate index of refraction which is invariant to viewing geometry. Results from a quartz window show that index of refraction can be retrieved to within 0.08 rms error from 875-1250 cm-1 for an amorphous material. Results from a silicon carbide (SiC) wafer, which has much sharper features than quartz glass, show the index of refraction can be retrieved to within 0.07 rms error. The results from each of these datasets show an improvement when compared with a maximum smoothness TES algorithm.

  19. REFRACTIVE SURGERY FOR HIGH AMETROPIES, A FEW CONCLUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Filip, Mircea; Nicolae, Miruna; Filip, Andrei; Dragne, Carmen; Triantafillydis, Grigorios; Antonescu, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a few clinical cases of patients with high ametropies and/or anisometropia, who underwent one or two surgical procedures in our clinic, in order to obtain independence of glasses or contact lenses. Twenty cases of high ametropies were included in our study, with or without astigmatism, with transparent lenses, who presented in our clinic for surgical treatment to correct their refractive errors. Postoperatively, we analyzed the results and took decisions for each case in particular; sometimes a second surgical procedure was needed. PMID:26978869

  20. Centration axis in refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    The human eye is an asymmetric optical system and the real cornea is not a rotationally symmetrical volume. Each optical element in the eye has its own optical and neural axes. Defining the optimum center for laser ablation is difficult with many available approaches. We explain the various centration approaches (based on these reference axes) in refractive surgery and review their clinical outcomes. The line-of-sight (LOS) (the line joining the entrance pupil center with the fixation point) is often the recommended reference axis for representing wavefront aberrations of the whole eye (derived from the definition of chief ray in geometrical optics); however pupil centration can be unstable and change with the pupil size. The corneal vertex (CV) represents a stable preferable morphologic reference which is the best approximate for alignment to the visual axis. However, the corneal light reflex can be considered as non-constant, but dependent on the direction of gaze of the eye with respect to the light source. A compromise between the pupil and CV centered ablations is seen in the form of an asymmetric offset where the manifest refraction is referenced to the CV while the higher order aberrations are referenced to the pupil center. There is a need for a flexible choice of centration in excimer laser systems to design customized and non-customized treatments optimally. PMID:26605360

  1. Statistical Analysis of Refractivity in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ansari, Kifah; Al-Mal, Abdulhadi Abu; Kamel, Rami

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the refractivity statistics in the UAE (United Arab Emirates) for a period of 14 years (1990-2003). Six sites have been considered using meteorological surface data (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Al-Ain, Ras Al-Kaimah, and Al-Fujairah). Upper air (radiosonde) data were available at one site only, Abu Dhabi airport, which has been considered for the refractivity gradient statistics. Monthly and yearly averages are obtained for the two parameters, refractivity and refractivity gradient. Cumulative distributions are also provided.

  2. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  3. The refractive index of krypton for lambda in the closed interval 168-288 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Huber, M. C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The index of refraction of krypton has been measured at 27 wavelengths between and including 168 and 288 nm. The probable error of each measurement is plus or minus 0.1%. Our results are compared with other measurements. Our data are about 3.8% smaller than those of Abjean et al.

  4. Crossmodal temporal order and processing acuity in developmentally dyslexic young adults.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Marja; Service, Elisabet; Virsu, Veijo

    2002-03-01

    We investigated crossmodal temporal performance in processing rapid sequential nonlinguistic events in developmentally dyslexic young adults (ages 20-36 years) and an age- and IQ-matched control group in audiotactile, visuotactile, and audiovisual combinations. Two methods were used for estimating 84% correct temporal acuity thresholds: temporal order judgment (TOJ) and temporal processing acuity (TPA). TPA requires phase difference detection: the judgment of simultaneity/nonsimultaneity of brief stimuli in two parallel, spatially separate triplets. The dyslexic readers' average temporal performance was somewhat poorer in all six comparisons; in audiovisual comparisons the group differences were not statistically significant, however. A principal component analysis indicated that temporal acuity and phonological awareness are related in dyslexic readers. The impairment of temporal input processing seems to be a general correlative feature of dyslexia in children and adults, but the overlap in performance between dyslexic and normal readers suggests that it is not a sufficient reason for developmental reading difficulties. PMID:11896646

  5. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  6. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  7. Interferometric analysis of the ablation profile in refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M. I.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Rosales, M. A.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Cantú, R.; Tepichín, E.

    2008-08-01

    In ophthalmology, the laser excimer corneal surface ablation used to correct the refractive eye defects, such as myopia, astigmatism and hyperopia and, more recently, presbyopia is known as refractive surgery. Typically, the characterization of the corresponding technique, as well as the laser accuracy, is performed by analyzing standard ablation profiles made on PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) plates. A drawback of this technique is that those plates do not necessarily represent the dimensions of the cornea during the ablation. On the other hand, due to the time varying process of the eye aberrations, the direct eye refractometric measurements can produce some errors. We report in this work the interferometric analysis of the ablation profile obtained with refractive surgery, applied directly on a contact lens. In this case, the resultant ablation profile might be closer to the real profile as well as time invariant. We use, as a reference, a similar contact lens without ablation. The preliminary results of the characterization of the corresponding ablation profile are also presented.

  8. Influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in dielectrics material with periodic refraction index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Latifah, Eny; Kurniati, Diana; Wisodo, Hari

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in refraction index-varied dielectric material. This dielectric material served as photonic lattice. The behavior of light propagation influenced by variation of refraction index in photonic lattice was investigated. Modes of the guiding light were determined numerically using squared-operator iteration method. It was found that the greater the strength of refraction index, the smaller the guiding modes.

  9. Topography and raytracing analysis of patients with excellent visual acuity 3 months after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy for myopia.

    PubMed

    Maguire, L J; Zabel, R W; Parker, P; Lindstrom, R L

    1991-01-01

    We performed topography and raytracing analysis 3 months after surgery on five consecutive eyes of five patients, which had excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy for myopia. Three of the five eyes had uncorrected postoperative visual acuity of 20/20 or better. Two eyes had an uncorrected vision of 20/40. In three of five eyes, the area of excimer ablation was centered within 1.0 mm of the optical axis. Three other eyes showed decentration that ranged from 1.1 to 1.5 mm. The range of surface power seen within 2 mm of the central keratoscope ring was as follows: patient CK = 37.50 to 39.50 diopters; patient CA = 40.50 D to 44.80 D; patient CW = 37.90 D to 42.20 D; patient AC = 35.50 D to 39.00 D; patient DT = 34.50 D to 41.40 D. Topography patterns differed from eye to eye. A raytracing program modeled refraction of 20/80 and 20/20 "E" of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5% and 6.25% contrast through all measured points on the central 10 keratoscope rings of the five postoperative corneas. The five computer-derived images were ranked subjectively according to the observed degree of image degradation by three observers. Two eyes showed discernible 20/20 E's even at the 12.5% contrast level. Little to no ghost image was seen. Two eyes showed degraded but discernible 20/20 letters at higher levels of contrast only. These eyes showed moderate ghost images that were most apparent in the high-contrast 20/80 letters. One eye showed poor resolution of the 100% contrast 20/20 letter and moderately severe ghost images.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043557

  10. Posterior staphyloma in oculocutaneous albinism: another possible cause of reduced visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susan; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; King, Richard A.; Brilliant, Murray; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Schoonveld, Cheri; Summers, C. Gail

    2016-01-01

    Posterior staphyloma is typically associated with myopic degeneration and has not been recognized as a cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism. We report 3 cases of posterior staphyloma, each with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) defined by phenotype and genotype. Two cases are biological sisters with OCA type 2; one was myopic and the other was hyperopic. The third case involves a man with OCA associated with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS-5). Staphyloma may be another cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism, particularly with increasing age. It may occur in association with myopia or hyperopia. PMID:26691042

  11. Posterior staphyloma in oculocutaneous albinism: another possible cause of reduced visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan; Schimmenti, Lisa A; King, Richard A; Brilliant, Murray; Anderson, Jennifer L; Schoonveld, Cheri; Summers, C Gail

    2015-12-01

    Posterior staphyloma is typically associated with myopic degeneration and has not been recognized as a cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism. We report 3 cases of posterior staphyloma, each with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) defined by phenotype and genotype. Two cases are biological sisters with OCA type 2; one was myopic and the other was hyperopic. The third case involves a man with OCA associated with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS-5). Staphyloma may be another cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism, particularly with increasing age. It may occur in association with myopia or hyperopia. PMID:26691042

  12. Tactile acuity training for patients with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain can disrupt the cortical representation of a painful body part. This disruption may play a role in maintaining the individual’s pain. Tactile acuity training has been used to normalise cortical representation and reduce pain in certain pain conditions. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of this intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The primary aim of this study was to inform the development of a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) by providing preliminary data on the effect of tactile acuity training on pain and function in individuals with CLBP. The secondary aim was to obtain qualitative feedback about the intervention. Methods In this mixed-methods pilot RCT 15 individuals were randomised to either an intervention (tactile acuity training) or a placebo group (sham tactile acuity training). All participants received 3 sessions of acuity training (intervention or sham) from a physiotherapist and were requested to undertake daily acuity home training facilitated by an informal carer (friend/relative). All participants also received usual care physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were pain (0-100visual analogue scale (VAS)) and function (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ)). Participants and their informal carers were invited to a focus group to provide feedback on the intervention. Results The placebo group improved by the greatest magnitude for both outcome measures, but there was no statistically significant difference (Mean difference (95%CI), p-value) between groups for change in pain (25.6 (-0.7 to 51.9), p = 0.056) or function (2.2 (-1.6 to 6.0), p = 0.237). Comparing the number of individuals achieving a minimally clinically significant improvement, the placebo group had better outcomes for pain with all participants achieving ≥30% improvement compared to only a third of the intervention group (6/6 vs. 3/9, p = 0.036). Qualitatively, participants reported that

  13. The BHVI-EyeMapper: Peripheral Refraction and Aberration Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C.; Holden, Brien A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Methods Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, −3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (−2.00 to −5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. Results As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p < 0.05) more negative and the profile of M became significantly (p < 0.05) more asymmetric. No significant differences were found for the J45 profiles (p > 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p < 0.05) less asymmetric as accommodation increased, but no differences were found in the curvature. Conclusions The current study showed that significant changes in peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to −5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development. PMID:25105690

  14. Building achromatic refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    Achromatic beam shapers can provide beam shaping in a certain spectral band and are very important for various laser techniques, such as, applications based on ultra-short pulse lasers with pulse width <100 fs, confocal microscopy, multicolour holography, life sciences fluorescence techniques, where several lasers in spectrum 405-650 nm are used simultaneously, for example 405-650 nm. Conditions of energy re-distribution and zero wave aberration are strictly fulfilled in ordinary plano-aspheric lens pair beam shapers for a definite wavelength only. Hence, these beam shapers work efficiently in relatively narrow, few nm spectrum. To provide acceptable beam quality for refractive beam shaping over a wide spectrum, an achromatizing design condition should be added. Consequently, the typical beam shaper design contains more than two-lenses, to avoid any damaging and other undesirable effects the lenses of beam shaper should be air-spaced. We suggest a two-step method of designing the beam shaper: 1) achromatizing of each plano-aspheric lens using a buried achromatizing surface ("chromatic radius"), then each beam shaper component presents a cemented doublet lens, 2) "splitting" the cemented lenses and realizing air-spaced lens design using optical systems design software. This method allows for using an achromatic design principle during the first step of the design, and then, refining the design by using optimization software. We shall present examples of this design procedure for an achromatic Keplerian beam shaper and for the design of an achromatic Galilean type of beam shaper. Experimental results of operation of refractive beam shapers will be presented as well.

