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Sample records for acuity scoring systems

  1. Variable acuity remote viewing system flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Variable Acuity Remote Viewing System (VARVS), originally developed under contract to the Navy (ONR) as a laboratory brassboard, was modified for flight demonstration. The VARVS system was originally conceived as a technique which could circumvent the acuity/field of view/bandwidth tradeoffs that exists in remote viewing to provide a nearly eye limited display in both field of view (160 deg) and resolution (2 min arc) while utilizing conventional TV sensing, transmission, and display equipment. The modifications for flight demonstration consisted of modifying the sensor so it could be installed and flow in a Piper PA20 aircraft, equipped for remote control and modifying the display equipment so it could be integrated with the NASA Research RPB (RPRV) remote control cockpit.

  2. Early Quick Acuity Score Provides More Complete Data on Emergency Department Walkouts

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, Paris B.; Kahn, J. Akiva; Greene, Stuart E.; Bloch, Matthew A.; Brandt, Daniel R.; Minckler, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many prior studies have compared the acuity of Emergency Department (ED) patients who have Left Without Being Seen (LWBS) against non-LWBS patients. A weakness in these studies is that patients may walk out prior to the assignment of a triage score, biasing comparisons. We report an operational change whereby acuity was assessed immediately upon patient arrival. We hypothesized more patients would receive acuity scores with EQAS. We also sought to compare LWBS and non-LWBS patient characteristics with reduced bias. Methods Setting: urban, academic medical center. Retrospective cohort study, electronic chart review, collecting data on all ED patients presenting between 4/1/2010 and 10/31/2011 (“Traditional Acuity Score” period, TAS) and from 11/1/2011 to 3/31/2012 (“Early Quick Acuity Score” period, EQAS). We recorded disposition (LWBS versus non-LWBS), acuity and demographics. For each subject during the EQAS period, we calculated how many prior ED visits and how many prior walkouts the subject had had during the TAS period. Results Acuity was recorded in 92,275 of 94,526 patients (97.6%) for TAS period, and 25,577 of 25,760 patients (99.3%) for EQAS period, a difference of 1.7% (1.5%, 1.8%). LWBS patients had acuity scores recorded in 5,180 of 7,040 cases (73.6%) during TAS period, compared with 897 of 1,010 cases (88.8%) during the EQAS period, a difference of 15.2% (14.8%, 15.7%). LWBS were more likely than non-LWBS to be male, were younger and had lower acuity scores. LWBS averaged 5.3 prior ED visits compared with 2.8 by non-LWBS, a difference of 2.5 (1.5, 3.5). LWBS averaged 1.3 prior ED walkouts compared with 0.2 among non-LWBS, a difference of 1.1 (0.8, 1.3). Conclusions EQAS resulted in a higher proportion of patients receiving acuity scores, particularly among LWBS. This offers more complete data when comparing LWBS and non-LWBS patient characteristics. The comparison reinforced findings from prior studies. PMID:24465699

  3. Wound center facility billing: A retrospective analysis of time, wound size, and acuity scoring for determining facility level of service.

    PubMed

    Fife, Caroline E; Walker, David; Farrow, Wade; Otto, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Outpatient wound center facility reimbursement for Medicare beneficiaries can be a challenge to determine and obtain. To compare methods of calculating facility service levels for outpatient wound centers and to demonstrate the advantages of an acuity-based billing system (one that incorporates components of facility work that is non-reimbursable by procedure codes and that represents an activity-based costing approach to medical billing), a retrospective study of 5,098 patient encounters contained in a wound care-specific electronic medical record database was conducted. Approximately 500 patient visits to the outpatient wound center of a Texas regional hospital between April 2003 and November 2004 were categorized by service level in documentation and facility management software. Visits previously billed using a time-based system were compared to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' proposed three-tiered wound size-based system. The time-based system also was compared to an acuity-based scoring system. The Pearson correlation coefficient between billed level of service by time and estimated level of service by acuity was 0.442 and the majority of follow-up visits were billed as Level 3 and above (on a time level of 1 to 5) , confirming that time is not a surrogate for actual work performed. Wound size also was found to be unrelated to service level (Pearson correlation = 0.017) and 97% of wound areas were < 100 cm2. The acuity-based scoring system produced a near-normal distribution of results, producing more mid-range billings than extremes; no other method produced this distribution. Hospital-based outpatient wound centers should develop, review, and refine acuity score-based models on which to determine billed level of service. PMID:17264354

  4. Acuity systems dialogue and patient classification system essentials.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kelle; McCully, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining resources for quality patient care is a major responsibility of nurse leaders and requires accurate information in the political world of budgeting. Patient classification systems (PCS) assist nurse managers in controlling cost and improving patient care while appropriately using financial resources. This paper communicates acuity systems development, background, flaws, and components while discussing a few tools currently available. It also disseminates the development of a new acuity tool, the Patient Classification System. The PCS tool, developed in a small rural hospital, uses 5 broad concepts: (1) medications, (2) complicated procedures, (3) education, (4) psychosocial issues, and (5) complicated intravenous medications. These concepts embrace a 4-tiered scale that differentiates significant patient characteristics and assists in staffing measures for equality in patient staffing and improving quality of care and performance. Data obtained through use of the PCS can be used by nurse leaders to effectively and objectively lobby for appropriate patient care resources. Two questionnaires distributed to registered nurses on a medical-surgical unit evaluated the nurses' opinion of the 5 concepts and the importance for establishing patient acuity for in-patient care. Interrater reliability among nurses was 87% with the author's acuity tool. PMID:17909428

  5. The Approximate Number System Acuity Redefined: A Diffusion Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonkoo; Starns, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    While all humans are capable of non-verbally representing numerical quantity using so-called the approximate number system (ANS), there exist considerable individual differences in its acuity. For example, in a non-symbolic number comparison task, some people find it easy to discriminate brief presentations of 14 dots from 16 dots while others do not. Quantifying individual ANS acuity from such a task has become an essential practice in the field, as individual differences in such a primitive number sense is thought to provide insights into individual differences in learned symbolic math abilities. However, the dominant method of characterizing ANS acuity—computing the Weber fraction (w)—only utilizes the accuracy data while ignoring response times (RT). Here, we offer a novel approach of quantifying ANS acuity by using the diffusion model, which accounts both accuracy and RT distributions. Specifically, the drift rate in the diffusion model, which indexes the quality of the stimulus information, is used to capture the precision of the internal quantity representation. Analysis of behavioral data shows that w is contaminated by speed-accuracy tradeoff, making it problematic as a measure of ANS acuity, while drift rate provides a measure more independent from speed-accuracy criterion settings. Furthermore, drift rate is a better predictor of symbolic math ability than w, suggesting a practical utility of the measure. These findings demonstrate critical limitations of the use of w and suggest clear advantages of using drift rate as a measure of primitive numerical competence. PMID:26733929

  6. Assessment of Visual Acuity in Relation to Central Nervous System Activation in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Karl; Grottland, Havar; Flaten, Magne Arve

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity, using Teller Acuity Cards, was combined with observations of behavioral state to indicate central nervous system activation in 24 individuals with mental retardation. Results indicate that forced-choice preferential-looking technique can be used to test visual acuity in this population unless the participant is drowsy.…

  7. Influences of multiple memory systems on auditory mental image acuity.

    PubMed

    Navarro Cebrian, Ana; Janata, Petr

    2010-05-01

    The influence of different memory systems and associated attentional processes on the acuity of auditory images, formed for the purpose of making intonation judgments, was examined across three experiments using three different task types (cued-attention, imagery, and two-tone discrimination). In experiment 1 the influence of implicit long-term memory for musical scale structure was manipulated by varying the scale degree (leading tone versus tonic) of the probe note about which a judgment had to be made. In experiments 2 and 3 the ability of short-term absolute pitch knowledge to develop was manipulated by presenting blocks of trials in the same key or in seven different keys. The acuity of auditory images depended on all of these manipulations. Within individual listeners, thresholds in the two-tone discrimination and cued-attention conditions were closely related. In many listeners, cued-attention thresholds were similar to thresholds in the imagery condition, and depended on the amount of training individual listeners had in playing a musical instrument. The results indicate that mental images formed at a sensory/cognitive interface for the purpose of making perceptual decisions are highly malleable. PMID:21117767

  8. Volleyball Scoring Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, William; Dargahi-Noubary, G. R.; Shi, Yixun

    2002-01-01

    The widespread interest in sports in our culture provides an excellent opportunity to catch students' attention in mathematics and statistics classes. One mathematically interesting aspect of volleyball, which can be used to motivate students, is the scoring system. (MM)

  9. Comparison of the performance of the CRUSADE, ACUITY-HORIZONS, and ACTION bleeding risk scores in STEMI undergoing primary PCI: insights from a cohort of 1391 patients

    PubMed Central

    Couto-Mallón, D; Rodríguez-Garrido, J; García-Guimaraes, M; Gargallo-Fernández, P; Piñón-Esteban, P; Aldama-López, G; Salgado-Fernández, J; Calviño-Santos, R; Vázquez-González, N; Castro-Beiras, A

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To compare the performance of the CRUSADE, ACUITY-HORIZONS, and ACTION risk models in the ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Methods: We studied all consecutive patients with STEMI who underwent PPCI at our institution between 2006 and 2010 (n=1391). The CRUSADE, ACUITY-HORIZONS, and ACTION risk scores were calculated based on the patients’ clinical characteristics. The occurrence of in-hospital major bleeding (defined as the composite of intracranial or intraocular bleeding, access site haemorrhage requiring intervention, reduction in haemoglobin ≥4 g/dl without or ≥3g/dl with overt bleeding source, reoperation for bleeding, or blood transfusion) reached 9.8%. Calibration and discrimination of the three risk models were evaluated by the Hosmer−Lemeshow test and the C-statistic, respectively. We compared the predictive accuracy of the risk scores by the DeLong non-parametric test. Results: Calibration of the three risk scores was adequate, given the non-significant results of Hosmer−Lemeshow test for the three risk models. Discrimination of CRUSADE, ACUITY-HORIZONS, and ACTION models was good (C-statistic 0.77, 0.70, and 0.78, respectively). The CRUSADE and ACTION risk scores had a greater predictive accuracy than the ACUITY-HORIZONS risk model (z=3.89, p-value=0.0001 and z=3.51, p-value=0.0004, respectively). There was no significant difference between the CRUSADE and ACTION models (z=0.63, p=0.531). Conclusions: The CRUSADE, ACUITY-HORIZONS, and ACTION scores are useful tools for the risk stratification of bleeding in STEMI treated by PPCI. Our findings favour the CRUSADE and ACTION risk models over the ACUITY-HORIZONS risk score. PMID:24062930

  10. Acuity of the Approximate Number System and Preschoolers' Quantitative Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Marle, Kristy; Chu, Felicia W.; Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the relations among acuity of the inherent approximate number system (ANS), performance on measures of symbolic quantitative knowledge, and mathematics achievement for a sample of 138 (64 boys) preschoolers. The Weber fraction (a measure of ANS acuity) and associated task accuracy were significantly correlated with mathematics…

  11. Maxillofacial trauma scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    The changing complexity of maxillofacial fractures in recent years has created a situation where classical systems of classification of maxillofacial injuries fall short of defining trauma particularly that observed with high-velocity collisions where more than one region of the maxillofacial skeleton is affected. Trauma scoring systems designed specifically for the maxillofacial region are aimed to provide a more accurate assessment of the injury, its prognosis, the possible treatment outcomes, economics, length of hospital stay, and triage. The evolution and logic of such systems along with their merits and demerits are discussed. The author also proposes a new system to aid users in quickly and methodically choosing the system best suited to their needs without having to study a plethora of literature available in order to isolate their choice. PMID:26971084

  12. Recovery of Upper Extremity Sensorimotor System Acuity in Baseball Athletes After a Throwing-Fatigue Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Brady L; Yochem, Eric M; Uhl, Timothy L

    2007-01-01

    Context: Research indicates that upper extremity fatigue hampers sensorimotor system acuity. However, no investigators have observed recovery of upper extremity acuity after fatigue. Objective: To observe recovery of active position reproduction acuity in overhead throwers after a throwing-fatigue protocol. Design: Single-session, repeated-measures design. Setting: University musculoskeletal laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy collegiate baseball players (age = 21.0 ± 1.6 years, height = 175.8 ± 10.2 cm, mass = 82.8 ± 4.3 kg). Intervention(s): Subjects threw a baseball with maximum velocity (every 5 seconds) from a single knee. Every 20 throws, subjects rated their upper extremity exertion on a Borg scale until reporting a level of more than 14. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used an electromagnetic tracking system to measure active multijoint position reproduction acuity at 5 intervals: prefatigue; immediately postfatigue; and after 4, 7, and 10 minutes of recovery. Blindfolded subjects reproduced their arm-cocked and ball-release positions. Dependent variables were 3-dimensional variable errors of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, elbow, and wrist joints; endpoint (ie, hand) position error represented overall upper extremity acuity. The independent variable was time (measured prefatigue and at 4 postfatigue intervals). Results: Fatigue significantly affected acuity of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, and elbow joints and endpoint error for both positions (P < .001). Fatigue significantly affected wrist acuity only for ball release (P < .001). For arm-cocked reproduction, each measure of acuity, except that of the glenohumeral joint, recovered by 7 minutes; for ball release, each measure of acuity recovered within 4 minutes (P > .05). Conclusions: The sensorimotor system deficits that we observed after fatigue recovered within 7 minutes in most upper extremity joints. Glenohumeral arm-cocked position reproduction acuity failed to recover within

  13. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  14. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  15. Dot Display Affects Approximate Number System Acuity and Relationships with Mathematical Achievement and Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jade Eloise; Castronovo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Much research has investigated the relationship between the Approximate Number System (ANS) and mathematical achievement, with continued debate surrounding the existence of such a link. The use of different stimulus displays may account for discrepancies in the findings. Indeed, closer scrutiny of the literature suggests that studies supporting a link between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement in adults have mostly measured the ANS using spatially intermixed displays (e.g. of blue and yellow dots), whereas those failing to replicate a link have primarily used spatially separated dot displays. The current study directly compared ANS acuity when using intermixed or separate dots, investigating how such methodological variation mediated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement. ANS acuity was poorer and less reliable when measured with intermixed displays, with performance during both conditions related to inhibitory control. Crucially, mathematical achievement was significantly related to ANS accuracy difference (accuracy on congruent trials minus accuracy on incongruent trials) when measured with intermixed displays, but not with separate displays. The findings indicate that methodological variation affects ANS acuity outcomes, as well as the apparent relationship between the ANS and mathematical achievement. Moreover, the current study highlights the problem of low reliabilities of ANS measures. Further research is required to construct ANS measures with improved reliability, and to understand which processes may be responsible for the increased likelihood of finding a correlation between the ANS and mathematical achievement when using intermixed displays. PMID:27195749

  16. [Urgency and acuity judgment systems before medical care (emergency telephone consultation center #7119, JTAS etc.)].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hideki; Yoshida, Masashi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Currently growing the demand of the emergency medical care in Japan, sharing the concept about medical urgency is needed in the whole society in order to maintain the emergency medical systems as social resources. The present conditions and challenges are outlined: Emergency Telephone Consultation Center in Tokyo Fire Department (established in June 2007) and on-site triage as representatives of "pre-hospital urgency determination systems", and JTAS (Japan Triage and Acuity System, introduced in April 2012) as a representative of "in-hospital, pre-examination urgency determination systems". PMID:26915257

  17. Vernier Acuity and the Magnocellular System Revisited: Response to Skottun and Skoyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keri, Szabolcs; Benedek, Gyorgy

    2010-01-01

    Skottun and Skoyles (2009) recently presented a comment on Vernier acuity and magnocellular dysfunctions in fragile X premutation carriers (Keri & Benedek, 2009). The authors concluded that our finding that the magnocellular deficit, as revealed by luminance-contrast sensitivity measurements, is associated with impaired Vernier acuity for…

  18. Impaired acuity of the approximate number system underlies mathematical learning disability (dyscalculia).

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many children have significant mathematical learning disabilities (MLD, or dyscalculia) despite adequate schooling. The current study hypothesizes that MLD partly results from a deficiency in the Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports nonverbal numerical representations across species and throughout development. In this study of 71 ninth graders, it is shown that students with MLD have significantly poorer ANS precision than students in all other mathematics achievement groups (low, typically, and high achieving), as measured by psychophysical assessments of ANS acuity (w) and of the mappings between ANS representations and number words (cv). This relation persists even when controlling for domain-general abilities. Furthermore, this ANS precision does not differentiate low-achieving from typically achieving students, suggesting an ANS deficit that is specific to MLD. PMID:21679173

  19. Brief report: the relationship between visual acuity, the embedded figures test and systemizing in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Mark J; Gwilliam, Lucy R; Walker, Ian

    2012-11-01

    Enhanced performance upon the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has informed psychological theories of the non-social aspects that characterise ASD. The Extreme Male Brain theory of autism proposes that enhanced visual acuity underpins greater attention to detail (assessed by the EFT) which is a prerequisite for Systemizing. To date, however, no study has empirically examined these relationships. 13 males with ASD and 13 male controls were assessed upon tasks argued to reflect these levels of processing. The ASD group were found to have significantly greater visual acuity, EFT performance and Systemizing ability than the control group. However, regression analysis revealed that the strongest relationship was between visual acuity and EFT performance. PMID:22450702

  20. New Evidence on Causal Relationship between Approximate Number System (ANS) Acuity and Arithmetic Ability in Elementary-School Students: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunfeng; Zhou, Xinlin; Shi, Dexin; Song, Hairong; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    Approximate number system (ANS) acuity and mathematical ability have been found to be closely associated in recent studies. However, whether and how these two measures are causally related still remain less addressed. There are two hypotheses about the possible causal relationship: ANS acuity influences mathematical performances, or access to math education sharpens ANS acuity. Evidences in support of both hypotheses have been reported, but these two hypotheses have never been tested simultaneously. Therefore, questions still remain whether only one-direction or reciprocal causal relationships existed in the association. In this work, we provided a new evidence on the causal relationship between ANS acuity and arithmetic ability. ANS acuity and mathematical ability of elementary-school students were measured sequentially at three time points within one year, and all possible causal directions were evaluated simultaneously using cross-lagged regression analysis. The results show that ANS acuity influences later arithmetic ability while the reverse causal direction was not supported. Our finding adds a strong evidence to the causal association between ANS acuity and mathematical ability, and also has important implications for educational intervention designed to train ANS acuity and thereby promote mathematical ability. PMID:27462291

  1. New Evidence on Causal Relationship between Approximate Number System (ANS) Acuity and Arithmetic Ability in Elementary-School Students: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Yunfeng; Zhou, Xinlin; Shi, Dexin; Song, Hairong; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    Approximate number system (ANS) acuity and mathematical ability have been found to be closely associated in recent studies. However, whether and how these two measures are causally related still remain less addressed. There are two hypotheses about the possible causal relationship: ANS acuity influences mathematical performances, or access to math education sharpens ANS acuity. Evidences in support of both hypotheses have been reported, but these two hypotheses have never been tested simultaneously. Therefore, questions still remain whether only one-direction or reciprocal causal relationships existed in the association. In this work, we provided a new evidence on the causal relationship between ANS acuity and arithmetic ability. ANS acuity and mathematical ability of elementary-school students were measured sequentially at three time points within one year, and all possible causal directions were evaluated simultaneously using cross-lagged regression analysis. The results show that ANS acuity influences later arithmetic ability while the reverse causal direction was not supported. Our finding adds a strong evidence to the causal association between ANS acuity and mathematical ability, and also has important implications for educational intervention designed to train ANS acuity and thereby promote mathematical ability. PMID:27462291

  2. A Bayesian Approach to Learning Scoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Şeyda; Rudin, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    We present a Bayesian method for building scoring systems, which are linear models with coefficients that have very few significant digits. Usually the construction of scoring systems involve manual effort-humans invent the full scoring system without using data, or they choose how logistic regression coefficients should be scaled and rounded to produce a scoring system. These kinds of heuristics lead to suboptimal solutions. Our approach is different in that humans need only specify the prior over what the coefficients should look like, and the scoring system is learned from data. For this approach, we provide a Metropolis-Hastings sampler that tends to pull the coefficient values toward their "natural scale." Empirically, the proposed method achieves a high degree of interpretability of the models while maintaining competitive generalization performances. PMID:27441407

  3. Measuring acuity of the approximate number system reliably and validly: the evaluation of an adaptive test procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Poom, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated the reliability and predictive validity of commonly used measures and models of Approximate Number System acuity (ANS). Study 1 investigated reliability by both an empirical approach and a simulation of maximum obtainable reliability under ideal conditions. Results showed that common measures of the Weber fraction (w) are reliable only when using a substantial number of trials, even under ideal conditions. Study 2 compared different purported measures of ANS acuity as for convergent and predictive validity in a within-subjects design and evaluated an adaptive test using the ZEST algorithm. Results showed that the adaptive measure can reduce the number of trials needed to reach acceptable reliability. Only direct tests with non-symbolic numerosity discriminations of stimuli presented simultaneously were related to arithmetic fluency. This correlation remained when controlling for general cognitive ability and perceptual speed. Further, the purported indirect measure of ANS acuity in terms of the Numeric Distance Effect (NDE) was not reliable and showed no sign of predictive validity. The non-symbolic NDE for reaction time was significantly related to direct w estimates in a direction contrary to the expected. Easier stimuli were found to be more reliable, but only harder (7:8 ratio) stimuli contributed to predictive validity. PMID:23964256

  4. Visual acuity test

    MedlinePlus

    Eye test -- acuity; Vision test -- acuity; Snellen test ... from your face. This will test your near vision. ... examination, particularly if there is a change in vision or a problem with vision. In children, the ...

  5. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  6. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  7. A Comparison of Two Scoring Methods for an Automated Speech Scoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xi, Xiaoming; Higgins, Derrick; Zechner, Klaus; Williamson, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares two alternative scoring methods--multiple regression and classification trees--for an automated speech scoring system used in a practice environment. The two methods were evaluated on two criteria: construct representation and empirical performance in predicting human scores. The empirical performance of the two scoring models…

  8. Visual stimulus parameters seriously compromise the measurement of approximate number system acuity and comparative effects between adults and children.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Dénes; Nobes, Alison; Devine, Amy; Gabriel, Florence C; Gebuis, Titia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that a simple non-symbolic magnitude comparison task is sufficient to measure the acuity of a putative Approximate Number System (ANS). A proposed measure of the ANS, the so-called "internal Weber fraction" (w), would provide a clear measure of ANS acuity. However, ANS studies have never presented adequate evidence that visual stimulus parameters did not compromise measurements of w to such extent that w is actually driven by visual instead of numerical processes. We therefore investigated this question by testing non-symbolic magnitude discrimination in seven-year-old children and adults. We manipulated/controlled visual parameters in a more stringent manner than usual. As a consequence of these controls, in some trials numerical cues correlated positively with number while in others they correlated negatively with number. This congruency effect strongly correlated with w, which means that congruency effects were probably driving effects in w. Consequently, in both adults and children congruency had a major impact on the fit of the model underlying the computation of w. Furthermore, children showed larger congruency effects than adults. This suggests that ANS tasks are seriously compromised by the visual stimulus parameters, which cannot be controlled. Hence, they are not pure measures of the ANS and some putative w or ratio effect differences between children and adults in previous ANS studies may be due to the differential influence of the visual stimulus parameters in children and adults. In addition, because the resolution of congruency effects relies on inhibitory (interference suppression) function, some previous ANS findings were probably influenced by the developmental state of inhibitory processes especially when comparing children with developmental dyscalculia and typically developing children. PMID:23882245

  9. Preschool visual acuity screening tests.

    PubMed Central

    Friendly, D S

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative merits of two screening tests used for visual acuity assessment of preschool children. The tests that were compared were the Good-Lite Company versions of the E-Test and of the STYCAR (Screening Test for Young Children and Retardates). The former is the most popular method for evaluating central acuity in young children in this nation; the STYCAR is a relatively new letter-matching-test developed in England, where it is widely employed. The E-Test poses left-right orientation problems which are eliminated by the symmetrical letters H, T, O and V utilized in the Letter-Matching-Test. Both visual acuity tests were administered on two separate occasions by personnel from the Prevention of Blindness Society of Metropolitan Washington to 633 preschool children in Washington, D.C. By random selection, 150 of the children received the E-Test at both sessions, 162 children received the Letter-Matching-Test at both sessions, 160 chilt athe the second session, and 161 children received the Letter-Matching-Test at the first session and the E-Test at the second session. The author medically examined the eyes of 408 of the 633 children without knowledge of which test had been initially administered. Statistical analysis of the data obtained from the study indicated that the Letter-Matching-Test was significantly better in terms of testability rates, group and individual instruction time, and performance time. The E-Test was more reliable in terms of test-retest acuity scores and was also more valid in terms of agreement between pass-fail results obtained at the first screening session and two levels of pass-fail refraction criteria. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B PMID:754379

  10. Impaired Acuity of the Approximate Number System Underlies Mathematical Learning Disability (Dyscalculia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many children have significant mathematical learning disabilities (MLD, or dyscalculia) despite adequate schooling. The current study hypothesizes that MLD partly results from a deficiency in the Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports nonverbal numerical representations across species and throughout development. In this study of 71 ninth…

  11. Preschool Acuity of the Approximate Number System Correlates with School Math Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research shows a correlation between individual differences in people's school math abilities and the accuracy with which they rapidly and nonverbally approximate how many items are in a scene. This finding is surprising because the Approximate Number System (ANS) underlying numerical estimation is shared with infants and with non-human…

  12. Acuity of a Cryptochrome and Vision-Based Magnetoreception System in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Mouritsen, Henrik; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The magnetic compass of birds is embedded in the visual system and it has been hypothesized that the primary sensory mechanism is based on a radical pair reaction. Previous models of magnetoreception have assumed that the radical pair-forming molecules are rigidly fixed in space, and this assumption has been a major objection to the suggested hypothesis. In this article, we investigate theoretically how much disorder is permitted for the radical pair-forming, protein-based magnetic compass in the eye to remain functional. Our study shows that only one rotational degree of freedom of the radical pair-forming protein needs to be partially constrained, while the other two rotational degrees of freedom do not impact the magnetoreceptive properties of the protein. The result implies that any membrane-associated protein is sufficiently restricted in its motion to function as a radical pair-based magnetoreceptor. We relate our theoretical findings to the cryptochromes, currently considered the likeliest candidate to furnish radical pair-based magnetoreception. PMID:20655831

  13. Brief Report: The Relationship between Visual Acuity, the Embedded Figures Test and Systemizing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Mark J.; Gwilliam, Lucy R.; Walker, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced performance upon the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has informed psychological theories of the non-social aspects that characterise ASD. The Extreme Male Brain theory of autism proposes that enhanced visual acuity underpins greater attention to detail (assessed by the EFT) which is a…

  14. Functional Visual Acuity in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yohei; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Shinoda, Hajime; Uchida, Atsuro; Mochimaru, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Sasaki, Mariko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We evaluated whether a functional visual acuity (FVA) system can detect subtle changes in central visual acuity that reflect pathological findings associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with unilateral AMD and logMAR monocular best corrected VA better than 0 in both eyes, as measured by conventional chart examination, were analyzed between November 2012 and April 2013. After measuring conventional VA, FVA, and contrast VA with best correction, routine eye examinations including spectral domain–optical coherence tomography were performed. Standard Schirmer test was performed, and corneal and lens densities were measured. Results The FVA score (p < 0.001) and visual maintenance ratio (p < 0.001) measured by the FVA system, contrast VA (p < 0. 01), and conventional VA (p < 0.01) were significantly worse in the AMD-affected eyes than in the fellow eyes. No significant differences were observed in the anterior segment conditions. Forward stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that the length of interdigitation zone disruption, as visualized by optical coherence tomography imaging, correlated with the FVA score (p < 0.01) but not with any other parameters investigated. Conclusions The FVA system detects subtle changes in best corrected VA in AMD-affected eyes and reflects interdigitation zone disruption, an anatomical change in the retina recorded by optical coherence tomography. Further studies are required to understand the value of the FVA system in detecting subtle changes in AMD. PMID:26583795

  15. Uncovering Concerns with Developing a Scoring System at ETS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stires, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Describes an expert panel member's experiences in working with Educational Testing Service to redesign the scoring for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Early Adolescence/English Language Arts Assessment. Maintains that a less mechanistic and more valid scoring system could have been developed if criticism and open discussion…

  16. Tactile Acuity Charts: A Reliable Measure of Spatial Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Patrick; Camargo, Carlos J.; Campanella, Humberto; Esteve, Jaume; Dinse, Hubert R.; Röder, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    For assessing tactile spatial resolution it has recently been recommended to use tactile acuity charts which follow the design principles of the Snellen letter charts for visual acuity and involve active touch. However, it is currently unknown whether acuity thresholds obtained with this newly developed psychophysical procedure are in accordance with established measures of tactile acuity that involve passive contact with fixed duration and control of contact force. Here we directly compared tactile acuity thresholds obtained with the acuity charts to traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds in a group of young healthy adults. For this purpose, two types of charts, using either Braille-like dot patterns or embossed Landolt rings with different orientations, were adapted from previous studies. Measurements with the two types of charts were equivalent, but generally more reliable with the dot pattern chart. A comparison with the two-point and grating orientation task data showed that the test-retest reliability of the acuity chart measurements after one week was superior to that of the passive methods. Individual thresholds obtained with the acuity charts agreed reasonably with the grating orientation threshold, but less so with the two-point threshold that yielded relatively distinct acuity estimates compared to the other methods. This potentially considerable amount of mismatch between different measures of tactile acuity suggests that tactile spatial resolution is a complex entity that should ideally be measured with different methods in parallel. The simple test procedure and high reliability of the acuity charts makes them a promising complement and alternative to the traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds. PMID:24504346

  17. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  18. Developmental change in the acuity of the "Number Sense": The Approximate Number System in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds and adults.

    PubMed

    Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2008-09-01

    Behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain imaging research points to a dedicated system for processing number that is shared across development and across species. This foundational Approximate Number System (ANS) operates over multiple modalities, forming representations of the number of objects, sounds, or events in a scene. This system is imprecise and hence differs from exact counting. Evidence suggests that the resolution of the ANS, as specified by a Weber fraction, increases with age such that adults can discriminate numerosities that infants cannot. However, the Weber fraction has yet to be determined for participants of any age between 9 months and adulthood, leaving its developmental trajectory unclear. Here we identify the Weber fraction of the ANS in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children and in adults. We show that the resolution of this system continues to increase throughout childhood, with adultlike levels of acuity attained surprisingly late in development. PMID:18793076

  19. Nephrolithometric Scoring Systems to Predict Outcomes of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Vernez, Simone L; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Motamedinia, Piruz; Bird, Vincent; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no single agreement upon an ideal predictive model that characterizes the complexity of renal stones and predicts surgical outcomes following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). New predictive tools have recently emerged to systematically and quantitatively assess kidney stone complexity to predict outcomes following PCNL: the Guy’s Stone Score, the CROES nomogram, S.T.O.N.E. nephrolithometry, and S-ReSC score. An ideal scoring system should include variables that both influence surgical planning and are predictive of postoperative outcomes. This review discusses the strengths, weaknesses, and commonalities of each of the above scoring systems. Additionally, we propose future directions for the development and analysis of surgical treatment for stone disease, namely, the importance of assessing radiation exposure and patient quality of life when counseling patients on treatment options. PMID:27162508

  20. C57BL/6 Neuromuscular Healthspan Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Developing a scoring system based on physiological and functional measurements is critical to test the efficacy of potential interventions for sarcopenia and frailty in aging animal models; therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a neuromuscular healthspan scoring system (NMHSS). We examined three ages of male C57BL/6 mice: adults (6–7 months old, 100% survival), old (24–26 months old, 75% survival), and elderly group (>28 months old, ≤50% survival)—as well as mice along this age continuum. Functional performance (as determined by the rotarod and inverted-cling grip test) and in vitro muscle contractility were the determinants. A raw score was derived for each determinant, and the NMHSS was then derived as the sum of the individual determinant scores. In comparison with individual determinants, the NMHSS reduced the effect of individual variability within age groups, thus potentially providing an enhanced ability to detect treatment effects in future studies. PMID:23585418

  1. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. PMID:25015031

  2. Accuracy of ‘My Gut Feeling:’ Comparing System 1 to System 2 Decision-Making for Acuity Prediction, Disposition and Diagnosis in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Daniel; Thomas, Jonathan F.; Wiswell, Jeffrey L.; Walston, James M.; Anderson, Joel R.; Hess, Erik P.; Bellolio, M. Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current cognitive sciences describe decision-making using the dual-process theory, where a System 1 is intuitive and a System 2 decision is hypothetico-deductive. We aim to compare the performance of these systems in determining patient acuity, disposition and diagnosis. Methods Prospective observational study of emergency physicians assessing patients in the emergency department of an academic center. Physicians were provided the patient’s chief complaint and vital signs and allowed to observe the patient briefly. They were then asked to predict acuity, final disposition (home, intensive care unit (ICU), non-ICU bed) and diagnosis. A patient was classified as sick by the investigators using previously published objective criteria. Results We obtained 662 observations from 289 patients. For acuity, the observers had a sensitivity of 73.9% (95% CI [67.7–79.5%]), specificity 83.3% (95% CI [79.5–86.7%]), positive predictive value 70.3% (95% CI [64.1–75.9%]) and negative predictive value 85.7% (95% CI [82.0–88.9%]). For final disposition, the observers made a correct prediction in 80.8% (95% CI [76.1–85.0%]) of the cases. For ICU admission, emergency physicians had a sensitivity of 33.9% (95% CI [22.1–47.4%]) and a specificity of 96.9% (95% CI [94.0–98.7%]). The correct diagnosis was made 54% of the time with the limited data available. Conclusion System 1 decision-making based on limited information had a sensitivity close to 80% for acuity and disposition prediction, but the performance was lower for predicting ICU admission and diagnosis. System 1 decision-making appears insufficient for final decisions in these domains but likely provides a cognitive framework for System 2 decision-making. PMID:26587086

  3. Building a User-Oriented Statewide Score Reporting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Michael B.

    In 1983 the Maryland State Department of Public Education (MSDE) issued a request for proposals for "The Development of the Score Reporting System for the Maryland Functional Testing Program." The MSDE called for a literature review, a national survey, a statewide survey of user needs and capabilities, an assessment of the state's report producing…

  4. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arm exercise stress testing may be an equivalent or better predictor of mortality outcome than pharmacological stress imaging for the ≥50% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals. Methods In this retrospective observational cohort study, arm exercise ECG stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans aged 64.1 (11.1) years. (mean (SD)) between 1997 and 2002. From multivariate Cox models, arm exercise scores were developed for prediction of 5-year and 12-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and 5-year cardiovascular mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Results Arm exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs), 1 min heart rate recovery (HRR) and ST segment depression ≥1 mm were the stress test variables independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by step-wise Cox analysis (all p<0.01). A score based on the relation HRR (bpm)+7.3×METs−10.5×ST depression (0=no; 1=yes) prognosticated 5-year cardiovascular mortality with a C-statistic of 0.81 before and 0.88 after adjustment for significant demographic and clinical covariates. Arm exercise scores for the other outcome end points yielded C-statistic values of 0.77–0.79 before and 0.82–0.86 after adjustment for significant covariates versus 0.64–0.72 for best fit pharmacological myocardial perfusion imaging models in a cohort of 1730 veterans who were evaluated over the same time period. Conclusions Arm exercise scores, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, have good power for prediction of mortality or MI in patients who cannot perform leg exercise. PMID:26835142

  5. A scoring system for predicting recurrence of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, H.T.; Shyu, S.K.; Chen, Y.K.; Yuan, C.C.; Chao, K.C.; Kan, Y.Y.

    1992-03-01

    An evaluation was made of factors that affect the recurrence of cervical cancer after primary surgery, these including age, clinical stage, histology, grade, involvement of uterine body, parametrium or vagina and lymph node metastases. During a period of at least 3 years, 702 of 1508 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection were studied by using a scoring system. A comparison between the group of women scored at or greater than 13 that scored less than 13 revealed that the risk of recurrence was higher in the former group. One hundred and twenty five of 702 patients found to have positive pelvic node involvement scored greater than 13, which rendered them eligible for further mangement as follows: the recurrence rate in 99 patients receiving multi-agent chemotherapy was 34.4%, compared with 65.4% in 26 patients receiving no treatment (P < 0.01). Applying this score to other patients in planning adjuvant therapy, the recurrence rate may be reduced further. The number of patients needlessly exposed to the toxic effects of multi-agent chemotherapy may be reduced also. PMID:11576239

  6. Acuity-driven gigapixel visualization.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Kaufman, Arie E

    2013-12-01

    We present a framework for acuity-driven visualization of super-high resolution image data on gigapixel displays. Tiled display walls offer a large workspace that can be navigated physically by the user. Based on head tracking information, the physical characteristics of the tiled display and the formulation of visual acuity, we guide an out-of-core gigapixel rendering scheme by delivering high levels of detail only in places where it is perceivable to the user. We apply this principle to gigapixel image rendering through adaptive level of detail selection. Additionally, we have developed an acuity-driven tessellation scheme for high-quality Focus-and-Context (F+C) lenses that significantly reduces visual artifacts while accurately capturing the underlying lens function. We demonstrate this framework on the Reality Deck, an immersive gigapixel display. We present the results of a user study designed to quantify the impact of our acuity-driven rendering optimizations in the visual exploration process. We discovered no evidence suggesting a difference in search task performance between our framework and naive rendering of gigapixel resolution data, while realizing significant benefits in terms of data transfer overhead. Additionally, we show that our acuity-driven tessellation scheme offers substantially increased frame rates when compared to naive pre-tessellation, while providing indistinguishable image quality. PMID:24051856

  7. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy. PMID:16479901

  8. Visual acuity in the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica)

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, James C.; Nguyen, Hoang; Seelke, Adele M. H.; Krubitzer, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Monodelphis domestica (short-tailed opossum) is an emerging animal model for studies of neural development due to the extremely immature state of the nervous system at birth and its subsequent rapid growth to adulthood. Yet little is known about its normal sensory discrimination abilities. In the present investigation, visual acuity was determined in this species using the optokinetic test (OPT), which relies on involuntary head tracking of a moving stimulus and can be easily elicited using a rotating visual stimulus of varying spatial frequencies. Using this methodology, we determined that the acuity of Monodelphis is 0.58 cycles per degree (cpd), which is similar to the acuity of rats using the same methodology, and higher than in mice. However, acuity in the short-tailed opossum is lower than in other marsupials. This is in part due to the methodology used to determine acuity, but may also be due to differences in diel patterns, lifestyle and phylogeny. We demonstrate that for the short-tailed opossum, the OPT is a rapid and reliable method of determining a baseline acuity and can be used to study enhanced acuities due to cortical plasticity. PMID:22871523

  9. Acuity of mental representations of pitch.

    PubMed

    Janata, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Singing in one's mind or forming expectations about upcoming notes both require that mental images of one or more pitches will be generated. As with other musical abilities, the acuity with which such images are formed might be expected to vary across individuals and may depend on musical training. Results from several behavioral tasks involving intonation judgments indicate that multiple memory systems contribute to the formation of accurate mental images for pitch, and that the functionality of each is affected by musical training. Electrophysiological measures indicate that the ability to form accurate mental images is associated with greater engagement of auditory areas and associated error-detection circuitry when listeners imagine ascending scales and make intonation judgments about target notes. A view of auditory mental images is espoused in which unified mental image representations are distributed across multiple brain areas. Each brain area helps shape the acuity of the unified representation based on current behavioral demands and past experience. PMID:22524362

  10. Making sense of scoring systems in community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    The site of care decision is one of the most important in the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Several scoring systems have been developed to predict mortality risk in CAP, and these have been applied to guide physicians about whether patients should be admitted to the hospital or to the intensive care unit (ICU). However, these tools were initially developed to predict mortality risk, and studies have demonstrated that the risk for death does not always equate with need for hospitalization or ICU care. The most widely studied scoring systems are the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and the CURB-65 (a modification of the British Thoracic Society rule). Each has advantages and limitations, with the more-complex PSI developed to identify low-mortality risk patients, and the CURB-65, which is simpler, being developed to easily identify more severely ill individuals. No scoring system can replace clinical judgement about the admission decision, and prospective studies have shown that physicians still admit at least 30-60% of low mortality risk patients when using the PSI to guide this decision. Limitations of these prognostic tools include their variable utility in the elderly, and their failure to include certain comorbidities (COPD, immune suppression) and social factors, in their calculations. The need for ICU care is also not well-defined by measuring the PSI or CURB-65, and other tools such as those developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society (IDSA/ATS) guideline committee and the SMART-COP rule may have greater utility for this purpose. In the future, measurements of serum biomarkers, such as procalcitonin, may augment the information provided by prognostic scoring tools for patients with CAP. PMID:19353770

  11. Visual Acuity and the Eye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beynon, J.

    1985-01-01

    Shows that visual acuity is a function of the structure of the eye and that its limit is set by the structure of the retina, emphasizing the role of lens aberrations and difraction on image quality. Also compares human vision with that of other vertebrates and insects. (JN)

  12. Comparison of AIMS65 Score and Other Scoring Systems for Predicting Clinical Outcomes in Koreans with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Min; Yeum, Seok Cheon; Kim, Byung-Wook; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Ji Hee; Sim, Eun Hui; Ji, Jeong-Seon; Choi, Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The AIMS65 score has not been sufficiently validated in Korea. The objective of this study was to compare the AIMS65 and other scoring systems for the prediction of various clinical outcomes in Korean patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Methods The AIMS65 score, clinical and full Rockall scores (cRS and fRS) and Glasgow-Blatchford (GBS) score were calculated in patients with NVUGIB in a single center retrospectively. The performance of these scores for predicting mortality, rebleeding, transfusion requirement, and endoscopic intervention was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results Of the 523 patients, 3.4% died within 30 days, 2.5% experienced rebleeding, 40.0% required endoscopic intervention, and 75.7% needed transfusion. The AIMS65 score was useful for predicting the 30-day mortality, the need for endoscopic intervention and for transfusion. The fRS was superior to the AIMS65, GBS, and cRS for predicting endoscopic intervention and the GBS was superior to the AIMS65, fRS, and cRS for predicting the transfusion requirement. Conclusions The AIMS65 score was useful for predicting the 30-day mortality, transfusion requirement, and endoscopic intervention in Korean patients with acute NVUGIB. However, it was inferior to the GBS and fRS for predicting the transfusion requirement and endoscopic intervention, respectively. PMID:27377742

  13. The development of an obstetric triage acuity tool.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Kathleen S; Wallace, Ruth; DuRant, Patricia G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the journey a multicampus hospital system took to improve the obstetric triage process. A review of literature revealed no current comprehensive obstetric acuity tool, and thus our team developed a tool with a patient flow process, revised and updated triage nurse competencies, and then educated the nurses about the new tool and process. Data were collected to assess the functionality of the new process in assigning acuity upon patient arrival, conveying appropriate acuities based on patient complaints, and initiating the medical screening examination, all within prescribed time intervals. Initially data indicated that processes were still not optimal, and re-education was provided for all triage nurses. This improved all data points. The result of this QI project is that our patients are now seen based on their acuity within designated time frames. PMID:21857199

  14. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care. PMID:22241201

  15. [Scoring systems in intensive care medicine : principles, models, application and limits].

    PubMed

    Fleig, V; Brenck, F; Wolff, M; Weigand, M A

    2011-10-01

    Scoring systems are used in all diagnostic areas of medicine. Several parameters are evaluated and rated with points according to their value in order to simplify a complex clinical situation with a score. The application ranges from the classification of disease severity through determining the number of staff for the intensive care unit (ICU) to the evaluation of new therapies under study conditions. Since the introduction of scoring systems in the 1980's a variety of different score models has been developed. The scoring systems that are employed in intensive care and are discussed in this article can be categorized into prognostic scores, expenses scores and disease-specific scores. Since the introduction of compulsory recording of two scoring systems for accounting in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, these tools have gained more importance for all intensive care physicians. Problems remain in the valid calculation of scores and interpretation of the results. PMID:21997474

  16. Natural history of alkaptonuria revisited: analyses based on scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Cox, Trevor F

    2011-12-01

    Increased circulating homogentisic acid in body fluids occurs in alkaptonuria (AKU) due to lack of enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase leading in turn to conversion of HGA to a pigmented melanin-like polymer, known as ochronosis. The tissue damage in AKU is due to ochronosis. A potential treatment, a drug called nitisinone, to decrease formation of HGA is available. However, deploying nitisinone effectively requires its administration at the most optimal time in the natural history. AKU has a long apparent latent period before overt ochronosis develops. The rate of change of ochronosis and its consequences over time following its recognition has not been fully described in any quantitative manner. Two potential tools are described that were used to quantitate disease burden in AKU. One tool describes scoring the clinical features that includes clinical assessments, investigations and questionnaires in 15 patients with AKU. The second tool describes a scoring system that only includes items obtained from questionnaires in 44 people with AKU. Analysis of the data reveals distinct phases of the disease, a pre-ochronotic phase and an ochronotic phase. The ochronotic phase appears to demonstrate an earlier slower progression followed by a rapidly progressive phase. The rate of change of the disease will have implications for monitoring the course of the disease as well as decide on the most appropriate time that treatment should be started for it to be effective either in prevention or arrest of the disease. PMID:21748407

  17. Smartphone-Based Visual Acuity Measurement for Screening and Clinical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Christopher J.; Eghrari, Allen O.; Labrique, Alain B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Visual acuity is the most frequently performed measure of visual function in clinical practice and most people worldwide living with visual impairment are living in low- and middle-income countries. OBJECTIVE To design and validate a smartphone-based visual acuity test that is not dependent on familiarity with symbols or letters commonly used in the English language. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Validation study conducted from December 11, 2013, to March 4, 2014, comparing results from smartphone-based Peek Acuity to Snellen acuity (clinical normal) charts and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) logMAR chart (reference standard). This study was nested within the 6-year follow-up of the Nakuru Eye Disease Cohort in central Kenya and included 300 adults aged 55 years and older recruited consecutively. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcome measures were monocular logMAR visual acuity scores for each test: ETDRS chart logMAR, Snellen acuity, and Peek Acuity. Peek Acuity was compared, in terms of test-retest variability and measurement time, with the Snellen acuity and ETDRS logMAR charts in participants’ homes and temporary clinic settings in rural Kenya in 2013 and 2014. RESULTS The 95%CI limits for test-retest variability of smartphone acuity data were ±0.029 logMAR. The mean differences between the smartphone-based test and the ETDRS chart and the smartphone-based test and Snellen acuity data were 0.07 (95%CI, 0.05–0.09) and 0.08 (95%CI, 0.06–0.10) logMAR, respectively, indicating that smartphone-based test acuities agreed well with those of the ETDRS and Snellen charts. The agreement of Peek Acuity and the ETDRS chart was greater than the Snellen chart with the ETDRS chart (95%CI, 0.05–0.10; P = .08). The local Kenyan community health care workers readily accepted the Peek Acuity smartphone test; it required minimal training and took no longer than the Snellen test (77 seconds vs 82 seconds; 95%CI, 71–84 seconds vs 73–91

  18. Dynamic Visual Acuity and Landing Sickness in Crewmembers Returning from Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.J.F; Peters, B.T.; Reschke, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity causes sensorimotor adaptations that result in functional deficits upon returning to a gravitational environment. At landing the vestibular system and the central nervous system, responsible for coordinating head and eye movements, are adapted to microgravity and must re-adapt to the gravitational environment. This re-adaptation causes decrements in gaze control and dynamic visual acuity, with astronauts reporting oscillopsia and blurred vision. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is assessed using an oscillating chair developed in the Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC. This chair is lightweight and easily portable for quick deployment in the field. The base of the chair is spring-loaded and allows for manual oscillation of the subject. Using a metronome, the chair is vertically oscillated plus or minus 2 cm at 2 Hz by an operator, to simulate walking. While the subject is being oscillated, they are asked to discern the direction of Landolt-C optotypes of varying sizes and record their direction using a gamepad. The visual acuity thresholds are determined using an algorithm that alters the size of the optotype based on the previous response of the subject using a forced-choice best parameter estimation that is able to rapidly converge on the threshold value. Visual acuity thresholds were determined both for static (seated) and dynamic (oscillating) conditions. Dynamic visual acuity is defined as the difference between the dynamic and static conditions. Dynamic visual acuity measures will be taken prior to flight (typically L-180, L-90, and L-60) and up to eight times after landing, including up to 3 times on R plus 0. Follow up measurements will be taken at R plus 1 (approximately 36 hours after landing). Long-duration International Space Station crewmembers will be tested once at the refueling stop in Europe and once again upon return to Johnson Space Center. In addition to DVA, subjective ratings of motion sickness will be recorded

  19. Scoring Systems for Outcome Prediction of Patients with Perforation Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Litake, Manjusha Madhusudhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peritonitis continues to be one of the major infectious problems confronting a surgeon. Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), Physiological and Operative Severity Score for en Umeration of Mortality (POSSUM) and Morbidity and sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute have been devised for risk assessment and for prediction of postoperative outcome. Aim The aim of this study was to find the accuracy of these scores in predicting outcome in terms of mortality in patients undergoing exploratory laprotomy for perforation peritonitis. Materials and Methods The prospective study was carried out in 100 diagnosed cases of perforation at our centre in a single unit over a period of 21 months from December 2012 to August 2014. Study was conducted on all cases of peritonitis albeit primary, tertiary, iatrogenic and those with age less than 12 years were excluded from the study. All the relevant data were collected and three scores were computed from one set of data from the patient. The main outcome measure was survival of the patient. The Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves were obtained for the three scores. Area Under the Curves (AUC) was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at a cut off point obtained from the ROC curves. Results POSSUM had an AUC of 0.99, sepsis score had an AUC of 0.98 and MPI had an AUC of 0.95. The cut off point score of 51 for POSSUM had an accuracy of 93.8 and positive predictive value of 70.5, the score of 29 for MPI had an accuracy of 82.8 and positive predictive value of 46 and the score of 22 for sepsis score had an accuracy of 95.9 and positive predictive value of 86.67. Conclusion POSSUM score was found to be superior in prediction of mortality as compared to sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute and MPI. POSSUM and MPI over predicted mortality in some cases. None of these scores are strictly preoperative. PMID:27134924

  20. Revised international prognostic scoring system for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Peter L; Tuechler, Heinz; Schanz, Julie; Sanz, Guillermo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Solé, Francesc; Bennett, John M; Bowen, David; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, Francois; Kantarjian, Hagop; Kuendgen, Andrea; Levis, Alessandro; Malcovati, Luca; Cazzola, Mario; Cermak, Jaroslav; Fonatsch, Christa; Le Beau, Michelle M; Slovak, Marilyn L; Krieger, Otto; Luebbert, Michael; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Magalhaes, Silvia M M; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Sekeres, Mikkael; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Stauder, Reinhard; Tauro, Sudhir; Valent, Peter; Vallespi, Teresa; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef

    2012-09-20

    The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) is an important standard for assessing prognosis of primary untreated adult patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). To refine the IPSS, MDS patient databases from international institutions were coalesced to assemble a much larger combined database (Revised-IPSS [IPSS-R], n = 7012, IPSS, n = 816) for analysis. Multiple statistically weighted clinical features were used to generate a prognostic categorization model. Bone marrow cytogenetics, marrow blast percentage, and cytopenias remained the basis of the new system. Novel components of the current analysis included: 5 rather than 3 cytogenetic prognostic subgroups with specific and new classifications of a number of less common cytogenetic subsets, splitting the low marrow blast percentage value, and depth of cytopenias. This model defined 5 rather than the 4 major prognostic categories that are present in the IPSS. Patient age, performance status, serum ferritin, and lactate dehydrogenase were significant additive features for survival but not for acute myeloid leukemia transformation. This system comprehensively integrated the numerous known clinical features into a method analyzing MDS patient prognosis more precisely than the initial IPSS. As such, this IPSS-R should prove beneficial for predicting the clinical outcomes of untreated MDS patients and aiding design and analysis of clinical trials in this disease. PMID:22740453

  1. Relationship among fMRI, contrast sensitivity and visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Leguire, L E; Algaze, A; Kashou, N H; Lewis, J; Rogers, G L; Roberts, C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether visual acuity or contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is proportional to visual cortical function based on fMRI volume and level of activation or Z-score. Forced choice procedures were utilized to measure the monocular log minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity and CSF. The CSF data were collapsed into a single index by the use of weighted mean contrast sensitivity (WMCS), being defined as the mean of the products of each spatial frequency multiplied by its corresponding contrast sensitivity. fMRI data had been obtained with a 1.5 T GE Signa scanner with visual stimuli including 1.0 and 2.0 c/deg vertical sinusoidal gratings. Subjects consisted of eight normal adults and five amblyopic patients, with the amblyopic subjects added to gauge whether the outcome was due to a restricted range of scores or the small number of study participants. In normal subjects, the fMRI volume and level of activation exhibited no statistically significant correlation with visual acuity at P<0.05. Statistically significant correlations were obtained between WMCS and fMRI volume (R=0.765, P=0.027) and fMRI level of activation (R=0.645, P=0.007), with right eye stimulation using the 1.0 c/deg grating. On the whole, statistically significant correlations between WMCS and fMRI parameters were maintained when subject age was held constant and when data from the five amblyopic subjects were included to expand the range of values and increase the number of data sets for analysis. fMRI volume and Z-score were more closely associated with the CSF, as defined by WMCS, than visual acuity. The results suggest that the CSF reflects the underlying visual cortical cells responsible for fMRI volume and the level of activation. PMID:21035430

  2. Revised trauma scoring system to predict in-hospital mortality in the emergency department: Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure score

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Our aim in this study was to assess whether the new Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure (GAP) scoring system, which is a modification of the Mechanism, Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Arterial Pressure (MGAP) scoring system, better predicts in-hospital mortality and can be applied more easily than previous trauma scores among trauma patients in the emergency department (ED). Methods This multicenter, prospective, observational study was conducted to analyze readily available variables in the ED, which are associated with mortality rates among trauma patients. The data used in this study were derived from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB), which consists of 114 major emergency hospitals in Japan. A total of 35,732 trauma patients in the JTDB from 2004 to 2009 who were 15 years of age or older were eligible for inclusion in the study. Of these patients, 27,154 (76%) with complete sets of important data (patient age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate and Injury Severity Score (ISS)) were included in our analysis. We calculated weight for the predictors of the GAP scores on the basis of the records of 13,463 trauma patients in a derivation data set determined by using logistic regression. Scores derived from four existing scoring systems (Revised Trauma Score, Triage Revised Trauma Score, Trauma and Injury Severity Score and MGAP score) were calibrated using logistic regression models that fit in the derivation set. The GAP scoring system was compared to the calibrated scoring systems with data from a total of 13,691 patients in a validation data set using c-statistics and reclassification tables with three defined risk groups based on a previous publication: low risk (mortality < 5%), intermediate risk, and high risk (mortality > 50%). Results Calculated GAP scores involved GCS score (from three to fifteen points), patient age < 60 years (three points) and SBP (> 120 mmHg, six points; 60 to 120

  3. Multiparametric and semiquantitative scoring systems for the evaluation of mouse model histopathology - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histopathology has initially been and is still used to diagnose infectious, degenerative or neoplastic diseases in humans or animals. In addition to qualitative diagnoses semiquantitative scoring of a lesion`s magnitude on an ordinal scale is a commonly demanded task for histopathologists. Multiparametric, semiquantitative scoring systems for mouse models histopathology are a common approach to handle these questions and to include histopathologic information in biomedical research. Results Inclusion criteria for scoring systems were a first description of a multiparametric, semiquantiative scoring systems which comprehensibly describe an approach to evaluate morphologic lesion. A comprehensive literature search using these criteria identified 153 originally designed semiquantitative scoring systems for the analysis of morphologic changes in mouse models covering almost all organs systems and a wide variety of disease models. Of these, colitis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, lupus nephritis and collagen induced osteoarthritis colitis were the disease models with the largest number of different scoring systems. Closer analysis of the identified scoring systems revealed a lack of a rationale for the selection of the scoring parameters or a correlation between scoring parameter value and the magnitude of the clinical symptoms in most studies. Conclusion Although a decision for a particular scoring system is clearly dependent on the respective scientific question this review gives an overview on currently available systems and may therefore allow for a better choice for the respective project. PMID:23800279

  4. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  5. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  6. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  7. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  8. 38 CFR 4.76 - Visual acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distance and near vision using Snellen's test type or its equivalent. (b) Evaluation of visual acuity. (1) Evaluate central visual acuity on the basis of corrected distance vision with central fixation, even if a central scotoma is present. However, when the lens required to correct distance vision in the poorer...

  9. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  10. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  11. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  12. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  13. Is there a relationship between spinal instability in neoplastic disease and Tokuhashi scoring system?

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Rotta, Jose Marcus; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2016-07-01

    Spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) classification evaluates spinal stability by adding together six radiographic and clinical components. The objective of this study was to verify the association between SINS and Tokuhashi scoring system (TSS) score. Fifty-eight patients with vertebral metastases were admitted from 2010 to 2014 at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo. They were evaluated according to their SINS and Tokuhashi SS score. Fourteen patients (24.13 %) scored from 0 to 6 points (stable spine), 37 (63.79 %) scored from 7 to 12 (potentially unstable), and 7 (12.06 %) scored from 13 to 18 (unstable). In stable spine patients according to SINS, the mean TSS score was 9.2. In potentially unstable spine patients, the mean TSS score was 8.24. In unstable spine patients, mean TSS score was 6.28. There was a statistically significant difference of the TSS score between stable and unstable patients. After evaluating TSS score in each patient, the worse the SINS, the worse was also the TSS score. PMID:26860530

  14. Clicker Score Trajectories and Concept Inventory Scores as Predictors for Early Warning Systems for Large STEM Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Un Jung; Sbeglia, Gena C.; Ha, Minsu; Finch, Stephen J.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the retention of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors has recently emerged as a national priority in undergraduate education. Since poor performance in large introductory science and math courses is one significant factor in STEM dropout, early detection of struggling students is needed. Technology-supported "early warning systems" (EWSs) are being developed to meet these needs. Our study explores the utility of two commonly collected data sources—pre-course concept inventory scores and longitudinal clicker scores—for use in EWS, specifically, in determining the time points at which robust predictions of student success can first be established. The pre-course diagnostic assessments, administered to 287 students, included two concept inventories and one attitude assessment. Clicker question scores were also obtained for each of the 37 class sessions. Additionally, student characteristics (sex, ethnicity, and English facility) were gathered in a survey. Our analyses revealed that all variables were predictive of final grades. The correlation of the first 3 weeks of clicker scores with final grades was 0.53, suggesting that this set of variables could be used in an EWS starting at the third week. We also used group-based trajectory models to assess whether trajectory patterns were homogeneous in the class. The trajectory analysis identified three distinct clicker performance patterns that were also significant predictors of final grade. Trajectory analyses of clicker scores, student characteristics, and pre-course diagnostic assessment appear to be valuable data sources for EWS, although further studies in a diversity of instructional contexts are warranted.

  15. Digital Algorithmic Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scoring System (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Slakter, Jason S.; Schneebaum, Jeffrey W.; Shah, Sabah A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new diabetic retinopathy severity scoring system and to determine if it can monitor changes from baseline as well as identify precise features that have changed over time. Such a grading system could potentially provide an understanding of the impact of treatments utilizing an algorithmic scoring technique. Methods: The traditional ETDRS grading system was examined and a flow algorithm based on the grading approach was created. All visual comparative assessment points, relying on identification of features in relation to prior standard photographic images, were evaluated and quantified. A new grading form was created that provided fields that captured all relevant features required for determining the ETDRS grading score. A computer software algorithm was developed that examines all entered fields and calculates the appropriate diabetic severity score. Results: This diabetic retinopathy scoring algorithm system was successful in generating a severity score comparable to traditional methods of grading images. Validation with traditionally graded images was performed, demonstrating that in a majority of cases, the severity scores were comparable. The algorithmic grading system was then used to analyze images obtained in a large clinical study of diabetic macular edema, resulting in data regarding baseline scoring values, as well as detailed features of the microvasculature that drove the severity scoring results, and changes seen during the trial. Conclusion: This new algorithmic diabetic severity scoring system provides a means to monitor the progression or regression of retinopathy with therapeutic intervention as well as assess the individual microvascular features that may be modified over the course of treatment.