  15. Ionospheric refraction correction in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yan; Han, Wen-Jun

    1986-10-01

    Using Snell's law in polar coordinates, the ionospheric refraction effects on the declination and right ascension determination are discussed in this paper. A ray tracing method is also given. With the ionospheric data observed in Beijing, the correction of ionospheric refraction is estimated and some useful conclusions are drawn.

  16. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  17. Error and adjustment of reflecting prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenwei

    1997-12-01

    A manufacturing error in the orientation of the working planes of a reflecting prism, such as an angle error or an edge error, will cause the optical axis to deviate and the image to lean. So does an adjustment (position error) of a reflecting prism. A universal method to be used to calculate the optical axis deviation and the image lean caused by the manufacturing error of a reflecting prism is presented. It is suited to all types of reflecting prisms. A means to offset the position error against the manufacturing error of a reflecting prism and the changes of image orientation is discussed. For the calculation to be feasible, a surface named the 'separating surface' is introduced just in front of the real exit face of a real prism. It is the image of the entrance face formed by all reflecting surfaces of the real prism. It can be used to separate the image orientation change caused by the error of the prism's reflecting surfaces from the image orientation change caused by the error of the prism's refracting surface. Based on ray tracing, a set of simple and explicit formulas of the optical axis deviation and the image lean for a general optical wedge is derived.

  18. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  19. Optical Evaluation of a Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Wong, Wayne A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Refractive secondary concentrators are being considered for solar thermal applications because of their ability to archive maximum efficiency through the use of total internal reflection for the concentration and distribution of solar energy. A prototype refractive secondary concentrator was built based on ray tracing analysis to demonstrate this collection and distribution concept. The design included a conical secondary concentrator and a faceted extractor. The objective of this effort was to functionally evaluate the performance of the refractive secondary concentrator/extractor prototype and to compare the results with modeling. Most of the light was found to exit the refractive secondary concentrator through the extractor. In addition, the degree of attenuation encountered by the light as it passed through the refractive secondary concentrator was of interest. Quantifying optical output and validating the modeling will provide further understanding of the efficiency of the prototype and will provide insight for additional design and materials selection activities.

  20. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  1. Refraction in electrically thin inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a new formulation for refraction from flat electrically thin lenses and reflectors comprised of inhomogeneous material. Inhomogeneous electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors cannot make use of the Snell law since this classical formulation works solely at interfaces of planar homogeneous media. The refraction of a perpendicularly incident plane wave at a planar interface is physically explained through the phase advance of the rays within the medium. The Huygens principle is then used to construct the refracted wavefront. The formulation is validated using numerical full wave simulation for several examples where the refractive angle is predicted with good accuracy. Furthermore, the formulation gives a physical insight of the phenomenon of refraction from electrically thin inhomogeneous media. PMID:27140761

  2. Regularized reconstruction of wave fields from refracted images of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, K. Roy; O'Sullivan, F.; Samanta, M.; Shrira, V.; Caulliez, G.

    2009-04-01

    Refractive imaging of wave fields is often used for observation of short gravity and gravity-capillary waves in wave tanks and in the field. A light box placed under the waves emits light of spatially graduated intensity. The refracted light intensity image recorded overhead can be related to the wave slope field using a system of equations derived from the laws of refraction. Previous authors have proposed a two stage reconstruction strategy for the recovery of wave slope and height fields: i) estimation of local slope fields ii) global reconstruction of height and slope fields using local estimates. Our statistical analysis of local slope estimates reveals that estimation error variability increases considerably from the bright to the dark ends of the imaging area, with some concomitant bias. The reconstruction problem behaves like an ill posed inverse problem in the dark areas of the image. Illposedness is addressed by a reconstruction method that imposes Tikhonov regularization of directional wave slopes using penalized least squares. Other refinements proposed include a) bias correction of local slope estimates b) spatially weighted reconstruction using estimated variability of local slope estimates and c) more accurate estimates of reference light profiles from time sequence data. A computationally efficient algorithm that exploits sparsity in the resulting system of equations is employed to evaluate the regularized estimator. Simulation studies show that the refinements can result in substantial improvements in the mean squared error of reconstruction. The algorithm is applied to obtain wave field reconstructions from video recordings. Analysis of various video sequences demonstrates distinct spatial patterns at different wind speed and fetch combinations.

  3. Effect of parallactic refraction correction on station height determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Huston, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of omitting the parallactic refraction correction for satellite optical observations in the determination of station coordinates is analyzed for a large satellite data distribution. A significant error effect is seen in station heights. A geodetic satellite data distribution of 23 close earth satellites, containing 30,000 optical observations obtained by 13 principal Baker-Nunn camera sites, is employed. This distribution was used in a preliminary Goddard Earth Model (GEM 1) for the determination of the gravity field of the earth and geocentric tracking station locations. The parallactic refraction correction is modeled as an error on the above satellite data and a least squares adjustment for station locations is obtained for each of the 13 Baker-Nunn sites. Results show an average station height shift of +8 meters with a dispersion of plus or minus 0.7 meters for individual sites. Station latitude and longitude shifts amounted to less than a meter. Similar results are obtained from a theoretical method employing a probability distribution for the satellite optical observations.

  4. Teachers' Knowledge of the Relationship of Auditory Acuity and Hearing Impairment to Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Evelyn Myrtle

    Teacher's knowledge of the relationship of auditory acuity and hearing impairment to reading was evaluated with 60 teachers and specialists (regular classroom primary and upper elementary teachers, reading teachers, teachers of the learning disabled, teachers of the hearing impaired, and speech and language pathologists). Ss were administered a…

  5. The Effects of Drift and Displacement Motion on Dynamic Visual Acuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aznar-Casanova, J. Antonio; Quevedo, Lluisa; Sinnett, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) can be measured from two types of equivalently considered movement referred to as drifting-motion and displacement-motion. Displacement motion can be best described as the horizontal displacement of a stimulus, thus implying pursuit eye movements, and involves moving the stimulus from the fixation point of gaze towards…

  6. Technology as an Aid in Assessing Visual Acuity in Severely/Profoundly Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Julie; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Technology has been used to measure visual acuity with the severely or profoundly mentally retarded child. The following categories of technology have been used for assessment: the recording of visual fixation within the habituation paradigm; equipment to measure eye movements and pursuits; operant techniques; and electrodiagnostic techniques…

  7. Evaluation of vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in adults with congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yukinori; Kaga, Kimitaka; Takekoshi, Hideki; Sakuraba, Keisyoku

    2012-10-01

    This study compared vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in 19 adult athletes with deafness participating in Deaflympics to those of 25 young adults with normal hearing. Balance capability was evaluated using a one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry. Caloric tests and vestibular evoked myogenic potential tests were conducted to test vestibular function. Visual function was evaluated using a dynamic visual acuity test. No significant difference was found between results of the one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry with eyes open. Athletes with deafness performed better than normal hearing young adults with eyes closed. The caloric test indicated hypofunction of the lateral semicircular canal function in 5 of the 19 athletes with deafness. Balance-function tests showed normal results for both groups. The results for athletes with deafness on visual acuity were better than those of controls. Young Deaflympics athletes with deafness can adjust their balance function as well as or better than normal hearing young adults using dynamic visual acuity. PMID:23265013

  8. A Close Eye on the Eagle-Eyed Visual Acuity Hypothesis of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Schlitt, Sabine; Gapp, Volker; Hainz, Daniela; Schirman, Shella; Poustka, Fritz; Weber, Bernhard; Freitag, Christine; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Walter, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been associated with sensory hypersensitivity. A recent study reported visual acuity (VA) in ASD in the region reported for birds of prey. The validity of the results was subsequently doubted. This study examined VA in 34 individuals with ASD, 16 with schizophrenia (SCH), and 26 typically developing (TYP).…

  9. Visual Vestibular Interaction in the Dynamic Visual Acuity Test during Voluntary Head Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moo Hoon; Durnford, Simon; Crowley, John; Rupert, Angus

    1996-01-01

    Although intact vestibular function is essential in maintaining spatial orientation, no good screening tests of vestibular function are available to the aviation community. High frequency voluntary head rotation was selected as a vestibular stimulus to isolate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) from visual influence. A dynamic visual acuity test that incorporates voluntary head rotation was evaluated as a potential vestibular function screening tool. Twenty-seven normal subjects performed voluntary sinusoidal head rotation at frequencies from 0.7-4.0 Hz under three different visual conditions: visually-enhanced VOR, normal VOR, and visually suppressed VOR. Standardized Baily-Lovie chart letters were presented on a computer monitor in front of the subject, who then was asked to read the letters while rotating his head horizontally. The electro-oculogram and dynamic visual acuity score were recorded and analyzed. There were no significant differences in gain or phase shift among three visual conditions in the frequency range of 2.8 to 4.0 Hz. The dynamic visual acuity score shifted less than 0.3 logMAR at frequencies under 2.0 Hz. The dynamic visual acuity test at frequencies a round 2.0 Hz can be recommended for evaluating vestibular function.

  10. Effects of Spatial Position and Density on Visual Acuity. Umea Psychological Reports No. 153.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannstrom, Lauritz

    Visual acuity as a function of target position and density was measured in a letter recognition task. A homogeneous pattern of equally-spaced elements was tachistoscopically exposed, where the target was never located at the boundaries of the pattern. The target was marked with a spatial cue to control attentional processes. With such a spatial…

  11. Short-Term Visual Deprivation, Tactile Acuity, and Haptic Solid Shape Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Charles E.; Norman, J. Farley

    2014-01-01

    Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity. Some studies have found that 45 to 90 minutes of total light deprivation produce significant improvements in participants' tactile acuity as measured with a grating orientation discrimination task. In contrast, a single 2011 study found no such improvement while attempting to replicate these earlier findings. A primary goal of the current experiment was to resolve this discrepancy in the literature by evaluating the effects of a 90-minute period of total light deprivation upon tactile grating orientation discrimination. We also evaluated the potential effect of short-term deprivation upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination using a set of naturally-shaped solid objects. According to previous research, short-term deprivation enhances performance in a tactile 2-D shape discrimination task – perhaps a similar improvement also occurs for haptic 3-D shape discrimination. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination. While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task – the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation. PMID:25397327

  12. Visual acuity changes in rhesus following low-level Q-switched exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David O.; Zwick, Harry; Bearden, Bradley D.; Evans, Brenda S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1997-05-01

    Previously we have shown that visual deficits can be produced by long duration pulses at or slightly below traditional threshold levels for retinal injury. Initially the deficits produced were only transient shifts in baseline acuity that lasted less than 30 min, but successive exposures over a period of days at these same power levels were shown to be cumulative and their impact on visual acuity lengthened and became permanent. The present investigation extended these exposures to Q-switched, 532 nm Nd/YAG pulses presented to awake, task-oriented nonhuman primates performing Landolt ring discriminations. At and above the ED50, single pulses of minimal spot diameter produced only minor, transient shifts in visual acuity while repeated exposures produced significant shifts in acuity that became permanent over time. At lower energies, minimal spot, single-pulsed exposures again produced little observable consequence until either retinal spot sizes or number of pulses were increased. At these lower energy levels, however, no permanent functional loss was observed. Hence, the functional impact of single Q-switched pulses was more difficult to assess than longer time domain exposures. Multiple, low level Q-switched pulses, and/or larger spot sizes produced visual deficits similar to those observed for msec time domain exposures, suggesting both temporal and spatial summation at energy levels where no permanent effects have been noted.