  16. Functional Visual Acuity of Early Presbyopia

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Shigeno, Yuta; Saiki, Megumi; Torii, Hidemasa; Kaido, Minako; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual function in patients with early presbyopia using the functional visual acuity (FVA) test. Methods This study included 27 eyes of 27 healthy older volunteers (mean age, 44.1 ± 2.6 years) and 14 eyes of 14 healthy young volunteers (mean age, 28.4±4.8 years). The distance-corrected visual acuity (DCVA), distance-corrected near VA (DCNVA), subjective amplitude of accommodation (AA), and distance and near pupillary diameters were measured. The distance FVA and distance-corrected near FVA (DCNFVA) were measured using the FVA Measurement System. The standard Schirmer test and standard tear break-up time measurement also were performed. Results The logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) DCVA was better than 0 in all subjects. The percentages of subjects with logMAR DCNVA below 0 was significantly lower in the presbyopia group than in the young group. The DCNFVA in the presbyopia group was significantly (P < 0.001) poorer than the DCNVA in that group. Significant linear negative correlations were seen between the DCNVA and AA (r = -0.507, P < 0.001) and the DCNFVA and AA (r = -0.681, P < 0.001) in the older subjects. Stepwise regression analysis showed that only the AA was a significant factor predictive of the DCNFVA in the presbyopia group. Tear function parameters were not adopted in the regression model. Conclusions Measurement of the DCNFVA can detect decreased AA in early presbyopia better than measurement of the conventional near VA. The DCNFVA is a good index for early presbyopia. PMID:26959362

  17. Agreement between bovine respiratory disease scoring systems for pre-weaned dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Aly, Sharif S; Love, William J; Williams, Deniece R; Lehenbauer, Terry W; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Drake, Christiana; Kass, Philip H; Farver, Thomas B

    2014-12-01

    Clinical scoring systems have been proposed for respiratory disease diagnosis in calves, including the Wisconsin (WI) system (McGuirk in 2008) which uses five clinical signs, each partitioned into four levels of severity. Recently, we developed the California (CA) bovine respiratory disease (BRD) scoring system requiring less calf handling and consisting of six clinical signs, each classified as normal or abnormal. The objective of this study was to estimate the on-farm agreement between the WI and the CA scoring systems. A total of 100 calves were enrolled on a CA dairy and assessed for BRD case status using the two scoring systems simultaneously. The Kappa coefficient of agreement between these two systems was estimated to be 0.85, which indicated excellent agreement beyond chance. The simpler design and reduced calf handling required by the CA BRD scoring system may make it advantageous for on-farm use. PMID:25424381

  18. Use of scoring systems for assessing and reporting the outcome results from shoulder surgery and arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Booker, Simon; Alfahad, Nawaf; Scott, Martin; Gooding, Ben; Wallace, W Angus

    2015-03-18

    To investigate shoulder scoring systems used in Europe and North America and how outcomes might be classified after shoulder joint replacement. All research papers published in four major journals in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed for the shoulder scoring systems used in their published papers. A method of identifying how outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty might be used to categorize patients into fair, good, very good and excellent outcomes was explored using the outcome evaluations from patients treated in our own unit. A total of 174 research articles that were published in the four journals used some form of shoulder scoring system. The outcome from shoulder arthroplasty in our unit has been evaluated using the constant score (CS) and the oxford shoulder score and these scores have been used to evaluate individual patient outcomes. CSs of < 30 = unsatisfactory; 30-39 = fair; 40-59 = good; 60-69 = very good; and 70 and over = excellent. The most popular shoulder scoring systems in North America were Simple Shoulder Test and American shoulder and elbow surgeons standard shoulder assessment form score and in Europe CS, Oxford Shoulder Score and DASH score. PMID:25793164

  19. Use of scoring systems for assessing and reporting the outcome results from shoulder surgery and arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Simon; Alfahad, Nawaf; Scott, Martin; Gooding, Ben; Wallace, W Angus

    2015-01-01

    To investigate shoulder scoring systems used in Europe and North America and how outcomes might be classified after shoulder joint replacement. All research papers published in four major journals in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed for the shoulder scoring systems used in their published papers. A method of identifying how outcomes after shoulder arthroplasty might be used to categorize patients into fair, good, very good and excellent outcomes was explored using the outcome evaluations from patients treated in our own unit. A total of 174 research articles that were published in the four journals used some form of shoulder scoring system. The outcome from shoulder arthroplasty in our unit has been evaluated using the constant score (CS) and the oxford shoulder score and these scores have been used to evaluate individual patient outcomes. CSs of < 30 = unsatisfactory; 30-39 = fair; 40-59 = good; 60-69 = very good; and 70 and over = excellent. The most popular shoulder scoring systems in North America were Simple Shoulder Test and American shoulder and elbow surgeons standard shoulder assessment form score and in Europe CS, Oxford Shoulder Score and DASH score. PMID:25793164

  20. New mobile technologies and visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, I A T; Lok, A S L; Tarbert, C

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices have shown promise in visual assessment. Traditional acuity measurement involves retro-illuminated charts or card-based modalities. Mobile platforms bring potential to improve on both portability and objectivity. The present research activity relates to design and validation of a novel tablet-based infant acuity test. Early results in an adult cohort, with various levels of artificially degraded vision, suggest improved test-retest reliability compared with current standards for infant acuity. Future pragmatic trials will assess the value of this emerging technology in pediatric visual screening. PMID:25570420

  1. Neutral particle beam scoring system proof-of-principle experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Pontau, A.E.; Antolak, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    A method of scoring a ground-based neutral particle beam pointing experiment is described. Beam scoring in this context means performing beam direction measurements in the near field (tens of meters) sufficient to determine whether energy would be concentrated on a far-field target as desired in a pointing experiment. The principle of operation is to impress a high-resolution spatial modulation on the beam by inserting an array of shadow wires into the beam upstream of the steering magnet. At the downstream end of the beam line the shadows are detected using one or more scintillation screens and video cameras. Beam direction is determined by measuring the location of the shadows at a known distance downstream of the point of steering. A proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates that: (1) wire shadows can be created in a 50 MeV beam and propagate over the distances required; (2) images of sufficient brightness and resolution can be formed on scintillating screens excited by 50 MeV protons; and (3) CCD array cameras can operate in the radiation environment created near the beam line.

  2. Application of a computed tomography based cystic fibrosis scoring system to chest tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderman, Christina; Johnsson, Åse; Vikgren, Jenny; Rystedt, Hans; Ivarsson, Jonas; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Nyberg Andersson, Lena; Bâth, Magnus

    2013-03-01

    In the monitoring of progression of lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), recurrent computed tomography (CT) examinations are often used. The relatively new imaging technique chest tomosynthesis (CTS) may be an interesting alternative in the follow-up of these patients due to its visualization of the chest in slices at radiation doses and costs significantly lower than is the case with CT. A first step towards introducing CTS imaging in the diagnostics of CF patients is to establish a scoring system appropriate for evaluating the severity of CF pulmonary disease based on findings in CTS images. Previously, several such CF scoring systems based on CT imaging have been published. The purpose of the present study was to develop a CF scoring system for CTS, by starting from an existing scoring system dedicated for CT images and making modifications regarded necessary to make it appropriate for use with CTS images. In order to determine any necessary changes, three thoracic radiologists independently used a scoring system dedicated for CT on both CT and CTS images from CF patients. The results of the scoring were jointly evaluated by all the observers, which lead to suggestions for changes to the scoring system. Suggested modifications include excluding the scoring of air trapping and doing the scoring of the findings in quadrants of the image instead of in each lung lobe.

  3. Acuity assessment of non-verbal infants and children: clinical experience with the acuity card procedure.

    PubMed

    Mohn, G; van Hof-van Duin, J; Fetter, W P; de Groot, L; Hage, M

    1988-04-01

    The acuity card procedure was used to assess the visual acuity of 510 neurologically normal and abnormal infants and children. Acuity estimates were obtained for 93 per cent of 842 binocular and 279 monocular tests. The observed development of binocular acuity of normal fullterm and preterm infants agreed well with previous reports using the traditional forced-choice preferential looking technique. Monocular tests seemed to support earlier suggestions that grating acuity may be relatively insensitive to strabismic amblyopia. Infants at risk of later neurological deficits but developing normally had only a slight delay in development of acuity, but there was a high incidence of acuity deficits (54 per cent) among those with severe neurological defects. The great majority of a group of multiply handicapped children had low acuity for age. Repeat tests showed a high degree of test-retest consistency. The acuity card procedure was a successful and useful method for assessing the acuity of infants and children who cannot be tested with standard ophthalmological methods. PMID:3384203

  4. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian T.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients’ scores were significantly worse than normals’ scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  5. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  6. An Evaluation of the IntelliMetric[SM] Essay Scoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Garcia, Veronica; Welch, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a two-part evaluation of the IntelliMetric[SM] automated essay scoring system based on its performance scoring essays from the Analytic Writing Assessment of the Graduate Management Admission Test[TM] (GMAT[TM]). The IntelliMetric system performance is first compared to that of individual human raters, a Bayesian system…

  7. 76 FR 16350 - Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Labeling; Black Box Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass... regulation classifying ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test systems to restrict these devices so that a... mass assessment score test system into class II (special controls). DATES: Submit either electronic...

  8. Dynamic Visual Acuity: a Functionally Relevant Research Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; Brady, Rachel A.; Miller, Chris A.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Wood, Scott J.; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    Coordinated movements between the eyes and head are required to maintain a stable retinal image during head and body motion. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays a significant role in this gaze control system that functions well for most daily activities. However, certain environmental conditions or interruptions in normal VOR function can lead to inadequate ocular compensation, resulting in oscillopsia, or blurred vision. It is therefore possible to use acuity to determine when the environmental conditions, VOR function, or the combination of the two is not conductive for maintaining clear vision. Over several years we have designed and tested several tests of dynamic visual acuity (DVA). Early tests used the difference between standing and walking acuity to assess decrements in the gaze stabilization system after spaceflight. Supporting ground-based studies measured the responses from patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction and explored the effects of visual target viewing distance and gait cycle events on walking acuity. Results from these studies show that DVA is affected by spaceflight, is degraded in patients with vestibular dysfunction, changes with target distance, and is not consistent across the gait cycle. We have recently expanded our research to include studies in which seated subjects are translated or rotated passively. Preliminary results from this work indicate that gaze stabilization ability may differ between similar active and passive conditions, may change with age, and can be affected by the location of the visual target with respect to the axis of motion. Use of DVA as a diagnostic tool is becoming more popular but the functional nature of the acuity outcome measure also makes it ideal for identifying conditions that could lead to degraded vision. By doing so, steps can be taken to alter the problematic environments to improve the man-machine interface and optimize performance.

  9. Introduction of a score system for the clinical evaluation of patients with spinal processes.

    PubMed

    Klekamp, J; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    To facilitate statistical analysis of the clinical course of patients with spinal lesions such as tumours, dysraphic malformations, inflammation, or syringomyelia, we have developed a score system for each of the following symptoms and signs: sensory deficits, dysaesthesiae, pain, motor weakness, gait, bladder and bowel function. For each a score between 0 and 5 is given. The grading is designed in such a way that levels of functional significance receive separate scores: 0 = no function, 1 = severely disabled, 2 = disabled, 3 = severely compromised but function preserved, 4 = slightly compromised, and 5 = normal function. In general, scores between 0 and 2 indicate insufficient functional capacity and an unsatisfactory condition. Scores between 3 and 5 represent levels of function which should be the aim of treatment. We have used this scoring system for evaluation of almost 500 patients with spinal lesions both retrospectively and prospectively with good results in terms of reproducibility and validity. PMID:8237513

  10. Strong tilt illusions always reduce orientation acuity.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Joshua A; Morgan, Michael J

    2009-03-01

    The apparent spatial orientation of an object can differ from its physical orientation when differently oriented objects surround it. This is the "tilt illusion". Previously [Solomon, J. A., & Morgan, M. J. (2006). Stochastic re-calibration: Contextual effects on perceived tilt. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 273, 2681-2686], we reported a loss of orientation acuity whenever a large physical tilt was required to compensate for the tilt illusion and make a target appear horizontal. Since all of those targets appeared to be at least approximately horizontal, we concluded that orientation acuity was not wholly determined by the target's apparent orientation. In the present study, we used oblique (i.e. neither horizontal nor vertical) reference orientations to more directly examine the effect of perceived orientation on orientation acuity. The results show that when surround and reference were parallel, there was no tilt illusion and acuity was high. Acuity suffered whenever the tilt illusion caused a large discrepancy between the target's physical and perceived tilts. Since this was true even for tilted references, context-induced acuity loss cannot be simply an "oblique effect" of the target's physical orientation. PMID:19268684

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiologic Scoring System for Evaluation of Suspicious Hirschsprung Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Alehossein, Mehdi; Roohi, Ahad; Pourgholami, Masoud; Mollaeian, Mansour; Salamati, Payman

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 1996, Donovan and colleagues represented a scoring system for better prediction of Hirschsprung disease (HD). Objectives: Our objective was to devise another scoring system that uses a checklist of radiologic and clinical signs to determine the probability of HD in suspicious patients. Patients and Methods: In a diagnostic accuracy study, 55 children with clinical manifestations of HD that referred to a training hospital from 1998 to 2011 were assessed. A checklist was used to evaluate the items proposed by contrast enema (CE), based on six subscales, including transitional zone, rectosigmoid index (RSI), irregular contractions in aganglionic region, cobblestone appearance, filling defect due to fecaloid materials and lack of meconium defecation during the first 48 hours after birth. The patients were classified as high score and low score. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of our scoring system were calculated for identifying HD, in comparison with pathologically proved or ruled out HD. Results: Of the 55 patients, 36 (65.4%) cases had HD and 19 (34.6%) cases were without HD. In the HD group, 32 patients showed high scores and four patients had low scores. The sensitivity and specificity of our diagnostic scoring system were 88.9% (95% CI: 78.6% - 99.1%) and 84.2% (95% CI: 68.7% - 100%), respectively. Moreover, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 91.4% (95% CI: 82.1% - 100%) and 80% (95% CI: 62.5% - 97.5%), respectively. Conclusions: Our new scoring system of CE is a useful diagnostic method in HD. If a patient’s score is high, that patient is highly suspicious to HD and reversely, when one’s score is low, the patient presents a reduced probability to be diagnosed with HD. PMID:25901256

  12. The importance of measuring dynamic visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Muzdalo, Natasa Vujko

    2013-04-01

    In their everyday life, people interact with different objects, static as well as those in motion. However, dynamic acuity is rarely checked in medical examinations, even those preceding the issue of driving license. In order for driving to be safe, good eyesight or good correction with visual aids is imperative. Beside good eyesight, drivers also have to have good reflexes and short reaction span. The aim of this study was to compare dynamic and static visual acuity in order to observe how they vary among individuals. Twenty female and male participants, 65 years of age, took part in the study and the comparison was made with the results provided by 20 20-year old participants. Dynamic acuity was tested using the Landolt-ring optotype which was simulating movement velocity of 72 km/h. T-test demonstrated the presence of a statistically significant difference between dynamic and static acuity among the participants from 62 to 68 years of age (t = 15.852; df = 39; p < 0.01). Within the same group, dynamic acuity (mean = 0.887; std. deviation = 0.297) proved to be significantly worse than static acuity (mean = 1.40; std. deviation = 0.317). By comparing the results measured within the older group of participants with those measured in the younger group, it was shown that there exists a statistically significant difference (t = 0.275; df = 58; p < 0,05) between the older and younger group in their dynamic binocular acuity with correction. Younger participants had better dynamic binocular acuity with correction (mean = 1.063; std. deviation = 0.259) than the older participants (mean = 0.884; std. deviation = 0.298). The differences between dynamic and static acuity and its degradation in the older age groups have to be taken into account when issuing driving licenses. The future of research lies within the study of correlation between the age and acuity in order that the results can be applied in practice. PMID:23837257

  13. Pasture monitoring at a farm scale with the USDA-NRCS pasture condition score system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system, developed by the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), is an assessment tool for pastureland enrolled in conservation programs. Ten indicators of vegetation and soils status are rated on a 1 to 5 scale and summed to give an aggregate score, whi...

  14. The Koppitz Developmental Scoring System for the Bender-Gestalt: Is It Developmental?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the developmental aspects of the Koppitz scoring system with 652 children who took the Bender Motor Gestalt Test. Scores were fitted to various developmental curves by computer. Results indicated only 35 percent of the Bender test performance variance was accounted for by age. (JAC)

  15. 76 FR 10047 - Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Financial Condition Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...This notice provides additional information to public housing agencies (PHAs) and members of the public about HUD's process for issuing scores under the financial condition indicator of the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS). This notice includes threshold values and associated scores for each financial subindicator derived from generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)-based......

  16. 76 FR 10055 - Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Physical Condition Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...This notice provides additional information to public housing agencies (PHAs) and members of the public about HUD's process for issuing scores under the physical condition indicator of the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS). This notice amends the current Physical Condition Scoring Process notice that was published on June 29, 2000, as corrected and updated by the Physical Condition......

  17. Field Reliability of Comprehensive System Scoring in an Adolescent Inpatient Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Robert E.; Pogge, David L.; Stokes, John M.; Cragnolino, Ana; Zaccario, Michele; Hayman, Judy; Piacentini, Teresa; Wayland-Smith, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The extent to which the Comprehensive System for the Rorschach is reliably scored has been a topic of some controversy. Although several studies have concluded it can be scored reliably in research settings, little is known about its reliability in field settings. This study evaluated the reliability of both response-level codes and protocol-level…

  18. Measuring Quality in Kindergarten Classrooms: Structural Analysis of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS K-3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandilos, Lia E.; DiPerna, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the structural validity of scores on a measure of global classroom quality, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS K-3; Pianta, La Paro, & Hamre, 2008). Using observational data from a sample of 417 kindergarten classrooms from the southern and mid-Atlantic regions of…

  19. The Validity of Preservice Teacher Use of Kohlberg's Issue Stage Scoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Social studies preservice teachers received background information on Kohlberg's theory of moral development and were trained to use one of the rater guides in his new "issue stage scoring system." They were directed to score sample moral thought statements, some on an intuitive basis and some with the rater guides. No overall differences between…

  20. Evaluation of visual acuity with Gen 3 night vision goggles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Using laboratory simulations, visual performance was measured at luminance and night vision imaging system (NVIS) radiance levels typically encountered in the natural nocturnal environment. Comparisons were made between visual performance with unaided vision and that observed with subjects using image intensification. An Amplified Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS6) binocular image intensifier was used. Light levels available in the experiments (using video display technology and filters) were matched to those of reflecting objects illuminated by representative night-sky conditions (e.g., full moon, starlight). Results show that as expected, the precipitous decline in foveal acuity experienced with decreasing mesopic luminance levels is effectively shifted to much lower light levels by use of an image intensification system. The benefits of intensification are most pronounced foveally, but still observable at 20 deg eccentricity. Binocularity provides a small improvement in visual acuity under both intensified and unintensified conditions.

  1. The 15-item Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) Scale: Portuguese Validation Studies.

    PubMed

    Vilaça, Margarida; de Sousa, Bruno; Stratton, Peter; Relvas, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the validity of the 15-item Portuguese version of the Systemic Clinical Outcome Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15; Vilaça, Silva, & Relvas, 2014), a brief and comprehensive measure of family functioning. Previous studies with SCORE-15 show that this version replicates the three-factor solution found for the original English version: Family strengths, Family communication and Family difficulties. In addition to reviewing previous studies, this article analyses the discriminant, convergent and predictive validity of the Portuguese SCORE-15. To do so, the SCORE-15 was administered to family members attending systemic family or couple's therapy at the start of the first and fourth sessions and also to a group of non-clinical individuals. Overall, data are reported from 618 participants, including 136 from families attending systemic therapy and 482 community family members. Comparisons of community and clinical samples (discriminant validity) showed statistically significant differences for the total scale and subscales (p < .001), with the community participants presenting healthier family functioning than the clinical ones. Analyses using SCORE-15 and the Quality of Life - adult version, another family measure applied simultaneously (convergent validity), indicate that both scales are significantly (p < .01) and moderately (r = -.47) correlated. Mean score analysis of SCORE-15's therapeutic sensitivity to change (predictive validity) showed that only the Family communication subscale was sensitive to statistically significant improvement (p < .05) from session 1 to session 4, whereas the SCORE-15's reliability change index points to its ability to detect clinical improvements (RCI = 14%). PMID:26585316

  2. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score System: Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Na; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2013-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system that includes an energy asset score tool to help building owners evaluate their buildings with respect to the score system. The goal of the energy asset score system is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrade progress over time. The system can also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building operators, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from their operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset score tool. This report also describes alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach. Finally, this report describes a few features of the program where alternative approaches are still under evaluation.

  3. Assessment of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-induced Pneumonia using Different Lung Lesion Scoring Systems: a Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, B; Segalés, J; Fraile, L; Pérez de Rozas, A; Maiti, H; Coll, T; Sibila, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary aetiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP) and one of the major contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Gross lung lesions in pigs affected by EP consist of cranioventral pulmonary consolidation (CVPC), usually distributed bilaterally in the apical, intermediate, accessory and cranial parts of the diaphragmatic lobes. Several lung scoring methods are currently in place for the evaluation of CVPC. The aims of this study were (1) to review the lung lesion scoring systems used to assess pneumonia associated with M. hyopneumoniae infection, and (2) to evaluate eight of these scoring systems by applying them to the lungs of 76 pigs with experimentally-induced M. hyopneumoniae pneumonia. A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was observed and the coefficients of determination in a regression analysis were very high between each pair-wise comparison, except for a unique scoring system based on image analysis. A formula of equivalence between lung scoring methods was developed in order to compare the results obtained with these methods. The present review provides a basis for comparison (even retrospectively) of lesions evaluated using different lung scoring systems. PMID:26774274

  4. Color improves "visual" acuity via sound.

    PubMed

    Levy-Tzedek, Shelly; Riemer, Dar; Amedi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Visual-to-auditory sensory substitution devices (SSDs) convey visual information via sound, with the primary goal of making visual information accessible to blind and visually impaired individuals. We developed the EyeMusic SSD, which transforms shape, location, and color information into musical notes. We tested the "visual" acuity of 23 individuals (13 blind and 10 blindfolded sighted) on the Snellen tumbling-E test, with the EyeMusic. Participants were asked to determine the orientation of the letter "E." The test was repeated twice: in one test, the letter "E" was drawn with a single color (white), and in the other test, with two colors (red and white). In the latter case, the vertical line in the letter, when upright, was drawn in red, with the three horizontal lines drawn in white. We found no significant differences in performance between the blind and the sighted groups. We found a significant effect of the added color on the "visual" acuity. The highest acuity participants reached in the monochromatic test was 20/800, whereas with the added color, acuity doubled to 20/400. We conclude that color improves "visual" acuity via sound. PMID:25426015

  5. Potential acuity meter for predicting visual acuity after Nd:YAG posterior capsulotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Smiddy, W.E.; Radulovic, D.; Yeo, J.H.; Stark, W.J.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    We studied 30 patients with opacifications of the posterior capsule to determine if the potential acuity meter (PAM) could accurately predict final visual outcome after Nd:YAG discussion. The final visual acuity was within one line of the PAM prediction in 22 of 30 patients (73%), better by two or more lines in seven patients (23%), and worse in one patient (4%) by two lines. Although in thicker capsules the final acuity was occasionally better than the PAM prediction, the rates of false negative and false positive predictions were very low. Mild cystoid macular edema (3 patients), age-related macular degeneration (3 patients), intraocular lens status, and level of initial acuity did not diminish PAM accuracy. The PAM effectively predicts final visual acuity after YAG posterior capsulotomy, when used in a patient, unhurried manner.

  6. Prediction of 18-month survival in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome. A regression model and scoring system based on the combination of chromosome findings and the Bournemouth score.

    PubMed

    Parlier, V; van Melle, G; Beris, P; Schmidt, P M; Tobler, A; Haller, E; Bellomo, M J

    1995-06-01

    The predictive potential of six selected factors was assessed in 72 patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of survival at 18 months. Factors were age (above median of 69 years), dysplastic features in the three myeloid bone marrow cell lineages, presence of chromosome defects, all metaphases abnormal, double or complex chromosome defects (C23), and a Bournemouth score of 2, 3, or 4 (B234). In the multivariate approach, B234 and C23 proved to be significantly associated with a reduction in the survival probability. The similarity of the regression coefficients associated with these two factors means that they have about the same weight. Consequently, the model was simplified by counting the number of factors (0, 1, or 2) present in each patient, thus generating a scoring system called the Lausanne-Bournemouth score (LB score). The LB score combines the well-recognized and easy-to-use Bournemouth score (B score) with the chromosome defect complexity, C23 constituting an additional indicator of patient outcome. The predicted risk of death within 18 months calculated from the model is as follows: 7.1% (confidence interval: 1.7-24.8) for patients with an LB score of 0, 60.1% (44.7-73.8) for an LB score of 1, and 96.8% (84.5-99.4) for an LB score of 2. The scoring system presented here has several interesting features. The LB score may improve the predictive value of the B score, as it is able to recognize two prognostic groups in the intermediate risk category of patients with B scores of 2 or 3. It has also the ability to identify two distinct prognostic subclasses among RAEB and possibly CMML patients. In addition to its above-described usefulness in the prognostic evaluation, the LB score may bring new insights into the understanding of evolution patterns in MDS. We used the combination of the B score and chromosome complexity to define four classes which may be considered four possible states of

  7. An audit of the current U.S. Department of Agriculture frame size scoring system.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, C D; Busby, W D

    2014-06-01

    Feedlot and carcass data from steers (n = 16,700) and heifers (n = 6,357) originating from 16 different states and fed in 17 feedlots located in southwest Iowa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the USDA frame score for predicting final BW of fed cattle. Frame score was recorded by USDA or state personnel for cattle either before leaving the state of origin or on arrival at the terminal feedlot. Mixed model procedures were used to investigate relationships between USDA frame score and measures of live performance and carcass traits. Other fixed effects included in the model included USDA muscle score, sex, age classification on feedlot entry (calf: ≤270 d of age, yearling: 271-365 d of age, and long yearling: >365 d of age), BCS on feedlot arrival, number of treatments for respiratory disease, hide color, and site of frame or muscle scoring; the interactions of sex × frame score and hide color × frame score were also included; fat thickness was included as a fixed effect (covariate) in the analysis of ADG, final BW, days on feed, LM area, marbling score, and quality grade. Random effects included in the model were year of feedlot arrival and feedlot in which cattle were fed. The system accurately projects the minimum target final BW for large frame steers and heifers; however, the final BW of the smallest medium frame steers and heifers exceeds the target minimum final BW by 35 and 40 kg, respectively. When frame score was assigned post facto based on actual final BW (adjusted to 1.27 cm fat thickness), it was determined that large frame was over-assigned by graders (62 vs. 35% for steers and 54 vs. 32% for heifers, actual score vs. postharvest score, respectively), medium frame was underassigned (37 vs. 51% and 46 vs. 58% for steers and heifers), and small frame was underassigned (0.7 vs. 15% and 0.6 vs. 10% for steers and heifers; K = 0.01, P < 0.01). Across sexes, of the cattle assigned to small, medium, or large frame score, 40, 59, and 43% actually had

  8. 76 FR 10053 - Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Capital Fund Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...This notice provides additional information to public housing agencies (PHAs) and members of the public about HUD's process for issuing scores under the Capital Fund program indicator of the Public Housing Assessment System...

  9. 76 FR 10050 - Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Management Operations Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...This notice provides additional information to public housing agencies (PHAs) and members of the public about HUD's process for issuing scores under the management operations indicator of the Public Housing Assessment System...

  10. Assessment of an implant-skin interface scoring system for external skeletal fixation of dogs.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Lynch, Mischa B; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Roe, Simon C; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Trumpatori, Brian J; Griffith, Emily H

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and in vivo versus photographic agreement of a scoring system for the implant-skin interface (ISI) of external skeletal fixation (ESF). SAMPLE 42 photographs of ISIs from 18 dogs for interobserver agreement and intraobserver repeatability and 27 photographs of ISIs from 6 dogs for in vivo versus photograph agreement. PROCEDURES An ISI inflammation scoring system was developed. It included scales for 6 metrics (erythema, drainage amount, drainage type, swelling, hair loss or lack of hair regrowth, and granulation tissue). Photographs of the ISI of ESF were obtained by use of a standard protocol and evaluated to determine intraobserver repeatability and interobserver agreement (Cronbach α; 4 raters) of the ISI score. Agreement between in vivo and photographic ISI scores (2 raters) and correlation between median scores across metrics were evaluated. RESULTS 42 photographs met the inclusion criteria. Overall intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.922 to 0.975. Interobserver overall Cronbach α ranged from 0.835 to 0.943. For in vivo versus photographic assessment, 27 ISIs in 6 dogs and their photographs were evaluated. The Cronbach α for both raters ranged from 0.614 to 0.938. Overall, the Cronbach α ranged from 0.725 to 0.932. Mean photographic scores were greater than mean in vivo scores for each metric. Pearson correlation coefficients ranged from 0.221 to 0.923. Erythema, swelling, and granulation were correlated with all other metrics. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, an ISI scoring system used in this study had high repeatability and agreement and may therefore be considered for use in clinical situations. Photographic scores were not equivalent to in vivo scores and should not be used interchangeably. PMID:26512537

  11. Lameness scoring system for dairy cows using force plates and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ghotoorlar, S Mokaram; Ghamsari, S Mehdi; Nowrouzian, I; Ghotoorlar, S Mokaram; Ghidary, S Shiry

    2012-02-01

    Lameness scoring is a routine procedure in dairy industry to screen the herds for new cases of lameness. Subjective lameness scoring, which is the most popular lameness detection and screening method in dairy herds, has several limitations. They include low intra-observer and inter-observer agreement and the discrete nature of the scores which limits its usage in monitoring the lameness. The aim of this study is to develop an automated lameness scoring system comparable with conventional subjective lameness scoring by means of artificial neural networks. The system is composed of four balanced force plates installed in a hoof-trimming box. A group of 105 dairy cows was used for the study. Twenty-three features extracted from ground reaction force (GRF) data were used in a computer training process which was performed on 60 per cent of the data. The remaining 40 per cent of the data were used to test the trained system. Repeatability of the lameness scoring system was determined by GRF samples from 25 cows, captured at two different times from the same animals. The mean sd was 0.31 and the mean coefficient of variation was 14.55 per cent, which represents a high repeatability in comparison with subjective vision-based scoring methods. Although the highest sensitivity and specificity values were seen in locomotion score groups 1 and 4, the automatic lameness system was both sensitive and specific in all groups. The sensitivity and specificity were higher than 72 per cent in locomotion score groups 1 to 4, and it was 100 per cent specific and 50 per cent sensitive for group 5. PMID:22141114

  12. A sonographic scoring system to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Pathirana, A A; Bandara, K G M W; Faleel, M A; Kuruppumullage, S D; Solangarachchi, N; Rupasinghe, R D; Karunaratne, N P N; Ranasinghe, D D; Epa, W A; Thusyanthan, V

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of thyroid malignancy with fine needle aspiration cytology or individual ultrasound characteristics has several limitations. This study evaluates the usefulness of a combination of ultrasound characteristics in predicting malignancy in patients with thyroid nodules. We assessed 189 thyroid nodules using ultrasonography and histology. Each nodule was assigned a score based on ultrasonographic characteristics. This score was compared with histology to identify ability to predict malignancy. There were 28 malignant nodules. The scoring system was appropriate for clinical use, obtaining an area under ROC curve of 0.822 [p< 0.0001] 95% confidence. FNAC of nodules with a score of more than 4 can be recommended (100% sensitivity). Nodules with a score less than 8 can be offered total thyroidectomy when FNAC is inconclusive (97.5% sensitivity). A combination of ultrasonographic criteria increase the accuracy of predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules. PMID:27031977

  13. Preserved Visual Acuity in Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Giant Cell (temporal) Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Antonio-Santos, Aileen A.; Murad-Kejbou, Sally J.; Foroozan, Rod; Yedavally, Sunita; Kaufman, David I.; Eggenberger, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of patients with biopsy-proven arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presenting with preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better and those with an initial poor visual acuity of 20/50 or worse through a retrospective chart review RESULTS Nine of 37 patients with arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presented with a preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better in the affected eye. All patients with preserved visual acuity had initial visual field defects that spared the central field. All 37 patients immediately received high-dose corticosteroid therapy. Visual acuity worsened by > 2 lines in one of nine patients (11%) with preserved visual acuity, with a corresponding progression of visual field constriction. CONCLUSION Although preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better has traditionally been associated with the nonarteritic form of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, giant cell arteritis should still be strongly considered, especially if they have giant cell arteritis systemic symptoms. PMID:26958148

  14. Total hip arthroplasty outcomes assessment using functional and radiographic scores to compare canine systems.

    PubMed

    Iwata, D; Broun, H C; Black, A P; Preston, C A; Anderson, G I

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective multi-centre study was carried out in order to compare outcomes between cemented and uncemented total hip arthoplasties (THA). A quantitative orthopaedic outcome assessment scoring system was devised in order to relate functional outcome to a numerical score, to allow comparison between treatments and amongst centres. The system combined a radiographic score and a clinical score. Lower scores reflect better outcomes than higher scores. Consecutive cases of THA were included from two specialist practices between July 2002 and December 2005. The study included 46 THA patients (22 uncemented THA followed for 8.3 +/- 4.7M and 24 cemented THA for 26.0 +/- 15.7M) with a mean age of 4.4 +/- 3.3 years at surgery. Multi-variable linear and logistical regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age at surgery, surgeon, follow-up time, uni- versus bilateral disease, gender and body weight. The differences between treatment groups in terms of functional scores or total scores were not significant (p > 0.05). Radiographic scores were different between treatment groups. However, these scores were usually assessed within two months of surgery and proved unreliable predictors of functional outcome (p > 0.05). The findings reflect relatively short-term follow-up, especially for the uncemented group, and do not include clinician-derived measures, such as goniometry and thigh circumference. Longer-term follow-up for the radiographic assessments is essential. A prospective study including the clinician-derived outcomes needs to be performed in order to validate the outcome instrument in its modified form. PMID:18536848

  15. Scoring Package

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Scoring Package (PC database for purchase)   The NIST Scoring Package (Special Database 1) is a reference implementation of the draft Standard Method for Evaluating the Performance of Systems Intended to Recognize Hand-printed Characters from Image Data Scanned from Forms.

  16. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T.; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  17. Validity of a Neurological Scoring System for Canine X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Meisner, Allison; Mack, David; Goddard, Melissa; Coulter, Ian T; Grange, Robert; Childers, Martin K

    2015-06-01

    A simple clinical neurological test was developed to evaluate response to gene therapy in a preclinical canine model of X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). This devastating congenital myopathy is caused by mutation in the myotubularin (MTM1) gene. Clinical signs include muscle weakness, early respiratory failure, and ventilator dependence. A spontaneously occurring canine model has a similar clinical picture and histological abnormalities on muscle biopsy compared with patients. We developed a neuromuscular assessment score, graded on a scale from 10 (normal) to 1 (unable to maintain sternal recumbency). We hypothesize that this neurological assessment score correlates with genotype and established measures of disease severity and is reliable when performed by an independent observer. At 17 weeks of age, there was strong correlation between neurological assessment scores and established methods of severity testing. The neurological severity score correctly differentiated between XLMTM and wild-type dogs with good interobserver reliability, on the basis of strong agreement between neurological scores assigned by independent observers. Together, these data indicate that the neurological scoring system developed for this canine congenital neuromuscular disorder is reliable and valid. This scoring system may be helpful in evaluating response to therapy in preclinical testing in this disease model, such as response to gene therapy. PMID:26086764

  18. GORA: a scoring system for the quantification of risk of graft occlusion.

    PubMed

    Copeland, G P; Edwards, P; Wilcox, A; Wake, P N; Harris, P L

    1994-03-01

    Auditing the outcome from vascular surgery with regard to graft occlusion is made difficult by variations in the type of surgery performed and the case mix. These difficulties are compounded when attempting to compare units. In the present study we have attempted to develop a scoring system to predict the risk of graft occlusion, and thus compensate for these variables. Prospectively collected data from 214 consecutive patients undergoing vascular reconstructive surgery (233 arterial grafts) were analysed. Graft occlusion occurred in 82 patients (35.2%). Using a multivariate linear regression analysis of these data a five-factor, five-grade scoring system has been devised (GORA: Graft Occlusive Risk Assessment). Logistic regression analysis of the observed risk of occlusion with this derived score produced the following relationship between the odds ratio of occlusive risk and GORA score: (logeR/1 - R = (0.229 x score) - 4.165). The score was then validated in a different group of 186 patients (196 arterial grafts). In both groups the score was found to predict accurately the risk of graft occlusion (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the receiver operating characteristic curves between the estimation and validation groups. PMID:8154808

  19. Application of scoring systems with point-of-care ultrasonography for bedside diagnosis of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Urnal, Rıfat; Eser, Utku; Bilgin, Serkan; Hacıyanlı, Mehmet; Oyar, Orhan; Akoğlu, Haldun; Karagöz, Arif

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appendicitis is a common disease requiring surgery. Bedside ultrasound (BUS) is a core technique for emergency medicine (EM). The Alvarado score is a well-studied diagnostic tool for appendicitis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between patients’ symptoms, Alvarado score and ultrasound (US) findings, as performed by emergency physicians (EPs) and radiologists, of patients with suspected appendicitis. METHODS: Three EM specialists underwent the BUS course and core course for appendicitis assessment. Patients suspected of having appendicitis were selected and their Alvarado and modified (m) Alvarado scores calculated. The specialists performed the BUS. Then, patients were given a formal US and surgery consultation if necessary. Preliminary diagnoses, admission or discharge from the emergency department (ED) and final diagnosis were documented. The patients were also followed up after discharge from the hospital. RESULTS: The determined cut-off value was 2 for Alvarado and 3 for mAlvarado scores. The sensitivities of the two scores were 100%. Each score was used to rule out appendicitis. The results of EP-performed BUS were as follows: accuracy 70%, sensitivity 0.733, specificity 0.673, + LR 2.24, and – LR 0.40 (95%CI). Radiologists were better than EPs at diagnosing appendicitis and radiologists and EPs were equally strong at ruling out appendicitis by US. When US was combined with Alvarado and mAlvarado scores, EP US+Alvarado/mAlvarado scores <3 and radiology US+Alvarado/mAlvarado scores <4 perfectly ruled out appendicitis. CONCLUSION: BUS performed by EPs is moderately useful in detecting appendicitis. Combined with scoring systems, BUS may be a perfect tool for ruling out decisions in EDs. PMID:27313807

  20. Developmental Change in the Acuity of the "Number Sense": The Approximate Number System in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-Year-Olds and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain imaging research points to a dedicated system for processing number that is shared across development and across species. This foundational Approximate Number System (ANS) operates over multiple modalities, forming representations of the number of objects, sounds, or events in a scene. This system is…

  1. Development of an echocardiographic scoring system to predict biventricular repair in neonatal hypoplastic left heart complex.

    PubMed

    Mart, Christopher Robin; Eckhauser, Aaron Wesley

    2014-12-01

    Neonates born with borderline left heart hypoplasia, or hypoplastic left heart complex, can undergo biventricular repair while those with severe left heart hypoplasia require single ventricle palliation. Deciding which patients are candidates for biventricular repair may be very difficult since there are no scoring systems to predict biventricular repair in these patients. The purpose of this study is to develop an echocardiographic scoring system capable of predicting successful biventricular repair in neonatal hypoplastic left heart complex. The study cohort consisted of twenty consecutive neonates with hypoplastic left heart complex presenting between 9/2008 and 5/2013. Multiple retrospective echocardiographic measurements of the right and left heart were performed. Six patients with significant LH hypoplasia (patent mitral and aortic valves, small left ventricle) who had undergone single ventricle repair were used to validate the scoring system. Seventeen patients underwent biventricular repair and three underwent single ventricle repair. A scoring system (2V-Score) was developed using the equation {[(MV4C/AVPSLA) ÷ (LV4C/RV4C)] + MPA}/BSA. Using a cutoff value of ≤ 16.2, a biventricular repair would have been predicted with a sensitivity of 1.0, specificity 1.0, positive predictive value 1.0, negative predictive value 1.0, area under the ROC curve 1.0, and the p value was 0.0004. The 2V-Score was more accurate than the Rhodes, CHSS, or Discriminant scores in retrospectively predicting biventricular repair in this cohort. The 2V-Score shows promise in being able to predict a successful biventricular repair in patients with hypoplastic left heart complex but requires prospective validation prior to widespread clinical application. PMID:25193182

  2. Visual Acuity of Children: United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    National estimates based on the findings from the Health Examination Survey in 1963 to 1965 of uncorrected monocular and binocular visual-acuity levels of children were studied. A nationwide sample of 7,417 children was selected to represent the approximately 24 million noninstitutionalized American children between ages 6 and 11 years. Testing…

  3. Effects of Horizontal Acceleration on Human Visual Acuity and Stereopsis

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tsai, Ming-Ling; Chang, Wei-Kang; Yang, Tzu-Hung; Yauan, Chien-Han; Wang, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years) were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (< and >0.1 g) were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration <0.1 g in the X- or Y-axis did not affect dynamic vision and stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR) and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc) when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR) and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc) when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy. PMID:25607601

  4. Effects of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Tsai, Ming-Ling; Chang, Wei-Kang; Yang, Tzu-Hung; Yauan, Chien-Han; Wang, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The effect of horizontal acceleration on human visual acuity and stereopsis is demonstrated in this study. Twenty participants (mean age 22.6 years) were enrolled in the experiment. Acceleration from two different directions was performed at the Taiwan High-Speed Rail Laboratory. Gx and Gy (< and >0.1 g) were produced on an accelerating platform where the subjects stood. The visual acuity and stereopsis of the right eye were measured before and during the acceleration. Acceleration <0.1 g in the X- or Y-axis did not affect dynamic vision and stereopsis. Vision decreased (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.25 logMAR) and stereopsis declined significantly (mean from 40 s to 60.2 s of arc) when Gx > 0.1 g. Visual acuity worsened (mean from 0.02 logMAR to 0.19 logMAR) and poor stereopsis was noted (mean from 40 s to 50.2 s of arc) when Gy > 0.1 g. The effect of acceleration from the X-axis on the visual system was higher than that from the Y-axis. During acceleration, most subjects complained of ocular strain when reading. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the exact levels of visual function loss during Gx and Gy. PMID:25607601

  5. The PERS(2) ON score for systemic assessment of symptomatology in palliative care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Masel, E K; Berghoff, A S; Schur, S; Maehr, B; Schrank, B; Simanek, R; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Watzke, H H

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive assessment of symptoms is the basis for effective, individualised palliative treatment. Established scoring systems provide in-depth information but are often lengthy and hence unsuitable. We introduce the PERS(2) ON score as a short and practically feasible score to evaluate symptom burden. Fifty patients admitted to a Palliative Care Unit rated seven items, i.e. pain, eating (loss of appetite/weight loss), rehabilitation (physical impairment), social situation (possibility for home care), suffering (anxiety/burden of disease/depression), O2 (dyspnoea) and nausea/emesis, on a scale ranging from 0 (absence) to 10 (worst imaginable), resulting in a score ranging from 0 to 70. Assessments were performed at admission, 7 days after admission and at the day of discharge. Symptom intensity scores were calculated, and change over time was evaluated. A significant improvement was observed from the PERS²ON score between admission and 7 days (P < 0.001; paired t-test). Significant improvement from baseline evaluation to evaluation on the day of discharge was observed (P = 0.001; paired t-test). This study provides initial evidence that the PERS²ON score is both feasible and sensitive to changes of the most prominent symptoms in palliative care. It may be useful in clinical practice to direct palliative treatment strategies and provide targeted symptom management. PMID:26564404

  6. A simple prognostic score system predicts the prognosis of solitary large hepatocellular carcinoma following hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun-yi; Li, Chuan; Wen, Tian-fu; Yan, Lv-nan; Li, Bo; Wang, Wen-tao; Yang, Jia-yin; Xu, Ming-qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solitary large hepatocellular carcinomas (SLHCC) form a heterogeneous group of patients with different survival probabilities. The aim of our study was to develop a simple prognostic index for identifying prognostic subgroups of SLHCC patients. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 268 patients with operable SLHCC was conducted to investigate prognostic factors and to construct a score system based on risk factors. A Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to evaluate the variables associated with prognosis. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier survival curves. Three variables remained in the final multivariate model: platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), microvascular invasion (MVI), and tumor size with hazard ratios equal to 1.004 (95% confidence interval: 1.001–1.006), 1.092 (1.044–1.142), and 2.233 (1.125–2.233), respectively. A score of 1 was assigned to each risk factor. Patient scores were determined based on these risk factors; thus, the scores ranged between 0 and 3. Ultimately, three categories (0, 1–2, 3) were defined. Patients with scores of 3 had a 5-year survival rate of 25.4%, whereas patients with a score of 0 had a 5-year survival rate of 52.1%. The prognosis significantly worsened as the score increased. Similar results were found among cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. Our simple prognostic index successfully predicts SLHCC survival. PMID:27495033

  7. Developing points-based risk-scoring systems in the presence of competing risks.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C; Lee, Douglas S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Fine, Jason P

    2016-09-30

    Predicting the occurrence of an adverse event over time is an important issue in clinical medicine. Clinical prediction models and associated points-based risk-scoring systems are popular statistical methods for summarizing the relationship between a multivariable set of patient risk factors and the risk of the occurrence of an adverse event. Points-based risk-scoring systems are popular amongst physicians as they permit a rapid assessment of patient risk without the use of computers or other electronic devices. The use of such points-based risk-scoring systems facilitates evidence-based clinical decision making. There is a growing interest in cause-specific mortality and in non-fatal outcomes. However, when considering these types of outcomes, one must account for competing risks whose occurrence precludes the occurrence of the event of interest. We describe how points-based risk-scoring systems can be developed in the presence of competing events. We illustrate the application of these methods by developing risk-scoring systems for predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction. Code in the R statistical programming language is provided for the implementation of the described methods. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27197622

  8. Associations among Visual Acuity and Vision- and Health-Related Quality of Life among Patients in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Kempen, John H.; Dunn, James P.; Holland, Gary N.; Latkany, Paul; Rao, Narsing A.; Sen, H. Nida; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Wang, Robert C.; Holbrook, Janet T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the associations between visual acuity and self-reported visual function; visual acuity and health-related quality of life (QoL) metrics; a summary measure of self-reported visual function and health-related QoL; and individual domains of self-reported visual function and health-related QoL in patients with uveitis. Methods. Best-corrected visual acuity, vision-related functioning as assessed by the NEI VFQ-25, and health-related QoL as assessed by the SF-36 and EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaires were obtained at enrollment in a clinical trial of uveitis treatments. Multivariate regression and Spearman correlations were used to evaluate associations between visual acuity, vision-related function, and health-related QoL. Results. Among the 255 patients, median visual acuity in the better-seeing eyes was 20/25, the vision-related function score indicated impairment (median, 60), and health-related QoL scores were within the normal population range. Better visual acuity was predictive of higher visual function scores (P ≤ 0.001), a higher SF-36 physical component score, and a higher EQ-5D health utility score (P < 0.001). The vision-specific function score was predictive of all general health-related QoL (P < 0.001). The correlations between visual function score and general quality of life measures were moderate (ρ = 0.29–0.52). Conclusions. The vision-related function score correlated positively with visual acuity and moderately positively with general QoL measures. Cost–utility analyses relying on changes in generic healthy utility measures will be more likely to detect changes when there are clinically meaningful changes in vision-related function, rather than when there are only changes in visual acuity. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00132691.) PMID:22247489

  9. Validation of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation-II model in an urban Indian population and comparison with three other risk scoring systems

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Biju Sivam; Baloria, Kanwar Aditya; Selot, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aims were to compare the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE)-II system against three established risk scoring systems for predictive accuracy in an urban Indian population and suggest improvements or amendments in the existing scoring system for adaptation in Indian population. Materials and Methods: EuroSCORE-II, Parsonnet score, System-97 score, and Cleveland score were obtained preoperatively for 1098 consecutive patients. EuroSCORE-II system was analyzed in comparison to each of the above three scoring systems in an urban Indian population. Calibrations of scoring systems were assessed using Hosmer–Lemeshow test. Areas under receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were compared according to the statistical approach suggested by Hanley and McNeil. Results: All EuroSCORE-II subgroups had highly significant P values stating good predictive mortality, except high-risk group (P = 0.175). The analysis of ROC curves of different scoring systems showed that the highest predictive value for mortality was calculated for the System-97 score followed by the Cleveland score. System-97 revealed extremely high predictive accuracies across all subgroups (curve area >80%). This difference in predictive accuracy was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The present study suggests that the EuroSCORE-II model in its present form is not validated for use in the Indian population. An interesting observation was significantly accurate predictive abilities of the System-97 score. PMID:26139738

  10. Timely diagnosis of dairy calf respiratory disease using a standardized scoring system.

    PubMed

    McGuirk, Sheila M; Peek, Simon F

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory disease of young dairy calves is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, economic loss, and animal welfare concern but there is no gold standard diagnostic test for antemortem diagnosis. Clinical signs typically used to make a diagnosis of respiratory disease of calves are fever, cough, ocular or nasal discharge, abnormal breathing, and auscultation of abnormal lung sounds. Unfortunately, routine screening of calves for respiratory disease on the farm is rarely performed and until more comprehensive, practical and affordable respiratory disease-screening tools such as accelerometers, pedometers, appetite monitors, feed consumption detection systems, remote temperature recording devices, radiant heat detectors, electronic stethoscopes, and thoracic ultrasound are validated, timely diagnosis of respiratory disease can be facilitated using a standardized scoring system. We have developed a scoring system that attributes severity scores to each of four clinical parameters; rectal temperature, cough, nasal discharge, ocular discharge or ear position. A total respiratory score of five points or higher (provided that at least two abnormal parameters are observed) can be used to distinguish affected from unaffected calves. This can be applied as a screening tool twice-weekly to identify pre-weaned calves with respiratory disease thereby facilitating early detection. Coupled with effective treatment protocols, this scoring system will reduce post-weaning pneumonia, chronic pneumonia, and otitis media. PMID:25410122

  11. Histological analysis of surgical samples and a proposed scoring system for infections in intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Phan, Kevin; Maharaj, Monish M; Scherman, Daniel B; Lambie, Neil; Salisbury, Elizabeth; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-08-01

    Back pain remains one the most prevalent types of pain and disability worldwide. Infection is estimated to be the underlying cause in approximately 0.01% of patients. Despite recent evidence demonstrating prominent infection rates, a standardised algorithm for diagnosis of disc infection is lacking. Histopathological evaluation can aid in confirming inflammatory changes and also in identifying degenerative changes. Hence, standardising practice through a clear scoring system with regards to inflammation and degeneration may have some utility in the clinical setting. To our knowledge no such systems exist specifically for intervertebral disc infection. A literature review of current methods of scoring inflammation and degeneration in spine surgery and orthopaedic surgery was performed. Based on the current evidence, a scoring system for disc inflammatory and degenerative changes was proposed. We propose four domains for consideration: (1) granulation tissue, (2) dense fibrosis, (3) chronic inflammatory cells, and (4) neutrophil count. The non-standardised nature of diagnosing infections and degeneration in the spinal surgery literature means that this scoring system is currently of particular value. Based on a literature review, our proposed method for diagnosis incorporates a combination of histopathological criteria expected to increase diagnostic sensitivity in the setting of disc infection. Overall, scoring can be applied to surgically obtained material and integrated directly into routine pathological practice. PMID:27050918

  12. Intra-Rater and Inter-Rater Reliability of the Balance Error Scoring System in Pre-Adolescent School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Dwayne P.; Lafave, Mark R.; Katz, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to test the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the University of North Carolina's Balance Error Scoring System in 9- and 10-year-old children. Additionally, a modified version of the Balance Error Scoring System was tested to determine if it was more sensitive in this population ("raw scores"). Forty-six normally…

  13. Comparison of McCarthy and Goodenough-Harris Scoring Systems for Kindergarten Children's Human Figure Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piersel, Wayne C.; Santos, Lande

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of the Goodenough-Harris and McCarthy scoring procedures for 60 kindergarten children's drawings yielded substantial agreement between the two scoring systems. The streamlined McCarthy scoring system should be utilized when large numbers of children are being evaluated with short periods of time. (Author)

  14. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  15. The Coma Recovery Scale Modified Score: a new scoring system for the Coma Recovery Scale-revised for assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sattin, Davide; Minati, Ludovico; Rossi, Davide; Covelli, Venusia; Giovannetti, Ambra M; Rosazza, Cristina; Bersano, Anna; Nigri, Anna; Leonardi, Matilde

    2015-12-01

    The differential diagnosis between vegetative state and minimally conscious state is still complex and the development of an evaluation systems is one of the challenging tasks for researchers and professionals. The Coma Recovery Scale-revised is considered the gold standard for clinical/behavioral assessment and for the differential diagnosis of patients with disorder of consciousness. However, the scale presents some limitations in that (i) scores may partially overlap between different diagnoses and (ii) there is an underlying assumption that if a patient is able to show higher-level behaviors, he/she is also able to show lower-level responses. In the present study, a procedure to calculate a modified Coma Recovery Scale-revised score is presented that attempts to avoid these problems. To exemplify this new scoring approach, 60 patients with disorder of consciousness were studied and the results showed the usefulness of the Modified Score. PMID:26465775

  16. PyParse: A semiautomated system for scoring spoken recall data

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Alec; Geller, Aaron S.; Sederberg, Per B.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of human memory often generate data on the sequence and timing of recalled items, but scoring such data using conventional methods is difficult or impossible. We describe a Python-based semiautomated system that greatly simplifies this task. This software, called PyParse, can easily be used in conjunction with many common experiment authoring systems. Scored data is output in a simple ASCII format and can be accessed with the programming language of choice, allowing for the identification of features such as correct responses, prior-list intrusions, extra-list intrusions, and repetitions. PMID:20160294

  17. Response of growing bone to irradiation: A proposed late effects scoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Eifel, P.J.; Donaldson, S.S.; Thomas, P.R.M.

    1995-03-30

    The effect of radiation on epiphyseal bone growth is one of the most important dose-limiting factors in the radiotherapeutic management of children with malignant neoplasms. Clinical and laboratory evidence suggest that many factors may influence the severity of radiation-induced growth arrest. However, the absence of a consistent scoring system for late effects has hampered efforts to analyze the influence of various therapeutic maneuvers or to compare and collate results from different reported series. In this review, laboratory and clinical studies of radiation effects on growing bone are summarized, and a late effects scoring system is proposed. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  19. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  1. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1150 - Visual acuity chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Visual acuity chart. 886.1150 Section 886.1150...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1150 Visual acuity chart. (a) Identification. A visual acuity chart is a device that is a chart, such as a Snellen chart with block letters...

  3. Visual Vestibular Interaction in the Dynamic Visual Acuity Test during Voluntary Head Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moo Hoon; Durnford, Simon; Crowley, John; Rupert, Angus

    1996-01-01

    Although intact vestibular function is essential in maintaining spatial orientation, no good screening tests of vestibular function are available to the aviation community. High frequency voluntary head rotation was selected as a vestibular stimulus to isolate the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) from visual influence. A dynamic visual acuity test that incorporates voluntary head rotation was evaluated as a potential vestibular function screening tool. Twenty-seven normal subjects performed voluntary sinusoidal head rotation at frequencies from 0.7-4.0 Hz under three different visual conditions: visually-enhanced VOR, normal VOR, and visually suppressed VOR. Standardized Baily-Lovie chart letters were presented on a computer monitor in front of the subject, who then was asked to read the letters while rotating his head horizontally. The electro-oculogram and dynamic visual acuity score were recorded and analyzed. There were no significant differences in gain or phase shift among three visual conditions in the frequency range of 2.8 to 4.0 Hz. The dynamic visual acuity score shifted less than 0.3 logMAR at frequencies under 2.0 Hz. The dynamic visual acuity test at frequencies a round 2.0 Hz can be recommended for evaluating vestibular function.