  13. Lingual tactile acuity and food texture preferences among children and their mothers

    PubMed Central

    Lukasewycz, Laura D.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite anecdotal reports of children being more sensitive to texture than adults, and of texture being one of the main drivers of food aversions, there is a paucity of scientific knowledge on the influence of texture perception on food choice in children. The primary goals of this study were to assess the use of a modified letter-identification task to study lingual tactile acuity, one aspect of oral sensitivity, in children and to examine age-related differences in sensitivity. The secondary goal was to explore whether lingual tactile acuity and age relate to various measures of food choice and preference. To this end, children 7–10 years old (31 girls, 21 boys) and their mothers were tested using identical procedures. To assess lingual tactile acuity, children and mothers were asked to use the tips of their tongues to identify raised alphabetical letters of varying size (2.5–8.0 mm) on Teflon strips. To relate lingual tactile acuity to food texture preferences, a forced-choice questionnaire assessed preferences for foods similar in flavor but different in texture (e.g., smooth versus crunchy peanut butter). Children were able to complete the lingual acuity task as well as their mothers and took less time to assess each letter stimulus (p < 0.001); however, there were no age-related differences in lingual acuity (p = 0.14). Age, but not lingual acuity, related to food texture preferences: mothers preferred harder foods (p < 0.001) and those containing more particles (p < 0.04) than did children, although children‘s preferences became more adult-like with increasing age. The availability of a rapid, child-friendly method for assessing oral sensitivity opens up new possibilities of examining differences in oral tactile perceptions across the life span. That food preferences changed with age and were not related to oral sensitivity underscores the fact that factors such as experience, culture and family food practices have a significant impact on children

  14. Reduction in Dynamic Visual Acuity Reveals Gaze Control Changes Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; Brady, Rachel A.; Miller, Chris; Lawrence, Emily L.; Mulavara Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exposure to microgravity causes adaptive changes in eye-head coordination that can lead to altered gaze control. This could affect postflight visual acuity during head and body motion. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in dynamic visual acuity after long-duration spaceflight. METHODS: Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) data from 14 astro/cosmonauts were collected after long-duration (6 months) spaceflight. The difference in acuity between seated and walking conditions provided a metric of change in the subjects ability to maintain gaze fixation during self-motion. In each condition, a psychophysical threshold detection algorithm was used to display Landolt ring optotypes at a size that was near each subject s acuity threshold. Verbal responses regarding the orientation of the gap were recorded as the optotypes appeared sequentially on a computer display 4 meters away. During the walking trials, subjects walked at 6.4 km/h on a motorized treadmill. RESULTS: A decrement in mean postflight DVA was found, with mean values returning to baseline within 1 week. The population mean showed a consistent improvement in DVA performance, but it was accompanied by high variability. A closer examination of the individual subject s recovery curves revealed that many did not follow a pattern of continuous improvement with each passing day. When adjusted on the basis of previous long-duration flight experience, the population mean shows a "bounce" in the re-adaptation curve. CONCLUSION: Gaze control during self-motion is altered following long-duration spaceflight and changes in postflight DVA performance indicate that vestibular re-adaptation may be more complex than a gradual return to normal.

  15. Glare sensitivity and visual acuity after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, U.; Businger, U.; Hartmann, P.; Senn, P.; Schipper, I.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), an increase in glare sensitivity and a reduction in contrast sensitivity can occur owing to changes in the cornea (structure and topography). In this study, an attempt was made to quantify and document objectively a change in those subjective perceptual factors.
METHODS—Snellen visual acuity and disability glare were measured with the Berkeley glare test preoperatively as well as 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively, after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on 32 myopic patients (46 eyes). During the postoperative progress checks, haze was graded and contrast sensitivity was measured with the Vistech chart. All the data were statistically analysed by multiple regression.
RESULTS—One year after PRK, a reduction in visual acuity (VA) measured with the low acuity contrast chart (10%) with and without glare could still be found, despite the fact that acuity measurements with a high contrast Snellen chart showed the same VA 6 months postoperatively as well as before the treatment. The lowest VA could be measured 1 month postoperatively; thereafter, the acuity increased despite the increase in haze that occurred during the first 3 months.
CONCLUSION—Disability glare and a reduction in contrast sensitivity could be observed in most patients after PRK treatment with the Meditec laser system with its scanning slit. The future will show if new technology and a broader flattening area of 6 to 7 mm can minimise these postoperative complications.

 PMID:9059248

  16. The influence of corrected visual acuity on visual attention and incidental learning in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Hertza, Jeremy; Williams, Ronald N; Gupta, Ajay S; Ohly, Johann G

    2009-07-01

    Visual disturbance is one of the hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS), yet clinical neuropsychologists rarely quantitatively assess visual acuity using standardized and norm-referenced measures. This is a significant oversight because disturbances in visual acuity can have an obvious and profound impact on neuropsychological tests which rely upon visual attention and/or scanning. This study investigated the relationship between corrected visual acuity and a widely used measure of visual attention and incidental learning in a group of 35 patients with MS. Regression analysis indicated that corrected visual acuity accounted for 21.3% of the variance in a Coding subtest. The results suggest neuropsychologists and other health care providers should exercise caution in interpreting visually based tests for patients with MS and should assess visual acuity with standardized and norm-referenced measures. PMID:20183167

  17. Negative Refraction experiments in Photonic Crystal prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodo, Plarenta; Parimi, Patanjali. V.; Lu, Wentao. T.; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated negative refraction in metallic photonic crystal (PC) prisms [1]. The refracted fields in the parallel plate waveguide (PPW) are measured by an automated dipole antenna, which scans the desired area, while the free space (FS) measurements, performed in a anechoic chamber, are measured by a rectangular X-band horn that swings in an arc in far field area. Both TE and TM excitation modes are used in FS experiments. Numerical calculations of the band structure and equi-frequency surface simulations are used to determine frequency regions of negative refraction of the triangular lattice PC. Angle of refraction determined by theoretical simulations and experimental results, are in exceptional good agreement, yielding the negative refraction index. FS and PPW refraction experimental results agree remarkably with simulations. 1. "Negative Refraction and Left-handed electromagnetism in Microwave Photonic Crystals", P.V Parimi, W.T Lu, P.Vodo J. Sokoloff and S.Sridhar, cond-mat/0306109 (2003)

  18. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  19. How to incorporate generic refraction models into multistatic tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouse, D. F.

    The vast majority of literature published on target tracking ignores the effects of atmospheric refraction. When refraction is considered, the solutions are generally tailored to a simple exponential atmospheric refraction model. This paper discusses how arbitrary refraction models can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. Attention is paid to multistatic tracking problems, where uncorrected refractive effects can worsen track accuracy and consistency in centralized tracking algorithms, and can lead to difficulties in track-to-track association in distributed tracking filters. Monostatic and bistatic track initialization using refraction-corrupted measurements is discussed. The results are demonstrated using an exponential refractive model, though an arbitrary refraction profile can be substituted.

  20. J. B. Biot and Refraction Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. T.

    2000-12-01

    The Auer-Standish (AJ 119, 2472, 2000) algorithm, recommended in the revised Explanatory Supplement for calculating refraction in an arbitrary model atmosphere, was derived and used by J. B. Biot (Conn. des Tems pour l'An 1839) a century and a half earlier, using Newton's (wrong) emission theory, and the clumsy notation of Laplace's Mécanique Céleste, which Biot had proof-read. Newton, Laplace, and Biot all describe refraction in terms of the trajectories of ``luminous molecules'' attracted by a central force exerted by the atmosphere; this explains why Laplace considered refraction a topic in celestial mechanics. Fortunately for these authors, the only optics required is Snel's law of refraction, which was discovered before Newton's birth, and which Newton's corpuscular optics was rigged to reproduce. Thus Biot's ``derivation'' of the refractive invariant nr sin z by Laplace's method is a circular and unnecessary argument. While Auer & Standish were reinventing Biot's method, the historian D. T. Whiteside (Centaurus 24, 288, 1980) noticed the mathematical similarity of the refraction theories of Newton and Biot to modern ones, and rashly concluded that ``working astronomers still find computational advantage in maintaining the fiction of a Newtonian emission theory'' --- which is absurd nonsense! Despite being an emissionist, Biot understood atmospheric refraction much better than most astronomers do today: he knew why refraction is almost independent of atmospheric structure, except within a few degrees of the horizon, and that refraction at the horizon depends mostly on the local temperature gradient. His work --- together with that of Lord Rayleigh, who derived his eponymous scattering law from the elastic-solid theory of the luminiferous \\ae ther --- reminds us that a theory's correct results do not make it true. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9714357.

  1. Baseline visual acuity strongly predicts visual acuity gain in patients with diabetic macular edema following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment across trials

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U; Hillenkamp, Jost; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Vögeler, Jessica; Mousseau, Marie-Catherine; Wenzel, Andreas; Margaron, Philippe; Hashmonay, Ron; Massin, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the correlation of baseline visual acuity (VA) with VA outcome in response to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diabetic macular edema using a retrospective analysis of nine clinical trials. The result will help assess the relevance of VA gain comparisons across trials. Methods A correlation analysis was performed between mean baseline VA and VA gain at month 12 for 1,616 diabetic macular edema patients across nine randomized clinical trials (RESOLVE, RISE, RIDE, RESTORE, RETAIN, DRCR.net Protocol I, DA VINCI, VIVID, VISTA) with anti-VEGF treatment regimens ranibizumab 0.5 mg and aflibercept 2 mg. Results The mean baseline VA ranged from 56.9 to 64.8 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters. The mean VA gain at month 12 ranged from 6.8 to 13.1 ETDRS letters across trials. There was a strong inverse correlation between mean baseline VA and VA gain at month 12 (r=−0.85). The mean VA at 12 months plateaued at ~70 (68.5–73.0) ETDRS letters (20/40 Snellen VA equivalent) for the anti-VEGF treatment groups from all trials, regardless of dosing regimens and agents. Conclusion Cross-trial comparisons based on changes in best-corrected visual acuity should be done cautiously and only after adjusting for best-corrected visual acuity at baseline. Furthermore, the total VA afforded by treatment appears to be subject to a plateau effect, which warrants further exploration. PMID:27366049

  2. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  3. The refractive index of relic gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical evolution of the refractive index of the tensor modes of the geometry produces a specific class of power spectra characterized by a blue (i.e. slightly increasing) slope which is directly determined by the competition of the slow-roll parameter and of the rate of variation of the refractive index. Throughout the conventional stages of the inflationary and post-inflationary evolution, the microwave background anisotropies measurements, the pulsar timing limits and the big-bang nucleosynthesis constraints set stringent bounds on the refractive index and on its rate of variation. Within the physically allowed region of the parameter space the cosmic background of relic gravitons leads to a potentially large signal for the ground-based detectors (in their advanced version) and for the proposed space-borne interferometers. Conversely, the lack of direct detection of the signal will set a qualitatively new bound on the dynamical variation of the refractive index.

  4. Nonlinear negative refraction by difference frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shen, Dongyi; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-05-01

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin Beta barium borate slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  5. Refractive index measurement using comparative interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, Mihaela; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Garoi, F.; Iordache, Iuliana

    2007-05-01

    The refractive index of a material medium is an important optical parameter since it exhibits the optical properties of the material. The adulteration problem is increasing day by day and hence simple, automatic and accurate measurement of the refractive index of materials is of great importance these days. For solid thin films materials Abeles method was reconsidered. Quick, measurements of refractive index using simple techniques and refractometers can help controlling adulteration of liquids of common use to a greater extent. Very simple interferometric set-up using Fizeau fringe patterns compares the fringe pitch as obtained in a cell with two levels: one down level with the unknown refractive index liquids and the upper level with gas air. A CCD matrix and a PC can handle the data and produce the results up to for digits.

  6. Seismic refraction profile in coral sea basin.

    PubMed

    Shor, G G

    1967-11-17

    A refraction profile near the south edge of Coral Sea Basin shows sediments, "second layer," and oceanic crust all thicker than normal for an oceanic station; normal mantle lies at a depth of 19 kilometers. PMID:17753600

  7. Development of a subjective refraction simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perches, S.; Ares, J.; Collados, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed simulation software by Matlab (MathworksInc.) with a graphical interface designed for non-expert users. This simulator allows you to complete the process of subjective refraction starting from the aberrometry of the patients and analyse the influence of different factors during the exam. In addition to explain the graphical interface and its working, we show two examples about a complete process of subjective refraction with the influence of high order aberrations and without them showing the retinal image obtained in each step of the refraction process. When the Jackson Cross-Cylinder technique is made with this software, it becomes clear the difficulty of chosen between two images when high order aberrations are present. Therefore, the variability of response during the refraction can be a problem when the examiner has to reach an adequate optical prescription.

  8. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  9. Dynamic Visual Acuity and Landing Sickness in Crewmembers Returning from Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.J.F; Peters, B.T.; Reschke, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity causes sensorimotor adaptations that result in functional deficits upon returning to a gravitational environment. At landing the vestibular system and the central nervous system, responsible for coordinating head and eye movements, are adapted to microgravity and must re-adapt to the gravitational environment. This re-adaptation causes decrements in gaze control and dynamic visual acuity, with astronauts reporting oscillopsia and blurred vision. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is assessed using an oscillating chair developed in the Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC. This chair is lightweight and easily portable for quick deployment in the field. The base of the chair is spring-loaded and allows for manual oscillation of the subject. Using a metronome, the chair is vertically oscillated plus or minus 2 cm at 2 Hz by an operator, to simulate walking. While the subject is being oscillated, they are asked to discern the direction of Landolt-C optotypes of varying sizes and record their direction using a gamepad. The visual acuity thresholds are determined using an algorithm that alters the size of the optotype based on the previous response of the subject using a forced-choice best parameter estimation that is able to rapidly converge on the threshold value. Visual acuity thresholds were determined both for static (seated) and dynamic (oscillating) conditions. Dynamic visual acuity is defined as the difference between the dynamic and static conditions. Dynamic visual acuity measures will be taken prior to flight (typically L-180, L-90, and L-60) and up to eight times after landing, including up to 3 times on R plus 0. Follow up measurements will be taken at R plus 1 (approximately 36 hours after landing). Long-duration International Space Station crewmembers will be tested once at the refueling stop in Europe and once again upon return to Johnson Space Center. In addition to DVA, subjective ratings of motion sickness will be recorded

  10. Comparison on testability of visual acuity, stereo acuity and colour vision tests between children with learning disabilities and children without learning disabilities in government primary schools

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Nurul Farhana; Chen, Ai-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Context: Children with learning disabilities might have difficulties to communicate effectively and give reliable responses as required in various visual function testing procedures. Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the testability of visual acuity using the modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and Cambridge Crowding Cards, stereo acuity using Lang Stereo test II and Butterfly stereo tests and colour perception using Colour Vision Test Made Easy (CVTME) and Ishihara's Test for Colour Deficiency (Ishihara Test) between children in mainstream classes and children with learning disabilities in special education classes in government primary schools. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 primary school children (50 children from mainstream classes and 50 children from special education classes) matched in age were recruited in this cross-sectional comparative study. The testability was determined by the percentage of children who were able to give reliable respond as required by the respective tests. ‘Unable to test’ was defined as inappropriate response or uncooperative despite best efforts of the screener. Results: The testability of the modified ETDRS, Butterfly stereo test and Ishihara test for respective visual function tests were found lower among children in special education classes (P < 0.001) but not in Cambridge Crowding Cards, Lang Stereo test II and CVTME. Conclusion: Non verbal or “matching” approaches were found to be more superior in testing visual functions in children with learning disabilities. Modifications of vision testing procedures are essential for children with learning disabilities. PMID:24008790

  11. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  12. Two Color Interferometry with Nonlinear Refractive Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    2002-01-01

    Using nonlinear refractive properties of salt-water solution at two wavelengths, numerical analysis has been performed to extract temperature and concentration from virtual interferometric fringe data. The theoretical study, using a commercially available equation solving tool, starts with critical fringe counting needs and the role of nonlinear refractive properties in such measurements. Finally, methodology of the analysis, developed codes, and fringe counting accuracy needs are described in detail.

  13. Classical gravity does not refract negatively.

    PubMed

    McCall, Martin W

    2007-03-01

    We appraise recent claims that classical gravitation can induce negative refraction of electromagnetic radiation in vacuum. By recasting the previous literature in covariant notation, we show that the criterion used hitherto for determining negative refraction in vacuum is inappropriate, and can even be satisfied by parametrized transformations in Minkowski spacetime. Using instead a covariantly acceptable definition, we find that in classical vacuum the power flux of a plane electromagnetic wave points in the direction of phase advance. PMID:17359145

  14. Methods to retrieve the complex refractive index of aquatic suspended particles: going beyond simple shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Piera, Jaume

    2016-07-01

    The scattering properties of aquatic suspended particles have many optical applications. Several data inversion methods have been proposed to estimate important features of particles, such as their size distribution or their refractive index. Most of the proposed methods are based on the Lorenz-Mie theory to solve Maxwell's equations, where particles are considered homogeneous spheres. A generalization that allows consideration of more complex-shaped particles is the T-matrix method. Although this approach imposes some geometrical restrictions (particles must be rotationally symmetrical) it is applicable to many life forms of phytoplankton. In this paper, three different scenarios are considered in order to compare the performance of several inversion methods for retrieving refractive indices. The error associated with each method is discussed and analyzed. The results suggest that inverse methods using the T-matrix approach are useful to accurately retrieve the refractive indices of particles with complex shapes, such as for many phytoplankton organisms.

  15. The effects of atmospheric refraction on the accuracy of laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanter, D. L.; Gardner, C. S.; Rao, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Correction formulas derived by Saastamoinen and Marini, and the ray traces through the refractivity profiles all assume a spherically symmetric refractivity profile. The errors introduced by this assumption were investigated by ray tracing through three-dimensional profiles. The results of this investigation indicate that the difference between ray traces through the spherically symmetric and three-dimensional profiles is approximately three centimeters at 10 deg and decreases to less than one half of a centimeter at 80 deg. If the accuracy desired in future laser ranging systems is less than a few centimeters, Saastamoinen and Marini's formulas must be altered to account for the fact that the refractivity profile is not spherically symmetric.

  16. An Update on the Development of a Line-Focus Refractive Concentrator Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; ONeill, Mark J.; Fraas, Lewis M.

    1994-01-01

    Concentrator arrays offer a number of generic benefits for space (i.e. high array efficiency, protection from space radiation effects, minimized plasma interactions, etc.). The line-focus refractive concentrator concept, however, also offers two very important advantages: (1) relaxation of precise array tracking requirements to only a single axis and (2) low-cost mass production of the lens material. The linear refractive concentrator can be designed to provide an essentially flat response over a wide range of longitudinal errors for satellites having only single-axis tracking capability. New panel designs emphasize light weight, high stiffness, stowability and ease of manufacturing and assembly. This paper will address the current status of the concentrator program with special emphasis on the design implications, and flexibility, of using a linear refractive concentrator lens as well as detail the recent fabrication of prototype hardware.

  17. An update on the development of a line-focus refractive concentrator array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Oneill, Mark J.; Fraas, Lewis M.

    1994-01-01

    Concentrator arrays offer a number of generic benefits for space (i.e. high array efficiency, protection from space radiation effects, minimized plasma interactions, etc.). The line-focus refractive concept, however, also offers two very important advantages: (1) relaxation of precise array tracking requirements to only a single axis and (2) low-cost mass production of the lens material. The linear refractive concentrator can be designed to provide an essentially flat response over a wide range of longitudinal errors for satellites having only single-axis tracking capability. New panel designs emphasize light weight, high stiffness, storability, and ease of manufacturing and assembly. This paper addresses the current status of the concentrator program with special emphasis on the design implications, and flexibility, of using a linear refractive concentrator lens as well as details recent fabrication of prototype hardware.

  18. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  19. On the sources of astrometric anomalous refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2009-06-01

    Over a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, now known as "anomalous refraction," is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order often minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but never confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters.

  20. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  1. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios. PMID:23428441

  2. Sun compass error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blucker, T. J.; Ferry, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    An error model is described for the Apollo 15 sun compass, a contingency navigational device. Field test data are presented along with significant results of the test. The errors reported include a random error resulting from tilt in leveling the sun compass, a random error because of observer sighting inaccuracies, a bias error because of mean tilt in compass leveling, a bias error in the sun compass itself, and a bias error because the device is leveled to the local terrain slope.

  3. The Nursing Home Minimum Data Set for Vision and Its Association with Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark W.; McGwin, Gerald; Elliott, Amanda F.; Owsley, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association between the Minimum Data Set's (MDS) Vision Patterns section and near and distance visual acuity and contrast sensitivity in nursing home residents. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Seventeen nursing homes in the Birmingham, Alabama area. Participants 371 nursing home residents ≥ 55 years old with Mini-mental State Exams of ≥ 13. Measurements The MDS 2.0 assessment for vision from the date closest to acuity and contrast sensitivity assessment was obtained from the resident's medical record. Acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured by the ETDRS chart and Pelli-Robson chart, respectively. Results The MDS rating of visual status was associated with both distance and near visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. The MDS performed poorly in distinguishing residents with mild versus moderate visual impairment. For residents who were rated on the MDS as having adequate vision, 45.9% had distance acuity worse than 20/40 in the better eye, 72.8% had near acuity worse than 20/40 in the better eye, and 85.8% had contrast sensitivity < 1.50. Conclusion The MDS 2.0 assessment for vision in nursing home residents is positively associated with visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, but does not adequately distinguish between individuals with mild versus moderate visual impairment and classifies many as having adequate vision who have visual impairment. The validity of the MDS 2.0 as a mechanism for triggering comprehensive eye care for nursing home residents is questionable. PMID:19187419

  4. A new method for the removal of refraction artifacts in multibeam echosounder systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerer, Edouard Louis Laurent Marie

    Refraction artifacts are often present in shallow water multibeam surveys and can degrade the quality of the final product if they are not adequately addressed. This thesis consists of the implementation of a systematic analysis and correction software package that addresses refraction artifacts in a post-processing context. The methodology consists of the estimation of the variation in the water sound speed distribution, by using the information given by the multibeam dataset itself. This is done by the evaluation of the appropriately modeled Sound Speed Profiles (SSP), which is applied either in addition to an already existing SSP, or applied directly to the raw data. Refraction errors are most developed in the outer parts of the survey line coverage. The software developed takes advantage of this observation by utilising the nadir data because they are almost unaffected by refraction errors. Two methods of analysis are considered in this study. The first method uses two neighbouring parallel lines to generate corrections. The second uses the crossing check lines. Both methods are used to evaluate the refraction coefficients of a two-layer SSP model, which, when applied, should bring the outer parts of the survey line as close as possible to the real seafloor (as observed at nadir). The software developed is tested on an actual multibeam dataset. This data has been acquired off Saint John Harbor (N.B.) with a SIMRAD EM1000 sonar. The application of the new post-processing tool reduces refraction artifacts. The reduction of such artifacts improves the extraction of useful information contained in the multibeam data. The method used allows as well the computation of correction SSPs that provide characteristics of an equivalent water mass.

  5. Theoretical and applied aspects of night vision goggle resolution and visual acuity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. Lee; Pinkus, Alan R.