  4. The Effect of State Medicaid Case-Mix Payment on Nursing Home Resident Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhanlian; Grabowski, David C; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between Medicaid case-mix payment and nursing home resident acuity. Data Sources Longitudinal Minimum Data Set (MDS) resident assessments from 1999 to 2002 and Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from 1996 to 2002, for all freestanding nursing homes in the 48 contiguous U.S. states. Study Design We used a facility fixed-effects model to examine the effect of introducing state case-mix payment on changes in nursing home case-mix acuity. Facility acuity was measured by aggregating the nursing case-mix index (NCMI) from the MDS using the Resource Utilization Group (Version III) resident classification system, separately for new admits and long-stay residents, and by an OSCAR-derived index combining a range of activity of daily living dependencies and special treatment measures. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We followed facilities over the study period to create a longitudinal data file based on the MDS and OSCAR, respectively, and linked facilities with longitudinal data on state case-mix payment policies for the same period. Principal Findings Across three acuity measures and two data sources, we found that states shifting to case-mix payment increased nursing home acuity levels over the study period. Specifically, we observed a 2.5 percent increase in the average acuity of new admits and a 1.3 to 1.4 percent increase in the acuity of long-stay residents, following the introduction of case-mix payment. Conclusions The adoption of case-mix payment increased access to care for higher acuity Medicaid residents. PMID:16899009

  5. Electrocardiogram-based scoring system for predicting secondary pulmonary hypertension: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Patel, Nimesh Kirit; Boruah, Pranjal; Nanavaty, Sukrut; Chandran, Sindu; Sethi, Arjinder; Sheth, Jignesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we have developed an electrocardiogram-based scoring system to predict secondary pulmonary hypertension. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Single tertiary-care hospital in Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA. Participants Five hundred and fifty-two consecutive patients undergoing right heart catheterization between 2006 and 2009. Main outcome measures Surface electrocardiogram was assessed for R-wave in lead V1 ≥ 6mm, R-wave in V6 ≤ 3mm, S-wave in V6 ≥ 3mm, right atrial enlargement, right axis deviation and left atrial enlargement. Pulmonary hypertension was defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, determined by right heart catheterization. Results A total of 297 (54%) patients in the study cohort had pulmonary hypertension. In total, 332 patients from the study cohort formed the development cohort and the remaining 220 patients formed the validation cohort. In the development cohort, based on log odds ratios of association, RAE, LAE, RAD, R-wave in V1 ≥ 6 mm were assigned scores of 5, 2, 2 and 1, respectively, to form a 10-point scoring system “Scranton PHT (SP) score”. SP scores of 5 points and 7 points in DC showed C-statistic of 0.83 and 0.89, respectively, for discriminating pulmonary hypertension. C-statistic for RAE alone was significantly lower compared to an SP score of 7 (0.83 vs. 0.89, P = 0.021). The reliability of SP score in the validation cohort was acceptable. Conclusion SP score provides a good point-of-care tool to predict pulmonary hypertension in patients with clinical suspicion of it. PMID:25396053

  6. Liver Stiffness Measurement-Based Scoring System for Significant Inflammation Related to Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mei-Zhu; Zhang, Ru-Mian; Chen, Guo-Liang; Huang, Wen-Qi; Min, Feng; Chen, Tian; Xu, Jin-Chao; Pan, Jin-Shui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Liver biopsy is indispensable because liver stiffness measurement alone cannot provide information on intrahepatic inflammation. However, the presence of fibrosis highly correlates with inflammation. We constructed a noninvasive model to determine significant inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients by using liver stiffness measurement and serum markers. Methods The training set included chronic hepatitis B patients (n = 327), and the validation set included 106 patients; liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored, and serum markers were investigated. All patients underwent liver stiffness measurement. Results An inflammation activity scoring system for significant inflammation was constructed. In the training set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.964, 91.9%, and 90.8% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.978, 85.0%, and 94.0% in the HBeAg(−) patients, respectively. In the validation set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.971, 90.5%, and 92.5% in the HBeAg(+) patients and 0.977, 95.2%, and 95.8% in the HBeAg(−) patients. The liver stiffness measurement-based activity score was comparable to that of the fibrosis-based activity score in both HBeAg(+) and HBeAg(−) patients for recognizing significant inflammation (G ≥3). Conclusions Significant inflammation can be accurately predicted by this novel method. The liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system can be used without the aid of computers and provides a noninvasive alternative for the prediction of chronic hepatitis B-related significant inflammation. PMID:25360742

  7. Relationship of a human oocyte scoring system to oocyte maturity and fertilizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, M M; Fleetham, J

    1990-01-01

    A simple, quick, and semiquantitative human oocyte scoring system is described. Oocyte-corona-cumulus complexes were spread, either by tilting the dish or by aspiration of the fluid, and examined under the dissecting microscope. A maximum of four points was assigned to each of the following: cumulus expansion, cumulus appearance, amount of cumulus, corona expansion, corona appearance, and oocyte appearance. The oocyte score was significantly correlated to two important physiological parameters of oocytes, nuclear maturity (P less than .02) and fertilization rate (P less than .0001). This oocyte scoring system is useful for selecting oocytes for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) or gamete intrafallopian tube transfer (GIFT), for training new laboratory personnel in recognizing the important characteristics of a mature oocyte, and in the standardized reporting of oocyte quality by different IVF-ET or GIFT programs. PMID:1977717

  8. Modified PADSS (Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System) for monitoring outpatients discharge.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Tellan, Guglielmo; Perotti, Bruno; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Vietri, Francesco; Illuminati, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    The decision to discharge a patient undergoing day surgery is a major step in the hospitalization pathway, because it must be achieved without compromising the quality of care, thus ensuring the same assistance and wellbeing as for a long-term stay. Therefore, the use of an objective assessment for the management of a fair and safe discharge is essential. The authors propose the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System (PADSS), which considers six criteria: vital signs, ambulation, nausea/vomiting, pain, bleeding and voiding. Each criterion is given a score ranging from 0 to 2. Only patients who achieve a score of 9 or more are considered ready for discharge. Furthermore, PADSS has been modified to ensure a higher level of safety, thus the "vital signs" criteria must never score lower than 2, and none of the other five criteria must ever be equal to 0, even if the total score reaches 9. The effectiveness of PADSS was analyzed on 2432 patients, by recording the incidence of postoperative complications and the readmission to hospital. So far PADDS has proved to be an efficient system that guarantees safe discharge. PMID:23165318

  9. An Inflammatory Polymorphisms Risk Scoring System for the Differentiation of Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Elena; Krupinski, Jurek; Carrera, Caty; Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Montaner, Joan; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been associated with atherothrombotic stroke and recently with cardioembolic stroke. Different genetic risk factors have been specifically associated with the subtypes of ischemic stroke (cardioembolic, atherothrombotic, and lacunar). However, there are no studies that have generated genetic risk scores for the different subtypes of ischemic stroke using polymorphisms associated with inflammation. Methods. We have analyzed 68 polymorphisms of 30 inflammatory mediator genes in 2,685 subjects: 1,987 stroke cases and 698 controls. We generated a genetic scoring system with the most significant polymorphisms weighted by the odds ratio of every polymorphism and taken into consideration the stroke subtype. Results. Three polymorphisms, rs1205 (CRP gene), rs1800779, and rs2257073 (NOS3 gene), were associated with cardioembolic stroke (p value <0.05). The score generated was only associated with the cardioembolic stroke subtype (p value: 0.001) and was replicated in an independent cohort (p value: 0.017). The subjects with the highest score presented a cardioembolic stroke in 92.2% of the cases (p value: 0.002). Conclusion. The genetics of inflammatory markers is more closely associated with cardioembolic strokes than with atherothrombotic or lacunar strokes. The genetic risk scoring system could be useful in the prediction and differentiation of ischemic stroke; however, it might be specific to particular ischemic stroke subtypes. PMID:26355258

  10. A Survey of Attitudes towards the Clinical Application of Systemic Inflammation Based Prognostic Scores in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watt, David G.; Roxburgh, Campbell S.; White, Mark; Chan, Juen Zhik; Horgan, Paul G.; McMillan, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The systemic inflammatory response (SIR) plays a key role in determining nutritional status and survival of patients with cancer. A number of objective scoring systems have been shown to have prognostic value; however, their application in routine clinical practice is not clear. The aim of the present survey was to examine the range of opinions internationally on the routine use of these scoring systems. Methods. An online survey was distributed to a target group consisting of individuals worldwide who have reported an interest in systemic inflammation in patients with cancer. Results. Of those invited by the survey (n = 238), 65% routinely measured the SIR, mainly for research and prognostication purposes and clinically for allocation of adjuvant therapy or palliative chemotherapy. 40% reported that they currently used the Glasgow Prognostic Score/modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS/mGPS) and 81% reported that a measure of systemic inflammation should be incorporated into clinical guidelines, such as the definition of cachexia. Conclusions. The majority of respondents routinely measured the SIR in patients with cancer, mainly using the GPS/mGPS for research and prognostication purposes. The majority reported that a measure of the SIR should be adopted into clinical guidelines. PMID:26504363

  11. The Flex Track: Flexible Partitioning between Low- and High-Acuity Areas of an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Laker, Lauren F.; Froehle, Craig M.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Ward, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective EDs with both low- and high-acuity treatment areas often have fixed allocation of resources, regardless of demand. We demonstrate the utility of discrete-event simulation to evaluate flexible partitioning between low- and high-acuity ED areas to identify the best operational strategy for subsequent implementation. Methods A discrete-event simulation was used to model patient flow through a 50-bed, urban, teaching ED that handles 85,000 patient visits annually. The ED has historically allocated ten beds to a Fast Track for low-acuity patients. We estimated the effect of a Flex Track policy, which involved switching up to five of these Fast Track beds to serving both low- and high-acuity patients, on patient waiting times. When the high-acuity beds were not at capacity, low-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Otherwise, high-acuity patients were given priority access to flexible beds. Wait times were estimated for patients by disposition and emergency severity index (ESI) score. Results A Flex Track policy using three flexible beds produced the lowest mean patient waiting of 30.9 (95% CI 30.6–31.2) minutes. The typical Fast Track approach of rigidly separating high- and low–acuity beds produced a mean patient wait time of 40.6 (95% CI 40.2–50.0) minutes, 31% higher than the three-bed Flex Track. A completely flexible ED, where all beds can accommodate any patient, produced mean wait times of 35.1 (95% CI 34.8–35.4) minutes. The results from the three-bed Flex Track scenario were robust, performing well across a range of scenarios involving higher and lower patient volumes and care durations. Conclusion Using discrete-event simulation, we have shown that adding some flexibility into bed allocation between low- and high-acuity can provide substantial reductions in overall patient waiting and a more efficient ED. PMID:24954578

  12. APPLYING THE NRCS PASTURE CONDITION SCORE SYSTEM AT THE WHOLE-FARM SCALE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system was developed by the USDA-NRCS as a monitoring and management tool. Ten key indicators (percent desirable plants, plant cover, plant diversity, plant residue, plant vigor, percent legume, uniformity of use, livestock concentration areas, soil compaction, and ...

  13. Usefulness of staging systems and prognostic scores for hepatocellular carcinoma treatments.

    PubMed

    Adhoute, Xavier; Penaranda, Guillaume; Raoul, Jean Luc; Le Treut, Patrice; Bollon, Emilie; Hardwigsen, Jean; Castellani, Paul; Perrier, Hervé; Bourlière, Marc

    2016-06-18

    Therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is quite complex owing to the underlying cirrhosis and portal vein hypertension. Different scores or classification systems based on liver function and tumoral stages have been published in the recent years. If none of them is currently "universally" recognized, the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system has become the reference classification system in Western countries. Based on a robust treatment algorithm associated with stage stratification, it relies on a high level of evidence. However, BCLC stage B and C HCC include a broad spectrum of tumors but are only matched with a single therapeutic option. Some experts have thus suggested to extend the indications for surgery or for transarterial chemoembolization. In clinical practice, many patients are already treated beyond the scope of recommendations. Additional alternative prognostic scores that could be applied to any therapeutic modality have been recently proposed. They could represent complementary tools to the BCLC staging system and improve the stratification of HCC patients enrolled in clinical trials, as illustrated by the NIACE score. Prospective studies are needed to compare these scores and refine their role in the decision making process. PMID:27330679

  14. [Prevention of venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Scoring system of the risk of TEN development].

    PubMed

    Pacejka, M; Adamíková, A

    1999-05-01

    The authors summarize hitherto used patterns of thromboprophylaxis. They attempted to quantify the risk of development of thromboembolism by means of a "Scoring system of the risk of development of TEN" which facilitates the decision on the intensity of prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease. PMID:15641248

  15. 78 FR 21623 - Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Capital Fund Final Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Capital Fund Final Scoring Notice AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  16. Creating a System of Accountability: The Impact of Instructional Assessment on Elementary Children's Achievement Test Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Xue, Yange; Bickel, Donna DiPrima; Son, Seung-Hee; Nicholson, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Examined the trajectory of change in scores on the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills of low-income, urban third and fourth graders enrolled in classrooms in which the Work Sampling System (WSS) had been used at least 3 years. Results for 2,564 students show academic gains associated with the WSS. (SLD)

  17. Reliability of the Advanced Psychodiagnostic Interpretation (API) Scoring System for the Bender Gestalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aucone, Ernest J.; Raphael, Alan J.; Golden, Charles J.; Espe-Pfeifer, Patricia; Seldon, Jen; Pospisil, Tanya; Dornheim, Liane; Proctor-Weber, Zoe; Calabria, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Assessed the interrater reliability of the revised Advanced Psychodiagnostic Interpretation (API) (A. Raphael and C. Golden, 1998) scoring system for the Bender Gestalt Test (L. Bender, 1938). Agreement across nine raters exceeded 90% for each of three clinical protocols, and kappa statistics indicated good interrater reliability. (SLD)

  18. Usefulness of staging systems and prognostic scores for hepatocellular carcinoma treatments

    PubMed Central

    Adhoute, Xavier; Penaranda, Guillaume; Raoul, Jean Luc; Le Treut, Patrice; Bollon, Emilie; Hardwigsen, Jean; Castellani, Paul; Perrier, Hervé; Bourlière, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is quite complex owing to the underlying cirrhosis and portal vein hypertension. Different scores or classification systems based on liver function and tumoral stages have been published in the recent years. If none of them is currently “universally” recognized, the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system has become the reference classification system in Western countries. Based on a robust treatment algorithm associated with stage stratification, it relies on a high level of evidence. However, BCLC stage B and C HCC include a broad spectrum of tumors but are only matched with a single therapeutic option. Some experts have thus suggested to extend the indications for surgery or for transarterial chemoembolization. In clinical practice, many patients are already treated beyond the scope of recommendations. Additional alternative prognostic scores that could be applied to any therapeutic modality have been recently proposed. They could represent complementary tools to the BCLC staging system and improve the stratification of HCC patients enrolled in clinical trials, as illustrated by the NIACE score. Prospective studies are needed to compare these scores and refine their role in the decision making process. PMID:27330679

  19. Temporal perceptual coding using a visual acuity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adzic, Velibor; Cohen, Robert A.; Vetro, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes research and results in which a visual acuity (VA) model of the human visual system (HVS) is used to reduce the bitrate of coded video sequences, by eliminating the need to signal transform coefficients when their corresponding frequencies will not be detected by the HVS. The VA model is integrated into the state of the art HEVC HM codec. Compared to the unmodified codec, up to 45% bitrate savings are achieved while maintaining the same subjective quality of the video sequences. Encoding times are reduced as well.

  20. A Standardized DNA Variant Scoring System for Pathogenicity Assessments in Mendelian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karbassi, Izabela; Maston, Glenn A.; Love, Angela; DiVincenzo, Christina; Braastad, Corey D.; Elzinga, Christopher D.; Bright, Alison R.; Previte, Domenic; Zhang, Ke; Rowland, Charles M.; McCarthy, Michele; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Dubois, Felicita; Medeiros, Katelyn A.; Batish, Sat Dev; Jones, Jeffrey; Liaquat, Khalida; Hoffman, Carol A.; Jaremko, Malgorzata; Wang, Zhenyuan; Sun, Weimin; Buller‐Burckle, Arlene; Strom, Charles M.; Keiles, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed a rules‐based scoring system to classify DNA variants into five categories including pathogenic, likely pathogenic, variant of uncertain significance (VUS), likely benign, and benign. Over 16,500 pathogenicity assessments on 11,894 variants from 338 genes were analyzed for pathogenicity based on prediction tools, population frequency, co‐occurrence, segregation, and functional studies collected from internal and external sources. Scores were calculated by trained scientists using a quantitative framework that assigned differential weighting to these five types of data. We performed descriptive and comparative statistics on the dataset and tested interobserver concordance among the trained scientists. Private variants defined as variants found within single families (n = 5,182), were either VUS (80.5%; n = 4,169) or likely pathogenic (19.5%; n = 1,013). The remaining variants (n = 6,712) were VUS (38.4%; n = 2,577) or likely benign/benign (34.7%; n = 2,327) or likely pathogenic/pathogenic (26.9%, n = 1,808). Exact agreement between the trained scientists on the final variant score was 98.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) (98.0, 98.9)] with an interobserver consistency of 97% [95% CI (91.5, 99.4)]. Variant scores were stable and showed increasing odds of being in agreement with new data when re‐evaluated periodically. This carefully curated, standardized variant pathogenicity scoring system provides reliable pathogenicity scores for DNA variants encountered in a clinical laboratory setting. PMID:26467025

  1. Development of a Novel Scoring System for Predicting the Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a novel scoring system to screen subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. Study Design and Setting We retrospectively analyzed 1061 subjects undergoing total colonoscopy (TCS) for the first time at Gihoku Kosei Hospital. The characteristics and habits of the subjects were analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk score was established according to each odds ratio of the individual risk factors, and the correlations between the sum of the risk scores and the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia for each individual were evaluated. Results Age 45–59 (risk score: 2 points) and ≥60 (3 points), male gender (1 point), and habitual alcohol consumption ≥21g daily (1 point) were extracted as the significant risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. When the risk groups were determined by summing up these risk scores, the prevalence rates of colorectal neoplasia were 8.8% for the low risk group (0–2 points), 30.5% for the low-moderate risk group (3 points), 39.1% for the high-moderate risk group (4 points), and 57.6% for the high risk group (5 points). In comparison with the low risk group, the odds ratio of the low-moderate risk, the high-moderate risk, and the high risk groups were 4.6, 6.7, and 14.1 folds, respectively. Conclusion Our scoring system, which linearly correlates with the prevalence rate of colorectal neoplasia, may be an effective tool for screening the subjects who have a high risk for colorectal neoplasia. These subjects, therefore, should be recommended to undergo TCS. PMID:27284907

  2. Comparison of acuity tests and pattern evoked potential criteria: two mechanisms underly acuity maturation in man.

    PubMed

    Spekreijse, H

    1983-10-01

    A comparative study of acuity tests and pattern evoked potential (EP) criteria was performed on a total of 307 subjects, 214 of them at an age between 2 months post-term and 12 years. All were examined ophthalmologically prior to testing. It was shown that both psychophysical and EP estimated acuity improve in the same way until puberty. From birth to about 6 months a rapid improvement is found. This fast phase can probably be attributed to retinal morphological maturation. During this period a fair estimate of acuity can be obtained by determining the checksize that yields the largest EP; a conclusion of practical importance for screening. The subsequent slow improvement phase, which ends around puberty, is reflected in the development of the waveform of the pattern onset EP. Since it correlates with the growth of a spatial contrast specific component of extrastriate origin in the EP, the slow improvement phase most likely reflects maturation of central processes. PMID:6639719

  3. Pediatric myelodysplasia: a study of 68 children and a new prognostic scoring system.

    PubMed

    Passmore, S J; Hann, I M; Stiller, C A; Ramani, P; Swansbury, G J; Gibbons, B; Reeves, B R; Chessells, J M

    1995-04-01

    Clinical, morphologic, and cytogenetic features were examined in a group of 68 children with myelodysplasia (MDS) referred to a single institution between 1971-1991. The morphologic French-American-British (FAB) system of classification proved of limited value in this group of patients because 50% of the cases were categorized as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and three patients with eosinophilia and MDS were unclassifiable. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in 63 cases and clonal abnormalities were detected in 55%; the most common chromosome involved was number 7. Modification of the FAB system to incorporate additional diagnostic features such as pretreatment fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) and cytogenetics allowed incorporation of the categories of juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia (JCML) and infantile monosomy 7 syndrome (IMo7). The resulting groups of patients had highly significant differences in survival (P = .00009). The overall 5-year survival for the patients was 31.9% (95% CI 21.7 to 44.1) and factors influencing prognosis included: modified FAB type, platelet count, Hb F level, and cytogenetic complexity. We developed a scoring system ("FPC") where each of the following findings at diagnosis scored one point: HbF greater than 10%, platelets < or = 40 x 10(9)/L, and complex karyotypic changes (two or more clonal structural/numerical abnormalities), which produced groups with highly significant differences, patients with a score of 0 having a 5-year survival of 61.6% (CI 33% to 84%), whereas those with a score of two or three all died within 4 years of diagnosis. The revised classification and scoring system may prove helpful in making treatment choices in pediatric MDS and now needs to be tested prospectively in large scale population-based studies. PMID:7703482

  4. Implementation of an Early Warning Scoring System to Identify Patients With Cancer at Risk for Deterioration.

    PubMed

    Olsen, MiKaela; Mooney, Kathy; Evans, Ellen

    2016-08-01

    Early warning scoring systems are tools for nurses to help monitor their patients and improve how quickly a patient experiencing a sudden decline receives clinical care. Nurse leaders and frontline staff at a major academic medical center implemented a new early warning system that gives clear guidelines to nurses, nursing assistants, and other clinicians about vital-sign parameters and changes in patients' mental status. 
. PMID:27441509

  5. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, I. A. T.; Tarbert, C. M.; Giardini, M. E.; Bastawrous, A.; Middleton, D.; Hamilton, R.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer’s recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  6. Photometric Compliance of Tablet Screens and Retro-Illuminated Acuity Charts As Visual Acuity Measurement Devices.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, I A T; Tarbert, C M; Giardini, M E; Bastawrous, A; Middleton, D; Hamilton, R

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly used to measure visual acuity. Standards for chart-based acuity tests specify photometric requirements for luminance, optotype contrast and luminance uniformity. Manufacturers provide some photometric data but little is known about tablet performance for visual acuity testing. This study photometrically characterised seven tablet computers (iPad, Apple inc.) and three ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) visual acuity charts with room lights on and off, and compared findings with visual acuity measurement standards. Tablet screen luminance and contrast were measured using nine points across a black and white checkerboard test screen at five arbitrary brightness levels. ETDRS optotypes and adjacent white background luminance and contrast were measured. All seven tablets (room lights off) exceeded the most stringent requirement for mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) providing the nominal brightness setting was above 50%. All exceeded contrast requirement (Weber ≥ 90%) regardless of brightness setting, and five were marginally below the required luminance uniformity threshold (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Re-assessing three tablets with room lights on made little difference to mean luminance or contrast, and improved luminance uniformity to exceed the threshold. The three EDTRS charts (room lights off) had adequate mean luminance (≥ 120 cd/m2) and Weber contrast (≥ 90%), but all three charts failed to meet the luminance uniformity standard (Lmin/Lmax ≥ 80%). Two charts were operating beyond manufacturer's recommended lamp replacement schedule. With room lights on, chart mean luminance and Weber contrast increased, but two charts still had inadequate luminance uniformity. Tablet computers showed less inter-device variability, higher contrast, and better luminance uniformity than charts in both lights-on and lights-off environments, providing brightness setting was >50%. Overall, iPad tablets matched or marginally out

  7. Bender-gradual scoring system: performance of Brazilian and Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Acácia Aparecida Angeli; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; Rueda, Fabián Javier Marín; Segovia, José Livia

    2014-06-01

    This is a transcultural study of a sample of Peruvian and Brazilian children using the Bender-Gradual Scoring System (B-SPG), which considers shape distortion as the only aspect to be analyzed, assuming that perceptual-motor maturity is independent of cultural context. The study verified that the scoring system has psychometric qualities such that it may be applied in another country. The sample consisted of 231 children, ages 6 to 10 yr., 108 from different districts of the province Lima in Peru, and 123 children from three states in Brazil. During test application, the figures were projected to children in groups. Scoring the protocols for errors was conducted by psychologists experienced in interpreting and correcting the Bender-SPG, who rigorously followed instructions in Portuguese and Spanish. The results obtained with Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis indicated that Figures 1 and 4 presented DIF, one favoring Brazilian children and the other Peruvian children. Thus, it was concluded that the overall scores did not favor either population and the Bender-SPG could be used to evaluate perceptual-motor maturity in both countries. PMID:25068753

  8. Response Classification Images in Vernier Acuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Beard, B. L.; Ellis, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Orientation selective and local sign mechanisms have been proposed as the basis for vernier acuity judgments. Linear image features contributing to discrimination can be determined for a two choice task by adding external noise to the images and then averaging the noises separately for the four types of stimulus/response trials. This method is applied to a vernier acuity task with different spatial separations to compare the predictions of the two theories. Three well-practiced observers were presented around 5000 trials of a vernier stimulus consisting of two dark horizontal lines (5 min by 0.3 min) within additive low-contrast white noise. Two spatial separations were tested, abutting and a 10 min horizontal separation. The task was to determine whether the target lines were aligned or vertically offset. The noises were averaged separately for the four stimulus/response trial types (e.g., stimulus = offset, response = aligned). The sum of the two 'not aligned' images was then subtracted from the sum of the 'aligned' images to obtain an overall image. Spatially smoothed images were quantized according to expected variability in the smoothed images to allow estimation of the statistical significance of image features. The response images from the 10 min separation condition are consistent with the local sign theory, having the appearance of two linear operators measuring vertical position with opposite sign. The images from the abutting stimulus have the same appearance with the two operators closer together. The image predicted by an oriented filter model is similar, but has its greatest weight in the abutting region, while the response images fall to nonsignificance there. The response correlation image method, previously demonstrated for letter discrimination, clarifies the features used in vernier acuity.

  9. Modeling acuity for optotypes varying in complexity.

    PubMed

    Watson, Andrew B; Ahumada, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Watson and Ahumada (2008) described a template model of visual acuity based on an ideal-observer limited by optical filtering, neural filtering, and noise. They computed predictions for selected optotypes and optical aberrations. Here we compare this model's predictions to acuity data for six human observers, each viewing seven different optotype sets, consisting of one set of Sloan letters and six sets of Chinese characters, differing in complexity (Zhang, Zhang, Xue, Liu, & Yu, 2007). Since optical aberrations for the six observers were unknown, we constructed 200 model observers using aberrations collected from 200 normal human eyes (Thibos, Hong, Bradley, & Cheng, 2002). For each condition (observer, optotype set, model observer) we estimated the model noise required to match the data. Expressed as efficiency, performance for Chinese characters was 1.4 to 2.7 times lower than for Sloan letters. Efficiency was weakly and inversely related to perimetric complexity of optotype set. We also compared confusion matrices for human and model observers. Correlations for off-diagonal elements ranged from 0.5 to 0.8 for different sets, and the average correlation for the template model was superior to a geometrical moment model with a comparable number of parameters (Liu, Klein, Xue, Zhang, & Yu, 2009). The template model performed well overall. Estimated psychometric function slopes matched the data, and noise estimates agreed roughly with those obtained independently from contrast sensitivity to Gabor targets. For optotypes of low complexity, the model accurately predicted relative performance. This suggests the model may be used to compare acuities measured with different sets of simple optotypes. PMID:23024356

  10. A Comparison of Systemic Inflammation-Based Prognostic Scores in Patients on Regular Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihiko; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Ohashi, Naro; Yasuda, Hideo; Fujimoto, Taiki; Takita, Takako; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores have prognostic power in patients with cancer, independently of tumor stage and site. Although inflammatory status is associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients, it remains to be determined as to whether these composite scores are useful in predicting clinical outcomes. Methods We calculated the 6 prognostic scores [Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), modified GPS (mGPS), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR), prognostic index (PI) and prognostic nutritional index (PNI), which have been established as a useful scoring system in cancer patients. We enrolled 339 patients on regular HD (age: 64 ± 13 years; time on HD: 129 ± 114 months; males/females = 253/85) and followed them for 42 months. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve was used to determine which scoring system was more predictive of mortality. Results Elevated GPS, mGPS, NLR, PLR, PI and PNI were all associated with total mortality, independent of covariates. If GPS was raised, mGPS, NLR, PLR and PI were also predictive of all-cause mortality and/or hospitalization. GPS and PNI were associated with poor nutritional status. Using overall mortality as an endpoint, the area under the curve (AUC) was significant for a GPS of 0.701 (95% CI: 0.637-0.765; p < 0.01) and for a PNI of 0.616 (95% CI: 0.553-0.768; p = 0.01). However, AUC for hypoalbuminemia (<3.5 g/dl) was comparable to that of GPS (0.695, 95% CI: 0.632-0.759; p < 0.01). Conclusion GPS, based on serum albumin and highly sensitive C-reactive protein, has the most prognostic power for mortality prediction among the prognostic scores in HD patients. However, as the determination of serum albumin reflects mortality similarly to GPS, other composite combinations are needed to provide additional clinical utility beyond that of albumin alone in HD patients. PMID:24403910

  11. Experience Modifies Olfactory Acuity: Acetylcholine-Dependent Learning Decreases Behavioral Generalization between Similar Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Max L.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Perceptual learning has been demonstrated in several thalamocortical sensory systems wherein experience enhances sensory acuity for trained stimuli. This perceptual learning is believed to be dependent on changes in sensory cortical receptive fields. Sensory experience and learning also modifies receptive fields and neural response patterns in the mammalian olfactory system; however, to date there has been little reported evidence of learned changes in behavioral olfactory acuity. The present report used a bradycardial orienting response and cross-habituation paradigm that allowed assessment of behavioral discrimination of nearly novel odorants, and then used the same paradigm to examine odorant discrimination after associative olfactory conditioning with similar or dissimilar odorants. The results demonstrate that associative conditioning can enhance olfactory acuity for odors that are the same as or similar to the learned odorant, but not for odors dissimilar to the learned odorant. Furthermore, scopolamine injected before associative conditioning can block the acquisition of this learned enhancement in olfactory acuity. These results could have important implications for mechanisms of olfactory perception and memory, as well as for correlating behavioral olfactory acuity with observed spatial representations of odorant features in the olfactory system. PMID:11784813

  12. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  13. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  14. Retrospective Evaluation of New Chinese Diagnostic Scoring System for Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jun; Wang, Huafang; Guo, Tao; Mei, Heng; Hu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To retrospectively validate the new Chinese DIC scoring system (CDSS). Methods This study retrospectively collected the information of 619 patients (371 cases with non-hematologic malignancies, 248 cases with hematologic malignancies) who suspected of DIC in Wuhan Union Hospital during 2013-4 to 2014-6. We validated CDSS by comparing it with three leading scoring systems, from International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) and Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (JMHW), and evaluated its prognostic value by 28 days mortality, APACHE II and SOFA score. Results In non-hematologic malignancies, CDSS was more specific than JAAM (72.55% vs. 50.49%, p<0.05) and more sensitive than ISTH (77.07% vs. 62.03%, p<0.05). In hematologic malignancies, the area under the ROC curve of CDSS was larger than ISTH and JMHW (0.933 vs. 0.889, p<0.01 with ISTH, 0.944 vs. 0.845, p<0.01 with JMHW). In addition, the 28-day mortality rate, SOFA scores, APACHE II scores of DIC patients diagnosed by CDSS were significantly greater than non-DIC (P <0.05). Conclusions We are the first group to propose CDSS. It emphasized the values of the clinical manifestations, the rapidly declining platelet count, APTT in the diagnosis of DIC and used D-dimer as the fibrin-related maker. DIC with hematological malignancies was treated as a special part. In this study we can see that CDSS displayed an acceptable property for the diagnosis of DIC with appropriate sensitivity and specificity, and also had a good prognostic value for DIC patients. PMID:26076032

  15. Predicting Hospital-Acquired Infections by Scoring System with Simple Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Jui; Yeh, Min-Li; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Background Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are associated with increased attributable morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and economic costs. A simple, reliable prediction model for HAI has great clinical relevance. The objective of this study is to develop a scoring system to predict HAI that was derived from Logistic Regression (LR) and validated by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) simultaneously. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 476 patients from all the 806 HAI inpatients were included for the study between 2004 and 2005. A sample of 1,376 non-HAI inpatients was randomly drawn from all the admitted patients in the same period of time as the control group. External validation of 2,500 patients was abstracted from another academic teaching center. Sixteen variables were extracted from the Electronic Health Records (EHR) and fed into ANN and LR models. With stepwise selection, the following seven variables were identified by LR models as statistically significant: Foley catheterization, central venous catheterization, arterial line, nasogastric tube, hemodialysis, stress ulcer prophylaxes and systemic glucocorticosteroids. Both ANN and LR models displayed excellent discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]: 0.964 versus 0.969, p = 0.507) to identify infection in internal validation. During external validation, high AUC was obtained from both models (AUC: 0.850 versus 0.870, p = 0.447). The scoring system also performed extremely well in the internal (AUC: 0.965) and external (AUC: 0.871) validations. Conclusions We developed a scoring system to predict HAI with simple parameters validated with ANN and LR models. Armed with this scoring system, infectious disease specialists can more efficiently identify patients at high risk for HAI during hospitalization. Further, using parameters either by observation of medical devices used or data obtained from EHR also provided good prediction outcome that

  16. Interobserver Reliability of Three Validated Scoring Systems in the Assessment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Chemla, Eric S; Jones, Keith G; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Scoring systems for diabetic foot ulcers may be used for clinical purposes, research or audit, to help assess disease severity, plan management, and even predict outcomes. While many have been validated in study populations, little is known about their interobserver reliability. This prospective study aimed to evaluate interobserver reliability of 3 scoring systems for diabetic foot ulceration. After sharp debridement, diabetic foot ulcers were classified by a multidisciplinary pool of trained observers, using the PEDIS (Perfusion, Extent, Depth, Infection, Sensation), SINBAD (Site, Ischemia, Neuropathy, Bacterial infection, Depth), and University of Texas (UT) wound classification systems. Interobserver reliability was assessed using intraclass correlations (0 = no agreement; 1 = complete agreement). Thirty-seven patients (78.4% male) were assessed by a pool of 12 observers. Single observer reliability was slight to moderate for all scoring systems (UT 0.53; SINBAD 0.44; PEDIS 0.23-0.42), but multiple observer reliability was almost perfect (UT 0.94; SINBAD 0.91; PEDIS 0.80-0.90). The worst agreement for single observers was when scoring infection (SINBAD 0.28; PEDIS 0.28), ischemia (SINBAD 0.26; PEDIS 0.23), or both (UT 0.25); however, this improved to almost perfect agreement for multiple observers (infection: 0.83; ischemia: 0.80-0.82; both: 0.81). These classification systems may be reliably used by multiple observers, for example, when conducting research and audit. However, they demonstrate only slight to moderate reliability when used by a single observer on an individual subject and may therefore be less helpful in the clinical setting, when documenting ulcer characteristics or communicating between colleagues. PMID:27358037

  17. A new scoring system using multiple immunohistochemical markers for diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Rosenblat, Yevgenia; Halpern, Marisa; Herbert, M; Hammel, I; Gal, Rivka; Leabu, M; Koren, Rumelia

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle neoplasms by light microscopy is difficult. Multiple classification schemes have been proposed based on mitotic rate, nuclear atypia, and the presence or absence of necrosis. None of these classification systems has been entirely successful. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of selected immunohistochemical and histochemical markers in differentiating these tumors, in addition to accepted morphologic criteria. Ten cases of each of the following: leiomyosarcomas (LMS), atypical leiomyomas (AL), cellular leiomyomas (CL) and usual leiomyomas (UL), were classically evaluated for histological diagnosis and were stained for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2 and p53 using monoclonal antibodies and the avidin-biotin peroxidase method, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNORs). The number of stained cells was counted in the most positively stained region in a 4 mm2 square cover glass mounted on each slide. The mean value was calculated for each group of tumors. The data for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 and AgNOR staining respectively, were significantly higher in LMS by comparison to UL, CL or AL. Because many singular cases had superimposed data being difficult to diagnose, a new scoring system for pathological evaluation was created. The results obtained by this scoring system suggest that immunohistochemical markers Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 together with the AgNOR staining could be useful, by the scoring system, as an adjunct to the current accepted morphologic criteria in differentiating smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. PMID:16563231

  18. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  19. Development and validation of a surgical-pathologic staging and scoring system for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Tang, Fangxu; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Sun, Haiying; Yang, Ru; Chen, Yile; Cheng, Xiaodong; Lv, Weiguo; Wu, Li; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Shaoshuai; Huang, Kecheng; Wang, Lin; Yao, Yuan; Yang, Qifeng; Yang, Xingsheng; Zhang, Qinghua; Han, Xiaobing; Lin, Zhongqiu; Xing, Hui; Qu, Pengpeng; Cai, Hongbing; Song, Xiaojie; Tian, Xiaoyu; Shen, Jian; Xi, Ling; Li, Kezhen; Deng, Dongrui; Wang, Hui; Wang, Changyu; Wu, Mingfu; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Gang; Gao, Qinglei; Wang, Shixuan; Hu, Junbo; Kong, Beihua; Xie, Xing; Ma, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background Most cervical cancer patients worldwide receive surgical treatments, and yet the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system do not consider surgical-pathologic data. We propose a more comprehensive and prognostically valuable surgical-pathologic staging and scoring system (SPSs). Methods Records from 4,220 eligible cervical cancer cases (Cohort 1) were screened for surgical-pathologic risk factors. We constructed a surgical-pathologic staging and SPSs, which was subsequently validated in a prospective study of 1,104 cervical cancer patients (Cohort 2). Results In Cohort 1, seven independent risk factors were associated with patient outcome: lymph node metastasis (LNM), parametrial involvement, histological type, grade, tumor size, stromal invasion, and lymph-vascular space invasion (LVSI). The FIGO staging system was revised and expanded into a surgical-pathologic staging system by including additional criteria of LNM, stromal invasion, and LVSI. LNM was subdivided into three categories based on number and location of metastases. Inclusion of all seven prognostic risk factors improves practical applicability. Patients were stratified into three SPSs risk categories: zero-, low-, and high-score with scores of 0, 1 to 3, and ≥4 (P=1.08E-45; P=6.15E-55). In Cohort 2, 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) outcomes decreased with increased SPSs scores (P=9.04E-15; P=3.23E-16), validating the approach. Surgical-pathologic staging and SPSs show greater homogeneity and discriminatory utility than FIGO staging. Conclusions Surgical-pathologic staging and SPSs improve characterization of tumor severity and disease invasion, which may more accurately predict outcome and guide postoperative therapy. PMID:27014971

  20. Dynamic Visual Acuity and Landing Sickness in Crewmembers Returning from Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Peters, B. T.; Reschke, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity causes sensorimotor adaptations that result in functional deficits upon returning to a gravitational environment. At landing the vestibular system and the central nervous system, responsible for coordinating head and eye movements, are adapted to microgravity and must re-adapt to the gravitational environment. This re-adaptation causes decrements in gaze control and dynamic visual acuity, with astronauts reporting oscillopsia and blurred vision. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is assessed using an oscillating chair (Figure 1) developed in the Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC. This chair is lightweight and easily portable for quick deployment in the field. The base of the chair is spring-loaded and allows for manual oscillation of the subject. Using a metronome, the chair is vertically oscillated +/- 2 cm at 2 Hz by an operator, to simulate walking. While the subject is being oscillated, they are asked to discern the direction of Landolt-C optotypes of varying sizes presented on a screen 1 m from the subject and record their direction using a gamepad. The visual acuity thresholds are determined using an algorithm that alters the size of the optotype based on the previous responses of the subject using a forced-choice best parameter estimation that is able to rapidly converge on the threshold value. Visual acuity thresholds are determined both for static (seated) and dynamic (oscillating) conditions. Dynamic visual acuity is defined as the difference between the dynamic and static conditions.

  1. Intelligibility in microbial complex systems: Wittgenstein and the score of life

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge in microbiology is reaching an extreme level of diversification and complexity, which paradoxically results in a strong reduction in the intelligibility of microbial life. In our days, the “score of life” metaphor is more accurate to express the complexity of living systems than the classic “book of life.” Music and life can be represented at lower hierarchical levels by music scores and genomic sequences, and such representations have a generational influence in the reproduction of music and life. If music can be considered as a representation of life, such representation remains as unthinkable as life itself. The analysis of scores and genomic sequences might provide mechanistic, phylogenetic, and evolutionary insights into music and life, but not about their real dynamics and nature, which is still maintained unthinkable, as was proposed by Wittgenstein. As complex systems, life or music is composed by thinkable and only showable parts, and a strategy of half-thinking, half-seeing is needed to expand knowledge. Complex models for complex systems, based on experiences on trans-hierarchical integrations, should be developed in order to provide a mixture of legibility and imageability of biological processes, which should lead to higher levels of intelligibility of microbial life. PMID:22919679

  2. [Predicting visual acuity in media opacities and uncorrectable refractive errors. Assessing so-called "retinal visual acuity"].

    PubMed

    Lachenmayr, B

    1990-01-01

    Three different components contribute to the modulation transfer function of the visual system: (1) formation of the optical image (refractive media, pupil); (2) scattering of light in the prereceptoral layers of the retina; (3) neuronal processing in the retina und superior visual centers. In the presence of media opacities or non-correctable refractive errors, the clinical question often arises as to which macular function can be expected under the assumption of normal optical image formation (e.g. prior to cataract extraction, corneal transplantation, or vitrectomy). Simple tests such as light projection, color discrimination, and two-point discrimination cannot provide adequate information about macular function. The same holds true for the global luminance ERG. The X-ray phosphene is obsolete. The Maddox rod (with limitations), transilluminated Amsler grid, and various entoptic phenomena (Purkinje vascular phenomenon, foveal chagrin, Haidinger's brushes, blue field phenomenon) are available as qualitative subjective tests. Maxwellian view systems with pinhole aperture (potential acuity meter PAM) and the interferometers (retinometer, visometer, SITE-IRAS interferometer) provide quantitative subjective methods. The flash VECP is primarily a qualitative objective test that allows semiquantitative acuity prediction under special conditions (unilateral opacities). Psychophysical criteria that are less affected by the quality of the retinal image show promising developments in future subjective tests, e.g. optotypes in positive contrast, optotypes or targets superimposed on a background of optical noise, or hyperacuity. Future objective test developments are pattern VECP or even pattern ERG elicited by interferometric stimulation, speckle VECP and focal ERG. PMID:2083891

  3. Set shot shooting performance and visual acuity in basketball.

    PubMed

    Applegate, R A; Applegate, R A

    1992-10-01

    Common sense suggests that decreasing visual acuity will have a negative effect on basketball shooting performance. To test the hypothesis that basketball shooting performance monotonically decreases with decreasing acuity, 19 subjects attempted 25 set shots from a fixed location at each of 5 different acuity levels: 6/6 or better and vision blurred (by optical defocus) to visual acuities of 6/12, 6/24, 6/48, and 6/75. Our results revealed a small but statistically nonsignificant decrease in shooting performance between the 6/6+ and 6/12 conditions. For visual acuities between 6/12 and 6/75, the number of baskets made remained constant. We conclude that decreases in visual acuity over the range of 6/6+ to 6/75 resulting from defocus do not significantly reduce set shot shooting performance. PMID:1436997

  4. Changes in brain morphology in albinism reflect reduced visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth A H; Davies, George; Chambers, Claire; Gouws, Andre; Hoffmann, Michael; Morland, Antony B

    2014-07-01

    Albinism, in humans and many animal species, has a major impact on the visual system, leading to reduced acuity, lack of binocular function and nystagmus. In addition to the lack of a foveal pit, there is a disruption to the routing of the nerve fibers crossing at the optic chiasm, resulting in excessive crossing of fibers to the contralateral hemisphere. However, very little is known about the effect of this misrouting on the structure of the post-chiasmatic visual pathway, and the occipital lobes in particular. Whole-brain analyses of cortical thickness in a large cohort of subjects with albinism showed an increase in cortical thickness, relative to control subjects, particularly in posterior V1, corresponding to the foveal representation. Furthermore, mean cortical thickness across entire V1 was significantly greater in these subjects compared to controls and negatively correlated with visual acuity in albinism. Additionally, the group with albinism showed decreased gyrification in the left ventral occipital lobe. While the increase in cortical thickness in V1, also found in congenitally blind subjects, has been interpreted to reflect a lack of pruning, the decreased gyrification in the ventral extrastriate cortex may reflect the reduced input to the foveal regions of the ventral visual stream. PMID:23039995

  5. A Simple Scoring System Predicting the Survival Time of Patients with Bone Metastases after RT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Yi; Li, Hui-Fang; Su, Meng; Lin, Rui-Fang; Chen, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Chang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop a scoring system to predict the survival time of patients with bone metastases after radiation therapy (RT). The scoring system can guide physicians to a better selection of appropriate treatment regimens. Materials and Methods The medical records of 125 patients with bone metastases treated with RT between January 2007 and September 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen potential prognostic factors were investigated: sex, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), type of primary tumor, resection of tumor before bone metastases, interval between primary tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA), lung metastases before bone metastases, liver metastases before bone metastases, brain metastases before bone metastases, stage, T, N, M, and degree of cellular differentiation. Results In an univariate analysis, 10 factors were significantly associated with survival time after bone metastasis: sex, KPS, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, CEA, lung metastases before bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. In a multivariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be significant: sex, KPS, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. The median survival of all patients with bone metastases after RT was 14.1 months. There were significant differences in the median survival of patients with bone metastases after RT of 4.9 months, 10.5 months, and 29.7 months in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion According to this scoring system, the survival time of patients after bone metastasis can be estimated. PMID:27438606

  6. Association of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Masashi; Miyata, Kimie; Morikawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomo; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kawasaki, Ryo; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Kurumatani, Norio; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both visual impairment and cognitive impairment are essential factors that determine the quality of life in the aged population. The aim of this study was to determine if a correlation existed between visual acuity and cognitive impairment in an elderly Japanese population. The Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study was a cross-sectional study of individuals aged ≥68 years who lived in Nara Prefecture of Japan. Participants underwent ophthalmological examinations and cognitive function test. A mild visual impairment was defined as having a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units in the better eye. Cognitive impairment was defined as having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of ≤23 points. A total to 2818 individuals completed the examinations. The mean age of the participants was 76.3 ± 4.8 years (mean ± standard deviation). The mean BCVA of the better eye was −0.02 ± 0.13 logMAR units and 6.6% subjects were classified as being mildly visually impaired. The mean MMSE score was 27.3 ± 2.3 and 5.7% subjects were classified as being cognitively impaired. The proportion of subjects with cognitive or moderate visual impairment increased with age, and there was a significant correlation between the visual acuity and MMSE score (r = −0.10, p < 0.0001). Subjects with mild visual impairments had 2.4 times higher odds of having cognitive impairment than those without visual impairment (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.5–3.8, p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and length of education. We conclude that it may be important to maintain good visual acuity to reduce the risk of having cognitive impairment. PMID:27610269

  7. Association of Visual Acuity and Cognitive Impairment in Older Individuals: Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Mine, Masashi; Miyata, Kimie; Morikawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Tomo; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kawasaki, Ryo; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Kurumatani, Norio; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    Both visual impairment and cognitive impairment are essential factors that determine the quality of life in the aged population. The aim of this study was to determine if a correlation existed between visual acuity and cognitive impairment in an elderly Japanese population. The Fujiwara-kyo Eye Study was a cross-sectional study of individuals aged ≥68 years who lived in Nara Prefecture of Japan. Participants underwent ophthalmological examinations and cognitive function test. A mild visual impairment was defined as having a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units in the better eye. Cognitive impairment was defined as having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of ≤23 points. A total to 2818 individuals completed the examinations. The mean age of the participants was 76.3 ± 4.8 years (mean ± standard deviation). The mean BCVA of the better eye was -0.02 ± 0.13 logMAR units and 6.6% subjects were classified as being mildly visually impaired. The mean MMSE score was 27.3 ± 2.3 and 5.7% subjects were classified as being cognitively impaired. The proportion of subjects with cognitive or moderate visual impairment increased with age, and there was a significant correlation between the visual acuity and MMSE score (r = -0.10, p < 0.0001). Subjects with mild visual impairments had 2.4 times higher odds of having cognitive impairment than those without visual impairment (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.8, p < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, and length of education. We conclude that it may be important to maintain good visual acuity to reduce the risk of having cognitive impairment. PMID:27610269

  8. Relation between uncorrected astigmatism and visual acuity in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Pesala, Veerendranath; Garg, Prashant; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R

    2013-04-01

    PURPOSE.: The end point of astigmatic correction after cataract surgery will depend on how uncorrected astigmatism impacts distance and near vision of pseudophakic eyes. This study determined the impact of induced astigmatism and pupil size on the distance and near acuity of otherwise emmetropic pseudophakic eyes implanted with monofocal intraocular lenses. METHODS.: Monocular high-contrast distance (4 m) and near (40 cm) logMAR acuity was determined in 15 subjects (mean ± 1 SD, 57.9 ± 9.0 years) without astigmatism and with 2.5 diopters (D) myopic to 2.0 D hyperopic astigmatic lenses induced in 0.5-D steps at 0-, 45-, 90-, and 135-degree axes. This experiment was repeated for the same range of induced astigmatism with 1.5-, 3-, and 6-mm artificial pupil diameters placed before one eye of 10 subjects dilated with 10% phenylephrine HCl. RESULTS.: Distance acuity deteriorated with astigmatism for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Near acuity deteriorated with hyperopic astigmatism (p < 0.1), whereas it improved with up to 1 D of myopic astigmatism before saturating for all axes tested (p < 0.01). Distance and near acuity improved with a reduction in pupil diameter (p < 0.01). The change in distance and near acuity with induced astigmatism was smaller for 1.5-mm than for 3-mm and 6-mm pupil diameters (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS.: Partial restoration of near acuity with uncorrected myopic astigmatism comes with a proportional loss of distance acuity in pseudophakic eyes. Uncorrected myopic astigmatism more than 1 D results in a large loss of distance acuity at no additional benefit to near acuity. Both distance and near acuities with and without astigmatism are benefited with a reduction in pupil diameter. Uncorrected hyperopic astigmatism results in deterioration of both distance and near acuities of pseudophakic eyes. PMID:23458979

  9. A Novel Scoring System to Measure Radiographic Abnormalities and Related Spirometric Values in Cured Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; López-Arteaga, Yesenia; Bizarrón-Muro, Alma; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; García-García, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. Objective To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. Results The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA) showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67–0.95) and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65–0.92), for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71–0.95), and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58–0.90). The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04); -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50); and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05); -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97) respectively, in the patients studied. Conclusion The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values, and

  10. A 'big five' scoring system for the item pool of the adjective check list.

    PubMed

    FormyDuval, D L; Williams, J E; Patterson, D J; Fogle, E E

    1995-08-01

    The item pool of the Adjective Check List (ACL; Gough & Heilbrun, 1980) is widely used as a means of capturing the personal characteristics associated with various target groups (e.g., women vs. men, young adults vs. old adults). The purpose of this research was to develop a system for scoring the ACL items in terms of the five-factor model of personality. In Study 1, five groups of introductory psychology students served as judges, with each group of approximately 100 persons rating the 300 ACL items for one of the five factors. The ratings of each factor were highly reliable. When corrected for favorability, the intercorrelations among the five factors were quite low, as expected, except for the positive correlation of Openness and Extraversion. Good convergence was found between our ratings and the indicative and counterindicative items identified by John's (1989) graduate student judges. In Study 2, convergent validity was demonstrated between the five-factor scores obtained from self-descriptive ACLs and corresponding factor scores obtained from Costa and McCrae's NEO-PI-R and NEO-FFI instruments (Costa & McCrae, 1992). Data from earlier cross-cultural studies of gender and age stereotypes were rescored using the new ACL-FF system to illustrate its potential utility as a research tool. PMID:16367646

  11. Age estimation of an Indian population by using the Kim's scoring system of occlusal tooth wear

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Lahari A.; Patil, Karthikeya; Mahima, V. G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Age is one of the prime factors employed to establish the identity of an individual and the use of teeth for this purpose has been considered reliable. Tooth wear is widely accepted as a physiological consequence of aging and evaluation of tooth wear can be a simple and convenient tool to estimate age in adults. Aims: The present study was conducted to record the degree of tooth wear among Indian adults and to estimate their ages from the degree of tooth wear based on Kim's scoring system. Materials and Methods: Dental stone casts of 120 participants were used to assess the degree of occlusal tooth wear based on the criteria given by Kim et al. Statistical Analysis Used: The age of all subjects was estimated based on these scores using multiple regression analysis function. Results: The degree of tooth wear showed a significant positive correlation with age in each and every examined tooth of both males and females. The predicted age was within ± 5 years of actual age in 70% of males and 68.3% females, and within ± 3 years of actual age in 50% of males and 50.1% of females. Conclusions: Kim's scoring system has proven to be a useful tool in estimation of age using occlusal wear in an Indian population with a high level of accuracy in adults. PMID:24695780

  12. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt Test for Both Black and White Brain-Damaged Patients Using Two Scoring Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Oliver T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study tested for cultural bias in the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 72 black and white patients diagnosed as either brain damaged or psychiatric. Bender protocols were scored by Pascal-Suttell and Hain systems. No race effect appeared except for the Pascal-Suttell system for which blacks scored significantly better. (Author)

  13. Tumor budding score based on 10 high-power fields is a promising basis for a standardized prognostic scoring system in stage II colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Horcic, Milo; Koelzer, Viktor H; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Terracciano, Luigi; Puppa, Giacomo; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Tumor budding is recognized by the World Health Organization as an additional prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but remains unreported in diagnostic work due to the absence of a standardized scoring method. This study aims to assess the most prognostic and reproducible scoring systems for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. Tumor budding on pancytokeratin-stained whole tissue sections from 105 well-characterized stage II patients was scored by 3 observers using 7 methods: Hase, Nakamura, Ueno, Wang (conventional and rapid method), densest high-power field, and 10 densest high-power fields. The predictive value for clinicopathologic features, the prognostic significance, and interobserver variability of each scoring method was analyzed. Pancytokeratin staining allowed accurate evaluation of tumor buds. Interobserver agreement for 3 observers was excellent for densest high-power field (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.83) and 10 densest high-power fields (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.91). Agreement was moderate to substantial for the conventional Wang method (κ = 0.46-0.62) and moderate for the rapid method (κ = 0.46-0.58). For Nakamura, moderate agreement (κ = 0.41-0.52) was reached, whereas concordance was fair to moderate for Ueno (κ = 0.39-0.56) and Hase (κ = 0.29-0.51). The Hase, Ueno, densest high-power field, and 10 densest high-power field methods identified a significant association of tumor budding with tumor border configuration. In multivariate analysis, only tumor budding as evaluated in densest high-power field and 10 densest high-power fields had significant prognostic effects on patient survival (P < .01), with high prognostic accuracy over the full 10-year follow-up. Scoring tumor buds in 10 densest high-power fields is a promising method to identify stage II patients at high risk for recurrence in daily diagnostics; it is highly reproducible, accounts for heterogeneity, and has a strong predictive value for adverse outcome

  14. Myeloproliferative Neoplasm (MPN) Symptom Assessment Form Total Symptom Score: Prospective International Assessment of an Abbreviated Symptom Burden Scoring System Among Patients With MPNs

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Robyn M.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Geyer, Holly L.; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Slot, Stefanie; Zweegman, Sonja; te Boekhorst, Peter A.W.; Commandeur, Suzan; Schouten, Harry C.; Sackmann, Federico; Kerguelen Fuentes, Ana; Hernández-Maraver, Dolores; Pahl, Heike L.; Griesshammer, Martin; Stegelmann, Frank; Doehner, Konstanze; Lehmann, Thomas; Bonatz, Karin; Reiter, Andreas; Boyer, Francoise; Etienne, Gabriel; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Ranta, Dana; Roy, Lydia; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Harrison, Claire N.; Radia, Deepti; Muxi, Pablo; Maldonado, Norman; Besses, Carlos; Cervantes, Francisco; Johansson, Peter L.; Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Passamonti, Francesco; Andreasson, Bjorn; Ferarri, Maria L.; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Samuelsson, Jan; Birgegard, Gunnar; Tefferi, Ayalew; Mesa, Ruben A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) symptoms are troublesome to patients, and alleviation of this burden represents a paramount treatment objective in the development of MPN-directed therapies. We aimed to assess the utility of an abbreviated symptom score for the most pertinent and representative MPN symptoms for subsequent serial use in assessing response to therapy. Patients and Methods The Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Assessment Form total symptom score (MPN-SAF TSS) was calculated as the mean score for 10 items from two previously validated scoring systems. Questions focus on fatigue, concentration, early satiety, inactivity, night sweats, itching, bone pain, abdominal discomfort, weight loss, and fevers. Results MPN-SAF TSS was calculable for 1,408 of 1,433 patients with MPNs who had a mean score of 21.2 (standard deviation [SD], 16.3). MPN-SAF TSS results significantly differed among MPN disease subtypes (P < .001), with a mean of 18.7 (SD, 15.3), 21.8 (SD, 16.3), and 25.3 (SD, 17.2) for patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis, respectively. The MPN-SAF TSS strongly correlated with overall quality of life (QOL; r = 0.59; P < .001) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) functional scales (all P < .001 and absolute r ≥ 0.50 except social functioning r = 0.48). No significant trends were present when comparing therapy subgroups. The MPN-SAF TSS had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .83). Factor analysis identified a single underlying construct, indicating that the MPN-SAF TSS is an appropriate, unified scoring method. Conclusion The MPN-SAF TSS is a concise, valid, and accurate assessment of MPN symptom burden with demonstrated clinical utility in the largest prospective MPN symptom study to date. This new prospective scoring method may be used to assess MPN symptom burden in both clinical practice and trial settings. PMID

  15. The Relationship of Scores on Elizur's Hostility System on the Rorschach to the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between Elizur's Hostility Scoring on the Rorschach Test and the Acting-Out Score on the Hand Test was examined. Correlations between the two measures (using several scoring procedures) ranged from .40 to .64. (JKS)

  16. The generic impact scoring system (GISS): a standardized tool to quantify the impacts of alien species.

    PubMed

    Nentwig, Wolfgang; Bacher, Sven; Pyšek, Petr; Vilà, Montserrat; Kumschick, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    Alien species can exert negative environmental and socio-economic impacts. Therefore, administrations from different sectors are trying to prevent further introductions, stop the spread of established species, and apply or develop programs to mitigate their impact, to contain the most harmful species, or to eradicate them if possible. Often it is not clear which of the numerous alien species are most important in terms of damage, and therefore, impact scoring systems have been developed to allow a comparison and thus prioritization of species. Here, we present the generic impact scoring system (GISS), which relies on published evidence of environmental and socio-economic impact of alien species. We developed a system of 12 impact categories, for environmental and socio-economic impact, comprising all kinds of impacts that an alien species may exert. In each category, the intensity of impact is quantified by a six-level scale ranging from 0 (no impact detectable) to 5 (the highest impact possible). Such an approach, where impacts are grouped based on mechanisms for environmental impacts and receiving sectors for socio-economy, allows for cross-taxa comparisons and prioritization of the most damaging species. The GISS is simple and transparent, can be conducted with limited funds, and can be applied to a large number of alien species across taxa and environments. Meanwhile, the system was applied to 349 alien animal and plant species. In a comparison with 22 other impact assessment methods, the combination of environmental and socio-economic impact, as well as the possibility of weighting and ranking of the scoring results make GISS the most broadly applicable system. PMID:27129597

  17. A recently developed MRI scoring system for hand osteoarthritis: its application in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Ramonda, Roberta; Favero, Marta; Vio, Stefania; Lacognata, Carmelo; Frallonardo, Paola; Belluzzi, Elisa; Campana, Carla; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Angelini, Federico; Piccoli, Antonio; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to apply the recently proposed Oslo hand osteoarthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system to evaluate MRI findings in a cohort of patients affected by long-standing erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA). Eleven female EHOA patients (median 59 [interquartile range 62-52] years, disease duration 9.5 [interquartile range 13-3.75] years) underwent MRI (1.5 T) of the dominant hand, and synovitis, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), joint space narrowing, osteophytes, cysts, malalignment, and erosions were scored using the Oslo scoring system. Intra- and inter-reader reliability were assessed. The patients also underwent X-ray examination, and bone features were evaluated using the same scoring system. Pain and tenderness were assessed during a physical examination. Spearman's non-parametric test was used to analyze the correlations between variables. MRI intra- and inter-reader reliability were found between good and moderate for many features. No statistical differences were found between the radiographs and MRI with regard to detection of JSN, malalignment, and bone erosions. Synovitis was detected in 39.8 % of the 80 joints examined (in a mild form in 80 %), erosions were found in 51.1 %, and BMLs were identified in 20.5 and 23.9 % at the distal and the proximal side, respectively. BMLs at both the proximal and distal ends were correlated with tender joints (BML distal p = 0.0013, BML proximal p = 0.012). The presence of synovitis was correlated with tenderness (p = 0.004) and erosions at both the distal and proximal joints (p = 0.004). The presence of erosions correlated with tender joints (p < 0.01) and the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score (distal p = 0.03, proximal p = 0.01). Synovitis and BMLs were correlated with clinical symptoms in our patients affected with long-standing EHOA. PMID:27236512

  18. Recommendations for the use of chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: Usefulness of scoring system?

    PubMed Central

    Adhoute, Xavier; Penaranda, Guillaume; Castellani, Paul; Perrier, Herve; Bourliere, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Several hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) staging systems have been established, and a variety of country-specific treatment strategies are also proposed. The barcelona - clinic liver cancer (BCLC) system is the most widely used in Europe. The Hong Kong liver Cancer is a new prognostic staging system; it might become the reference system in Asia. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the most widely used treatment for HCC worldwide; but it showed a benefit only for intermediate stage HCC (BCLC B), and there is still no consensus concerning treatment methods and treatment strategies. In view of the highly diverse nature of HCC and practices, a scoring system designed to assist with decision making before the first TACE is performed or prior to repeating the procedure would be highly useful. PMID:25848475

  19. Life in the Atacama: A scoring system for habitability and the robotic exploration for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Andrew N.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Dohm, James M.; Piatek, Jennifer; Warren-Rhodes, Kim; Weinstein, Shmuel; Wettergreen, David S.; Grin, Edmond A.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Cockell, Charles S.; Coppin, Peter; Ernst, Lauren; Fisher, Gregory; Hardgrove, Craig; Marinangeli, Lucia; Minkley, Edwin; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Waggoner, Alan; Wyatt, Mike; Smith, Trey; Thompson, David; Wagner, Michael; Jonak, Dominic; Stubbs, Kristen; Thomas, Geb; Pudenz, Erin; Glasgow, Justin

    2007-12-01

    The science goals of the Life in the Atacama (LITA) robotic field experiment are to understand habitat and seek out life in the Atacama Desert, Chile, as an analog to future missions to Mars. To those ends, we present a new data analysis tool, the LITA Data Scoring System (DSS), which (1) integrates rover and orbital data relevant to environmental habitability and life detection, and (2) provides a standard metric, or ``score'' to evaluate (a) the potential habitability, and (b) the strength of evidence for life at all locales along the rover's traverse. Designed and tested during the 2005 field campaign, first results from the DSS indicate that the three selected sites in the Atacama Desert are generally inhospitable. The strength of evidence for life is positively correlated with potential habitability at two of the three sites. Using factor analysis, we find three factors explain 79.9% of the variance in biological observations and five factors explain 96.2% of the variance in potential habitability across all sites. These factors are used to focus a discussion of scoring variable definitions for future robotic missions in the Atacama and of instrument selection and strategy development for future robotic missions on Earth and Mars.

  20. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  1. Overview of different scoring systems in Fournier’s Gangrene and assessment of prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Doluoğlu, Ömer Gökhan; Karagöz, Mehmet Ali; Kılınç, Muhammet Fatih; Karakan, Tolga; Yücetürk, Cem Nedim; Sarıcı, Haşmet; Özgür, Berat Cem; Eroğlu, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate prognostic factors for the survival of patients with Fournier’s gangrene (FG), and overview different validated scoring systems for outcome prediction. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed the data of 39 patients treated for FG in our clinic. Data were collected on medical history, symptoms, physical examination findings, vital signs, laboratory parameters at admission and at the end of treatment, timing and extent of surgical debridement, and the antibiotic treatment used. The Fournier’s Gangrene Severity Index (FGSI) and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) were used to predict outcome. The data were analyzed in relation with the survival of the patients. Mann-Whitney U test, chi -square test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, and Cox regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. Results Of 39 patients analyzed, 8 (20.5%) died and 31 (79.5%) survived. The median FGSI score on admission was 2 (0–9) for the survivors and 6 (2–14) for the non-survivors (p=0.004). The median CCI scores of the survivors and non-survivors were 2 (0–10) and 6.5 (5–11), respectively (p=0.001). Except for urea, albumin and hematocrit levels, no significant differences were found between survivors and non-survivors for other laboratory parameters on admission. Lower albumin levels and advanced age were found to be associated with mortality. Conclusion High blood urea, low albumin, and low hematocrit levels were associated with poor prognosis. High CCI and FGSI scores could be associated with a poor prognosis in patients with FG.