    2007-04-01

    The image quality of night vision goggles is often expressed in terms of visual acuity, resolution or modulation transfer function. The primary reason for providing a measure of image quality is the underlying assumption that the image quality metric correlates with the level of visual performance that one could expect when using the device, for example, target detection or target recognition performance. This paper provides a theoretical analysis of the relationships between these three image quality metrics: visual acuity, resolution and modulation transfer function. Results from laboratory and field studies were used to relate these metrics to visual performance. These results can also be applied to non-image intensifier based imaging systems such as a helmet-mounted display coupled to an imaging sensor.

  6. Crossmodal temporal processing acuity impairment aggravates with age in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Virsu, Veijo; Lahti-Nuuttila, Pekka; Laasonen, Marja

    2003-01-23

    Temporal processing has been found to be impaired in developmental dyslexia. We investigated how aging affects crossmodal temporal processing impairment with 39 dyslexic and 40 fluent 20-59-year-old readers. Cognitive temporal acuity was measured at millisecond levels in six tasks. They consisted of order judgments of two brief non-speech stimulus pulses, the stimuli being audiotactile, visuotactile and audiovisual, and of simultaneity/nonsimultaneity detection of the pulses in two parallel three-pulse trains. Temporal acuity declined with age in both reading groups and its impairment was observed in developmental dyslexia. A new finding was that the crossmodal temporal impairment, directly relevant to reading, increased with age. The age-related exacerbation suggests a developmental neuronal deficit, possibly related to magnocells, which exists before dyslexia and is its ontogenetic cause. PMID:12505615

  7. Microactuator production via high aspect ratio, high edge acuity metal fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guckel, H.; Christenson, T. R.

    1993-01-01

    LIGA is a procession sequence which uses x-ray lithography on photoresist layers of several hundred micrometers to produce very high edge acuity photopolymer molds. These plastic molds can be converted to metal molds via electroplating of many different metals and alloys. The end results are high edge acuity metal parts with large structural heights. The LIGA process as originally described by W. Ehrfeld can be extended by adding a surface micromachining phase to produce precision metal parts which can be assembled to form three-dimensional micromechanisms. This process, SLIGA, has been used to fabricate a dynamometer on a chip. The instrument has been fully implemented and will be applied to tribology issues, speed-torque characterization of planar magnetic micromotors and a new family of sensors.

  8. Changes in smell acuity induced by radiation exposure of the olfactory mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ophir, D.; Guterman, A.; Gross-Isseroff, R.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on smell acuity were assessed in 12 patients in whom the olfactory mucosa was exposed to radiation in the course of treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma or pituitary adenoma. Olfactory detection thresholds for two odorants (amyl acetate and eugenol) were determined before the start of radiation therapy, within a week of termination of therapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months later. The results show clearly that smell acuity is profoundly affected by therapeutic irradiation. Thresholds had increased in all 12 patients by the end of treatment and were still high one month later. Varying degrees of recovery were noted in most patients three to six months after cessation of treatment. The fate of the sense of smell deserves more attention when considering the disability caused by irradiation to certain head and neck tumors.

  9. Binocular visual acuity for the correction of spherical aberration in polychromatic and monochromatic light.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christina; Cánovas, Carmen; Manzanera, Silvestre; Weeber, Henk; Prieto, Pedro M; Piers, Patricia; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Correction of spherical (SA) and longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA) significantly improves monocular visual acuity (VA). In this work, the visual effect of SA correction in polychromatic and monochromatic light on binocular visual performance is investigated. A liquid crystal based binocular adaptive optics visual analyzer capable of operating in polychromatic light is employed in this study. Binocular VA improves when SA is corrected and LCA effects are reduced separately and in combination, resulting in the highest value for SA correction in monochromatic light. However, the binocular summation ratio is highest for the baseline condition of uncorrected SA in polychromatic light. Although SA correction in monochromatic light has a greater impact monocularly than binocularly, bilateral correction of both SA and LCA may further improve binocular spatial visual acuity which may support the use of aspheric-achromatic ophthalmic devices, in particular, intraocular lenses (IOLs). PMID:24520150

  10. Gains following perceptual learning are closely linked to the initial visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Oren; Sterkin, Anna; Lev, Maria; Levi, Dennis M.; Polat, Uri

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the dependence of perceptual learning gains on initial visual acuity (VA), in a large sample of subjects with a wide range of VAs. A large sample of normally sighted and presbyopic subjects (N = 119; aged 40 to 63) with a wide range of uncorrected near visual acuities (VA, −0.12 to 0.8 LogMAR), underwent perceptual learning. Training consisted of detecting briefly presented Gabor stimuli under spatial and temporal masking conditions. Consistent with previous findings, perceptual learning induced a significant improvement in near VA and reading speed under conditions of limited exposure duration. Our results show that the improvements in VA and reading speed observed following perceptual learning are closely linked to the initial VA, with only a minor fraction of the observed improvement that may be attributed to the additional sessions performed by those with the worse VA. PMID:27122254

  11. Vision-guided ocular growth in a mutant chicken model with diminished visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Eric R.; Zelinka, Christopher; Tang, Junhua; Liu, Jun; Code, Kimberly A.; Petersen-Jones, Simon; Fischer, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    Visual experience is known to guide ocular growth. We tested the hypothesis that vision-guided ocular growth is disrupted in a model system with diminished visual acuity. We examine whether ocular elongation is influenced by form-deprivation (FD) and lens-imposed defocus in the Retinopathy, Globe Enlarged (RGE) chicken. Young RGE chicks have poor visual acuity, without significant retinal pathology, resulting from a mutation in guanine nucleotide-binding protein β3 (GNB3), also known as transducin β3 or Gβ3. The mutation in GNB3 destabilizes the protein and causes a loss of Gβ3 from photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells. (Ritchey et al. 2010)FD increased ocular elongation in RGE eyes in a manner similar to that seen in wild-type (WT) eyes. By comparison, the excessive ocular elongation that results from hyperopic defocus was increased, whereas myopic defocus failed to significantly decrease ocular elongation in RGE eyes. Brief daily periods of unrestricted vision interrupting FD prevented ocular elongation in RGE chicks in a manner similar to that seen in WT chicks. Glucagonergic amacrine cells differentially expressed the immediate early gene Egr1 in response to growth-guiding stimuli in RGE retinas, but the defocus-dependent up-regulation of Egr1 was lesser in RGE retinas compared to that of WT retinas. We conclude that high visual acuity, and the retinal signaling mediated by Gβ3, is not required for emmetropization and the excessive ocular elongation caused by FD and hyperopic defocus. However, the loss of acuity and Gβ3 from RGE retinas causes enhanced responses to hyperopic defocus and diminished responses to myopic defocus. PMID:22824538

  12. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity in rats with retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Goetz, G.; Lorach, H.; Mandel, Y.; Smith, R.; Boinagrov, D.; Lei, X.; Kamins, T.; Harris, J.; Mathieson, K.; Sher, A.

    2015-03-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays with 70μm pixels were used to convert pulsed near-IR light (880-915nm) into pulsed current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Network-mediated responses of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could be modulated by pulse width (1-20ms) and peak irradiance (0.5-10 mW/mm2). Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibited flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images, and non-linear spatial summation. Spatial resolution was assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using alternating gratings with variable stripe width, projected with rapidly pulsed illumination (20-40Hz). In-vitro, average size of the electrical receptive fields in normal retina was 248+/-59μm - similar to their visible light RF size: 249+/-44μm. RGCs responded to grating stripes down to 67μm using photovoltaic stimulation in degenerate rat retina, and 28μm with visible light in normal retina. In-vivo, visual acuity in normally-sighted controls was 29+/-5μm/stripe, vs. 63+/-4μm/stripe in rats with subretinal photovoltaic arrays, corresponding to 20/250 acuity in human eye. With the enhanced acuity provided by eye movements and perceptual learning in human patients, visual acuity might exceed the 20/200 threshold of legal blindness. Ease of implantation and tiling of these wireless arrays to cover a large visual field, combined with their high resolution opens the door to highly functional restoration of sight.

  13. Association of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Masashi; Miyata, Kimie; Morikawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomo; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kawasaki, Ryo; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Kurumatani, Norio; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both visual impairment and cognitive impairment are essential factors that determine the quality of life in the aged population. The aim of this study was to determine if a correlation existed between visual acuity and cognitive impairment in an elderly Japanese population. The Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study was a cross-sectional study of individuals aged ≥68 years who lived in Nara Prefecture of Japan. Participants underwent ophthalmological examinations and cognitive function test. A mild visual impairment was defined as having a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units in the better eye. Cognitive impairment was defined as having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of ≤23 points. A total to 2818 individuals completed the examinations. The mean age of the participants was 76.3 ± 4.8 years (mean ± standard deviation). The mean BCVA of the better eye was −0.02 ± 0.13 logMAR units and 6.6% subjects were classified as being mildly visually impaired. The mean MMSE score was 27.3 ± 2.3 and 5.7% subjects were classified as being cognitively impaired. The proportion of subjects with cognitive or moderate visual impairment increased with age, and there was a significant correlation between the visual acuity and MMSE score (r = −0.10, p < 0.0001). Subjects with mild visual impairments had 2.4 times higher odds of having cognitive impairment than those without visual impairment (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.5–3.8, p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and length of education. We conclude that it may be important to maintain good visual acuity to reduce the risk of having cognitive impairment. PMID:27610269

  14. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  15. Variance analysis. Part I, Extending flexible budget variance analysis to acuity.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A

    1991-01-01

    The author reviews the concepts of flexible budget variance analysis, including the price, quantity, and volume variances generated by that technique. He also introduces the concept of acuity variance and provides direction on how such a variance measure can be calculated. Part II in this two-part series on variance analysis will look at how personal computers can be useful in the variance analysis process. PMID:1870002

  16. Final Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with conventionally-managed eyes. Methods Infants with symmetrical, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye randomized to earlier treatment at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either early treatment or conventional management. Main Outcome Measures ETDRS visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers. Retinal structure was assessed as a secondary outcome. Results Analysis of all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant benefit for early treatment (24.6% v. 29.0% unfavorable outcome, P=0.15). Analysis of 6-year visual acuity results according to the Type 1 and 2 clinical algorithm showed a benefit for Type 1 eyes (25.1% v. 32.8%, P=0.02) treated early, but not Type 2 eyes (23.6% v. 19.4%, P=0.37). Early treated eyes showed a significantly better structural outcome compared with conventionally managed eyes (8.9% v. 15.2% unfavorable outcome, P<0.001), with no greater risk of ocular complications. Conclusion Early treatment for Type 1 high-risk prethreshold eyes improved visual acuity outcomes at 6 years of age. Early treatment for Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes did not. Application to Clinical Practice Type 1 eyes, not Type 2 eyes should be treated early. These results are particularly important considering that 52 % of Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes underwent regression of ROP without requiring treatment. PMID:20385926

  17. Association of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Mine, Masashi; Miyata, Kimie; Morikawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomo; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kawasaki, Ryo; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Kurumatani, Norio; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    Both visual impairment and cognitive impairment are essential factors that determine the quality of life in the aged population. The aim of this study was to determine if a correlation existed between visual acuity and cognitive impairment in an elderly Japanese population. The Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study was a cross-sectional study of individuals aged ≥68 years who lived in Nara Prefecture of Japan. Participants underwent ophthalmological examinations and cognitive function test. A mild visual impairment was defined as having a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units in the better eye. Cognitive impairment was defined as having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of ≤23 points. A total to 2818 individuals completed the examinations. The mean age of the participants was 76.3 ± 4.8 years (mean ± standard deviation). The mean BCVA of the better eye was -0.02 ± 0.13 logMAR units and 6.6% subjects were classified as being mildly visually impaired. The mean MMSE score was 27.3 ± 2.3 and 5.7% subjects were classified as being cognitively impaired. The proportion of subjects with cognitive or moderate visual impairment increased with age, and there was a significant correlation between the visual acuity and MMSE score (r = -0.10, p < 0.0001). Subjects with mild visual impairments had 2.4 times higher odds of having cognitive impairment than those without visual impairment (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.8, p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and length of education. We conclude that it may be important to maintain good visual acuity to reduce the risk of having cognitive impairment. PMID:27610269

  18. Research Experience for Teachers at NRAO-Green Bank: Atmospheric Refraction at Low Elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Jeff; Maddalena, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    During the summer, 2008 Research Experience for Teachers, J. Paradis worked at the NRAO in Green Bank to collect and reduce data taken on the 43-m radio telescope to compare models of atmospheric refraction at elevations below 10º. Unlike optical telescopes, radio telescopes cannot use guide stars to overcome deficiencies in refraction models but, instead, need accurate refraction predictions. The GBT, for example, has a large aperture, observes at high frequencies and to low elevations, and requires a model that is accurate to a few arc seconds. Unfortunately, there is no radio refraction model that has been universally accepted, with some of the most common models differing by up to an arc minute at the horizon. There are a number of advantages in using the 43-m telescope at 1 GHz to measure refraction using the Moon as a source. The telescope can observe to the horizon, the Moon's size closely matches the beam width of the telescope, and the Moon is bright enough to have its position measured accurately in under 30 sec. Most importantly, the equatorial mount of the telescope, when combined with the monthly changing azimuth of Moon rises and sets, makes it possible to disentangle telescope pointing errors from refraction. So far we have not collected sufficient data for a complete analysis, but lessons for high school students have been developed that embrace the core concepts of the summers’ efforts. Using BUFKIT, a weather forecast program developed by the National Weather Service, students in physics classes determine the atmospheric refraction at different elevations for fictional radio and optical telescopes in upstate New York. Students are given a pre and post test assessment to measure understanding for a topic students traditionally find difficult. This work was supported in part by the NSF-RET program

  19. The association of indicators of fetal growth with visual acuity and hearing among conscripts.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Sørensen, H T; Steffensen, F H; Sabroe, S; Gillman, M W; Fischer, P; Rothman, K J

    2001-03-01

    Impaired fetal growth is associated with increased susceptibility to several chronic diseases. We studied the association between birth weight, indicators of disproportional fetal growth, and impaired visual acuity and hearing in 4,300 conscripts from a well-defined region in Denmark from August 1, 1993, to July 31, 1994. From the standard health examination for conscripts, we obtained data on sight based on the Snellen's chart and data on hearing acuity based on audiometry. By means of record linkage, we obtained data on outcomes for the conscripts at birth from the Medical Birth Registry. From this registry, we have data on birth weight, gestational age, and birth length that were recorded from existing computerized registers based on the records of midwives. A birth weight of less than 3,000 gm and a body mass index at birth of less than 3.4 were associated with reduced visual acuity and impaired hearing. The results could be due to fetal brain programming or due to confounding, by early birth trauma or other factors. PMID:11246586

  20. Is acuity enough? Other considerations in clinical investigations of visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lepri, Bernard P

    2009-06-01

    Visual impairing eye diseases are the major frontier facing ophthalmic research today in light of our rapidly aging population. The visual skills necessary for improving the quality of daily function and life are inextricably linked to these impairing diseases. Both research and reimbursement programs are emphasizing outcome-based results. Is improvement in visual acuity alone enough to improve the function and quality of life of visually impaired persons? This perspective summarizes the types of effectiveness endpoints for clinical investigations of visual prostheses that go beyond visual acuity. The clinical investigation of visual prostheses should include visual function, functional vision and quality of life measures. Specifically, they encompass contrast sensitivity, orientation and mobility, activities of daily living and quality of life assessments. The perspective focuses on the design of clinical trials for visual prostheses and the methods of determining effectiveness above and beyond visual acuity that will yield outcomes that are measured by improved function in the visual world and quality of life. The visually impaired population is the primary consideration in this presentation with particular emphases on retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Clinical trials for visual prostheses cannot be isolated from the need for medical rehabilitation in order to obtain measurements of effectiveness that produce outcomes/evidence-based success. This approach will facilitate improvement in daily function and quality of life of patients with diseases that cause chronic vision impairment. PMID:19458402

  1. Visual acuity thresholds of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta): an electrophysiological approach.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Soraya Moein; Musick, John A; Ochs, Alfred L

    2002-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials measure dynamic properties of the visual system by recording transient electric responses of neural tissue identified to correspond to a specific visual stimulus, such as light or a striped grid. In this study, visual evoked potentials were used to test the visual acuity of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in water. Subject animals were fitted with a Plexiglas goggle filled with filtered seawater. Stimuli of black and white striped gratings were presented to the turtles using a slide projector directing an image onto a screen via a rotatable mirror that shifted the striped pattern laterally one-half cycle. Bioelectric activity was collected using a digital averaging computer and subdermal platinum electrodes, implanted under the head scutes directly above the optic nerve and the contralateral optic tectum. To isolate the response signal from the noise, signal averaging techniques were used when collecting visual evoked potentials. The resulting response waveforms included a robust positive-negative compound that was used to track the turtle's response to visual stimulation. Acuity thresholds for these sea turtles, which were derived from linear regressions analysis of the positive-negative compound amplitudes versus stripe size, ranged from 0.130 to 0.215. This acuity level is comparable to other inshore, shallow water marine species. PMID:11913813

  2. Estimation of volcanic ash refractive index from satellite infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, H.; Masuda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of volcanic ash clouds (cloud height, optical depth, and effective radius of the particles) are planned to estimate from the data of the next Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari 8/9. The volcanic ash algorithms, such as those proposed by NOAA/NESDIS and by EUMETSAT, are based on the infrared absorption properties of the ash particles, and the refractive index of a typical volcanic rock (i.e. andesite) has been used in the forward radiative transfer calculations. Because of a variety of the absorption properties for real volcanic ash particles at infrared wavelengths (9-13 micron), a large retrieval error may occur if the refractive index of the observed ash particles was different from that assumed in the retrieval algorithm. Satellite infrared sounder provides spectral information for the volcanic ash clouds. If we can estimate the refractive index of the ash particles from the infrared sounder data, a dataset of the optical properties for similar rock type of the volcanic ash can be prepared for the ash retrieval algorithms of geostationary/polar-orbiting satellites in advance. Furthermore, the estimated refractive index can be used for a diagnostic and a correction of the ash particle model in the retrieval algorithm within a period of the volcanic activities. In this work, optimal estimation of the volcanic ash parameters was conducted through the radiative transfer calculations for the window channels of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS). The estimated refractive indices are proposed for the volcanic ash particles of some eruption events.

  3. Assembly and alignment of infrared refractive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Ya-jing; Chen, Fan-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems for scientific instrumentation frequently include lens or mirrors with critical mechanical requirements. Position issues of those components are inextricably bound to the efficiency of the instrument. The position referring to the lens system mainly means spacer and rotation of all elements concerned. Instrument could not be completed without the accuracy assembly even the previous design was top one. The alignment of infrared optical system always is a tough thing due to the IR material being opaque to visible light which hardly effect on the imaging ability of the system. In this paper a large-aperture IR refractive system was described in details and the alignment of this system was presented. The brief work describes the assembly and integration of the camera barrel in lab. First of all, all the mechanical elements must be manufactured with high accuracy requirements to meet alignment tolerances and minimum errors mostly could be ignored. The rotations relative to the optical axis were hardy restricted by the space between barrel and cells. The lens vertex displacements were determined through high accuracy titanium alloy spacer. So the actual shape data of the optical lenses were obtained by coordinate measuring machining (CMM) to calculate the real space between lenses after alignment1 done. All the measured results were critical for instruction of the practical assemble. Based on the properties and tolerances of the system, the camera barrel includes sets of six lenses with their respective supports and cells which are composed of two parts: the flied lens group and the relay lenses group. The first one was aligned by the geometry centering used CMM. And the relay lenses were integrated one by one after centered individually with a classical centering instrument. Then the two separate components were assembled under the monitor of the CMM with micron precision. Three parameters on the opti-mechanical elements which include decenter, tilt and

  4. Refractive Development in the “ROP Rat”

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Toco Y. P.; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Akula, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Although retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is clinically characterized by abnormal retinal vessels at the posterior pole of the eye, it is also commonly characterized by vascular abnormalities in the anterior segment, visual dysfunction which is based in retinal dysfunction, and, most commonly of all, arrested eye growth and high refractive error, particularly (and paradoxically) myopia. The oxygen-induced retinopathy rat model of ROP presents neurovascular outcomes similar to the human disease, although it is not yet known if the “ROP rat” also models the small-eyed myopia characteristic of ROP. In this study, magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of albino (Sprague-Dawley) and pigmented (Long-Evans) ROP rat eyes, and age- and strain-matched room-air-reared (RAR) controls, were examined. The positions and curvatures of the various optical media were measured and the refractive state (℞) of each eye estimated based on a previously published model. Even in adulthood (postnatal day 50), Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans ROP rats were significantly myopic compared to strain-matched controls. The myopia in the Long-Evans ROP rats was more severe than in the Sprague-Dawley ROP rats, which also had significantly shorter axial lengths. These data reveal the ROP rat to be a novel and potentially informative approach to investigating physiological mechanisms in myopia in general and the myopia peculiar to ROP in particular. PMID:22482037

  5. Refraction tomography over a buried waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, E.; Maurer, H.; Green, A.G.

    1998-07-01

    Potential field methods generally lack the necessary depth resolution, and seismic reflection data are usually contaminated by source-generated noise in the time range of interest (<50 ms). To address this problem, the authors have developed a surface 2-D tomographic refraction scheme that is based on a fast finite-difference eikonal solver and an inversion method that incorporates appropriate damping and smoothing constraints. This new scheme has been applied to a first-arrival traveltime data set collected across adjacent landfills in northern Switzerland. High-quality seismic data were collected along five profiles that crossed the landfills and two that sampled undisturbed natural sediments. Seismic waves generated from multiple shots were recorded on large numbers of closely spaced receivers during quiet evening periods. Reliability of the resultant velocity tomograms was estimated on the basis of (1) ray diagrams, (2) plots of synthetic and observed traveltimes, (3) traveltime residual analyses, (4) comparisons of coincident velocity-depth profiles computed from intersecting profiles, (5) inversions with diverse input models, and (6) quantitative error analyses using a bootstrap technique. Although results have demonstrated that the tomographic refraction scheme may be an efficient and cost-effective means of studying the very shallow subsurface (<20 m depth), complementary geological and other geophysical data were required to discriminate between velocity anomalies attributed to the landfills and those attributed to natural variations in the near-surface geology.

  6. Sensitivity analysis and performance estimation of refractivity from clutter techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.

    2009-02-01

    Refractivity from clutter (RFC) refers to techniques that estimate the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter returns. A RFC algorithm works by finding the environment whose simulated clutter pattern matches the radar measured one. This paper introduces a procedure to compute RFC estimator performance. It addresses the major factors such as the radar parameters, the sea surface characteristics, and the environment (region, time of the day, season) that affect the estimator performance and formalizes an error metric combining all of these. This is important for applications such as calculating the optimal radar parameters, selecting the best RFC inversion algorithm under a set of conditions, and creating a regional performance map of a RFC system. The performance metric is used to compute the RFC performance of a non-Bayesian evaporation duct estimator. A Bayesian estimator that incorporates meteorological statistics in the inversion is introduced and compared to the non-Bayesian estimator. The performance metric is used to determine the optimal radar parameters of the evaporation duct estimator for six scenarios. An evaporation duct inversion performance map for a S band radar is created for the larger Mediterranean/Arabian Sea region.