  2. Scoring system for differential diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and reactive mesothelial cells on cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriko; Dota, Kimiko; Araya, Yoshikazu; Ishidate, Takuzo; Ishizaka, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    Cytology is the only useful tool in the detection of malignant mesothelioma (MM) at an early stage. No other methods, such as immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy, are available to distinguish MM from reactive mesothelial cells (RMC). Some objective analysis of cytology specimens is necessary. On the basis of our case review and cytological features described in previous articles, we developed a scoring system for malignant mesothelioma (SSMM) of effusion cytology to distinguish MM cells from RMC. Mesothelioma cells in effusions from 22 patients (20 pleural and 2 peritoneal mesotheliomas) were compared with RMC from 20 patients without obvious tumor cells and 50 effusions containing metastatic carcinoma cells. The SSMM is based on characteristic features of mesothelial and malignant cells. The total achievable score is 10 points: one point each is given for variety of cell size, cyanophilic cytoplasm with villosity/windows/bleb, sheet-like arrangement, mirror-ball-like cell clusters, nuclear atypia, and cannibalism, respectively. Further two points each are ascribed for acidophilic large nucleoli and multinucleated cells with more than eight nuclei. The total score for each of the 22 mesotheliomas was more than 5 points. On the other hand, all RMC and the 50 metastatic carcinoma cases scored less than 3 points, aside from two cases that were treated with OK432. No single characteristic feature was observed to be consistent within the 22 mesotheliomas analyzed. Ancillary use of immunocytochemistry, such as podoplanin (D2-40) and calretinin, supported the diagnostic accuracy of the SSMM. SSMM is useful for the differential diagnosis of MM. PMID:19572412

  3. Brief Report: Visual Acuity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Matthew A.; Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Falkmer, Marita; Ordqvist, Anna; Leung, Denise; Foster, Jonathan K.; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been heightened interest in suggestions of enhanced visual acuity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) which was sparked by evidence that was later accepted to be methodologically flawed. However, a recent study that claimed children with ASD have enhanced visual acuity (Brosnan et al. in "J Autism Dev Disord"…

  4. Comparison of Risk Scoring Systems to Predict the Outcome in ASA-PS V Patients Undergoing Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yurtlu, Derya Arslan; Aksun, Murat; Ayvat, Pınar; Karahan, Nagihan; Koroglu, Lale; Aran, Gülcin Önder

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Operative decision in American Society of Anesthesiology Physical Status (ASA-PS) V patient is difficult as this group of patients expected to have high mortality rate. Another risk scoring system in this ASA-PS V subset of patients can aid to ease this decision. Data of ASA-PS V classified patients between 2011 and 2013 years in a single hospital were analyzed in this study. Predicted mortality of these patients was determined with acute physiology and chronic health evaluations (APACHE) II, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), Porthsmouth physiological and operative severity score for enumeration of mortality and morbidity (P-POSSUM), Surgical apgar score (SAS), and Goldman cardiac risk index (GCRI) scores. Observed and predicted mortality rates according to the risk indexes in these patients were compared at survivor and nonsurvivor group of patients. Risk stratification was made with receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Data of 89 patients were included in the analyses. Predicted mortality rates generated by APACHE II and SAPS II scoring systems were significantly different between survivor and nonsurvivor group of patients. Risk stratification with ROC analysis revealed that area under curve was 0.784 and 0.681 for SAPS II and APACHE II scoring systems, respectively. Highest sensitivity (77.3) is reached with SAPS II score. APACHE II and SAPS II are better predictive tools of mortality in ASA-PS V classified subset of patients. Discrimination power of SAPS II score is the best among the compared risk stratification scores. SAPS II can be suggested as an additional risk scoring system for ASA-PS V patients. PMID:27043696

  5. The Consistency between Human Raters and an Automated Essay Scoring System in Grading High School Students' English Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Min-hsiu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the consistency between human raters and an automated essay scoring system in grading high school students' English compositions. A total of 923 essays from 23 classes of 12 senior high schools in Taiwan (Republic of China) were obtained and scored manually and electronically. The results show that the consistency between…

  6. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  7. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity in young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane

    2004-12-01

    Research involving college-age students and women fast pitch softball players indicated that coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity are different visual abilities. This study used an alternative procedure to measure dynamic visual acuity to re-examine their relationship. Coincidence anticipation and dynamic visual acuity were measured in 24 young adolescents (12 boys, 12 girls) 11 to 14 years of age. During the dynamic visual acuity procedure, the subject tracked an object of a constant size while the researcher manipulated the object's velocity. Analysis indicated that they are different visual abilities. Findings indicated that the dynamic visual acuity of boys was significantly better than that of girls, and coincidence anticipation between boys and girls did not differ. PMID:15739838

  8. Quantifying Systemic Evolutionary Changes by Color Coding Confidence-Scored PPI Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Phuong; Schönhuth, Alexander; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Ester, Martin

    A current major challenge in systems biology is to compute statistics on biomolecular network motifs, since this can reveal significant systemic differences between organisms. We extend the “color coding” technique to weighted edge networks and apply it to PPI networks where edges are weighted by probabilistic confidence scores, as provided by the STRING database. This is a substantial improvement over the previously available studies on, still heavily noisy, binary-edge-weight data. Following up on such a study, we compute the expected number of occurrences of non-induced subtrees with k ≤ 9 vertices. Beyond the previously reported differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms, we reveal major differences between prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. This establishes, for the first time on a statistically sound data basis, that evolutionary distance can be monitored in terms of elevated systemic arrangements.

  9. Visual acuity and associated factors. The Central India Eye and Medical Study.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B; Sinha, Ajit; Gupta, Rajesh; Agarwal, Shubhra

    2011-01-01

    Visual acuity is a major parameter for quality of vision and quality of life. Information on visual acuity and its associated factors in rural societies almost untouched by any industrialization is mostly non-available. It was, therefore, the purpose of our study to determine the distribution of visual acuity and its associated factors in a rural population not marked influenced by modern lifestyle. The population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study included 4711 subjects (aged 30+ years), who underwent a detailed ophthalmologic examination including visual acuity measurement. Visual acuity measurements were available for 4706 subjects with a mean age of 49.5±13.4 years (range: 30-100 years). BCVA decreased significantly (P<0.001) from the moderately hyperopic group (0.08±0.15 logMAR) to the emmetropic group (0.16±0.52 logMAR), the moderately myopic group (0.28±0.33 logMAR), the highly hyperopic group (0.66±0.62 logMAR) and finally the highly myopic group (1.32±0.92 logMAR). In multivariate analysis, BCVA was significantly associated with the systemic parameters of lower age (P<0.001), higher level of education (P<0.001), higher body stature (P<0.001) and higher body mass index (P<0.001), and with the ophthalmic parameters of more hyperopic refractive error (spherical equivalent) (P<0.001), shorter axial length (P<0.001), lower degree of nuclear cataract (P<0.001), and lower intraocular pressure (P = 0.006). The results suggest that in the rural population of Central India, major determinants of visual acuity were socioeconomic background, body stature and body mass index, age, refractive error, cataract and intraocular pressure. PMID:21829503

  10. Performance Assessment of the SOFA, APACHE II Scoring System, and SAPS II in Intensive Care Unit Organophosphate Poisoned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Yeo, Jung Hoon; Kang, Mun Ju; Cho, Kwang Won; Hwang, SeongYoun; Hong, Chong Kun; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yang Weon

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring systems, as well as the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II method to predict group mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were poisoned with organophosphate. The medical records of 149 organophosphate poisoned patients admitted to the ICU from September 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively examined. The SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II were calculated based on initial laboratory data in the Emergency Department, and during the first 24 hr of ICU admission. The probability of death was calculated for each patient based on the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II equations. The ability to predict group mortality by the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II method was assessed using two by two decision matrices and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 131 patients (mean age, 61 yr) were enrolled. The sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were 86.2%, 82.4%, and 83.2% for the SOFA score, respectively; 65.5%, 68.6%, and 67.9% for the APACHE II scoring system, respectively; and 86.2%, 77.5%, and 79.4% for the SAPS II, respectively. The areas under the curve in the ROC curve analysis for the SOFA score, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II were 0.896, 0.716, and 0.852, respectively. In conclusion, the SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II have different capability to discriminate and estimate early in-hospital mortality of organophosphate poisoned patients. The SOFA score is more useful in predicting mortality, and easier and simpler than the APACHE II and SAPS II. PMID:24339715

  11. A score system for quality evaluation of RNA sequence tags: an improvement for gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Daniel G; Galante, Pedro AF; de Souza, Sandro J; Zago, Marco A; Silva, Wilson A

    2009-01-01

    Background High-throughput molecular approaches for gene expression profiling, such as Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) or Sequencing-by-Synthesis (SBS) represent powerful techniques that provide global transcription profiles of different cell types through sequencing of short fragments of transcripts, denominated sequence tags. These techniques have improved our understanding about the relationships between these expression profiles and cellular phenotypes. Despite this, more reliable datasets are still necessary. In this work, we present a web-based tool named S3T: Score System for Sequence Tags, to index sequenced tags in accordance with their reliability. This is made through a series of evaluations based on a defined rule set. S3T allows the identification/selection of tags, considered more reliable for further gene expression analysis. Results This methodology was applied to a public SAGE dataset. In order to compare data before and after filtering, a hierarchical clustering analysis was performed in samples from the same type of tissue, in distinct biological conditions, using these two datasets. Our results provide evidences suggesting that it is possible to find more congruous clusters after using S3T scoring system. Conclusion These results substantiate the proposed application to generate more reliable data. This is a significant contribution for determination of global gene expression profiles. The library analysis with S3T is freely available at . S3T source code and datasets can also be downloaded from the aforementioned website. PMID:19500384

  12. A wireless-sensor scoring and training system for combative sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Kane; Hayes, Jason P.; James, Daniel A.; Hill, Craig; Gin, Gareth; Hahn, Allan

    2005-02-01

    Although historically among the most popular of sports, today, combative sports are often viewed as an expression of our savage past. Of primary concern are the long term effects of participating in these sports on the health of participants. The scoring of such sports has also been the subject of much debate, with a panel of judges making decisions about very quick events involving large sums of prize money. This paper describes an electronic system for use primarily in the sport of boxing, though it is suitable for martial arts such as karate and taekwondo. The technology is based on a previously described sensor platform and integrates a network of sensors on the athlete"s head, body and hands. Using a Bluetooth network, physical contacts are monitored in near real-time or post event on a remote computer to determine legal hits and hence derivative measures like scoring and final outcomes. It is hoped that this system can be applied to reduce the need for full contact contests as well as provide a more reliable method of determining the outcome of a bout. Other benefits presented here include the ability to analyse an athlete's performance post match or training session, such as assessing the efficacy of training drills and effects of fatigue.

  13. Validation of an IGF-CTP scoring system for assessing hepatic reserve in egyptian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Shehata, Samir; Hassan, Manal M.; Xiao, Lianchun; Lee, Ju-Seog; Cheung, Sheree; Essa, Hoda H.; Hassabo, Hesham M.; Shalaby, Ahmed S.; Mosad, Eman; Raghav, Kanwal; Rashid, Asif; Wolff, Robert A.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Amin, Hesham M.; Kaseb, Ahmed O.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (CTP) is the standard tool for hepatic reserve assessment in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, we reported that integrating plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) level into the CTP score was associated with better patient risk stratification in two U.S. independent cohorts. Our current study aimed to validate the IGF-CTP score in patients who have different demographics and risk factors. Patients and Methods We prospectively recruited 100 Egyptian patients and calculated their IGF-CTP score compared to CTP score. C-index was used to compare the prognostic significance of the two scoring systems. Finally, we compared our results with our U.S. cohorts published data. Results IGF-CTP score showed significant better patient stratification compared to CTP score in the international validation cohort. Among CTP class A patients, who usually considered for active treatment and clinical trial enrollment, 32.5% were reclassified as IGF-CTP class B with significantly shorter OS than patients reclassified as class A with hazard ratio [HR] = 6.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.18-17.37. Conclusion IGF-CTP score showed significantly better patient stratification and survival prediction not only in the U.S. population but also in international validation population, who had different demographics and HCC risk factors. PMID:26098859

  14. Sideline Performance of the Balance Error Scoring System during a Live Sporting Event

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Carrie; Munkasy, Barry A.; Joyner, A. Barry; Buckley, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose was to examine the influence of a live sporting sideline environment on balance error scoring system (BESS) performance. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting The BESS was performed by all participants at three locations; 1) quiet laboratory, 2) football stadium sidelines, 3) basketball arena sidelines. Participants The experimental group had 38 participants (age: 20.1±1.1 years; height: 170.0±7.7 cm; mass: 66.7±9.5 kg) who were female intercollegiate student-athletes (SA). The control group consisted of 38 recreationally active female college students (age: 20.8±1.1 years; height: 162.6±6.0 cm; mass: 63.7±10.6 kg). Interventions The two groups performed the tests at the same locations, the SA group during live sporting events and the control group when no event was occurring. Main Outcome Measures The dependent variable was the total BESS score. Separate 2 × 3 mixed methods ANOVAs investigated the influence of the environment and practice effect. Results There was a significant interaction for group by environment (P=0.004) and the SA group committed more errors at both the football and basketball settings than the control group. The SA group also committed more errors at football (P=0.028) than baseline. The control group demonstrated a likely practice effect with fewer errors during each administration. Conclusions BESS score deteriorated when performed on the sidelines of a live sporting event potentially challenging the clinical utility of the BESS. Clinicians need to consider the role of the local environment when performing the BESS test and should perform post-injury tests in the same environment as the baseline test. Clinical Relevance When performing balance testing of patients with suspected concussions, clinicians need to consider the environment in which the test is performed and attempt to match the pre-season testing environment. PMID:25098674

  15. Visual acuity and magnification devices in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Philippe; Eichenberger, Martina; Neuhaus, Klaus W; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses visual acuity in dentistry and the influence of optical aids. Studies based on objective visual tests at a dental working distance were included. These studies show dramatic individual variation independent of the dentists’ age. The limitations due to presbyopia begin at an age of 40 years. Dental professionals should have their near vision tested regularly. Visual deficiencies can be compensated with magnification aids. It is important to differentiate between Galilean and Keplerian loupes. The lightweight Galilean loupes allow an almost straight posture and offer improved ergonomics. Younger dentists profit more from the ergonomic aspects, while dentists over the age of 40 can compensate their age-related visual deficiencies when using this type of loupe. Keplerian loupes, with their superior optical construction, improve the visual performance for dentists of all age groups. The optical advantages come at the cost of ergonomic constraints due to the weight of these loupes. The microscope is highly superior visually and ergonomically, and it is indispensable for the visual control of endodontic treatments. PMID:27023468

  16. Sensitivity of the Balance Error Scoring System and the Sensory Organization Test in the Combat Environment.

    PubMed

    Haran, F Jay; Slaboda, Jill C; King, Laurie A; Wright, W Geoff; Houlihan, Daniel; Norris, Jacob N

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the utility of the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) and the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) as tools for the screening and monitoring of Service members (SMs) with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in a deployed setting during the acute and subacute phases of recovery. Patient records (N = 699) were reviewed for a cohort of SMs who sustained a blast-related mTBI while deployed to Afghanistan and were treated at the Concussion Restoration Care Center (CRCC) at Camp Leatherneck. On initial intake into the CRCC, participants completed two assessments of postural control, the BESS, and SOT. SMs with mTBI performed significantly worse on the BESS and SOT when compared with comparative samples. When the SOT data were further examined using sensory ratios, the results indicated that postural instability was primarily a result of vestibular and visual integration dysfunction (r > 0.62). The main finding of this study was that the sensitivity of the SOT composite score (50-58%) during the acute phase was higher than previous sensitivities found in the sports medicine literature for impact-related trauma. PMID:26560740

  17. A quantitative assessment of alkaptonuria: testing the reliability of two disease severity scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor F; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan

    2011-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is due to excessive homogentisic acid accumulation in body fluids due to lack of enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase leading in turn to varied clinical manifestations mainly by a process of conversion of HGA to a polymeric melanin-like pigment known as ochronosis. A potential treatment, a drug called nitisinone, to decrease formation of HGA is available. However, successful demonstration of its efficacy in modifying the natural history of AKU requires an effective quantitative assessment tool. We have described two potential tools that could be used to quantitate disease burden in AKU. One tool describes scoring the clinical features that includes clinical assessments, investigations and questionnaires in 15 patients with AKU. The second tool describes a scoring system that only includes items obtained from questionnaires used in 44 people with AKU. Statistical analyses were carried out on the two patient datasets to assess the AKU tools; these included the calculation of Chronbach's alpha, multidimensional scaling and simple linear regression analysis. The conclusion was that there was good evidence that the tools could be adopted as AKU assessment tools, but perhaps with further refinement before being used in the practical setting of a clinical trial. PMID:21744089

  18. Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Injury Severity Score System: A Literature Review of Its Safety

    PubMed Central

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; de Almeida Bastos, Dhiego Chaves; Jorge Torres, Hélio Henrique; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Systematic literature review. Objective The Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score System (TLICS) is widely used to help guide the treatment of thoracolumbar spine trauma. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of the TLICS in clinical practice. Methods Using the Medline database without time restriction, we performed a systematic review using the keyword “Thoracolumbar Injury Classification,” searching for articles utilizing the TLICS. We classified the results according to their level of evidence and main conclusions. Results Nine articles met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. One article evaluated the safety of the TLICS based on its clinical application (level II). The eight remaining articles were based on retrospective application of the score, comparing the proposed treatment suggested by the TLICS with the treatment patients actually received (level III). The TLICS was safe in surgical and nonsurgical treatment with regards to neurologic status. Some studies reported that the retrospective application of the TLICS had inconsistencies with the treatment of burst fractures without neurologic deficits. Conclusions This literature review suggested that the TLICS use was safe especially with regards to preservation or improvement of neurologic function. Further well-designed multicenter prospective studies of the TLICS application in the decision making process would improve the evidence of its safety. Special attention to the TLICS application in the treatment of stable burst fractures is necessary. PMID:26835205

  19. The Frequency of Decreased Visual Acuity in Orbital Fractures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Joo Ho; Hwang, Kun

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and evaluate the effect of orbital fractures (blowout fractures and nonblowout fractures) on visual acuity. In PubMed search and Scopus search, the terms "orbital fracture OR maxillofacial injury OR facial trauma OR craniofacial fracture," and "visual acuity OR functional outcome OR visual outcome OR improving document of visual acuity OR blindness OR optic nerve neuropathy" were used, which resulted in 1634 and 1152 papers, respectively. Of the 2226 titles excluding 560 duplicated titles, 227 abstracts were reviewed. Of the 227 abstracts reviewed, the authors found 56 potentially relevant full-text articles, of which 5 studies met our inclusion criteria. The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals from each study were abstracted. The statistical analysis was performed with review manager (The Nordic Cochrane Centre). A summary of 5 studies affirmed that 43 patients among 532 orbital fractures (8.1%) had decreased visual acuity. Twelve patients among 159 blowout fractures (7.5%) had decreased visual acuity. Thirty-one patients among 373 orbital fractures other than pure blowout fractures (8.3%) had decreased visual acuity. In orbital fractures other than pure blowout fractures, the frequency of decreased visual acuity was higher than pure blowout fractures (n = 532, odds ratio, 2.23, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-4.70). Surgeons should acknowledge this with patients before surgery. PMID:26114513

  20. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  1. A comparison of visual acuity, predictability, and visual function outcomes after intracorneal ring segments and laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, B G; Twa, M D; Ruckhofer, J; Schanzlin, D J

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare correction of low myopia by intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS) and by laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with respect to early visual recovery and refractive outcomes. METHODS: Eighty-two eyes implanted with ICRS in a phase III study for US Food and Drug Administration review were matched with 133 eyes treated with LASIK by criteria of age (> 18 years, < 65 years), preoperative myopia (-1.00 to -3.50 diopters [D]), astigmatism (< or = 1.00 D), single treatment, and attempted full correction. Examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at days 1 and 7 and months 1 and 3. Visual acuity and manifest refraction data were collected retrospectively. Visual function scores were assigned, and summarized results were compared. RESULTS: Uncorrected visual acuity was 20/20 or better at day 1 in 24% of eyes (20/82) after ICRS and in 55% of eyes (73/133) after LASIK, and at month 3 in 75% of eyes (58/77) after ICRS and in 67% of eyes (84/126) after LASIK. Spherical equivalent refraction at month 3 was within +/- 1.00 D of intended correction in 99% of eyes (76/77) after ICRS and in 96% of eyes (121/126) after LASIK. Excellent visual function scores were noted at month 3 in 90% of eyes (69/77) after ICRS and in 78% of eyes (98/126) after LASIK. CONCLUSION: Patients treated with LASIK showed better uncorrected visual acuity immediately following surgery; however, beyond 1 month, patients treated with ICRS achieved better uncorrected visual acuity that continued to improve with time. Visual function scores indicate that ICRS eyes see at higher levels of uncorrected visual acuity than LASIK eyes do with the same refractive error. The ICRS and LASIK were comparable in the correction of mild myopia. PMID:11190040

  2. Development of a Likelihood of Survival Scoring System for Hospitalized Equine Neonates Using Generalized Boosted Regression Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dembek, Katarzyna A.; Hurcombe, Samuel D.; Frazer, Michele L.; Morresey, Peter R.; Toribio, Ramiro E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical management of critically ill equine neonates (foals) can be expensive and labor intensive. Predicting the odds of foal survival using clinical information could facilitate the decision-making process for owners and clinicians. Numerous prognostic indicators and mathematical models to predict outcome in foals have been published; however, a validated scoring method to predict survival in sick foals has not been reported. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system that can be used by clinicians to predict likelihood of survival of equine neonates based on clinical data obtained on admission. Methods and Results Data from 339 hospitalized foals of less than four days of age admitted to three equine hospitals were included to develop the model. Thirty seven variables including historical information, physical examination and laboratory findings were analyzed by generalized boosted regression modeling (GBM) to determine which ones would be included in the survival score. Of these, six variables were retained in the final model. The weight for each variable was calculated using a generalized linear model and the probability of survival for each total score was determined. The highest (7) and the lowest (0) scores represented 97% and 3% probability of survival, respectively. Accuracy of this survival score was validated in a prospective study on data from 283 hospitalized foals from the same three hospitals. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the survival score in the prospective population were 96%, 71%, 91%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions The survival score developed in our study was validated in a large number of foals with a wide range of diseases and can be easily implemented using data available in most equine hospitals. GBM was a useful tool to develop the survival score. Further evaluations of this scoring system in field conditions are needed. PMID:25295600

  3. Prognostic scoring systems for infectious diseases: their applicability to the care of older adults.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Quagliarello, Vincent J

    2004-03-01

    Physicians often make clinical predictions about individual patients. For many infectious diseases, published prognostic scoring systems (PSSs) can help predict relevant outcomes. Validated PSSs exist for the general adult population for diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, meningitis, and bloodstream infection. Although these PSSs have been rigorously derived and validated, they have limited value in the care of older adults, because most studies have involved a heterogeneous adult population with mortality as the primary end point. In the United States, the number of patients who are > or =65 years old is growing, and their health care costs are increasing. Assessment of clinical outcomes other than merely survival (i.e., physical functional ability, cognitive ability, need for nursing home care, and overall quality of life) is required for this population. Some pioneering work has been done to develop PSSs that specifically address the health care needs of older adults. This review will describe existing PSSs and explore areas of further investigation. PMID:14986254

  4. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  5. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  6. Validating a Scoring System for the Diagnosis of Smear-Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Coimbra, Isabella; Maruza, Magda; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão; Batista, Joanna D’Arc Lyra; Braga, Maria Cynthia; Moura, Líbia Vilela; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito Barros; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; de Alencar Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes

    2014-01-01

    Background The challenge of diagnosing smear-negative pulmonary TB (tuberculosis) in people living with HIV justifies the use of instruments other than the smear test for diagnosing the disease. Considering the clinical-radiological similarities of TB amongst HIV-infected adults and children, the proposal of this study was to assess the accuracy of a scoring system used to diagnose smear-negative pulmonary TB in children and adolescents, in HIV-infected adults suspected of having smear-negative pulmonary TB. Methods A Phase III validation study aiming to assess the diagnostic accuracy of a scoring system for diagnosing smear-negative pulmonary TB in HIV-infected adults. The study assessed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and positive and negative predictive values of the scoring system. Three versions of the scoring system were tested. Results From a cohort of 2,382 (HIV-infected adults), 1276 were investigated and 128 were diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Variables associated with the diagnosis of TB were: coughing, weight loss, fever, malnutrition, chest X-ray, and positive tuberculin test. The best diagnostic performance occurred with the scoring system with new scores, with sensitivity = 81.2% (95%-CI 74.5% –88%), specificity = 78% (75.6% –80.4%), PPV = 29.2% (24.5% –33.9%) and NPV = 97.4% (96.4% –98.4%), LR+ = 3.7 (3.4–4.0) and LR− = 0.24 (0.2–0.4). Conclusion The proposed scoring system (with new scores) presented a good capacity for discriminating patients who did not have pulmonary TB, in the studied population. Further studies are necessary in order to validate it, thus permitting the assessment of its use in diagnosing smear-negative pulmonary TB in HIV-infected adults. PMID:24755628

  7. Proposing Melasma Severity Index: A New, More Practical, Office-based Scoring System for Assessing the Severity of Melasma

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Haq, Inaamul; Imran, Saher; Keen, Abid; Aziz, Khalid; Arif, Tasleem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), the scoring system in melasma, needs to be refined. Aims and Objectives: To propose a more practical scoring system, named as Melasma Severity Index (MSI), for assessing the disease severity and treatment response in melasma. Materials and Methods: Four dermatologists were trained to calculate MASI and also the proposed MSI scores. For MSI, the formula used was 0.4 (a × p2) l + 0.4 (a × p2) r + 0.2 (a × p2) n where “a” stands for area, “p” for pigmentation, “l” for left face, “r” for right face, and “n” for nose. On a single day, 30 enrolled patients were randomly examined by each trained dermatologist and their MASI and MSI scores were calculated. Next, each rater re-examined every 6th patient for repeat MASI and MSI scoring to assess intra- and inter-rater reliability of MASI and MSI scores. Validity was assessed by comparing the individual scores of each rater with objective data from mexameter and ImageJ software. Results: Inter-rater reliability, as assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient, was significantly higher for MSI (0.955) as compared to MASI (0.816). Correlation of scores with objective data by Spearman's correlation revealed higher rho values for MSI than for MASI for all raters. Limitations: Sample population belonged to a single ethnic group. Conclusions: MSI is simpler and more practical scoring system for melasma. PMID:26955093

  8. Ankle proprioceptive acuity is associated with objective as well as self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Simonsick, Eleanor; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ko, Seunguk; Ferrucci, Luigi; Studenski, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Ankle proprioceptive information is integrated by the central nervous system to generate and modulate muscle contractions for maintaining standing balance. This study evaluated the association of ankle joint proprioception with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function across the adult life span. Seven hundred and ninety participants (age range 24-97 years, 362 women) who completed ankle proprioception assessment between 2010 and 2014 were included in the present study from the population-based cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), USA. Outcome measures included ankle joint proprioception measured as threshold for perception of passive movement (TPPM); single leg stance time; perceived difficulty for standing balance; usual, fastest, and narrow-path gait speed; walking index; short physical performance battery score; and self-reported activity restriction due to fear of falling. Descriptive variables included age, sex, body mass index, education, strength, and cognition. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) in general linear model (GLM) or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed, as appropriate, to test the hypothesis that balance, mobility, and physical function were significantly different according to TPPM quintiles even after adjusting for relevant covariates. Those with TPPM >2.2° consistently demonstrated poor balance, mobility, and physical function. However, with increase in challenge (single leg stance, fastest walking speed, and SPPB), TPPM >1.4° was associated with significantly worse performance. In conclusion, ankle proprioceptive acuity has an overall graded relationship with objective and self-report measures of balance, mobility, and physical function. However, the cutoff proprioceptive acuity associated with substantial decline or inability to perform could depend on the challenge induced. PMID:27146830

  9. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. PMID:25940058

  10. Tobias Mayer--experiments on visual acuity (1755).

    PubMed

    Scheerer, E

    1987-01-01

    The pioneering experimental work of Tobias Mayer (1723-1762) on visual acuity, published in 1755 in Latin, is presented in English translation. Mayer distinguished between two kinds of visual acuity, the one (30 arc sec) for single objects seen against a uniform background, the other (1 arc min) for more complex objects such as gratings, grids, or checkerboards. Strong illumination did not improve visual acuity. For targets seen in the light of a candle, the visual angle needed for resolution was inversely proportional to the cube root of the distance of the candle and therefore to the sixth root of 'brightness'. The historical significance of Mayer's work on visual acuity is briefly outlined. PMID:3154942

  11. Prognostic factors and scoring systems in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a retrospective analysis of 213 patients.

    PubMed

    Onida, Francesco; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Smith, Terry L; Ball, Greg; Keating, Michael J; Estey, Elihu H; Glassman, Armand B; Albitar, Maher; Kwari, Monica I; Beran, Miloslav

    2002-02-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a hematologic malignancy characterized by wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and course. CMML shares myelodysplastic characteristics with features of myeloproliferative disorders. No treatment has proven effective in modifying the natural course of the disease. To improve the prognostic assessment of clinical outcome, the associations of patient and disease characteristics with survival times of 213 patients with CMML was investigated retrospectively. Median survival was 12 months. Univariate analysis identified low hemoglobin level; low platelet count; high white blood cell, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts; presence of circulating immature myeloid cells, high percentage of marrow blasts, low percentage of marrow erythroid cells, abnormal cytogenetics, and high levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase and beta(2)-microglobulin as characteristics associated with shorter survival. Hemoglobin level below 120 g/L (12 g/dL), presence of circulating immature myeloid cells, absolute lymphocyte count above 2.5 x 10(9)/L, and marrow blasts 10% or more were independently associated with shorter survival by multivariate analysis and were used to generate a prognostic score. The model identified 4 subgroups of patients with median survival of 24, 15, 8, and 5 months for low, intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high risk, respectively. Researchers could not confer objective evidence suggesting that arbitrary divisions of CMML by white blood cell counts into "dysplastic" and "proliferative" categories reflect clinical entities differing in the risk of acute leukemia development, although a trend of shorter survival in patients with leukocytosis was observed. The prognostic model was compared with 6 previously published scoring systems for myelodysplastic syndrome/CMML. The reported results should provide an improved assessment of prognosis in CMML. PMID:11806985

  12. The Cord Blood Apgar: a novel scoring system to optimize selection of banked cord blood grafts for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kristin M.; Zhang, Lijun; Mendizabal, Adam; Wease, Stephen; Carter, Shelly; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Engraftment failure and delays, likely due to diminished cord blood unit (CBU) potency, remain major barriers to the overall success of unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). To address this problem, we developed and retrospectively validated a novel scoring system, the Cord Blood Apgar (CBA), which is predictive of engraftment after UCBT. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In a single-center retrospective study, utilizing a database of 435 consecutive single cord myeloablative UCBTs performed between January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008, precryopreservation and postthaw graft variables (total nucleated cell, CD34+, colony-forming units, mononuclear cell content, and volume) were initially correlated with neutrophil engraftment. Subsequently, based on the magnitude of hazard ratios (HRs) in univariate analysis, a weighted scoring system to predict CBU potency was developed using a randomly selected training data set and internally validated on the remaining data set. RESULTS The CBA assigns transplanted CBUs three scores: a precryopreservation score (PCS), a postthaw score (PTS), and a composite score (CS), which incorporates the PCS and PTS values. CBA-PCS scores, which could be used for initial unit selection, were predictive of neutrophil (CBA-PCS ≥ 7.75 vs. <7.75, HR 3.5; p < 0.0001) engraftment. Likewise, CBA-PTS and CS scores were strongly predictive of Day 42 neutrophil engraftment (CBA-PTS ≥ 9.5 vs. <9.5, HR 3.16, p < 0.0001; CBA-CS ≥ 17.75 vs. <17.75, HR 4.01, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION The CBA is strongly predictive of engraftment after UCBT and shows promise for optimizing screening of CBU donors for transplantation. In the future, a segment could be assayed for the PTS score providing data to apply the CS for final CBU selection. PMID:21810098

  13. Development and validation of a visual body condition scoring system for dairy goats with picture-based training.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A; Brandão, S; Monteiro, A; Ajuda, I; Stilwell, G

    2015-09-01

    Body condition scoring (BCS) is the most widely used method to assess changes in body fat reserves, which reflects its high potential to be included in on-farm welfare assessment protocols. Currently used scoring systems in dairy goats require animal restraint for body palpation. In this study, the Animal Welfare Indicators project (AWIN) proposes to overcome this constraint by developing a scoring system based only on visual assessment. The AWIN visual body condition scoring system highlights representative animals from 3 categories: very thin, normal, and very fat, and was built from data sets with photographs of animals scored by a commonly used 6-point scoring system that requires palpation in 2 anatomical regions. Development of the AWIN scoring system required 3 steps: (1) identification and validation of a body region of interest; (2) sketching the region from photographs; and (3) creation of training material. The scoring system's reliability was statistically confirmed. An initial study identified features in the rump region from which we could compute a set of body measurements (i.e., measures based on anatomical references of the rump region) that showed a strong correlation with the assigned BCS. To validate the result, we collected a final data set from 171 goats. To account for variability in animal size and camera position, we mapped a subset of features to a standard template and aligned all the rump images before computing the body measurements. Scientific illustrations were created from the aligned images of animals identified as representative of each category to increase clarity and reproducibility. For training material, we created sketches representing the threshold between consecutive categories. Finally, we conducted 2 field reliability studies. In the first test, no training was given to 4 observers, whereas in the second, training using the threshold images was delivered to the same observers. In the first experiment, interobserver results

  14. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  15. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  16. 49 CFR 242.117 - Vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required in 29 CFR 1910.95(h) (OSHA); (2) As required in § 227.111 of this chapter; or (3) Conducted using... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vision and hearing acuity. 242.117 Section 242.117... Requirements § 242.117 Vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with a program...

  17. Etiology of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Spierer, A

    1991-10-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the etiologic factor of reduced visual acuity in congenital nystagmus. Fourteen children with congenital nystagmus and reduced visual acuity were examined, using a modified "E" game test. Their success rate in identifying vertical lines was compared with their success rate in identifying horizontal lines. The children identified both vertical and horizontal lines with a similar rate of success. These results may indicate that poor vision in congenital nystagmus patients is partly the result of amblyopia. PMID:1755616

  18. Apgar score

    MedlinePlus

    ... the baby's: Breathing effort Heart rate Muscle tone Reflexes Skin color Each category is scored with 0, ... scores 2 for muscle tone. Grimace response or reflex irritability is a term describing response to stimulation, ...

  19. Objective evaluation of the visual acuity in human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, M. A.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Varillas, G.; Tepichín, E.

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the quality of the human vision is evaluated by a subjective test in which the examiner asks the patient to read a series of characters of different sizes, located at a certain distance of the patient. Typically, we need to ensure a subtended angle of vision of 5 minutes, which implies an object of 8.8 mm high located at 6 meters (normal or 20/20 visual acuity). These characters constitute what is known as the Snellen chart, universally used to evaluate the spatial resolution of the human eyes. The mentioned process of identification of characters is carried out by means of the eye - brain system, giving an evaluation of the subjective visual performance. In this work we consider the eye as an isolated image-forming system, and show that it is possible to isolate the function of the eye from that of the brain in this process. By knowing the impulse response of the eye´s system we can obtain, in advance, the image of the Snellen chart simultaneously. From this information, we obtain the objective performance of the eye as the optical system under test. This type of results might help to detect anomalous situations of the human vision, like the so called "cerebral myopia".

  20. Olfactory acuity in theropods: palaeobiological and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Zelenitsky, Darla K.; Therrien, François; Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    This research presents the first quantitative evaluation of the olfactory acuity in extinct theropod dinosaurs. Olfactory ratios (i.e. the ratio of the greatest diameter of the olfactory bulb to the greatest diameter of the cerebral hemisphere) are analysed in order to infer the olfactory acuity and behavioural traits in theropods, as well as to identify phylogenetic trends in olfaction within Theropoda. A phylogenetically corrected regression of olfactory ratio to body mass reveals that, relative to predicted values, the olfactory bulbs of (i) tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids are significantly larger, (ii) ornithomimosaurs and oviraptorids are significantly smaller, and (iii) ceratosaurians, allosauroids, basal tyrannosauroids, troodontids and basal birds are within the 95% CI. Relative to other theropods, olfactory acuity was high in tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids and therefore olfaction would have played an important role in their ecology, possibly for activities in low-light conditions, locating food, or for navigation within large home ranges. Olfactory acuity was the lowest in ornithomimosaurs and oviraptorids, suggesting a reduced reliance on olfaction and perhaps an omnivorous diet in these theropods. Phylogenetic trends in olfaction among theropods reveal that olfactory acuity did not decrease in the ancestry of birds, as troodontids, dromaeosaurids and primitive birds possessed typical or high olfactory acuity. Thus, the sense of smell must have remained important in primitive birds and its presumed decrease associated with the increased importance of sight did not occur until later among more derived birds. PMID:18957367

  1. Visual acuity in mammals: effects of eye size and ecology.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Kirk, E Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Previous comparative research has attributed interspecific variation in eye size among mammals to selection related to visual acuity. Mammalian species have also been hypothesized to differ in visual acuity partly as a result of differences in ecology. While a number of prior studies have explored ecological and phylogenetic effects on eye shape, a broad comparative analysis of the relationships between visual acuity, eye size and ecology in mammals is currently lacking. Here we use phylogenetic comparative methods to explore these relationships in a taxonomically and ecologically diverse sample of 91 mammal species. These data confirm that axial eye length and visual acuity are significantly positively correlated in mammals. This relationship conforms to expectations based on theoretical optics and prior analyses of smaller comparative samples. Our data also demonstrate that higher visual acuity in mammals is associated with: (1) diurnality and (2) predatory habits once the effects of eye size and phylogeny have been statistically controlled. These results suggest that interspecific variation in mammalian visual acuity is the result of a complex interplay between phylogenetic history, visual anatomy and ecology. PMID:24603494

  2. Preferential looking and recognition acuities in clinical amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mandava, N; Simon, J W; Jenkins, P L

    1991-01-01

    Although others have noted a correlation between grating and recognition acuities (RA) when both tests are performed on the same day, the value of preferential looking (PL) in predicting eventual visual outcome has not been studied. PL acuities of 64 preverbal patients considered at risk of amblyopia were measured. When these children became verbal, their visual acuities were determined using standard recognition acuity tests. Based on intervening amblyopia treatment between PL and RA measures, 40 patients were designated the minimal treatment group (MTG) and 24 the intensive treatment group (ITG). Chi-square analysis for the MTG showed agreement (P less than .005) between PL and RA in identifying better, equal, and worse eyes. Interocular ratios of PL and RA were significantly correlated for the MTG (P less than .001), but not for the ITG. Monocularly, a consistent correlation between PL and RA was not found. Our data suggest that PL is predictive of recognition acuity in patients whose visual acuity was expected to remain stable. PMID:1757857

  3. 76 FR 20366 - Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Management Operations Scoring Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... scoring information was published on August 21, 2008 (73 FR 49575). This proposal included a metric for... receivable. The interim Management Operations Scoring Notice was published on February 23, 2011 (76 FR 10050... greater than 2.5.'' (See 76 FR 10051, 3rd column). A chart immediately following this text restates...

  4. Investigating the Generalizability of Scores from Different Rating Systems in Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sungsook C.

    The generalizability of scores from different scales in performance assessment was studied. First, a concept map of teachers' and raters' perceptions about various scores and scales was constructed using multidimensional scaling analysis. Then, a generalizability study using a random, partially nested design was conducted to analyze the…

  5. Validating a Computerized Scoring System for Assessing Writing and Placing Students in Composition Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Cindy L.

    2006-01-01

    How do scores from writing samples generated by computerized essay scorers compare to those generated by ''untrained'' human scorers and what combination of scores, if any, is more accurate at placing students in composition courses? This study endeavored to answer this two-part question by evaluating the correspondence between writing sample…

  6. A new prognostic score based on the systemic inflammatory response in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lizhen; Li, Xiaofen; Shen, Yanwei; Cao, Ying; Fang, Xuefeng; Chen, Jiaqi; Yuan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pretreatment systemic inflammatory response has been confirmed to have prognostic value in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Increasing studies show that the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS), a prognostic score based on C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, is a prognostic factor in these patients. This study was aimed at recognizing possible prognostic factors and new prognostic scores of inoperable NSCLC based on pretreatment systemic inflammatory response. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathological data of 105 patients with inoperable NSCLC who received first-line chemotherapy as initial treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for prognostic factors and scores were performed. Results The serum CRP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), and pathological type were independent pretreatment prognostic factors for PFS and OS. A new score was assembled by CRP, LDH, and CA125. In multivariate analysis, when the mGPS and the new score were covariates, only the new score retained independent prognostic value for both PFS (P<0.001; hazard ratio =2.12; 95% confidence interval: 1.60–2.82) and OS (P<0.001; hazard ratio =1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.33–2.48). Conclusion The new score based on pretreatment serum level of CRP, LDH, and CA125, indicates the prognosis of both PFS and OS in patients with inoperable NSCLC who were treated with first-line systemic chemotherapy, and it was found to be more effective than mGPS. PMID:27540301

  7. Intensive care nursing scoring system. Part 1: Classification of nursing diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, A K; Laurila, J; Ala-Kokko, T I; Hentinen, M; Janhonen, S A

    2000-12-01

    The introduction of computer-based information management systems to intensive care units offers new possibilities to describe and document the content of nursing. In different countries and health care organizations, the hospital culture and the approach taken by nurses and medical colleagues determine what, how and to what extent nursing is documented. There are nursing diagnosis classifications that are used in North America, such as NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and the European Union Telenurse project will promote the use of the ICNP (International Classifications of Nursing Practice) throughout Europe. The above classifications are used to describe individual, family or community responses to potential or actual health problems or life processes. But there is no nursing diagnosis classification that would take into account both the aims and the unique context of intensive care nursing. This first article describes part of our research: the action research process and the result of the development of a nursing diagnosis classification compatible with the goals of intensive care in three adult intensive care units in the Oulu University Hospital. The classification of nursing diagnoses is part of the Intensive Care Nursing Scoring System (ICNSS) which was developed in the course of this study. The other parts deal with nursing outcomes and nursing interventions. ICNSS is used to facilitate information exchange in the process of intensive care nursing and to describe the nursing workload. PMID:11091466

  8. Palmprint and face score level fusion: hardware implementation of a contactless small sample biometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, Audrey; Yang, Fan; Brost, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    Including multiple sources of information in personal identity recognition and verification gives the opportunity to greatly improve performance. We propose a contactless biometric system that combines two modalities: palmprint and face. Hardware implementations are proposed on the Texas Instrument Digital Signal Processor and Xilinx Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platforms. The algorithmic chain consists of a preprocessing (which includes palm extraction from hand images), Gabor feature extraction, comparison by Hamming distance, and score fusion. Fusion possibilities are discussed and tested first using a bimodal database of 130 subjects that we designed (uB database), and then two common public biometric databases (AR for face and PolyU for palmprint). High performance has been obtained for recognition and verification purpose: a recognition rate of 97.49% with AR-PolyU database and an equal error rate of 1.10% on the uB database using only two training samples per subject have been obtained. Hardware results demonstrate that preprocessing can easily be performed during the acquisition phase, and multimodal biometric recognition can be treated almost instantly (0.4 ms on FPGA). We show the feasibility of a robust and efficient multimodal hardware biometric system that offers several advantages, such as user-friendliness and flexibility.

  9. Glare sensitivity and visual acuity after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy for myopia

    PubMed Central

    Niesen, U.; Businger, U.; Hartmann, P.; Senn, P.; Schipper, I.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Following excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), an increase in glare sensitivity and a reduction in contrast sensitivity can occur owing to changes in the cornea (structure and topography). In this study, an attempt was made to quantify and document objectively a change in those subjective perceptual factors.
METHODS—Snellen visual acuity and disability glare were measured with the Berkeley glare test preoperatively as well as 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively, after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on 32 myopic patients (46 eyes). During the postoperative progress checks, haze was graded and contrast sensitivity was measured with the Vistech chart. All the data were statistically analysed by multiple regression.
RESULTS—One year after PRK, a reduction in visual acuity (VA) measured with the low acuity contrast chart (10%) with and without glare could still be found, despite the fact that acuity measurements with a high contrast Snellen chart showed the same VA 6 months postoperatively as well as before the treatment. The lowest VA could be measured 1 month postoperatively; thereafter, the acuity increased despite the increase in haze that occurred during the first 3 months.
CONCLUSION—Disability glare and a reduction in contrast sensitivity could be observed in most patients after PRK treatment with the Meditec laser system with its scanning slit. The future will show if new technology and a broader flattening area of 6 to 7 mm can minimise these postoperative complications.

 PMID:9059248

  10. Impact of visual acuity on developing literacy at age 4–5 years: a cohort-nested cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alison; Fairley, Lesley; Chambers, Bette; Wright, John; Sheldon, Trevor A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of poor vision in children aged 4–5 years and determine the impact of visual acuity on literacy. Design Cross-sectional study linking clinical, epidemiological and education data. Setting Schools located in the city of Bradford, UK. Participants Prevalence was determined for 11 186 children participating in the Bradford school vision screening programme. Data linkage was undertaken for 5836 Born in Bradford (BiB) birth cohort study children participating both in the Bradford vision screening programme and the BiB Starting Schools Programme. 2025 children had complete data and were included in the multivariable analyses. Main outcome measures Visual acuity was measured using a logMAR Crowded Test (higher scores=poorer visual acuity). Literacy measured by Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests-Revised (WRMT-R) subtest: letter identification (standardised). Results The mean (SD) presenting visual acuity was 0.14 (0.09) logMAR (range 0.0–1.0). 9% of children had a presenting visual acuity worse than 0.2logMAR (failed vision screening), 4% worse than 0.3logMAR (poor visual acuity) and 2% worse than 0.4logMAR (visually impaired). Unadjusted analysis showed that the literacy score was associated with presenting visual acuity, reducing by 2.4 points for every 1 line (0.10logMAR) reduction in vision (95% CI −3.0 to −1.9). The association of presenting visual acuity with the literacy score remained significant after adjustment for demographic and socioeconomic factors reducing by 1.7 points (95% CI −2.2 to −1.1) for every 1 line reduction in vision. Conclusions Prevalence of decreased visual acuity was high compared with other population-based studies. Decreased visual acuity at school entry is associated with reduced literacy. This may have important implications for the children's future educational, health and social outcomes. PMID:26883240

  11. Redundancy in the Pascal-Suttell Bender-Gestalt scoring system: discriminating organicity with only one design.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E E; Marsico, D S

    1991-03-01

    The eight Bender-Gestalt (B-G) designs scored by the Pascal-Suttell (P-S) system proved to be highly intercorrelated, while the ninth component, the Configuration score, was modestly related to only design one. A factor analysis of the eight designs revealed one significant factor, which was interpreted as reflecting general reproductive accuracy rather than special gestalt properties of the drawings. While the P-S Total score could discriminate between organic (n = 52) and nonorganic (n = 52) clinical outpatient groups with a 74% hit rate, only one design (seven) yielded a 73% discrimination. It was suggested that a quick and reliable method for screening for organicity with the B-G would be to calculate the P-S score for design seven only. PMID:2030131

  12. Manipal Cervical Scoring System by Transvaginal Ultrasound in Predicting Successful Labour Induction

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Neha; Bhakta, Rajesh; Kumar, Pratap; Rai, Lavanya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Induction of labour (IOL) nowadays is a common procedure in obstetric practice. The success of IOL largely depends upon “favourability” or “readiness” cervix which is traditionally assessed by manual examination and Scored as Bishop Score. However, this method is limited by subjectivity and reproducibility and though done in all the patients prior to IOL, several studies have demonstrated poor correlation between Bishop Score and outcome of labour. Objective To evaluate the role of preinduction transvaginal ultrasonographic (TVS) cervical assessment in predicting labour outcome and to compare its performance against Bishop Score in patients undergoing induction of labour (IOL). Setting A tertiary medical college hospital in Southern India. Design Prospective observational and investigational study. Materials and Methods Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in 131 patients who underwent labour induction at term with intact membranes and live fetus. Bishop Score was assessed by pervaginal examination and was compared with preinduction TVS cervical Score (parameters being cervical length, funneling, position of cervix and distance of presenting part from external os). Labour was induced within one hour of cervical assessment. The labour induction was considered successful if patient could get into active labour i.e., onset of regular uterine contractions (at interval of 2-3 minutes) and cervical dilatation of 4 cm or greater within 24 hours of induction. Results Labour induction was successful in 86.9% of patients. At cut off Scores of ≥ 4, TVS cervical Score performed better than Bishop Score (Sensitivity 77% vs. 65%, Specificity 93% vs. 86%). ROC analysis indicated that Area Under Curve (AUC) was more for TVS Score (0.90, 95% CI 0.84 – 0.95), compared to Bishop Score. It was found that an increase in cervical length and distance from the os by 1 mm from their means were associated with an increase in odds for failure of induction and there

  13. Reliability and validity of a modified gait scoring system and its use in assessing tibial dyschondroplasia in broilers.

    PubMed

    Garner, J P; Falcone, C; Wakenell, P; Martin, M; Mench, J A

    2002-07-01

    1. The gait scoring system for broilers developed by Kestin et al. (Veterinary Record, 131: 190-194, 1992) has been widely used to evaluate leg problems. The many factors and measures associated with this scale have empirically established its external (biological) validity. However, published test-retest (within-observer) reliabilities are poor, and inter-observer reliabilities are unknown. We evaluated several modifications to this scale aimed at improving its objectivity and reliability. 2. Eighteen naïve observers scored a standardised video of birds exhibiting varying degrees of lameness, either using Kestin et al.'s system, or our modified system. 3. Test-retest reliability (0.906) for Kestin et al.'s system was higher than previously reported. Inter-rater reliability was also good (0.892). The modified system offered significantly better test-retest (0.948) and inter-rater reliabilities (0.943), without incurring costs in terms of time taken or difficulty of use. The systems were consistent, assigning individual birds the same score on average. 4. It is concluded that the modified system offers the advantages of reduced error within and between studies. 5. In a second experiment, we used our modified scoring system to examine the relationship between tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) and gait score in 267 selected broilers. 6. Neither the presence nor severity of TD affected gait score, suggesting that, at least in this strain of broilers, other leg problems like slipped tendons or torsional deformities had more influence on gait impairment than did TD. PMID:12195794

  14. Expanded CURB-65: a new score system predicts severity of community-acquired pneumonia with superior efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Xu, Feng; Hui Zhou; Wu, Xue-jie; Shi, Ling-xian; Lu, Rui-qing; Farcomeni, Alessio; Venditti, Mario; Zhao, Ying-li; Luo, Shu-ya; Dong, Xiao-jun; Falcone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to develop a new simpler and more effective severity score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 1640 consecutive hospitalized CAP patients in Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University were included. The effectiveness of different pneumonia severity scores to predict mortality was compared, and the performance of the new score was validated on an external cohort of 1164 patients with pneumonia admitted to a teaching hospital in Italy. Using age ≥ 65 years, LDH > 230 u/L, albumin < 3.5 g/dL, platelet count < 100 × 109/L, confusion, urea > 7 mmol/L, respiratory rate ≥ 30/min, low blood pressure, we assembled a new severity score named as expanded-CURB-65. The 30-day mortality and length of stay were increased along with increased risk score. The AUCs in the prediction of 30-day mortality in the main cohort were 0.826 (95% CI, 0.807–0.844), 0.801 (95% CI, 0.781–0.820), 0.756 (95% CI, 0.735–0.777), 0.793 (95% CI, 0.773–0.813) and 0.759 (95% CI, 0.737–0.779) for the expanded-CURB-65, PSI, CURB-65, SMART-COP and A-DROP, respectively. The performance of this bedside score was confirmed in CAP patients of the validation cohort although calibration was not successful in patients with health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The expanded CURB-65 is objective, simpler and more accurate scoring system for evaluation of CAP severity, and the predictive efficiency was better than other score systems. PMID:26987602

  15. A meta-analysis-derived proposal for a clinical, ultrasonographic, and cytological scoring system to evaluate thyroid nodules: the "CUT" score.

    PubMed

    Ianni, Francesca; Campanella, Paolo; Rota, Carlo Antonio; Prete, Alessandro; Castellino, Laura; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new cancer risk score for preoperative assessment of thyroid nodules (TN) trying to reduce unnecessary thyroidectomies. On the basis of a recent meta-analysis of published literature, we assigned a matching value to the clinical (C) and ultrasonographic (U) features of TN with increased malignancy risk (MR). The created "CUT" score derived from "C+U" score, (CU[1-10] ), along with the five-tiered "T" (T[1-5] ), represents the cytologic result of the fine-needle aspiration. The C+U score was prospectively applied to 683 consecutive patients with 705 TN and validated through a ROC curve analysis. The CUT score was correlated with the histopathological diagnoses of 110 surgically resected TN. Fifty-five histologically benign TN had a mean C+U score of 2.4 versus 5.7 of 55 malignant TN (p < 0.001). Three categories were identified: low risk for C+U score ≤2.5 (MR: 9 %), intermediate risk for C+U score ≥2.75 and ≤5 (MR: 38 %), and high risk for C+U score ≥5.25 (MR: 95 %). Sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 95 and 60 % for a cut-off value >2.5, and 69 and 96 % for >5. The "CUT" score can be easily applied, aiding clinicians in the evaluation of TN, especially in cases with indeterminate or repeated non-diagnostic FNA. PMID:26518189

  16. Scoring System for the Management of Acute Gallstone Pancreatitis: Cost Analysis of a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Prigoff, Jake G; Swain, Gary W; Divino, Celia M

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the presence of a persistent common bile duct (CBD) stone is a difficult and expensive task. The aim of this study is to determine if a previously described protocol-based scoring system is a cost-effective strategy. The protocol includes all patients with gallstone pancreatitis and stratifies them based on laboratory values and imaging to high, medium, and low likelihood of persistent stones. The patient's stratification then dictates the next course of management. A decision analytic model was developed to compare the costs for patients who followed the protocol versus those that did not. Clinical data model inputs were obtained from a prospective study conducted at The Mount Sinai Medical Center to validate the protocol from Oct 2009 to May 2013. The study included all patients presenting with gallstone pancreatitis regardless of disease severity. Seventy-three patients followed the proposed protocol and 32 did not. The protocol group cost an average of $14,962/patient and the non-protocol group cost $17,138/patient for procedural costs. Mean length of stay for protocol and non-protocol patients was 5.6 and 7.7 days, respectively. The proposed protocol is a cost-effective way to determine the course for patients with gallstone pancreatitis, reducing total procedural costs over 12 %. PMID:27000127

  17. The Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System for myelofibrosis predicts outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bart L; Gooley, Ted A; Sorror, Mohamed L; Rezvani, Andrew R; Linenberger, Michael L; Grim, Jonathan; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Myerson, David; Chauncey, Thomas R; Storb, Rainer; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Radich, Jerald P; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Deeg, H Joachim

    2012-03-15

    Studies by the International Working Group showed that the prognosis of myelofibrosis patients is predicted by the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) risk categorization, which includes patient age, constitutional symptoms, hemoglobin, leukocyte count, and circulating blasts. We evaluated the prognostic usefulness of the DIPSS in 170 patients with myelofibrosis, 12 to 78 years of age (median, 51.5 years of age), who received hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1990 and 2009 from related (n = 86) or unrelated donors (n = 84). By DIPSS, 21 patients had low-risk disease, 48 had intermediate-1, 50 had intermediate-2, and 51 had high-risk disease. Five-year incidence of relapse, relapse-free survival, overall survival, and nonrelapse mortality for all patients were 10%, 57%, 57%, and 34%, respectively. Among patients with DIPSS high-risk disease, the hazard ratio for post-HCT mortality was 4.11 (95% CI, 1.44-11.78; P = .008), and for nonrelapse mortality was 3.41 (95% CI, 1.15-10.09; P = .03) compared with low-risk patients. After a median follow-up of 5.9 years, the median survivals have not been reached for DIPSS risk groups low and intermediate-1, and were 7 and 2.5 years for intermediate-2 and high-risk patients, respectively. Thus, HCT was curative for a large proportion of patients with myelofibrosis, and post-HCT success was dependent on pre-HCT DIPSS classification. PMID:22234678

  18. Donor liver dysfunction: application of a new scoring system to identify the marginal donor.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-Neto, B H; Zurstrassen, M P V C; Hidalgo, R; Fonseca, L E P; Motta, T D B; Pandullo, F L; Rezende, M B; Meira-Filho, S P; Sá, J R; Afonso, R C

    2007-10-01

    Livers from marginal donors are increasingly used for transplantation due to the shortage of donor organs. The definition of a marginal donor remains unclear; prediction of organ function is a challenge. In the literature the use of steatotic livers has been associated with poor liver function or even primary dysfunction of the allograft. Tekin et al created a scoring system that classifies a donor as marginal or nonmarginal, using a mathematical model based on donor age and steatosis degree. The aims of this study were to apply the Tekin method to identify marginal and nonmarginal donors and evaluate the influence of the cold ischemia time (CIT) on allograft evolution. We retrospectively reviewed deceased donor liver transplantations performed from October 1995 to March 2006, namely, 177 adult liver transplantations in 163 patients. Fifty-five were excluded due to retransplantation (14) or insufficient data (41). Donor age and macrovesicular steatosis were evaluated according to the mathematical formula proposed by Tekin et al, classifying the donors as marginal versus nonmarginal. The authors also analyzed the CIT, 3-month mortality, and development of primary nonfunction or primary dysfunction. The median donor age was 38.9 years (range, 6-71). The postreperfusion biopsy specimen showed moderate to intense steatosis (>30%) in 14.75% of specimens, with no steatosis or mild steatosis in 85.25%. Sixty-one grafts (50%) developed primary graft dysfunction (PGD): 10 grafts, with primary nonfunction (PNF); and 51 with initial poor function (IPF). Using the criteria provided by Tekin et al, we obtained 41 marginal and 81 nonmarginal allografts. The marginal group showed 61.9% PGD, compared with 59.2% of PGD by the nonmarginal group. The CIT was greater than 12 hours in 5 marginal group transplants and 4 PGD cases (80%). Of the nonmarginal allografts, the CIT was greater than 12 hours in 29.6%, with 75% PGD. The 3-month graft survival rate was 80% in the marginal group

  19. Manual and automatic locomotion scoring systems in dairy cows: a review.

    PubMed

    Schlageter-Tello, Andrés; Bokkers, Eddie A M; Koerkamp, Peter W G Groot; Van Hertem, Tom; Viazzi, Stefano; Romanini, Carlos E B; Halachmi, Ilan; Bahr, Claudia; Berckmans, Daniël; Lokhorst, Kees

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this review was to describe, compare and evaluate agreement, reliability, and validity of manual and automatic locomotion scoring systems (MLSSs and ALSSs, respectively) used in dairy cattle lameness research. There are many different types of MLSSs and ALSSs. Twenty-five MLSSs were found in 244 articles. MLSSs use different types of scale (ordinal or continuous) and different gait and posture traits need to be observed. The most used MLSS (used in 28% of the references) is based on asymmetric gait, reluctance to bear weight, and arched back, and is scored on a five-level scale. Fifteen ALSSs were found that could be categorized according to three approaches: (a) the kinetic approach measures forces involved in locomotion, (b) the kinematic approach measures time and distance of variables associated to limb movement and some specific posture variables, and (c) the indirect approach uses behavioural variables or production variables as indicators for impaired locomotion. Agreement and reliability estimates were scarcely reported in articles related to MLSSs. When reported, inappropriate statistical methods such as PABAK and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were commonly used. Some of the most frequently used MLSSs were poorly evaluated for agreement and reliability. Agreement and reliability estimates for the original four-, five- or nine-level MLSS, expressed in percentage of agreement, kappa and weighted kappa, showed large ranges among and sometimes also within articles. After the transformation into a two-level scale, agreement and reliability estimates showed acceptable estimates (percentage of agreement ≥ 75%; kappa and weighted kappa ≥ 0.6), but still estimates showed a large variation between articles. Agreement and reliability estimates for ALSSs were not reported in any article. Several ALSSs use MLSSs as a reference for model calibration and validation. However, varying agreement and reliability estimates of MLSSs make a

  20. The utility of the balance error scoring system for mild brain injury assessments in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Quatman-Yates, Catherine; Hugentobler, Jason; Ammon, Robin; Mwase, Najima; Kurowski, Brad; Myer, Gregory D

    2014-09-01

    The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) is widely recognized as an acceptable assessment of postural control for adult patients following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion. However, the measurement properties of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for younger patients are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the BESS as a post-mTBI assessment test for children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years through 2 investigations: (1) a retrospective medical records review of the relationship among age, BESS scores, and other common post-mTBI assessment tests; and (2) a prospective study comparing BESS scores for a cohort of children with a recent mTBI and BESS scores for a cohort of matched healthy peers. Age was found to be significantly correlated with several of the BESS measures and the total BESS score (P < 0.05). Significant differences were observed between the injured and healthy cohorts for 3 of the BESS measures and the total BESS score. However, the observed differences were not likely to be clinically meaningful. Cumulatively, evidence from the literature and the results of these studies indicate that the BESS may be limited for producing accurate assessments of younger athletes' post-mTBI postural control abilities. Future research recommendations include testing of modified versions of the BESS or other alternatives for post-mTBI postural control assessments with younger individuals. PMID:25295764

  1. Automated scoring system of standard uptake value for torso FDG-PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tatsunori; Kawai, Kazunao; Zhou, Xiangrong; Itoh, Satoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an automated method to calculate the score of SUV for torso region on FDG-PET scans. The three dimensional distributions for the mean and the standard deviation values of SUV were stored in each volume to score the SUV in corresponding pixel position within unknown scans. The modeling methods is based on SPM approach using correction technique of Euler characteristic and Resel (Resolution element). We employed 197 nor-mal cases (male: 143, female: 54) to assemble the normal metabolism distribution of FDG. The physique were registered each other in a rectangular parallelepiped shape using affine transformation and Thin-Plate-Spline technique. The regions of the three organs were determined based on semi-automated procedure. Seventy-three abnormal spots were used to estimate the effectiveness of the scoring methods. As a result, the score images correctly represented that the scores for normal cases were between zeros to plus/minus 2 SD. Most of the scores of abnormal spots associated with cancer were lager than the upper of the SUV interval of normal organs.

  2. The Two Sides of Sensory-Cognitive Interactions: Effects of Age, Hearing Acuity, and Working Memory Span on Sentence Comprehension.

    PubMed

    DeCaro, Renee; Peelle, Jonathan E; Grossman, Murray; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Reduced hearing acuity is among the most prevalent of chronic medical conditions among older adults. An experiment is reported in which comprehension of spoken sentences was tested for older adults with good hearing acuity or with a mild-to-moderate hearing loss, and young adults with age-normal hearing. Comprehension was measured by participants' ability to determine the agent of an action in sentences that expressed this relation with a syntactically less complex subject-relative construction or a syntactically more complex object-relative construction. Agency determination was further challenged by inserting a prepositional phrase into sentences between the person performing an action and the action being performed. As a control, prepositional phrases of equivalent length were also inserted into sentences in a non-disruptive position. Effects on sentence comprehension of age, hearing acuity, prepositional phrase placement and sound level of stimulus presentations appeared only for comprehension of sentences with the more syntactically complex object-relative structures. Working memory as tested by reading span scores accounted for a significant amount of the variance in comprehension accuracy. Once working memory capacity and hearing acuity were taken into account, chronological age among the older adults contributed no further variance to comprehension accuracy. Results are discussed in terms of the positive and negative effects of sensory-cognitive interactions in comprehension of spoken sentences and lend support to a framework in which domain-general executive resources, notably verbal working memory, play a role in both linguistic and perceptual processing. PMID:26973557

  3. Effects of distance and duration on vertical dynamic visual acuity in screening healthy adults and people with vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian T.; Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) testing may be a useful, indirect indicator of vestibulo-ocular reflex function. Previous evidence shows that acuity for 2 m targets differs little between patients and normals using a 75 ms display duration and that healthy subjects do not differ in acuity when standing and walking while viewing a far target but they do differ when viewing a near target. Objective Improve the protocol of a screening tool by testing the hypothesis that healthy control subjects and patients and with unilateral peripheral vestibular weakness differ on DVA when viewing far targets while seated. Methods Controls and patients were tested while they were seated in a chair that oscillated vertically at 2 Hz. They viewed a computer screen 4 m away, while stationary and while moving, with viewing times of either 75 ms or 500 ms. Results The amount of change between static and dynamic conditions did not differ significantly between patients and controls for the 75 ms condition but controls had lower difference scores than patients when using the 500 ms duration. The ROC value was low, 0.68. Compared to historical data using the 75 ms duration at a distance of 2 m, subjects in both diagnostic groups had better visual acuity at the 75 ms/ 4 m distance. Conclusions These results suggest that using the longer duration is better for differentiating patients from healthy controls and they support previous evidence showing that near target viewing is more challenging. PMID:24447968

  4. The Two Sides of Sensory–Cognitive Interactions: Effects of Age, Hearing Acuity, and Working Memory Span on Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    DeCaro, Renee; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Grossman, Murray; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Reduced hearing acuity is among the most prevalent of chronic medical conditions among older adults. An experiment is reported in which comprehension of spoken sentences was tested for older adults with good hearing acuity or with a mild-to-moderate hearing loss, and young adults with age-normal hearing. Comprehension was measured by participants’ ability to determine the agent of an action in sentences that expressed this relation with a syntactically less complex subject-relative construction or a syntactically more complex object-relative construction. Agency determination was further challenged by inserting a prepositional phrase into sentences between the person performing an action and the action being performed. As a control, prepositional phrases of equivalent length were also inserted into sentences in a non-disruptive position. Effects on sentence comprehension of age, hearing acuity, prepositional phrase placement and sound level of stimulus presentations appeared only for comprehension of sentences with the more syntactically complex object-relative structures. Working memory as tested by reading span scores accounted for a significant amount of the variance in comprehension accuracy. Once working memory capacity and hearing acuity were taken into account, chronological age among the older adults contributed no further variance to comprehension accuracy. Results are discussed in terms of the positive and negative effects of sensory–cognitive interactions in comprehension of spoken sentences and lend support to a framework in which domain-general executive resources, notably verbal working memory, play a role in both linguistic and perceptual processing. PMID:26973557

  5. Development of a Comprehensive Osteochondral Allograft MRI Scoring System (OCAMRISS) With Histopathologic, Micro–Computed Tomography, and Biomechanical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cory, Esther; Amiel, David; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe and apply a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for multifeature analysis of cartilage defect repair in the knee by osteochondral allografts and to correlate this scoring system with histopathologic, micro–computed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical reference standards using a goat repair model. Design: Fourteen adult goats had 2 osteochondral allografts implanted into each knee: one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the lateral trochlea. At 12 months, goats were euthanized and MRI was performed. Two blinded radiologists independently rated 9 primary features for each graft, including cartilage signal, fill, edge integration, surface congruity, calcified cartilage integrity, subchondral bone plate congruity, subchondral bone marrow signal, osseous integration, and presence of cystic changes. Four ancillary features of the joint were also evaluated, including opposing cartilage, meniscal tears, synovitis, and fat-pad scarring. Comparison was made with histologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical measures. Interobserver agreement and agreement with reference standards was assessed. Cohen’s κ, Spearman’s correlation, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used as appropriate. Results: There was substantial agreement (κ > 0.6, P < 0.001) for each MRI feature and with comparison against reference standards, except for cartilage edge integration (κ = 0.6). There was a strong positive correlation between MRI and reference standard scores (ρ = 0.86, P < 0.01). Osteochondral allograft MRI scoring system was sensitive to differences in outcomes between the types of allografts. Conclusions: We have described a comprehensive MRI scoring system for osteochondral allografts and have validated this scoring system with histopathologic and µCT reference standards as well as biomechanical indentation testing. PMID:24489999

  6. Assessing the utility of visual acuity measures in visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Avi; Zivotofsky, Ari Z

    2015-03-01

    There are presently several ongoing clinical trials to provide usable sight to profoundly visually impaired patients by means of electrical stimulation of the retina. Some of the blind patients implanted with retinal prosthesis reported un-patterned perception and yet benefit from the device in many activities of daily living, seemingly because they adopt active scanning strategies. The aim of the present work is to evaluate if and under what conditions a measured visual acuity level is truly an indication that the brain perceived a patterned image from the electrical stimulation of the visual prosthesis. Sighted subjects used a pixelized simulator in which they perceived either a low resolution sub-sampling of the original image ("normal mode"--patterned vision) or an image that was solely a function of the brightness and size of the original image ("brightness mode"--no patterned vision). Results show that subjects were able to adopt a head scanning strategy that enabled acuity beyond the resolution set by a static view of the stimulus. In brightness mode, i.e. without patterned vision, most subjects achieved a measurable acuity level better than the limit set by the geometrical resolution of the entire array but worse than the limit set by the distance between neighboring simulated pixels. In normal mode all subject achieved acuity level that is better than the geometrical resolution of the simulated pixels. Thus, visual acuity levels comparable with the electrodes/pixels resolution implies that the patient perceives an image with spatial patterns. PMID:25637855

  7. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  8. An acoustic feature-based similarity scoring system for speech rehabilitation assistance.

    PubMed

    Syauqy, Dahnial; Wu, Chao-Min; Setyawati, Onny

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which focused on automatic scoring based on the comparison of the patient's speech with another normal speech on several aspects including pitch, vowel, voiced-unvoiced segments, strident fricative and sound intensity. The pitch estimation employed the use of cepstrum-based algorithm for its robustness; the vowel classification used multilayer perceptron (MLP) to classify vowel from pitch and formants; and the strident fricative detection was based on the major peak spectral intensity, location and the pitch existence in the segment. In order to evaluate the performance of the system, this study analyzed eight patient's speech recordings (four males, four females; 4-58-years-old), which had been recorded in previous study in cooperation with Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Taoyuan General Hospital. The experiment result on pitch algorithm showed that the cepstrum method had 5.3% of gross pitch error from a total of 2086 frames. On the vowel classification algorithm, MLP method provided 93% accuracy (men), 87% (women) and 84% (children). In total, the overall results showed that 156 tool's grading results (81%) were consistent compared to 192 audio and visual observations done by four experienced respondents. Implication for Rehabilitation Difficulties in communication may limit the ability of a person to transfer and exchange information. The fact that speech is one of the primary means of communication has encouraged the needs of speech diagnosis and rehabilitation. The advances of technology in computer-assisted speech therapy (CAST) improve the quality, time efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of the disorders. The present study attempted to develop tool to assist speech therapy and rehabilitation, which provided simple interface to let the assessment be done even by the patient himself without the need of particular knowledge of speech processing while at the

  9. Scored Discussions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1992-01-01

    Suggests a classroom strategy to help students learn to analyze and discuss significant issues from history and current policy debates. Describes scored discussions in which small groups of students receive points for participation. Provides an example of a discussion on gold mining. Includes an agenda. Explores uses of scored discussions and…

  10. Flexible Colonoscopy in Mice to Evaluate the Severity of Colitis and Colorectal Tumors Using a Validated Endoscopic Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Corridoni, Daniele; Lopetuso, Loris; Di Martino, Luca; Marks, Brian; Pizarro, James; Pizarro, Theresa; Chak, Amitabh; Cominelli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The use of modern endoscopy for research purposes has greatly facilitated our understanding of gastrointestinal pathologies. In particular, experimental endoscopy has been highly useful for studies that require repeated assessments in a single laboratory animal, such as those evaluating mechanisms of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and the progression of colorectal cancer. However, the methods used across studies are highly variable. At least three endoscopic scoring systems have been published for murine colitis and published protocols for the assessment of colorectal tumors fail to address the presence of concomitant colonic inflammation. This study develops and validates a reproducible endoscopic scoring system that integrates evaluation of both inflammation and tumors simultaneously. This novel scoring system has three major components: 1) assessment of the extent and severity of colorectal inflammation (based on perianal findings, transparency of the wall, mucosal bleeding, and focal lesions), 2) quantitative recording of tumor lesions (grid map and bar graph), and 3) numerical sorting of clinical cases by their pathological and research relevance based on decimal units with assigned categories of observed lesions and endoscopic complications (decimal identifiers). The video and manuscript presented herein were prepared, following IACUC-approved protocols, to allow investigators to score their own experimental mice using a well-validated and highly reproducible endoscopic methodology, with the system option to differentiate distal from proximal endoscopic colitis (D-PECS). PMID:24193215

  11. Using Student Test Scores to Measure Teacher Performance: Some Problems in the Design and Implementation of Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Dale; Springer, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this article is to draw attention to some underappreciated problems in the design and implementation of evaluation systems that incorporate value-added measures. We focus on four: (1) taking into account measurement error in teacher assessments, (2) revising teachers' scores as more information becomes available about their students,…

  12. The Effect of Zeaxanthin on the Visual Acuity of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saidi, Eric A.; Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; Cameron, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Oral supplementation of carotenoids such as zeaxanthin or lutein which naturally occur in human retina have been shown to improve vision and prevent progression of damage to advanced AMD in some studies. The zebrafish eye shares many physiological similarities with the human eye and is increasingly being used as model for vision research. We hypothesized that injection of zeaxanthin into the zebrafish eye would improve the visual acuity of the zebrafish over time. Visual acuity, calculated in cycles per degree, was measured in adult zebrafish to establish a consistent baseline using the optokinetic response. Zeaxanthin dissolved into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or PBS only was injected into the anterior chamber of the right and left eyes of the Zebrafish. Visual acuities were measured at 1 week and 3, 8 and 12 weeks post-injection to compare to baseline values. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare visual acuities between fish injected with PBS and zeaxanthin. A significant improvement in visual acuity, 14% better than before the injection (baseline levels), was observed one week after injection with zeaxanthin (p = 0.04). This improvement peaked at more than 30% for some fish a few weeks after the injection and improvement in vision persisted at 3 weeks after injection (p = 0.006). The enhanced visual function was not significantly better than baseline at 8 weeks (p = 0.19) and returned to baseline levels 12 weeks after the initial injection (p = 0.50). Zeaxanthin can improve visual acuity in zebrafish eyes. Further studies are required to develop a better understanding of the role zeaxanthin and other carotenoids play during normal visual function. PMID:26267864

  13. Theoretical and applied aspects of night vision goggle resolution and visual acuity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. Lee; Pinkus, Alan R.

    2007-04-01

    The image quality of night vision goggles is often expressed in terms of visual acuity, resolution or modulation transfer function. The primary reason for providing a measure of image quality is the underlying assumption that the image quality metric correlates with the level of visual performance that one could expect when using the device, for example, target detection or target recognition performance. This paper provides a theoretical analysis of the relationships between these three image quality metrics: visual acuity, resolution and modulation transfer function. Results from laboratory and field studies were used to relate these metrics to visual performance. These results can also be applied to non-image intensifier based imaging systems such as a helmet-mounted display coupled to an imaging sensor.

  14. Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4π). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

  15. Visual acuity and pupillary reactions after peribulbar anaesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Talks, S J; Chong, N H; Gibson, J M; Francis, I R

    1994-01-01

    The effect of peribulbar anaesthesia on optic nerve function in 20 patients, before and after cataract surgery, was measured. All the patients had decreased visual acuity. Five (25%) had no perception of light. Seventeen (85%) developed a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD). No patients saw the operating instruments. Seven (35%) had improved visual acuity immediately postoperatively. Patients should be warned that they may lose vision completely on being given a peribulbar anaesthetic; however their vision will improve, but not necessarily immediately, postoperatively. Examination for an RAPD is a good method of providing reassurance that the operating instruments will not be seen. PMID:8110698

  16. Diagnostic value of the Vesikari Scoring System for predicting the viral or bacterial pathogens in pediatric gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dong Ho; Kim, Dong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Vesikari Scoring System (VSS) as an early predictor of pathogens in children with acute gastroenteritis (AG). Methods In this retrospective study, the VSS score, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were analyzed in 107 hospitalized children with AG, aged 6 months to 17 years. Patients were divided into nonspecific, viral, and bacterial groups according to the pathogens detected using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Results Patients in the bacterial group had significantly higher CRP values and VSS scores compared to those in the viral group and significantly higher VSS scores compared to those in the nonspecific group (P<0.05). Patients in the viral group had significantly higher VSS scores than those in the nonspecific group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that VSS was the most effective diagnostic tool for predicting the type of pathogen (P<0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of VSS was significantly greater than that for ANC and CRP (P<0.05). At a cutoff point of 10 in the VSS, an acceptable diagnostic accuracy could be achieved for distinguishing between bacterial and viral pathogens in AG. Conclusion VSS can be considered a useful and reliable infectious marker for pediatric gastroenteritis. VSS may be a good early predictor of the type of pathogen, enabling development of a treatment plan before results from a stool culture or PCR test are available. PMID:27186219

  17. Can an 18-point clock-drawing scoring system predict dementia in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment?

    PubMed

    Babins, Lennie; Slater, Marie-Eve; Whitehead, Victor; Chertkow, Howard

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a clock-drawing scoring system better suited to detecting possible early markers of dementia in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We modified the scoring system of Freedman et al. (1994), in which the major components are integrity of the circle, placement and size of the hands, and placement and sequence of the numbers. We rescored the clock-drawing test using a novel 18-point scoring system, which emphasizes hand elements-number of hands, direction indicated, and size differences. We retrospectively assessed 123 individuals (ages 58-88 years) selected from the Memory Clinic at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. These consisted of 21 normal elderly individuals (NORM group), 41 participants with mild cognitive impairment who did not develop dementia on follow-up visits (MCI-NP), 41 participants with mild cognitive impairment who became demented after a 48-month follow-up (MCI-D), and 20 participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the 18-point system, the MCI-NP and the MCI-D did not show any difference on overall total score (p = .166), However, using Pearson chi-squares to examine the within-categories effects comparing the mildly cognitively impaired groups (MCI-NP and MCI-D), there were three significant hand items that appear to be possible early markers of progression to dementia. The clock has two hands (p = .043), hour hand is towards correct number (p = .023), and size difference of the hands is respected (p = .004), all showed significant differences between progressors and nonprogressors. The 18-point clock-drawing scoring system may have advantages in better indicating MCI individuals more likely to progress to dementia. PMID:18938669

  18. Problems with Percentiles: Student Growth Scores in New York's Teacher Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Drew

    2016-01-01

    New York State has used the Growth Model for Educator Evaluation ratings since the 2011-2012 school year. Since that time, student growth percentiles have been used as the basis for teacher and principal ratings. While a great deal has been written about the use of student test scores to measures educator effectiveness, less attention has been…

  19. Comparison of risk-scoring systems in predicting hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Supsamutchai, Chaiyarat; Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity, Portsmouth adjustment (P-POSSUM), the Hardman index and the Glasgow aneurysm score (GAS) in the prediction of hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Medical charts of 146 AAA patients treated between January 1996 and January 2007 were reviewed. The P-POSSUM, Hardman index and GAS were calculated for each patient. The scores were tested and compared for their discriminatory ability to predict hospital death. RESULTS: Of the 146 patients with ruptured and unruptured AAAs (133 underwent open repair, five underwent extra-anatomical bypass and eight underwent endovascular aneurysm repair), 18 died (12%) after AAA repair. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the GAS, Hardman index and P-POSSUM for predicting hospital mortality were 0.740, 0.730 and 0.886, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the P-POSSUM was significantly higher than those of other scores. CONCLUSION: In the present study, the P-POSSUM was the best predictor of hospital mortality for patients undergoing AAA repair. PMID:22477446

  20. 77 FR 34399 - Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Capital Fund Interim Scoring Notice; Request for Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    .../ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The PHAS interim rule, published on February 23, 2011, at 76 FR 10136... Fund Scoring Notice, also published on February 23, 2011, at 76 FR 10053. Under this indicator, PHAs... Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 550 12th Street, SW., Suite 100, Washington,...

  1. 77 FR 47707 - Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS): Physical Condition Scoring Notice and Revised Dictionary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Comment On October 13, 2011 (76 FR 63640), HUD published for public comment a notice revising the scoring... cap are described in the October 13, 2011, notice; see 76 FR 63641. In addition to the point loss cap... specific changes proposed are found at 76 FR 63648-63654 (October 13, 2011). II. This Final Notice...

  2. Managing What We Can Measure: Quantifying the Susceptibility of Automated Scoring Systems to Gaming Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Derrick; Heilman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As methods for automated scoring of constructed-response items become more widely adopted in state assessments, and are used in more consequential operational configurations, it is critical that their susceptibility to gaming behavior be investigated and managed. This article provides a review of research relevant to how construct-irrelevant…

  3. The Effect of Specific Language Features on the Complexity of Systems for Automated Essay Scoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Yoav; Ben-Simon, Anat; Hovav, Myra

    This paper focuses on the relationship between different aspects of the linguistic structure of a given language and the complexity of the computer program, whether existing or prospective, that is to be used for the scoring of essays in that language. The first part of the paper discusses common scales used to assess writing products, then…

  4. An Inmate Classification System Based on PCL: SV Factor Scores in a Sample of Prison Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wogan, Michael; Mackenzie, Marci

    2007-01-01

    Psychopaths represent a significant management challenge in a prison population. A sample of ninety-five male inmates from three medium security prisons was tested using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV). Using traditional criteria, 22% of the inmates were classified as psychopaths. Scores on the two factor dimensions of…

  5. Pragmatism or Gaming the System? One School District's Solution to Low Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Kathryn Bell

    2009-01-01

    In this era of accountability and high stakes testing, district and school administrators are vigilant in their attention to student test scores and the ramifications these have for district and school performance labels. In other words, no school or district wants to be labeled "low performing." This case, based on a real situation, demonstrates…

  6. Assessing the Potential Value for an Automated Body Condition Scoring System through Stochastic Simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated body condition scoring (BCS) through extraction of information from digital images has been demonstrated to be feasible; and commercial technologies are being developed. The primary objective of this research was to identify the factors that influence the potential profitability of investi...

  7. Assessment of dermal pesticide exposure with fluorescent tracer: a modification of a visual scoring system for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Aurora; Blanco, Luis E; Funez, Aura; Ruepert, Clemens; Lidén, Carola; Nise, Gun; Wesseling, Catharina

    2006-01-01

    A semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment method based on visual observations of fluorescence images was presented by Fenske in 1988. We adapted the method to Nicaraguan working conditions and evaluated its performance. Thirty-two farmers applied chlorpyrifos and methamidophos marked with Tinopal CBS-X(R). Skin fluorescent depositions were observed with a portable UV lamp in a foldaway darkened room. We modified the two components of the original system-extent by weighting the size of exposed body parts according to total body surface and intensity by establishing criteria for reading the fluorescence images. This resulted in body segment scores (BSSs) for specific body parts as well as two summary measures, contaminated body area (CBA) as the percentage of contaminated skin in relation to total body surface and total visual score (TVS) as an overall score combining extent and intensity of contamination. The scoring of intensity was evaluated with quantitative chemical residue analyses. Hands were the most frequently contaminated, and the back had the highest BSS. The CBA ranged between 1 and 66% and the TVS between 0.5 and 270. The farmer with the highest TVS scored 60% of the maximum possible. Residues increased with increasing fluorescence intensities with some misclassification. Fluorescent images reflected work practices and contamination mechanisms. In conclusion, the visual score, as modified by us, provides information on the body segments most contributing to dermal exposure and degree of skin contamination during pesticide applications. Fluorescence patterns reflect exposure routes. The system is low-cost and practical for developing countries. Further improvements are recommended. PMID:16126770

  8. A prospective study validating a clinical scoring system and demonstrating phenotypical-genotypical correlations in Silver-Russell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Salah; Salem, Jennifer; Thibaud, Nathalie; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Lieber, Eli; Netchine, Irène; Harbison, Madeleine D

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple clinical scoring systems have been proposed for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Here we aimed to test a clinical scoring system for SRS and to analyse the correlation between (epi)genotype and phenotype. Subjects and methods Sixty-nine patients were examined by two physicians. Clinical scores were generated for all patients, with a new, six-item scoring system: (1) small for gestational age, birth length and/or weight ≤−2SDS, (2) postnatal growth retardation (height ≤−2SDS), (3) relative macrocephaly at birth, (4) body asymmetry, (5) feeding difficulties and/or body mass index (BMI) ≤−2SDS in toddlers; (6) protruding forehead at the age of 1–3 years. Subjects were considered to have likely SRS if they met at least four of these six criteria. Molecular investigations were performed blind to the clinical data. Results The 69 patients were classified into two groups (Likely-SRS (n=60), Unlikely-SRS (n=9)). Forty-six Likely-SRS patients (76.7%) displayed either 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation (n=35; 58.3%) or maternal UPD of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) (n=11; 18.3%). Eight Unlikely-SRS patients had neither ICR1 hypomethylation nor mUPD7, whereas one patient had mUPD7. The clinical score and molecular results yielded four groups that differed significantly overall and for individual scoring system factors. Further molecular screening led identifying chromosomal abnormalities in Likely-SRS-double-negative and Unlikely-SRS groups. Four Likely-SRS-double negative patients carried a DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR hypomethylation, a mUPD16; a mUPD20 and a de novo 1q21 microdeletion. Conclusions This new scoring system is very sensitive (98%) for the detection of patients with SRS with demonstrated molecular abnormalities. Given its clinical and molecular heterogeneity, SRS could be considered as a spectrum. PMID:25951829

  9. CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc Scoring Systems for Predicting Atrial Fibrillation following Cardiac Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua; Min, Jie; Xi, Wang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhinong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical use of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scoring systems for predicting AF following cardiac surgery have been reported in previous studies and demonstrated well-validated predictive value. We sought to investigate whether the two scoring systems are effective for predicting new-onset of AF following cardiac valve surgery and to demonstrate its potential utility of clinical assessment. Methods Medical records of all patients underwent cardiac valve surgeries during the period of January 2003 and December 2013 without preoperative AF at the cardiac center of our university were reviewed. The main outcome end point of our study was the early new-onset of AF following cardiac valve surgery. Results There were overall 518 patients involved in this study, with 234 (45.17%) developed POAF following valve surgery. Patients with POAF had older age (P=0.23) and higher BMI (P=0.013) than those without POAF. History of heart failure (P=0.025), hypertension (P=0.021), previous stroke or TIA (P=0.032), coronary artery disease (P=0.001), carotid artery disease (P=0.024) and preoperative medication of statins (P=0.021) were significantly more recorded in POAF group. Patients with POAF also had higher LAD (P=0.013) and E/e’ ratio (P<0.001). The CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were significantly higher in patients with POAF (P=0.002; P<0.001), and under univariate and multivariate regression analysis the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were significant predictors of POAF (P=0.001; P<0.001). Based on stratification of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores, the Kaplan-Meier analysis obtained a higher POAF rate on patients with higher stratification of CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores (P<0.001; P<0.001). Conclusion In conclusion, CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were directly associated with the incidence of POAF following valve surgery and a higher score was strongly predictive of POAF. PMID:25849563

  10. Identifying molecular genetic features and oncogenic pathways of clear cell renal cell carcinoma through the anatomical (PADUA) scoring system

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqian; Shi, Guohai; Lin, Xiaozhu; Wu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Although the preoperative aspects and dimensions used for the PADUA scoring system were successfully applied in macroscopic clinical practice for renal tumor, the relevant molecular genetic basis remained unclear. To uncover meaningful correlations between the genetic aberrations and radiological features, we enrolled 112 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) whose clinicopathological data, genomics data and CT data were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA). Overall PADUA score and several radiological features included in the PADUA system were assigned for each ccRCC. Despite having observed no significant association between the gene mutation frequency and the overall PADUA score, correlations between gene mutations and a few radiological features (tumor rim location and tumor size) were identified. A significant association between rim location and miRNA molecular subtypes was also observed. Survival analysis revealed that tumor size > 7 cm was significantly associated with poor survival. In addition, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) on mRNA expression revealed that the high PADUA score was related to numerous cancer-related networks, especially epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) related pathways. This preliminary analysis of ccRCC revealed meaningful correlations between PADUA anatomical features and molecular basis including genomic aberrations and molecular subtypes. PMID:26848523

  11. How can the R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry scoring system aid management of a solid renal mass?

    PubMed

    Wong, M H; Cho, K Y; Ho, K L; Wong, K W; Lai, C T; Man, C M; Yiu, M K

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVES. To investigate use of the R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score in relation to the choice of treatment and postoperative complications for renal masses. DESIGN. Case series. SETTING. A tertiary referral hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Data of patients undergoing nephrectomy were collected retrospectively from a clinical database and analysed. A R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score was allocated to each renal tumour by a blinded qualified radiologist, utilising computerised imaging systems. Patient demographics, choice of surgery (radical vs partial), and approaches (open vs minimally invasive) were analysed with respect to their R.E.N.A.L. score. RESULTS. In all, 74 patients were included during the study period, of which 38 underwent partial nephrectomy and 36 underwent radical nephrectomy. No differences between the groups were found with respect to patient demographics. There were significant differences between the partial and radical nephrectomy groups in terms of their mean nephrometry score (6.9 vs 9.3, P<0.001). The mean nephrometry sum was also significantly different in the open approach versus the minimally invasive approach in patients having partial nephrectomy (7.8 vs 6.0, P=0.001). There was no difference in the postoperative 90-day morbidity and mortality in the partial nephrectomy and radical nephrectomy groups. CONCLUSIONS. The R.E.N.A.L. nephrometry score of a renal mass correlated significantly with our choice of surgery (partial vs radical) and our approach to surgery (open vs minimally invasive surgery), particularly in the partial nephrectomy group. It does not, however, correlate with postoperative complications. The nephrometry score provides a useful tool for objectively describing renal mass characteristics and enhancing better communication for the operative planning directed at renal masses. PMID:23878200

  12. Vision-guided ocular growth in a mutant chicken model with diminished visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Eric R.; Zelinka, Christopher; Tang, Junhua; Liu, Jun; Code, Kimberly A.; Petersen-Jones, Simon; Fischer, Andy J.

    2012-01-01

    Visual experience is known to guide ocular growth. We tested the hypothesis that vision-guided ocular growth is disrupted in a model system with diminished visual acuity. We examine whether ocular elongation is influenced by form-deprivation (FD) and lens-imposed defocus in the Retinopathy, Globe Enlarged (RGE) chicken. Young RGE chicks have poor visual acuity, without significant retinal pathology, resulting from a mutation in guanine nucleotide-binding protein β3 (GNB3), also known as transducin β3 or Gβ3. The mutation in GNB3 destabilizes the protein and causes a loss of Gβ3 from photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells. (Ritchey et al. 2010)FD increased ocular elongation in RGE eyes in a manner similar to that seen in wild-type (WT) eyes. By comparison, the excessive ocular elongation that results from hyperopic defocus was increased, whereas myopic defocus failed to significantly decrease ocular elongation in RGE eyes. Brief daily periods of unrestricted vision interrupting FD prevented ocular elongation in RGE chicks in a manner similar to that seen in WT chicks. Glucagonergic amacrine cells differentially expressed the immediate early gene Egr1 in response to growth-guiding stimuli in RGE retinas, but the defocus-dependent up-regulation of Egr1 was lesser in RGE retinas compared to that of WT retinas. We conclude that high visual acuity, and the retinal signaling mediated by Gβ3, is not required for emmetropization and the excessive ocular elongation caused by FD and hyperopic defocus. However, the loss of acuity and Gβ3 from RGE retinas causes enhanced responses to hyperopic defocus and diminished responses to myopic defocus. PMID:22824538

  13. Checklist and Scoring System for the Assessment of Soft Tissue Preservation in CT Examinations of Human Mummies

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Stephanie; Mc Coy, Mark R.; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Zink, Albert R.; Augat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a checklist for standardized assessment of soft tissue preservation in human mummies based on whole-body computed tomography examinations, and to add a scoring system to facilitate quantitative comparison of mummies. Computed tomography examinations of 23 mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily (17 adults, 6 children; 17 anthropogenically and 6 naturally mummified) and 7 mummies from the crypt of the Dominican Church of the Holy Spirit of Vilnius, Lithuania (5 adults, 2 children; all naturally mummified) were used to develop the checklist following previously published guidelines. The scoring system was developed by assigning equal scores for checkpoints with equivalent quality. The checklist was evaluated by intra- and inter-observer reliability. The finalized checklist was applied to compare the groups of anthropogenically and naturally mummified bodies. The finalized checklist contains 97 checkpoints and was divided into two main categories, “A. Soft Tissues of Head and Musculoskeletal System” and “B. Organs and Organ Systems”, each including various subcategories. The complete checklist had an intra-observer reliability of 98% and an inter-observer reliability of 93%. Statistical comparison revealed significantly higher values in anthropogenically compared to naturally mummified bodies for the total score and for three subcategories. In conclusion, the developed checklist allows for a standardized assessment and documentation of soft tissue preservation in whole-body computed tomography examinations of human mummies. The scoring system facilitates a quantitative comparison of the soft tissue preservation status between single mummies or mummy collections. PMID:26244862

  14. A magnetic resonance imaging-based prognostic scoring system to predict outcome in transplant-eligible patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Elias K.; Hielscher, Thomas; Kloth, Jost K.; Merz, Maximilian; Shah, Sofia; Raab, Marc S.; Hillengass, Michaela; Wagner, Barbara; Jauch, Anna; Hose, Dirk; Weber, Marc-André; Delorme, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hillengass, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse and focal bone marrow infiltration patterns detected by magnetic resonance imaging have been shown to be of prognostic significance in all stages of monoclonal plasma cell disorders and have, therefore, been incorporated into the definition of the disease. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to develop a rapidly evaluable prognostic scoring system, incorporating the most significant information acquired from magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore, the impact of bone marrow infiltration patterns on progression-free and overall survival in 161 transplant-eligible myeloma patients was evaluated. Compared to salt and pepper/minimal diffuse infiltration, moderate/severe diffuse infiltration had a negative prognostic impact on both progression-free survival (P<0.001) and overall survival (P=0.003). More than 25 focal lesions on whole-body magnetic resonance imaging or more than seven on axial magnetic resonance imaging were associated with an adverse prognosis (progression-free survival: P=0.001/0.003 and overall survival: P=0.04/0.02). A magnetic resonance imaging-based prognostic scoring system, combining grouped diffuse and focal infiltration patterns, was formulated and is applicable to whole-body as well as axial magnetic resonance imaging. The score identified high-risk patients with median progression-free and overall survival of 23.4 and 55.9 months, respectively (whole-body-based). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the magnetic resonance imaging-based prognostic score stage III (high-risk) and adverse cytogenetics are independent prognostic factors for both progression-free and overall survival (whole-body-based, progression-free survival: hazard ratio=3.65, P<0.001; overall survival: hazard ratio=5.19, P=0.005). In conclusion, we suggest a magnetic resonance imaging-based prognostic scoring system which is a robust, easy to assess and interpret parameter summarizing significant magnetic resonance imaging findings in transplant

  15. An automatic machine learning system for coronary calcium scoring in clinical non-contrast enhanced, ECG-triggered cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Takx, Richard A. P.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Presence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a system using a forest of extremely randomized trees to automatically identify and quantify CAC in routinely acquired cardiac non-contrast enhanced CT. Candidate lesions the system could not label with high certainty were automatically identified and presented to an expert who could relabel them to achieve high scoring accuracy with minimal effort. The study included 200 consecutive non-contrast enhanced ECG-triggered cardiac CTs (120 kV, 55 mAs, 3 mm section thickness). Expert CAC annotations made as part of the clinical routine served as the reference standard. CAC candidates were extracted by thresholding (130 HU) and 3-D connected component analysis. They were described by shape, intensity and spatial features calculated using multi-atlas segmentation of coronary artery centerlines from ten CTA scans. CAC was identified using a randomized decision tree ensemble classifier in a ten-fold stratified cross-validation experiment and quantified in Agatston and volume scores for each patient. After classification, candidates with posterior probability indicating uncertain labeling were selected for further assessment by an expert. Images with metal implants were excluded. In the remaining 164 images, Spearman's p between automatic and reference scores was 0.94 for both Agatston and volume scores. On average 1.8 candidate lesions per scan were subsequently presented to an expert. After correction, Spearman's p was 0.98. We have described a system for automatic CAC scoring in cardiac CT images which is able to effectively select difficult examinations for further refinement by an expert.

  16. Astronaut Charles Conrad during visual acuity experiments over Laredo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., pilot for the prime crew on the Gemini 5 space flight, takes pictures of predetermined land areas during visual acuity experiments over Laredo, Texas. The experiments will aid in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions.

  17. Astronauts Cooper and Conrad prepare cameras during visual acuity tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. (left), command pilot, and Charles Conrad Jr., pilot, the prime crew of the Gemini 5 space flight, prepare their cameras while aboard a C-130 aircraft flying near Laredo. The two astronauts are taking part in a series of visual acuity experiments to aid them in learning to identify known terrestrial features under controlled conditions.

  18. A Comparison of Patched HOTV Visual Acuity and Photoscreening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leman, Rachel; Clausen, Michelle M.; Bates, Janice; Stark, Lee; Arnold, Koni K.; Arnold, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Early detection of significant vision problems in children is a high priority for pediatricians and school nurses. Routine vision screening is a necessary part of that detection and has traditionally involved acuity charts. However, photoscreening in which "red eye" is elicited to show whether each eye is focusing may outperform routine acuity…

  19. Visual acuity thresholds of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta): an electrophysiological approach.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Soraya Moein; Musick, John A; Ochs, Alfred L

    2002-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials measure dynamic properties of the visual system by recording transient electric responses of neural tissue identified to correspond to a specific visual stimulus, such as light or a striped grid. In this study, visual evoked potentials were used to test the visual acuity of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in water. Subject animals were fitted with a Plexiglas goggle filled with filtered seawater. Stimuli of black and white striped gratings were presented to the turtles using a slide projector directing an image onto a screen via a rotatable mirror that shifted the striped pattern laterally one-half cycle. Bioelectric activity was collected using a digital averaging computer and subdermal platinum electrodes, implanted under the head scutes directly above the optic nerve and the contralateral optic tectum. To isolate the response signal from the noise, signal averaging techniques were used when collecting visual evoked potentials. The resulting response waveforms included a robust positive-negative compound that was used to track the turtle's response to visual stimulation. Acuity thresholds for these sea turtles, which were derived from linear regressions analysis of the positive-negative compound amplitudes versus stripe size, ranged from 0.130 to 0.215. This acuity level is comparable to other inshore, shallow water marine species. PMID:11913813

  20. An Automatic Assessment System of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Based on Wound Area Determination, Color Segmentation, and Healing Score Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Pedersen, Peder C.; Strong, Diane M.; Tulu, Bengisu; Agu, Emmanuel; Ignotz, Ron; He, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Background: For individuals with type 2 diabetes, foot ulcers represent a significant health issue. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate a wound assessment system to help wound clinics assess patients with foot ulcers in a way that complements their current visual examination and manual measurements of their foot ulcers. Methods: The physical components of the system consist of an image capture box, a smartphone for wound image capture and a laptop for analyzing the wound image. The wound image assessment algorithms calculate the overall wound area, color segmented wound areas, and a healing score, to provide a quantitative assessment of the wound healing status both for a single wound image and comparisons of subsequent images to an initial wound image. Results: The system was evaluated by assessing foot ulcers for 12 patients in the Wound Clinic at University of Massachusetts Medical School. As performance measures, the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value for the wound area determination algorithm tested on 32 foot ulcer images was .68. The clinical validity of our healing score algorithm relative to the experienced clinicians was measured by Krippendorff’s alpha coefficient (KAC) and ranged from .42 to .81. Conclusion: Our system provides a promising real-time method for wound assessment based on image analysis. Clinical comparisons indicate that the optimized mean-shift-based algorithm is well suited for wound area determination. Clinical evaluation of our healing score algorithm shows its potential to provide clinicians with a quantitative method for evaluating wound healing status. PMID:26253144

  1. A phytochemical-rich diet may explain the absence of age-related decline in visual acuity of Amazonian hunter-gatherers in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    London, Douglas S; Beezhold, Bonnie

    2015-02-01

    Myopia is absent in undisturbed hunter-gatherers but ubiquitous in modern populations. The link between dietary phytochemicals and eye health is well established, although transition away from a wild diet has reduced phytochemical variety. We hypothesized that when larger quantities and greater variety of wild, seasonal phytochemicals are consumed in a food system, there will be a reduced prevalence of degenerative-based eye disease as measured by visual acuity. We compared food systems and visual acuity across isolated Amazonian Kawymeno Waorani hunter-gatherers and neighboring Kichwa subsistence agrarians, using dietary surveys, dietary pattern observation, and Snellen Illiterate E visual acuity examinations. Hunter-gatherers consumed more food species (130 vs. 63) and more wild plants (80 vs. 4) including 76 wild fruits, thereby obtaining larger variety and quantity of phytochemicals than agrarians. Visual acuity was inversely related to age only in agrarians (r = -.846, P < .001). As hypothesized, when stratified by age (<40 and ≥ 40 years), Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that hunter-gatherers maintained high visual acuity throughout life, whereas agrarian visual acuity declined (P values < .001); visual acuity of younger participants was high across the board, however, did not differ between groups (P > .05). This unusual absence of juvenile-onset vision problems may be related to local, organic, whole food diets of subsistence food systems isolated from modern food production. Our results suggest that intake of a wider variety of plant foods supplying necessary phytochemicals for eye health may help maintain visual acuity and prevent degenerative eye conditions as humans age. PMID:25636674

  2. Application of a score system to evaluate the risk of malnutrition in a multiple hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An increased but unpredictable risk of malnutrition is associated with hospitalization, especially in children with chronic diseases. We investigated the applicability of Screening Tool for Risk of Impaired Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids), an instrument proposed to estimate the risk of malnutrition in hospitalized children. We also evaluated the role of age and co-morbidities as risk for malnutrition. Methods The STRONGkids consists of 4 items providing a score that classifies a patient in low, moderate, high risk for malnutrition. A prospective observational multi-centre study was performed in 12 Italian hospitals. Children 1–18 years consecutively admitted and otherwise unselected were enrolled. Their STRONGkids score was obtained and compared with the actual nutritional status expressed as BMI and Height for Age SD-score. Results Of 144 children (75 males, mean age 6.5 ± 4.5 years), 52 (36%) had an underlying chronic disease. According to STRONGkids, 46 (32%) children were at low risk, 76 (53%) at moderate risk and 22 (15%) at high risk for malnutrition. The latter had significantly lower Height for Age values (mean SD value -1.07 ± 2.08; p = 0.008) and BMI values (mean SD-values -0.79 ± 2.09; p = 0.0021) in comparison to other groups. However, only 29 children were actually malnourished. Conclusions The STRONGkids is easy to administer. It is highly sensitive but not specific. It may be used as a very preliminary screening tool to be integrated with other clinical data in order to reliably predict the risk of malnutrition. PMID:24373709

  3. Assessment of a HER2 scoring system for colorectal cancer: results from a validation study.

    PubMed

    Valtorta, Emanuele; Martino, Cosimo; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Penaullt-Llorca, Frédérique; Viale, Giuseppe; Risio, Mauro; Rugge, Massimo; Grigioni, Walter; Bencardino, Katia; Lonardi, Sara; Zagonel, Vittorina; Leone, Francesco; Noe, Johannes; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Pinto, Carmine; Labianca, Roberto; Mosconi, Stefania; Graiff, Claudio; Aprile, Giuseppe; Frau, Barbara; Garufi, Carlo; Loupakis, Fotios; Racca, Patrizia; Tonini, Giuseppe; Lauricella, Calogero; Veronese, Silvio; Truini, Mauro; Siena, Salvatore; Marsoni, Silvia; Gambacorta, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    We sought to develop criteria for ERBB2-positivity (HER2) in colorectal cancer to ensure accurate identification of ERBB2-amplified metastatic colorectal cancer patients suitable for enrollment in a phase II trial of ERBB2-targeted therapy (HERACLES trial). A two-step approach was used. In step 1, a consensus panel of pathologists adapted existing protocols for use in colorectal cancer to test ERBB2 expression and amplification. Collegial revision of an archival test cohort of colorectal cancer samples led to specific recommendations for adapting current breast and gastric cancer criteria for scoring ERBB2 in colorectal cancer. In step 2, from September 2012 to January 2015, colorectal-specific ERBB2 testing protocols and ERBB2 scoring criteria were used to centrally screen for ERBB2-positive KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer patients to be enrolled in the HERACLES trial (clinical validation cohort). In both archival test (N=256) and clinical validation (N=830) cohorts, a clinically sizeable 5% fraction of KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer patients was found to be ERBB2-positive according to the colorectal cancer-specific ERBB2 scoring criteria. ERBB2-positive tumors showed ERBB2 immunostaining consisting of intense membranous ERBB2 protein expression, corresponding to homogenous ERBB2 amplification, in >50% of cells. None of the immunohistochemistry 0 or 1+ cases was amplified. Concordance between SISH and FISH was 100%. In conclusion, we propose specific criteria for defining ERBB2-positivity in colorectal cancer (HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria). In a phase II trial of trastuzumab and lapatinib in a cetuximab-resistant population, HERACLES Diagnostic Criteria shaped the selection of patients and defined ERBB2 as a predictive marker for response to ERBB2-targeted therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26449765

  4. Clinical utility of a new endoscopic scoring system for Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Maeda, Osamu; Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical value of the newly modified Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn’s disease (mSES-CD). METHODS: Seventy-six Crohn’s disease (CD) patients who underwent transanal double balloon endoscopy (DBE) in our hospital between 2003 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. DBE is defined as small intestinal endoscopy using two attached balloons. We included patients with stenosis which hampered passage of the scope and those who underwent DBE with observation for at least 80 cm from the ileocecal valve. Our new mSES-CD assesses the endoscopic activity of two consecutive small intestinal segments located 0-40 cm and 40-80 cm from the ileocecal valve by DBE, in addition to the activity of four colorectal segments. To compare the usefulness of mSES-CD with SES-CD, we similarly divided the patients into two groups according to total mSES-CD score (low disease activity group, < 4; high disease activity group, ≥ 4). The clinical value of mSES-CD in predicting clinical outcome in patients with CD was evaluated using the occurrence of surgery after DBE as an endpoint. RESULTS: Median age of the 76 CD patients was 36 years (range, 16-71). Thirty-nine patients had stenosis which hampered passage of the DBE to 80 cm on the proximal side from the ileocecal valve. Median evaluable length of small intestine by DBE was 80 cm (range, 3-200). A total of 74 patients had one or more small intestinal lesions detected by DBE, of which 62 (83.8%) were within 80 cm of the ileocecal valve on the proximal side. Only two patients (2.7%) with proximal-side lesions more than 80 cm from the ileocecal valve did not have lesions within 80 cm. Patients with high mSES-CD scores showed significantly shorter surgery-free survival than those with low scores (P < 0.05). In contrast, surgery-free survival did not significantly differ between the low and high SES-CD groups (P > 0.05). Multivariate analysis by a Cox proportional hazards model identified mSES-CD as an independent

  5. Implementation of a Pediatric Early Warning Scoring System at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kimberly; Collado, Jerry Christopher; Keller, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Despite the addition of family-activated rapid response to the rapid response team algorithm, a children's hospital did not see an increase in utilization of the pediatric rapid response team. A Pediatric Early Warning Score in non-ICU pediatric inpatient units was implemented to increase the number of rapid response team activations. A retrospective review of the 130-bed facility, over a 12-month period, revealed an increase in pediatric rapid response calls, with a subsequent decrease in code team activations. The authors outline implementation strategies and discuss barriers encountered throughout the process, along with implications for nurse leaders. PMID:27575799

  6. A messy reality: an analysis of New Zealand's elective surgery scoring system via media sources, 2000-2006.

    PubMed

    Derrett, Sarah; Cousins, Kim; Gauld, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Waiting lists for elective procedures are a characteristic feature of tax-funded universal health systems. New Zealand has gained a reputation for its 'booking system' for waiting list management, introduced in the early-1990s. The New Zealand system uses criteria to 'score' and then 'book' qualifying patients for surgery. This article aims to (i) describe key issues focused on by the media, (ii) identify local strategies and (iii) present evidence of variation. Newspaper sources were searched (2000-2006). A total of 1199 booking system stories were identified. Findings demonstrate, from a national system perspective, the extraordinarily difficult nature of maintaining overall control and coordination. Equity and national consistency are affected when hospitals respond to local pressure by reducing access to elective treatment. Findings suggest that central government probably needs to be closely involved in local-level management and policy adjustments; that through the study period, the New Zealand system appears to have been largely out of the control of government; and that governments elsewhere may need to be cautious when considering developing similar systems. Developing and implementing scoring and booking systems may always be a 'messy reality' with unintended consequences and throwing regional differences in service management and access into stark relief. PMID:22815091

  7. Public versus Private Healthcare Systems following Discharge from the ICU: A Propensity Score-Matched Comparison of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Rosa, Regis Goulart; Duso, Bruno Achutti; Haas, Jaqueline Sanguiogo; Savi, Augusto; Cabral, Cláudia da Rocha; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; de Oliveira, Roselaine Pinheiro; Antônio, Ana Carolina Peçanha; Castro, Priscylla de Souza; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The long-term outcomes of patients after discharge from tertiary ICUs as they relate to the public versus private healthcare systems in Brazil have not yet been evaluated. Materials and Methods. A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted to compare the all-cause mortality and the physical functional status (PFS) 24 months after discharge from the ICU between adult patients treated in the public and private healthcare systems. A propensity score- (PS-) matched comparison of all causes of mortality and PFS 24 months after discharge from the ICU was performed. Results. In total, 928 patients were discharged from the ICU including 172 (18.6%) patients in the public and 756 (81.4%) patients in the private healthcare system. The results of the PS-matched comparison of all-cause mortality revealed higher mortality rates among the patients of the public healthcare system compared to those of the private healthcare system (47.3% versus 27.6%, P = 0.003). The comparison of the PS-matched Karnofsky performance and Lawton activities of daily living scores between the ICU survivors of the public and private healthcare systems revealed no significant differences. Conclusions. The patients of private healthcare system exhibited significantly greater survival rates than the patients of the public healthcare system with similar PFS following ICU discharge. PMID:27123450

  8. How I handled ambiguity in a system to read music scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttenberg, Alan

    1992-11-01

    In a program for reading printed music, a variety of low level feature detectors were used to extract sufficient information to reconstruct the score. All feature detectors were unreliable to some extent, and were biased towards yielding false positives rather than missing features. In order to reconstruct the score, conflicting information from the feature detectors needed to be recognized and eliminated. All objects as well as their geometric and semantic relations were represented in an object oriented framework. Ambiguity (implemented as a generic predicate) was defined -- and explicitly represented -- in terms of these relationships. Examples of ambiguous relationships include: An accidental and a note head having an on-top-of geometric relationship, or the total duration of notes in a measure not being equal to the notated time signature. A method inspired by Waltz filtering was used to produce a consistent, unambiguous interpretation. Waltz filtering is a symbolic constraint propagation technique which has been applied to line drawings. During interpretation attention was focused on objects which had ambiguous relations. Ambiguity was iteratively reduced or removed by using a variety of methods employing information gathered from local unambiguous relations.

  9. [Prediction of postoperative visual acuity in retinal detachment with macular involvement].

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, T; Fukuda, T; Kishimoto, M; Ogura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We used laser interferometry (LI) and a potential acuity meter (PAM) to predict visual acuity after surgery for patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with macular involvement. Thirty one eyes of 31 patients with retinal detachment were treated with scleral buckling procedures. Postoperative visual acuity was correlated with preoperative measurements of the LI and PAM, preoperative visual acuity by Landort's ring, and the estimated duration of macular detachment. The correlation between the duration of macular detachment and the postoperative visual acuity was not good (r = 0.55, p < 0.01). Although the preoperative visual acuity showed a relatively good correlation with postoperative visual acuity (r = 0.62, p < 0.01), the results of the LI and PAM provided a better correlation (LI; r = 0.73, PAM; r = 0.71). Our results suggest that the LI and PAM are useful to predict the visual acuity after retinal reattachment in patients with preoperative macular detachment. PMID:7732924

  10. A scoring system based on artificial neural network for predicting 10-year survival in stage II A colon cancer patients after radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wu; Lu, Shi-Xun; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Li, Pei-Xing; Yun, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Wan, De-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20% patients with stage II A colon cancer will develop recurrent disease post-operatively. The present study aims to develop a scoring system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for predicting 10-year survival outcome. The clinical and molecular data of 117 stage II A colon cancer patients from Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were used for training set and test set; poor pathological grading (score 49), reduced expression of TGFBR2 (score 33), over-expression of TGF-β (score 45), MAPK (score 32), pin1 (score 100), β-catenin in tumor tissue (score 50) and reduced expression of TGF-β in normal mucosa (score 22) were selected as the prognostic risk predictors. According to the developed scoring system, the patients were divided into 3 subgroups, which were supposed with higher, moderate and lower risk levels. As a result, for the 3 subgroups, the 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 16.7%, 62.9% and 100% (P < 0.001); and the 10-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 16.7%, 61.8% and 98.8% (P < 0.001) respectively. It showed that this scoring system for stage II A colon cancer could help to predict long-term survival and screen out high-risk individuals for more vigorous treatment. PMID:27008710

  11. Morbid anatomy of ‘erosive osteoarthritis’ of the interphalangeal finger joints: an optimised scoring system to monitor disease progression in affected joints

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Gust; Wittoek, Ruth; Cruyssen, Bert Vander; Elewaut, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate a quantitative radiographic scoring system, the Ghent University Scoring System (GUSS), with better ability to detect progression over a shorter period of time in erosive osteoarthritis (OA) of the interphalangeal (IP) finger joints compared with the existing anatomic phase scoring system. Methods Thirty IP finger joints showing erosive features at baseline or follow-up were selected from 18 patients with erosive hand OA. Posteroanterior radiographs of these joints obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months—totalling 90 images—were used for the study. All joints were first scored according to the original anatomic phase scoring system. Erosive progression and signs of repair or remodelling were then scored by indicating the proportion of normal subchondral bone, subchondral plate and joint space on an 11-point rating scale (range 0–100 with 10 unit increases). Inter- and intrareader reproducibility was studied using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Based on the within-variance of two readers, the smallest detectable change (SDC) was calculated and allowed identification of joints with changes above the SDC as ‘progressors’. Results Longitudinal inter-reader ICC scores rated well for all variables and the total score (ICC 0.86–0.93). To identify ‘real’ change over background noise, a change of at least 40 units on the total score (range 0–300) over 12 months (SDC 0–12:36.0), and 50 units over 6 months (SDC 0–6:47.6) had to be present. 60% of the 30 joints were identified as ‘progressors’ over 6 months compared with 33.3% with the classical anatomical scoring system, and 70% versus 56.6%, respectively, over 12 months. Conclusion GUSS, is a reliable method to score radiographic change over time in erosive IP OA and detects more progression over a shorter period of time than the classical scoring system. PMID:19948521

  12. The sequential organ failure assessment score as a useful predictor for estimating the prognosis of systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients being treated with extracorporeal blood purification.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Hiroki; Omori, Saori; Kazama, Junichiro J; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2003-08-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Extracorporeal blood purification procedures are becoming important for treating these patients. However, the cost of these procedures is high. Therefore, a prognostic marker would be helpful. To establish the reliability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score as a prognostic indicator, we evaluated daily changes in the SOFA score of 40 SIRS patients who needed blood purification procedures such as continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), endotoxin adsorption, bilirubin adsorption, and/or plasma exchange. Twenty patients survived and 20 died. Although the baseline scores of the two groups (survivors and non-survivors) did not differ, both the maximum value of the SOFA score and the DeltaSOFA score (the difference between the maximum SOFA and baseline SOFA scores) were significantly higher in the non-survivor group. The mortality rate among patients with a maximum SOFA score greater than or equal to 18 or a DeltaSOFA score greater than or equal to 3 was higher than for the rest of the patients. The changes in the SOFA score correlated well with the outcomes of the SIRS patients. The maximum SOFA score and the DeltaSOFA score are therefore likely to be useful prognostic markers. PMID:12887731

  13. Panic attacks and interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, G J; Sandler, L S; Wilson, K G; Norton, G R

    1993-02-01

    It has been suggested that perception of visceral changes, and cognitive reactions to such changes, may be important for triggering panic attacks. It remains to be determined, however, whether people with panic attacks are actually characterized by enhanced perceptual acuity for interoceptive stimuli. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between panic attacks and awareness for cardiac sensations using an objective heartbeat discrimination procedure. Twenty panickers and 20 nonpanickers were given 60 trials of the Whitehead heartbeat discrimination procedure. Thirty trials were given during rest and 30 following hyperventilation. Results indicated that panic attacks were not related to enhanced interoceptive acuity for cardiac sensations, either at rest or following hyperventilation. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to cognitive models of panic. PMID:8442744

  14. Influence of loupes and age on the near visual acuity of practicing dentists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenberger, Martina; Perrin, Philippe; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Bringolf, Ueli; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the near visual acuity of 40 dentists and its improvement by using different magnification devices. The acuity was tested with miniaturized E-optotype tests on a negatoscope under the following conditions: 1. natural visual acuity, 300 mm; 2. single lens loupe, 2×, 250 mm; 3. Galilean loupe, 2.5×, 380 mm; and 4. Keplerian loupe, 4.3×, 400 mm. In part 1, the influence of the magnification devices was investigated for all dentists. The Keplerian loupe obtained the highest visual acuity (4.64), followed by the Galilean loupe (2.43), the single lens loupe (1.42), and natural visual acuity (1.19). For part 2, the dentists were classified according to their age (=40 years). The younger dentists' group achieved a significantly higher visual acuity with all magnification devices (p<0.001). For part 3, the dentists were grouped according to their natural visual acuity. The group with the higher natural visual acuity achieved significantly higher visual acuity with all magnification devices than did the group of dentists with the lower natural visual acuity (p<0.01). It can be concluded that near visual acuity varies highly between individuals and decreases during the lifetime. Independent of age or natural vision, visual acuity can be significantly improved by using magnification devices.