  7. Evaporation duct refractivity profile from satellite meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levadnyi, Iu.; Ivanov, V.; Shalyapin, V.

    The refractivity profile is initial data for the microwave propagation prediction models Evaporation duct height is usually used to characterize refractivity profile in the surface layer over sea The evaporation duct height is calculated using bulk measurement of air temperature wind speed humidity pressure at some level and sea surface temperature Four prevailing models LKB Liu-Katsaros-Businger RSHMU Russian State Hydro-Meteorological University optimized by us ECMWF European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast and COARE Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment were examined The results of computation using above mentioned models were compared with the direct refractometric measurements All measurements meteorological and refractometric were made by us during two marine expeditions First expedition was in the Atlantic ocean from March to May in latitude 22 circ-32° North and longitude 52 circ-65° West 29 measurements Second one was in the Indian ocean from December to February in latitude 0 circ-15° North and longitude 55 circ-80° East 94 measurements The approximation by least square-root method was carried out to compare the direct measurements of evaporation duct height with the results of computations The minimum square-root error is obtained for LKB model 2 59m for negative air-sea temperature difference 2 42m maximum - for ECMWF model 2 72m All models overestimate low evaporation duct heights and underestimate - high values This effect is least of all define in RSHMU

  8. Remediating Common Math Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Rudolph F.

    1981-01-01

    Explanations and remediation suggestions for five types of mathematics errors due either to perceptual or cognitive difficulties are given. Error types include directionality problems, mirror writing, visually misperceived signs, diagnosed directionality problems, and mixed process errors. (CL)

  9. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  10. Visual and Refractive Outcomes after Cataract Surgery with Implantation of a New Toric Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mazzini, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate and report the visual, refractive and aberrometric outcomes of cataract surgery with implantation of the new aspheric Tecnis ZCT toric intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes with low to moderate corneal astigmatism. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 19 consecutive eyes of 17 patients (mean age: 78 years) with a visually significant cataract and moderate corneal astigmatism [higher than 1 diopter (D)] undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of the aspheric Tecnis ZCT toric IOL (Abbott Medical Optics). Visual, refractive and aberrometric changes were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. Ocular aberrations as well as IOL rotation were evaluated by means of the OPD-Station II (Nidek). Results The six-month postoperative spherical equivalent and power vector components of the refractive cylinder were within ±0.50 D in all eyes (100%). Postoperative logMAR uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuities (UDVA/CDVA) were 0.1 (about 20/25) or better in almost all eyes (94.74%). The mean logMAR CDVA improved significantly from 0.41 ± 0.23 to 0.02 ± 0.05 (p < 0.01). No significant changes were found in corneal astigmatism (p = 0.73). The mean IOL rotation was 3.33 ± 1.94°. This parameter did not correlate with higher-order aberrations (r = −0.09, p = 0.73). A significant improvement in the Strehl ratio was also observed (p < 0.01), which was consistent with the significant reduction in higher-order aberrations (p = 0.02). Conclusion Cataract surgery with implantation of the aspheric Tecnis ZCT IOL is a predictable and effective procedure for visual rehabilitation in eyes with cataract and low to moderate corneal astigmatism, providing an excellent postoperative ocular optical quality. PMID:23898293

  11. Correlation between visual function and refractive, topographic, pachymetric and aberrometric data in eyes with keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar Bilen, Neslihan; Hepsen, Ibrahim F.; Arce, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the relationship between two visual functions and refractive, topographic, pachymetric and aberrometric indicators in eyes with keratoconus. METHODS Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and letter contrast sensitivity (CS) were correlated with refraction, corneal topography, pachymetry, and total corneal wavefront data prospectively in 71 eyes with keratoconus. The topographic indices assessed were simulated keratometry for the flattest and steepest meridians (SimK1 and SimK2), posterior steeper K (Ks), elevation value in best-fit sphere (BFS) maps, squared eccentricity (Є2), aspheric asymmetric index (AAI), pachymetry, thickness progression index (TPI), the amount of pachymetric decentralization (APD), and GalileiTM-keratoconus indices. RESULTS The mean CDVA (expressed as logMAR) were 0.25±0.21. The mean CS was 1.25±0.46. The spherical refraction correlated well with CDVA (r=-0.526, P<0.001). From topographic indices, SRI correlated with CS (r=-0.695), and IAI with CS (r=-0.672) (P<0.001 for all). Root mean square (RMS) was 4.3±1.81 µm, spherical aberration (SA) was -0.4±0.67 µm, vertical and horizontal coma were -2.1±1.47 and -0.4±0.72 µm. All wavefront data (except horizontal coma), AAI, Є2 and maximum BFS correlated significantly with the visual function (P≤0.001 for all). CONCLUSION In this study, CS is more affected than CDVA as a visual function. The quantity and quality of vision is significantly correlated with well-known and new topographic indices. There is not a significant correlation between visual function and pachymetric parameters. The significantly correlated indices can be used in staging keratoconus and to follow the outcome of a treatment. PMID:27588266

  12. Surgical and healing changes to ocular aberrations following refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jochen; Schwiegerling, Jim

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To measure ocular aberrations before and at several time periods after LASIK surgery to determine the change to the aberration structure of the eye. Methods: A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to measure 88 LASIK patients pre-operatively and at 1 week and 12 months following surgery. Reconstructed wavefront errors are compared to look at induced differences. Manifest refraction was measured at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following surgery. Sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and pupil diameter are analyzed. Results: A dramatic elevation in spherical aberration is seen following surgery. This elevation appears almost immediately and remains for the duration of the study. A temporary increase in pupil size is seen following surgery. Conclusions: LASIK surgery dramatically reduces defocus and astigmatism in the eye, but simultaneously increases spherical aberration levels. This increase occurs at the time of surgery and is not an effect of the healing response.

  13. New consideration of atmospheric refraction in laser ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojian; Wang, Guangli

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we reconsider the formulae of tropospheric refraction correction for the Satellite Laser Range technique. From the expansion of the complementary error function, a new continued fraction form of the mapping function at optical frequencies is derived. The correction terms related to the operation frequency of the laser beam are considered in both the zenith delay and the mapping function. The correction for low-elevation satellites is briefly reviewed. The theoretical accuracy of the new mapping function has been analysed via the ray tracing integrals under the standard atmospheric profile. With respect to the radiosonde data, the deviations of the new mapping function are investigated in an elevation range down to near 1 deg, which is comparable with the results of the Marini-Murray formulae.

  14. Full field imaging based instantaneous hyperspectral absolute refractive index measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2012-01-01

    Multispectral refractometers typically measure refractive index (RI) at discrete monochromatic wavelengths via a serial process. We report on the demonstration of a white light full field imaging based refractometer capable of instantaneous multispectral measurement of absolute RI of clear liquid/gel samples across the entire visible light spectrum. The broad optical bandwidth refractometer is capable of hyperspectral measurement of RI in the range 1.30 1.70 between 400nm 700nm with a maximum error of 0.0036 units (0.24% of actual) at 414nm for a = 1.50 sample. We present system design and calibration method details as well as results from a system validation sample.

  15. Deflectometry for measuring inhomogeneous refractive index fields in two-dimensional gradient-index elements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Di; Teichman, Jeremy; Leger, James R

    2015-05-01

    We present a numerical method for calculating inhomogeneous refractive index fields in rectangular gradient-index (GRIN) elements from measured boundary positions and slopes of a collection of rays that transit the medium. The inverse problem is reduced to a set of linear algebraic equations after approximating ray trajectories from the measured boundary values and is solved using a pseudo-inverse algorithm for sparse linear equations. The ray trajectories are subsequently corrected using an iterative ray trace procedure to ensure consistency in the solution. We demonstrate our method in simulation by reconstructing a hypothetical rectangular GRIN element on a  15×15 discrete grid using 800 interrogating rays, in which RMS refractive index errors less than 0.5% of the index range (n(max)-n(min)) are achieved. Furthermore, we identify three primary sources of error and assess the importance of data redundancy and system conditioning in the reconstruction process. PMID:26366925

  16. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  17. Refractive index change in dissociating shocked benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    A calculation is made of the refractive index of a shocked solution of hydrocarbon species and spheroidal carbon particles that would be the dissociation products of benzene. The results is evaluated for benzene shocked to 15 GPa, both for an arbitrary endpoint distribution of products and reactant, and for a specific endpoint distribution suggested by a statistical-mechanical calculation. In the case of diamond particles, the refractive index is predicted to decrease by a small amount (from 1.96 to 1.75) as the dissociation proceeds. In the case of graphite particles of large oblateness, the refractive index could increase significantly through the dissociation (from 1.96 to 2.75 for infinitely oblate platelets). Thus the measurement of the time dependent refractive index through the dissociation of shocked benzene can indicate the morphology of the carbon particulates as well as the time scale for this reaction. We propose using the refractive index as a measure of completion of the dissociation reaction. This would allow a determination of the instantaneous amount of carbon in particulate form, information which is valuable in conjunction with Mie scattering experiments for example.

  18. [Refractive changes after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty].

    PubMed

    Röck, T; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Röck, D; Yoeruek, E

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has different refractive disadvantages in contrast to posterior lamellar keratoplasty. For example, a decentered corneal trephination and a tilted trephination or unevenly tightened corneal sutures can cause an uncontrolled high astigmatism as well as a refractive change. Also the postoperative refraction may change over time as a result of wound healing, suture loosening or suture removal. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate a possible refractive change after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A total of 139 pseudophakic eyes from 125 patients with endothelial decompensation had undergone DMEK surgery at the Tübingen Eye Clinic. After a mean postoperative time of 13.15 ± 2.98 months after DMEK discreet mean changes in the spherical equivalent of + 0.37 ± 0.87 diopters and the cylinder to - 0.45 ± 0.57 diopters were observed. The mean central corneal thickness decreased from 670 ± 70 µm to 544 ± 55 µm. In conclusion after DMEK a discreet induced hyperopic refractive shift due to the reversal of stromal swelling was observed. PMID:23989219

  19. One of the most well-established age-related changes in neural activity disappears after controlling for visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Porto, Fábio H G; Tusch, Erich S; Fox, Anne M; Alperin, Brittany R; Holcomb, Phillip J; Daffner, Kirk R

    2016-04-15

    Numerous studies using a variety of imaging techniques have reported age-related differences in neural activity while subjects carry out cognitive tasks. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to the potential impact of age-associated changes in sensory acuity on these findings. Studies in the visual modality frequently report that their subjects had "normal or corrected- to-normal vision." However, in most cases, there is no indication that visual acuity was actually measured, and it is likely that the investigators relied largely on self-reported visual status of subjects, which is often inaccurate. We investigated whether differences in visual acuity influence one of the most commonly observed findings in the event-related potentials literature on cognitive aging, a reduction in posterior P3b amplitude, which is an index of cognitive decision-making/updating. Well-matched young (n=26) and old adults (n=29) participated in a visual oddball task. Measured visual acuity with corrective lenses was worse in old than young adults. Results demonstrated that the robust age-related decline in P3b amplitude to visual targets disappeared after controlling for visual acuity, but was unaffected by accounting for auditory acuity. Path analysis confirmed that the relationship between age and diminished P3b to visual targets was mediated by visual acuity, suggesting that conveyance of suboptimal sensory data due to peripheral, rather than central, deficits may undermine subsequent neural processing. We conclude that until the relationship between age-associated differences in visual acuity and neural activity during experimental tasks is clearly established, investigators should exercise caution attributing results to differences in cognitive processing. PMID:26825439