  15. Validation of WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) for myelodysplastic syndromes and comparison with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A study of the International Working Group for Prognosis in Myelodysplasia (IWG-PM).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Tuechler, H; Malcovati, L; Schanz, J; Sanz, G; Garcia-Manero, G; Solé, F; Bennett, J M; Bowen, D; Fenaux, P; Dreyfus, F; Kantarjian, H; Kuendgen, A; Levis, A; Cermak, J; Fonatsch, C; Le Beau, M M; Slovak, M L; Krieger, O; Luebbert, M; Maciejewski, J; Magalhaes, S M M; Miyazaki, Y; Pfeilstöcker, M; Sekeres, M A; Sperr, W R; Stauder, R; Tauro, S; Valent, P; Vallespi, T; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Germing, U; Haase, D; Greenberg, P L; Cazzola, M

    2015-07-01

    A risk-adapted treatment strategy is mandatory for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We refined the World Health Organization (WHO)-classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) by determining the impact of the newer clinical and cytogenetic features, and we compared its prognostic power to that of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A population of 5326 untreated MDS was considered. We analyzed single WPSS parameters and confirmed that the WHO classification and severe anemia provide important prognostic information in MDS. A strong correlation was found between the WPSS including the new cytogenetic risk stratification and WPSS adopting original criteria. We then compared WPSS with the IPSS-R prognostic system. A highly significant correlation was found between the WPSS and IPSS-R risk classifications. Discrepancies did occur among lower-risk patients in whom the number of dysplastic hematopoietic lineages as assessed by morphology did not reflect the severity of peripheral blood cytopenias and/or increased marrow blast count. Moreover, severe anemia has higher prognostic weight in the WPSS versus IPSS-R model. Overall, both systems well represent the prognostic risk of MDS patients defined by WHO morphologic criteria. This study provides relevant in formation for the implementation of risk-adapted strategies in MDS. PMID:25721895

  16. Accommodation, Acuity, and their Relationship to Emmetropization in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones, Lisa A.; Friedman, Nina E.; Frane, Sara L.; Lin, Wendy K.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Zadnik, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between accommodation, visual acuity, and emmetropization in human infancy. Methods Defocus at distance and near (57cm) was assessed using Mohindra and dynamic retinoscopy, respectively, in 262 normal birthweight infants at 3, 9, and 18 months of age. Preferential looking provided acuity data at the same ages. The spherical equivalent refractive error was measured by cycloplegic retinoscopy (cyclopentolate 1%). Results Univariate linear regression analyses showed no associations between the change in refractive error and defocus at distance or near. Change in refractive error was linearly related to the accommodative response at distance (R2 = 0.17, p<0.0001) and near (R2 = 0.13, p<0.0001). The ten subjects with the poorest emmetropization relative to the change predicted by the linear effects of their refractive error had higher average levels of hyperopic defocus at distance and near (p-values <0.043). Logistic regression showed a decrease in the odds of reaching +2.00D or less hyperopia by 18 months with increasing levels of hyperopia at 3 months, or if Mohindra retinoscopy was myopic combined with acuity better than the median level of 1.25 logMAR (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.78 (95% CI = 0.68, 0.88)). Conclusions The level of cycloplegic refractive error was the best single factor for predicting emmetropization by 18 months of age, with smaller contributions from visual acuity and Mohindra retinoscopy. The lack of correlation between defocus and change in refractive error does not support a simple model of emmetropization in response to the level of hyperopic defocus. Infants were capable of maintaining accurate average levels of accommodation across a range of moderate hyperopic refractive errors at 3 months of age. The association between the change in refractive error and accommodative response suggests that the amount of accommodation is a plausible visual signal for emmetropization. PMID

  17. Nutrient Density Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Annette; Thompson, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Announces a nutrient density food scoring system called the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ). It expresses the ratio between the percent RDA of a nutrient and the percent daily allowance of calories in a food. (Author/SA)

  18. Improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity correlates with perception of improved hand function in patients after hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Kon, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate how well patients’ perceptions related to the improvements in their hand function during hospitalization. [Subjects] Sixteen patients who were hospitalized after hand surgery. [Methods] Using the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand edition of the Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; tactile roughness discrimination acuity, motor imagery, motor function, sensory function, and pain of the upper limb were assessed at admission and discharge. Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated using the differences in all assessment items at admission and discharge. A multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) was performed to investigate factors that correlated with improvements in Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. [Results] The improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity was significantly associated with patient perception of improved hand function. [Conclusion] The results suggest that an improvement in tactile roughness discrimination acuity was most strongly correlated with patient perception of improved hand function. PMID:27190473

  19. Improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity correlates with perception of improved hand function in patients after hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Kon, Noriko

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate how well patients' perceptions related to the improvements in their hand function during hospitalization. [Subjects] Sixteen patients who were hospitalized after hand surgery. [Methods] Using the Japanese Society for Surgery of the Hand edition of the Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; tactile roughness discrimination acuity, motor imagery, motor function, sensory function, and pain of the upper limb were assessed at admission and discharge. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated using the differences in all assessment items at admission and discharge. A multiple regression analysis (stepwise method) was performed to investigate factors that correlated with improvements in Quick-Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. [Results] The improvement of tactile roughness discrimination acuity was significantly associated with patient perception of improved hand function. [Conclusion] The results suggest that an improvement in tactile roughness discrimination acuity was most strongly correlated with patient perception of improved hand function. PMID:27190473

  20. A new extranodal scoring system based on the prognostically relevant extranodal sites in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified treated with chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hee Sang; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Suh, Cheolwon; Huh, Jooryung

    2016-08-01

    Extranodal involvement is a well-known prognostic factor in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Nevertheless, the prognostic impact of the extranodal scoring system included in the conventional international prognostic index (IPI) has been questioned in an era where rituximab treatment has become widespread. We investigated the prognostic impacts of individual sites of extranodal involvement in 761 patients with DLBCL who received rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy. Subsequently, we established a new extranodal scoring system based on extranodal sites, showing significant prognostic correlation, and compared this system with conventional scoring systems, such as the IPI and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-IPI (NCCN-IPI). An internal validation procedure, using bootstrapped samples, was also performed for both univariate and multivariate models. Using multivariate analysis with a backward variable selection, we found nine extranodal sites (the liver, lung, spleen, central nervous system, bone marrow, kidney, skin, adrenal glands, and peritoneum) that remained significant for use in the final model. Our newly established extranodal scoring system, based on these sites, was better correlated with patient survival than standard scoring systems, such as the IPI and the NCCN-IPI. Internal validation by bootstrapping demonstrated an improvement in model performance of our modified extranodal scoring system. Our new extranodal scoring system, based on the prognostically relevant sites, may improve the performance of conventional prognostic models of DLBCL in the rituximab era and warrants further external validation using large study populations. PMID:27167532

  1. Handedness and behavioural inhibition system/behavioural activation system (BIS/BAS) scores: A replication and extension of Wright, Hardie, and Wilson (2009).

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alan A; Kaack, Imogen H; Corr, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    The Annett Hand Preference Questionnaire (AHPQ) as modified by Briggs and Nebes was administered along with Carver and White's behavioural inhibition system (BIS) and behavioural activation system (BAS) scale and a shortened form of the Big Five personality questionnaire to 92 university students. After eliminating the data from five respondents who reported having changed handedness and one outlier, there was a significant sex difference in mean BIS scores, with females (n = 43) scoring higher than males (n = 43). Replicating the results of Wright, Hardie and Wilson, non-right-handers (n = 36) had significantly higher mean BIS score than right-handers (n = 50). Controlling for sex of participant, neuroticism and BAS sub-scale scores in hierarchical regression analyses left this BIS effect substantially unaffected. There was no handedness or sex difference on any of the three BAS sub-scales. Further analyses revealed no association between strength, as distinct from direction, of handedness and BIS (or BAS) scores. The findings are discussed with reference to recent developments in reinforcement sensitivity theory on which BIS/BAS variables are based. PMID:25697855

  2. The use of the Balanced ScoreCard (BSC) in the model for investment and evaluation of medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Niss, K U

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the Balanced ScoreCard (BSC) in the MIEMIS meso-model (Model for Investment and Evaluation of Medical Information Systems). The scope of the MIEMIS model is to integrate the evaluation process into the whole lifecycle of an information system using both a prospective and a retrospective approach. We conclude, that the MIEMIS-model has benefited from implementing the BSC into the model due to the fact, that the BSC can support the project management work. This approach helps ensuring, that the new information systems are fulfilled according to the plan and with a balance between the four perspectives (financial, customer/user, internal, and innovation/learning perspective) to avoid that the financial aspect is the driving force in developing and implementing a new information system, for example. PMID:10724849

  3. A scoring system for assessing the severity of acute diarrhea of adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hong-li; Ma, Su-xia; Qi, Hai-yu; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Yan; Yin, Cheng-hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diarrhea is frequently seen in developed and developing countries, and severe diarrhea is characterized by the high risk of death. Thus, it is very important to assess the severity of diarrhea early. We conducted a multi-center study to identify risk factors for the severity of diarrhea in adult patients and formulate an adult diarrhea state score (ADSS) for out-patient clinicians. METHODS: A total of 219 adult patients with acute diarrhea were divided into two groups: 132 patients with mild diarrhea and 87 with severe diarrhea. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for the severity of diarrhea. The risk factors were assessed and an ADSS was formulated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was made to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ADSS, and the Kappa test was used to confirm the diagnostic reliability. RESULTS: Five risk factors for evaluating the severity of diarrhea in adults included age (P<0.05), axillary temperature (P<0.01), mean arterial pressure (P<0.01), white blood cell count (WBC; P<0.01), and WBC in stool (P<0.01). The area under the ROC curve for ADSS was 0.958 when the cut off value was 4 (a sensitivity of 0.909; a specificity of 0.874), and the Kappa value was 0.781 (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The risk factors associated with the pathogenic condition of diarrhea were identified, quantified and formulated into an ADSS, which has high diagnostic accuracy and reliability for the early identification of patients with severe acute diarrhea. PMID:27313808

  4. Olympic Scoring of English Compositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follman, John; Panther, Edward

    1974-01-01

    Examines empirically the efficacy of utilizing Olympic diving and gymnastic scoring systems for grading graduate students' English compositions. Results indicated that such scoring rules do not produce ratings different in reliability or in level from conventional letter grades. (ED)

  5. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  6. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules. PMID:27385551

  7. Systems view of adipogenesis via novel omics-driven and tissue-specific activity scoring of network functional modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, Isar; Lombardo, Rosario; Lauria, Mario; Morine, Melissa J.; Moyseos, Petros; Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Nolen, Greg T.; Knox, Bridgett; Sloper, Daniel; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    The investigation of the complex processes involved in cellular differentiation must be based on unbiased, high throughput data processing methods to identify relevant biological pathways. A number of bioinformatics tools are available that can generate lists of pathways ranked by statistical significance (i.e. by p-value), while ideally it would be desirable to functionally score the pathways relative to each other or to other interacting parts of the system or process. We describe a new computational method (Network Activity Score Finder - NASFinder) to identify tissue-specific, omics-determined sub-networks and the connections with their upstream regulator receptors to obtain a systems view of the differentiation of human adipocytes. Adipogenesis of human SBGS pre-adipocyte cells in vitro was monitored with a transcriptomic data set comprising six time points (0, 6, 48, 96, 192, 384 hours). To elucidate the mechanisms of adipogenesis, NASFinder was used to perform time-point analysis by comparing each time point against the control (0 h) and time-lapse analysis by comparing each time point with the previous one. NASFinder identified the coordinated activity of seemingly unrelated processes between each comparison, providing the first systems view of adipogenesis in culture. NASFinder has been implemented into a web-based, freely available resource associated with novel, easy to read visualization of omics data sets and network modules.

  8. The High Performance of Dutch and Flemish 15-Year-Old Native Pupils: Explaining Country Differences in Math Scores between Highly Stratified Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokic-Breuer, Tijana; Dronkers, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to explain the high scores of 15-year-old native pupils in The Netherlands and Flanders by comparing them with the scores of pupils in countries with the same highly stratified educational system: Wallonia, the German "Lander," the Swiss German cantons, and Austria. We use the data from the Programme for International Pupil…

  9. Measuring Quality in Rural Kindergarten Classrooms: Reliability and Validity Evidence for the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, Kindergarten-Third Grade (CLASS K-3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandilos, Lia E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the structural validity and stability of scores on a measure of global classroom quality, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, Kindergarten-Third Grade (CLASS K-3; Pianta, La Paro, & Hamre, 2008). Using data from a sample of 417 kindergarten classrooms in the rural Southern and Mid-Atlantic…

  10. State and Local Efforts to Investigate the Validity and Reliability of Scores from Teacher Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlihy, Corinne; Karger, Ezra; Pollard, Cynthia; Hill, Heather C.; Kraft, Matthew A.; Williams, Megan; Howard, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Context: In the past two years, states have implemented sweeping reforms to their teacher evaluation systems in response to Race to the Top legislation and, more recently, NCLB waivers. With these new systems, policymakers hope to make teacher evaluation both more rigorous and more grounded in specific job performance domains such as teaching…

  11. Change of teicoplanin loading dose requirement for incremental increases of systemic inflammatory response syndrome score in the setting of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Takata, Tohru; Irie, Keiichi; Sano, Kazunori; Imakyure, Osamu; Mishima, Kenichi; Futagami, Koujiro

    2016-08-01

    Background Target trough concentrations are recommended for teicoplanin (TEIC) to minimize its adverse effects and to maximize efficacy in sepsis caused by grampositive cocci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, optimal doses to attain proper trough values in patients with sepsis have not yet been well established for TEIC. Objective This study investigated whether the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score could predict the pharmacokinetics of TEIC in patients with sepsis. Setting This study was conducted at Fukuoka University Hospital in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients using TEIC between April 2012 and March 2015. SIRS positive was defined as infection with a SIRS score ≥2. Estimates of pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a Bayesian method. Creatinine clearance rates were estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (eCcr). Main outcome measure Change of TEIC loading dose requirement for incremental increases of SIRS score. Results In total, 133 patients were enrolled: 50 non-SIRS patients and 83 patients with SIRS. The TEIC plasma trough concentration was significantly lower in SIRS than non-SIRS patients (15.7 ± 7.1 vs. 20.1 ± 8.6 μg/mL; P < 0.01), although there was no significant difference in the loading dose administered. Moreover, SIRS scores were increasingly predictive of eCcr and TEIC clearance in a stepwise manner. To achieve the target trough concentration (15-30 μg/mL), the optimal doses required in non-SIRS versus SIRS patients were 12-24 versus 18-30 mg/kg/day, respectively, during the first 48 h. Conclusions These findings suggest that the pharmacokinetics of TEIC are altered in SIRS patients, who required higher doses than non-SIRS patients to achieve the target trough concentration. We suggest that the SIRS score can become a new modality to determine the initial TEIC loading dose. PMID:27125378

  12. Reproducibility of the NEPTUNE descriptor-based scoring system on whole-slide images and histologic and ultrastructural digital images.

    PubMed

    Barisoni, Laura; Troost, Jonathan P; Nast, Cynthia; Bagnasco, Serena; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Hodgin, Jeffrey; Palmer, Matthew; Rosenberg, Avi; Gasim, Adil; Liensziewski, Chrysta; Merlino, Lino; Chien, Hui-Ping; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M; Gaut, Joseph; Song, Peter; Holzman, Lawrence; Gibson, Debbie; Kretzler, Matthias; Gillespie, Brenda W; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    The multicenter Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) digital pathology scoring system employs a novel and comprehensive methodology to document pathologic features from whole-slide images, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural digital images. To estimate inter- and intra-reader concordance of this descriptor-based approach, data from 12 pathologists (eight NEPTUNE and four non-NEPTUNE) with experience from training to 30 years were collected. A descriptor reference manual was generated and a webinar-based protocol for consensus/cross-training implemented. Intra-reader concordance for 51 glomerular descriptors was evaluated on jpeg images by seven NEPTUNE pathologists scoring 131 glomeruli three times (Tests I, II, and III), each test following a consensus webinar review. Inter-reader concordance of glomerular descriptors was evaluated in 315 glomeruli by all pathologists; interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (244 cases, whole-slide images) and four ultrastructural podocyte descriptors (178 cases, jpeg images) were evaluated once by six and five pathologists, respectively. Cohen's kappa for inter-reader concordance for 48/51 glomerular descriptors with sufficient observations was moderate (0.40scoring system enables novel morphologic profiling of renal structures. For all histologic and ultrastructural descriptors tested with

  13. Inclusion of ‘ICU-Day’ in a Logistic Scoring System Improves Mortality Prediction in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Fabian; Heldwein, Matthias B.; Bayer, Ole; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Wahlers, Thorsten; Hekmat, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay is a predictor of mortality. The length of ICU stay has never been considered as a variable in an additive scoring system. How could this variable be integrated into a scoring system? Does this integration improve mortality prediction? Material/Methods The ‘modified CArdiac SUrgery Score’ (CASUS) was generated by implementing the length of stay as a new variable to the ‘additive CASUS’. The ‘logistic CASUS’ already considers this variable. We defined outcome as ICU mortality and statistically compared the three CASUS models. Discrimination, comparison of receiver operating characteristic curves (DeLong’s method), and calibration (observed/expected ratio) were analyzed on days 1–13. Results Between 2007 and 2010, we included 5207 cardiac surgery patients in this prospective study. The mean age was 67.2±10.9 years. The mean length of ICU stay was 4.6±7.0 days and ICU mortality was 5.9%. All scores had good discrimination, with a mean area under the curve of 0.883 for the additive and modified, and 0.895 for the ‘logistic CASUS’. DeLong analysis showed superiority in favor of the logistic model as from day 5. The calibration of the logistic model was good. We identified overestimation (days 1–5) and accurate (days 6–9) calibration for the additive and ‘modified CASUS’. The ‘modified CASUS’ remained accurate but the ‘additive CASUS’ tended to underestimate the risk of mortality (days 10–13). Conclusions The integration of length of ICU stay as a variable improves mortality prediction significantly. An ‘ICU-day’ variable should be included into a logistic but not an additive model. PMID:26137928

  14. Mortality Risk Prediction by Application of Pediatric Risk of Mortality Scoring System in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh, Ali; Noori, Noor Mohammad; Reisi, Mohsen; Fayyazi, Afshin; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) score is one of the scores used by many pediatricians for prediction of the mortality risk in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Herein, we intend to evaluate the efficacy of PRISM score in prediction of mortality rate in PICU. Methods In this cohort study, 221 children admitted during an 18-month period to PICU, were enrolled. PRISM score and mortality risk were calculated. Follow up was noted as death or discharge. Results were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve, ROC curve, Log Rank (Mantel-Cox), Logistic regression model using SPSS 15. Findings Totally, 57% of the patients were males. Forty seven patients died during the study period. The PRISM score was 0-10 in 71%, 11-20 in 20.4% and 21-30 in 8.6%. PRISM score showed an increase of mortality from 10.2% in 0-10 score patients to 73.8% in 21-30 score ones. The survival time significantly decreased as PRISM score increased (P≤0.001). A 7.2 fold mortality risk was present in patients with score 21-30 compared with score 0-10. ROC curve analysis for mortality according to PRISM score showed an under curve area of 80.3%. Conclusion PRISM score is a good predictor for evaluation of mortality risk in PICU. PMID:24800015

  15. Comparison of different electrocardiographic scoring systems for detection of any previous myocardial infarction as assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Caroline; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C; Haidari, Zaki; Smulders, Martijn W; Nelemans, Patricia J; Gorgels, Anton P; Crijns, Harry J; Wildberger, Joachim E; Schalla, Simon

    2013-10-15

    Although electrocardiography is frequently used as an initial test to detect or rule out previous myocardial infarction (MI), the diagnostic performance of commonly used electrocardiographic scoring systems is not well described. We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of (1) the Universal Definition, (2) Minnesota ECG Code (MC), (3) Selvester QRS Score, and (4) assessment by cardiologists using late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging as the reference standard. Additionally, the effect of electrocardiographic patterns and infarct characteristics on detecting previous MI was evaluated. The 3-month follow-up electrocardiograms of 78 patients with first-time reperfused ST elevation MI were pooled with electrocardiograms of 36 healthy controls. All 114 electrocardiograms were randomly analyzed, blinded to clinical and LGE-CMR data. The sensitivity of the Universal Definition, MC, Selvester QRS Score, and cardiologists to detect previous MI was 33%, 79%, 90%, and 67%, respectively; specificity 97%, 72%, 31%, and 89%, respectively; diagnostic accuracy 54%, 77%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. Probability of detecting MI by cardiologists increased with an increasing number (odds ratio [OR] 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30 to 3.09), width (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.03), and depth (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.27) of Q waves as well as increasing infarct size (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.25) and transmurality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08; p <0.05 for all). The time-consuming MC and rapid visual assessment by cardiologists achieved the best and similar diagnostic accuracies to detect previous MI. The diagnostic performance of all 4 electrocardiographic scoring systems was modest and related to the number, depth, and width of Q waves as well as increasing infarct size and transmurality. In conclusion, the exclusion of a previous MI based solely on electrocardiographic findings should be done with caution. Future studies are needed to define

  16. Using Projects Scoring Rubrics to Assess Student Learning in an Information Systems Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petkov, Doncho; Petkova, Olga; D'Onofrio, Marianne; Jarmoszko, A. T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about using projects for assessment of student learning in different courses of an Information Systems (IS) program. An overview of the role of educational projects in student learning is presented. The various aspects of defining standardized rubrics across an IS program are discussed. A methodology for the use of such rubrics in…

  17. ECG scores for a triage of patients with acute myocardial infarction transported by the emergency medical system.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Grzybowski, M; Ross, M A; Blaustein, N; Bock, B

    2000-01-01

    Prehospital triage of cardiac patients for bypass from community hospitals to cardiac centers may improve survival. This article determines if electrocardiogram (ECG)-based scoring triage methods (Aldrich MI scoring, QRS distortion, and the TIMI classification) and location of infarct (via 12 lead ECG) are associated with mortality before and after adjusting for age, sex, and race. It is a retrospective study of 291 AMI adult patients transported by ambulance to community hospitals or cardiac centers. Patients with an ED chief complaint of chest pain or dyspnea, presence of MI as defined by ECG findings of 0.1 mV of ST segment elevation in two leads or positive CPK-MB were eligible for the study. The primary outcome variable was 2-year mortality as determined with a metropolitan Detroit tri-county death index. Logistic regression was used to calculate the unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (with 95% CIs) of the predictor variables with mortality. Of the initial population selected for the study (n = 291), 229 patients were eligible for the analysis. The mean age was 66 years (SD of 14.4) with 63.8% being male and 54% being white. The overall mortality point estimate was 21.3% (95% CI of 15.2 to 27.3%). Aldrich scores and QRS distortion (yes/no) were not associated with mortality. Patients classified as a "high risk" for AMI per TIMI status were almost 3 times more likely to die than those at "low risk" and reached borderline statistical significance (P = .06) after adjusting for the covariates. Having an anterior infarct, as opposed to an inferior infarct, was significantly associated with death before and after adjusting for the covariates (Unadjusted OR = 2.6, Adjusted OR = 2.8). Properly training emergency medical system professionals in this area may prove useful for identifying higher risk AMI patients in the prehospital setting. PMID:11265729

  18. A messy reality: an analysis of New Zealand's elective surgery scoring system via media sources, 200–2006

    PubMed Central

    Derrett, Sarah; Cousins, Kim; Gauld, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Waiting lists for elective procedures are a characteristic feature of tax-funded universal health systems. New Zealand has gained a reputation for its ‘booking system’ for waiting list management, introduced in the early-1990s. The New Zealand system uses criteria to ‘score’ and then ‘book’ qualifying patients for surgery. This article aims to (i) describe key issues focused on by the media, (ii) identify local strategies and (iii) present evidence of variation. Newspaper sources were searched (2000–2006). A total of 1199 booking system stories were identified. Findings demonstrate, from a national system perspective, the extraordinarily difficult nature of maintaining overall control and coordination. Equity and national consistency are affected when hospitals respond to local pressure by reducing access to elective treatment. Findings suggest that central government probably needs to be closely involved in local-level management and policy adjustments; that through the study period, the New Zealand system appears to have been largely out of the control of government; and that governments elsewhere may need to be cautious when considering developing similar systems. Developing and implementing scoring and booking systems may always be a ‘messy reality’ with unintended consequences and throwing regional differences in service management and access into stark relief. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22815091

  19. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. A SCORING SYSTEM TO IMPROVE DECISION MAKING AND OUTCOMES IN THE ADAPTATION OF RECENTLY CAPTURED WHITE RHINOCEROSES (CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM) TO CAPTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Kruger, Milandie; Kruger, Marius; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Buss, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Ninety-four subadult and adult white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) were captured between February and October, 2009-11, in Kruger National Park and placed in holding bomas prior to translocation to other locations within South Africa. A simple three-category system was developed based on appetite, fecal consistency/volume, and behavior to assess adaptation to bomas. Individual animal and group daily median scores were used to determine trends and when rhinoceroses had successfully adapted to the boma. Seventeen rhinoceroses did not adapt to boma confinement, and 16 were released (1 mortality). No differences in boma scores were observed between rhinoceroses that adapted and those that did not, until day 8, when the first significant differences were observed (adapted score=13 versus nonadapted score=10). The time to reach a boma score determined as successful adaptation (median 19 d) matched subjective observations, which was approximately 3 wk for most rhinoceroses. Unsuccessful adaptation was indicated by an individual boma score of less than 15, typically during the first 2 wk, or a declining trend in scores within the first 7-14 d. This scoring system can be used for most locations and could also be easily adapted to other areas in which rhinoceroses are held in captivity. This tool also provides important information for assessing welfare in newly captured rhinoceroses. PMID:26845302

  1. Impact of model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scoring system on pathological findings at and after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khettry, Urmila; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Simpson, Mary Ann; Pomfret, Elizabeth A; Pomposelli, James J; Lewis, W David; Jenkins, Roger L; Gordon, Fredric D

    2006-06-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scoring system, a validated objective liver disease severity scale, was adopted in February 2002 to allocate cadaveric organs for liver transplantation (LT). To improve transplantability before succumbing to advanced disease, patients with low-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are given extra points in this system commensurate with their predicted mortality. Our aims were to determine 1) any change in the pathological findings at LT following the implementation of this system and 2) the impact of scoring advantage given to early-stage HCC. Clinicopathologic findings were compared before (pre-MELD, n = 87) and after (MELD, n = 58) the introduction of the MELD system. The findings in the pre-MELD vs. MELD groups were as follows: HCC, 27.5% vs. 48.3% (P = 0.001); portal vein thrombosis (PVT), 13.7% vs. 25.9% (P = 0.08); cholestasis, 16.1% vs. 32.7% (P = 0.026); inflammation grade of 2 or more, 43.7% vs. 48.3% (P = not significant); hepatitis C (HCV), 45.9% vs. 51.7% (P = not significant); HCV with lymphoid aggregates, 25% vs. 60% (P = 0.003); HCV with hyperplastic hilar nodes, 15.0% vs. 36.6% (P = 0.001); and post-LT HCC recurrence, 4.1% vs. 3.4% (P = not significant). Non-HCC-related findings were further compared in the 2 subgroups of pre-MELD (n = 57) and MELD (n = 31) after exclusion of HCC and fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) cases, and only cholestasis was significantly increased in the subgroup MELD. In conclusion, increased incidence of native liver cholestasis in the MELD era may be the histologic correlate of clinically severe liver disease. The scoring advantage given to low-stage HCC did result in a significantly increased incidence of HCC in the MELD group, but it did not adversely affect the post-LT recurrence rate. PMID:16598742

  2. Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) as a Measure of Injury Severity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Morgan Thorn; Ishikawa, Takuro; Schneeberg, Amy; Brussoni, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    This research explored whether the pediatric version of the Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) represented a valid alternative indicator for surveillance of injury severity. Every patient presenting in a Canadian emergency department is assigned a CTAS or PaedsCTAS score in order to prioritize access to care and to predict the nature and scope of care that is likely to be required. The five-level PaedsCTAS score ranges from I (resuscitation) to V (non-urgent). A total of 256 children, 0 to 17-years-old, who attended a pediatric hospital for an injury were followed longitudinally. Of these children, 32.4% (n = 83) were hospitalized and 67.6% (n = 173) were treated in the emergency department and released. They completed the PedsQL(TM), a validated measure of health related quality of life, at baseline (pre-injury status), one-month, four- to six-months, and 12-months post-injury. In this secondary data analysis, PaedsCTAS was found to be significantly associated with hospitalization and length of stay, sensitive to the differences between PaedsCTAS II and III, and related to physical but not psychosocial HRQoL. The findings suggest that PaedsCTAS may be a useful proxy measure of injury severity to supplement or replace hospitalization status and/or length of stay, currently proxy measures. PMID:27399743

  3. Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) as a Measure of Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Morgan Thorn; Ishikawa, Takuro; Schneeberg, Amy; Brussoni, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    This research explored whether the pediatric version of the Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) represented a valid alternative indicator for surveillance of injury severity. Every patient presenting in a Canadian emergency department is assigned a CTAS or PaedsCTAS score in order to prioritize access to care and to predict the nature and scope of care that is likely to be required. The five-level PaedsCTAS score ranges from I (resuscitation) to V (non-urgent). A total of 256 children, 0 to 17-years-old, who attended a pediatric hospital for an injury were followed longitudinally. Of these children, 32.4% (n = 83) were hospitalized and 67.6% (n = 173) were treated in the emergency department and released. They completed the PedsQLTM, a validated measure of health related quality of life, at baseline (pre-injury status), one-month, four- to six-months, and 12-months post-injury. In this secondary data analysis, PaedsCTAS was found to be significantly associated with hospitalization and length of stay, sensitive to the differences between PaedsCTAS II and III, and related to physical but not psychosocial HRQoL. The findings suggest that PaedsCTAS may be a useful proxy measure of injury severity to supplement or replace hospitalization status and/or length of stay, currently proxy measures. PMID:27399743

  4. Development of retinal structure and visual acuity in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Gao, Tian-Xiang; Arimoto, Takafumi

    2000-12-01

    The retinal structure and visual acuity in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus at different stages of development were examined by light microscopy. The resolving power of the retina, the visual axis and the best visual field were estimated based on the distribution of cone cells in the retina. The visual system of the larvae appears poorly developed at hatching. The larvae with total length (TL) of less than 10 mm, have single cones only and the eyes were well pigmented. At 10 11 mm TL, most single cones fused to form double cones, with the single and double cones forming a mosaic pattern. From larvae to early juvenile the retina stretches, the cones increase in diameter and rods increase in number. Based on the highest density of the cones in the ventro-temporal region, the visual axis was orientated upforward. The resolving power of the retina in 40 530 mm TL Japanese flounder was found to range from 25.1 to 11.5 min. The results indicated continual improvements in the visual system of the growing fish towards higher resolving power, visual acuity and sensitivity.

  5. Prognostic value of scores based on malnutrition or systemic inflammatory response in patients with metastatic or recurrent gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sachlova, Milana; Majek, Ondrej; Tucek, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients are frequently affected by malnutrition and weight loss, which affects their prognosis, length of hospital stay, health care costs, quality of life and survival. Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of different scores based on malnutrition or systemic inflammatory response in 91 metastatic or recurrent gastric cancer patients considered for palliative chemotherapy at the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute. We investigated their overall survival according to the following measures: Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index (OPNI), Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), nutritional risk indicator (NRI), Cancer Cachexia Study Group (CCSG), as previously defined, and a simple preadmission weight loss. The OPNI, GPS, and CCSG provided very significant prognostic values for survival (log-rank test P value < 0.001). For example, the median survival for patients with GPS 0 was 12.3 mo [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7-16.7], whereas the median survival for patients with GPS 2 was only 2.9 mo (95% CI: 1.9-4.8). A significantly worse survival of malnourished patients was also suggested by a multivariate model. The values of GPS, OPNI, and CCSG represent useful tools for the evaluation of patients' prognosis and should be part of a routine evaluation of patients to provide a timely nutrition support. PMID:25356861

  6. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  7. Visual acuity in an opportunistic raptor, the chimango caracara (Milvago chimango).

    PubMed

    Potier, Simon; Bonadonna, Francesco; Kelber, Almut; Duriez, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Raptors are always considered to have an extraordinary resolving power of their eyes (high visual acuity). Nevertheless, raptors differ in their diet and foraging tactics, which could lead to large differences in visual acuity. The visual acuity of an opportunist bird of prey, the Chimango caracara (Mivalgo chimango) was estimated by operant conditioning. Three birds were trained to discriminate two stimuli, a positive grey uniform pattern and a negative grating pattern stimulus. The visual acuity range from 15.08 to 39.83cycles/degrees. When compared to other birds, they have a higher visual acuity than non-raptorial birds, but they have the lowest visual acuity found in bird of prey so far. We discuss this result in the context of the ecology of the bird, with special focus on it is foraging tactic. PMID:26821187

  8. Impact on stereo-acuity of two presbyopia correction approaches: monovision and small aperture inlay

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Enrique J.; Schwarz, Christina; Prieto, Pedro M.; Manzanera, Silvestre; Artal, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Some of the different currently applied approaches that correct presbyopia may reduce stereovision. In this work, stereo-acuity was measured for two methods: (1) monovision and (2) small aperture inlay in one eye. When performing the experiment, a prototype of a binocular adaptive optics vision analyzer was employed. The system allowed simultaneous measurement and manipulation of the optics in both eyes of a subject. The apparatus incorporated two programmable spatial light modulators: one phase-only device using liquid crystal on silicon technology for wavefront manipulation and one intensity modulator for controlling the exit pupils. The prototype was also equipped with a stimulus generator for creating retinal disparity based on two micro-displays. The three-needle test was programmed for characterizing stereo-acuity. Subjects underwent a two-alternative forced-choice test. The following cases were tested for the stimulus placed at distance: (a) natural vision; (b) 1.5 D monovision; (c) 0.75 D monovision; (d) natural vision and small pupil; (e) 0.75 D monovision and small pupil. In all cases the standard pupil diameter was 4 mm and the small pupil diameter was 1.6 mm. The use of a small aperture significantly reduced the negative impact of monovision on stereopsis. The results of the experiment suggest that combining micro-monovision with a small aperture, which is currently being implemented as a corneal inlay, can yield values of stereoacuity close to those attained under normal binocular vision. PMID:23761846

  9. Binocular depth acuity research to support the modular multi-spectral stereoscopic night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, John O.; CuQlock-Knopp, V. Grayson; Paicopolis, Peter; Smoot, Jennifer; Kregel, Mark; Corona, Bernard

    2006-05-01

    This paper discusses the depth acuity research conducted in support of the development of a Modular Multi-Spectral Stereoscopic (M2S2) night vision goggle (NVG), a customizable goggle that lets the user select one of five goggle configurations: monocular thermal, monocular image intensifier (I2), binocular I2, binocular thermal, and binocular dual-waveband (thermal imagery to one eye and I2 imagery to the other eye). The motives for the development of this type of customizable goggle were (1) the need for an NVG that allows the simultaneous use of two wavebands, (2) the need for an alternative sensor fusion method to avoid the potential image degradation that may accompany digitally fused images, (3) a requirement to provide the observer with stereoscopic, dual spectrum views of a scene, and (4) the need to handle individual user preferences for sensor types and ocular configurations employed in various military operations. Among the increases in functionality that the user will have with this system is the ability to convert from a binocular I2 device (needed for detailed terrain analysis during off-road mobility) to a monocular thermal device (for increased situational awareness in the unaided eye during nights with full moon illumination). Results of the present research revealed potential depth acuity advantages that may apply to off-road terrain hazard detection for the binocular thermal configuration. The results also indicated that additional studies are needed to address ways to minimize binocular incompatibility for the dual waveband configuration.

  10. Clinical performance of two visual scoring systems in detecting and assessing activity status of occlusal caries in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Braga, M M; Ekstrand, K R; Martignon, S; Imparato, J C P; Ricketts, D N J; Mendes, F M

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical performance of two sets of visual scoring criteria for detecting caries severity and assessing caries activity status in occlusal surfaces. Two visual scoring systems--the Nyvad criteria (NY) and the ICDAS-II including an adjunct system for lesion activity assessment (ICDAS-LAA)--were compared using 763 primary molars of 139 children aged 3-12 years. The examinations were performed by 2 calibrated examiners. A subsample (n = 50) was collected after extraction and histology with 0.1% red methyl dye was performed to validate lesion depth and activity. The reproducibility of the indices was calculated (kappa test) and ROC analysis was performed to assess their validity and related parameters were compared using McNemar's test. The association between the indices and with the histological examination was evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficient (r(s)). Visual criteria showed excellent reproducibility both regarding severity (NY: 0.94; ICDAS-II: 0.91) and activity (NY: 0.90; LAA: 0.91). The NY and LAA showed good association in caries activity assessment (r(s) = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.86-0.89; p < 0.001). Nevertheless, considering only cavitated lesions, this association was not significant (p > 0.05). Concerning the severity, both indices presented similar validity parameters. At D2 threshold, the sensitivity was higher for NY (NY = 0.87; ICDAS = 0.61, p < 0.05). Regarding activity status, NY showed higher specificities and accuracies. In conclusion, NY and ICDAS-II criteria are comparable and present good reproducibility and validity to detect caries lesions and estimate their severities, but the LAA seems to overestimate the caries activity assessment of cavitated lesions compared to NY. PMID:20530964

  11. Association between serotonin cumulative genetic score and the Behavioral Approach System (BAS): Moderation by early life environment

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Rahel; McGeary, John E.; Beevers, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates if genetic variation in the serotonergic system interacts with early adversity to predict changes in the Behavioral Approach System (BAS), a system that taps into reward processing. In a sample of community adults (N= 236) the influence of single serotonergic candidate polymorphisms on BAS was analyzed, we also examined the aggregate contribution of these genetic variants by creating a Cumulative Genetic Score (CGS). A CGS quantifies an individual’s cumulative risk by aggregating the number of risk alleles across the candidate polymorphisms. After individual gene analysis, three candidate genes rs7305115 (TPH2), rs6311 (HTR2A), and rs6295 (HTR1A) were combined into the CGS. There were no significant interactions between individual candidate polymorphisms and childhood adversity, but the CGS interacted with childhood adversity to explain a significant amount of variance (11.6%) in the BAS. Findings suggest that genetic variations in the serotonergic system in combination with childhood adversity contribute to individual differences in reward sensitivity. PMID:25264393

  12. Practical use of a uterine score system for predicting effects on interval from calving to first insemination and non-return rate 56 in Danish dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Elkjær, Karina; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Ancker, Marie-Louise; Gustafsson, Hans; Callesen, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    A detailed study of 398,237 lactations of Danish Holstein dairy cows was undertaken. The objective was to investigate the information gained by evaluating vaginal discharge in cows from 5 to 19 days post-partum (p.p.) using an ordinal scale from 0 to 9. The study focused on the interval from calving to first insemination (CFI) and the non-return rate 56 days after first insemination (NR56), adjusted for the confounders milk production and body condition score (BCS). For the analyses, BCS was evaluated on the same day that the uterine score was made. Milk production was defined as test-day milk yield in the first month p.p. The study showed that the evaluation of vaginal discharge according to this score system permitted ranking of cows according to CFI and NR56, i.e. an increasing uterine score was associated with a significantly longer time from calving to first insemination and significantly reduced the probability of success of the first insemination. Reproductive success was already affected if the uterine score had reached 4 (i.e. before the discharge smelled abnormally). The negative effect on CFI and NR56 increased as the uterine score increased, which suggested that the uterine scoring system was a useful guide to dairy producers. PMID:24144773

  13. The Relationship between OCT-measured Central Retinal Thickness and Visual Acuity in Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare optical coherence tomography (OCT)-measured retinal thickness and visual acuity in eyes with diabetic macular edema (DME) both before and after macular laser photocoagulation. Design Cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Participants 210 subjects (251 eyes) with DME enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of laser techniques. Methods Retinal thickness was measured with OCT and visual acuity was measured with the electronic-ETDRS procedure. Main Outcome Measures OCT-measured center point thickness and visual acuity Results The correlation coefficients for visual acuity versus OCT center point thickness were 0.52 at baseline and 0.49, 0.36, and 0.38 at 3.5, 8, and 12 months post-laser photocoagulation. The slope of the best fit line to the baseline data was approximately 4.4 letters (95% C.I.: 3.5, 5.3) better visual acuity for every 100 microns decrease in center point thickness at baseline with no important difference at follow-up visits. Approximately one-third of the variation in visual acuity could be predicted by a linear regression model that incorporated OCT center point thickness, age, hemoglobin A1C, and severity of fluorescein leakage in the center and inner subfields. The correlation between change in visual acuity and change in OCT center point thickening 3.5 months after laser treatment was 0.44 with no important difference at the other follow-up times. A subset of eyes showed paradoxical improvements in visual acuity with increased center point thickening (7–17% at the three time points) or paradoxical worsening of visual acuity with a decrease in center point thickening (18%–26% at the three time points). Conclusions There is modest correlation between OCT-measured center point thickness and visual acuity, and modest correlation of changes in retinal thickening and visual acuity following focal laser treatment for DME. However, a wide range of visual acuity may be observed for a given degree of retinal edema and paradoxical

  14. Testing vision testing: quantifying the effect of movement on visual acuity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tidbury, L P; O'Connor, A R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of visual acuity (VA) has been shown to vary between tests, which may be attributable in part to test inaccuracies, such as a change in the distance between the chart and subject. Therefore, the study aim was to quantify changes in chart/patient separation during near and distance VA testing, and to analyse the relationship between VA and movement observed. Methods Volunteer orthoptists and subjects were filmed during near and distance VA testing, with the amount of movement determined from the recording. Controlling for movement using chin rests and chart stands, VA was retested. Actual changes in VA due to a change in subject or chart movement were compared with theoretical predictions. Results Fifty-one subjects (18–73 years) were assessed. Median (interquartile) movements of 0.06 m (0.07) towards and 0.11 m (0.08) away from the chart were measured (maximum 0.17 m towards and 0.24 m away). Significant differences in VA score were measured when movement was restricted, at near and distance (P<0.05). VA score change agreed with predicted values in 67% of the cases, however, reduced test distance during near vision testing resulted in a degradation of VA, opposite to the improvement expected. Conclusion There were significant variations in subject/chart separation during testing, which could have affected VA values. While this movement is associated with a change in VA, additional factors to movement appear to influence the score achieved during near testing. Procedures to minimise variation, by eliminating movement of test chart or subject, will improve VA test accuracy. PMID:25341437

  15. Multicenter retrospective evaluation of the validity of the Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score system in children.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Jonathan N; Steele, William J; Simpson, Lauren; Huff, Wei X; Lane, Brandon C; Chern, Joshua J; Fulkerson, Daniel H; Sayama, Christina M; Jea, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The Thoracolumbar Injury Classification and Severity Score (TLICS) system was developed to streamline injury assessment and guide surgical decision making. To the best of the authors' knowledge, external validation in the pediatric age group has not been undertaken prior to this report. METHODS This study evaluated the use of the TLICS in a large retrospective series of children and adolescents treated at 4 pediatric medical centers (Texas Children's Hospital, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Riley Children's Hospital, and Doernbecher Children's Hospital). A total of 147 patients treated for traumatic thoracic or lumbar spine trauma between February 1, 2002, and September 1, 2015, were included in this study. Clinical and radiographic data were evaluated. Injuries were classified using American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) status, Denis classification, and TLICS. RESULTS A total of 102 patients (69%) were treated conservatively, and 45 patients (31%) were treated surgically. All patients but one in the conservative group were classified as ASIA E. In this group, 86/102 patients (84%) had Denis type compression injuries. The TLICS in the conservative group ranged from 1 to 10 (mean 1.6). Overall, 93% of patients matched TLICS conservative treatment recommendations (score ≤ 3). No patients crossed over to the surgical group in delayed fashion. In the surgical group, 26/45 (58%) were ASIA E, whereas 19/45 (42%) had neurological deficits (ASIA A, B, C, or D). One of 45 (2%) patients was classified with Denis type compression injuries; 25/45 (56%) were classified with Denis type burst injuries; 14/45 (31%) were classified with Denis type seat belt injuries; and 5/45 (11%) were classified with Denis type fracture-dislocation injuries. The TLICS ranged from 2 to 10 (mean 6.4). Eighty-two percent of patients matched TLICS surgical treatment recommendations (score ≥ 5). No patients crossed over to the conservative management group. Eight patients (8

  16. Predicting Prostate Biopsy Results Using a Panel of Plasma and Urine Biomarkers Combined in a Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars; Albitar, Ferras; Diep, Kevin; Fritsche, Herbert A.; Shore, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determining the need for prostate biopsy is frequently difficult and more objective criteria are needed to predict the presence of high grade prostate cancer (PCa). To reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies, we explored the potential of using biomarkers in urine and plasma to develop a scoring system to predict prostate biopsy results and the presence of high grade PCa. Methods: Urine and plasma specimens were collected from 319 patients recommended for prostate biopsies. We measured the gene expression levels of UAP1, PDLIM5, IMPDH2, HSPD1, PCA3, PSA, TMPRSS2, ERG, GAPDH, B2M, AR, and PTEN in plasma and urine. Patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (sPSA) level, and biomarkers data were used to develop two independent algorithms, one for predicting the presence of PCa and the other for predicting high-grade PCa (Gleason score [GS] ≥7). Results: Using training and validation data sets, a model for predicting the outcome of PCa biopsy was developed with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.87. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87% and 63%, respectively. We then developed a second algorithm to identify patients with high-grade PCa (GS ≥7). This algorithm's AUROC was 0.80, and had a PPV and NPV of 56% and 77%, respectively. Patients who demonstrated concordant results using both algorithms showed a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 93% for predicting high-grade aggressive PCa. Thus, the use of both algorithms resulted in a PPV of 90% and NPV of 89% for predicting high-grade PCa with toleration of some low-grade PCa (GS <7) being detected. Conclusions: This model of a biomarker panel with algorithmic interpretation can be used as a “liquid biopsy” to reduce the need for unnecessary tissue biopsies, and help to guide appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:26918043

  17. Establishment and Validation of SSCLIP Scoring System to Estimate Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Who Received Curative Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sha; Huang, Gui-Qian; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Liu, Wen-Yue; You, Jie; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Che, Han-Yang; Chen, Guo-Liang; Fang, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Meng-Tao; Chen, Yong-Ping; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is no prognostic model that is reliable and practical for patients who have received curative liver resection (CLR) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to establish and validate a Surgery-Specific Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (SSCLIP) scoring system for those patients. Methods 668 eligible patients who underwent CLR for HCC from five separate tertiary hospitals were selected. The SSCLIP was constructed from a training cohort by adding independent predictors that were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to the original Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP). The prognostic performance of the SSCLIP at 12 and 36-months was compared with data from existing models. The patient survival distributions at different risk levels of the SSCLIP were also assessed. Results Four independent predictors were added to construct the SSCLIP, including age (HR = 1.075, 95%CI: 1.019–1.135, P = 0.009), albumin (HR = 0.804, 95%CI: 0.681–0.950, P = 0.011), prothrombin time activity (HR = 0.856, 95%CI: 0.751–0.975, P = 0.020) and microvascular invasion (HR = 19.852, 95%CI: 2.203–178.917, P = 0.008). In both training and validation cohorts, 12-month and 36-month prognostic performance of the SSCLIP were significantly better than those of the original CLIP, model of end-stage liver disease-based CLIP, Okuda and Child-Turcotte-Pugh score (all P < 0.05). The stratification of risk levels of the SSCLIP showed an enhanced ability to differentiate patients with different outcomes. Conclusions A novel SSCLIP to predict survival of HCC patients who received CLR based on objective parameters may provide a refined, useful prognosis algorithm. PMID:26057656

  18. Prognostic relevance of morphological classification models for myelodysplastic syndromes in an era of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System.

    PubMed

    van Spronsen, Margot F; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Westers, Theresia M; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2016-03-01

    Numerous morphological classification models have been developed to organise the heterogeneous spectrum of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). While the 2008 update of the World Health Organisation (WHO) is the current standard, the publication of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) has illustrated the need for supplemental prognostic information. The aim of this study was to investigate whether morphological classification models for MDS - of both the French-American-British (FAB) group and WHO - provide reliable criteria for their classification into homogeneous and clinically relevant categories with prognostic relevance beyond the IPSS-R. We reclassified 238 MDS patients using each of the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 criteria and studied classification categories in terms of clinical, haematological and cytogenetic features. Subsequently, we calculated prognostic scores using the IPSS-R and investigated whether the morphological classification models had significantly prognostic value in patients stratified by the IPSS-R and vice versa. By adopting the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 classifications, MDS patients were organised into homogeneous categories with intrinsic prognostic information. However, whereas the morphological classification models showed no prognostic value beyond the IPSS-R, the IPSS-R had significant prognostic value beyond the FAB, WHO 2001 and WHO 2008 classifications. Even though morphological classification models for MDS might be clinically relevant from a prognostic point of view, their relevance in terms of risk stratification is evidently limited in light of the IPSS-R. Therefore, we suggest to stop the use of morphological classification models for MDS for risk stratification in routine clinical practice. PMID:26798967

  19. Floor Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexler, Brad

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to quantify what constitutes an "environmentally correct" building, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) created the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. LEED has become the North American standard for what constitutes sustainable design. The LEED guidelines are the best way to differentiate genuinely…

  20. Predicting visual acuity from the structure of visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shyam; Carlo, C. Nikoosh; Stevens, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Three decades ago, Rockel et al. proposed that neuronal surface densities (number of neurons under a square millimeter of surface) of primary visual cortices (V1s) in primates is 2.5 times higher than the neuronal density of V1s in nonprimates or many other cortical regions in primates and nonprimates. This claim has remained controversial and much debated. We replicated the study of Rockel et al. with attention to modern stereological precepts and show that indeed primate V1 is 2.5 times denser (number of neurons per square millimeter) than many other cortical regions and nonprimate V1s; we also show that V2 is 1.7 times as dense. As primate V1s are denser, they have more neurons and thus more pinwheels than similar-sized nonprimate V1s, which explains why primates have better visual acuity. PMID:26056277

  1. Recovery of stereo acuity in adults with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Astle, Andrew T; McGraw, Paul V; Webb, Ben S

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of visual input to one eye during early development leads to marked functional impairments of vision, commonly referred to as amblyopia. A major consequence of amblyopia is the inability to encode binocular disparity information leading to impaired depth perception or stereo acuity. If amblyopia is treated early in life (before 4 years of age), then recovery of normal stereoscopic function is possible. Treatment is rarely undertaken later in life (adulthood) because declining levels of neural plasticity are thought to limit the effectiveness of standard treatments. Here, the authors show that a learning-based therapy, designed to exploit experience-dependent plastic mechanisms, can be used to recover stereoscopic visual function in adults with amblyopia. These cases challenge the long-held dogma that the critical period for visual development and the window for treating amblyopia are one and the same. PMID:22707543

  2. Collective enhancement of numerical acuity by meritocratic leadership in fish.

    PubMed

    Bisazza, Angelo; Butterworth, Brian; Piffer, Laura; Bahrami, Bahador; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Agrillo, Christian

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for more than a century that interacting people can generally achieve more accurate decisions than single individuals. Here we show that interacting guppy fish (Poecilia reticulata) achieve a superior level of numerosity discrimination well beyond the average ability of the isolated individual fish. This enhancement of numerical acuity was observed in dyadic interactions when (Experiment 1) the dyad chose which larger shoal of guppies to join and when (Experiment 2) the dyad chose the higher or the lower numerosity among two decision options after having learned the task individually. Dyadic accuracy and that of the more competent member of each dyad matched closely, supporting the hypothesis that meritocratic leadership arises spontaneously between dyadically interacting fish, rather than the 'many wrongs' principle that has been used to explain group superiority in many species. PMID:24691116

  3. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Lorach, Henri; Goetz, Georges; Smith, Richard; Lei, Xin; Mandel, Yossi; Kamins, Theodore; Mathieson, Keith; Huie, Philip; Harris, James; Sher, Alexander; Palanker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. We demonstrate that subretinal arrays with 70 μm photovoltaic pixels provide highly localized stimulation, with electrical and visual receptive fields of comparable sizes in rat retinal ganglion cells. Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibits flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images and non-linear spatial summation. In rats with retinal degeneration, these photovoltaic arrays provide spatial resolution of 64 ± 11 μm, corresponding to half of the normal visual acuity in pigmented rats. Ease of implantation of these wireless and modular arrays, combined with their high resolution opens the door to functional restoration of sight. PMID:25915832

  4. Sensitivity of The Dynamic Visual Acuity Test To Sensorimotor Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob; Elizalde, Elizabeth; Fregia, Melody

    1999-01-01

    Post-flight astronauts, acutely post-vestibular nerve section patients, and patients with severe chronic bilateral vestibular deficits have oscillopsia caused by reduced vestibulocular reflex gains and decreased postural stability. Therefore, as previous work has shown, a test of dynamic visual acuity (DVA), in which the subject must read numbers from a computer screen while standing still or walking in place provides a composite measure of sensorimotor integration. This measure may be useful for determining the level of recovery, post-flight, post-operatively, or after vestibular rehabilitation. To determine the sensitivity of DVA to change in impaired populations we have tested patients with acoustic neuromas before and during the first post-operative week after resection of the tumors, and with bilaterally labyrinthine deficient subjects before and after six weeks of balance rehabilitation therapy.

  5. The role of ANS acuity and numeracy for the calibration and the coherence of subjective probability judgments

    PubMed Central

    Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Lindskog, Marcus; Nilsson, Håkan; Kerimi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how numeracy and acuity of the approximate number system (ANS) relate to the calibration and coherence of probability judgments. Based on the literature on number cognition, a first hypothesis was that those with lower numeracy would maintain a less linear use of the probability scale, contributing to overconfidence and nonlinear calibration curves. A second hypothesis was that also poorer acuity of the ANS would be associated with overconfidence and non-linearity. A third hypothesis, in line with dual-systems theory (e.g., Kahneman and Frederick, 2002) was that people higher in numeracy should have better access to the normative probability rules, allowing them to decrease the rate of conjunction fallacies. Data from 213 participants sampled from the Swedish population showed that: (i) in line with the first hypothesis, overconfidence and the linearity of the calibration curves were related to numeracy, where people higher in numeracy were well calibrated with zero overconfidence. (ii) ANS was not associated with overconfidence and non-linearity, disconfirming the second hypothesis. (iii) The rate of conjunction fallacies was slightly, but to a statistically significant degree decreased by numeracy, but still high at all numeracy levels. An unexpected finding was that participants with better ANS acuity gave more realistic estimates of their performance relative to others. PMID:25140163

  6. The Effectiveness of Using the Mississippi Student Progress Monitoring System to Improve a District's State Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Timothy Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in MCT2 scores between students who attended a school district that used MSPMS and students who attended a school district that did not use MSPMS. The data for this study were archived and consisted of math and language arts MCT2 scores for two groups of students. The independent…

  7. Logical memory subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale: age and education norms and alternate-form reliability of two scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Abikoff, H; Alvir, J; Hong, G; Sukoff, R; Orazio, J; Solomon, S; Saravay, S

    1987-08-01

    The Logical Memory (LM) subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale has been characterized by imprecise scoring instructions which can make data interpretation and study comparisons difficult. A total of 339 adults, from 18 to 83 years old, took either Form I or Form II of the LM. Verbal recall of the story passages was evaluated using gist and verbatim scoring systems. Interrater reliability was very high for both scoring approaches. The two forms were equivalent for gist recall. However, verbatim recall of Form I was more difficult than Form II because the former consists of more words to remember. Recall was related more to educational level than to age. For both gist and verbatim scoring, age and education norms were generated for immediate, delayed, and 24-h recall. PMID:3597734

  8. AB162. A novel “SSS+f” nephrometry score system to evaluate the technical complexity of nephron-sparing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shudong; Ma, Lin; Liu, Lei; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective For the complex and technical nature of tumor exposure, tumor resection, and renal reconstruction involved in partial nephrectomy, a detailed understanding of renal tumor anatomy is necessary for comprehensive preoperative surgical protocols. We have developed a novel nephrometry scoring system (3S+f nephrometry score) to quantify the anatomical characteristics of renal masses on computerized tomography/magnetic resonance imaging. We aimed to propose this simple scoring system to evaluate the technical complexity of partial nephrectomy. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 100 patients with contrast-enhanced CT imaging who underwent laparoscopic partial nephrectomy consecutively between January 2014 and October 2015. The “SSS+f” nephrometry score is based on four critical and reproducible anatomical features of solid renal masses. Of the four components three are scored on a 1, 2 or 3-point scale with the 4th indicating the quantity and quality of the perinephric fat which put great influence on the technical difficulty is scored on 0 or 1-point scale. The “SSS+f” nephrometry score consists of SIZE (tumor size as intrarenal maximal diameter), SITE (tumor location including lateral/lower pole, medial/upper pole, hilar/endophytic), SIDE (distance of tumor deepest side to the collecting system or sinus or the main renal artery or vein). Moreover, perinephric fat (f) which is sticky or thick is assigned to tumors that evaluate technical difficulty of mobilize the kidney and isolate the renal tumor. Results The “SSS+f” nephrometry scoring system accurately classified the complexity of 100 consecutive tumors undergoing laparoscopic partial nephrectomy at our institution by single surgeon. Tumor complexity according to nephrometry score was assessed as low in 18 (18%), moderate in 48 (48%) and high-complexity group in 34 (34%). There were no significant differences with respect to EBL, transfusion rate, or postoperative complications among the three

  9. Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores and profiles in African American adolescents involved with the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Frank C; Andretta, James R; Woodland, Malcolm H

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the internal consistency and structural validity of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores in a sample of 477 African American adolescents who had been arrested in a city in the mid-Atlantic. Using cluster analysis, we also identified profiles of CRIS scores and compared adolescents with different profiles on Major Depressive Episode, Manic Episode, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder scores. Results indicated that CRIS subscale scores were reliable, and the 6-factor structure of the CRIS was supported. Five nigrescence profiles were identified: Miseducation-Pro-Black, Conflicted-Self-Hatred, Multiculturalist, Low Race Salience, and Conflicted-Anti-White. Individuals with Conflicted-Self-Hatred profiles reported significantly and meaningfully higher scores on the 4 syndromes than did their peers, and individuals with the Multiculturalist and Low Race Salience profiles reported the lowest scores. A greater percentage of individuals with Conflicted racial identity profiles had syndrome scores in the clinically significant range. The results of this study demonstrate that some of the nigrescence profiles found in college-age students generalize to adolescents. The implications of the findings for theory, research, and practice are discussed. PMID:25151117

  10. Tactile Spatial Acuity in Childhood: Effects of Age and Fingertip Size

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ryan M.; Goldreich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Tactile acuity is known to decline with age in adults, possibly as the result of receptor loss, but less is understood about how tactile acuity changes during childhood. Previous research from our laboratory has shown that fingertip size influences tactile spatial acuity in young adults: those with larger fingers tend to have poorer acuity, possibly because mechanoreceptors are more sparsely distributed in larger fingers. We hypothesized that a similar relationship would hold among children. If so, children’s tactile spatial acuity might be expected to worsen as their fingertips grow. However, concomitant CNS maturation might result in more efficient perceptual processing, counteracting the effect of fingertip growth on tactile acuity. To investigate, we conducted a cross-sectional study, testing 116 participants ranging in age from 6 to 16 years on a precision-controlled tactile grating orientation task. We measured each participant's grating orientation threshold on the dominant index finger, along with physical properties of the fingertip: surface area, volume, sweat pore spacing, and temperature. We found that, as in adults, children with larger fingertips (at a given age) had significantly poorer acuity, yet paradoxically acuity did not worsen significantly with age. We propose that finger growth during development results in a gradual decline in innervation density as receptive fields reposition to cover an expanding skin surface. At the same time, central maturation presumably enhances perceptual processing. PMID:24454612

  11. An investigation of the relation between sibilant production and somatosensory and auditory acuity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Matthies, Melanie L.; Maas, Edwin; Hanson, Alexandra; Tiede, Mark; Ménard, Lucie; Guenther, Frank H.; Lane, Harlan; Perkell, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    The relation between auditory acuity, somatosensory acuity and the magnitude of produced sibilant contrast was investigated with data from 18 participants. To measure auditory acuity, stimuli from a synthetic sibilant continuum ([s]-[ʃ]) were used in a four-interval, two-alternative forced choice adaptive-staircase discrimination task. To measure somatosensory acuity, small plastic domes with grooves of different spacing were pressed against each participant’s tongue tip and the participant was asked to identify one of four possible orientations of the grooves. Sibilant contrast magnitudes were estimated from productions of the words ‘said,’ ‘shed,’ ‘sid,’ and ‘shid’. Multiple linear regression revealed a significant relation indicating that a combination of somatosensory and auditory acuity measures predicts produced acoustic contrast. When the participants were divided into high- and low-acuity groups based on their median somatosensory and auditory acuity measures, separate ANOVA analyses with sibilant contrast as the dependent variable yielded a significant main effect for each acuity group. These results provide evidence that sibilant productions have auditory as well as somatosensory goals and are consistent with prior results and the theoretical framework underlying the DIVA model of speech production. PMID:21110603

  12. Comparison of Dynamic Visual Acuity between Water Polo Players and Sedentary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo-Junyent, Lluisa; Aznar-Casanova, Jose Antonio; Merindano-Encina, Dolores; Cardona, Genis; Sole-Forto, Joan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined differences in dynamic visual acuity between elite and subelite water polo players and sedentary students. To measure dynamic visual acuity binocularly, we asked participants to indicate the orientation of a broken ring, similar to the Landolt C, which increased in size as it moved across a computer screen. Two different…

  13. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  14. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  15. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  16. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  17. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  18. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  19. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  20. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  1. 49 CFR 240.207 - Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. 240.207 Section 240.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... making the determination on vision and hearing acuity. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially...

  2. 49 CFR 240.121 - Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for vision and hearing acuity data. 240... ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.121 Criteria for vision and hearing acuity... paragraph (e) of this section, a person's vision and hearing shall meet or exceed the standards...