  20. Evaluation of a Public Child Eye Health Tertiary Facility for Pediatric Cataract in Southern Nigeria I: Visual Acuity Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Roseline E.; Adio, Adedayo; Oparah, Sidney K.; Odey, Friday; Eyo, Okon A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study of the outcome of congenital and developmental cataract surgery was conducted in a public child eye health tertiary facility in children <16 years of age in Southern Nigeria, as part of an evaluation. Materials and Method: Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy was performed. The outcome measures were visual acuity (VA) and change (gain) in visual acuity. The age of the child at onset, duration of delay in presentation, ocular co-morbidity, non ocular co-morbidity, gender, and pre operative visual acuity were matched with postoperative visual acuity. A total of 66 children were studied for a period of six weeks following surgery. Results: Forty eight (72.7%) children had bilateral congenital cataracts and 18 (27.3%) children had bilateral developmental cataracts. There were 38(57.6%) males and 28 (42.4%) females in the study. Thirty Five (53%) children had good visual outcome (normal vision range 6/6/ -6/18) post-operatively. The number of children with blindness (vision <3/60) decreased from 61 (92.4%) pre-operatively to 4 (6.1%) post-operatively. Post operative complication occurred in 6.8% of cases six week after surgery. Delayed presentation had an inverse relationship with change (gain) in visual acuity (r = - 0.342; p-value = 0.005). Pre-operative visual acuity had a positive relationship with post operative change (gain) in visual acuity (r = 0.618; p-value = 0.000). Conclusion: Predictors of change in visual acuity in our study were; delayed presentation and pre-operative VA. Cataract surgery in children showed clinical benefit. PMID:27347247

  1. Study on singular radius and surface boundary constraint in refractive beam shaper design

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Zhang, Shukui

    2007-10-01

    Abstract: This paper presents analysis on important issues associated with the design of the refractive laser beam shaping system. The concept of â singular radiusâ is introduced along with solutions to minimize its adverse effect on the shaper performance. In addition, the surface boundary constraint is also discussed in details. This study provides useful guidelines against possible general design errors that would degrade the shaper quality or add undesired complication to the system.

  2. A comparison of evaporation duct models for IREPS (Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, W.

    1984-06-01

    An evaluation of current meteorological measurement techniques to determine adequate description of the surface meteorological processes used to infer evaporation duct height includes a comparison of relative performance, sensitivities to meteorological inputs, and ease of computation for several standard evaporation duct height models. EM wave propagation pathloss models are compared and evaluated, and a maximum range of detection error is determined for the modified NOSC propagation model employed by the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS).

  3. Correction of geometric and refractive image distortions in optical coherence tomography applying Fermat's principle.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Volker; Rollins, Andrew; Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Izatt, Joseph

    2002-05-01

    We describe a methodology for quantitative image correction in OCT which includes procedures for correction of nonlinear axial scanning and non-telecentric scan patterns, as well as a novel approach for refraction correction in layered media based on Fermat's principle. The residual spatial error obtained in layered media with a fan-beam hand-held probe was reduced from several hundred micrometers to near the diffraction and coherence-length limits. PMID:19436373

  4. Comparison of Methods for Predicting the Compositional Dependence of the Density and Refractive Index of Organic-Aqueous Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Miles, Rachael E H; Cotterell, Michael I; Marsh, Aleksandra; Rovelli, Grazia; Rickards, Andrew M J; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-08-25

    Representing the physicochemical properties of aerosol particles of complex composition is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting aerosol thermodynamic, kinetic, and optical properties and processes and for interpreting and comparing analysis methods. Here, we consider the representations of the density and refractive index of aqueous-organic aerosol with a particular focus on the dependence of these properties on relative humidity and water content, including an examination of the properties of solution aerosol droplets existing at supersaturated solute concentrations. Using bulk phase measurements of density and refractive index for typical organic aerosol components, we provide robust approaches for the estimation of these properties for aerosol at any intermediate composition between pure water and pure solute. Approximately 70 compounds are considered, including mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids, alcohols, diols, nitriles, sulfoxides, amides, ethers, sugars, amino acids, aminium sulfates, and polyols. We conclude that the molar refraction mixing rule should be used to predict the refractive index of the solution using a density treatment that assumes ideal mixing or, preferably, a polynomial dependence on the square root of the mass fraction of solute, depending on the solubility limit of the organic component. Although the uncertainties in the density and refractive index predictions depend on the range of subsaturated compositional data available for each compound, typical errors for estimating the solution density and refractive index are less than ±0.1% and ±0.05%, respectively. Owing to the direct connection between molar refraction and the molecular polarizability, along with the availability of group contribution models for predicting molecular polarizability for organic species, our rigorous testing of the molar refraction mixing rule provides a route to predicting refractive indices for aqueous solutions containing organic molecules

  5. Short-Term Stability in Refractive Status Despite Large Fluctuations in Glucose Levels in Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Huntjens, Byki; Charman, W. Neil; Workman, Helena; Hosking, Sarah L.; O’Donnell, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This work investigates how short-term changes in blood glucose concentration affect the refractive components of the diabetic eye in patients with long-term Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Methods Blood glucose concentration, refractive error components (mean spherical equivalent MSE, J0, J45), central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), crystalline lens thickness (LT), axial length (AL) and ocular aberrations were monitored at two-hourly intervals over a 12-hour period in: 20 T1DM patients (mean age ± SD) 38±14 years, baseline HbA1c 8.6±1.9%; 21 T2DM patients (mean age ± SD) 56±11 years, HbA1c 7.5±1.8%; and in 20 control subjects (mean age ± SD) 49±23 years, HbA1c 5.5±0.5%. The refractive and biometric results were compared with the corresponding changes in blood glucose concentration. Results Blood glucose concentration at different times was found to vary significantly within (p<0.0005) and between groups (p<0.0005). However, the refractive error components and ocular aberrations were not found to alter significantly over the day in either the diabetic patients or the control subjects (p>0.05). Minor changes of marginal statistical or optical significance were observed in some biometric parameters. Similarly there were some marginally significant differences between the baseline biometric parameters of well-controlled and poorly-controlled diabetic subjects. Conclusion This work suggests that normal, short-term fluctuations (of up to about 6 mM/l on a timescale of a few hours) in the blood glucose levels of diabetics are not usually associated with acute changes in refractive error or ocular wavefront aberrations. It is therefore possible that factors other than refractive error fluctuations are sometimes responsible for the transient visual problems often reported by diabetic patients. PMID:23285232

  6. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  7. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  8. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  9. Removing singular refractive indices with sculpted surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Mitchell–Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo–Teruel, O.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of Transformation Optics established the link between geometry and material properties, and has resulted in a degree of control over electromagnetic fields that was previously impossible. For waves confined to a surface it is known that there is a simpler, but related, geometrical equivalence between the surface shape and the refractive index, and here we demonstrate that conventional devices possessing a singularity — that is, the requirement of an infinite refractive index — can be realised for waves confined to an appropriately sculpted surface. In particular, we redesign three singular omnidirectional devices: the Eaton lens, the generalized Maxwell Fish–Eye, and the invisible sphere. Our designs perfectly reproduce the behaviour of these singular devices, and can be achieved with simple isotropic media of low refractive index contrast. PMID:24786649

  10. Correction of laser tracking data for the effects of horizontal refractivity gradients. [in ranging satellite from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pulsed laser ranging systems are being used to measure accurately the distance from the earth to retroreflector equipped satellites. At the lower elevation angles horizontal refractivity gradients can introduce centimeter level errors into the range measurements. A correction formula which compensates for the gradient effects is developed and evaluated using typical meteorological data obtained from weather stations located near Washington, D.C.

  11. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  12. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-01

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  13. Negative refraction without absorption via quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Wenchao; Wang, Meng; Li, Fu-li; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-02-01

    Negative refraction of a probe field is studied in a dense gas consisting of cascade-type four-level atoms. By coupling the magnetic component of the probe field to a Λ scheme with initially prepared coherence in the two lower levels, strong negative permeability with minimal absorption can be obtained. The permittivity of the gas to the electric component of the probe field can be made negative by taking into account the local field effect of the dense atoms. Strong negative refraction with zero absorption can be achieved in a wide range of parameters in our scheme. A possible experimental realization is also discussed.

  14. A Liquid Prism for Refractive Index Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, Michael D.

    2001-11-01

    A hollow glass prism filled with liquid becomes a "liquid prism". A simple method for constructing hollow glass prisms is presented. A method is given for a demonstration that uses the liquid prism with a laser or laser pointer so the audience can observe differences in refractive index for various liquids. The demonstration provides a quick and easy determination of the sugar content of soft drinks and juices. The prism makes it easy to determine a numerical value for the refractive index of a liquid.

  15. Plasmonic crystal enhanced refractive index sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Benedikt; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate experimentally how the local anisotropy of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon modes propagating over periodic metal gratings can lead to an enhancement of the figure of merit of refractive index sensors. Exploiting the possibility to acquire defocused images of the Fourier space of a highly stable leakage radiation microscope, we report a twofold increase in sensing sensitivity close to the band gap of a one-dimensional plasmonic crystal where the anisotropy of the band structure is the most important. A practical sensing resolution of O(10{sup −6}) refractive index units is demonstrated.

  16. Refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound.

    PubMed

    Cervera, F; Sanchis, L; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Martínez-Sala, R; Rubio, C; Meseguer, F; López, C; Caballero, D; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-14

    We show that a sonic crystal made of periodic distributions of rigid cylinders in air acts as a new material which allows the construction of refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound. It is demonstrated that, in the long-wave regime, the crystal has low impedance and the sound is transmitted at subsonic velocities. Here, the fabrication and characterization of a convergent lens are presented. Also, an example of a Fabry-Perot interferometer based on this crystal is analyzed. It is concluded that refractive devices based on sonic crystals behave in a manner similar to that of optical systems. PMID:11801014

  17. Determining the refractive index and thickness of thin films from prism coupler measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, S. T.

    1981-01-01

    A simple method of determining thin film parameters from mode indices measured using a prism coupler is described. The problem is reduced to doing two least squares straight line fits through measured mode indices vs effective mode number. The slope and y intercept of the line are simply related to the thickness and refractive index of film, respectively. The approach takes into account the correlation between as well as the uncertainty in the individual measurements from all sources of error to give precise error tolerances on the best fit values. Due to the precision of the tolerances, anisotropic films can be identified and characterized.

  18. Active modulation of refractive index by stress in the terahertz frequency range: erratum.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-20

    A previous paper [Appl. Opt.52, 6364 (2013)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.52.006364] presented experimental work on the stress-optical effect in the terahertz frequency range. Although the theoretical model of experimental measurement is correct, there are two errors in the original version. As a result, the presented experimentally measured value of the refractive index-stress coefficient A of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is erroneous. This erratum points out the errors in the original paper and reports the correct values. PMID:27140555

  19. Calculations of atmospheric refraction for spacecraft remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the refraction integrals appropriate for ray trajectories along slant paths through the atmosphere are derived in this paper. This type of geometry is commonly encountered in remote-sensing applications utilizing an occultation technique. The solutions are obtained by evaluating higher-order terms from expansion of the refraction integral and are dependent on the vertical temperature distributions. Refraction parameters such as total refraction angles, air masses, and path lengths can be accurately computed. It is also shown that the method can be used for computing refraction parameters in astronomical refraction geometry for large zenith angles.

  20. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.