  3. The Clinical Performance of an Office-Based Risk Scoring System for Fatal Cardiovascular Diseases in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Ghodsi, Saeed; Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Etemadi, Arash; Pourshams, Akram; Pharoah, Paul D.; Abnet, Christian C.; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are becoming major causes of death in developing countries. Risk scoring systems for CVD are needed to prioritize allocation of limited resources. Most of these risk score algorithms have been based on a long array of risk factors including blood markers of lipids. However, risk scoring systems that solely use office-based data, not including laboratory markers, may be advantageous. In the current analysis, we validated the office-based Framingham risk scoring system in Iran. Methods The study used data from the Golestan Cohort in North-East of Iran. The following risk factors were used in the development of the risk scoring method: sex, age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, hypertension treatment, current smoking, and diabetes. Cardiovascular risk functions for prediction of 10-year risk of fatal CVDs were developed. Results A total of 46,674 participants free of CVD at baseline were included. Predictive value of estimated risks was examined. The resulting Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) was 0.774 (95% CI: 0.762-0.787) in all participants, 0.772 (95% CI: 0.753-0.791) in women, and 0.763 (95% CI: 0.747-0.779) in men. AUC was higher in urban areas (0.790, 95% CI: 0.766-0.815). The predicted and observed risks of fatal CVD were similar in women. However, in men, predicted probabilities were higher than observed. Conclusion The AUC in the current study is comparable to results of previous studies while lipid profile was replaced by body mass index to develop an office-based scoring system. This scoring algorithm is capable of discriminating individuals at high risk versus low risk of fatal CVD. PMID:26011607

  4. Climatic effects on milk production traits and somatic cell score in lactating Holstein-Friesian cows in different housing systems.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, C; Sanker, C; Gauly, M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of the temperature-humidity index (THI) on milk production traits and somatic cell score (SCS) of dairy cows raised in 4 different housing systems: (1) warm loose housing with access to grazing (WG), (2) warm loose housing without access to grazing (WI), (3) cold loose housing with access to grazing (CG), and (4) cold loose housing without access to grazing (CI). For each of the 4 housing systems, 5 farms with a herd size of 70 to 200 lactating cows in Lower Saxony, Germany, were studied. Ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded hourly in each barn to calculate THI. Milk production data included 21,546 test-day records for milk, fat, and protein yield, and SCS. These data were associated with the average THI of the 3 d preceding the respective measurement, which was divided into 6 classes (<45, ≥45 to <50, ≥50 to <55, ≥55 to <60, ≥60 to <65, and ≥65). Furthermore, bulk milk samples including the fat and protein percentage, and SCS taken 4 to 6 times per month were associated with the average and maximum THI of the 3 d before sampling. Data were recorded from April 2010 to March 2011. In each of the housing systems, monthly THI values above 60, indicating heat stress, were recorded between June and September, with higher values in WI and WG. In all systems, fat-corrected milk, fat, and protein yields of the test-day records decreased in tendency from 60 ≤ THI<65 to THI >65. In WI and CI, values for SCS were greater in the class THI > 65 than in 60 ≤ THI<65, whereas no difference between any of the THI classes was found in WG and CG. The fat and protein percentage of the bulk milk samples decreased with increasing 3-d maximum THI in all 4 systems, whereas the SCS increased with increasing 3-d average THI. In conclusion, negative effects of heat stress conditions under a temperate climate on milk production traits and SCS were found, although a housing system being superior to the other

  5. An international data set for CMML validates prognostic scoring systems and demonstrates a need for novel prognostication strategies

    PubMed Central

    Padron, E; Garcia-Manero, G; Patnaik, M M; Itzykson, R; Lasho, T; Nazha, A; Rampal, R K; Sanchez, M E; Jabbour, E; Al Ali, N H; Thompson, Z; Colla, S; Fenaux, P; Kantarjian, H M; Killick, S; Sekeres, M A; List, A F; Onida, F; Komrokji, R S; Tefferi, A; Solary, E

    2015-01-01

    Since its reclassification as a distinct disease entity, clinical research efforts have attempted to establish baseline characteristics and prognostic scoring systems for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Although existing data for baseline characteristics and CMML prognostication have been robustly developed and externally validated, these results have been limited by the small size of single-institution cohorts. We developed an international CMML data set that included 1832 cases across eight centers to establish the frequency of key clinical characteristics. Of note, we found that the majority of CMML patients were classified as World Health Organization CMML-1 and that a 7.5% bone marrow blast cut-point may discriminate prognosis with higher resolution in comparison with the existing 10%. We additionally interrogated existing CMML prognostic models and found that they are all valid and have comparable performance but are vulnerable to upstaging. Using random forest survival analysis for variable discovery, we demonstrated that the prognostic power of clinical variables alone is limited. Last, we confirmed the independent prognostic relevance of ASXL1 gene mutations and identified the novel adverse prognostic impact imparted by CBL mutations. Our data suggest that combinations of clinical and molecular information may be required to improve the accuracy of current CMML prognostication. PMID:26230957

  6. Development of a novel clinical scoring system for on-farm diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease in pre-weaned dairy calves

    PubMed Central

    Love, William J.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Kass, Philip H.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical scoring systems for diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in calves have been proposed. However, such systems were based on subjective judgment, rather than statistical methods, to weight scores. Data from a pair-matched case-control study on a California calf raising facility was used to develop three novel scoring systems to diagnose BRD in preweaned dairy calves. Disease status was assigned using both clinical signs and diagnostic test results for BRD-associated pathogens. Regression coefficients were used to weight score values. The systems presented use nasal and ocular discharge, rectal temperature, ear and head carriage, coughing, and respiratory quality as predictors. The systems developed in this research utilize fewer severity categories of clinical signs, require less calf handling, and had excellent agreement (Kappa > 0.8) when compared to an earlier scoring system. The first scoring system dichotomized all clinical predictors but required inducing a cough. The second scoring system removed induced cough as a clinical abnormality but required distinguishing between three levels of nasal discharge severity. The third system removed induced cough and forced a dichotomized variable for nasal discharge. The first system presented in this study used the following predictors and assigned values: coughing (induced or spontaneous coughing, 2 points), nasal discharge (any discharge, 3 points), ocular discharge (any discharge, 2 points), ear and head carriage (ear droop or head tilt, 5 points), fever (≥39.2°C or 102.5°F, 2 points), and respiratory quality (abnormal respiration, 2 points). Calves were categorized “BRD positive” if their total score was ≥4. This system correctly classified 95.4% cases and 88.6% controls. The second presented system categorized the predictors and assigned weights as follows: coughing (spontaneous only, 2 points), mild nasal discharge (unilateral, serous, or watery discharge, 3 points), moderate to

  7. Comparison of two classification systems in predicting the outcome of diabetic foot ulcers: the Wagner grade and the Saint Elian Wound score systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Xie, Ting; Cao, Yemin; Wu, MinJie; Yu, LeiLei; Lu, ShuLiang; Xu, Gang; Hu, Jiale; Ruan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare two systems of classification in a consecutive population with diabetic foot ulcers: the Wagner grade and the Saint Elian Wound Score System (SEWSS). Sociodemographic information, patient-related and ulcer-related data at first presentation was recorded, and the patients were followed up until wound healing or accepting major amputation or for 24 weeks. One hundred eighty-six patients were included in the study, of which 172 patients were completely followed up. Among the remaining 172 patients, 53.5% (n = 92) were healed without minor amputation, 32% (n = 55) were healed with minor amputation, 9.3% (n = 16) were not healed at study termination, 3.5% (n = 6) died and 1.7% (n = 3) underwent major amputation. The median healing time for Wagner 1, Wagner 2, Wagner 3, and Wagner 4 were 23, 50, 54, 119 days, respectively. The log-rank test showed significant differences in healing time for Wagner 1, Wagner 2, Wagner 3, and Wagner 4; The median healing time for SEWSS I, SEWSS II and SEWSS III were 12, 51, and 150 days, respectively. The log-rank test showed significant differences in healing time for SEWSS I, SEWSS II and SEWSS III. Cox regression analysis showed a decreasing probability of healing with or without minor amputation with a higher SEWSS value, an increase in the SEWSS by one score reduced the probability for healing by 24%. ROC analysis showed Wagner 3 and a cut-point 17 of SEWSS had the highest Youden's index. Both the Wagner grade and SEWSS system were associated with the ulcer healing time for the patients with active DFUs. The SEWSS score makes it a better prediction tool of DFU outcome synthetically. PMID:25817047

  8. Water-Induced Finger Wrinkles Do Not Affect Touch Acuity or Dexterity in Handling Wet Objects

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Henning; Gross, Manfred; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Human non-hairy (glabrous) skin of the fingers, palms and soles wrinkles after prolonged exposure to water. Wrinkling is a sympathetic nervous system-dependent process but little is known about the physiology and potential functions of water-induced skin wrinkling. Here we investigated the idea that wrinkling might improve handling of wet objects by measuring the performance of a large cohort of human subjects (n = 40) in a manual dexterity task. We also tested the idea that skin wrinkling has an impact on tactile acuity or vibrotactile sensation using two independent sensory tasks. We found that skin wrinkling did not improve dexterity in handling wet objects nor did it affect any aspect of touch sensitivity measured. Thus water-induced wrinkling appears to have no significant impact on tactile driven performance or dexterity in handling wet or dry objects. PMID:24416318

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of on-farm scoring systems and nasal culture to detect bovine respiratory disease complex in preweaned dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Love, William J; Lehenbauer, Terry W; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Drake, Christiana M; Kass, Philip H; Farver, Thomas B; Aly, Sharif S

    2016-03-01

    The California (CA) and Wisconsin (WI) clinical scoring systems have been proposed for bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) detection in preweaned dairy calves. The screening sensitivity (SSe), for estimating BRDC prevalence in a cohort of calves, diagnostic sensitivity (DSe), for confirming BRDC in ill calves, and specificity (Sp) were estimated for each of the scoring systems, as well as for nasal swab cultures for aerobic bacteria and mycoplasma species. Thoracic ultrasound and auscultation were used as the reference standard tests interpreted in parallel. A total of 536 calves (221 with BRDC and 315 healthy) were sampled from 5 premises in California. The SSe of 46.8%, DSe of 72.6%, and Sp of 87.4% was determined for the CA system. The SSe of 46.0%, DSe of 71.1%, and Sp of 91.2% was determined for the WI system. For aerobic culture, the SSe was 43.4%, DSe was 52.6%, and Sp was 71.3%; for Mycoplasma spp. culture, the SSe was 57.5%, DSe was 68.9%, and Sp was 59.7%. The screening and diagnostic sensitivities of the scoring systems were not significantly different but the Sp of the WI system was greater by 3.8%. Scoring systems can serve as rapid on-farm tools to determine the burden of BRDC in preweaned dairy calves. However, users may expect the SSe to be less than the DSe when confirming BRDC in an ill calf. PMID:26796957

  10. The Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System (inCLASS): Preliminary Reliability and Validity of a System for Observing Preschoolers’ Competence in Classroom Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Downer, Jason T.; Booren, Leslie M.; Lima, Olivia K.; Luckner, Amy E.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System (inCLASS), an observation tool that targets children’s interactions in preschool classrooms with teachers, peers, and tasks. In particular, initial evidence is reported of the extent to which the inCLASS meets the following psychometric criteria: inter-rater reliability, normal distributions and adequate range, construct validity, and criterion-related validity. These initial findings suggest that the inCLASS has the potential to provide an authentic, contextualized assessment of young children’s classroom behaviors. Future directions for research with the inCLASS are discussed. PMID:23175598

  11. Malingering or simulation in ophthalmology-visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Incesu, Ali Ihsan; Sobacı, Güngör

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as malingering, or sometimes functional visual loss (FVL). It manifests as either simulating an ophthalmic disease (positive simulation), or denial of ophthalmic disease (negative simulation). Conscious behavior and compensation or indemnity claims are prominent features of simulation. Since some authors suggest that this is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, even conversion is included in this context. In today's world, every ophthalmologist can face with simulation of ophthalmic disease or disorder. In case of simulation suspect, the physician's responsibility is to prove the simulation considering the disease/disorder first, and simulation as an exclusion. In simulation examinations, the physician should be firm and smart to select appropriate test(s) to convince not only the subject, but also the judge in case of indemnity or compensation trials. Almost all ophthalmic sensory and motor functions including visual acuity, visual field, color vision and night vision can be the subject of simulation. Examiner must be skillful in selecting the most appropriate test. Apart from those in the literature, we included all kinds of simulation in ophthalmology. In addition, simulation examination techniques, such as, use of OCT (optical coherence tomography), frequency doubling perimetry (FDP), and modified polarization tests were also included. In this review, we made a thorough literature search, and added our experiences to give the readers up-to-date information on malingering or simulation in ophthalmology. PMID:22553721

  12. Insects groom their antennae to enhance olfactory acuity

    PubMed Central

    Böröczky, Katalin; Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Batchelor, Dale; Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Schal, Coby

    2013-01-01

    Grooming, a common behavior in animals, serves the important function of removing foreign materials from body surfaces. When antennal grooming was prevented in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy images revealed that an unstructured substance accumulated on nongroomed antennae, covering sensillar pores, but not on groomed antennae of the same individuals. Gas chromatography analysis of antennal extracts showed that over a 24-h period nongroomed antennae accumulated three to four times more cuticular hydrocarbons than groomed antennae. Moreover, nongroomed antennae accumulated significantly more environmental contaminants from surfaces (stearic acid) and from air (geranyl acetate) than groomed antennae. We hypothesized that the accumulation of excess native cuticular hydrocarbons on the antennae would impair olfactory reception. Electroantennogram experiments and single-sensillum recordings supported this hypothesis: antennae that were prevented from being groomed were significantly less responsive than groomed antennae to the sex pheromone component periplanone-B, as well as to the general odorants geranyl acetate and hexanol. We therefore conclude that antennal grooming removes excess native cuticular lipids and foreign chemicals that physically and/or chemically interfere with olfaction, and thus maintains the olfactory acuity of the antennae. Similar experimental manipulations of the German cockroach (Blattella germanica), carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus), and the housefly (Musca domestica), which use different modes of antennal grooming, support the hypothesis that antennal grooming serves a similar function in a wide range of insect taxa. PMID:23382193

  13. From innervation density to tactile acuity: 1. Spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul B; Koerber, H Richard; Millecchia, Ronald

    2004-06-11

    We tested the hypothesis that the population receptive field representation (a superposition of the excitatory receptive field areas of cells responding to a tactile stimulus) provides spatial information sufficient to mediate one measure of static tactile acuity. In psychophysical tests, two-point discrimination thresholds on the hindlimbs of adult cats varied as a function of stimulus location and orientation, as they do in humans. A statistical model of the excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields of spinocervical, postsynaptic dorsal column and spinothalamic tract neurons was used to simulate the population receptive field representations in this neural population of the one- and two-point stimuli used in the psychophysical experiments. The simulated and observed thresholds were highly correlated. Simulated and observed thresholds' relations to physiological and anatomical variables such as stimulus location and orientation, receptive field size and shape, map scale, and innervation density were strikingly similar. Simulated and observed threshold variations with receptive field size and map scale obeyed simple relationships predicted by the signal detection model, and were statistically indistinguishable from each other. The population receptive field representation therefore contains information sufficient for this discrimination. PMID:15140641

  14. Insects groom their antennae to enhance olfactory acuity.

    PubMed

    Böröczky, Katalin; Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Batchelor, Dale; Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Schal, Coby

    2013-02-26

    Grooming, a common behavior in animals, serves the important function of removing foreign materials from body surfaces. When antennal grooming was prevented in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, field emission gun scanning electron microscopy images revealed that an unstructured substance accumulated on nongroomed antennae, covering sensillar pores, but not on groomed antennae of the same individuals. Gas chromatography analysis of antennal extracts showed that over a 24-h period nongroomed antennae accumulated three to four times more cuticular hydrocarbons than groomed antennae. Moreover, nongroomed antennae accumulated significantly more environmental contaminants from surfaces (stearic acid) and from air (geranyl acetate) than groomed antennae. We hypothesized that the accumulation of excess native cuticular hydrocarbons on the antennae would impair olfactory reception. Electroantennogram experiments and single-sensillum recordings supported this hypothesis: antennae that were prevented from being groomed were significantly less responsive than groomed antennae to the sex pheromone component periplanone-B, as well as to the general odorants geranyl acetate and hexanol. We therefore conclude that antennal grooming removes excess native cuticular lipids and foreign chemicals that physically and/or chemically interfere with olfaction, and thus maintains the olfactory acuity of the antennae. Similar experimental manipulations of the German cockroach (Blattella germanica), carpenter ant (Camponotus pennsylvanicus), and the housefly (Musca domestica), which use different modes of antennal grooming, support the hypothesis that antennal grooming serves a similar function in a wide range of insect taxa. PMID:23382193

  15. Acoustic basis of directional acuity in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Amanda M; Slee, Sean J; May, Bradford J

    2011-10-01

    The acoustic basis of auditory spatial acuity was investigated in CBA/129 mice by relating patterns of behavioral errors to directional features of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Behavioral performance was assessed by training the mice to lick a water spout during sound presentations from a "safe" location and to suppress the response during presentations from "warning" locations. Minimum audible angles (MAAs) were determined by delivering the safe and warning sounds from different locations in the inter-aural horizontal and median vertical planes. HRTFs were measured at the same locations by implanting a miniature microphone and recording the gain of sound energy near the ear drum relative to free field. Mice produced an average MAA of 31° when sound sources were located in the horizontal plane. Acoustic measures indicated that binaural inter-aural level differences (ILDs) and monaural spectral features of the HRTF change systematically with horizontal location and therefore may have contributed to the accuracy of behavioral performance. Subsequent manipulations of the auditory stimuli and the directional properties of the ear produced errors that suggest the mice primarily relied on ILD cues when discriminating changes in azimuth. The MAA increased beyond 80° when the importance of ILD cues was minimized by testing in the median vertical plane. Although acoustic measures demonstrated a less robust effect of vertical location on spectral features of the HRTF, this poor performance provides further evidence for the insensitivity to spectral cues that was noted during behavioral testing in the horizontal plane. PMID:21717290

  16. Malingering or simulation in ophthalmology-visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Incesu, Ali Ihsan; Sobacı, Güngör

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as malingering, or sometimes functional visual loss (FVL). It manifests as either simulating an ophthalmic disease (positive simulation), or denial of ophthalmic disease (negative simulation). Conscious behavior and compensation or indemnity claims are prominent features of simulation. Since some authors suggest that this is a manifestation of underlying psychopathology, even conversion is included in this context. In today's world, every ophthalmologist can face with simulation of ophthalmic disease or disorder. In case of simulation suspect, the physician's responsibility is to prove the simulation considering the disease/disorder first, and simulation as an exclusion. In simulation examinations, the physician should be firm and smart to select appropriate test(s) to convince not only the subject, but also the judge in case of indemnity or compensation trials. Almost all ophthalmic sensory and motor functions including visual acuity, visual field, color vision and night vision can be the subject of simulation. Examiner must be skillful in selecting the most appropriate test. Apart from those in the literature, we included all kinds of simulation in ophthalmology. In addition, simulation examination techniques, such as, use of OCT (optical coherence tomography), frequency doubling perimetry (FDP), and modified polarization tests were also included. In this review, we made a thorough literature search, and added our experiences to give the readers up-to-date information on malingering or simulation in ophthalmology. PMID:22553721

  17. Cognitive aging and hearing acuity: modeling spoken language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Arthur; Amichetti, Nicole M.; Lash, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The comprehension of spoken language has been characterized by a number of “local” theories that have focused on specific aspects of the task: models of word recognition, models of selective attention, accounts of thematic role assignment at the sentence level, and so forth. The ease of language understanding (ELU) model (Rönnberg et al., 2013) stands as one of the few attempts to offer a fully encompassing framework for language understanding. In this paper we discuss interactions between perceptual, linguistic, and cognitive factors in spoken language understanding. Central to our presentation is an examination of aspects of the ELU model that apply especially to spoken language comprehension in adult aging, where speed of processing, working memory capacity, and hearing acuity are often compromised. We discuss, in relation to the ELU model, conceptions of working memory and its capacity limitations, the use of linguistic context to aid in speech recognition and the importance of inhibitory control, and language comprehension at the sentence level. Throughout this paper we offer a constructive look at the ELU model; where it is strong and where there are gaps to be filled. PMID:26124724

  18. Problems of "draw-a-person: a quantitative scoring system" (DAP:QSS) as a measure of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Troncone, Alda

    2014-10-01

    There has been some ongoing debate on whether the DAP:QSS can be used to measure intelligence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concurrent validity of the DAP:QSS with Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) and the DAP:QSS's accuracy as a predictor of RCPM scores and academic achievement. 184 children from two elementary schools in a region of Southern Italy was evaluated by the DAP:QSS, the RCPM, the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test (GH), and school marks. Drawings' scores, school marks, and RCPM scores were subjected to a Pearson's correlation. Stepwise regression analyses were carried out to identify significant predictors of RCPM scores and school marks. After controlling for socioeconomic status, the DAP:QSS showed a significant correlation with the RCPM and GH tests and academic achievement. However, the modest correlations with the RCPM, the small amount of variance in RCPM scores accounted for by the DAP:QSS (R(2) = .24), and the errors of the DAP:QSS in correctly classifying participants with borderline/deficient intellectual functioning advise against the use of the DAP:QSS as a measure of intelligence. PMID:25350210

  19. The Use of Dynamic Visual Acuity as a Functional Test of Gaze Stabilization Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R.; Miller, C. A.; Richards, J. T.; Warren, L. E.; Cohen, H. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    After prolonged exposure to a given gravitational environment the transition to another is accompanied by adaptations in the sensorimotor subsystems, including the vestibular system. Variation in the adaptation time course of these subsystems, and the functional redundancies that exist between them make it difficult to accurately assess the functional capacity and physical limitations of astro/cosmonauts using tests on individual subsystems. While isolated tests of subsystem performance may be the only means to address where interventions are required, direct measures of performance may be more suitable for assessing the operational consequences of incomplete adaptation to changes in the gravitational environment. A test of dynamic visual acuity (DVA) is currently being used in the JSC Neurosciences Laboratory as part of a series of measures to assess the efficacy of a countermeasure to mitigate postflight locomotor dysfunction. In the current protocol, subjects visual acuity is determined using Landolt ring optotypes presented sequentially on a computer display. Visual acuity assessments are made both while standing and while walking at 1.8 m/s on a motorized treadmill. The use of a psychophysical threshold detection algorithm reduces the required number of optotype presentations and the results can be presented immediately after the test. The difference between the walking and standing acuity measures provides a metric of the change in the subject s ability to maintain gaze fixation on the visual target while walking. This functional consequence is observable regardless of the underlying subsystem most responsible for the change. Data from 15 cosmo/astronauts have been collected following long-duration (approx. 6 months) stays in space using a visual target viewing distance of 4.0 meters. An investigation of the group mean shows a change in DVA soon after the flight that asymptotes back to baseline approximately one week following their return to earth. The

  20. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  1. Development of risk-based trading farm scoring system to assist with the control of bovine tuberculosis in cattle in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Adkin, A; Brouwer, A; Simons, R R L; Smith, R P; Arnold, M E; Broughan, J; Kosmider, R; Downs, S H

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and ranking cattle herds with a higher risk of being or becoming infected on known risk factors can help target farm biosecurity, surveillance schemes and reduce spread through animal trading. This paper describes a quantitative approach to develop risk scores, based on the probability of infection in a herd with bovine tuberculosis (bTB), to be used in a risk-based trading (RBT) scheme in England and Wales. To produce a practical scoring system the risk factors included need to be simple and quick to understand, sufficiently informative and derived from centralised national databases to enable verification and assess compliance. A logistic regression identified herd history of bTB, local bTB prevalence, herd size and movements of animals onto farms in batches from high risk areas as being significantly associated with the probability of bTB infection on farm. Risk factors were assigned points using the estimated odds ratios to weight them. The farm risk score was defined as the sum of these individual points yielding a range from 1 to 5 and was calculated for each cattle farm that was trading animals in England and Wales at the start of a year. Within 12 months, of those farms tested, 30.3% of score 5 farms had a breakdown (sensitivity). Of farms scoring 1-4 only 5.4% incurred a breakdown (1-specificity). The use of this risk scoring system within RBT has the potential to reduce infected cattle movements; however, there are cost implications in ensuring that the information underpinning any system is accurate and up to date. PMID:26678120

  2. Evaluation of a pretest scoring system (4Ts) for the diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a university hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Vatanparast, Rodina; Lantz, Sarah; Ward, Kristine; Crilley, Pamela Ann; Styler, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The initial diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is made on clinical grounds because the assays with the highest sensitivity (eg, heparin-platelet factor 4 antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) and specificity (eg, serotonin release assay) may not be readily available. The clinical utility of the pretest scoring system, the 4Ts, was developed and validated by Lo et al in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis in 2006. The pretest scoring system looks at the degree and timing of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and the possibility of other etiologies. Based on the 4T score, patients can be categorized as having a high, intermediate, or low probability of having HIT. We conducted a retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients who were tested for HIT during their hospitalization at Hahnemann University Hospital (Philadelphia, PA) in 2009. Of the 100 patients analyzed, 72, 23, and 5 patients had 4T pretest probability scores of low, intermediate, and high, respectively. A positive HIT ELISA (optical density > 1.0 unit) was detected in 0 of 72 patients (0%) in the low probability group, in 5 of 23 patients (22%) in the intermediate probability group, and in 2 of 5 patients (40%) in the high probability group. The average turnaround time for the HIT ELISA was 4 to 5 days. Fourteen (19%) of the 72 patients with a low pretest probability of HIT were treated with a direct thrombin inhibitor. Ten (71%) of the 14 patients in the low probability group treated with a direct thrombin inhibitor had a major complication of bleeding requiring blood transfusion support. In this retrospective study, a low 4T score showed 100% correlation with a negative HIT antibody assay. We recommend incorporating the 4T scoring system into institutional core measures when assessing a patient with suspected HIT, selecting only patients with intermediate to high probability for therapeutic intervention, which may translate into reduced morbidity and lower health care

  3. Machine-Scorable Complex Constructed-Response Quantitative Items: Agreement between Expert System and Human Raters' Scores. GRE Board Professional Report No. 88-07aP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebrechts, Marc M.; And Others

    This study evaluated agreement between expert system and human scores on 12 algebra word problems taken by Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) General Test examinees from a general sample of 285 and a study sample of 30. Problems were drawn from three content classes (rate x time, work, and interest) and presented in four constructed-response…

  4. SAT Scores, 2012-13: Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). Measuring Up. D&A Report No. 13.22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muli, Juliana; Gilleland, Kevin; McMillen, Brad

    2014-01-01

    As the ACT has become part of North Carolina's mandatory testing program, SAT participation in Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) and North Carolina has declined in recent years. However, SAT performance in WCPSS remains high compared to state and national averages. In 2012-13, students in WCPSS continued to score 50-60 points higher on the…

  5. Observations of Teacher-Child Interactions in Classrooms Serving Latinos and Dual Language Learners: Applicability of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in Diverse Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Jason T.; Lopez, Michael L.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hamagami, Aki; Pianta, Robert C.; Howes, Carollee

    2012-01-01

    With the rising number of Latino and dual language learner (DLL) children attending pre-k and the importance of assessing the quality of their experiences in those settings, this study examined the extent to which a commonly used assessment of teacher-child interactions, the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), demonstrated similar…

  6. The Performance Levels and Associated Cut Scores on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment Mathematics and Reading Tests: A Critical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwerling, Harris L.

    In the context of controversy over the use of high stakes testing, the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) asked for an evaluation of the performance levels and cut score of the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) mathematics and reading tests. While awaiting technical documentation from the Pennsylvania Department of…

  7. ADHD Subtypes and Co-Occurring Anxiety, Depression, and Oppositional-Defiant Disorder: Differences in Gordon Diagnostic System and Wechsler Working Memory and Processing Speed Index Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Chase, Gary A.; Mink, Danielle M.; Stagg, Ryan E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Freedom-from-Distractibility/Working Memory Index (FDI/WMI), Processing Speed Index (PSI), and Gordon Diagnostic System (GDS) scores in ADHD children were examined as a function of subtype and coexisting anxiety, depression, and oppositional-defiant disorder. Method: Participants were 587…

  8. ON-LINE PREDICTION OF YIELD GRADE, LONGISSIMUS MUSCLE AREA, PRELIMINARY YIELD GRADE, ADJUSTED PRELIMINARY YIELD GRADE, AND MARBLING SCORE USING THE MARC BEEF CARCASS IMAGE ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the ability of the MARC Beef Carcass Image Analysis System to predict calculated yield grade, longissimus area, preliminary yield grade, adjusted preliminary yield grade, and marbling score under commercial beef processing conditions. In two commerci...

  9. A Point-Scoring System for the Clinical Diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome Based on Quantified SPECT Imaging of Salivary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Haixia; Zhou, Sheng; Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Shouxin; Xianyu, Zhiqun; Han, Yunfeng; Shen, Guifen; Li, Jinming; Ye, Cong; Sun, Wei; Dong, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To establish a point-scoring diagnostic system for Sjögren's syndrome (SS) based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland, and evaluate its feasibility and performance compared with 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria. Methods 213 patients with suspected SS enrolled in this study. The related clinical data of all patients were collected. All patients were evaluated and grouped on a clinical basis and posttreatment follow-up by rheumatology specialists as the unified standard (SS group with 149 cases and nSS group with 64 cases). From SPECT imaging of salivary gland, Tmax, UImax, Ts and EFs were derived for bilateral parotid and submandibular glands, and compared between the groups. A point-scoring diagnostic system for SS was established based on the quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland. We estimated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy for the new diagnostic system, compared with 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria. Results When 7.0 was used as the cut-off point, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the new point-scoring system in diagnosing SS were 89.93% (134/149), 93.75% (60/64), 97.10% (134/138), 80.00% (60/75) and 91.08% (194/213), respectively. The new point-scoring diagnostic system based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland keeps the specificity comparatively to 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria, but improves the sensitivity significantly (P<0.01). Conclusion The new point-scoring diagnostic system for SS based on quantified SPECT imaging of salivary gland may be superior to 2002 AECG criteria and 2012 ACR criteria, with higher sensitivity and similar specificity in the diagnosis of SS. Additionally, it also has good feasibility in the clinical settings. PMID:27195488

  10. The Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing score: A comprehensive standardized system for predicting necessity of ureteral dilatation to treat proximal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Beom; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Kim, Khae Hawn; Jung, Han; Yoon, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For treating proximal ureteral calculi, treatment decision has been known still difficult to choose ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) or shockwave lithotripsy. The aims of our study are to identify the possible predictors for necessity of URS and to propose the Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing scoring system (GUUN score) as a helpful predictor. Materials and Methods We evaluated 83 consecutive patients who underwent semirigid URS due to proximal ureteral calculi between April 2011 and February 2014 by a single surgeon. We reviewed patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative parameters and surgical records. We divided the patients into 2 groups (group 1, nondilation group; group 2, dilation group) according to whether or not balloon dilation was performed. A stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify the factors that predict dilatation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted and areas under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated to GUUN score. Results Mean patients' age and their stone size were 48.53±12.90 years and 7.79±2.57 cm, respectively. Significantly smaller stone size (p=0.009), lower stone density (p=0.005), and lower ureteral density differences between ureteral narrowing level and far distal ureter (UD) (p<0.001) were observed in group 1 (n=34) than in group 2 (n=49). GUUN score consists of age, stone size and UD (AUC, 0.938). Overall stone-free clearance rate was 85.5%. Conclusions We suggest that the GUUN score is an excellent scoring system to predict the necessity of ureteral dilatation for decision making whether or not to perform surgical manipulation. PMID:27437538

  11. Effects of Treatment Intensification on Acute Local Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Prospective Observational Study Validating CTCAE, Version 3.0, Scoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro Tomatis, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Guzzo, Marco; Sangalli, Claudia; Potepan, Paolo; Fantini, Simona; Bergamini, Cristiana; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Licitra, Lisa; Scaramellini, Gabriele; Cantu', Giulio; Olmi, Patrizia

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence and severity of acute local toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy (CHT), using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0), scoring system. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2006, 149 patients with head and neck cancer treated with RT at our center were prospectively evaluated for local toxicity during treatment. On a weekly basis, patients were monitored and eight toxicity items were recorded according to the CTCAE v3.0 scoring system. Of the 149 patients, 48 (32%) were treated with RT alone (conventional fractionation), 82 (55%) with concomitant CHT and conventional fractionation RT, and 20 (13%) with accelerated-fractionation RT and CHT. Results: Severe (Grade 3-4) adverse events were recorded in 28% (mucositis), 33% (dysphagia), 40% (pain), and 12% (skin) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed CHT to be the most relevant factor independently predicting for worse toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia, weight loss, salivary changes). In contrast, previous surgery, RT acceleration and older age, female gender, and younger age, respectively, predicted for a worse outcome of mucositis, weight loss, pain, and dermatitis. The T-score method confirmed that conventional RT alone is in the 'low-burden' class (T-score = 0.6) and suggests that concurrent CHT and conventional fractionation RT is in the 'high-burden' class (T-score = 1.15). Combined CHT and accelerated-fractionation RT had the highest T-score at 1.9. Conclusions: The CTCAE v3.0 proved to be a reliable tool to quantify acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with various treatment intensities. The effect of CHT and RT acceleration on the acute toxicity burden was clinically relevant.

  12. Night vision goggle visual acuity assessment: results of an interagency test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task, H. Lee

    2001-08-01

    There are several parameters that are used to characterize the quality of a night vision goggle (NVG) such as resolution, gain, field-of-view, visual acuity, etc. One of the primary parameters is visual acuity or resolution of the NVG. These two terms are often used interchangeably primarily because of the measurement methods employed. The objectives of this paper are to present: (1) an argument as to why NVG visual acuity and resolution should be considered as distinctly different parameters, (2) descriptions of different methods of measuring visual acuity and resolution, and (3) the results of a blind test by several agencies to measure the resolution of the same two NVGs (four oculars).

  13. A single cohort prospective trial of the immediate effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Athaide, Michelle; Rego, Carol; Budgell, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is no high quality evidence on which to judge the generalizability of isolated reports of improvement in vision following manipulation. The current paucity of research results also precludes the thoughtful design of a controlled, prospective clinical study. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to test the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial of the acute effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity. Methods: New adult patients presenting to a community based chiropractic clinic were recruited into a single cohort prospective trial to determine the immediate effects of cervical spinal manipulation on visual acuity. Results: The experimental protocol was well accepted by patients and caused minimal or no disruption of the clinic routine. By some measures, chiropractic treatment was accompanied by statistically significant improvements in visual acuity. Discussion: The results of this study indicate that it is quite feasible to conduct a prospective, community based clinical study of the acute effects of spinal manipulation on visual acuity. PMID:27069271

  14. Ocular motility, visual acuity and dysfunction of neuropsychological impairment in children with shunted uncomplicated hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, H K; Prigatano, G P; Pollay, M; Biscoe, C B; Smith, R V

    1985-01-01

    Children with shunted, uncomplicated, communicating hydrocephalus were tested to determine (1) the persistence of neuropsychological impairment and (2) the relationship between neuropsychological functioning, ocular motility, and acuity abnormalities. Eighteen hydrocephalic and 18 individually age- and sex-matched controls were given a neuropsychological battery, repeated after an interval of 1 year. Hydrocephalic children were also tested at the beginning of the second year for strabismus, amblyopia and visual acuity. Their medical records were reviewed for history of ocular motility and/or acuity abnormalities. Hydrocephalic children with normal range IQ were found to have lower verbal IQ, memory, and fine motor skills compared to controls. A history of ocular motility and acuity abnormalities was associated with impaired visuospatial and verbal problem-solving skills. PMID:4005882

  15. Grating Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare grating (resolution) visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment (ET) for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) versus eyes that were managed conventionally (CM). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, infants with bilateral, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye treated early at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, and treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either ET or CM. Main Outcome Measures Grating visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers using Teller acuity cards. Results Monocular grating acuity results were obtained from 317 (86%) of 370 surviving children. Analysis of grating acuity results for all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant overall benefit for early treatment (18.1% vs 22.8% unfavorable outcome, P=0.08). When the 6-year grating acuity results were analyzed according to a clinical algorithm (high-risk Type 1 and high-risk Type 2 prethreshold ROP), a benefit was seen in Type 1 eyes (16.4% vs 25.2%, P=0.004) that were treated early, but not in Type 2 eyes (21.3% vs 15.9%, P=0.29). Conclusion Early treatment for eyes with Type 1 ROP improved grating acuity outcomes but early treatment for eyes with Type 2 ROP did not. Application to Clinical Medicine Type I eyes should be treated early; however, based on acuity results at age 6 years, Type 2 eyes should be cautiously monitored for progression to Type 1 ROP. Trial Registration NCT00027222 PMID:21746974

  16. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, acuity threshold was measured with an adaptive staircase procedure. In an ABCDDCBA scheme, trial-by-trial feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  17. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier.

    PubMed

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, acuity threshold was measured with an adaptive staircase procedure. In an ABCDDCBA scheme, trial-by-trial feedback was provided in 2 x 4 conditions: (A) no feedback, (B) acoustic signals indicating correctness, (C)visual indication of correct orientation, and (D) a combination of (B) and (C). After each run the participants judged comfort. Main outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants' comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)-no feedback-was on average "slightly uncomfortable", the other three conditions were "slightly comfortable" (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  18. Validation of acute physiologic and chronic health evaluation II scoring system software developed at The Aga Khan University, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, M; Asghar, A; Shamim, F; Khan, FH

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the predictive performance of Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) software available on the hospital intranet and analyze interrater reliability of calculating the APACHE II score by the gold standard manual method or automatically using the software. Materials and Methods: An expert scorer not involved in the data collection had calculated APACHE II score of 213 patients admitted to surgical Intensive Care Unit using the gold standard manual method for a previous study performed in the department. The same data were entered into the computer software available on the hospital intranet (http://intranet/apacheii) to recalculate the APACHE II score automatically along with the predicted mortality. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistical test and Pearson's correlation coefficient was computed. Results: The 213 patients had an average APACHE II score of 17.20 ± 8.24, the overall mortality rate was 32.8% and standardized mortality ratio was 1.00. The area under the ROC curve of 0.827 was significantly >0.5 (P < 0.01) and had confidence interval of 0.77-0.88. The goodness-of-fit test showed a good calibration (H = 5.46, P = 0.71). Interrater reliability using Pearson's product moment correlations demonstrated a strong positive relationship between the computer and the manual expert scorer (r = 0.98, P = 0.0005). Conclusion: APACHE II software available on the hospital's intranet has satisfactory calibration and discrimination and interrater reliability is good when compared with the gold standard manual method. PMID:26955310

  19. Crowding and visual acuity measured in adults using paediatric test letters, pictures and symbols.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Sarah J H; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Crowding refers to the degradation of visual acuity for target optotypes with, versus without, surrounding features. Crowding is important clinically, however the effect of target-flanker spacing on acuity for symbols and pictures, compared to letters, has not been investigated. Five adults with corrected-to-normal vision had visual acuity measured for modified single target versions of Kay Pictures, Lea Symbols, HOTV and Cambridge Crowding Cards, tests. Single optotypes were presented in isolation and with surrounding features placed 0-5 stroke-widths away. Visual acuity measured with Kay Picture optotypes is 0.13-0.19logMAR better than for other test optotypes and varies significantly across picture. The magnitude of crowding is strongest when the surrounding features abut, or are placed 1 stroke-width away from the target optotype. The slope of the psychometric function is steeper in the region just beyond maximum crowding. Crowding is strongest and the psychometric function steepest, with the Cambridge Crowding Cards arrangement, than when any single optotype is surrounded by a box. Estimates of crowding extent are less variable across test when expressed in units of stroke-width, than optotype-width. Crowding for single target presentations of letters, symbols and pictures used in paediatric visual acuity tests can be maximised and made more sensitive to change in visual acuity, by careful selection of optotype, by surrounding the target with similar flankers, and by using a closer target-flanker separation than half an optotype-width. PMID:26878696

  20. In early returns scoring scores big.

    PubMed

    Butman, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    A scoring or cutting balloon is always useful in preventing slippage during therapy of in-stent restenosis. A drug-coated scoring balloon for in-stent restenosis may be an alternative to a drug-coated balloon Definitive comparison trials are needed and likely to help define their exact role in patients with in-stent restenosis. PMID:27400636

  1. Frozen-section evaluation of cervical adenocarcinoma at time of radical trachelectomy: Pathologic pitfalls and the application of an objective scoring system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kay J.; Soslow, Robert A.; Sonoda, Yukio; Barakat, Richard R.; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the incidence of diagnostic discrepancy between frozen-section and final diagnosis of the endocervical margin at time of radical trachelectomy and to apply an objective scoring system to non-invasive endocervical glandular atypia to determine its utility in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. Methods Histologic slides from 19 cases of radical trachelectomy performed for invasive endocervical adenocarcinoma were evaluated for correlation between the frozen and permanent sections of the endocervical margin. An objective scoring system for grading non-invasive endocervical glandular lesions proposed by Ioffe et al. was also applied to the frozen and permanent section slides and compared to the final diagnosis. Results There was 84% concordance between the frozen-section and final diagnosis using histology alone, vs. 95% concordance using the Ioffe scoring system. One trachelectomy was converted to completion hysterectomy for what was presumed to be adenocarcinoma in situ at the margin, which in retrospect, was a benign lesion and was correctly classified using the Ioffe system. Most of the discrepancies were due to misinterpretation of tubal metaplasia, tubo-endometrioid metaplasia, and atypical tubal metaplasia as adenocarcinoma in situ. Conclusion Benign mimics of endocervical adenocarcinoma in situ can be difficult to distinguish from malignant lesions, especially during frozen-section evaluation of the trachelectomy. Correctly diagnosing the margin status intraoperatively has great clinical impact and the application of an objective scoring system, like that proposed by Ioffe et al., can increase diagnostic accuracy when applied to frozen-section slides and better correlates with final diagnosis when compared to histology alone. PMID:18635252

  2. The clinical absolute and relative scoring system-a quantitative scale measuring myasthenia gravis severity and outcome used in the traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chao; Gao, Bu-Lang; Yang, Hong-Qi; Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by autoantigen against the nicotine acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. With modern treatment facilities, the treatment effect and outcome for MG has been greatly improved with MG and non-MG patients enjoying the same life expectancy. Many classifications of disease distribution and severity have been set up and tested all over the world, mainly in the western world. However, the absolute and relative scoring system for evaluating the severity and treatment effect of MG in China where traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years has not been introduced worldwide. The TCM has achieved a great success in the treatment of MG in the country with a huge population. This article serves to introduce this scoring system to the world. PMID:25440379

  3. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome. Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test. The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  4. The thromboelastometric discrepancy between septic and trauma induced disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by the scoring system from the Japanese association for acute medicine.

    PubMed

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the hematological differences between septic and traumatic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) using the rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).This retrospective study includes all sepsis or severe trauma patients transported to our emergency department who underwent ROTEM from 2013 to 2014. All patients were divided into 2 groups based on the presence of DIC diagnosed by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC score. We statistically analyzed the demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory data, ROTEM findings (EXTEM and FIBTEM), and outcome.Fifty-seven patients (30 sepsis and 27 severe trauma) were included in primary analysis. Sepsis cases were significantly older and had higher systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) scores, whereas there were no significant differences in other parameters including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Twenty-six patients (14 sepsis and 12 severe trauma) were diagnosed with DIC. The Septic DIC (S-DIC) group was significantly older and had higher DIC scores than the traumatic DIC (T-DIC) group. Hematologic examination revealed significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, lower FDP, DD, and higher FDP/DD ratio were found in the S-DIC group in comparison with the T-DIC group. ROTEM findings showed that the A10, A20, and MCF in the FIBTEM test were significantly higher in the S-DIC group. However, no statistical differences were confirmed in the LI30, LI45, and ML in EXTEM test.The plasma fibrinogen level and fibrinogen based clot firmness in whole-blood test revealed statistical significance between septic and traumatic DIC patients. PMID:27495106

  5. Determination of myopes' visual acuity using stimuli with different contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikaunieks, G.; Caure, E.; Kassaliete, E.; Meskovska, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The influence of different contrast stimuli on the myopes’ visual acuity (VA) was studied using positive (35.7), negative (-0.97) and low contrast (-0.11) Landolt optotypes. Test subjects were 13 myopes with corrected eyesight and 8 emmetropes, all of them being 20-22 years old. For VA determination the FrACT computer program was employed. In the tests it was found that for emmetropes the positive and negative contrast VA values do not differ significantly, while for myopes the respective values are better with positive than with negative contrast stimuli. These differences were the same in the measurements taken with spectacles or contact lenses. Our results also show that the retinal straylight created by clean spectacles or soft contact lenses is similar in both cases. Dažu autoru pētījumi rāda, ka miopijas gadījumā redzes asums ir labāks ar pozitīva Vēbera kontrasta stimuliem (balts stimuls uz melna fona) nekā negatīva kontrasta stimuliem (melns stimuls uz balta fona). Šis fenomens tiek saistītas ar neirālām izmaiņām ON un OFF ceļos un miopiskās acīs. Citi pētījumi rāda, ka arī acī izkliedētās gaismas ietekmē labāks redzes asums ir ar pozitīviem kontrasta stimuliem nekā negatīva. Miopijas gadījumā papildus gaismas izkliedi rada briļļu lēcas vai kontaktlēcas. Mēs savā pētījumā vēlējāmies noskaidrot, cik lielā mērā labāks redzes asums ar pozitīva kontrasta stimuliem miopiskās acīs ir saistāms ar optiskās korekcijas radīto gaismas izkliedi. Pētījumā piedalījās 21 dalībnieks - 8 emetropi un 13 miopi ar sfērisko refrakcijas lielumu no -1.25 līdz -6,25 D. Dalībnieku vecums bija no 20 līdz 22 gadi. Izmantojot FrACT datorprogrammu, tika noteiks monokulārais redzes asums VA ar Landolta gredzeniem pie pozitīva, negatīva un zema kontrasta fotopiskos apstākļos. Vēbera kontrasti stimuliem attiecīgi bija 35.7, -0.97 un -0.11. Miopiem mērījumi tika veikti gan ar brillēm, gan

  6. "Far" and "Near" Visual Acuity While Walking and the Collective Contributions of Non-Ocular Mechanisms to Gaze Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; vanEmmerik, Richard E. A.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2006-01-01

    Gaze stabilization was quantified in subjects (n=11) as they walked on a motorized treadmill (1.8 m/s) and viewed visual targets at two viewing distances. A "far" target was positioned at 4 m (FAR) in front of the subject and the "near" target was placed at a distance of 0.5 m (NEAR). A direct measure of visual acuity was used to assess the overall effectiveness of the gaze stabilization system. The contributions of nonocular mechanisms to the gaze goal were also quantified using a measure of the distance between the subject and point in space where fixation of the visual target would require the least eye movement amplitude (i.e. the head fixation distance (HFD)). Kinematic variables mirrored those of previous investigations with the vertical trunk translation and head pitch signals, and the lateral translation and head yaw signals maintaining what appear as antiphase relationships. However, an investigation of the temporal relationships between the maxima and minima of the vertical translation and head pitch signals show that while the maximum in vertical translation occurs at the point of the minimum head pitch signal, the inverse is not true. The maximum in the head pitch signal lags the vertical translation minimum by an average of greater than 12 percent of the step cycle time. Three HFD measures, one each for data in the sagittal and transverse planes, and one that combined the movements from both planes, all revealed changes between the FAR and NEAR target viewing conditions. This reorganization of the nonocular degrees of freedom while walking was consistent with a strategy to reduce the magnitude of the eye movements required when viewing the NEAR target. Despite this reorganization, acuity measures show that image stabilization is not occurring while walking and viewing the NEAR target. Group means indicate that visual acuity is not affected while walking in the FAR condition, but a decrement of 0.15 logMAR (i.e. 1.5 eye chart lines) exists between the

  7. Visual Acuity Using Head-fixed Displays During Passive Self and Surround Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Black, F. Owen; Stallings, Valerie; Peters, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The ability to read head-fixed displays on various motion platforms requires the suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflexes. This study examined dynamic visual acuity while viewing a head-fixed display during different self and surround rotation conditions. Twelve healthy subjects were asked to report the orientation of Landolt C optotypes presented on a micro-display fixed to a rotating chair at 50 cm distance. Acuity thresholds were determined by the lowest size at which the subjects correctly identified 3 of 5 optotype orientations at peak velocity. Visual acuity was compared across four different conditions, each tested at 0.05 and 0.4 Hz (peak amplitude of 57 deg/s). The four conditions included: subject rotated in semi-darkness (i.e., limited to background illumination of the display), subject stationary while visual scene rotated, subject rotated around a stationary visual background, and both subject and visual scene rotated together. Visual acuity performance was greatest when the subject rotated around a stationary visual background; i.e., when both vestibular and visual inputs provided concordant information about the motion. Visual acuity performance was most reduced when the subject and visual scene rotated together; i.e., when the visual scene provided discordant information about the motion. Ranges of 4-5 logMAR step sizes across the conditions indicated the acuity task was sufficient to discriminate visual performance levels. The background visual scene can influence the ability to read head-fixed displays during passive motion disturbances. Dynamic visual acuity using head-fixed displays can provide an operationally relevant screening tool for visual performance during exposure to novel acceleration environments.

  8. Effect of Target Location on Dynamic Visual Acuity During Passive Horizontal Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Meghan; DeDios, Yiri; Kulecz, Walter; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) generates eye rotation to compensate for potential retinal slip in the specific plane of head movement. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) has been utilized as a functional measure of the VOR. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in accuracy and reaction time when performing a DVA task with targets offset from the plane of rotation, e.g. offset vertically during horizontal rotation. Visual acuity was measured in 12 healthy subjects as they moved a hand-held joystick to indicate the orientation of a computer-generated Landolt C "as quickly and accurately as possible." Acuity thresholds were established with optotypes presented centrally on a wall-mounted LCD screen at 1.3 m distance, first without motion (static condition) and then while oscillating at 0.8 Hz (DVA, peak velocity 60 deg/s). The effect of target location was then measured during horizontal rotation with the optotypes randomly presented in one of nine different locations on the screen (offset up to 10 deg). The optotype size (logMar 0, 0.2 or 0.4, corresponding to Snellen range 20/20 to 20/50) and presentation duration (150, 300 and 450 ms) were counter-balanced across five trials, each utilizing horizontal rotation at 0.8 Hz. Dynamic acuity was reduced relative to static acuity in 7 of 12 subjects by one step size. During the random target trials, both accuracy and reaction time improved proportional to optotype size. Accuracy and reaction time also improved between 150 ms and 300 ms presentation durations. The main finding was that both accuracy and reaction time varied as a function of target location, with greater performance decrements when acquiring vertical targets. We conclude that dynamic visual acuity varies with target location, with acuity optimized for targets in the plane of motion. Both reaction time and accuracy are functionally relevant DVA parameters of VOR function.

  9. A double dissociation of the acuity and crowding limits to letter identification, and the promise of improved visual screening.

    PubMed

    Song, Shuang; Levi, Dennis M; Pelli, Denis G

    2014-01-01

    Here, we systematically explore the size and spacing requirements for identifying a letter among other letters. We measure acuity for flanked and unflanked letters, centrally and peripherally, in normals and amblyopes. We find that acuity, overlap masking, and crowding each demand a minimum size or spacing for readable text. Just measuring flanked and unflanked acuity is enough for our proposed model to predict the observer's threshold size and spacing for letters at any eccentricity. We also find that amblyopia in adults retains the character of the childhood condition that caused it. Amblyopia is a developmental neural deficit that can occur as a result of either strabismus or anisometropia in childhood. Peripheral viewing during childhood due to strabismus results in amblyopia that is crowding limited, like peripheral vision. Optical blur of one eye during childhood due to anisometropia without strabismus results in amblyopia that is acuity limited, like blurred vision. Furthermore, we find that the spacing:acuity ratio of flanked and unflanked acuity can distinguish strabismic amblyopia from purely anisometropic amblyopia in nearly perfect agreement with lack of stereopsis. A scatter diagram of threshold spacing versus acuity, one point per patient, for several diagnostic groups, reveals the diagnostic power of flanked acuity testing. These results and two demonstrations indicate that the sensitivity of visual screening tests can be improved by using flankers that are more tightly spaced and letter like. Finally, in concert with Strappini, Pelli, Di Pace, and Martelli (submitted), we jointly report a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Two clinical conditions-anisometropic amblyopia and apperceptive agnosia-each selectively impair either acuity A or the spacing:acuity ratio S/A, not both. Furthermore, when we specifically estimate crowding, we find a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Models of human object recognition will need to

  10. A double dissociation of the acuity and crowding limits to letter identification, and the promise of improved visual screening

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shuang; Levi, Dennis M.; Pelli, Denis G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we systematically explore the size and spacing requirements for identifying a letter among other letters. We measure acuity for flanked and unflanked letters, centrally and peripherally, in normals and amblyopes. We find that acuity, overlap masking, and crowding each demand a minimum size or spacing for readable text. Just measuring flanked and unflanked acuity is enough for our proposed model to predict the observer's threshold size and spacing for letters at any eccentricity. We also find that amblyopia in adults retains the character of the childhood condition that caused it. Amblyopia is a developmental neural deficit that can occur as a result of either strabismus or anisometropia in childhood. Peripheral viewing during childhood due to strabismus results in amblyopia that is crowding limited, like peripheral vision. Optical blur of one eye during childhood due to anisometropia without strabismus results in amblyopia that is acuity limited, like blurred vision. Furthermore, we find that the spacing:acuity ratio of flanked and unflanked acuity can distinguish strabismic amblyopia from purely anisometropic amblyopia in nearly perfect agreement with lack of stereopsis. A scatter diagram of threshold spacing versus acuity, one point per patient, for several diagnostic groups, reveals the diagnostic power of flanked acuity testing. These results and two demonstrations indicate that the sensitivity of visual screening tests can be improved by using flankers that are more tightly spaced and letter like. Finally, in concert with Strappini, Pelli, Di Pace, and Martelli (submitted), we jointly report a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Two clinical conditions—anisometropic amblyopia and apperceptive agnosia—each selectively impair either acuity A or the spacing:acuity ratio S/A, not both. Furthermore, when we specifically estimate crowding, we find a double dissociation between acuity and crowding. Models of human object recognition will need

  11. A clinical prognostic scoring system for resectable gastric cancer to predict survival and benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Qian, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Gu, Bing; Pei, Dong; He, Shaohua; Zhu, Fang; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Xu, Jin; Liu, Lianke; Gu, Yanhong; Guo, Renhua; Yin, Yongmei; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is a standard procedure of curative resection for gastric cancer (GC). The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable prognostic scoring system for GC treated with D2 gastrectomy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods A prognostic scoring system was established based on clinical and laboratory data from 579 patients with localized GC without distant metastasis treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Results From the multivariate model for overall survival (OS), five factors were selected for the scoring system: ≥50% metastatic lymph node rate, positive lymphovascular invasion, pathologic TNM Stage II or III, ≥5 ng/mL preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level, and <110 g/L preoperative hemoglobin. Two models were derived using different methods. Model A identified low- and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001), while Model B differentiated low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients for OS (P<0.001). Stage III patients in the low-risk group had higher survival probabilities than Stage II patients. Both Model A (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69–0.78) and Model B (AUC: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.72–0.83) were better predictors compared with the pathologic TNM classification (AUC: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.59–0.71, P<0.001). Adjuvant paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based or triple chemotherapy showed significantly better outcomes in patients classified as high risk, but not in those with low and intermediate risk. Conclusion A clinical three-tier prognostic risk scoring system was established to predict OS of GC treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The potential advantage of this scoring system is that it can identify high-risk patients in Stage II or III who may benefit from paclitaxel- or oxaliplatin-based regimens. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results before they are applied clinically. PMID:26966350

  12. Fingermark evidence evaluation based on automated fingerprint identification system matching scores: the effect of different types of conditioning on likelihood ratios.

    PubMed

    Alberink, Ivo; de Jongh, Arent; Rodriguez, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    In recent studies, the evidential value of the similarity of minutiae configurations of fingermarks and fingerprints, for example expressed by automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS), is determined by likelihood ratios (LRs). The paper explores whether there is an effect on LRs if conditioning takes place on specified fingers, fingerprints, or fingermarks under competing hypotheses: In addition, an approach is explored where conditioning is asymmetric. Comparisons between fingerprints and simulated fingermarks with eight minutiae are performed to produce similarity score distributions for each type of conditioning, given a fixed AFIS matching algorithm. Both similarity scores and LRs are significantly different if the conditioning changes. Given a common-source scenario, "LRs" resulting from asymmetric conditioning are on average higher. The difference may reach a factor of 2000. As conditioning on a suspect's finger(print) is labor-intensive and requires a cooperating suspect, it is recommended to just condition on the number of minutiae in the fingermark. PMID:24180303

  13. Critical Overview of the Risk Scoring Systems to Predict Non-Responsiveness to Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Kawasaki Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Andreozzi, Laura; Fastiggi, Michele; Bracci, Benedetta; Natale, Marco Francesco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is the most relevant cause of heart disease in children living in developed countries. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has a preventive function in the formation of coronary artery abnormalities and a poor strictly-curative action in established coronary damage. More than two decades ago, the Harada score was set to assess which children with KS should be subject to administration of IVIG, evaluating retrospectively a large cohort of patients with regard to age, sex and laboratory data. Nowadays, high dose IVIG is administered to all children with a confirmed diagnosis of KS, but a tool for predicting non-responsiveness to the initial infusion of IVIG has not been found. The prediction of IVIG resistance is a crucial issue, as recognising these high-risk patients should consent the administration of an intensified initial treatment in combination with IVIG in order to prevent coronary injuries. Few reports have focused on factors, referring to both clinical parameters and laboratory data at the onset of KS, in order to predict which patients might be IVIG non-responsive. We have analysed three different risk scores which were formulated to predict IVIG resistance in Japanese children with typical KS, but their application in non-Japanese patients or in those with incomplete and atypical patterns of the disease has been studied in a fragmentary way. Overall, our analysis showed that early and definite ascertainment of likely IVIG non-responders who require additional therapies reducing the development of coronary artery involvement in children with KS is still a challenge. PMID:26927060

  14. Critical Overview of the Risk Scoring Systems to Predict Non-Responsiveness to Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Kawasaki Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rigante, Donato; Andreozzi, Laura; Fastiggi, Michele; Bracci, Benedetta; Natale, Marco Francesco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is the most relevant cause of heart disease in children living in developed countries. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has a preventive function in the formation of coronary artery abnormalities and a poor strictly-curative action in established coronary damage. More than two decades ago, the Harada score was set to assess which children with KS should be subject to administration of IVIG, evaluating retrospectively a large cohort of patients with regard to age, sex and laboratory data. Nowadays, high dose IVIG is administered to all children with a confirmed diagnosis of KS, but a tool for predicting non-responsiveness to the initial infusion of IVIG has not been found. The prediction of IVIG resistance is a crucial issue, as recognising these high-risk patients should consent the administration of an intensified initial treatment in combination with IVIG in order to prevent coronary injuries. Few reports have focused on factors, referring to both clinical parameters and laboratory data at the onset of KS, in order to predict which patients might be IVIG non-responsive. We have analysed three different risk scores which were formulated to predict IVIG resistance in Japanese children with typical KS, but their application in non-Japanese patients or in those with incomplete and atypical patterns of the disease has been studied in a fragmentary way. Overall, our analysis showed that early and definite ascertainment of likely IVIG non-responders who require additional therapies reducing the development of coronary artery involvement in children with KS is still a challenge. PMID:26927060

  15. Determine the effect of neck muscle fatigue on dynamic visual acuity in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Al Saif, Amer A.; Al Senany, Samira

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether neck muscle fatigue affects dynamic visual acuity in healthy young participants. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a double-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Thirty healthy young subjects (ages 21 to 30 years) participated in the study. Participants were randomly divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The experimental group performed an exercise designed to induce neck muscle fatigue and the control group preformed non-fatiguing sham exercises. [Results] There were significant differences in mean dynamic visual acuity between the two groups (0.26±0.11 LogMar versus 0.003±0.02 LogMar). Subjects in the experimental group showed a significant decline in their dynamic visual acuity compared with the control group. Dynamic visual acuity strongly correlated with neck muscle fatigue (r = 0.79). No significant differences in joint position error were observed between the two groups and no significant correlations between joint position error and neck muscle fatigue were observed (r = 0.23). [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that neck muscle fatigue negatively impacts dynamic visual acuity. Although not statistically significant, cervical spine proprioception as measured by the joint position error in the experimental group was diminished after fatigue. PMID:25642087

  16. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace.

    PubMed

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  17. Robot-Aided Mapping of Wrist Proprioceptive Acuity across a 3D Workspace

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Francesca; Squeri, Valentina; Morasso, Pietro; Konczak, Jürgen; Masia, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals from peripheral mechanoreceptors form the basis for bodily perception and are known to be essential for motor control. However we still have an incomplete understanding of how proprioception differs between joints, whether it differs among the various degrees-of-freedom (DoFs) within a particular joint, and how such differences affect motor control and learning. We here introduce a robot-aided method to objectively measure proprioceptive function: specifically, we systematically mapped wrist proprioceptive acuity across the three DoFs of the wrist/hand complex with the aim to characterize the wrist position sense. Thirty healthy young adults performed an ipsilateral active joint position matching task with their dominant wrist using a haptic robotic exoskeleton. Our results indicate that the active wrist position sense acuity is anisotropic across the joint, with the abduction/adduction DoF having the highest acuity (the error of acuity for flexion/extension is 4.64 ± 0.24°; abduction/adduction: 3.68 ± 0.32°; supination/pronation: 5.15 ± 0.37°) and they also revealed that proprioceptive acuity decreases for smaller joint displacements. We believe this knowledge is imperative in a clinical scenario when assessing proprioceptive deficits and for understanding how such sensory deficits relate to observable motor impairments. PMID:27536882

  18. Development of microcomputer-based mental acuity tests for repeated-measures studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, R. S.; Wilkes, R. L.; Baltzley, D. R.; Fowlkes, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to detail the development of the Automated Performance Test System (APTS), a computer battery of mental acuity tests that can be used to assess human performance in the presence of toxic elements and environmental stressors. There were four objectives in the development of APTS. First, the technical requirements for developing APTS followed the tenets of the classical theory of mental tests which requires that tests meet set criteria like stability and reliability (the lack of which constitutes insensitivity). To be employed in the study of the exotic conditions of protracted space flight, a battery with multiple parallel forms is required. The second criteria was for the battery to have factorial multidimensionality and the third was for the battery to be sensitive to factors known to compromise performance. A fourth objective was for the tests to converge on the abilities entailed in mission specialist tasks. A series of studies is reported in which candidate APTS tests were subjected to an examination of their psychometric properties for repeated-measures testing. From this work, tests were selected that possessed the requisite metric properties of stability, reliability, and factor richness. In addition, studies are reported which demonstrate the predictive validity of the tests to holistic measures of intelligence.

  19. The Apgar Score.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The Apgar score provides an accepted and convenient method for reporting the status of the newborn infant immediately after birth and the response to resuscitation if needed. The Apgar score alone cannot be considered as evidence of, or a consequence of, asphyxia; does not predict individual neonatal mortality or neurologic outcome; and should not be used for that purpose. An Apgar score assigned during resuscitation is not equivalent to a score assigned to a spontaneously breathing infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists encourage use of an expanded Apgar score reporting form that accounts for concurrent resuscitative interventions. PMID:26416932

  20. Crossmodal temporal order and processing acuity in developmentally dyslexic young adults.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Marja; Service, Elisabet; Virsu, Veijo

    2002-03-01

    We investigated crossmodal temporal performance in processing rapid sequential nonlinguistic events in developmentally dyslexic young adults (ages 20-36 years) and an age- and IQ-matched control group in audiotactile, visuotactile, and audiovisual combinations. Two methods were used for estimating 84% correct temporal acuity thresholds: temporal order judgment (TOJ) and temporal processing acuity (TPA). TPA requires phase difference detection: the judgment of simultaneity/nonsimultaneity of brief stimuli in two parallel, spatially separate triplets. The dyslexic readers' average temporal performance was somewhat poorer in all six comparisons; in audiovisual comparisons the group differences were not statistically significant, however. A principal component analysis indicated that temporal acuity and phonological awareness are related in dyslexic readers. The impairment of temporal input processing seems to be a general correlative feature of dyslexia in children and adults, but the overlap in performance between dyslexic and normal readers suggests that it is not a sufficient reason for developmental reading difficulties. PMID:11896646

  1. A useful scoring system for the prediction and management of delayed graft function following kidney transplantation from cadaveric donors.

    PubMed

    Chapal, Marion; Le Borgne, Florent; Legendre, Christophe; Kreis, Henri; Mourad, Georges; Garrigue, Valérie; Morelon, Emmanuel; Buron, Fanny; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim; Kessler, Michèle; Ladrière, Marc; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Launay, Katy; Daguin, Pascal; Offredo, Lucile; Giral, Magali; Foucher, Yohann

    2014-12-01

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is a common complication in kidney transplantation and is known to be correlated with short- and long-term graft outcomes. Here we explored the possibility of developing a simple tool that could predict with good confidence the occurrence of DGF and could be helpful in current clinical practice. We built a score, tentatively called DGFS, from a French multicenter and prospective cohort of 1844 adult recipients of deceased donor kidneys collected since 2007, and computerized in the Données Informatisées et VAlidées en Transplantation databank. Only five explicative variables (cold ischemia time, donor age, donor serum creatinine, recipient body mass index, and induction therapy) contributed significantly to the DGF prediction. These were associated with a good predictive capacity (area under the ROC curve at 0.73). The DGFS calculation is facilitated by an application available on smartphones, tablets, or computers at www.divat.fr/en/online-calculators/dgfs. The DGFS should allow the simple classification of patients according to their DGF risk at the time of transplantation, and thus allow tailored-specific management or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24897036

  2. Posterior staphyloma in oculocutaneous albinism: another possible cause of reduced visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susan; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; King, Richard A.; Brilliant, Murray; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Schoonveld, Cheri; Summers, C. Gail

    2016-01-01

    Posterior staphyloma is typically associated with myopic degeneration and has not been recognized as a cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism. We report 3 cases of posterior staphyloma, each with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) defined by phenotype and genotype. Two cases are biological sisters with OCA type 2; one was myopic and the other was hyperopic. The third case involves a man with OCA associated with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS-5). Staphyloma may be another cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism, particularly with increasing age. It may occur in association with myopia or hyperopia. PMID:26691042

  3. Posterior staphyloma in oculocutaneous albinism: another possible cause of reduced visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan; Schimmenti, Lisa A; King, Richard A; Brilliant, Murray; Anderson, Jennifer L; Schoonveld, Cheri; Summers, C Gail

    2015-12-01

    Posterior staphyloma is typically associated with myopic degeneration and has not been recognized as a cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism. We report 3 cases of posterior staphyloma, each with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) defined by phenotype and genotype. Two cases are biological sisters with OCA type 2; one was myopic and the other was hyperopic. The third case involves a man with OCA associated with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS-5). Staphyloma may be another cause of reduced visual acuity in albinism, particularly with increasing age. It may occur in association with myopia or hyperopia. PMID:26691042

  4. Tactile acuity training for patients with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain can disrupt the cortical representation of a painful body part. This disruption may play a role in maintaining the individual’s pain. Tactile acuity training has been used to normalise cortical representation and reduce pain in certain pain conditions. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of this intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The primary aim of this study was to inform the development of a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) by providing preliminary data on the effect of tactile acuity training on pain and function in individuals with CLBP. The secondary aim was to obtain qualitative feedback about the intervention. Methods In this mixed-methods pilot RCT 15 individuals were randomised to either an intervention (tactile acuity training) or a placebo group (sham tactile acuity training). All participants received 3 sessions of acuity training (intervention or sham) from a physiotherapist and were requested to undertake daily acuity home training facilitated by an informal carer (friend/relative). All participants also received usual care physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were pain (0-100visual analogue scale (VAS)) and function (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ)). Participants and their informal carers were invited to a focus group to provide feedback on the intervention. Results The placebo group improved by the greatest magnitude for both outcome measures, but there was no statistically significant difference (Mean difference (95%CI), p-value) between groups for change in pain (25.6 (-0.7 to 51.9), p = 0.056) or function (2.2 (-1.6 to 6.0), p = 0.237). Comparing the number of individuals achieving a minimally clinically significant improvement, the placebo group had better outcomes for pain with all participants achieving ≥30% improvement compared to only a third of the intervention group (6/6 vs. 3/9, p = 0.036). Qualitatively, participants reported that

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: outcome analysis with use of the modified arteriovenous malformation scoring system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph C T; Mariscal, Luis; Girvigian, Michael R; Vanefsky, Marc A; Glousman, Brandon N; Miller, Michael J; Feng, Lei; Rahimian, Javad

    2016-07-01

    Radiosurgery has long been an accepted modality for definitive treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio for this indication include use of staged volume procedures and hypofractionation. This study reviews our experience with a cohort of patients treated with hypofractionated radiosurgery. Over a 3year period, 38 patients harboring 39 cerebral AVM were treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Seventeen of these patients presented due to hemorrhage, four were asymptomatic unruptured lesions and the remainder were symptomatic unruptured lesions. The median AVM volume was 11.43 cc and median modified Radiosurgery-Based Arteriovenous Malformation Score (mRBAS) was 2.02. The median follow-up was 7.32years. Four patients harboring four AVM were lost to follow-up before a result could be ascertained leaving 35 AVM for analysis. Excellent outcomes (AVM obliteration without new deficits) occurred in 17 of 34 (50%) patients and in 18 of 35 (51%) AVM treated. AVM obliteration was seen in 26 of 35 (74%) lesions treated. Two patients died during the follow-up period (6%). A poor result (major deficit without obliteration) was seen in one patient. Of 19 patients harboring AVM with mRBAS >2.0, an excellent outcome was achieved in eight (42%). Hypofractionation for cerebral AVM can result in satisfactory obliteration rates, but with risk of significant complications commensurate with mRBAS. Further study of this technique will be needed to ascertain the degree of incremental improvement, if any, over other radiosurgery treatment methods. PMID:26947340

  6. A simple sonographic scoring system combined with routine serology is useful in differentiating parasitic from non-parasitic cysts of the liver☆

    PubMed Central

    Grisolia, A.; Troìa, G.; Mariani, G.; Brunetti, E.; Filice, C.

    2009-01-01

    In the absence of a detached endocyst, unilocular echinococcal cysts of the liver may be difficult to distinguish from non-parasitic cysts. In an attempt to identify sonographic features that could help distinguish these two types of cysts, we retrospectively analyzed 64 cases of fluid-filled hepatic cysts whose parasitic nature was ultimately excluded. This experience allowed us to develop a simple scoring system that quantifies the likelihood that hepatic cysts are non-parasitic. Sonographic criteria, together with the results of standard serological testing for cystic echinococcosis, proved to be sufficiently specific to allow definitive diagnosis without resorting to further tests. PMID:23396670

  7. A simple sonographic scoring system combined with routine serology is useful in differentiating parasitic from non-parasitic cysts of the liver().

    PubMed

    Grisolia, A; Troìa, G; Mariani, G; Brunetti, E; Filice, C

    2009-06-01

    In the absence of a detached endocyst, unilocular echinococcal cysts of the liver may be difficult to distinguish from non-parasitic cysts. In an attempt to identify sonographic features that could help distinguish these two types of cysts, we retrospectively analyzed 64 cases of fluid-filled hepatic cysts whose parasitic nature was ultimately excluded. This experience allowed us to develop a simple scoring system that quantifies the likelihood that hepatic cysts are non-parasitic. Sonographic criteria, together with the results of standard serological testing for cystic echinococcosis, proved to be sufficiently specific to allow definitive diagnosis without resorting to further tests. PMID:23396670

  8. Relevance of a scoring system including CD11c expression in the identification of splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SRPL).

    PubMed

    Baseggio, L; Traverse-Glehen, A; Callet-Bauchu, E; Morel, D; Magaud, J P; Berger, F; Salles, G; Felman, P

    2011-03-01

    'Splenic red pulp lymphoma with numerous basophilic villous lymphocytes' (SRPL), recently described, is characterized by clinical, morphologic, immunologic, cytogenetic and molecular features distinct from SMZL/SLVL and HCL. In particular, the intensity of CD11c staining (expressed as fluorescence intensity -RFI-) in SRPL is significantly different from the RFI in SMZL/SLVL and HCL. Moreover the use of a scoring system based on the expression of CD11c, CD22, CD76, CD38 and CD27 appears to improve the differential diagnosis between SRPL and SMZL/SLVL and emphasizes that SRPL is an entity closed to but distinct from SMZL/SLVL. PMID:20677173

  9. GRACE Score among Six Risk Scoring Systems (CADILLAC, PAMI, TIMI, Dynamic TIMI, Zwolle) Demonstrated the Best Predictive Value for Prediction of Long-Term Mortality in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Littnerova, Simona; Kala, Petr; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Kubkova, Lenka; Prymusova, Krystyna; Kubena, Petr; Tesak, Martin; Toman, Ondrej; Poloczek, Martin; Spinar, Jindrich; Dusek, Ladislav; Parenica, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the prognostic accuracy of six scoring models for up to three-year mortality and rates of hospitalisation due to acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) in STEMI patients. Methods and Results A total of 593 patients treated with primary PCI were evaluated. Prospective follow-up of patients was ≥3 years. Thirty-day, one-year, two-year, and three-year mortality rates were 4.0%, 7.3%, 8.9%, and 10.6%, respectively. Six risk scores—the TIMI score and derived dynamic TIMI, CADILLAC, PAMI, Zwolle, and GRACE—showed a high predictive accuracy for six- and 12-month mortality with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.73–0.85. The best predictive values for long-term mortality were obtained by GRACE. The next best-performing scores were CADILLAC, Zwolle, and Dynamic TIMI. All risk scores had a lower prediction accuracy for repeat hospitalisation due to ADHF, except Zwolle with the discriminatory capacity for hospitalisation up to two years (AUC, 0.80–0.83). Conclusions All tested models showed a high predictive value for the estimation of one-year mortality, but GRACE appears to be the most suitable for the prediction for a longer follow-up period. The tested models exhibited an ability to predict the risk of ADHF, especially the Zwolle model. PMID:25893501

  10. Knowing the Score. A National Review of the State and Territory Training Authority Statistical Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    This report presents results of a project to produce a set of strategies to ensure the compatibility of Australian state and territory information systems with the requirements of the National Management Information and Statistics System (NATMISS) and the Australian Vocational Education and Training Management Information Statistical Standard…

  11. Body condition score at calving affects systemic and hepatic transcriptome indicators of inflammation and nutrient metabolism in grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Akbar, H; Grala, T M; Vailati Riboni, M; Cardoso, F C; Verkerk, G; McGowan, J; Macdonald, K; Webster, J; Schutz, K; Meier, S; Matthews, L; Roche, J R; Loor, J J

    2015-02-01

    Calving body condition score (BCS) is an important determinant of early-lactation dry matter intake, milk yield, and disease incidence. The current study investigated the metabolic and molecular changes induced by the change in BCS. A group of cows of mixed age and breed were managed from the second half of the previous lactation to achieve mean group BCS (10-point scale) that were high (HBCS, 5.5; n=20), medium (MBCS, 4.5; n=18), or low (LBCS, 3.5; n=19). Blood was sampled at wk -4, -3, -2, 1, 3, 5, and 6 relative to parturition to measure biomarkers of energy balance, inflammation, and liver function. Liver was biopsied on wk 1, 3, and 5 relative to parturition, and 10 cows per BCS group were used for transcript profiling via quantitative PCR. Cows in HBCS and MBCS produced more milk and had greater concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate postpartum than LBCS. Peak concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate and greater hepatic triacylglycerol concentrations were recorded in HBCS at wk 3. Consistent with blood biomarkers, HBCS and MBCS had greater expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation (CPT1A, ACOX1), ketogenesis (HMGCS2), and hepatokines (FGF21, ANGPTL4), whereas HBCS had the lowest expression of APOB (lipoprotein transport). Greater expression during early lactation of BBOX1 in MBCS and LBCS suggested greater de novo carnitine synthesis. The greater BCS was associated with lower expression of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling axis genes (GHR1A, IGF1, and IGFALS) and greater expression of gluconeogenic genes. These likely contributed to the higher milk production and greater gluconeogenesis. Despite greater serum haptoglobin around calving, cows in HBCS and MBCS had greater blood albumin. Cows in MBCS, however, had a higher albumin:globulin ratio, probably indicating a less pronounced inflammatory status and better liver function. The marked decrease in expression of NFKB1

  12. New Comprehensive Cytogenetic Scoring System for Primary Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Oligoblastic Acute Myeloid Leukemia After MDS Derived From an International Database Merge

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Tüchler, Heinz; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Luño, Elisa; Cervera, José; Granada, Isabel; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Valent, Peter; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Faderl, Stefan; Pierce, Sherry; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Bennett, John M.; Greenberg, Peter; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The karyotype is a strong independent prognostic factor in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since the implementation of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) in 1997, knowledge concerning the prognostic impact of abnormalities has increased substantially. The present study proposes a new and comprehensive cytogenetic scoring system based on an international data collection of 2,902 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were included from the German-Austrian MDS Study Group (n = 1,193), the International MDS Risk Analysis Workshop (n = 816), the Spanish Hematological Cytogenetics Working Group (n = 849), and the International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics (n = 44) databases. Patients with primary MDS and oligoblastic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after MDS treated with supportive care only were evaluated for overall survival (OS) and AML evolution. Internal validation by bootstrap analysis and external validation in an independent patient cohort were performed to confirm the results. Results In total, 19 cytogenetic categories were defined, providing clear prognostic classification in 91% of all patients. The abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups (P < .001): very good (median OS, 61 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; n = 81); good (49 months; HR, 1.0 [reference category]; n = 1,809); intermediate (26 months; HR, 1.6; n = 529); poor (16 months; HR, 2.6; n = 148); and very poor (6 months; HR, 4.2; n = 187). The internal and external validations confirmed the results of the score. Conclusion In conclusion, these data should contribute to the ongoing efforts to update the IPSS by refining the cytogenetic risk categories. PMID:22331955

  13. Creation of an Accurate Algorithm to Detect Snellen Best Documented Visual Acuity from Ophthalmology Electronic Health Record Notes

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Gill, Manjot; Mitchell, Christopher; Jackson, Kathryn; Kho, Abel; Bryar, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background Visual acuity is the primary measure used in ophthalmology to determine how well a patient can see. Visual acuity for a single eye may be recorded in multiple ways for a single patient visit (eg, Snellen vs. Jäger units vs. font print size), and be recorded for either distance or near vision. Capturing the best documented visual acuity (BDVA) of each eye in an individual patient visit is an important step for making electronic ophthalmology clinical notes useful in research. Objective Currently, there is limited methodology for capturing BDVA in an efficient and accurate manner from electronic health record (EHR) notes. We developed an algorithm to detect BDVA for right and left eyes from defined fields within electronic ophthalmology clinical notes. Methods We designed an algorithm to detect the BDVA from defined fields within 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes with visual acuity data present. About 5668 unique responses were identified and an algorithm was developed to map all of the unique responses to a structured list of Snellen visual acuities. Results Visual acuity was captured from a total of 295,218 ophthalmology clinical notes during the study dates. The algorithm identified all visual acuities in the defined visual acuity section for each eye and returned a single BDVA for each eye. A clinician chart review of 100 random patient notes showed a 99% accuracy detecting BDVA from these records and 1% observed error. Conclusions Our algorithm successfully captures best documented Snellen distance visual acuity from ophthalmology clinical notes and transforms a variety of inputs into a structured Snellen equivalent list. Our work, to the best of our knowledge, represents the first attempt at capturing visual acuity accurately from large numbers of electronic ophthalmology notes. Use of this algorithm can benefit research groups interested in assessing visual acuity for patient centered outcome. All codes used for this study are currently

  14. Teachers' Knowledge of the Relationship of Auditory Acuity and Hearing Impairment to Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Evelyn Myrtle

    Teacher's knowledge of the relationship of auditory acuity and hearing impairment to reading was evaluated with 60 teachers and specialists (regular classroom primary and upper elementary teachers, reading teachers, teachers of the learning disabled, teachers of the hearing impaired, and speech and language pathologists). Ss were administered a…

  15. The Effects of Drift and Displacement Motion on Dynamic Visual Acuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aznar-Casanova, J. Antonio; Quevedo, Lluisa; Sinnett, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) can be measured from two types of equivalently considered movement referred to as drifting-motion and displacement-motion. Displacement motion can be best described as the horizontal displacement of a stimulus, thus implying pursuit eye movements, and involves moving the stimulus from the fixation point of gaze towards…

  16. Technology as an Aid in Assessing Visual Acuity in Severely/Profoundly Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Julie; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Technology has been used to measure visual acuity with the severely or profoundly mentally retarded child. The following categories of technology have been used for assessment: the recording of visual fixation within the habituation paradigm; equipment to measure eye movements and pursuits; operant techniques; and electrodiagnostic techniques…

  17. Evaluation of vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in adults with congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yukinori; Kaga, Kimitaka; Takekoshi, Hideki; Sakuraba, Keisyoku

    2012-10-01

    This study compared vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in 19 adult athletes with deafness participating in Deaflympics to those of 25 young adults with normal hearing. Balance capability was evaluated using a one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry. Caloric tests and vestibular evoked myogenic potential tests were conducted to test vestibular function. Visual function was evaluated using a dynamic visual acuity test. No significant difference was found between results of the one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry with eyes open. Athletes with deafness performed better than normal hearing young adults with eyes closed. The caloric test indicated hypofunction of the lateral semicircular canal function in 5 of the 19 athletes with deafness. Balance-function tests showed normal results for both groups. The results for athletes with deafness on visual acuity were better than those of controls. Young Deaflympics athletes with deafness can adjust their balance function as well as or better than normal hearing young adults using dynamic visual acuity. PMID:23265013

  18. A Close Eye on the Eagle-Eyed Visual Acuity Hypothesis of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Schlitt, Sabine; Gapp, Volker; Hainz, Daniela; Schirman, Shella; Poustka, Fritz; Weber, Bernhard; Freitag, Christine; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Walter, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been associated with sensory hypersensitivity. A recent study reported visual acuity (VA) in ASD in the region reported for birds of prey. The validity of the results was subsequently doubted. This study examined VA in 34 individuals with ASD, 16 with schizophrenia (SCH), and 26 typically developing (TYP).…

  19. Effects of Spatial Position and Density on Visual Acuity. Umea Psychological Reports No. 153.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannstrom, Lauritz

    Visual acuity as a function of target position and density was measured in a letter recognition task. A homogeneous pattern of equally-spaced elements was tachistoscopically exposed, where the target was never located at the boundaries of the pattern. The target was marked with a spatial cue to control attentional processes. With such a spatial…

  20. Short-Term Visual Deprivation, Tactile Acuity, and Haptic Solid Shape Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Charles E.; Norman, J. Farley

    2014-01-01

    Previous psychophysical studies have reported conflicting results concerning the effects of short-term visual deprivation upon tactile acuity. Some studies have found that 45 to 90 minutes of total light deprivation produce significant improvements in participants' tactile acuity as measured with a grating orientation discrimination task. In contrast, a single 2011 study found no such improvement while attempting to replicate these earlier findings. A primary goal of the current experiment was to resolve this discrepancy in the literature by evaluating the effects of a 90-minute period of total light deprivation upon tactile grating orientation discrimination. We also evaluated the potential effect of short-term deprivation upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination using a set of naturally-shaped solid objects. According to previous research, short-term deprivation enhances performance in a tactile 2-D shape discrimination task – perhaps a similar improvement also occurs for haptic 3-D shape discrimination. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that not only does short-term visual deprivation not enhance tactile acuity, it additionally has no effect upon haptic 3-D shape discrimination. While visual deprivation had no effect in our study, there was a significant effect of experience and learning for the grating orientation task – the participants' tactile acuity improved over time, independent of whether they had, or had not, experienced visual deprivation. PMID:25397327

  1. Visual acuity changes in rhesus following low-level Q-switched exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David O.; Zwick, Harry; Bearden, Bradley D.; Evans, Brenda S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1997-05-01

    Previously we have shown that visual deficits can be produced by long duration pulses at or slightly below traditional threshold levels for retinal injury. Initially the deficits produced were only transient shifts in baseline acuity that lasted less than 30 min, but successive exposures over a period of days at these same power levels were shown to be cumulative and their impact on visual acuity lengthened and became permanent. The present investigation extended these exposures to Q-switched, 532 nm Nd/YAG pulses presented to awake, task-oriented nonhuman primates performing Landolt ring discriminations. At and above the ED50, single pulses of minimal spot diameter produced only minor, transient shifts in visual acuity while repeated exposures produced significant shifts in acuity that became permanent over time. At lower energies, minimal spot, single-pulsed exposures again produced little observable consequence until either retinal spot sizes or number of pulses were increased. At these lower energy levels, however, no permanent functional loss was observed. Hence, the functional impact of single Q-switched pulses was more difficult to assess than longer time domain exposures. Multiple, low level Q-switched pulses, and/or larger spot sizes produced visual deficits similar to those observed for msec time domain exposures, suggesting both temporal and spatial summation at energy levels where no permanent effects have been noted.

  2. Lingual tactile acuity and food texture preferences among children and their mothers

    PubMed Central

    Lukasewycz, Laura D.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite anecdotal reports of children being more sensitive to texture than adults, and of texture being one of the main drivers of food aversions, there is a paucity of scientific knowledge on the influence of texture perception on food choice in children. The primary goals of this study were to assess the use of a modified letter-identification task to study lingual tactile acuity, one aspect of oral sensitivity, in children and to examine age-related differences in sensitivity. The secondary goal was to explore whether lingual tactile acuity and age relate to various measures of food choice and preference. To this end, children 7–10 years old (31 girls, 21 boys) and their mothers were tested using identical procedures. To assess lingual tactile acuity, children and mothers were asked to use the tips of their tongues to identify raised alphabetical letters of varying size (2.5–8.0 mm) on Teflon strips. To relate lingual tactile acuity to food texture preferences, a forced-choice questionnaire assessed preferences for foods similar in flavor but different in texture (e.g., smooth versus crunchy peanut butter). Children were able to complete the lingual acuity task as well as their mothers and took less time to assess each letter stimulus (p < 0.001); however, there were no age-related differences in lingual acuity (p = 0.14). Age, but not lingual acuity, related to food texture preferences: mothers preferred harder foods (p < 0.001) and those containing more particles (p < 0.04) than did children, although children‘s preferences became more adult-like with increasing age. The availability of a rapid, child-friendly method for assessing oral sensitivity opens up new possibilities of examining differences in oral tactile perceptions across the life span. That food preferences changed with age and were not related to oral sensitivity underscores the fact that factors such as experience, culture and family food practices have a significant impact on children

  3. Home Energy Score

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The Home Energy Score allows a homeowner to compare her or his home's energy consumption to that of other homes, similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. A home energy assessor will collect energy information during a brief home walk-through and then score that home on a scale of 1 to 10.

  4. SCORE - A DESCRIPTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SLACK, CHARLES W.

    REINFORCEMENT AND ROLE-REVERSAL TECHNIQUES ARE USED IN THE SCORE PROJECT, A LOW-COST PROGRAM OF DELINQUENCY PREVENTION FOR HARD-CORE TEENAGE STREET CORNER BOYS. COMMITTED TO THE BELIEF THAT THE BOYS HAVE THE POTENTIAL FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR, THE SCORE WORKER FOLLOWS B.F. SKINNER'S THEORY OF OPERANT CONDITIONING AND REINFORCES THE DELINQUENT'S GOOD…

  5. Cerebral blood flow in patients with peritoneal dialysis by an easy Z-score imaging system for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Rei; Kobayashi, Shuzo; Iwagami, Masao; Tsutumi, Daimu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Maesato, Kyoko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Ohtake, Takayasu; Hidaka, Sumi

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been recognized as a complication of chronic kidney disease. However, there is little information available regarding regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Therefore, we evaluated rCBF using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We conducted a cross-sectional study in our hospital. Eighteen consecutive PD patients who could visit the hospital by themselves without any history of stroke were examined by Technetium-99 m-labeled ethylcrysteinate dimer brain SPECT. An easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) was used to compare rCBF in PD patients with those in age-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated cognitive dysfunction with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) questionnaire. Only one patient showed an MMSE score of 18 points, and the remaining 14 patients were considered as normal (MMSE ≥ 27), and three patients were considered to have mild cognitive impairment (24 ≤ MMSE ≤ 26). In all patients, rCBF in the posterior cingulated gyri, precunei, and parietal cortices was significantly decreased. The ratio of the reduction of rCBF in each region relative to that of rCBF across the whole brain correlated positively with the PD duration (r = 0.559; P < 0.05). The serum β2-microglobulin level was significantly higher in patients who had a higher ratio of rCBF reduction compared with those with lower ratios. In conclusion, all PD patients in the present study had decreased rCBF irrespective of MMSE scores. PMID:24965295

  6. Scoring system for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in indigenous children and adolescents under 15 years of age in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil *

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Sandra Christo; Marques, Ana Maria Campos; de Oliveira, Roselene Lopes; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the process of diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis in smear-negative indigenous children and adolescents under 15 years of age with the modified Brazilian National Ministry of Health Scoring System (mBNMH-SS). METHODS: This was a retrospective descriptive study involving 49 indigenous patients under 15 years of age with tuberculosis, treated between 2007 and 2010 in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. RESULTS: Of the 49 patients, 27 (56%) were under 5 years of age, 33 (67%) had symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, 24 (49%) were underweight, and 36 (73.5%) had been BCG vaccinated. The tuberculin skin test was positive in 28 patients (57%), 18 (64%) of whom had an induration ≥ 10 mm. Chest X-rays were performed in 37 (76%) of the patients, 31 (84%) of whom had only one chest X-ray taken. Among those 37 patients, the radiological findings were suggestive of tuberculosis in 16 (43%), infiltration/condensation in 10 (27%), and normal in 4 (11%). The Indigenous Health Care Teams made the diagnosis in 31 (63%) of the cases, using the original BNMH-SS in only 14 (45%). We calculated the mBNMH-SS scores for 30 (61%) of the 49 patients. Among the 30 cases scored, a diagnosis of tuberculosis was found to be highly likely, possible, and unlikely in 16 (53%), 11 (37%), and 3 (10%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of highly likely and possible diagnoses was consistent with the standard proportion of cases diagnosed by the teams (90%), demonstrating the epidemiological applicability of the mBNMH-SS for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in the indigenous population, within the scenario of the health care provided. PMID:23503490

  7. The Landing Error Scoring System as a Screening Tool for an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury–Prevention Program in Elite-Youth Soccer Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.; Beutler, Anthony I.; de la Motte, Sarah J.; DiStefano, Michael J.; Marshall, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Context Identifying neuromuscular screening factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a critical step toward large-scale deployment of effective ACL injury-prevention programs. The Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) is a valid and reliable clinical assessment of jump-landing biomechanics. Objective To investigate the ability of the LESS to identify individuals at risk for ACL injury in an elite-youth soccer population. Design Cohort study. Setting Field-based functional movement screening performed at soccer practice facilities. Patients or Other Participants A total of 829 elite-youth soccer athletes (348 boys, 481 girls; age = 13.9 ± 1.8 years, age range = 11 to 18 years), of whom 25% (n = 207) were less than 13 years of age. Intervention(s) Baseline preseason testing for all participants consisted of a jump-landing task (3 trials). Participants were followed prospectively throughout their soccer seasons for diagnosis of ACL injuries (1217 athlete-seasons of follow-up). Main Outcome Measure(s) Landings were scored for “errors” in technique using the LESS. We used receiver operator characteristic curves to determine a cutpoint on the LESS. Sensitivity and specificity of the LESS in predicting ACL injury were assessed. Results Seven participants sustained ACL injuries during the follow-up period; the mechanism of injury was noncontact or indirect contact for all injuries. Uninjured participants had lower LESS scores (4.43 ± 1.71) than injured participants (6.24 ± 1.75; t1215 = −2.784, P = .005). The receiver operator characteristic curve analyses suggested that 5 was the optimal cutpoint for the LESS, generating a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 64%. Conclusions Despite sample-size limitations, the LESS showed potential as a screening tool to determine ACL injury risk in elite-youth soccer athletes. PMID:25811846

  8. Reduction in Dynamic Visual Acuity Reveals Gaze Control Changes Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; Brady, Rachel A.; Miller, Chris; Lawrence, Emily L.; Mulavara Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exposure to microgravity causes adaptive changes in eye-head coordination that can lead to altered gaze control. This could affect postflight visual acuity during head and body motion. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in dynamic visual acuity after long-duration spaceflight. METHODS: Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) data from 14 astro/cosmonauts were collected after long-duration (6 months) spaceflight. The difference in acuity between seated and walking conditions provided a metric of change in the subjects ability to maintain gaze fixation during self-motion. In each condition, a psychophysical threshold detection algorithm was used to display Landolt ring optotypes at a size that was near each subject s acuity threshold. Verbal responses regarding the orientation of the gap were recorded as the optotypes appeared sequentially on a computer display 4 meters away. During the walking trials, subjects walked at 6.4 km/h on a motorized treadmill. RESULTS: A decrement in mean postflight DVA was found, with mean values returning to baseline within 1 week. The population mean showed a consistent improvement in DVA performance, but it was accompanied by high variability. A closer examination of the individual subject s recovery curves revealed that many did not follow a pattern of continuous improvement with each passing day. When adjusted on the basis of previous long-duration flight experience, the population mean shows a "bounce" in the re-adaptation curve. CONCLUSION: Gaze control during self-motion is altered following long-duration spaceflight and changes in postflight DVA performance indicate that vestibular re-adaptation may be more complex than a gradual return to normal.

  9. SAT Scores, 2013-14: Wake County Public School System (WCPSS). Measuring Up. D&A Report No. 14.14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleland, Kevin; Muli, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    The SAT is a national college entrance examination offered by the College Board and consists of three parts: Mathematics, Critical Reading, and Writing. The top score for each part is 800, for a total possible score of 2400. Colleges use SAT scores, in conjunction with other tools, to measure students' potential for success at the postsecondary…

  10. The influence of corrected visual acuity on visual attention and incidental learning in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Hertza, Jeremy; Williams, Ronald N; Gupta, Ajay S; Ohly, Johann G

    2009-07-01

    Visual disturbance is one of the hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS), yet clinical neuropsychologists rarely quantitatively assess visual acuity using standardized and norm-referenced measures. This is a significant oversight because disturbances in visual acuity can have an obvious and profound impact on neuropsychological tests which rely upon visual attention and/or scanning. This study investigated the relationship between corrected visual acuity and a widely used measure of visual attention and incidental learning in a group of 35 patients with MS. Regression analysis indicated that corrected visual acuity accounted for 21.3% of the variance in a Coding subtest. The results suggest neuropsychologists and other health care providers should exercise caution in interpreting visually based tests for patients with MS and should assess visual acuity with standardized and norm-referenced measures. PMID:20183167

  11. Restoration of pretrabeculectomy visual acuity and a functioning filtering bleb in an eye with delayed suprachoroidal haemorrhage following trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Senthil, Sirisha; Gupta, Supriya; Balijepalli, Pasyanthi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old myopic man with juvenile open angle glaucoma was referred to us with fluctuating intraocular pressure (IOP) and progression in his only seeing left eye. He had systemic features suggestive of Marfan's syndrome. He underwent trabeculectomy with low dose mitomycin-C with operative precautions to prevent postoperative hypotony in view of high myopia and scleral thinning. On the second postoperative day, he had severe pain in his left eye, with vomiting, and presented with decreased vision, high IOP and a flat anterior chamber. Ultrasound B scan revealed 360° haemorrhagic choroidal detachment. He was conservatively managed and monitored over the next 1 month with appropriate medical treatment. He not only recovered his pretrabeculectomy visual acuity but also had a well functioning bleb at the end of 2 months. PMID:26661281

  12. Reporting Valid and Reliable Overall Scores and Domain Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    In educational assessment, overall scores obtained by simply averaging a number of domain scores are sometimes reported. However, simply averaging the domain scores ignores the fact that different domains have different score points, that scores from those domains are related, and that at different score points the relationship between overall…

  13. Baseline visual acuity strongly predicts visual acuity gain in patients with diabetic macular edema following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment across trials

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U; Hillenkamp, Jost; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Vögeler, Jessica; Mousseau, Marie-Catherine; Wenzel, Andreas; Margaron, Philippe; Hashmonay, Ron; Massin, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the correlation of baseline visual acuity (VA) with VA outcome in response to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diabetic macular edema using a retrospective analysis of nine clinical trials. The result will help assess the relevance of VA gain comparisons across trials. Methods A correlation analysis was performed between mean baseline VA and VA gain at month 12 for 1,616 diabetic macular edema patients across nine randomized clinical trials (RESOLVE, RISE, RIDE, RESTORE, RETAIN, DRCR.net Protocol I, DA VINCI, VIVID, VISTA) with anti-VEGF treatment regimens ranibizumab 0.5 mg and aflibercept 2 mg. Results The mean baseline VA ranged from 56.9 to 64.8 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters. The mean VA gain at month 12 ranged from 6.8 to 13.1 ETDRS letters across trials. There was a strong inverse correlation between mean baseline VA and VA gain at month 12 (r=−0.85). The mean VA at 12 months plateaued at ~70 (68.5–73.0) ETDRS letters (20/40 Snellen VA equivalent) for the anti-VEGF treatment groups from all trials, regardless of dosing regimens and agents. Conclusion Cross-trial comparisons based on changes in best-corrected visual acuity should be done cautiously and only after adjusting for best-corrected visual acuity at baseline. Furthermore, the total VA afforded by treatment appears to be subject to a plateau effect, which warrants further exploration. PMID:27366049

  14. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D. . E-mail: rennis@chpnet.org

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy {+-} hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a <5% Grade 1-2 acute toxicity rate (except spasms). Rectal dosimetry predicted late toxicities: for diarrhea, 5% Grade 1 toxicity rate for %V{sub 25} (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) {<=} 25% vs. 60% for %V{sub 25} > 25% (p < 0.001); for maximum toxicity, 10% Grade 1 toxicity rate for %V{sub 1} {<=} 40% vs. 44% for %V{sub 1} > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V{sub 25} > 25% and %V{sub 1} > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively.

  15. Computer-Aided Quantification of Interstitial Lung Disease from High Resolution Computed Tomography Images in Systemic Sclerosis: Correlation with Visual Reader-Based Score and Physiologic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Bosello, Silvia; Bichisecchi, Elisabetta; Giuseppetti, Gianmarco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of a computerized-aided method (CaM) for quantification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with systemic sclerosis and to determine its correlation with the conventional visual reader-based score (CoVR) and the pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled. All patients underwent chest high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scored by two radiologists adopting the CoVR. All HRCT images were then analysed by a CaM using a DICOM software. The relationships among the lung segmentation analysis, the readers, and the PFTs results were calculated using linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed for determination of CaM extent threshold. Results. A strong correlation between CaM and CoVR was observed (P < 0.0001). The CaM showed a significant negative correlation with forced vital capacity (FVC) (P < 0.0001) and the single breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLco) (P < 0.0001). A CaM optimal extent threshold of 20% represented the best compromise between sensitivity (75.6%) and specificity (97.4%). Conclusions. CaM quantification of SSc-ILD can be useful in the assessment of extent of lung disease and may provide reliable tool in daily clinical practice and clinical trials. PMID:25629053

  16. Evaluation of Visual Acuity Measurements after Autorefraction versus Manual Refraction in Eyes with and without Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jennifer K.; Qin, Haijing; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Melia, Michele; Beck, Roy W.; Andreoli, Christopher M.; Edwards, Paul A.; Glassman, Adam R.; Pavlica, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare visual acuity (VA) scores after autorefraction versus research protocol manual refraction in eyes of patients with diabetes and a wide range of VA. Methods Electronic Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (E-ETDRS) VA Test© letter score (EVA) was measured after autorefraction (AR-EVA) and after Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) protocol manual refraction (MR-EVA). Testing order was randomized, study participants and VA examiners were masked to refraction source, and a second EVA utilizing an identical manual refraction (MR-EVAsupl) was performed to determine test-retest variability. Results In 878 eyes of 456 study participants, median MR-EVA was 74 (Snellen equivalent approximately 20/32). Spherical equivalent was often similar for manual and autorefraction (median difference: 0.00, 5th and 95th percentiles −1.75 to +1.13 Diopters). However, on average, MR-EVA results were slightly better than AR-EVA results across the entire VA range. Furthermore, variability between AR-EVA and MR-EVA was substantially greater than the test-retest variability of MR-EVA (P<0.001). Variability of differences was highly dependent on autorefractor model. Conclusions Across a wide range of VA at multiple sites using a variety of autorefractors, VA measurements tend to be worse with autorefraction than manual refraction. Differences between individual autorefractor models were identified. However, even among autorefractor models comparing most favorably to manual refraction, VA variability between autorefraction and manual refraction is higher than the test-retest variability of manual refraction. The results suggest that with current instruments, autorefraction is not an acceptable substitute for manual refraction for most clinical trials with primary outcomes dependent on best-corrected VA. PMID:22159173

  17. Elevated high-mobility group B1 levels in active adult-onset Still's disease associated with systemic score and skin rash.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Sohn, Seonghyang; Nam, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-08-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein, and such prototypical damage-associated molecular patterns mediate the immune response in the noninfectious inflammatory response. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder involved in the dysregulation of innate immunity. We investigated the serum HMGB1 level in patients with AOSD and evaluated its clinical significance. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with active AOSD and 40 healthy controls (HC). Of the patients with AOSD, follow-up samples were collected from 16 patients after a resolution of AOSD disease activity. Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with AOSD were higher than those of the HC (10.0 ± 5.85 vs. 5.15 ± 1.79 ng/mL, p < 0.001). Serum HMGB1 levels were found to be correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and the systemic score. The AOSD patient who had a sore throat showed a higher serum HMGB1 level than those patients who did not, and the patient with a skin rash had higher levels than the patients without. In addition, the serum HMGB1 levels were decreased after the resolution of disease activity in the AOSD patients who were followed up. The serum HMGB1 levels were elevated in AOSD patients compared to the HC and were correlated with both CRP and the systemic score. The HMGB1 levels were associated with skin rash and a sore throat in AOSD patients. After the resolution of disease activity, serum HMGB1 levels were found to have decreased. PMID:27225247

  18. Manual versus Automated Rodent Behavioral Assessment: Comparing Efficacy and Ease of Bederson and Garcia Neurological Deficit Scores to an Open Field Video-Tracking System

    PubMed Central

    Desland, Fiona A.; Afzal, Aqeela; Warraich, Zuha; Mocco, J

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of stroke have been crucial in advancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. Currently, the standards for determining neurological deficit in rodents are the Bederson and Garcia scales, manual assessments scoring animals based on parameters ranked on a narrow scale of severity. Automated open field analysis of a live-video tracking system that analyzes animal behavior may provide a more sensitive test. Results obtained from the manual Bederson and Garcia scales did not show significant differences between pre- and post-stroke animals in a small cohort. When using the same cohort, however, post-stroke data obtained from automated open field analysis showed significant differences in several parameters. Furthermore, large cohort analysis also demonstrated increased sensitivity with automated open field analysis versus the Bederson and Garcia scales. These early data indicate use of automated open field analysis software may provide a more sensitive assessment when compared to traditional Bederson and Garcia scales. PMID:24526841

  19. The Youth Throwing Score

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Christopher S.; Padaki, Ajay S.; Noticewala, Manish Suresh; Makhni, Eric Chugh; Popkin, Charles Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Epidemic levels of shoulder and elbow injuries have been reported in youth and adolescent baseball players. Despite the concerning frequency of these injuries, no instrument has been validated to assess upper extremity injury in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to validate an upper extremity assessment tool specifically designed for youth baseball players. We hypothesize this tool will be reliable, responsive and valid. Methods: The Youth Throwing Score (YTS) was constructed by a multidisciplinary healthcare provider team in addition to baseball coaches as a tool to assess upper extremity injury in 10 to 18 year old baseball players. The instrument was comprised of a demographics section and a 14 item assessment of pain, fatigue and psychosocial health. The 14 items were scored from 1 to 5 and weighted equally, with higher scores reflecting fewer symptoms and less functional disability. The psychometric properties, including the test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and responsiveness were calculated. Additionally, the Pearson correlation coefficient to 4 validated outcomes was determined. Results: A pilot form of the instrument was administered to 25 players to assess comprehension and mean item importance. Pilot analysis resulted in none of the 14 items receiving less than a 3 out of 5 mean athlete importance rating and the final instrument read at a Flesch-Kincaid level of 4.1, appropriate for patients age 9 and older. A total of 223 players completed the Youth Throwing Score, with an average player age of 14.3 ± 2.7 years old. The players self-assigned injury status, resulting in an average survey score of 59.7 ± 8.4 for the 148 players ‘playing without pain,’ 42.0 ± 11.5 for the 60 players ‘playing with pain,’ and 40.4 ± 10.5 for the 15 players ‘not playing due to pain.’ Players playing without pain scored significantly higher than those playing with pain (p < .001). The scoring tiers of the Youth

  20. Comparison on testability of visual acuity, stereo acuity and colour vision tests between children with learning disabilities and children without learning disabilities in government primary schools

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Nurul Farhana; Chen, Ai-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Context: Children with learning disabilities might have difficulties to communicate effectively and give reliable responses as required in various visual function testing procedures. Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the testability of visual acuity using the modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and Cambridge Crowding Cards, stereo acuity using Lang Stereo test II and Butterfly stereo tests and colour perception using Colour Vision Test Made Easy (CVTME) and Ishihara's Test for Colour Deficiency (Ishihara Test) between children in mainstream classes and children with learning disabilities in special education classes in government primary schools. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 primary school children (50 children from mainstream classes and 50 children from special education classes) matched in age were recruited in this cross-sectional comparative study. The testability was determined by the percentage of children who were able to give reliable respond as required by the respective tests. ‘Unable to test’ was defined as inappropriate response or uncooperative despite best efforts of the screener. Results: The testability of the modified ETDRS, Butterfly stereo test and Ishihara test for respective visual function tests were found lower among children in special education classes (P < 0.001) but not in Cambridge Crowding Cards, Lang Stereo test II and CVTME. Conclusion: Non verbal or “matching” approaches were found to be more superior in testing visual functions in children with learning disabilities. Modifications of vision testing procedures are essential for children with learning disabilities. PMID:24008790

  1. Development of microcomputer-based mental acuity tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnage, J. J.; Kennedy, R. S.; Smith, M. G.; Baltzley, D. R.; Lane, N. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent disasters have focused attention on performance problems due to the use of alcohol and controlled substances in the workplace. Environmental stressors such as thermal extremes, mixed gases, noise, motion, and vibration also have adverse effects on human performance and operator efficiency. However, the lack of a standardized, sensitive, human performance assessment battery has probably delayed the systematic study of the deleterious effects of various toxic chemicals and drugs at home and in the workplace. The collective goal of the research reported here is the development of a menu of tests embedded in a coherent package of hardware and software that may be useful in repeated-measures studies of a broad range of agents that can degrade human performance. A menu of 40 tests from the Automated Performance Test System (APTS) is described, and the series of interlocking studies supporting its development is reviewed. The APTS tests, which run on several versions of laptop portables and desktop personal computers, have been shown to be stable, reliable, and factorially rich, and to have predictive validities with holistic measures of intelligence and simulator performances. In addition, sensitivity studies have been conducted in which performance changes due to stressors, agents, and treatments were demonstrated. We believe that tests like those described here have prospective use as an adjunct to urine testing for the screening for performance loss of individuals who are granted access to workplaces and stations that impact public safety.

  2. Development of microcomputer-based mental acuity tests.

    PubMed

    Turnage, J J; Kennedy, R S; Smith, M G; Baltzley, D R; Lane, N E

    1992-10-01

    Recent disasters have focused attention on performance problems due to the use of alcohol and controlled substances in the workplace. Environmental stressors such as thermal extremes, mixed gases, noise, motion, and vibration also have adverse effects on human performance and operator efficiency. However, the lack of a standardized, sensitive, human performance assessment battery has probably delayed the systematic study of the deleterious effects of various toxic chemicals and drugs at home and in the workplace. The collective goal of the research reported here is the development of a menu of tests embedded in a coherent package of hardware and software that may be useful in repeated-measures studies of a broad range of agents that can degrade human performance. A menu of 40 tests from the Automated Performance Test System (APTS) is described, and the series of interlocking studies supporting its development is reviewed. The APTS tests, which run on several versions of laptop portables and desktop personal computers, have been shown to be stable, reliable, and factorially rich, and to have predictive validities with holistic measures of intelligence and simulator performances. In addition, sensitivity studies have been conducted in which performance changes due to stressors, agents, and treatments were demonstrated. We believe that tests like those described here have prospective use as an adjunct to urine testing for the screening for performance loss of individuals who are granted access to workplaces and stations that impact public safety. PMID:1516578

  3. The Nursing Home Minimum Data Set for Vision and Its Association with Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark W.; McGwin, Gerald; Elliott, Amanda F.; Owsley, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association between the Minimum Data Set's (MDS) Vision Patterns section and near and distance visual acuity and contrast sensitivity in nursing home residents. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Seventeen nursing homes in the Birmingham, Alabama area. Participants 371 nursing home residents ≥ 55 years old with Mini-mental State Exams of ≥ 13. Measurements The MDS 2.0 assessment for vision from the date closest to acuity and contrast sensitivity assessment was obtained from the resident's medical record. Acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured by the ETDRS chart and Pelli-Robson chart, respectively. Results The MDS rating of visual status was associated with both distance and near visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. The MDS performed poorly in distinguishing residents with mild versus moderate visual impairment. For residents who were rated on the MDS as having adequate vision, 45.9% had distance acuity worse than 20/40 in the better eye, 72.8% had near acuity worse than 20/40 in the better eye, and 85.8% had contrast sensitivity < 1.50. Conclusion The MDS 2.0 assessment for vision in nursing home residents is positively associated with visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, but does not adequately distinguish between individuals with mild versus moderate visual impairment and classifies many as having adequate vision who have visual impairment. The validity of the MDS 2.0 as a mechanism for triggering comprehensive eye care for nursing home residents is questionable. PMID:19187419

  4. Crossmodal temporal processing acuity impairment aggravates with age in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Virsu, Veijo; Lahti-Nuuttila, Pekka; Laasonen, Marja

    2003-01-23

    Temporal processing has been found to be impaired in developmental dyslexia. We investigated how aging affects crossmodal temporal processing impairment with 39 dyslexic and 40 fluent 20-59-year-old readers. Cognitive temporal acuity was measured at millisecond levels in six tasks. They consisted of order judgments of two brief non-speech stimulus pulses, the stimuli being audiotactile, visuotactile and audiovisual, and of simultaneity/nonsimultaneity detection of the pulses in two parallel three-pulse trains. Temporal acuity declined with age in both reading groups and its impairment was observed in developmental dyslexia. A new finding was that the crossmodal temporal impairment, directly relevant to reading, increased with age. The age-related exacerbation suggests a developmental neuronal deficit, possibly related to magnocells, which exists before dyslexia and is its ontogenetic cause. PMID:12505615

  5. Microactuator production via high aspect ratio, high edge acuity metal fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guckel, H.; Christenson, T. R.

    1993-01-01

    LIGA is a procession sequence which uses x-ray lithography on photoresist layers of several hundred micrometers to produce very high edge acuity photopolymer molds. These plastic molds can be converted to metal molds via electroplating of many different metals and alloys. The end results are high edge acuity metal parts with large structural heights. The LIGA process as originally described by W. Ehrfeld can be extended by adding a surface micromachining phase to produce precision metal parts which can be assembled to form three-dimensional micromechanisms. This process, SLIGA, has been used to fabricate a dynamometer on a chip. The instrument has been fully implemented and will be applied to tribology issues, speed-torque characterization of planar magnetic micromotors and a new family of sensors.

  6. Changes in smell acuity induced by radiation exposure of the olfactory mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ophir, D.; Guterman, A.; Gross-Isseroff, R.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on smell acuity were assessed in 12 patients in whom the olfactory mucosa was exposed to radiation in the course of treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma or pituitary adenoma. Olfactory detection thresholds for two odorants (amyl acetate and eugenol) were determined before the start of radiation therapy, within a week of termination of therapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months later. The results show clearly that smell acuity is profoundly affected by therapeutic irradiation. Thresholds had increased in all 12 patients by the end of treatment and were still high one month later. Varying degrees of recovery were noted in most patients three to six months after cessation of treatment. The fate of the sense of smell deserves more attention when considering the disability caused by irradiation to certain head and neck tumors.

  7. Binocular visual acuity for the correction of spherical aberration in polychromatic and monochromatic light.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christina; Cánovas, Carmen; Manzanera, Silvestre; Weeber, Henk; Prieto, Pedro M; Piers, Patricia; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Correction of spherical (SA) and longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA) significantly improves monocular visual acuity (VA). In this work, the visual effect of SA correction in polychromatic and monochromatic light on binocular visual performance is investigated. A liquid crystal based binocular adaptive optics visual analyzer capable of operating in polychromatic light is employed in this study. Binocular VA improves when SA is corrected and LCA effects are reduced separately and in combination, resulting in the highest value for SA correction in monochromatic light. However, the binocular summation ratio is highest for the baseline condition of uncorrected SA in polychromatic light. Although SA correction in monochromatic light has a greater impact monocularly than binocularly, bilateral correction of both SA and LCA may further improve binocular spatial visual acuity which may support the use of aspheric-achromatic ophthalmic devices, in particular, intraocular lenses (IOLs). PMID:24520150

  8. Gains following perceptual learning are closely linked to the initial visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Oren; Sterkin, Anna; Lev, Maria; Levi, Dennis M.; Polat, Uri

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the dependence of perceptual learning gains on initial visual acuity (VA), in a large sample of subjects with a wide range of VAs. A large sample of normally sighted and presbyopic subjects (N = 119; aged 40 to 63) with a wide range of uncorrected near visual acuities (VA, −0.12 to 0.8 LogMAR), underwent perceptual learning. Training consisted of detecting briefly presented Gabor stimuli under spatial and temporal masking conditions. Consistent with previous findings, perceptual learning induced a significant improvement in near VA and reading speed under conditions of limited exposure duration. Our results show that the improvements in VA and reading speed observed following perceptual learning are closely linked to the initial VA, with only a minor fraction of the observed improvement that may be attributed to the additional sessions performed by those with the worse VA. PMID:27122254

  9. Development and validation of a pre-percutaneous coronary intervention risk model of contrast-induced acute kidney injury with an integer scoring system.

    PubMed

    Inohara, Taku; Kohsaka, Shun; Abe, Takayuki; Miyata, Hiroaki; Numasawa, Yohei; Ueda, Ikuko; Nishi, Yutaro; Naito, Kotaro; Shibata, Masaru; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Kawamura, Akio; Sato, Yuji; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-06-15

    Previous models for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) include procedure-related variables in addition to pre-procedural variables. We sought to develop a risk model for CI-AKI based on pre-procedural variables and compare its predictability with a conventional risk model and also to develop an integer score system based on selected variables. A total of 5,936 consecutive PCIs registered in the Japanese Cardiovascular Database were analyzed (derivation cohort, n = 3,957; validation cohort, n = 1,979). CI-AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of 50% or 0.3 mg/dl compared with baseline. From the derivation cohort, 2 different CI-AKI risk models were generated using logistic regression analyses: a pre-procedural model and a conventional model including both pre-procedural and procedure-related variables. The predictabilities of the models were compared by c-statistics. An integer score was assigned to each variable in proportion to each estimated regression coefficient for the final model. In our derivation cohort, the proportion of CI-AKI was 9.0% (n = 358). Predictors for CI-AKI included older age, heart failure, diabetes, previous PCI, hypertension, higher baseline creatinine level, and acute coronary syndrome. Presence of procedure-related complications and insertion of intra-aortic balloon pumping were included as procedure-related variables in the conventional model. Both the conventional model (c-statistics 0.789) and the pre-procedural model (c-statistics 0.799) demonstrated reasonable discrimination. The integer risk-scoring method demonstrated good agreement between the expected and observed risks of CI-AKI in the validation cohort. In conclusion, the pre-procedural risk model for CI-AKI had acceptable discrimination compared with the conventional model and may aid in risk stratification of CI-AKI before PCI. PMID:25891989

  10. Does field reliability for Static-99 scores decrease as scores increase?

    PubMed

    Rice, Amanda K; Boccaccini, Marcus T; Harris, Paige B; Hawes, Samuel W

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the field reliability of Static-99 (Hanson & Thornton, 2000) scores among 21,983 sex offenders and focused on whether rater agreement decreased as scores increased. As expected, agreement was lowest for high-scoring offenders. Initial and most recent Static-99 scores were identical for only about 40% of offenders who had been assigned a score of 6 during their initial evaluations, but for more than 60% of offenders who had been assigned a score of 2 or lower. In addition, the size of the difference between scores increased as scores increased, with pairs of scores differing by 2 or more points for about 30% of offenders scoring in the high-risk range. Because evaluators and systems use high Static-99 scores to identify sexual offenders who may require intensive supervision or even postrelease civil commitment, it is important to recognize that there may be more measurement error for high scores than low scores and to consider adopting procedures for minimizing or accounting for measurement error. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24932647

  11. Photovoltaic restoration of sight with high visual acuity in rats with retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Goetz, G.; Lorach, H.; Mandel, Y.; Smith, R.; Boinagrov, D.; Lei, X.; Kamins, T.; Harris, J.; Mathieson, K.; Sher, A.

    2015-03-01

    Patients with retinal degeneration lose sight due to gradual demise of photoreceptors. Electrical stimulation of the surviving retinal neurons provides an alternative route for delivery of visual information. Subretinal photovoltaic arrays with 70μm pixels were used to convert pulsed near-IR light (880-915nm) into pulsed current to stimulate the nearby inner retinal neurons. Network-mediated responses of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could be modulated by pulse width (1-20ms) and peak irradiance (0.5-10 mW/mm2). Similarly to normal vision, retinal response to prosthetic stimulation exhibited flicker fusion at high frequencies, adaptation to static images, and non-linear spatial summation. Spatial resolution was assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using alternating gratings with variable stripe width, projected with rapidly pulsed illumination (20-40Hz). In-vitro, average size of the electrical receptive fields in normal retina was 248+/-59μm - similar to their visible light RF size: 249+/-44μm. RGCs responded to grating stripes down to 67μm using photovoltaic stimulation in degenerate rat retina, and 28μm with visible light in normal retina. In-vivo, visual acuity in normally-sighted controls was 29+/-5μm/stripe, vs. 63+/-4μm/stripe in rats with subretinal photovoltaic arrays, corresponding to 20/250 acuity in human eye. With the enhanced acuity provided by eye movements and perceptual learning in human patients, visual acuity might exceed the 20/200 threshold of legal blindness. Ease of implantation and tiling of these wireless arrays to cover a large visual field, combined with their high resolution opens the door to highly functional restoration of sight.

  12. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  13. Variance analysis. Part I, Extending flexible budget variance analysis to acuity.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A

    1991-01-01

    The author reviews the concepts of flexible budget variance analysis, including the price, quantity, and volume variances generated by that technique. He also introduces the concept of acuity variance and provides direction on how such a variance measure can be calculated. Part II in this two-part series on variance analysis will look at how personal computers can be useful in the variance analysis process. PMID:1870002

  14. Final Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with conventionally-managed eyes. Methods Infants with symmetrical, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye randomized to earlier treatment at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either early treatment or conventional management. Main Outcome Measures ETDRS visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers. Retinal structure was assessed as a secondary outcome. Results Analysis of all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant benefit for early treatment (24.6% v. 29.0% unfavorable outcome, P=0.15). Analysis of 6-year visual acuity results according to the Type 1 and 2 clinical algorithm showed a benefit for Type 1 eyes (25.1% v. 32.8%, P=0.02) treated early, but not Type 2 eyes (23.6% v. 19.4%, P=0.37). Early treated eyes showed a significantly better structural outcome compared with conventionally managed eyes (8.9% v. 15.2% unfavorable outcome, P<0.001), with no greater risk of ocular complications. Conclusion Early treatment for Type 1 high-risk prethreshold eyes improved visual acuity outcomes at 6 years of age. Early treatment for Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes did not. Application to Clinical Practice Type 1 eyes, not Type 2 eyes should be treated early. These results are particularly important considering that 52 % of Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes underwent regression of ROP without requiring treatment. PMID:20385926

  15. Evaluation of stone-free rate using Guy's Stone Score and assessment of complications using modified Clavien grading system for percutaneous nephro-lithotomy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Jindal, Tarun; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Saha, Barun; Mitra, Nilanjan; Kumar, Jay; Mukhopadhyay, Chandranath; Ghosh, Nabankur; Kamal, Mir Reza; Mandal, Soumendra Nath; Karmakar, Dilip

    2015-08-01

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of Guy's Stone Score (GSS) in predicting stone clearance rate and complication rate (by modified Clavien grade) for renal stones treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). From January 2013 to June 2014, a total of 142 patients undergoing PNL were evaluated prospectively. Patients with co-morbidities like hypertension, diabetes, renal failure were excluded from the study. All patients were classified according to GSS based on the findings of pre-operative intravenous urography (IVU) and per-operative retrograde pyelography (RGP). All PNL procedures were done by standard technique in prone position and success was defined as no residual stone visible on X-ray KUB done on the third postoperative day. Complications were classified according to modified Clavien grading system. The initial stone clearance rate was 71.1% and overall final stone clearance rate was 90.14%. The complication rate according to Clavien grading system was 40.1%. The final stone clearance rates were 93.9, 85.71, 90.47, and 77.77% in GSS I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.001, <0.05, <0.05 and >0.05, respectively). The Clavien complication rates were 23, 61, 52, and 77.7% in GSS I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.001). The GSS is a simple and easily reproducible system to preoperatively predict stone-free rate and perioperative complication rate. It helps in better patient counseling preoperatively. PMID:25850962

  16. Normal Visual Acuity and Electrophysiological Contrast Gain in Adults with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Bach, Michael; Blessing, Julia; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel<