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Sample records for acuity-adaptable patient room

  1. Impacting patient outcomes through design: acuity adaptable care/universal room design.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine Kay; Gallant, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    To succeed in today's challenging healthcare environment, hospitals must examine their impact on customers--patients and families--staff and physicians. By using competitive facility design and incorporating evidence-based concepts such as the acuity adaptable care delivery model and the universal room, the hospital will realize an impact on patient satisfaction that will enhance market share, on physician satisfaction that will foster loyalty, and on staff satisfaction that will decrease turnover. At the same time, clinical outcomes such as a reduction in mortality and complications and efficiencies such as a reduction in length of stay and minimization of hospital costs through the elimination of transfers can be gained. The results achieved are dependent on the principles used in designing the patient room that should focus on maximizing patient safety and improving healing. This article will review key design elements that support the success of an acuity adaptable unit such as the use of a private room with zones dedicated to patients, families, and staff, healing environment, technology, and decentralized nursing stations that support the success of the acuity adaptable unit. Outcomes of institutions currently utilizing the acuity adaptable concept will be reviewed.

  2. Noise control considerations for patient rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenny, Benjamin

    2005-09-01

    The patient room envelope is a path between outside noise sources and the patient receiver. Within the patient room there are several sources including televisions, clinical monitor alarms, medical pumps, etc. Noise control in patient rooms relies on a combination of the sound transmission loss of the patient room envelope and the level of background sound at the patient's head. Guidelines published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), American Institute of Architects (AIA), and the U.S. Department of Defense for background noise and sound transmission loss in patient rooms will be discussed. Appropriate levels, spectra, and temporal characteristics of background sound at the patient head location may be helpful in raising the threshold of annoying sounds. Various means of personal hearing protection for patients will be discussed. Sound-pressure levels in patient rooms reported in previous literature will also be discussed.

  3. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  4. Patients' Experience of Winter Depression and Light Room Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a need for more knowledge on the effects of light room treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder and to explore patients' subjective experience of the disease and the treatment. Methods. This was a descriptive and explorative study applying qualitative content analysis. A purposeful sample of 18 psychiatric outpatients with a major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern and a pretreatment score ≥12 on the 9-item Montgomery-Åsberg Depression self-rating scale was included (10 women and 8 men, aged 24–65 years). All patients had completed light room treatment (≥7/10 consecutive weekdays). Data was collected two weeks after treatment using a semistructured interview guide. Results. Patients described a clear seasonal pattern and a profound struggle to adapt to seasonal changes during the winter, including deterioration in sleep, daily rhythms, energy level, mood, activity, and cognitive functioning. Everyday life was affected with reduced work capacity, social withdrawal, and disturbed relations with family and friends. The light room treatment resulted in a radical and rapid improvement in all the major symptoms with only mild and transient side effects. Discussion. The results indicate that light room treatment is essential for some patients' ability to cope with seasonal affective disorder. PMID:28293623

  5. Patient room considerations in the intensive care unit: caregiver, patient, family.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennie; Reyers, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Room is one of the most important and costly rooms in the design of an inpatient bed unit. As a result, the patient room mock-up requires knowledge of the components that inform the patient room environment. This article provides the intensive care nurse with questions about patient care processes and unit policies that should be considered in a mock-up. The mock-up outcome should align with the project's goals and objectives of the health care system, infuse the principles of evidence-based design, and ensure that the design accommodates the best workflow for the patient population that will be served. The template will serve as a guide to evaluate the various features of the patient room and for the mock-up discussion between the nurse and the architect.

  6. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  7. SU-E-T-387: Achieving Optimal Patient Setup Imaging and Treatment Workflow Configurations in Multi-Room Proton Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Prado, K; Langen, K; Yi, B; Mehta, M; Regine, W; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate patient flow in proton treatment center under uncertainty and to explore the feasibility of treatment preparation rooms to improve patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Methods: Three center layout scenarios were modeled: (S1: In-Tx room imaging) patient setup and imaging (planar/volumetric) performed in treatment room, (S2: Patient setup in preparation room) each treatment room was assigned with preparation room(s) that was equipped with lasers only for patient setup and gross patient alignment, and (S3: Patient setup and imaging in preparation room) preparation room(s) was equipped with laser and volumetric imaging for patient setup, gross and fine patient alignment. A 'snap' imaging was performed in treatment room. For each scenario, the number of treatment rooms and the number of preparation rooms serving each treatment room were varied. We examined our results (average of 100 16-hour (two shifts) working days) by evaluating patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Results: When the number of treatment rooms increased ([from, to]) [1, 5], daily patient throughput increased [32, 161], [29, 184] and [27, 184] and cyclotron utilization increased [13%, 85%], [12%, 98%], and [11%, 98%] for scenarios S1, S2 and S3 respectively. However, both measures plateaued after 4 rooms. With the preparation rooms, the throughput and the cyclotron utilization increased by 14% and 15%, respectively. Three preparation rooms were optimal to serve 1-3 treatment rooms and two preparation rooms were optimal to serve 4 or 5 treatment rooms. Conclusion: Patient preparation rooms for patient setup may increase throughput and decrease the need for additional treatment rooms (cost effective). Optimal number of preparation rooms serving each gantry room varies as a function of treatment rooms and patient setup scenarios. A 5th treatment room may not be justified by throughput or utilization.

  8. Islam and the healthcare environment: designing patient rooms.

    PubMed

    Kopec, D A K; Han, Li

    2008-01-01

    Islam and the Muslim population are often the source of much misunderstanding and media-influenced misconceptions. Muslim patients who enter the healthcare environment are often weak and likely to experience feelings of vulnerability. Because of the complex and interwoven nature of culture and religion in a person's identity, it is important to consider patient belief systems and values when designing a patient's immediate environment. Through an exploration of literature related to culture and diversity and the beliefs and value system of the Muslim population, the authors were able to identify flexible design initiatives that could accommodate an array of cultural and spiritual practices. Islam and the Muslim population were chosen as the points of reference for this study because of the strong influence of the religion on the culture, and because of the many nuances that differ from the dominant culture within the United States. From these points of reference, a hypothetical design was developed for a patient room that considers differing notions of privacy, alternatives for cultural and religious practices, and ways to include symbolic meaning derived from attributes such as color.

  9. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt.

  10. Aggression and recent substance abuse: absence of association in psychiatric emergency room patients.

    PubMed

    Dhossche, D M

    1999-01-01

    Substance abuse has been linked to aggression in community and psychiatric samples. A retrospective chart review in 311 consecutive psychiatric emergency room patients was conducted to assess the association of substance abuse and aggression in an acute psychiatric setting. Various indices of substance abuse, including positive urine toxicology for alcohol, cocaine, and/or cannabis, were not associated with aggressive behavior. Patients with positive toxicology for cocaine were less frequently aggressive than cocaine-negative patients. Among aggressive patients, the presence of psychotic symptoms was the most important factor associated with admission. These findings suggest that aggression is not a common acute manifestation of recent substance abuse in psychiatric emergency room patients. Selection factors in this population and the specifics of an acute psychiatric setting may obscure the association, if any. Acute psychosis seems to have a more important role in this setting. Future studies should focus on the prevention and early treatment of aggression in psychotic emergency room patients.

  11. Ventilation Rates and Airflow Pathways in Patient Rooms: A Case Study of Bioaerosol Containment and Removal.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Ehsan S; Grosskopf, Kevin R

    2015-11-01

    Most studies on the transmission of infectious airborne disease have focused on patient room air changes per hour (ACH) and how ACH provides pathogen dilution and removal. The logical but mostly unproven premise is that greater air change rates reduce the concentration of infectious particles and thus, the probability of airborne disease transmission. Recently, a growing body of research suggests pathways between pathogenic source (patient) and control (exhaust) may be the dominant environmental factor. While increases in airborne disease transmission have been associated with ventilation rates below 2 ACH, comparatively less data are available to quantify the benefits of higher air change rates in clinical spaces. As a result, a series of tests were conducted in an actual hospital to observe the containment and removal of respirable aerosols (0.5-10 µm) with respect to ventilation rate and directional airflow in a general patient room, and, an airborne infectious isolation room. Higher ventilation rates were not found to be proportionately effective in reducing aerosol concentrations. Specifically, increasing mechanical ventilation from 2.5 to 5.5 ACH reduced aerosol concentrations only 30% on average. However, particle concentrations were more than 40% higher in pathways between the source and exhaust as was the suspension and migration of larger particles (3-10 µm) throughout the patient room(s). Computational analyses were used to validate the experimental results, and, to further quantify the effect of ventilation rate on exhaust and deposition removal in patient rooms as well as other particle transport phenomena.

  12. Identifying Patient Door-to-Room Goals to Minimize Left-Without-Being-Seen Rates

    PubMed Central

    Pielsticker, Shea; Whelan, Lori; Arthur, Annette O.; Thomas, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency department (ED) patients in the leave-without-being-seen (LWBS) group risk problems of inefficiency, medical risk, and financial loss. The goal at our hospital is to limit LWBS to <1%. This study’s goal was to assess the influence on LWBS associated with prolonging intervals between patient presentation and placement in an exam room (DoorRoom time). This study’s major aim was to identify DoorRoom cutoffs that maximize likelihood of meeting the LWBS goal (i.e. <1%). Methods We conducted the study over one year (8/13–8/14) using operations data for an ED with annual census ~50,000. For each study day, the LWBS endpoint (i.e. was LWBS <1%: “yes or no”) and the mean DoorRoom time were recorded. We categorized DoorRoom means by intervals starting with ≤10min and ending at >60min. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess for DoorRoom cutoffs predicting high LWBS, while adjusting for patient acuity (triage scores and admission %) and operations parameters. We used predictive marginal probability to assess utility of the regression-generated cutoffs. We defined statistical significance at p<0.05 and report odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Univariate results suggested a primary DoorRoom cutoff of 20′, to maintain a high likelihood (>85%) of meeting the LWBS goal. A secondary DoorRoom cutoff was indicated at 35′, to prevent a precipitous drop-off in likelihood of meeting the LWBS goal, from 61.1% at 35′ to 34.4% at 40′. Predictive marginal analysis using multivariate techniques to control for operational and patient-acuity factors confirmed the 20′ and 35′ cutoffs as significant (p<0.001). Days with DoorRoom between 21–35′ were 74% less likely to meet the LWBS goal than days with DoorRoom ≤20′ (OR 0.26, 95% CI [0.13–0.53]). Days with DoorRoom >35′ were a further 75% less likely to meet the LWBS goal than days with DoorRoom of 21–35′ (OR 0.25, 95% CI [0.15–0.41]). Conclusion

  13. Room service improves patient food intake and satisfaction with hospital food.

    PubMed

    Williams, R; Virtue, K; Adkins, A

    1998-07-01

    Cancer therapy causes side effects that interfere with oral intake. Frequently, patients undergoing such therapy suffer from anorexia, nausea, vomiting, food aversions, dysgeusia, and xerostomia, all which adversely affect oral intake. Adequate nutrition intake is an important part of therapy for the cancer patient, especially when that patient is a child. Children who are well nourished are better able to withstand infection and tolerate therapy. Parents and staff at our hospital have worked diligently to improve patient's oral intake with limited success. Hence, a multidisciplinary team was organized to develop a new approach to food services that would improve patients' oral intake. The team initiated patient "room service," and patients were allowed to call the kitchen when they were ready to eat. The system works much like room service in a hotel. After the introduction of room service, patients' caloric intake improved significantly (P = .008), and protein intake increased by 18%. Patient satisfaction with hospital food service also improved; excellent ratings increased by as much as 35%. We conclude that room service is a viable alternative to traditional food services in the pediatric oncology setting and may be useful in other patient populations, such as maternity and general pediatrics.

  14. Homeward bound: the safety of discharging postappendectomy patients directly home from the recovery room.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark B; Daniel, Dale

    2014-10-01

    The discharge of the patients directly from the recovery room after appendectomy has only recently been described in the literature. Because the 30-day readmission rate is used as a surrogate for safety and as a means to identify complications from appendicitis, it is our aim to demonstrate that the 30-day readmission rate of patients with acute appendicitis discharged from the recovery room is not higher than that of a control group and that from other studies in the literature for traditional hospital discharge. The operating room electronic database at Kaiser Riverside and Kaiser Moreno Valley hospitals was used to identify all appendectomies from September 1, 2008, to April 30, 2013. During that span, 2044 appendectomies were performed. Eight hundred seventy (43%) were discharged from the recovery room. Of these patients, 861 (99%) had a laparoscopic appendectomy. The average time from anesthesia end time until discharge from the recovery room was 2 hours 42 minutes. There were 12 (1.4%) total readmissions with nine (1%) related to previous appendectomy compared with one (0.9%) in the control group. None of the readmissions were the result of early life-threatening problems such as bleeding, bowel injury, intraperitoneal bladder injury, or stump leak. Patients with acute appendicitis who were discharged home from the recovery room did not have an increased incidence of 30-day readmission when compared with traditional hospital discharge.

  15. Patient room lighting influences on sleep, appraisal and mood in hospitalized people.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Marina C; Geerdinck, Leonie M; Versteylen, Mathijs; Leffers, Pieter; Meekes, Gaby J B M; Herremans, Hannelore; de Ruyter, Boris; Bikker, Jan Willem; Kuijpers, Petra M J C; Schlangen, Luc J M

    2017-04-01

    Irregular 24 h light/dark cycles with night-time light exposure and a low amplitude are disruptive for sleep, mood and circadian rhythms. Nevertheless such lighting conditions are quite common in medical care facilities. A controlled clinical trial among 196 cardiology ward patients (mean age 66.5 ± 13.1 years SD) investigated how a patient room lighting intervention affects sleep, appraisal and mood across hospitalization. Patients were either assigned to a standardly-lit room or to a room with an interventional lighting system offering a dynamic 24 h light/dark cycle with low nocturnal light exposure and 2 h of bright light (1750 lux) during daytime. Measures included wrist actigraphy and questionnaires assessing alertness, sleep quality, anxiety, depression and lighting appraisal. The median length of hospitalization was 5 days in both study arms. Subjective scores on sleep, alertness, anxiety and depression did not differ between arms. Lighting appraisal in intervention rooms was better as compared to standardly-lit rooms, both in patients (P < 0.001) and staff (P < 0.005). Actigraphic sleep duration of patients improved by 5.9 min (95% CI: 0.6-11.2; P = 0.03 intervention × time effect) per hospitalization day with interventional lighting instead of standard lighting. After 5 days of hospitalization, sleep duration in the lighting intervention rooms increased by 29 min, or a relative 7.3%, as compared to standardly-lit rooms. A 24 h lighting system with enhanced daytime brightness and restricted nocturnal light exposure can improve some aspects of appraisal and objective sleep in hospital patients. More clinical research is needed to establish the best lighting strategy to promote healing and wellbeing within healthcare settings.

  16. Listening to "How the Patient Presents Herself": A Case Study of a Doctor-Patient Interaction in an Emergency Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delbene, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    This is a case-study based on a micro-ethnography analyzing a doctor-patient interaction in an emergency room (ER) in New York City. Drawing on the framework of narrative medicine (Charon, 2006), the study examines how a phenomenological approach to listening to the patient facilitated the patient's narrative orientation not only to relevant…

  17. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  18. Teaching avian patients and caregivers in the examination room.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ellen K

    2012-09-01

    Client education and patient well-being should be primary goals and responsibilities for practicing avian veterinarians. Time is limited in the normal clinical appointment setting. However, this opportunity can still be used to introduce clients to the basics of training with positive reinforcement. These methods build a healthy relationship of trust between caregivers and their birds. Within the allotted appointment time, it is possible to teach clients how to train a simple behavior. This article outlines and demonstrates how training avian patients is successfully applied in a typical clinical practice.

  19. To lock or not to lock patients'rooms: the key to autonomy?

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, Netta; Ulman, Anne-Marie; Weiss, Mordechai; Strous, Rael D

    2008-10-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia experience prominent negative symptoms. Functional impairment often results in patients who remain in their rooms for most of the day. It has thus become common practice in many psychiatric wards to lock patients' rooms during much of the morning and afternoon hours to encourage participation in ward activities and treatment modalities. Within the context of a quality control evaluation, two self-report surveys were conducted among patients (N=20) and staff members (N=9) in Beer Yaakov, Israel: the first survey was given when the rooms were locked at certain times, and the second survey was given after the rooms had been unlocked for one week. Patients and staff members expressed differing views both before and after the week-long open-door policy (patients enjoyed the policy, whereas many staff did not). Behavior during the period of the open-door policy varied among patients. The authors discuss the ethical grounds of locking doors and whether it is a best practice in keeping with rehabilitation interests.

  20. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  1. Shielding hospital rooms for brachytherapy patients: design, regulatory and cost/benefit factors.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, M; Webster, E W

    1984-03-01

    The current regulations of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) normally require limitation of radiation exposure in any part of unrestricted occupied areas to 2 mrem in any one hour and to 100 mrem in 7 days. To meet these limits when patients are treated therapeutically with radioactive materials, it is advisable to designate specific rooms in a hospital and often necessary to incorporate substantial costly shielding into one or more walls and the room door. Plans have been formulated for shielding existing hospital rooms housing brachytherapy patients receiving 192Ir and 137Cs therapy in order to meet the above NRC requirements for adjacent corridors and rooms. Typical shielding thicknesses required are 4-6 in. of concrete for certain walls and 1/4 in. of lead in the doors. Shielding costs are approx. $6000 per room for one shielded wall and a shielded door. Applying recent estimates of the cancer risk from low-level gamma radiation, the cost of shielding per cancer fatality averted has been estimated to range from $1.8 million to $10.9 million. Cost/benefit comparisons with many other life-saving activities suggest that these costs and the application of the 2 mrem/hr limit which necessitated them are not justified.

  2. Use of Critical Access Hospital Emergency Rooms by Patients with Mental Health Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David; Ziller, Erika C.; Loux, Stephenie L.; Gale, John A.; Lambert, David; Yousefian, Anush E.

    2007-01-01

    Context: National data demonstrate that mental health (MH) visits to the emergency room (ER) comprise a small, but not inconsequential, proportion of all visits; however, we lack a rural picture of this issue. Purpose: This study investigates the use of critical access hospital (CAH) ERs by patients with MH problems to understand the role these…

  3. Analysis of Patients with Facial Lacerations Repaired in the Emergency Room of a Provincial Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon Ho; Jeon, Myeong Su; Shin, Hea Kyeong; Seul, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Facial laceration is the most common injury encountered in the emergency room in the plastic surgery field, and optimal treatment is important. However, few authors have investigated this injury in all age groups or performed follow-up visit after repair. In the present study, the medical records of patients with lacerations in the facial area and underwent primary repair in an emergency room over a 2-year period were reviewed and analyzed. Methods Medical records of 3,234 patients with lacerations in facial area and underwent primary repair in an emergency room between March 2011 and February 2013 were reviewed and identified. Results All the 3,234 patients were evaluated, whose ratio of men to women was 2.65 to 1. The forehead was the most common region affected and a slip down was the most common mechanism of injury. In terms of monthly distribution, May had the highest percentage. 1,566 patients received follow-up managements, and 58 patients experienced complications. The average days of follow-up were 9.8. Conclusions Proportion of male adolescents was significantly higher than in the other groups. Facial lacerations exhibit a 'T-shaped' facial distribution centered about the forehead. Careful management is necessary if a laceration involves or is located in the oral cavity. We were unable to long term follow-up most patients. Thus, it is necessary to encourage patients and give them proper education for follow-up in enough period. PMID:25606487

  4. Suicide Attempts After Emergency Room Visits: The Effect of Patient Safety Goals.

    PubMed

    Robst, John

    2015-12-01

    In 2007 the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals included a requirement addressing risks associated with patient suicidality. The rational for this requirement was that suicide has been the most frequently reported sentinel event since the inception of the Sentinel Event Policy in 1996. The Patient Safety Goals on suicide required hospitals implement actions to assess suicide risk, meet client's immediate safety needs and provide information such as a crisis hotline to individuals and family members for crisis situations. This study performed a secondary data analysis to assess the effect of the 2007 Joint Commission Patient Safety Goals on suicide attempts among patients following treatment at hospital emergency rooms among individuals enrolled in the Florida Medicaid program. A difference-in-difference approach compared changes in rates of suicide attempts for individuals with a primary mental health diagnosis and individuals with a physical health diagnosis after emergency room treatment. In the 6 months following treatment, suicide rates declined after implementation of the goals among patients treated for a primary mental health diagnosis, and increased among patients with a poisoning diagnosis, compared to individuals with a physical health diagnosis. The goals were associated with a reduction in suicide attempts after emergency room treatment.

  5. The sound environment in an ICU patient room--a content analysis of sound levels and patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Lotta; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Waye, Kerstin Persson; Ryherd, Erica; Lindahl, Berit

    2012-10-01

    This study had two aims: first to describe, using both descriptive statistics and quantitative content analysis, the noise environment in an ICU patient room over one day, a patient's physical status during the same day and early signs of ICU delirium; second, to describe, using qualitative content analysis, patients' recall of the noise environment in the ICU patient room. The final study group comprised 13 patients. General patient health status data, ICU delirium observations and sound-level data were collected for each patient over a 24-hour period. Finally, interviews were conducted following discharge from the ICU. The sound levels in the patient room were higher than desirable and the LAF max levels exceed 55dB 70-90% of the time. Most patients remembered some sounds from their stay in the ICU and whilst many were aware of the sounds they were not disturbing to them. However, some also experienced feelings of fear related to sounds emanating from treatments and investigations of the patient beside them. In this small sample, no statistical connection between early signs of ICU delirium and high sound levels was seen, but more research will be needed to clarify whether or not a correlation does exist between these two factors.

  6. Patient walk detection in hospital room using Microsoft Kinect V2.

    PubMed

    Liang Liu; Mehrotra, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a system using Kinect sensor to detect patient walk automatically in a hospital room setting. The system is especially essential for the case when the patient is alone and the nursing staff is absent. The patient activities are represented by the features extracted from Kinect V2 skeletons. The analysis to the recognized walk could help us to better understand the health situation of the patient and the possible hospital acquired infection (HAI), and provide valuable information to healthcare givers for making a corresponding treatment decision and alteration. The Kinect V2 depth sensor provides the ground truth.

  7. [Screening and brief intervention for alcoholic patients treated at emergency rooms: prospects and challenges].

    PubMed

    Segatto, Maria Luiza; Pinsky, Ilana; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Rezende, Fabiana Faria; dos Reis Vilela, Thaís

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this article was to present the general principles, concepts, and main elements of brief intervention, with a literature review on its use for alcoholic patients treated at emergency rooms. It also presents the applicability of screening as a first step to the brief intervention process and the use of validated standard instruments that allow useful information for consistent feedback. Finally, it highlights the challenges associated with screening in emergency rooms due to insufficient time, inadequate professional training, fear of annoying the patient, and common beliefs that alcoholics do not respond to such interventions. Meanwhile, it emphasizes the relevancy of brief emergency intervention, which is both feasible and efficient, and the need for research to define the relevant adjustments by professionals and the health care system.

  8. Insufflation using carbon dioxide versus room air during colonoscopy: comparison of patient comfort, recovery time, and nursing resources.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Isabelle; Hayes, Ann; Buffum, Martha D; Conners, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    The standard of practice for colonoscopy is room air insufflation. Recent research demonstrates safety and significant decrease in postcolonoscopy discomfort from distention when carbon dioxide (CO2) is used during insufflation. Reducing abdominal pain after colonoscopy may lead to increased acceptance of colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer. This study aims to compare patient comfort intra- and postprocedure, length of recovery, and nursing time in patients undergoing colonoscopy using room air vs. CO2 insufflation. This study uses an experimental design with patients randomly assigned to either room air or CO2 during colonoscopy. Physician endoscopists, postprocedure nurses, and patients were blinded to assignment. Prior bowel surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, or inability to consent excluded participants. Outcome measures included discomfort assessment, nursing tasks, and recovery time.Of 191 participants, 177 were men and 14 were women; 94 received room air; 97 received CO2. Patients insufflated with room air reported higher levels of some measures of discomfort: (a) during colonoscopy (p = .02), (b) on admission to recovery (p = .001), and (c) on discharge from recovery (p = .001). Patients receiving room air required more nursing tasks in recovery (p = .001) and more total nursing time (p = .001).Compared with room air, CO2 insufflation increases patient comfort and decreases nursing tasks and time.

  9. Practicability of avoiding hypothermia in resuscitation room phase in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K O; Jensen, J M; Sprengel, K

    2015-05-01

    Hypothermia in severely injured patients is a high demanding situation resulting from an effect of injury severity, surrounding temperature at trauma site and admittance. This article reviews the possible options to combat hypothermia in the resuscitation room with respect to practicability. This review summarizes available passive and active re-warming techniques and trys to offer a practicable chronology to restore normothermia. Resources should be applied depending on the availability of each institution and manifestation of hypothermia, but there is a strong demand for improvements with respect to practicability, convenience and safety for the patient.

  10. Two loose screws: near-miss fall of a morbidly obese patient after an operating room table failure.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Russell K; Booth, Robert T; Bittenbinder, Timothy M

    2016-09-01

    Operating room surgical table failure is a rare event but can lead to a dangerous situation when it does occur. The dangers can be compounded in the presence of obesity, especially in the anesthetized or sedated patient. We present a case of a near-miss fall of a morbidly obese patient while turning the patient in preparation to transfer from the operating room table to the hospital bed when 2 fractured bolts in the tilt cylinder mechanism led to an operating room table failure.

  11. Impact of healthcare design on patients' perception of a rheumatology outpatient infusion room: an interventional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Gunhild; Tommerup, Anne Marie Munk; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-07-01

    Evidence-based healthcare design is a concept aimed at reducing stress factors in the physical environment for the benefit of patients and the medical staff. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of room modifications on patients' perception of an outpatient infusion room used for treating rheumatologic diseases. Patient and nurse interviews, a staff workshop and field observations were performed to identify environmental room factors important for the patients, and the room was modified accordingly. The changes included the colours, atmosphere and functionality of the room. Artificial plants and a water bubble wall were added to the room. Forty-four patients receiving intravenous biologic therapy for inflammatory arthritis completed a questionnaire before and after the intervention. The agreement with 25 statements regarding the environmental room factors was scored (range 0-4). A total score was calculated as the sum of all 25 scores (range 0-100). The median (range) age was 55 (28-78) years. Seventeen out of 25 scores improved significantly (p < 0.000-0.050), none deteriorated. The amount of decorating and room colours, for example, was scored significantly higher after the intervention (p < 0.000), and the atmosphere was considered significantly more comfortable and "safe" (p < 0.005). The total score increased from 63.0 (34-88) to 81.0 (48-100) (p < 0.000). The study suggests that room modifications according to the principles of evidence-based healthcare design may have the potential to improve patients' perception of outpatient infusion rooms used for treating rheumatologic diseases.

  12. An Exploration of the Use of a Sensory Room in a Forensic Mental Health Setting: Staff and Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wiglesworth, Sophie; Farnworth, Louise

    2016-09-01

    Despite the increased use of sensory rooms, there is little published evidence related to their benefits. The purpose of this study was to explore staff and patient perspectives of the use of a sensory room in an Australian forensic mental health setting. Staff and patients on a forensic hospital unit were recruited for this study. Focus group data was obtained from the perspective of the healthcare staff. A sensory assessment identified patients' sensory preferences. The details of the patients sensory room use and stress experienced before and after using the sensory room were recorded. The results showed a mean decrease in stress that was attributed to the use of the sensory room. Stress reducing benefits of sensory room use may improve a patient's experience within a forensic mental health facility while applying a recovery approach. As a limitation of the study, patient stress was rated on an un-validated scale. Further research is needed for greater insight and evidence in evaluating the use of sensory rooms in forensic mental health settings in reducing stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. [Hybrid room - the new standard for cooperation of cardiosurgeon, anaesthesiologist and invasive cardiologist in treating difficult, complex cardiovascular patients].

    PubMed

    Hawranek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz; Tajstra, Mateusz; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The concept of hybrid room is to combine capabilities of cardiosurgery operating room and fully equipped cathlab. Since May 2011, an ultramodern hybrid room has been working, in our center. The cases reported in this article show the possibilities of cooperation of cardiosurgeons, anaesthesiologists and invasive cardiologists in performing difficult, complex cardiovascular interventions. In near future the capabilities of hybrid room will allow to perform simultaneously a number of complex cardiovascular procedures. It should not only shorten the time of hospitalisation but also substantially improve the patients comfort.

  14. Crew resource management improved perception of patient safety in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Gore, Dennis C; Powell, Jennifer M; Baer, Jennifer G; Sexton, Karen H; Richardson, C Joan; Marshall, David R; Chinkes, David L; Townsend, Courtney M

    2010-01-01

    To improve safety in the operating theater, a company of aviation pilots was employed to guide implementation of preprocedural briefings. A 5-point Likert scale survey that assessed the attitudes of operating room personnel toward patient safety was distributed before and 6 months following implementation of the briefings. Using Mann-Whitney analysis, the survey showed a significant (P < .05) improvement in 2 questions (of 13) involving reporting error and 2 questions (of 11) involving patient safety climate. When analyzed by occupation, there were no significant changes for faculty physicians; for resident physicians, there was a significant improvement in 1 question (of 13) regarding error reporting. For nurses, there were significant improvements in 3 questions (of 4) involving teamwork, 1 question (of 13) involving reporting error, and 3 questions (of 11) regarding patient safety climate. These results suggest that aviation-based crew resource management initiatives lead to an improved perception of patient safety, which was largely demonstrated by nursing personnel.

  15. [Standard operating procedures and operating room management: Improvement of patient safety and the efficiency of processes].

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R

    2008-01-01

    Financial pressures have led the way more efficiency in health care management. To decrease hospital costs a more proficient use of personal resources is required. The drive to increase efficiency with the concomitant increase in workload can cause a reduction in quality of patient care and of patient security. A professional operating room (OR) management and the introduction of standard operating procedures (SOP) have helped to optimise workflow in and around the OR. OR management can control an efficient workflow and generate data concerning performance, costs and quality. SOPs lead to a standardisation of workflow in the OR and in patient treatment modalities. This guaranties a high quality in patient care and more safety despite an increase in work-load.

  16. The Psychogeriatric Patient in the Emergency Room: Focus on Management and Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka; Grossberg, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The growing geriatric population in the United States (US) has prompted better understanding of treatment of the elderly in the hospital and emergency room (ER) settings. This study examines factors influencing the disposition of psychogeriatric patients after their initial presentation in the ER. Methods. Data was collected on patients 65 years of age or older arriving at the ER of a large urban hospital in the USA (January 2009–December 2010). Results. Of the total subjects (n = 95) included in the study, majority were females (66.3%) with an average age of 75.5 years. The chief complaint for psychogeriatric patients coming to the ER was delirium (61.6%). Caucasians were significantly more likely than African-American patients to get a psychiatric consult (33% versus 9%). Patients with delirium were less likely than patients with other psychiatric complaints to get a psychiatric consult in the ER (1.2% versus 47.2%) and less likely to be referred to a psychiatric inpatient unit compared to patients with other psychiatric complaints (2.4% versus 16.7%). Conclusion. Even though delirium is the most common reason for ER visits among psychogeriatric patients, very few delirium patients got a psychiatric consultation in the ER. A well-equipped geriatric psychiatry unit can manage delirium and associated causes. PMID:24734206

  17. Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  18. [Interdisciplinary treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation room].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Müller, Thorben; Jansen, Hendrik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Roewer, Norbert; Kühne, Christian A

    2010-06-01

    The trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is an important link between preclinical treatment and clinical management of patients with multiple trauma. For the trauma team (Trauma Surgery, Anaesthesiology, Radiology) to respond adequately, a high degree of training and standardisation is required. With arrival of the patient, the trauma team starts with priority orientated resuscitation. After life-threatening problems have been resolved, the diagnostic work is started with plain films of the chest and the pelvis and FAST. Additional plain films are made depending on further suspected injuries. Reassessment of the patient is done and necessary emergency interventions are performed before the patient is transferred to the radiology department for organ focused computed tomography. CT has gained importance in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care. The development of Multislice Helical Computed Tomography (MSCT) has led to substantial refinement in the diagnostic work-up. For many institutions it has become an essential part of the imaging of the traumatized patient. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcome. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process and can be achieved by implementation of an algorithm-based structured workflow. In that context some elements of quality management are well established in clinical practice. In the presented paper we describe the effort that needs to be done to provide optimal care for multiple trauma patients after admission to a designed trauma centre.

  19. Monte Carlo study of neutron-ambient dose equivalent to patient in treatment room.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Afarideh, H; Abbasi Davani, F; Ghergherehchi, M; Arbabi, A

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for the calculation of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H* (10) regarding patients, whereby the different concrete types that are used in the surrounding walls of the treatment room are considered. This work has been performed according to a detailed simulation of the Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator head that is operated at 18MV, and silver activation counter as a neutron detector, for which the Monte Carlo MCNPX 2.6 code is used, with and without the treatment room walls. The results show that, when compared to the neutrons that leak from the LINAC, both the scattered and thermal neutrons are the major factors that comprise the out-of field neutron dose. The scattering factors for the limonite-steel, magnetite-steel, and ordinary concretes have been calculated as 0.91±0.09, 1.08±0.10, and 0.371±0.01, respectively, while the corresponding thermal factors are 34.22±3.84, 23.44±1.62, and 52.28±1.99, respectively (both the scattering and thermal factors are for the isocenter region); moreover, the treatment room is composed of magnetite-steel and limonite-steel concretes, so the neutron doses to the patient are 1.79 times and 1.62 times greater than that from an ordinary concrete composition. The results also confirm that the scattering and thermal factors do not depend on the details of the chosen linear accelerator head model. It is anticipated that the results of the present work will be of great interest to the manufacturers of medical linear accelerators.

  20. Music and ambient operating room noise in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Chakib M; Rizk, Laudi B; Yaacoub, Chadi I; Gaal, Dorothy; Kain, Zeev N

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that music decreases intraoperative sedative requirements in patients undergoing surgical procedures under regional anesthesia. In this study we sought to determine whether this decrease in sedative requirements results from music or from eliminating operating room (OR) noise. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship of response to intraoperative music and participants' culture (i.e., American versus Lebanese). Eighty adults (36 American and 54 Lebanese) undergoing urological procedures with spinal anesthesia and patient-controlled IV propofol sedation were randomly assigned to intraoperative music, white noise, or OR noise. We found that, controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements (0.004 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.014 +/- 0.004 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.012 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.026). We also found that, regardless of group assignment, Lebanese patients used less propofol as compared with American patients (0.005 +/- 0.001 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.017 +/- 0.003 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.001) and that, in both sites, patients in the music group required less propofol (P < 0.05). We conclude that when controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements of both Lebanese and American patients who undergo urological surgery under spinal anesthesia.

  1. [Roentgen image presentation in the patient's room. Simple equipment for demonstration and storage of roentgen images].

    PubMed

    Prokop, A; Rehm, K E; Sagebiel, A

    1996-12-01

    Immediate presentation of the more significant X-ray pictures facilitates planning and supervision of therapy in trauma surgery and orthopedics. If a wire rope is stretched in front of the window X-ray pictures can be clipped onto it, which avoids time-consuming searches. Suspended filing boxes placed in each sickroom make appropriate storage of each patient's X-ray pictures possible. The expenditure for all this amounted to 100 DM for each two-bedded room. Wire ropes and boxes were technically easy to install with a minimum investment of time. The presentation of X-ray pictures considerably increased the patients' understanding of their illness. It was also very rare for X-ray pictures to get mixed up once this system had been instituted.

  2. Techniques and clinical effect of aseptic procedures on patients with acute leukemia in laminar airflow rooms.

    PubMed

    Takeo, H; Sakurai, T; Amaki, I

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of aseptic procedures in the laminar airflow room (LAF) were evaluated in 110 adult patients undergoing antileukemic chemotherapy for remission induction. The patients were divided into three groups according to the regimens: Group A, consisting of 20 patients who stayed in the LAF and received the gown technique + sterile food + prophylactic oral and topical antibiotics; Group B, consisting of 12 patients who stayed in the LAF and received sterile food + prophylactic oral antibiotics; and Group C, consisting of 78 patients in open wards, who received prophylactic oral antibiotics alone. Species and numbers of microorganisms on the skin surface were far less in the patients in Group A than in those in Group B. Airborne microorganisms were counted by the air sampling method. No microorganisms could be detected at the time of the patient's rest and of blood collection in either Group A or B. Electrocardiography and X-ray examination caused an increase in the number of colonies to more than one colony in Group B, but Group A had a count of less than 0.5 colony. The colony counts became negative within 5 min after the cessation of each operation. The percentage of febrile days for patients with a peripheral granulocyte count of less than 100/microliter was 29% in Group A, 21% in Group B and 44% in Group C. The incidence of documented infections during the total hospital stay was 25% (5/20), 42% (5/12) and 86% (67/78), respectively. The aseptic procedures in Group B were not as strict as in Group A, but the incidence of infections in Group B was significantly lower than in Group C.

  3. Patient portal doldrums: does an exam room promotional video during an office visit increase patient portal registrations and portal use?

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Barbara K; Crane, Sarah J; Smith, Steven A; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Stroebel, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The patient portal is a web service which allows patients to view their electronic health record, communicate online with their care teams, and manage healthcare appointments and medications. Despite advantages of the patient portal, registrations for portal use have often been slow. Using a secure video system on our existing exam room electronic health record displays during regular office visits, the authors showed patients a video which promoted use of the patient portal. The authors compared portal registrations and portal use following the video to providing a paper instruction sheet and to a control (no additional portal promotion). From the 12 050 office appointments examined, portal registrations within 45 days of the appointment were 11.7%, 7.1%, and 2.5% for video, paper instructions, and control respectively (p<0.0001). Within 6 months following the interventions, 3.5% in the video cohort, 1.2% in the paper, and 0.75% of the control patients demonstrated portal use by initiating portal messages to their providers (p<0.0001). PMID:21976028

  4. Patient portal doldrums: does an exam room promotional video during an office visit increase patient portal registrations and portal use?

    PubMed

    North, Frederick; Hanna, Barbara K; Crane, Sarah J; Smith, Steven A; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Stroebel, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    The patient portal is a web service which allows patients to view their electronic health record, communicate online with their care teams, and manage healthcare appointments and medications. Despite advantages of the patient portal, registrations for portal use have often been slow. Using a secure video system on our existing exam room electronic health record displays during regular office visits, the authors showed patients a video which promoted use of the patient portal. The authors compared portal registrations and portal use following the video to providing a paper instruction sheet and to a control (no additional portal promotion). From the 12,050 office appointments examined, portal registrations within 45 days of the appointment were 11.7%, 7.1%, and 2.5% for video, paper instructions, and control respectively (p<0.0001). Within 6 months following the interventions, 3.5% in the video cohort, 1.2% in the paper, and 0.75% of the control patients demonstrated portal use by initiating portal messages to their providers (p<0.0001).

  5. Patient satisfaction, preventive services, and emergency room use among African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gary, Tiffany L; Maiese, Eric M; Batts-Turner, Marian; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Brancati, Fredrick L

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between patient satisfaction and diabetes- related preventive health care and emergency room (ER) use. We studied 542 urban African-Americans with type 2 diabetes aged > or =25 years who were enrolled in a primary carebased intervention trial to improve diabetes control and reduce adverse health events; 73% female, mean age 58 years, 35% had yearly household incomes of <$7500, and all participants had health insurance. All completed a baseline interview-administered questionnaire. Patient satisfaction was measured using a modified version (nine questions) of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (CAHPS) and use of diabetes-related preventive health care and ER were assessed by self-report. We then followed participants for 12 months to determine ER use prospectively. In general, participants gave favorable ratings of their care; over 70% reported that they had no problem getting care, over 60% reported the highest ratings on the communication and courtesy domains, and mean ratings (0-10 scale) for personal doctor and overall health care were high (8.8 and 8.4, respectively). Using poisson regression models adjusted for age, education, and self-reported rating of health, several aspects of patient satisfaction were associated with subsequent ER use. Participants who reported that medical staff were usually helpful or that doctors and nurses usually spent enough time were 0.49 and 0.37 times, respectively, less likely to use the ER (all p < 0.05). However, few aspects of patient satisfaction were associated with better preventive services. These data suggest that greater patient satisfaction was associated with lower ER use in urban African-Americans. Whether measures to improve patient satisfaction would reduce ER use requires further prospective study.

  6. Using human factors engineering to improve patient safety in the cardiovascular operating room.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Ayse P; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Bauer, Laura; Kim, George; Lubomski, Lisa H; Marsteller, Jill A; Pennathur, Priyadarshini R; Goeschel, Chris; Pronovost, Peter J; Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant medical advances, cardiac surgery remains a high risk procedure. Sub-optimal work system design characteristics can contribute to the risks associated with cardiac surgery. However, hazards due to work system characteristics have not been identified in the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR) in sufficient detail to guide improvement efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify and categorize hazards (anything that has the potential to cause a preventable adverse patient safety event) in the CVOR. An interdisciplinary research team used prospective hazard identification methods including direct observations, contextual inquiry, and photographing to collect data in 5 hospitals for a total 22 cardiac surgeries. We performed thematic analysis of the qualitative data guided by a work system model. 60 categories of hazards such as practice variations, high workload, non-compliance with evidence-based guidelines, not including clinicians' in medical device purchasing decisions were found. Results indicated that hazards are common in cardiac surgery and should be eliminated or mitigated to improve patient safety. To improve patient safety in the CVOR, efforts should focus on creating a culture of safety, increasing compliance with evidence based infection control practices, improving communication and teamwork, and designing better tools and technologies through partnership among all stakeholders.

  7. [Impact of The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate report on patient safety in operating rooms: teamwork is better than bureaucracy].

    PubMed

    Lange, J F

    2008-10-18

    The Netherlands Health Care Inpectorate recently concluded that patient safety in operating rooms should improve. One example of improvement is the implementation of the time out procedure, which consists of a preoperative briefing and a postoperative debriefing in the operating room. There is, however, a risk of bureaucray and pro forma procedures, due to the time pressure the inspectorate has imposed. Sustainable improvement in patient safety requires teamwork and training of all members of surgical teams in non-technical skills such as communication. Crew resource management has been implemented in the intensive care departments in The Netherlands and is now being adapted for the training of integrated surgical teams.

  8. Meanings of Being Critically Ill in a Sound-Intensive ICU Patient Room - A Phenomenological Hermeneutical Study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Lotta; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meanings of being critically ill in a sound-intensive ICU patient room, as disclosed through patients’ narratives. Patient rooms in ICUs are filled with loud activity and studies have revealed sound levels comparable to those of a busy road above the patient’s head. There is a risk that the sound or noise is disturbing and at worst a major problem for the patient, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning the patients’ own experiences. Thirteen patients were asked to narrate their experiences of the sound environment in ICU patient rooms. The interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological- hermeneutical method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Six themes emerged from the analysis. Conclusion: The meanings of being a patient in a sound- intensive environment were interpreted as never knowing what to expect next regarding noise, but also of being situated in the middle of an uncontrollable barrage of noise, unable to take cover or disappear. This condition is not to be seen as static; for some patients there is movement and change over time. The meanings indicate that the unpredictable shifts between silence and disturbing sounds stress the critically ill patient and impede sleep and recovery. Our findings indicate the need to reduce disturbing and unexpected sounds and noise around critically ill patients in high-tech environments in order to facilitate wellbeing, sleep and recovery. Nurses have a vital role in developing such an environment. PMID:22977654

  9. Operating Room to Intensive Care Unit Handoffs and the Risks of Patient Harm

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa M.; Collins, Kelly M.; Koller, Felicitas L.; Khorzad, Rebeca; Abecassis, Michael M.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess systems and processes involved in the operating room (OR) to intensive care unit (ICU) handoff in an attempt to understand the criticality of specific steps of the handoff. Methods We performed a failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) of the OR to ICU handoff of deceased donor liver transplant recipients using in-person observations and descriptions of the handoff process from a multidisciplinary group of clinicians. For each step in the process, failures were identified along with frequency of occurrence, causes, potential effects and safeguards. A risk priority number (RPN) was calculated for each failure (Frequency x Potential effect x Safeguard; range 1-least risk to 1000-most risk). Results The FMECA identified 37 individual steps in the OR to ICU handoff process. In total, 81 process failures were identified, 22 of which were determined to be critical and 36 of which relied on weak safeguards such as informal human verification. Process failures with the highest risk of harm were lack of preliminary OR to ICU communication (RPN 504), team member absence during handoff communication (RPN 480) and transport equipment malfunction (RPN 448). Conclusions Based on the analysis, recommendations were made to reduce potential for patient harm during OR to ICU handoffs. These included automated transfer of OR data to ICU clinicians, enhanced ICU team member notification processes and revision of the postoperative order sets. The FMECA revealed steps in the OR to ICU handoff that are high risk for patient harm and are currently being targeted for process improvement. PMID:26067459

  10. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  11. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  12. One size fits all? Mixed methods evaluation of the impact of 100% single-room accommodation on staff and patient experience, safety and costs

    PubMed Central

    Maben, Jill; Penfold, Clarissa; Simon, Michael; Anderson, Janet E; Robert, Glenn; Pizzo, Elena; Hughes, Jane; Murrells, Trevor; Barlow, James

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives There is little strong evidence relating to the impact of single-room accommodation on healthcare quality and safety. We explore the impact of all single rooms on staff and patient experience; safety outcomes; and costs. Methods Mixed methods pre/post ‘move’ comparison within four nested case study wards in a single acute hospital with 100% single rooms; quasi-experimental before-and-after study with two control hospitals; analysis of capital and operational costs associated with single rooms. Results Two-thirds of patients expressed a preference for single rooms with comfort and control outweighing any disadvantages (sense of isolation) felt by some. Patients appreciated privacy, confidentiality and flexibility for visitors afforded by single rooms. Staff perceived improvements (patient comfort and confidentiality), but single rooms were worse for visibility, surveillance, teamwork, monitoring and keeping patients safe. Staff walking distances increased significantly post move. A temporary increase of falls and medication errors in one ward was likely to be associated with the need to adjust work patterns rather than associated with single rooms per se. We found no evidence that single rooms reduced infection rates. Building an all single-room hospital can cost 5% more with higher housekeeping and cleaning costs but the difference is marginal over time. Conclusions Staff needed to adapt their working practices significantly and felt unprepared for new ways of working with potentially significant implications for the nature of teamwork in the longer term. Staff preference remained for a mix of single rooms and bays. Patients preferred single rooms. PMID:26408568

  13. A simple intervention to improve patient safety, save time and improve staff experience in the AMU procedure room.

    PubMed

    Misselbrook, Gary Peter; Kause, Juliane; Yeoh, Su-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, operating theatres and Intensive Care Units (ICUs) have established systematic methods for performing procedures on patients that have been shown to reduce complications and improve patient safety. Whilst the use of procedure rooms on Acute Medicine Units (AMUs) is highly recommended by patient safety groups and Royal College publications, they are not universally available or appropriately utilised. In this article we discuss a quality improvement project that was undertaken on an AMU at a large university teaching hospital in the United Kingdom, highlighting its successes and challenges.

  14. Reasons Military Patients with Primary Care Access Leave an Emergency Department Waiting Room Before Seeing a Provider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    department, leave without being seen, pri mary care access, wait times Emergency department (ED) waiting rooms can be anxietyprovoking, uncomfortable, and...Our patients, despite being in a closed healthcare system with ready access to care, identified long wait times as the pri- mary reason they left... Somerville , Everett. http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/ cambridge/2011/02/check cambridge hospital emerg.html. Accessed February 21, 2012. 19. In an

  15. Initial presentation in psychiatry emergency room led to diagnosis of many urinary bladder stones in a male patient.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Nagaraja, Aarathi; Mahmood, Aza K

    2013-01-01

    The first case of man who presented to psychiatry emergency room for evaluation of abnormal behavior because of urinary stones was reported. Careful evaluation of patient led to a diagnosis of 37 urinary bladder stones in an Egyptian man with obstructive uropathy and metabolic defects in the form of hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects can lead to successful outcome in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery. A 61-year-old Egyptian man presented to psychiatry emergency room because he was found lying on floor in bathroom to urinate by his wife who thought her husband needed psychiatric evaluation. Patient gave history of frequent urination and dysuria on and off for 3 years. In the last 3 months before his presentation to emergency room, he got into a habit of lying down on his left side when he went to bathroom to urinate because it was easier for him to pass urine. Renal consultation requested because of presence of red blood cells in urinalysis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed bilateral hydronephrosis and multiple bladder stones. Twenty-four-hour urine collection showed low urinary citrate and high oxalate. Patient underwent open vesicolithotomy and removal of 36 stones. Stone analysis showed 75% uric acid and 25% calcium oxalate. Patient did very well after surgery, and 1 month later, he underwent transuretheral resection of prostate without any complications. Now patient has no difficulty passing urine and he has no recent attack of urinary tract infection. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects in men with urinary bladder stones would hopefully provide clinicians with the proper diagnostic tools to more specifically treat such patients with improved success in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery.

  16. Role of the trauma-room chest x-ray film in assessing the patient with severe blunt traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Barry A.; Ali, Jameel; Towers, Mark J.; Sharkey, P. William

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To examine the accuracy of standard trauma-room chest x-ray films in assessing blunt abdominal trauma and to determine the significance of missed injuries under these circumstances. Design A retrospective review. Setting A regional trauma unit in a tertiary-care institution. Patients Multiply injured trauma patients admitted between January 1988 and December 1990 who died within 24 hours of injury and in whom an autopsy was done. Intervention Standard radiography of the chest. Main Outcome Measures Chest injuries diagnosed and recorded by the trauma room team from standard anteroposterior x-ray films compared with the findings at autopsy and with review of the films by a staff radiologist initially having no knowledge of the injuries and later, if injuries remained undetected, having knowledge of the autopsy findings. Results Thirty-seven patients met the study criteria, and their cases were reviewed. In 11 cases, significant injuries were noted at autopsy and not by the trauma-room team, and in 7 cases these injuries were also missed by the reviewing radiologist. Injuries missed by the team were: multiple rib fractures (11 cases), sternal fractures (3 cases), diaphragmatic tear (2 cases) and intimal aortic tear (1 case). In five cases, chest tubes were not inserted despite the presence (undiagnosed) of multiple rib fractures and need for intubation and positive-pressure ventilation. Conclusions Significant blunt abdominal trauma, potentially requiring operative management or chest-tube insertion, may be missed on the initial anteroposterior chest x-ray film. Caution must therefore be exercised in interpreting these films in the trauma resuscitation room. PMID:8599789

  17. An exploration of the basis for patient complaints about the oldness of magazines in practice waiting rooms: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Alrutz, Stowe; Moyes, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the basis for patient complaints about the oldness of most magazines in practice waiting rooms. Design Cohort study. Setting Waiting room of a general practice in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants 87 magazines stacked into three mixed piles and placed in the waiting room: this included non-gossipy magazines (Time magazine, the Economist, Australian Women’s Weekly, National Geographic, BBC History) and gossipy ones (not identified for fear of litigation). Gossipy was defined as having five or more photographs of celebrities on the front cover and most gossipy as having up to 10 such images. Interventions The magazines were marked with a unique number on the back cover, placed in three piles in the waiting room, and monitored twice weekly. Main outcome measures Disappearance of magazines less than 2 months old versus magazines 3-12 months old, the overall rate of loss of magazines, and the rate of loss of gossipy versus non-gossipy magazines. Results 47 of the 82 magazines with a visible date on the front cover were aged less than 2 months. 28 of these 47 (60%) magazines and 10 of the 35 (29%) older magazines disappeared (P=0.002). After 31 days, 41 of the 87 (47%, 95% confidence interval 37% to 58%) magazines had disappeared. None of the 19 non-gossipy magazines (the Economist and Time magazine) had disappeared compared with 26 of the 27 (96%) gossipy magazines (P<0.001). All 15 of the most gossipy magazines and all 19 of the non-gossipy magazines had disappeared by 31 days. The study was terminated at this point. Conclusions General practice waiting rooms contain mainly old magazines. This phenomenon relates to the disappearance of the magazines rather than to the supply of old ones. Gossipy magazines were more likely to disappear than non-gossipy ones. On the grounds of cost we advise practices to supply old copies of non-gossipy magazines. A waiting room science curriculum is urgently needed. PMID:25500116

  18. The influence of goal setting and SmartRoom patient education videos on readmission rate, length of stay, and patient satisfaction in the orthopedic spine population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwen; Dudjak, Linda A; Larue, Elizabeth M; Ren, Dianxu; Scholle, Carol; Wolf, Gail A

    2013-09-01

    The SmartRoom technology, a system now owned by TeleTracking Technologies, aims to transform the delivery of patient care in the inpatient environment. The purpose of this project was to use goal setting and SmartRoom patient education videos to examine whether the videos more effectively engaged patients and their families in their discharge plan and encouraged them to take a more active role in their care while hospitalized. This study used a descriptive design to analyze the effect of goal setting and patient education videos on patient satisfaction at discharge, hospital average length of stay, and 30-day readmission rate in the orthopedic spine surgical care setting. Comparisons were made among three patient groups. No statistically significant difference was found for average length of stay and 30-day readmission across these three groups. However, patient satisfaction with discharge, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems, revealed an increase in five items regarding discharge with statistically significant differences on two of the five items.

  19. Strategizing EHR use to achieve patient-centered care in exam rooms: a qualitative study on primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Ashfaq, Shazia; Bell, Kristin; Calvitti, Alan; Farber, Neil J; Gabuzda, Mark T; Gray, Barbara; Liu, Lin; Rick, Steven; Street, Richard L; Zheng, Kai; Zuest, Danielle; Agha, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHRs) have great potential to improve quality of care. However, their use may diminish “patient-centeredness” in exam rooms by distracting the healthcare provider from focusing on direct patient interaction. The authors conducted a qualitative interview study to understand the magnitude of this issue, and the strategies that primary care providers devised to mitigate the unintended adverse effect associated with EHR use. Methods and Materials Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 healthcare providers at 4 Veterans Affairs (VAs) outpatient primary care clinics in San Diego County. Data analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach. Results The results show that providers face demands from both patients and the EHR system. To cope with these demands, and to provide patient-centered care, providers attempt to perform EHR work outside of patient encounters and create templates to streamline documentation work. Providers also attempt to use the EHR to engage patients, establish patient buy-in for EHR use, and multitask between communicating with patients and using the EHR. Discussion and Conclusion This study has uncovered the challenges that primary care providers face in integrating the EHR into their work practice, and the strategies they use to overcome these challenges in order to maintain patient-centered care. These findings illuminate the importance of developing “best” practices to improve patient-centered care in today’s highly “wired” health environment. These findings also show that more user-centered EHR design is needed to improve system usability. PMID:26568605

  20. Length of stay, wait time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures after the opening of a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michel; Hopman, Wilma; Yach, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background In September 2011, Kingston General Hospital (KGH) opened a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room. Previously, 1 weekend operating room (OR) was used by all surgical services. We assessed the impact this dedicated weekend trauma room had on hospital length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures. Methods Patients admitted between Oct. 1, 2009, and Sept. 30, 2012, were identified through our trauma registry, representing the 2 years before and 1 year after the opening of the orthopedic weekend trauma room. We documented type of fracture, mode of fixation, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, time to OR, LOS, discharge disposition and 30-day mortality. We excluded patients with multiple fractures, open fractures and those requiring trauma team activation. Results Our study included 609 patients (405 pre- and 204 post–trauma room opening). Mean LOS decreased from 11.6 to 9.4 days (p = 0.005) and there was a decreasing trend in mean time to OR from 31.5 to 28.5 hours (p = 0.16). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (p = 0.24). The LOS decreased by an average of 2 days following opening of the weekend trauma room (p = 0.031) and by an average of 2.2 additional days if the patient was admitted on the weekend versus during the week (p = 0.024). Conclusion The weekend trauma OR at KGH significantly decreased the LOS and appears to have decreased wait times to surgery. Further analysis is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the current strategy, the long-term outcome of this patient population and the impact the additional orthopedic weekend trauma room has had on other surgical services (i.e., general surgery) and their patients. PMID:27668332

  1. RADIATION DOSIMETRY IN THE BNCT PATIENT TREATMENT ROOM AT THE BMRR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Medical Research Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BMRR) was a heterogeneous, tank type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was operated on demand at a power level up to 3 mega-watts (MW) for medical and biological research [1]. The reactor first went critical on March 15, 1959, with 17 fresh fuel elements (2.52 kg uranium-235 in a total of 2.7 kg uranium) in the center core. The BMRR had two treatment rooms on opposite sides of the core. It had a predominately thermal neutron beam in the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNE) on the west side of the core. By early 1990, a redesigned beam line had a predominately epithermal neutron beam in the Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (ENIF) on the east side of the core [2]. The ENP was approximately 11 feet by 21 feet in size with its focal point consisting of a bismuth plate mounted in the wall adjacent to the reactor shield about 36 inches above the floor. The beam originated at a shutter constructed of 0.75 inch steel filled with concrete and weighing {approx}21 tons. Access to the ENIF was through a pair of hand operated steel shielding doors, each 42 inches wide, 84 inches high and 5 inches thick. The inner door had a 4-inch thick layer of paraffin on the side facing the reactor. The doors 5000 pounds weighed each. Additional shielding material had been added to the entire beam port at reactor wall within the ENIF. The shielding material consisted of 2-inch thick polyethylene sheets, which were impregnated with 95%-enriched {sup 6}Li in lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The shielding sheets around the port face were designed to allow the insertion of a variety of different beam collimators.

  2. [Shuttle Challenger disaster: what lessons can be learned for management of patients in the operating room?].

    PubMed

    Suva, Domizio; Poizat, Germain

    2015-02-04

    For many years hospitals have been implementing crew resource management (CRM) programs, inspired by the aviation industry, in order to improve patient safety. However, while contributing to improved patient care, CRM programs are controversial because of their limited impact, a decrease in effectiveness over time, and the underinvestment by some caregivers. By analyzing the space shuttle Challenger accident, the objective of this article is to show the potential impact of the professional culture in decision-making processes. In addition, to present an approach by cultural factors which are an essential complement to current CRM programs in order to enhance the safety of care.

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Is "intra-operating room" thromboelastometry useful in liver transplantation? A case-control study in 303 patients.

    PubMed

    Alamo, J-M; León, A; Mellado, P; Bernal, C; Marín, L M; Cepeda, C; Suárez, G; Serrano, J; Padillo, J; Gómez, M-Á

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation monitoring during liver transplantation (LT) is, even today, fundamental to reduce blood loss during surgery. Thromboelastometry (TEM) is a proven technique for controlling the various parameters that influence coagulation. However, there are no studies linking "intra-operating room" TEM (orTEM) with LT outcomes. We describe a case-control study in 303 liver graft recipients analyzing variables associated with operative complications and long-term LT outcomes. The results showed that orTEM reduced the use of blood products in patients with Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores of ≥ 21, retransplantation, and high surgical difficulty and important intraoperative bleeding. In addition, results in survival and postoperative complications were better when orTEM was used. In conclusion, we confirm that use of orTEM is associated with less use of blood products and a lower rate of complications after LT.

  5. [The risk of infection with patients with multi-drug resistant bacteria in the operating room].

    PubMed

    Latroche, Marie-France; Roche, Géraldine; Velardo, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The risk of infection in the operating theatre is constant and multifactorial. It can be contained through a prevention process. The organisation, implementation, monitoring and the results of the patient pathway are all sources for the analysis of practices, quality and professional progress in order to limit the risks of transmitting multi-drug or highly resistant bacteria.

  6. Behind the Scenes: Patient Safety in the Operating Room and Central Materiel Service During Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    masks are worn. The work flow of people, supplies, and equipment needs to travel from dirty to clean areas in such a way that contaminated items are...standard. The OR staff used what they had to create the best dirty to clean traffic pattern possible. Training and education were paramount to their...Resistant Organism standard operating procedure was created to provide the best possible care for the patients. War wounds are notoriously dirty , and

  7. Association between weather conditions and the number of patients at the emergency room in an Argentine hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusticucci, Matilde; Bettolli, Laura M.; de los Angeles Harris, M.

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the relationships between hospital emergencies and weather conditions by analysing summer and winter cases of patients requiring attention at the emergency room of a hospital in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Hospital data have been sorted into seven different diagnostic groups as follows: (1) respiratory, cardiovascular and chest-pain complaints; (2) digestive, genitourinary and abdominal complaints; (3) neurological and psychopathological disorders; (4) infections; (5) contusion and crushing, bone and muscle complaints; (6) skin and allergies and (7) miscellaneous complaints. In general, there is an increase of 16.7% in winter while, for group 2 and group 6, there are more patients in summer, 54% and 75% respectively. In summer, the total number of patients for group 6 shows a significant positive correlation with temperature and dew-point temperature, and a negative correlation with the sea-level pressure for the same day. In winter, the same relationship exists, however its correlation is not as strong. The lags observed between these three variables: maximum dew-point temperature, maximum temperature, minimum air pressure and the peaks in admissions are 1, 2 and 4 days respectively. In winter, increases in temperature and dew point and decreases in pressure are followed by a peak in admissions for group 2. In winter, there are significantly more cases in group 5 on warm, dry days and on warm, wet days in the summer.

  8. Rui Liao's work on patient-specific 3-D model guidance for interventional and hybrid-operating-room applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rui

    2011-06-28

    Compared to surgery, interventional and hybrid-operating-room (OR) approaches diagnose or treat pathology with the most minimally invasive techniques possible. By minimizing the physical trauma to the patient, peripheral or hybrid approaches can reduce infection rates and recovery time as well as shorten hospital stays. Minimally invasive approaches therefore are the trend and often the preferred choice, and may even be the only option for the patients associated with high surgery risks. Common interventional imaging modalities include 2-D X-ray fluoroscopy and ultrasound. However, fluoroscopic images do not display the anatomic structures without a contrast agent, which on the other hand, needs to be minimized for patients' safety. Ultrasound images suffer from relatively low image quality and tissue contrast problems. To augment the doctor's view of the patient's anatomy and help doctors navigate the devices to the targeted area with more confidence and a higher accuracy, high-resolution pre-operative volumetric data such as computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance can be fused with intra-operative 2-D images during interventions. A seamless workflow and accurate 2-D/3-D registration as well as cardiac and/or respiratory motion compensation are the key components for a successful image guidance system using a patient-specific 3-D model. Dr. Liao's research has been focused on developing methods and systems of 3-D model guidance for various interventions and hybrid-OR applications. Dr. Liao's work has led to several Siemens products with high clinical and/or market impact and a good number of scientific publications in leading journals/conferences on medical imaging.

  9. Formulating an effective response to emergency room drug diversion by drug seeking patients.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Drug diversion has become a $100 billion a year problem for the healthcare industry. By far the leading source of such diversion is the obtaining of prescription drugs by bogus patients from ER staff, the author claims. Solving the problem will not be easy, he says, because drug seekers are experts in avoiding detection or in persuading health providers to supply them with the pharmaceuticals they want. But, he adds, a program for reducing such diversion in your health facility can be successful if a multi-disciplinary approach is taken. Such a program is described in this article.

  10. Memory's Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Liberal Arts Studiolo from the Ducal Palace at Guibbio, Italy. Discusses how the room's design and decoration mirrors its educational uses. Notes that the object of education was to provide the young person with a kind of mental library of materials that could be drawn upon quickly. (RS)

  11. Factors predicting a change in diagnosis in patients hospitalised through the emergency room: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hautz, Stefanie C; Schuler, Luca; Kämmer, Juliane E; Schauber, Stefan K; Ricklin, Meret E; Sauter, Thomas C; Maier, Volker; Birrenbach, Tanja; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergency rooms (ERs) generally assign a preliminary diagnosis to patients, who are then hospitalised and may subsequently experience a change in their lead diagnosis (cDx). In ERs, the cDx rate varies from around 15% to more than 50%. Among the most frequent reasons for diagnostic errors are cognitive slips, which mostly result from faulty data synthesis. Furthermore, physicians have been repeatedly found to be poor self-assessors and to be overconfident in the quality of their diagnosis, which limits their ability to improve. Therefore, some of the clinically most relevant research questions concern how diagnostic decisions are made, what determines their quality and what can be done to improve them. Research that addresses these questions is, however, still rare. In particular, field studies that allow for generalising findings from controlled experimental settings are lacking. The ER, with its high throughput and its many simultaneous visits, is perfectly suited for the study of factors contributing to diagnostic error. With this study, we aim to identify factors that allow prediction of an ER's diagnostic performance. Knowledge of these factors as well as of their relative importance allows for the development of organisational, medical and educational strategies to improve the diagnostic performance of ERs. Methods and analysis We will conduct a field study by collecting diagnostic decision data, physician confidence and a number of influencing factors in a real-world setting to model real-world diagnostic decisions and investigate the adequacy, validity and informativeness of physician confidence in these decisions. We will specifically collect data on patient, physician and encounter factors as predictors of the dependent variables. Statistical methods will include analysis of variance and a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination The Bern ethics committee approved the study under KEK Number 197/15. Results will be published in

  12. A literature review and guidance for nurse-led patient extubation in the recovery room/post anaesthetic care unit: endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    A review of current literature highlighted the lack of national or local guidelines for post anaesthetic care unit (PACU) practitioners/recovery room nurses to extubate their own patients. This article documents the findings of a systematic literature review and gives simple diagrammatic representations from a comprehensive flow chart that has been developed to assist nurses in the extubation process. A knowledge and skills competency validated training package was developed locally with the anaesthetic department to train practitioners to undertake endotracheal extubation safely.

  13. User-Centered Design of a Tablet Waiting Room Tool for Complex Patients to Prioritize Discussion Topics for Primary Care Visits

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Andrea; Chawla, Neetu; Kowalski, Christine; McQuillan, Deanna; Bayliss, Elizabeth; Heisler, Michele; Grant, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Background Complex patients with multiple chronic conditions often face significant challenges communicating and coordinating with their primary care physicians. These challenges are exacerbated by the limited time allotted to primary care visits. Objective Our aim was to employ a user-centered design process to create a tablet tool for use by patients for visit discussion prioritization. Methods We employed user-centered design methods to create a tablet-based waiting room tool that enables complex patients to identify and set discussion topic priorities for their primary care visit. In an iterative design process, we completed one-on-one interviews with 40 patients and their 17 primary care providers, followed by three design sessions with a 12-patient group. We audiorecorded and transcribed all discussions and categorized major themes. In addition, we met with 15 key health communication, education, and technology leaders within our health system to further review the design and plan for broader implementation of the tool. In this paper, we present the significant changes made to the tablet tool at each phase of this design work. Results Patient feedback emphasized the need to make the tablet tool accessible for patients who lacked technical proficiency and to reduce the quantity and complexity of text presentation. Both patients and their providers identified specific content choices based on their personal experiences (eg, the ability to raise private or sensitive concerns) and recommended targeting new patients. Stakeholder groups provided essential input on the need to augment text with video and to create different versions of the videos to match sex and race/ethnicity of the actors with patients. Conclusions User-centered design in collaboration with patients, providers, and key health stakeholders led to marked evolution in the initial content, layout, and target audience for a tablet waiting room tool intended to assist complex patients with setting

  14. [Effect of vacuum cleaning of room floors and bed clothes of patients on house dust mites counts and clinical scores of atopic dermatitis. A double blind control trial].

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Fukuzumi, T; Adachi, J; Kojima, M; Aoki, T; Yoshida, M; Morita, K; Nari, T; Tsujino, M

    1997-10-01

    By a randomized double blind control trial we studied the effect of vacuum cleaning of room floors, mattresses and quilts for twelve months on clinical symptoms and laboratory data of atopic dermatitis patients. All patients used the identical new vacuum cleaners. Thirty patients (3-12 years of age) with relatively stable skin conditions were randomly allocated to either of the following two groups. In the monitor group we visited patient's home every three weeks and mite specialists cleaned drastically the room floors, mattresses and quilts and the patient continued to clean in the same way in-between. In the control group we visited similarly but the cleaning was made insufficiently which was also followed by the patient. But, at 2 occasions (the first and the last visits), cleaning was made drastically also in the control group. Thus the mite numbers were counted precisely at the start and the end of the experiment both in the monitor and control groups. Each patient was seen every six weeks by the same doctor and estimated of his symptoms using our unique scoring system (Fig. 1). At the start and the end of the study, total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to house dust mites in the serum were evaluated. The monitor group showed a tendency to count smaller number of mites than the control group after a year, when there was a significant difference only in quilts. However, a statistically significant decrease in the mite counts was observed only in room floors and not in mattresses and quilts both in the monitor and control groups (Fig. 2). Clinical scores after a year significantly improved only in the monitor group and not in the control group (Fig. 3). Serum IgE value and specific antibody titer to house dust mites were not changed significantly after the trial in both groups. As a conclusion, vacuum cleaning of the patient's room improved the clinical symptoms of atopic dermatitis but this could not be related to the reduction of house dust mite number.

  15. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  16. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods.  We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results.  Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions.  Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research.

  17. [Alcohol drinking-related disorders in 1901 patients treated at Taubaté's Municipal Emergency room in 2000: a contribution to sociocentric education in neurology].

    PubMed

    Ferri-de-Barros, João E; Winter, Daniel Hugo; César, Karolina Gouveia; Gavinier, Leandro Camille dos Santos; Alencar, Maurício José de; Faria, Maria Carolina Soares de

    2004-06-01

    Medical education must focus prevalent themes in communities; alcohol consumption is one of these themes. Our objective was to determine the frequency of the alcohol consumption related disorders and verify if a patient had more than one disease diagnosed, contributing to sociocentric education. It was a transversal retrospective study made by collection of medical records that had any reference to alcohol in a emergency room in 2000 (1901 cases). Alcohol direct effects were found in 80.38% of the patients, trauma in 28.56%, digestive and/or metabolic diseases in 27%, infections in 6.42% and nutritional disorders in 5.94%. Only one diagnosis was attributed in 46.6% of the cases and more than one in 48.67%. The most frequent disturbs were: intoxication, abstinence syndrome, gastritis, cirrhosis, dehydration, low or high glucose levels and trauma. Alcohol related disturbances are frequent and often associated; thus, alcohol abuse is an important content in a medical education.

  18. Wireless sensor and data transmission needs and technologies for patient monitoring in the operating room and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Paksuniemi, M; Sorvoja, H; Alasaarela, E; Myllyla, R

    2005-01-01

    In the intensive care unit, or during anesthesia, patients are attached to monitors by cables. These cables obstruct nursing staff and hinder the patients from moving freely in the hospital. However, rapidly developing wireless technologies are expected to solve these problems. To this end, this study revealed problem areas in current patient monitoring and established the most important medical parameters to monitor. In addition, usable wireless techniques for short-range data transmission were explored and currently employed wireless applications in the hospital environment were studied. The most important parameters measured of the patient include blood pressures, electrocardiography, respiration rate, heart rate and temperature. Currently used wireless techniques in hospitals are based on the WMTS and WLAN standards. There are no viable solutions for short-range data transmission from patient sensors to patient monitors, but potentially usable techniques in the future are based on the WPAN standards. These techniques include Bluetooth, ZigBee and UWB. Other suitable techniques might be based on capacitive or inductive coupling. The establishing of wireless techniques depends on ensuring the reliability of data transmission, eliminating disturbance by other wireless devices, ensuring patient data security and patient safety, and lowering the power consumption and price.

  19. Indoor Temperatures in Patient Waiting Rooms in Eight Rural Primary Health Care Centers in Northern South Africa and the Related Potential Risks to Human Health and Wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Street, Renée A; Cele, Nokulunga; Kunene, Zamantimande; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Albers, Patricia N; Mathee, Angela

    2017-01-06

    Increased temperatures affect human health and vulnerable groups including infants, children, the elderly and people with pre-existing diseases. In the southern African region climate models predict increases in ambient temperature twice that of the global average temperature increase. Poor ventilation and lack of air conditioning in primary health care clinics, where duration of waiting time may be as long as several hours, pose a possible threat to patients seeking primary health care. Drawing on information measured by temperature loggers installed in eight clinics in Giyani, Limpopo Province of South Africa, we were able to determine indoor temperatures of waiting rooms in eight rural primary health care facilities. Mean monthly temperature measurements inside the clinics were warmer during the summer months of December, January and February, and cooler during the autumn months of March, April and May. The highest mean monthly temperature of 31.4 ± 2.7 °C was recorded in one clinic during February 2016. Maximum daily indoor clinic temperatures exceeded 38 °C in some clinics. Indoor temperatures were compared to ambient (outdoor) temperatures and the mean difference between the two showed clinic waiting room temperatures were higher by 2-4 °C on average. Apparent temperature (AT) incorporating relative humidity readings made in the clinics showed 'realfeel' temperatures were >4 °C higher than measured indoor temperature, suggesting a feeling of 'stuffiness' and discomfort may have been experienced in the waiting room areas. During typical clinic operational hours of 8h00 to 16h00, mean ATs fell into temperature ranges associated with heat-health impact warning categories of 'caution' and 'extreme caution'.

  20. Indoor Temperatures in Patient Waiting Rooms in Eight Rural Primary Health Care Centers in Northern South Africa and the Related Potential Risks to Human Health and Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Caradee Y.; Street, Renée A.; Cele, Nokulunga; Kunene, Zamantimande; Balakrishna, Yusentha; Albers, Patricia N.; Mathee, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Increased temperatures affect human health and vulnerable groups including infants, children, the elderly and people with pre-existing diseases. In the southern African region climate models predict increases in ambient temperature twice that of the global average temperature increase. Poor ventilation and lack of air conditioning in primary health care clinics, where duration of waiting time may be as long as several hours, pose a possible threat to patients seeking primary health care. Drawing on information measured by temperature loggers installed in eight clinics in Giyani, Limpopo Province of South Africa, we were able to determine indoor temperatures of waiting rooms in eight rural primary health care facilities. Mean monthly temperature measurements inside the clinics were warmer during the summer months of December, January and February, and cooler during the autumn months of March, April and May. The highest mean monthly temperature of 31.4 ± 2.7 °C was recorded in one clinic during February 2016. Maximum daily indoor clinic temperatures exceeded 38 °C in some clinics. Indoor temperatures were compared to ambient (outdoor) temperatures and the mean difference between the two showed clinic waiting room temperatures were higher by 2–4 °C on average. Apparent temperature (AT) incorporating relative humidity readings made in the clinics showed ‘realfeel’ temperatures were >4 °C higher than measured indoor temperature, suggesting a feeling of ‘stuffiness’ and discomfort may have been experienced in the waiting room areas. During typical clinic operational hours of 8h00 to 16h00, mean ATs fell into temperature ranges associated with heat–health impact warning categories of ‘caution’ and ‘extreme caution’. PMID:28067816

  1. Briefing and debriefing in the cardiac operating room. Analysis of impact on theatre team attitude and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Papaspyros, Sotiris C; Javangula, Kalyana C; Adluri, Rajeshwara Krishna Prasad; O'Regan, David J

    2010-01-01

    Error in health services delivery has long been recognised as a significant cause of inpatient morbidity and mortality. Root-cause analyses have cited communication failure as one of the contributing factors in adverse events. The formalised fighter pilot mission brief and debrief formed the basis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) crew resource management (CRM) concept produced in 1979. This is a qualitative analysis of our experience with the briefing-debriefing process applied to cardiac theatres. We instituted a policy of formal operating room (OR) briefing and debriefing in all cardiac theatre sessions. The first 118 cases were reviewed. A trouble-free operation was noted in only 28 (23.7%) cases. We experienced multiple problems in 38 (32.2%) cases. A gap was identified in the second order problem solving in relation to instrument repair and maintenance. Theatre team members were interviewed and their comments were subjected to qualitative analysis. The collaborative feeling is that communication has improved. The health industry may benefit from embracing the briefing-debriefing technique as an adjunct to continuous improvement through reflective learning, deliberate practice and immediate feedback. This may be the initial step toward a substantive and sustainable organizational transformation.

  2. A simplified way for the urgent treatment of somatic pain in patients admitted to the emergency room: the SUPER algorithm.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Marsiliani, Davide; Alesi, Andrea; Mancini, Maria Grazia; Ojetti, Veronica; Candelli, Marcello; Gabrielli, Maurizio; D'Aurizio, Gabriella; Gilardi, Emanuele; Adducci, Enrica; Proietti, Rodolfo; Buccelletti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Somatic pain is one of the most frequent symptoms reported by patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), but, in spite of this, it is very often underestimated and under-treated. Moreover, pain-killers prescriptions are usually related to the medical examination, leading to a delay in its administration, thus worsening the patient's quality of life. With our study, we want to define and validate a systematic and homogeneous approach to analgesic drugs administration, testing a new therapeutic algorithm in terms of earliness, safety, and efficacy. 442 consecutive patients who accessed our ED for any kind of somatic pain were enrolled, and then randomly divided into two groups: group A follow the normal process of access to pain-control drugs, and group B follow our SUPER algorithm for early administration of drugs to relieve pain directly from triage. We excluded from the study, patients with abdominal pain referred to the surgeon, patients with headache, recent history of trauma, history of drug allergies, and life-threatening conditions or lack of cooperation. Drugs used in the study were those available in our ED, such as paracetamol, paracetamol/codeine, ketorolac-tromethamine, and tramadol-hydrochloride. Pain level, risk factors, indication, and contraindication of each drug were taken into account in our SUPER algorithm for a rapid and safe administration of it. The Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to verify the patient's health and perception of it. Only 59 patient from group A (27.1 %) received analgesic therapy (at the time of the medical examination) compared to 181 patients (100 %) of group B (p < 0.001). Group B patients, received analgesic therapy 76 min before group A subjects (p < 0.01), resulting in a significant lower VNS (7.31 ± 1.68 vs 4.75 ± 2.3; p < 0.001), and a superior VAS after discharge (54.43 ± 22.16 vs 61.30 ± 19.13; p < 0.001) compared to group A subjects. No significant differences

  3. Assessment of DICOM Viewers Capable of Loading Patient-specific 3D Models Obtained by Different Segmentation Platforms in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Giuseppe; Carbone, Marina; Ciriaci, Damiano; Aramini, Daniele; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    Patient-specific 3D models obtained by the segmentation of volumetric diagnostic images play an increasingly important role in surgical planning. Surgeons use the virtual models reconstructed through segmentation to plan challenging surgeries. Many solutions exist for the different anatomical districts and surgical interventions. The possibility to bring the 3D virtual reconstructions with native radiological images in the operating room is essential for fostering the use of intraoperative planning. To the best of our knowledge, current DICOM viewers are not able to simultaneously connect to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and import 3D models generated by external platforms to allow a straight integration in the operating room. A total of 26 DICOM viewers were evaluated: 22 open source and four commercial. Two DICOM viewers can connect to PACS and import segmentations achieved by other applications: Synapse 3D® by Fujifilm and OsiriX by University of Geneva. We developed a software network that converts diffuse visual tool kit (VTK) format 3D model segmentations, obtained by any software platform, to a DICOM format that can be displayed using OsiriX or Synapse 3D. Both OsiriX and Synapse 3D were suitable for our purposes and had comparable performance. Although Synapse 3D loads native images and segmentations faster, the main benefits of OsiriX are its user-friendly loading of elaborated images and it being both free of charge and open source.

  4. Should we monitor with bispectral index in all patients at high risk for seizures in the operating room?

    PubMed

    Elgueta, M F; Vega, P; Lema, G; Clede, L

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with a cerebral aneurysm, located in the left middle cerebral artery. During the clipping of this aneurysm, the bispectral index (BIS) increased for no apparent reason. This was then interpreted as intraoperative non-convulsive status epilepticus. This clinical condition may have negative impact in the prognosis of the patient, so it is very important to be able to detect this conditions as early as possible. Measuring the BIS while the patient is anaesthetised could be useful in this situation, considering that an increase in values greater than 60, associated with acidosis and without any other peri-anaesthetic explanation, may provide evidence of a convulsive equivalent state, allowing appropriate action to be taken.

  5. The person in the room: how relating holistically contributes to an effective patient-care provider alliance.

    PubMed

    Penner, Leslie A; Roger, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how relating to the 'whole' person--both the physical body and the invisible aspects of the 'self'--is essential in the establishment of a strong therapeutic alliance between patients and health care providers. Our work is based on interviews conducted with individuals affected by neurological illnesses (patients and family care providers). Hsieh and Shannon's (2005) conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Under the broad theme of 'maintaining a coherent sense of self' we identified four distinct sub-themes related to interactions with health care providers. The results elucidate the more complex and deep needs of patients who must access care on an ongoing basis, and highlight the important role that care providers play in supporting individuals who are experiencing physical, spiritual and social losses. Care must attend to the deep needs of these individuals by communicating in a style that addresses both emotional and cognitive needs of patients, by thorough and holistic assessment and by appropriate referrals.

  6. [From a Service to a Brand: TUR-Room Inspection, Patient Journals, After-Sales Greetings in the Witten Marketing Concept].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, A; Gellisch, O; Abrolat, J; Füsgen, I; Heppner, H J

    2015-05-01

    Marketing in economic systems means to create a brand in a competitive surrounding to serve customers as a target. Thereby, elements of marketing are product policy and pricing as well as distribution. Due to the fact that not only products and services are almost not modifiable at all and that price variation is impossible due to the DRG system but also common distribution channels, such as retail or wholesale, are prohibited, the fist mentioned marketing elements are of special importance. Primary customers are the referring physicians who are well served by medical education or presentations, which belong to the common facilities of a hospital department. Nowadays one can observe an increasing mobility of patients and an increasing willingness to inform themselves about medical topics and the service provider behind them. In conclusion, the maintenance of patients is a growing field for the economic success of a hospital or a hospital department. The marketing elements are ruled by the "Heilmittelwerbegesetz" and must fulfill the standards which are defined by this statute. Patient´s journals, a guided tour around the procedure rooms with technical equipment, an after-sales postcard and the participation in events not only with medical contents, such as fairs, can help to steadily establish an image, for example, as an ambitious and caring service provider.

  7. One-year follow-up of neurological status of patients after cardiac arrest seen at the emergency room of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; de Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe neurological status and associated factors of survivors after cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 month follow-up. Methods: A cohort, prospective, descriptive study conducted in an emergency room. Patients who suffered cardiac arrest and survived were included. A one-year consecutive sample, comprising 285 patients and survivors (n=16) followed up for one year after discharge. Neurological status was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category before the cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 months after discharge. The following factors were investigated: comorbidities, presence of consciousness upon admission, previous cardiac arrest, witnessed cardiac arrest, location, cause and initial rhythm of cardiac arrest, number of cardiac arrests, interval between collapse and start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and between collapse and end of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Results: Of the patients treated, 4.5% (n=13) survived after 6 and 12 months follow-up. Upon discharge, 50% of patients remained with previous Cerebral Performance Category of the cardiac arrest and 50% had worsening of Cerebral Performance Category. After 6 months, 53.8% remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category and 46.2% improved as compared to discharge. After 12 months, all patients remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category of the previous 6 months. There was no statistically significant association between neurological outcome during follow-up and the variables assessed. Conclusion: There was neurological worsening at discharge but improvement or stabilization in the course of a year. There was no association between Cerebral Performance Category and the variables assessed. PMID:26154538

  8. Locker Room Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines the trends in college and university sports and recreation center locker rooms as envisioned by a specialist. Features of the modern locker room and the different levels of locker room design are explained. Final comments discuss whether college and university facility managers are inclined to move to high-end locker rooms. (GR)

  9. Impact of atypical long-acting injectable versus oral antipsychotics on rehospitalization rates and emergency room visits among relapsed schizophrenia patients: a retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among schizophrenia patients relapsed on an oral antipsychotic (AP), this study compared the impact of switching to atypical AP long-acting injectable therapy (LAT) versus continuing oral APs on hospitalization and emergency room (ER) visit recurrence. Methods Electronic records from the Premier Hospital Database (2006-2010) were analyzed. Adult patients receiving oral APs during a schizophrenia-related hospitalization were identified and, upon relapse (i.e., rehospitalization for schizophrenia), were stratified into (a) patients switching to atypical LAT and (b) patients continuing with oral APs. Atypical LAT relapse patients were matched 1:3 with oral AP relapse patients, using a propensity score model. Andersen-Gill Cox proportional hazards models assessed the impact of atypical LAT versus oral AP on time to multiple recurrences of all-cause hospitalizations and ER visits. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Results Atypical LAT (N = 1032) and oral AP (N = 2796) patients were matched and well-balanced with respect to demographic (mean age: 42.1 vs 42.4 years, p = .5622; gender: 43.6% vs 44.6% female, p = .5345), clinical, and hospital characteristics. Over a mean 30-month follow-up period, atypical LATs were associated with significantly lower mean number of rehospitalizations (1.25 vs 1.61, p < .0001) and ER visits (2.33 vs 2.67, p = .0158) compared with oral APs, as well as fewer days in hospital (mean days: 13.46 vs. 15.69, p = .0081). Rehospitalization (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.87, p < .0001) and ER visit (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.87–0.93, p < .0001) rates were significantly lower for patients receiving atypical LAT versus oral APs. Conclusions This hospital database analysis found that in relapsed schizophrenia patients, atypical LATs were associated with lower rehospitalization and ER visit rates than oral APs. PMID:24016390

  10. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 attended to at the emergency room of a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Lera, Esther; Wörner, Núria T; Sancosmed, Mónica; Fàbregas, Anna; Casquero, Alejandro; Melendo, Susana; Miserachs, Mar; Tórtola, Teresa; Borrego, Astrid; Campins, Magda; Moraga, Fernando; Figueras, Concepció; Cebrián, Rocío

    2011-03-01

    In June 2009, the first influenza pandemic of the twenty-first century, due to the swine origin influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, was declared. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological and clinical features, complications, lethality and risk factors for hospital admission of microbiologically confirmed cases of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection seen at the emergency department of a children's hospital. All cases of children with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viral infection, confirmed microbiologically by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and treated in the emergency room between July and December 2009, were prospectively included. Patients were compared according to admission requirement to study variables associated with the risk of hospitalisation. Oseltamivir was the antiviral used for the treatment and its safety was analysed. Four hundred and twelve patients with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection were included. The most frequent symptoms were: fever (96%), cough (95%) and coryza (90%). Eighty-five patients (20.6%) were admitted: three to the paediatric intensive care unit and two died. Hospitalised children were younger than those not admitted (median age 5 vs 8 years; p = 0.001). Age under 1 year (OR 6.01; CI 95% 2.77-13.05), pneumonia (OR 7.99; CI 95% 3.50-18.22) and haemoglobinopathy or underlying blood disorders (OR 5.99; CI 95% 1.32-27.30) were statistically significant risk factors for admission. No differences were observed regarding onset of antiviral treatment among admitted and non-admitted patients. Treatment with oseltamivir was well tolerated. In conclusion, the incidence of severe cases and lethality of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection were low in our setting, even in a population with risk factors for developing complications.

  11. Accurate IMRT fluence verification for prostate cancer patients using ‘in-vivo’ measured EPID images and in-room acquired kilovoltage cone-beam CT scans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate for prostate cancer patients the comparison of ‘in-vivo’ measured portal dose images (PDIs) with predictions based on a kilovoltage cone-beam CT scan (CBCT), acquired during the same treatment fraction, as an alternative for pre-treatment verification. For evaluation purposes, predictions were also performed using the patients’ planning CTs (pCT). Methods To get reliable CBCT electron densities for PDI predictions, Hounsfield units from the pCT were mapped onto the CBCT, while accounting for non-rigidity in patient anatomy in an approximate way. PDI prediction accuracy was first validated for an anatomical phantom, using IMRT treatment plans of ten prostate cancer patients. Clinical performance was studied using data acquired for 50 prostate cancer patients. For each patient, 4–5 CBCTs were available, resulting in a total of 1413 evaluated images. Measured and predicted PDIs were compared using γ-analyses with 3% global dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement as reference criteria. Moreover, the pass rate for automated PDI comparison was assessed. To quantify improvements in IMRT fluence verification accuracy results from multiple fractions were combined by generating a γ-image with values halfway the minimum and median γ values, pixel by pixel. Results For patients, CBCT-based PDI predictions showed a high agreement with measurements, with an average percentage of rejected pixels of 1.41% only. In spite of possible intra-fraction motion and anatomy changes, this was only slightly larger than for phantom measurements (0.86%). For pCT-based predictions, the agreement deteriorated (average percentage of rejected pixels 2.98%), due to an enhanced impact of anatomy variations. For predictions based on CBCT, combination of the first 2 fractions yielded gamma results in close agreement with pre-treatment analyses (average percentage of rejected pixels 0.63% versus 0.35%, percentage of rejected beams 0.6% versus 0%). For the p

  12. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) Is Associated with Severe Sepsis and Fatal Disease in Emergency Room Patients with Suspected Infection: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo-Seppälä, Raija; Huttunen, Reetta; Aittoniemi, Janne; Koskinen, Pertti; Leino, Aila; Vahlberg, Tero; Rintala, Esa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnostic and prognostic stratification of patients with suspected infection is a difficult clinical challenge. We studied plasma pentraxin 3 (PTX3) upon admission to the emergency department in patients with suspected infection. Methods The study comprised 537 emergency room patients with suspected infection: 59 with no systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and without bacterial infection (group 1), 67 with bacterial infection without SIRS (group 2), 54 with SIRS without bacterial infection (group 3), 308 with sepsis (SIRS and bacterial infection) without organ failure (group 4) and 49 with severe sepsis (group 5). Plasma PTX3 was measured on admission using a commercial solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The median PTX3 levels in groups 1–5 were 2.6 ng/ml, 4.4 ng/ml, 5.0 ng/ml, 6.1 ng/ml and 16.7 ng/ml, respectively (p<0.001). The median PTX3 concentration was higher in severe sepsis patients compared to others (16.7 vs. 4.9 ng/ml, p<0.001) and in non-survivors (day 28 case fatality) compared to survivors (14.1 vs. 5.1 ng/ml, p<0.001). A high PTX3 level predicted the need for ICU stay (p<0.001) and hypotension (p<0.001). AUCROC in the prediction of severe sepsis was 0.73 (95% CI 0.66–0.81, p<0.001) and 0.69 in case fatality (95% CI 0.58–0.79, p<0.001). PTX3 at a cut-off level for 14.1 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for severe sepsis) showed 63% sensitivity and 80% specificity. At a cut-off level 7.7 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for case fatality) showed 70% sensitivity and 63% specificity in predicting case fatality on day 28.In multivariate models, high PTX3 remained an independent predictor of severe sepsis and case fatality after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusions A high PTX3 level on hospital admission predicts severe sepsis and case fatality in patients with suspected infection. PMID:23341967

  13. SARS in Hospital Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Huang, Li-Min; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Su, Chan-Ping; Chang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing aids. The third cluster (12 patients) occurred exclusively among healthcare workers. Six healthcare workers had close contact with SARS patients. Six others, with different working patterns, indicated that they did not have contact with a SARS patient. Environmental surveys found 9 of 119 samples of inanimate objects to be positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. These observations indicate that although transmission by direct contact with known SARS patients was responsible for most cases, environmental contamination with the SARS coronavirus may have lead to infection among healthcare workers without documented contact with known hospitalized SARS patients. PMID:15200809

  14. Locker Room Design Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Examines how today's college and university athletic locker rooms have become sophisticated recruiting tools that rival many professional facilities. Locker room design and location and their level of furniture, finishes, and equipment are discussed as is the trend for more environmentally friendly locker rooms. (GR)

  15. Designing a "safe room" on a medical nursing unit floor.

    PubMed

    Corbin, David

    2009-01-01

    Building a "safe room" on a Medical Nursing floor to house high-risk patients as well as regular patients required inter-department cooperation and an understanding of the differences between a normal room renovation and that of a safe room. In this article, the author describes the kind of cooperation needed and the steps taken to successfully build and use the new safe room.

  16. The Upstairs Room - Room for Controversy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Mary F.

    1973-01-01

    Doubtless everyone is tired of the subject of censorship; but I do have to give vent to my feelings when they are as intense as they are over the selection of a book as full of profanity as a Newbery honor book ( The Upstairs Room''). (Author/SM)

  17. The virtual gamma camera room.

    PubMed

    Penrose, J M; Trowbridge, E A; Tindale, W B

    1996-05-01

    The installation of a gamma camera is time-consuming and costly and, once installed, the camera position is unlikely to be altered during its working life. Poor choice of camera position therefore has long-term consequences. Additional equipment such as collimators and carts, the operator's workstation and wall-mounted display monitors must also be situated to maximize access and ease of use. The layout of a gamma camera room can be optimized prior to installation by creating a virtual environment. Super-Scape VRT software running on an upgraded 486 PC microprocessor was used to create a 'virtual camera room'. The simulation included an operator's viewpoint and a controlled tour of the room. Equipment could be repositioned as required, allowing potential problems to be identified at the design stage. Access for bed-ridden patients, operator ergonomics, operator and patient visibility were addressed. The display can also be used for patient education. Creation of a virtual environment is a valuable tool which allows different camera systems to be compared interactively in terms of dimensions, extent of movement and use of a defined space. Such a system also has applications in radiopharmacy design and simulation.

  18. Unlocking the Locker Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Dean

    1996-01-01

    Discusses locker-room design standards and common challenges when complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Accessibility and safety considerations for shower, toilet, and locker areas are addressed, as are entrance vestibules, drying and grooming areas, and private dressing rooms. (GR)

  19. Strengthening Weight Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Rachel M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines ways of giving an existing weight-training room new life without spending a lot of time and money. Tips include adding rubber floor coverings; using indirect lighting; adding windows, art work, or mirrors to open up the room; using more aesthetically pleasing ceiling tiles; upgrading ventilation; repadding or painting the equipment; and…

  20. Clean room wiping liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A water-based liquid containing isopropyl alcohol, ammonium hydroxide, and surfactants was developed to replace 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for the dampening of clean room wiping cloths used to wipe clean benches, clean room equipment, and latex finger cots and gloves.

  1. Computer Room Water Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1990-01-01

    Addresses the protection of computer rooms from water. Sources of water and potentially vulnerable areas in computer rooms are described. Water detection is then discussed, and several detection systems are detailed. Prices and manufacturers' telephone numbers for some of the systems are included. Water cleanup is also briefly considered. (MES)

  2. Transformer room fire tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fustich, C. D.

    1980-03-01

    A series of transformer room fire tests are reported to demonstate the shock hazard present when automatic sprinklers operate over energized electrical equipment. Fire protection was provided by standard 0.5 inch pendent automatic sprinklers temperature rated at 135 F and installed to give approximately 150 sq ft per head coverage. A 480 v dry transformer was used in the room to provide a three phase, four wire distribution system. It is shown that the induced currents in the test room during the various tests are relatively small and pose no appreciable personnel shock hazard.

  3. Interior. Balance room for chemistry laboratory. Storage room for glassware ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Balance room for chemistry laboratory. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequently used chemistry and chemical engineering texts. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  4. Carpenter in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Inside Hangar S at the White Room Facility at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Mercury astronaut M. Scott Carpenter examines the honeycomb protective material on the main pressure bulkhead (heat shield) of his Mercury capsule nicknamed 'Aurora 7.'

  5. Positive predictive values of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision codes for dermatologic events and hypersensitivity leading to hospitalization or emergency room visit among women with postmenopausal osteoporosis in the Danish and Swedish national patient registries

    PubMed Central

    Adelborg, Kasper; Christensen, Lotte Brix; Munch, Troels; Kahlert, Johnny; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Tell, Grethe S; Apalset, Ellen M; Xue, Fei; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical epidemiology research studies, including pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacovigilance studies, use routinely collected health data, such as diagnoses recorded in national health and administrative registries, to assess clinical effectiveness and safety of treatments. We estimated positive predictive values (PPVs) of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) codes for primary diagnoses of dermatologic events and hypersensitivity recorded at hospitalization or emergency room visit in the national patient registries of Denmark and Sweden among women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). Methods This validation study included women with PMO identified from the Danish and Swedish national patient registries (2005–2014). Medical charts of the potential cases served as the gold standard for the diagnosis confirmation and were reviewed and adjudicated by physicians. Results We obtained and reviewed 189 of 221 sampled medical records (86%). The overall PPV was 92.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 85.1%–96.3%) for dermatologic events, while the PPVs for bullous events and erythematous dermatologic events were 52.5% (95% CI, 37.5%–67.1%) and 12.5% (95% CI, 2.2%–47.1%), respectively. The PPV was 59.0% (95% CI, 48.3%–69.0%) for hypersensitivity; however, the PPV of hypersensitivity increased to 100.0% (95% CI, 67.6%–100.0%) when restricting to diagnostic codes for anaphylaxis. The overall results did not vary by country. Conclusion Among women with PMO, the PPV for any dermatologic event recorded as the primary diagnosis at hospitalization or at an emergency room visit was high and acceptable for epidemiologic research in the Danish and Swedish national patient registries. The PPV was substantially lower for hypersensitivity leading to hospitalization or emergency room visit.

  6. Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Wash room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. This room is a screened porch with the original sinks extant. Light and ventilation was borrowed from the wash room into the toilets and bathing rooms. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  7. Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, 501, and 505), looking south towards the staff corridor vestibule (room 206A, representing rooms 305A, 405A, and 505A). - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  9. Rooms with a View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, Peter; Berry, Millard, III

    2006-01-01

    When well-designed and integrated into a campus living or learning space, an atrium can function as the heart and spirit of a building, connecting interior rooms and public spaces with the outside environment. However, schools and universities should seek technological and HVAC solutions that maximize energy efficiency. This article discusses how…

  10. Locker-Room Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Jason; Noyes, Brad

    1999-01-01

    Explains how proper athletic facility locker-room design can save time and money. Design factors that address who will be using the facility are discussed as are user requirements, such as preparation areas, total storage area per user, grooming area, and security areas. Final comments address maintenance and operations issues. (GR)

  11. Visiting Room 501

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2009-01-01

    Students in Room 501 were exploring and negotiating their lives as transnational citizens. In a globalized world of instantaneous information and communication, Latino students are shaping, morphing, and evolving into a new generation. This study highlights one group of students who were aspiring toward middle class, which is not the typical…

  12. Clean room wiping cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of various fabrics for use as clean room wiping cloths was investigated. These fabrics included knit polyester, knit nylon, urethane foam, woven cotton, nonwoven polyester, nonwoven rayon, nonwoven polyethylene and polypropylene, and woven nylon. These materials were tested for detachable lint and fibers, deterioration, and oil content which could leave contaminating films on wiped surfaces. Well-laundered nylon and polyester cloths knitted from filamentary yarn, with hems, were found to be suitable. (LCL)

  13. 44. Launch Control Equipment Room, taken from rear of room. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Launch Control Equipment Room, taken from rear of room. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  14. 42. Launch Control Equipment Room, rear of room. Lyon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Launch Control Equipment Room, rear of room. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 4, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT ROOM, FIRING ROOM NO. 3, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Launch Control Center, LCC Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. View from window of southeast room (bed room no. 1), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from window of southeast room (bed room no. 1), second floor, commandant's house, looking east across parade ground. - Fort Simcoe, Commandant's House & Blockhouse, Fort Simcoe Road, White Swan, Yakima County, WA

  20. 8. GROUND FLOOR, NORTH ROOM, NORTH WALL, VIEW OF ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND FLOOR, NORTH ROOM, NORTH WALL, VIEW OF ROOM LOOKING TOWARDS FIREPLACE, SHOWING PROJECTING CHIMNEY, WINDOW EMBRASURES ON EITHER SIDE AND PANELING - Ocean Hall, Bushwood, St. Mary's County, MD

  1. FACILITY 713, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM IN LEFT BACKGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 713, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM IN LEFT BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Central-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Ayres Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. FACILITY 728, LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 728, LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  3. FACILITY 809, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM ON RIGHT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 809, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM ON RIGHT, VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Corner-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets, & between Williston & Ayres Avenues, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 8. VIEW OF ROOM 101 (ASSEMBLY ROOM) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF ROOM 101 (ASSEMBLY ROOM) FROM NORTHEAST CORNER SHOWING FLEXIBLE AIR-CONDITIONING DUCT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. Interior. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequentlyused ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior. Storage room for glassware and reference room with frequently-used chemistry and chemical engineering texts. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 2, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  6. 21. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #200, electrical equipment room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #200, electrical equipment room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. 24. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #203, communications room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #203, communications room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  8. 34. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #325, tape handler room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #325, tape handler room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  9. 23. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #202, mechanical equipment room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #202, mechanical equipment room no. 2 - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF A TYPICAL ROOM (ROOM NO. 209), FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF A TYPICAL ROOM (ROOM NO. 209), FACING NORTH. THE SINK AND MIRROR MAY HAVE BEEN FROM THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Dealy Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Console Room, looking southwesterly into Highbay Generator Room Beale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Console Room, looking southwesterly into Highbay Generator Room - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. [Virtual room of gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Osvaldo Mateo; Fittipaldi, Mónica Elsa; Henderson, Eduardo; Krabshuis, Justus Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    The amount of published information and its continuing growth can no longer be managed by an individual searcher. One of today's great challenges for the academic researcher and clinician is to find a relevant scientific article using bibliographic search strategies. We aimed to design and build a Virtual Room of Gastroenterology (VRG) generating real-time automated search strategies and producing bibliographic and full text search results. These results update and complement with the latest evidence the Clinical Guideline Program of the World Gastroenterology Organisation. The HTML driven interface provides a series of pre-formulated MeSH based search strategies for each Aula. For each topic between 10 and 20 specific terms, qualifiers and subheadings are identified. The functionality of the VRG is based on the PubMed's characteristic that allows a search strategy to be captured as a web address. The VRG is available in Spanish and English, and the access is free. There are 28 rooms currently available. All together these rooms provide an advanced bibliographic access using more than 900 pre-programmed MeSH driven strategies. In a further very recent development some of the topics of VRG now allow cascade based searches. These searches look at resource sensitive options and possible ethnic difference per topic. The VRG allows significant reductions in time required to design and carry out complex bibliographic searches in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology and endoscopy. The system updates automatically in real-time thus ensuring the currency of the results.

  13. [Pain assessment in the postanaesthesia recovery room].

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Assunta; Mathieu, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Pain assessment is an important activity in nursing care. Postanaesthesia recovery rooms are specialised care units. Pain assessment must form part of a global approach, beyond an objective of care. The nurse plays a key role from the reception of the patient through to their transfer to the ward.

  14. Risk Factors for Development of Chronic Kidney Disease following Renal Infarction: Retrospective Evaluation of Emergency Room Patients from a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Ling; Seak, Chen-June; Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Weng, Yi-Ming; Chen, Hang-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have analyzed factors associated with renal infarction so that patients can be provided with earlier diagnosis and treatment. However, the factors associated with development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) following renal infarction are unknown. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with a diagnosis of renal infarction based on enhanced computed tomography. All patients were admitted to a single emergency department in Taiwan from 1999 to 2008. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the effect of different factors on development of CKD based on estimates of the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at admission and at 3–12 months after discharge. Results Univariate analysis indicated significantly increased risk of CKD in patients older than 50 years, with symptoms for 24 h or less before admission, lower eGFR at admission, APACHE II score greater than 7, SOFA score greater than 1, ASA score greater than 2, and SAPS II score greater than 15. Multivariate analysis indicated that only SOFA score greater than 1 was significantly and independently associated with CKD at follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions A total of 32.5% of patients admitted for renal infarction over a ten-year period developed CKD at 3–12 months after discharge. A SOFA score greater than 1 was significantly and independently associated with development of CKD in these patients. PMID:24911965

  15. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks.

  16. Room with a View: Ethical Encounters in Room 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes ethical encounters in Room 13, a schoolroom where children made what they wanted, posed their own questions, and ran an art room like a small business. In Room 13 children had the responsibility to maintain all aspects of the art studio. Specific decisions fell to an annually elected management team, a small…

  17. 45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, WALL ON LEFT DIVIDING CLOTH ROOM ADDED LATER (PROBABLY C. 1970s). - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  18. Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom and bedroom, leading to conference room 211. Viewing windows look down on the display area. View to north - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. One Room Schools in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue focuses on one-room school houses in Iowa. At one time, almost 14,000 one-room schools dotted Iowa's rural landscape. Articles explore Native American schools of the past and present, segregation of black students, and Amish schools. An article remembering one-room schools describes the early schools from 1830 to 1858, township schools…

  20. Sunny hospital rooms expedite recovery from severe and refractory depressions.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K M; Hays, P

    1996-09-09

    Bright light therapy is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder, an uncommon condition marked by mild winter depression. Bright lights have been used as adjuncts in the pharmacological treatment of other types of depressive illness. The rooms in our psychiatric inpatient unit are so placed that half are bright and sunny and the rest are not. Reasoning that some patients were getting light therapy inadvertently, we compared the lengths of stay of depressed patients in sunny rooms with those of patients in dull rooms. Those in sunny rooms had an average stay of 16.9 days compared to 19.5 days for those in dull rooms, a difference of 2.6 days (15%): P < 0.05.

  1. Epidemiological profile of 277 patients with facial fractures treated at the emergency room at the ENT Department of Hospital do Trabalhador in Curitiba/PR, in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ykeda, Renier Barreto Arrais; Ballin, Carlos Roberto; Moraes, Rafael Souza; Ykeda, Ronnie Barreto Arrais; Miksza, Alana Farias

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Epidemiological studies that focus on facial injuries are of great interest for the knowledge of occurrence and severity of presentation. Aim: To study the epidemiological profile of 277 patients who suffered facial fractures at the Hospital do Trabalhador (HT), with an emphasis on variables such as sex, age, cause, and anatomical sites of fractures, comparing the clinical findings with other studies. Method: Retrospective nonrandomized chart review of 277 patients who were treated at HT by the ENT service during the full year 2010, victims of facial fractures. Results: Of 277 patients, 74.72% were male and 25.27% female (ratio 3:1). According to age, the fractures were distributed as follows: 0–9 years: 4.69%, 10–19 years: 17.32%, 20–29 years: 23.82%, 30–39 years: 20.21%, 40–49 years: 16.24%, 50–59 years: 10.83%, 60–69 years: 3.97%, and 60–79 years: 2.88%. The cause of trauma was most frequently interpersonal violence, 36.45%, followed by falls, 23.09%, and motor vehicle crashes with 17.32%. Regarding location, nasal fracture was the most common, with 44.75%, followed by the mandible, 14.32%, orbit, 12.78%, maxillary, 12.02%, zygomatic, 9.97%, 3.32% and front Le Fort 2.88%. Conclusion: The patients were mostly males, aged 21–30 years, victims of aggression with the most commonly fractured bone being the nose. The adoption of personal and public strategies and measures may prevent facial fractures. PMID:25991971

  2. Patterns and injuries associated with orbital wall fractures in elderly patients who visited the emergency room: a retrospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Lee, Hyung-Joo; Park, In-June; Yang, Dong-Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine orbital wall fracture (OWF) patterns and associated facial injuries in elderly patients and compare them with those in their younger adult counterparts. Design A retrospective case–control study. Setting An emergency department of a university-affiliated hospital located in an urban area. Participants A total of 1378 adult patients with OWF diagnosed by CT from 1 January 2004 through 31 March 2014 were enrolled. Patients were categorised into elderly (≥65 years) and non-elderly (<65 years) groups. Results The elderly group (n=146) had a mean age of 74.0 years compared with 37.5 years in the non-elderly group (n=1232). Slipping was the most common cause of OWF in the elderly group (43.8%, p<0.001), whereas violence was the most common cause in the non-elderly group (37.3%, p<0.001). The lateral orbital wall was the more common site of fracture in the elderly group, and their injuries were more often associated with concurrent facial bone fractures, including the mandible, maxilla and zygoma, compared with the non-elderly group. After adjusting for sex and the mechanism of injury, inclusion in the elderly group was a significant risk factor for fracture of the lateral wall (OR 1.658; 95% CI 1.074 to 2.560) and concomitant facial bone fractures of the maxilla (OR 1.625; 95% CI 1.111 to 2.377) and zygoma (OR 1.670; 95% CI 1.126 to 2.475). Conclusions Elderly patients were vulnerable to facial trauma, and concurrent facial bone fracture associated with OWF was more commonly observed in this age group. Therefore, a high index of suspicion and thorough investigation, including CT, for OWF-associated facial bone fractures are important. PMID:27645553

  3. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Thomas Oren

    2005-05-01

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facility's 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week maintenance period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  4. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Thomas Oren

    2005-05-01

    The Machine Control Center at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility was initially constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on workflow processes and ergonomic attributes. This effort also sets the foundation for the redevelopment of the accelerator's control system to deliver high reliability performance with improvements in beam specifications management and information flow. The complete renovation was performed over a three-week period with no interruption to beam operations. We present the results of this effort.

  5. CEBAF Control Room Renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Spata; Anthony Cuffe; Thomas Oren

    2005-03-22

    The Machine Control Center (MCC) at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was constructed in the early 1990s and based on proven technology of that era. Through our experience over the last 15 years and in our planning for the facilities 12 GeV upgrade we reevaluated the control room environment to capitalize on emerging visualization and display technologies and improve on work-flow processes and ergonomic attributes. The renovation was performed in two phases during the summer of 2004, with one phase occurring during machine operations and the latter, more extensive phase, occurring during our semi-annual shutdown period. The new facility takes advantage of advances in display technology, analog and video signal management, server technology, ergonomic workspace design, lighting engineering, acoustic ceilings and raised flooring solutions to provide a marked improvement in the overall environment of machine operations.

  6. Binaural room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, H.; Blauert, Jens; Pompetzki, W.

    1991-01-01

    In every-day listening the auditory event perceived by a listener is determined not only by the sound signal that a sound emits but also by a variety of environmental parameters. These parameters are the position, orientation and directional characteristics of the sound source, the listener's position and orientation, the geometrical and acoustical properties of surfaces which affect the sound field and the sound propagation properties of the surrounding fluid. A complete set of these parameters can be called an Acoustic Environment. If the auditory event perceived by a listener is manipulated in such a way that the listener is shifted acoustically into a different acoustic environment without moving himself physically, a Virtual Acoustic Environment has been created. Here, we deal with a special technique to set up nearly arbitrary Virtual Acoustic Environments, the Binaural Room Simulation. The purpose of the Binaural Room Simulation is to compute the binaural impulse response related to a virtual acoustic environment taking into account all parameters mentioned above. One possible way to describe a Virtual Acoustic Environment is the concept of the virtual sound sources. Each of the virtual sources emits a certain signal which is correlated but not necessarily identical with the signal emitted by the direct sound source. If source and receiver are non moving, the acoustic environment becomes a linear time-invariant system. Then, the Binaural Impulse Response from the source to a listener' s eardrums contains all relevant auditory information related to the Virtual Acoustic Environment. Listening into the simulated environment can easily be achieved by convolving the Binaural Impulse Response with dry signals and representing the results via headphones.

  7. The room acoustic rendering equation.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Samuel; Lokki, Tapio; Kiminki, Sami; Savioja, Lauri

    2007-09-01

    An integral equation generalizing a variety of known geometrical room acoustics modeling algorithms is presented. The formulation of the room acoustic rendering equation is adopted from computer graphics. Based on the room acoustic rendering equation, an acoustic radiance transfer method, which can handle both diffuse and nondiffuse reflections, is derived. In a case study, the method is used to predict several acoustic parameters of a room model. The results are compared to measured data of the actual room and to the results given by other acoustics prediction software. It is concluded that the method can predict most acoustic parameters reliably and provides results as accurate as current commercial room acoustic prediction software. Although the presented acoustic radiance transfer method relies on geometrical acoustics, it can be extended to model diffraction and transmission through materials in future.

  8. Anesthesia and sedation outside of the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ann Misun; Kim, Yoon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid evolution and technological advancements, medical personnel now require special training outside of their safe zones. Anesthesiologists face challenges in practicing in locations beyond the operating room. New locations, inadequate monitoring devices, poor assisting staff, unfamiliarity of procedures, insufficient knowledge of basic standards, and lack of experience compromise the quality of patient care. Therefore, anesthesiologists must recognize possible risk factors during anesthesia in nonoperating rooms and familiarize themselves with standards to improve safe practice. This review article emphasizes the need for standardizing hospitals and facilities requiring nonoperating room anesthesia, and encourages anesthesiologists to take the lead in applying these practice guidelines to improve patient outcomes and reduce adverse events. PMID:26257843

  9. 37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DINING ROOM FROM BALCONY. THE DINING ROOM ROOF IS SUPPORTED BY A SCISSOR TRUSS SYSTEM REINFORCED WITH TURNBUCKLE IRON RODS AND GUSSET PLATES (NOTE: THIS SYSTEM DIFFERS FROM THE LOBBY). - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  10. 10. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR. Looking into southwest corner. CONTROL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR. Looking into southwest corner. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING ESCAPE HATCH. Looking north along east wall. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 12. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM SHOWING OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM FROM DINING ROOM SHOWING OPEN FRONT DOOR AT PHOTO CENTER AND OPEN DOOR TO BEDROOM NO. 1 AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  12. 49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Machinery rooms on north tower. Facing north. Machinery rooms contain all motors, motor controllers, and gears for operating one span, in this case, the north span. Note bell with continuous operating clapper for use as fog signals. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND MINE, LOOKING NORTH. THE MAIN HOIST USED A FLAT CABLE, WHICH WAS SCRAPPED IN THE 1950s. THE ORIGINAL DIXON CABLE STILL EXISTS IN THE CHIPPY HOIST HOUSE. - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  14. Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview of air handling system, large walk-in filter, large ducts, pipes, and gauges - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  15. LIVING ROOM WITH THE SLIDING DOORS TO DINING ROOM ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LIVING ROOM WITH THE SLIDING DOORS TO DINING ROOM ON THE LEFT. SHOWING THE WOOD GRILLE TO THE FOYER. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #102, electrical equipment room; the prime power distribution system. Excellent example of endulum-types shock isolation. The grey cabinet and barrel assemble is part of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) retrofill project - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. 17. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, mechanical equipment room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #105, mechanical equipment room no. 1; sign reads: Heat exchangers (shell and tube type). Provide precise temperature control of water for cooling critical electronic equipment - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  18. 16. Bus Room (also known as Switch Gear Room), view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Bus Room (also known as Switch Gear Room), view to the southeast. An air circuit breaker compressor (visible in photograph number 2) was once attached to the main bus relay visible in the background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  19. system at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoyuan; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xiuhua; Xiao, Yongyin; Ma, Mingyu; Zhu, Wenjie; Wei, Feng

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the moderately and lightly doped porous silicon nanowires (PSiNWs) were fabricated by the `one-pot procedure' metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method in the HF/H2O2/AgNO3 system at room temperature. The effects of H2O2 concentration on the nanostructure of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated. The experimental results indicate that porous structure can be introduced by the addition of H2O2 and the pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of H2O2. The H2O2 species replaces Ag+ as the oxidant and the Ag nanoparticles work as catalyst during the etching. And the concentration of H2O2 influences the nucleation and motility of Ag particles, which leads to formation of different porous structure within the nanowires. A mechanism based on the lateral etching which is catalyzed by Ag particles under the motivation by H2O2 reduction is proposed to explain the PSiNWs formation.

  20. Room temperature polyesterification

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.S.; Stupp, S.I. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new room temperature polymerization method has been developed for the synthesis of high molecular weight polyesters directly from carboxylic acids and phenols. The solution polymerization reaction proceeds under mild conditions, near neutral pH, and also avoids the use of preactivated acid derivatives for esterification. The reaction is useful in the preparation of isoregic ordered chains with translational polar symmetry and also in the polymerization of functionalized or chiral monomers. The conditions required for polymerization in the carbodiimide-based reaction included catalysis by the 1:1 molecular complex formed by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and p-toluenesulfonic acid. These conditions were established through studies on a model system involving esterification of p-toluic acid and p-cresol. Self-condensation of several hydroxy acid monomers by this reaction has produced routinely good yields of polyesters with molecular weights greater than 15,000. It is believed that the high extents of reaction required for significant degrees of polymerization result from suppression of the side reaction leading to N-acylurea. The utility of this reaction in the formation of polar chains from sensitive monomers is demonstrated hereby the polycondensation of a chiral hydroxy acid.

  1. Emergency room coverage: an evolving crisis.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Historically, a newly graduated plastic surgeon in the United States could build a practice from his or her emergency room coverage. The historical cliche was for the surgeon to be affable, able, and available, and from that basis one's practice would grow. Emergency room exposure was an avenue for starting a practice, developing recognition, and, after that, building a referral pattern. Recently, the cross-shifting influence of management care, rising malpractice insurance costs, and risk ratio are changing this cliche to a crisis. An evaluation of a 2 1/2-year exposure to emergency room coverage has revealed a completely different profile. A total of 300 patient visits resulting in 69 surgical operations were evaluated for insurance and remuneration history. The findings indicated a significant remuneration dilemma for emergency room coverage. Interestingly, a remuneration problem exists in a market different from what one would expect. In this study, a sample from a suburban hospital, rather than an inner-city university hospital, is the greater problem.

  2. Recurarization in the recovery room.

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, P; Kinirons, B; Brocas, E; Benhamou, D; Samii, K

    1999-07-01

    A case of recurarization in the recovery room is reported. Accumulation of atracurium in the intravenous line led to recurarization after flushing the line in the recovery room. A respiratory arrest with severe desaturation and bradycardia occurred. Circumstances leading to this event and the mechanisms enabling a neuromuscular blockade to occur, following the administration of a small dose of relaxant, are discussed.

  3. Advanced visualization platform for surgical operating room coordination: distributed video board system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peter F; Xiao, Yan; Ho, Danny; Mackenzie, Colin F; Hu, Hao; Voigt, Roger; Martz, Douglas

    2006-06-01

    One of the major challenges for day-of-surgery operating room coordination is accurate and timely situation awareness. Distributed and secure real-time status information is key to addressing these challenges. This article reports on the design and implementation of a passive status monitoring system in a 19-room surgical suite of a major academic medical center. Key design requirements considered included integrated real-time operating room status display, access control, security, and network impact. The system used live operating room video images and patient vital signs obtained through monitors to automatically update events and operating room status. Images were presented on a "need-to-know" basis, and access was controlled by identification badge authorization. The system delivered reliable real-time operating room images and status with acceptable network impact. Operating room status was visualized at 4 separate locations and was used continuously by clinicians and operating room service providers to coordinate operating room activities.

  4. 33. ROOM A (WEST ROOM) LOOKING SOUTHWEST. The windows above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. ROOM A (WEST ROOM) LOOKING SOUTHWEST. The windows above the original Ministers' Gallery were raised in 1888 when inside toilet facilities were added on the other side of the west wall. Note the sloped window sills which provided more light. Also at the rear of the Meeting House a caretaker's apartment was added in 1908. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. 32 CFR 518.9 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading room. 518.9 Section 518.9 National... RELATIONS THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM FOIA Reading Rooms § 518.9 Reading room. (a) Reading room... the records described, DA may elect to place other records in their reading room, and also make...

  6. 32 CFR 518.9 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Reading room. 518.9 Section 518.9 National... RELATIONS THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM FOIA Reading Rooms § 518.9 Reading room. (a) Reading room... the records described, DA may elect to place other records in their reading room, and also make...

  7. 7 CFR 58.408 - Brine room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brine room. 58.408 Section 58.408 Agriculture... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.408 Brine room. A brine room, when applicable, should be a separate room constructed so it can...

  8. What's New in Locker Rooms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin M.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses athletic facility design and renovation issues that exist because of increasing numbers of female athletes. Outlines renovation issues such as locker room facilities, space for sports equipment, and additional athletic fields. (GR)

  9. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  10. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOEpatents

    Lamuro, Robert C.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

  11. Nuclear reactor control room construction

    DOEpatents

    Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

    1993-11-16

    A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

  12. The 'Room within a Room' Concept for Monitored Warhead Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Jennifer E.; Benz, Jacob M.; White, Helen; McOmish, Sarah; Allen, Keir; Tolk, Keith; Weeks, George E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, US and UK experts have engaged in a technical collaboration with the aim of improving scientific and technological abilities in support of potential future nuclear arms control and non-proliferation agreements. In 2011 a monitored dismantlement exercise provided an opportunity to develop and test potential monitoring technologies and approaches. The exercise followed a simulated nuclear object through a dismantlement process and looked to explore, with a level of realism, issues surrounding device and material monitoring, chain of custody, authentication and certification of equipment, data management and managed access. This paper focuses on the development and deployment of the ‘room-within-a-room’ system, which was designed to maintain chain of custody during disassembly operations. A key challenge for any verification regime operating within a nuclear weapon complex is to provide the monitoring party with the opportunity to gather sufficient evidence, whilst protecting sensitive or proliferative information held by the host. The requirement to address both monitoring and host party concerns led to a dual function design which: • Created a controlled boundary around the disassembly process area which could provide evidence of unauthorised diversion activities. • Shielded sensitive disassembly operations from monitoring party observation. The deployed room-within-a-room was an integrated system which combined a number of chain of custody technologies (i.e. cameras, tamper indicating panels and enclosures, seals, unique identifiers and radiation portals) and supporting deployment procedures. This paper discusses the bounding aims and constraints identified by the monitoring and host parties with respect to the disassembly phase, the design of the room-within-a-room system, lessons learned during deployment, conclusions and potential areas of future work. Overall it was agreed that the room-within-a-room approach was effective but

  13. A Study to Determine the Impact of the PRIMUS Clinic on Patient Workload in the General Outpatient Clinic, the Emergency Room, the GYN Clinic, the Pediatric Clinic, and the Family Practice Clinic at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-07

    as obstetrics and pediatrics will be honed to a fine edge. Cherkov further suggests that construction of medical facilities outside of the hospital...ROOM, m THE OB GYN CLINIC, THE PEDIATRIC CLINIC, AND THE FAMILY o 0c C PRACTICE CLINIC AT MARTIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 0 0 m M xz z Baylor...Clinic on patien workload in the Outpatient, Family Practice, and Pediatrics Clinics and The Emergency Room at Martin Army Commnity Hospital. 12. PERSONAL

  14. High-tech tools transform the operating room.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This installment of our quarterly Clinical Management series examines how the hospital operating room is becoming a safer place for patients. Thanks to such technological breakthroughs as 3-D images, virtual patients and robots, surgeons can operate with more accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Getting into the System: The Physician's Staff and Waiting Room

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This article represents a panel discussion with the staff of the Family Practice Unit at the Plains Health Centre, Regina, Sask. It outlines those things found helpful in presenting a positive image to the patient by a physician and his staff - telephone contacts, waiting rooms, patient flow, and common complaints. PMID:21308056

  16. 26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. A typical outer rod room, or rack room, showing the racks for the nine horizontal control rods (HCRs) that would be inserted or withdrawn from the pile to control the rate of reaction. In this case, it is the 105-F Reactor in February 1945. The view is looking away from the pile, which is out of the picture on the left. Several of the cooling water hose reels for the rods can be seen at the end of the racks near the wall. D-8323 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  17. The dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    The development and implementation of a dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room (OTOR) that is used for the treatment of orthopedic trauma patients has changed and improved the practice of orthopedic trauma surgery. Advantages noted with OTOR implementation include improvements in morbidity and complication rates, enhancements in the professional and personal lifestyles of the on-call surgeon, and increased physician recruitment and retention in orthopedic traumatology. However, the inappropriate use of the OTOR, which can waste valuable resources and delay the treatment of emergent cases, must be monitored and avoided.

  18. Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

  19. Complex soundproofing of industrial rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocsa, V.; Veres, A.; Biborosch, L.

    1974-01-01

    Some structures treated for sound absorption are described that are used to soundproof industrial rooms with a very high noise level. Soundproofing treatments for the walls and coilings or only for the ceilings are considered. In the case of relatively small rooms having a noise source with a high level, complex treatments involve, in addition to soundproofing of the walls and ceiling, suspended panels specially oriented with respect to the noise source. The efficiency of the adopted solutions is compared with calculated damping values.

  20. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  1. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  2. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  3. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  4. 32 CFR 296.6 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reading room. 296.6 Section 296.6 National... Reading room. (a) The NRO shall provide a reading room equipped with hard copy and electronic records as required in the “Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996”. The NRO Reading Room is...

  5. 32 CFR 296.6 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reading room. 296.6 Section 296.6 National... Reading room. (a) The NRO shall provide a reading room equipped with hard copy and electronic records as required in the “Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996”. The NRO Reading Room is...

  6. 32 CFR 296.6 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading room. 296.6 Section 296.6 National... Reading room. (a) The NRO shall provide a reading room equipped with hard copy and electronic records as required in the “Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996”. The NRO Reading Room is...

  7. 39 CFR 3004.12 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading room. 3004.12 Section 3004.12 Postal... Reading room. (a) The Commission maintains a public reading room at its offices (901 New York Avenue, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20268-0001) and an electronic reading room at http://www.prc.gov. The...

  8. 7 CFR 58.409 - Drying room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drying room. 58.409 Section 58.409 Agriculture... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.409 Drying room. When applicable, a drying room of adequate size shall be provided to accommodate...

  9. 7 CFR 58.410 - Paraffining room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paraffining room. 58.410 Section 58.410 Agriculture... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.410 Paraffining room. When applicable for rind cheese, a separate room or compartment should...

  10. 7 CFR 58.213 - Repackaging room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repackaging room. 58.213 Section 58.213 Agriculture... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.213 Repackaging room. A separate room shall be provided for the filling of small packages and...

  11. Individual rooms in the NICU - an evolving concept.

    PubMed

    White, Robert D

    2003-01-01

    The provision of individual rooms for NICU patients has several attractive benefits, including the ability to provide the appropriate environmental stimuli for each child, and increased privacy and accessibility for families. This concept can put serious strain on caregivers, however, by isolating them from one another and from the multiple infants for whom they may have responsibility, and places additional financial and space demands on the institution. These problems are not insurmountable, however, and use of individual rooms for at least some patients is feasible and probably desirable if certain considerations are addressed in the planning and design process.

  12. Locker Rooms: The Durable Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viklund, Roy; Coons, John

    1997-01-01

    Offers advice on heavy-use locker-room design that provides easier maintenance and vandal resistance. Design features and materials used for flooring, ceilings, and walls are addressed as are built-in systems and equipment, toilet and shower fixtures and partitions, lockers, and mechanical and electrical systems. (GR)

  13. Hotels Make Room for Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Hotels, in hopes of gaining a competitive edge, are offering workout rooms, exercise equipment, fitness trails, and jogging tracks, but no standards have been set for safety of the facilities or staff preparedness in exercise screening, equipment use, injury prevention, or first aid. (MT)

  14. Locker Room Maintenance Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theel, James

    1998-01-01

    Provides examples on ways to make locker room maintenance easier and their use more student-friendly. Improvements include use of indoor-outdoor carpeting with numerous floor drains to cut mildew buildup, adequate ventilation to reduce musty smells, better hot water management, ceramic tiles to reduce water-damage repair and painting needs, and…

  15. 'How To' Clean Room Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Kaley Corinne

    2013-01-01

    One of the projects that I am completing this summer is a Launch Services Program intern 'How to' set up a clean room informational video. The purpose of this video is to go along with a clean room kit that can be checked out by employees at the Kennedy Space Center and to be taken to classrooms to help educate students and intrigue them about NASA. The video will include 'how to' set up and operate a clean room at NASA. This is a group project so we will be acting as a team and contributing our own input and ideas. We will include various activities for children in classrooms to complete, while learning and having fun. Activities that we will explain and film include: helping children understand the proper way to wear a bunny suit, a brief background on cleanrooms, and the importance of maintaining the cleanliness of a space craft. This project will be shown to LSP management and co-workers; we will be presenting the video once it is completed.

  16. Trends in operating room devices.

    PubMed

    Laufman, H

    1976-01-01

    Although trends in the use of operating room devices have generally followed advances in technology, the trends are not always influenced as much by surgical need as they are by industrial expediency and commercial promotion. Nonetheless, a broad view of trends in OR devices definitely points to efforts at greater compatibility between devices made by different manufacturers. To mention a few examples, operating tables are being made more compatible with OR X-ray equipment; surgical lighting is being designed for greater compatibility with air-handling systems and video equipment; power consoles have reduced the clutter of tubes, hoses, and wires in complicated operations, and have become more functional in keeping with the trend away from electrical power and toward nitrogen power for driving surgical tools; cabinetry is being designed to employ clean-air principles; and surgical apparel and barrier materials are undergoing close scrutiny for their effectiveness against moist bacterial strike-through in lengthy wet operations. Operating room devices form an important segment of the devices classified by the FDA, and are expected to benefit by the application of standards in performance and safety. This trend will affect not only the devices themselves, but all other facets of operating room design and engineering.

  17. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  18. A Study to Determine the Impact of the Recently Established Primus Clinics on the Patient Workload in the Pediatric Clinic, General Outpatient Clinic and Emergency Room at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    pediatric clinic, general outpatient clinic, and emergency room at Darnall. 4. The present organization and resources for primary medical care at...specialty (e.g. family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics , emergency medicine, or obstetrics/gynecology). The medical director of the PRIMUS...Germantown, MD. < m zCallahan, Charles W. Jr. 1988. " Pediatric Clinic Briefing." KM z 12 September. CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the

  19. Characteristics of Chinese Suicide Attempters: An Emergency Room Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Jia, Shuhua; Jiang, Chao; Sun, Jie

    2006-01-01

    Studying the characteristics of attempted suicide is helpful in knowing the background of some completed suicides and improving prevention or intervention strategies. This current study analyzed data of 74 suicide attempters and 92 accident injured patients admitted to 6 hospital emergency rooms in an area of Northeastern China and found both…

  20. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amita

    2004-06-01

    Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting

  1. Management of a fire in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan David; Kolinsky, Daniel; Urman, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    Operating room (OR) fires remain a significant source of liability for anesthesia providers and injury for patients, despite existing practice guidelines and other improvements in operating room safety. Factors contributing to OR fires are well understood and these occurrences are generally preventable. OR personnel must be familiar with the fire triad which consists of a fuel supply, an oxidizing agent, and an ignition source. Existing evidence shows that OR-related fires can result in significant patient complications and malpractice claims. Steps to reduce fires include taking appropriate safety measures before a patient is brought to the OR, taking proper preventive measures during surgery, and effectively managing fire and patient complications when they occur. Decreasing the incidence of fires should be a team effort involving the entire OR personnel, including surgeons, anesthesia providers, nurses, scrub technologists, and administrators. Communication and coordination among members of the OR team is essential to creating a culture of safety.

  2. Effectiveness of ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems for terminal room decontamination: Focus on clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Anderson, Deverick J; Chen, Luke F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Boyce, John M

    2016-05-02

    Over the last decade, substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that indicates contamination of environmental surfaces in hospital rooms plays an important role in the transmission of key health care-associated pathogens (eg, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter spp). For example, a patient admitted to a room previously occupied by a patient colonized or infected with one of these pathogens has a higher risk for acquiring one of these pathogens than a patient admitted to a room whose previous occupant was not colonized or infected. This risk is not surprising because multiple studies have demonstrated that surfaces in hospital rooms are poorly cleaned during terminal cleaning. To reduce surface contamination after terminal cleaning, no touch methods of room disinfection have been developed. This article will review the no touch methods, ultraviolet light devices, and hydrogen peroxide systems, with a focus on clinical trials which have used patient colonization or infection as an outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet light devices and hydrogen peroxide systems have been shown to inactivate microbes experimentally plated on carrier materials and placed in hospital rooms and to decontaminate surfaces in hospital rooms naturally contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens. A growing number of clinical studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems when used for terminal disinfection can reduce colonization or health care-associated infections in patients admitted to these hospital rooms.

  3. 24 CFR 3280.109 - Room requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gross floor area. (b) Rooms designed for sleeping purposes shall have a minimum gross square foot floor... of two. (c) Every room designed for sleeping purposes shall have accessible clothes hanging...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.109 - Room requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gross floor area. (b) Rooms designed for sleeping purposes shall have a minimum gross square foot floor... of two. (c) Every room designed for sleeping purposes shall have accessible clothes hanging...

  5. New thinking for the boiler room.

    PubMed

    Rose, Wayne

    2008-09-01

    Wayne Rose, marketing manager at integrated plant room manufacturer Armstrong Integrated Systems, explains how increasing use of off-site manufacture, the latest 3D modelling technology, and advances in control technology, are revolutionising boiler room design and construction.

  6. 24 CFR 3280.109 - Room requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gross floor area. (b) Rooms designed for sleeping purposes shall have a minimum gross square foot floor... of two. (c) Every room designed for sleeping purposes shall have accessible clothes hanging...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.109 - Room requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gross floor area. (b) Rooms designed for sleeping purposes shall have a minimum gross square foot floor... of two. (c) Every room designed for sleeping purposes shall have accessible clothes hanging...

  8. Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs'

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163886.html Hospital Room Floors May Harbor 'Superbugs' But that area often overlooked when it comes ... Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research ...

  9. [When should the nephrologist be called in the emergency room?].

    PubMed

    Favre, Nathalie; Burnier, Michel; Kissling, Sébastien

    2016-02-24

    Nephrology emergencies are not the most frequent in the emergency room but they often generate some diagnostic and therapeutic problems. Most common renal emergencies are due most often to acute renal failure whatever the cause, electrolytes disturbances, hypertensive crisis and less frequently intoxications or acute decompensation of chronic kidney diseases. The goal of this paper is to review some of these clinical situations both in the diagnostic and therapeutic perspective but essentially to discuss when the nephrologist should be called in the emergency room so that the coordination of care is optimal for the patients.

  10. 32 CFR 701.6 - Reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reading rooms. 701.6 Section 701.6 National... Reading rooms. The FOIA requires that (a)(2) records created on or after 1 November 1996, be made available electronically (starting 1 November 1997) as well as in hard copy, in the FOIA reading room...

  11. 32 CFR 701.6 - Reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading rooms. 701.6 Section 701.6 National... Reading rooms. The FOIA requires that (a)(2) records created on or after 1 November 1996, be made available electronically (starting 1 November 1997) as well as in hard copy, in the FOIA reading room...

  12. 32 CFR 518.9 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Reading room. 518.9 Section 518.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM FOIA Reading Rooms § 518.9 Reading room. (a) Reading...

  13. Neutron fluxes in radiotherapy rooms.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Foglio Para, A; Maggioni, B

    1993-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the neutron flux, originated in an electron accelerator therapy room when energies above the threshold of (y,n) and (e,e'n) reactions are employed, is physically due to a direct flux, coming from the accelerator head, and to a flux diffused from the walls. In this work, the flux is described to a high degree of approximation by a set of functions whose spatial behavior is univocally determined by the angular distributions of the neutrons emitted from the shield of the accelerator head and diffused from the walls. The analytical results are verified with an extended series of Monte Carlo simulations obtained with the MCNP code.

  14. Flow analysis of airborne particles in a hospital operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeghi, Shiva; Lennerts, Kunibert

    2016-06-01

    Preventing airborne infections during a surgery has been always an important issue to deliver effective and high quality medical care to the patient. One of the important sources of infection is particles that are distributed through airborne routes. Factors influencing infection rates caused by airborne particles, among others, are efficient ventilation and the arrangement of surgical facilities inside the operating room. The paper studies the ventilation airflow pattern in an operating room in a hospital located in Tehran, Iran, and seeks to find the efficient configurations with respect to the ventilation system and layout of facilities. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and investigates the effects of different inflow velocities for inlets, two pressurization scenarios (equal and excess pressure) and two arrangements of surgical facilities in room while the door is completely open. The results show that system does not perform adequately when the door is open in the operating room under the current conditions, and excess pressure adjustments should be employed to achieve efficient results. The findings of this research can be discussed in the context of design and controlling of the ventilation facilities of operating rooms.

  15. True Cost of Amateur Clean rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the cost factors for clean rooms that are not professionally built, monitored or maintained. These amateur clean rooms are built because scientist and engineers desire to create a clean room to build a part of an experiment that requires a clean room, and the program manager is looking to save money. However, in the long run these clean rooms may not save money, as the cost of maintenance may be higher due to the cost of transporting the crews, and if the materials were of lesser quality, the cost of modifications may diminish any savings, and the product may not be of the same quality. Several examples are shown of the clean rooms that show some of the problems that can arise from amateur clean rooms.

  16. Diagnostic Dilemmas and Cultural Diversity in Emergency Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Charlotte; Sklar, David

    1980-01-01

    Language and cultural beliefs play an extremely important role in the interaction between patients from diverse cultural groups and physicians. Especially in emergency rooms, there are many dangers in missed communications. A patient from a foreign culture, especially one who does not speak English, often expresses symptoms in ways that are unfamiliar to many American physicians. Specific areas of cultural vulnerability can be identified for the major ethnic groups in the United States as they interact with the scientific medical system. A short review of folk medical beliefs and recommendations for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment may assist emergency room staffs in offering care that is culturally acceptable to patients of diverse ethnic backgrounds. PMID:7347053

  17. One year orthopaedic trauma experience using an advanced interdisciplinary hybrid operating room.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter H; Yarboro, Seth; Kraus, Michael; Gebhard, Florian

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid operating rooms have been used successfully in several surgical specialties, but no data have been published for orthopaedic trauma. We present our one-year orthopaedic trauma experience using a hybrid operating room, which incorporates 3D fluoroscopic imaging as well as navigation capabilities. Data were compiled for a series of 92 cases performed in an advanced hybrid operating room at the level one trauma center in Ulm, Germany. All patients who had surgery performed using this operating room during the first year were included. Setup time and surgical complications using hybrid operating room were recorded and analysed. The hybrid operating room resulted in no higher rate of complication than expected from the same cases in a conventional operating room. The hybrid room did however allow the surgeon to confidently place implants for orthopaedic trauma cases, and was most advantageous for spine and pelvis cases, both minimally invasive and conventional. Further, appropriate reduction and implant position was confirmed with 3D imaging prior to leaving the operating room and obviated the need for postoperative CT scan. Based on our one-year experience, the hybrid operating room is a useful and safe tool for orthopaedic trauma surgery.

  18. Control of the Environment in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan D

    2016-09-23

    There is a direct relationship between the quality of the environment of a workplace and the productivity and efficiency of the work accomplished. Components such as temperature, humidity, ventilation, drafts, lighting, and noise each contribute to the quality of the overall environment and the sense of well-being of those who work there.The modern operating room is a unique workplace with specific, and frequently conflicting, environmental requirements for each of the inhabitants. Even minor disturbances in the internal environment of the operating room can have serious ramifications on the comfort, effectiveness, and safety of each of the inhabitants. A cool, well-ventilated, and dry climate is optimal for many members of the surgical team. Any significant deviation from these objectives raises the risk of decreased efficiency and productivity and adverse surgical outcomes. A warmer, more humid, and quieter environment is necessary for the patient. If these requirements are not met, the risk of surgical morbidity and mortality is increased. An important task for the surgical team is to find the correct balance between these 2 opposed requirements. Several of the components of the operating room environment, especially room temperature and airflow patterns, are easily manipulated by the members of the surgical team. In the following discussion, we will examine these elements to better understand the clinical ramifications of adjustments and accommodations that are frequently made to meet the requirements of both the surgical staff and the patient.

  19. Delays in the operating room: signs of an imperfect system

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janice; Khu, Kathleen Joy; Kaderali, Zul; Bernstein, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Delays in the operating room have a negative effect on its efficiency and the working environment. In this prospective study, we analyzed data on perioperative system delays. Methods One neurosurgeon prospectively recorded all errors, including perioperative delays, for consecutive patients undergoing elective procedures from May 2000 to February 2009. We analyzed the prevalence, causes and impact of perioperative system delays that occurred in one neurosurgeon’s practice. Results A total of 1531 elective surgical cases were performed during the study period. Delays were the most common type of error (33.6%), and more than half (51.4%) of all cases had at least 1 delay. The most common cause of delay was equipment failure. The first cases of the day and cranial cases had more delays than subsequent cases and spinal cases, respectively. A delay in starting the first case was associated with subsequent delays. Conclusion Delays frequently occur in the operating room and have a major effect on patient flow and resource utilization. Thorough documentation of perioperative delays provides a basis for the development of solutions for improving operating room efficiency and illustrates the principles underlying the causes of operating room delays across surgical disciplines. PMID:20507792

  20. Pattern of emergency room mortality among road traffic crash victims.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Oladimeji Ranti; Oluwadiya, Kehinde; Vrgoč, Goran; Akpati, Ugochukwu; Sindik, Joško; Čoklo, Miran; Marinović, Marin; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    Road traffic injuries are a major cause of death in the emergency room. The goal of this study was to highlight the demographic pattern of road traffic-related deaths in the accident and emergency room of a regional trauma centre. This was a 5-year retrospective study in which road traffic-related cases of emergency room mortality between June 2009 and June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 33 road traffic crash-related deaths occurred during this period with a male-to-female ratio of 2.3:1. Most of these patients were pedestrians with severe injuries involving two or more Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) coded regions. The mean time between injury and presentation in the first trauma facility was 112.1 (±55.4)min, and between presentation in the emergency room and death was 410 (±645)min. Mangled lower extremity, bilateral long bone lower limb fractures, pelvic injuries, blunt injuries to the chest and abdomen, and cranial fossae fractures were the common injury pattern. Median ISS and NISS in these patients were 22 (interquartile range [IQR]=11) and 25 (IQR=17), respectively. Severe injuries, delayed presentation, multiple referrals and delayed resuscitative measures contribute to road traffic crash-related mortality.

  1. Apparel for Cleaner Clean Rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In the 1960s NASA pioneered contamination control technology, providing a base from which aerospace contractors could develop control measures. NASA conducted special courses for clean room technicians and supervisors, and published a series of handbooks with input from various NASA field centers. These handbooks extended aerospace experience to the medical, pharmaceutical, electronics, and other industries where extreme cleanliness is important. American Hospital Supply Company (AHSC) felt that high technology products with increasingly stringent operating requirements in aerospace, electronics, pharmaceuticals and medical equipment manufacturing demanded improvement in contamination control techniques. After studying the NASA handbooks and visiting NASA facilities, the wealth of information gathered resulted in Micro-clean non-woven garments and testing equipment and procedures for evaluating effectiveness.

  2. Clean-room robot implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Comeau, J.L.

    1982-07-14

    A robot has been incorporated in a clean room operation in which vacuum tube parts are cleaned just prior to final assembly with a 60 lb/in/sup 2/ blast of argon gas. The robot is programmed to pick up the parts, manipulate/rotate them as necessary in the jet pattern and deposit them in a tray precleaned by the robot. A carefully studied implementation plan was followed in the procurement, installation, modification and programming of the robot facility. An unusual configuration of one tube part required a unique gripper design. A study indicated that the tube parts processed by the robot are 12% cleaner than those manually cleaned by an experienced operator.

  3. Demagnetization of magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Knappe-Grueneberg, S.; Stollfuss, D.; Burghoff, M.

    2007-03-15

    Magnetically shielded rooms for specific high resolution physiological measurements exploiting the magnetic field, e.g., of the brain (dc-magnetoencephalograpy), low-field NMR, or magnetic marker monitoring, need to be reproducibly demagnetized to achieve reliable measurement conditions. We propose a theoretical, experimental, and instrumental base whereupon the parameters which affect the quality of the demagnetization process are described and how they have to be handled. It is demonstrated how conventional demagnetization equipment could be improved to achieve reproducible conditions. The interrelations between the residual field and the variability at the end of the demagnetization process are explained on the basis of the physics of ferromagnetism and our theoretical predictions are evaluated experimentally.

  4. Room acoustics for the aged.

    PubMed

    Plomp, R; Duquesnoy, A J

    1980-12-01

    This article deals with the combined effects of noise and reverberation on the speech-reception threshold for sentences. It is based on a series of current investigations on: (1) the modulation-transfer function as a measure of speech intelligibility in rooms, (2) the applicability of this concept to hearing-impaired persons, and (3) hearing loss for speech in quiet and in noise as a function of age. It is shown that, generally, in auditoria, classrooms, etc. the reverberation time T, acceptable for normal-hearing listeners, has to be reduced to (0.75)DT in order to be acceptable for elderly subjects with a hearing loss of D dB for speech in noise; for listening conditions as in lounges, restaurants, etc. the corresponding value is (0.82)DT.

  5. Nuclear power station main control room habitability

    SciTech Connect

    Paschal, W.B.; Knous, W.S. )

    1989-01-01

    The main control room at a nuclear power station must remain habitable during a variety of plant conditions and postulated events. The control room habitability requirement and the function of the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and air treatment system are to control environmental factors, such as temperature, pressure, humidity, radiation, and toxic gas. Habitability requirements provide for the safety of personnel and enable operation of equipment required to function in the main control room. Habitability as an issue has been gaining prominence with the Advisor Committee of Reactor Safeguards and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since the incident at Three Mile Island. Their concern is the ability of the presently installed habitability systems to control the main control room environment after an accident. This paper discusses main control room HVAC systems; the concern, requirements, and results of NRC surveys and notices; and an approach to control room habitability reviews.

  6. From Baltic rooms to conference rooms: my jouney with data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    From time spent in murky, mosquito-filled mangrove swamps searching for fiddler crabs, to being transported off ships in webbed "man-baskets" on inky-black winter mornings to sample sea ice, to teaching rooms full of students the benefits of information organization, the wonders of science have long shaped my career path. Regardless of surroundings, the driving factor has always been a desire to learn new skills, then try to figure out how to use them to make work easier or more efficient for myself and hopefully others. Somewhere along the way, I've switched from doing it primarily for my "own" research projects, to a focus on helping others with theirs. Like many in this field, my route to a career in data science has influenced how I do my work. Along the way I've carried skills with me but also learned a few things that have made my journey both practical and fun. In this presentation, I'll discuss a few key factors that contribute to my current efforts as a data curation specialist in a research library, including communication (translation of "library" concepts to "science" concepts and vice versa), flexibility (ability to accomodate ideas, pace and values of those I'm working with), and prioritization (learning to balance what's valuable to researchers with principles important to libraries, curators, repositories, archives and other groups with which I interact).

  7. Snoezelen Room and Childbirth Outcome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi Manesh, Mansoureh; Kalati, Mahnaz; Hosseini, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the strategies for a good outcome and pain free childbearing is to design the delivery room. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of snoezelen room on childbearing outcome such as pain intensity, duration of labor, and perinea status in nulliparous women. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial consists of 100 childbearing women. They were randomly divided into 2 groups. The experimental group went to snoezelen room when their cervix dilation was 4 cm, while the control group went to physiologic delivery room with the same cervix dilation. Results: The mean ± SD of VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) pain intensity of the experimental and control groups before the intervention were 5.1 ± 1.95 and 5.58 ± 1.62, respectively (P = 0.13). The mean ± SD of VAS pain intensity scores of the experimental and control groups after 3 hours spending in their assigned rooms were 5.26 ± 0.86 and 9.56 ± 1.48, respectively (P = 0.01). The mean ± SD of the first stage scores of the experimental and control groups were 6.95 ± 0.97 and 8.41 ± 0.67, respectively (P = 0.042). About 92% of participants’ intervention vs. 66% of control participants had perinea laceration (P = 0.041). Conclusions: According to the findings of the present study, distracting senses in snoezelen room decreases mother’s pain intensity, the length of labor, and incidence of episiotomy. PMID:26082849

  8. Robin Room and cannabis policy: dangerous comparisons.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes Robin Room's contribution to cannabis policy debates over the period 1993-2010. It focuses on a controversy that erupted over a review that Room and the author undertook for the World Health Organization in the mid-1990s on the comparative harms of cannabis, alcohol, opiates and tobacco. It also briefly describes Room's recent work on global cannabis policy and ends with a brief appreciation of the character of his scholarly contributions to this field.

  9. 24 CFR 3285.502 - Expanding rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Optional Features § 3285.502 Expanding rooms. The... the home manufacturer or prepared by a registered professional engineer or registered architect,...

  10. 24 CFR 3285.502 - Expanding rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Optional Features § 3285.502 Expanding rooms. The... the home manufacturer or prepared by a registered professional engineer or registered architect,...

  11. 24 CFR 3285.502 - Expanding rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Optional Features § 3285.502 Expanding rooms. The... the home manufacturer or prepared by a registered professional engineer or registered architect,...

  12. Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Lindsell, Claire E

    2015-09-01

    When IVC are directly exhausted from a rodent housing room, the air quality of the room can become independent of the intracage air quality and may reduce the need for high room ventilation rates. This study assessed the effect of decreasing the ventilation rate in rodent rooms using direct-exhaust IVC systems. The study was conducted over 16 wk and compared conditions in 8 rodent rooms that had ventilation rates of 5 to 6 air changes per hour (ACH) with those in rooms at 10 to 12 ACH. At the low ventilation rate, rooms had higher CO₂ concentrations, higher dew point temperature, and lower particulate levels and spent a greater percentage of time above the temperature set point than did rooms at the high rate. The levels of allergens and endotoxins in room air were the same regardless of the ventilation rate. Differences seen in parameters within cages at the 2 ventilation rates were operationally irrelevant. We detected no total volatile organic compounds in the room that were attributable to ammonia, regardless of the ventilation rate. Clearing the air of ethanol after a spill took longer at the low compared with high rate. However, ethanol clearance was faster at the low rate when the demand-control system was activated than at the high ventilation rate alone. Air quality in the room and in the cages were acceptable with room ventilation rates of 5 to 6 ACH in rodent rooms that use direct-exhaust IVC systems.

  13. Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Roger S; Lindsell, Claire E

    2015-01-01

    When IVC are directly exhausted from a rodent housing room, the air quality of the room can become independent of the intracage air quality and may reduce the need for high room ventilation rates. This study assessed the effect of decreasing the ventilation rate in rodent rooms using direct-exhaust IVC systems. The study was conducted over 16 wk and compared conditions in 8 rodent rooms that had ventilation rates of 5 to 6 air changes per hour (ACH) with those in rooms at 10 to 12 ACH. At the low ventilation rate, rooms had higher CO2 concentrations, higher dew point temperature, and lower particulate levels and spent a greater percentage of time above the temperature set point than did rooms at the high rate. The levels of allergens and endotoxins in room air were the same regardless of the ventilation rate. Differences seen in parameters within cages at the 2 ventilation rates were operationally irrelevant. We detected no total volatile organic compounds in the room that were attributable to ammonia, regardless of the ventilation rate. Clearing the air of ethanol after a spill took longer at the low compared with high rate. However, ethanol clearance was faster at the low rate when the demand-control system was activated than at the high ventilation rate alone. Air quality in the room and in the cages were acceptable with room ventilation rates of 5 to 6 ACH in rodent rooms that use direct-exhaust IVC systems. PMID:26424250

  14. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  15. Interior building details of Building D, Room D101 to Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building D, Room D-101 to Room D-101c partition wall with multi-pane wood sash; westerly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  16. Field Test of Room-to-Room Uniformity of Ventilation Air Distribution in Two New Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Anderson, Ren; Barley, Dennis; Rudd, Armin; Townsend, Aaron; Hancock, Ed

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a field test to characterize the uniformity of room-to-room ventilation air distribution under various operating conditions by examining multi-zone tracer gas decay curves and calculating local age-of-air.

  17. Interior building details of Building C, Room C203 to Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building C, Room C-203 to Room C-204: historical partition track with folding doors, east painted wall; easterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  18. ENERGY STAR Certified Room Air Conditioners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 4.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Room Air Conditioners that are effective as of October 26, 2015. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=roomac.pr_crit_room_ac

  19. 32 CFR 701.35 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reading room. 701.35 Section 701.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.35 Reading room. Location where...

  20. 32 CFR 701.35 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reading room. 701.35 Section 701.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.35 Reading room. Location where...

  1. 32 CFR 701.35 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reading room. 701.35 Section 701.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.35 Reading room. Location where...

  2. 32 CFR 701.35 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading room. 701.35 Section 701.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.35 Reading room. Location where...

  3. 32 CFR 701.35 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reading room. 701.35 Section 701.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.35 Reading room. Location where...

  4. PASSWORD: Organizing Exits from the Resource Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda K.

    1990-01-01

    The article offers a classroom management technique, PASSWORD, that facilitates the smooth transition of handicapped students from the resource room to the regular class. Students are each asked a "code question," usually a review question, the answer to which is the password for leaving the resource room. (DB)

  5. The Mini Dark Room from Holywell High

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The mini dark room from Holywell High School costs nothing to make and has a construction time of 10 min. In spite of progress, or perhaps because of it, light experiments often have to be performed without blackout. Put this idea into practice and each pupil can have a dark room--and best of all, it's free. In this article, the author describes…

  6. Room 13: The Movement and International Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Room 13 is a global uprising of creative and entrepreneurial children who are responsible for a growing international network of student-organised art studios. Each Room 13 studio facilitates the work of young artists alongside a professional adult artist in residence, providing an exchange of ideas, skills and experience across the ages. The…

  7. The Ethics of the Collegiate Locker Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Locker rooms are a fixture in the athletic culture of colleges and universities. Given the important roles those spaces play in the learning, growth, and development of student-athletes, collegiate leaders should consider how to influence locker room environments in positive ways.

  8. Prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in the pediatric emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Luiz Gabriel; Mendes, Elaine de Abreu

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Fever and pain, which are very common in ear, nose, and throat pathologies, are among the most frequent complaints recorded during emergency room pediatric patient treatment. Most of time, the pediatricians are called on to evaluate otorhinolaryngology disorders that requires specialist assessment. Aim: To determine the prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in a pediatric population in a reference hospital in the city of Itatiba, São Paulo. Methods: We evaluated 2,054 pediatric patients (age range, 0–12 years, 11 months) in this descriptive, transversal observational (survey) study. Data collection was performed by a single observer during 103 night shifts (07:00 p.m. to 07:00 a.m.) between January and December 2011, and included documentation of the main diagnosis, and patient age and sex. The ethics committee and research institution approved study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on diagnosis: Group A otorhinolaryngology disease and Group B included diagnoses not contained in Group A. Results: Of the total enrolled patients, 52.2% corresponded to Group A and 47.8% to Group B; 51.9% were male and 48.1% were female. The average age was 4.5 years (Group A, 3.93 years; Group B, 5.03 years). We compared the prevalence of the diagnostic hypotheses of the 2 groups. Conclusion: A large number of patients sought treatment at pediatric emergency rooms for otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses. PMID:25991987

  9. 146. View of oil filter room in basement (Room B1) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. View of oil filter room in basement (Room B-1) where oil used in lubrication in generator room is cleaned and recycled. The two tanks in the foreground each have capacities of 2,100 gallons. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. High Efficiency Room Air Conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This project was undertaken as a CRADA project between UT-Battelle and Geberal Electric Company and was funded by Department of Energy to design and develop of a high efficiency room air conditioner. A number of novel elements were investigated to improve the energy efficiency of a state-of-the-art WAC with base capacity of 10,000 BTU/h. One of the major modifications was made by downgrading its capacity from 10,000 BTU/hr to 8,000 BTU/hr by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity (8,000 BTU/hr) but high efficiency compressor having an EER of 9.7 as compared with 9.3 of the original compressor. However, all heat exchangers from the original unit were retained to provide higher EER. The other subsequent major modifications included- (i) the AC fan motor was replaced by a brushless high efficiency ECM motor along with its fan housing, (ii) the capillary tube was replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and (iii) the unit was tested with a drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (90% molar concentration)/R125 (10% molar concentration). The WAC was tested in the environmental chambers at ORNL as per the design rating conditions of AHAM/ASHRAE (Outdoor- 95F and 40%RH, Indoor- 80F, 51.5%RH). All these modifications resulted in enhancing the EER of the WAC by up to 25%.

  11. Perceptual effects in auralization of virtual rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Mendel; Larsson, Pontus; Vastfjall, Daniel; Torres, Rendell R.

    2002-05-01

    By using various types of binaural simulation (or ``auralization'') of physical environments, it is now possible to study basic perceptual issues relevant to room acoustics, as well to simulate the acoustic conditions found in concert halls and other auditoria. Binaural simulation of physical spaces in general is also important to virtual reality systems. This presentation will begin with an overview of the issues encountered in the auralization of room and other environments. We will then discuss the influence of various approximations in room modeling, in particular, edge- and surface scattering, on the perceived room response. Finally, we will discuss cross-modal effects, such as the influence of visual cues on the perception of auditory cues, and the influence of cross-modal effects on the judgement of ``perceived presence'' and the rating of room acoustic quality.

  12. Instrumentation for measuring speech privacy in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrall, Thomas; Pirn, Rein; Markham, Ben

    2003-10-01

    Federal legislation pertaining to oral privacy in healthcare and financial services industries has increased the need for a convenient and economical way to document speech privacy conditions in offices, medical examination rooms, and certain other workspaces. This legislation is embodied in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA). Both laws require that reasonable measures be put in place to safeguard the oral privacy of patients and clients. While techniques for privacy documentation are known within the acoustical consulting community, it is unlikely that community alone has the capacity to provide the surveys needed to evaluate acoustical conditions and demonstrate compliance with the legislation. A portable computer with integrated soundboard and a suitable amplified loudspeaker and test microphone are all that are needed to perform in situ measurements of articulation index or other accepted indices of speech privacy. Along with modest training, such instrumentation allows technicians to survey a large number of sites economically. Cost-effective components are shown that can meet the requirements for testing in most common environments where oral privacy is likely to be required. Example cases are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of such instrumentation.

  13. Soft silicone foam dressing is more effective than polyurethane film dressing for preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers in spinal surgery patients: the Border Operating room Spinal Surgery (BOSS) trial in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mine; Ohura, Norihiko; Tanaka, Junko; Ichimura, Shoichi; Kasuya, Yusuke; Hotta, Oruto; Kagaya, Yu; Sekiyama, Takuya; Tannba, Mitsuko; Suzuki, Nao

    2016-12-07

    Preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers (IAPUs) in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position using a Relton-Hall frame is challenging. We investigated the efficacy of soft silicone foam dressings in preventing IAPUs. A prospective dual-center sham study was conducted among patients undergoing elective spinal surgery in a general hospital and a university hospital in Japan. The incidence of IAPUs that developed when soft silicone foam dressings and polyurethane film dressings were used was compared on two sides in the same patient. IAPUs developed on the chest in 11 of 100 patients (11%). Polyurethane film dressings were associated with a significantly higher rate of IAPUs than soft silicone foam dressings (11 versus 3, P = 0·027). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a diastolic blood pressure of <50 mmHg (P = 0·025, OR 3·74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·18-13·08) and the length of surgery (by 1 hour: P = 0·038, OR 1·61, 95% CI 1·03-2·64) were independently associated with the development of IAPUs. The use of soft silicone foam dressings reduced the risk of IAPUs (P = 0·019, OR 0·23, 95% CI 0·05-0·79) and was more effective than film dressings for preventing IAPUs in spinal surgery patients.

  14. Nursing is the room rate.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2012-01-01

    Shrinking dollars increase the need for health care stakeholders to clearly understand nursing's worth. For nursing to assure an adequate investment in nurses, it needs to articulate its value drivers. Nursing revenue offers a data source that reflects stakeholder choices and patient needs. The daily nursing billing supports hospital payment and provides cost data, important for hospital financial decision making. This revenue is a tangible asset reflecting nursing value and can be used to justify an investment in the profession. Nursing leadership can use this daily nursing charge data to monitor and measure the impact of efficiencies related to patient care.

  15. On designing room sheilding for total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    When designing shielding for total-body irradiation as an additional modality of treatment in an ordinary radiation therapy room, the extended treatment distance used for these patients greatly increases the workload because of the inverse-square factor. In a seeming contradiction to logic, for a facility with an exterior wall in the path of one lateral primary beam, and a restricted area behind the other primary wall, the overall shielding requirements are lower if the TBI patients are treated with the machine oriented toward the occupied interior. 4 refs.

  16. Assessment of Health-Care Worker Exposure to Pandemic Flu in Hospital Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, U.; Gressel, M.; Konangi, S.; Mead, K.; Kishore, A.; Earnest, G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a current Airborne Infection Isolation Room (AIIR) in protecting health-care workers (HCWs) from airborne-infection (AI) exposure, and compares HCW AI exposures within an AIIR and a traditional patient room. We numerically simulated the air-flow patterns in the rooms, using room geometries and layout (room dimensions, bathroom dimensions and details, placement of vents and furniture), ventilation parameters (flow rates at the inlet and outlet vents, diffuser design, thermal sources, etc.), and pressurization corresponding to those measured at a local hospital. A patient-cough was introduced into each simulation, and the AI dispersal was tracked in time using a multi-phase flow simulation approach. The measured data showed that ventilation rates for both rooms exceeded 12 air-changes per hour (ACH), and the AIIR was at almost 16 ACH. Thus, the AIIR met the recommended design criteria for ventilation rate and pressurization. However, the computed results revealed incomplete air mixing, and not all of the room air was changed 12 (or 16) times per hour. In fact, in some regions of the room, the air merely circulated, and did not refresh. With the main exhaust flow rate exceeding the main supply, mass flow rate conservation required a part of the deficit to be accounted for by air migration from the corridor through the gaps around the main door. Hence, the AIIR was effective in containing the “infectious aerosol” within the room. However, it showed increased exposure of the HCW to the AI pathogens, as the flow from the ceiling-mounted supply louver first encountered the patient and then the HCW almost directly on its way to the main exhaust, also located on the ceiling. The traditional patient room exhibited a similar flow path. In addition, for the traditional patient room, some cough-generated aerosol is observed very close to the gaps around the door to the corridor, indicating that the aerosol may escape to the corridor

  17. Assessment of Health-Care Worker Exposure to Pandemic Flu in Hospital Rooms.

    PubMed

    Ghia, U; Gressel, M; Konangi, S; Mead, K; Kishore, A; Earnest, G

    This study examines the effectiveness of a current Airborne Infection Isolation Room (AIIR) in protecting health-care workers (HCWs) from airborne-infection (AI) exposure, and compares HCW AI exposures within an AIIR and a traditional patient room. We numerically simulated the air-flow patterns in the rooms, using room geometries and layout (room dimensions, bathroom dimensions and details, placement of vents and furniture), ventilation parameters (flow rates at the inlet and outlet vents, diffuser design, thermal sources, etc.), and pressurization corresponding to those measured at a local hospital. A patient-cough was introduced into each simulation, and the AI dispersal was tracked in time using a multi-phase flow simulation approach. The measured data showed that ventilation rates for both rooms exceeded 12 air-changes per hour (ACH), and the AIIR was at almost 16 ACH. Thus, the AIIR met the recommended design criteria for ventilation rate and pressurization. However, the computed results revealed incomplete air mixing, and not all of the room air was changed 12 (or 16) times per hour. In fact, in some regions of the room, the air merely circulated, and did not refresh. With the main exhaust flow rate exceeding the main supply, mass flow rate conservation required a part of the deficit to be accounted for by air migration from the corridor through the gaps around the main door. Hence, the AIIR was effective in containing the "infectious aerosol" within the room. However, it showed increased exposure of the HCW to the AI pathogens, as the flow from the ceiling-mounted supply louver first encountered the patient and then the HCW almost directly on its way to the main exhaust, also located on the ceiling. The traditional patient room exhibited a similar flow path. In addition, for the traditional patient room, some cough-generated aerosol is observed very close to the gaps around the door to the corridor, indicating that the aerosol may escape to the corridor, and

  18. Automated Primary Care Screening in Pediatric Waiting Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Implementing US Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of Pediatrics preventive service guidelines within the short duration of a visit is difficult because identifying which of a large number of guidelines apply to a particular patient is impractical. Clinical decision support system integrated with electronic medical records offer a good strategy for implementing screening in waiting rooms. Our objective was to determine rates of positive risk screens during typical well-care visits among children and adolescents in a primary care setting. METHODS: Child Health Improvement through Computer Automation (CHICA) is a pediatric clinical decision support system developed by our research group. CHICA encodes clinical guidelines as medical logic modules to generate scanable paper forms: the patient screening form to collect structured data from patient families in the waiting room and the physician worksheet to provide physician assessments at each visit. By using visit as a unit of analysis from CHICA’s database, we have determined positive risk screen rates in our population. RESULTS: From a cohort of 16 963 patients, 408 601 questions were asked in 31 843 visits. Of the questions asked, 362 363 (89%) had a response. Of those, 39 176 (11%) identified positive risk screens in both the younger children and the adolescent age groups. CONCLUSIONS: By automating the process of screening and alerting the physician to those who screened positive, we have significantly decreased the burden of identifying relevant guidelines and screening of patient families in our clinics. PMID:22508925

  19. Some folded issues related to over-shielded and unplanned rooms for medical linear accelerators - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Ullah, Asad; Hussain, Amjad; Ali, Nawab; Alam, Khan; Khan, Gulzar; Matiullah; Maeng, Seongjin; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2015-08-01

    A medical linear accelerator (LINAC) room must be properly shielded to limit the outside radiation exposure to an acceptable safe level defined by individual state and international regulations. However, along with this prime objective, some additional issues are also important. The current case-study was designed to unfold the issues related to over-shielded and unplanned treatment rooms for LINACs. In this connection, an apparently unplanned and over-shielded treatment room of 610 × 610 cm2 in size was compared with a properly designed treatment room of 762 × 762 cm2 in size ( i.e., by following the procedures and recommendations of the IAEA Safety Reports Series No. 47 and NCRP 151). Evaluation of the unplanned room indicated that it was over-shielded and that its size was not suitable for total body irradiation (TBI), although the license for such a treatment facility had been acquired for the installed machine. An overall 14.96% reduction in the total shielding volume ( i.e., concrete) for an optimally planned room as compared to a non-planned room was estimated. Furthermore, the inner room's dimensions were increased by 25%, in order to accommodate TBI patients. These results show that planning and design of the treatment rooms are imperative to avoid extra financial burden to the hospitals and to provide enough space for easy and safe handling of the patients. A spacious room is ideal for storing treatment accessories and facilitates TBI treatment.

  20. 7 CFR 58.211 - Packaging room for bulk products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging room for bulk products. 58.211 Section 58... Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.211 Packaging room for bulk products. A separate room or area shall... dust within the packaging room and where needed, a dust collector shall be provided and...

  1. Operating room metrics score card-creating a prototype for individualized feedback.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Rodney A; Gimlich, Robert; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Urman, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The balance between reducing costs and inefficiencies with that of patient safety is a challenging problem faced in the operating room suite. An ongoing challenge is the creation of effective strategies that reduce these inefficiencies and provide real-time personalized metrics and electronic feedback to anesthesia practitioners. We created a sample report card structure, utilizing existing informatics systems. This system allows to gather and analyze operating room metrics for each anesthesia provider and offer personalized feedback. To accomplish this task, we identified key metrics that represented time and quality parameters. We collected these data for individual anesthesiologists and compared performance to the overall group average. Data were presented as an electronic score card and made available to individual clinicians on a real-time basis in an effort to provide effective feedback. These metrics included number of cancelled cases, average turnover time, average time to operating room ready and patient in room, number of delayed first case starts, average induction time, average extubation time, average time to recovery room arrival to discharge, performance feedback from other providers, compliance to various protocols, and total anesthetic costs. The concept we propose can easily be generalized to a variety of operating room settings, types of facilities and OR health care professionals. Such a scorecard can be created using content that is important for operating room efficiency, research, and practice improvement for anesthesia providers.

  2. Key facilitators and best practices of hotel-style room service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sheehan-Smith, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    This qualitative study sought to identify the features, advantages, and disadvantages of hotel-style room service; the barriers to, and facilitators for, implementing the process; and "best practices." The study took place in four heterogeneous hospitals. Participants included hospital administrators, managers, and room-service employees. Data-collection methods included semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis. Common features of hotel-style room service were meal delivery within 30 to 45 minutes, a restaurant-style menu, procedures to feed ineligible patients, tray assembly on demand, scripting, and waitstaff uniforms for room-service employees. The major barrier to implementing room service was obtaining nursing support. The key facilitators were the hospital's service-oriented culture, using a multidisciplinary planning team, engaging nursing departments early in the planning stages, and intense customer-service training of room-service employees. The overwhelming advantage was patients' control over their food choices. The main disadvantage was cost. Initial best practices in hotel-style room service include: (a) taking a multidisciplinary team approach for developing and implementing the process, (b) customer-service training, (c) using a customer-driven menu, (d) wearing waitstaff uniforms, and (e) using carts with airpots for dispensing hot beverages.

  3. Misidentification of English Language Proficiency in Triage: Impact on Satisfaction and Door-to-Room Time.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vamsi; Roper, Jamie; Cossey, Kori; Roman, Crystal; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    We examined triage nurses' assessment of patients' language proficiency compared to patients' self-reported proficiency and the impact of language discordance on door-to-room time and patient satisfaction. This was a prospective study of emergency department walk-in patients. Patients completed a survey in which they identified their language proficiency. On a Likert scale, patients ranked how well they felt they were understood and how satisfied they were with the triage process. Nurses completed surveys identifying the patient's primary language and how well they felt they understood the patient. Door-to-room times were obtained from medical records. 163 patients were enrolled. 66% of patients identified themselves as having good English proficiency, while 34% of patients had limited English proficiency. Nurses misclassified 27% of self-identified Spanish-speaking patients as being English proficient. Spanish-speakers felt less satisfied with triage than English-speakers (p < 0.01). There were no differences in door-to-room time. Triage nurses overestimate patient language skills. Spanish-speaking patients feel less satisfied with triage than English-speakers.

  4. Factors determining the smooth flow and the non-operative time in a one-induction room to one-operating room setting

    PubMed Central

    Mulier, Jan P; De Boeck, Liesje; Meulders, Michel; Beliën, Jeroen; Colpaert, Jan; Sels, Annabel

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives What factors determine the use of an anaesthesia preparation room and shorten non-operative time? Methods A logistic regression is applied to 18 751 surgery records from AZ Sint-Jan Brugge AV, Belgium, where each operating room has its own anaesthesia preparation room. Surgeries, in which the patient's induction has already started when the preceding patient's surgery has ended, belong to a first group where the preparation room is used as an induction room. Surgeries not fulfilling this property belong to a second group. A logistic regression model tries to predict the probability that a surgery will be classified into a specific group. Non-operative time is calculated as the time between end of the previous surgery and incision of the next surgery. A log-linear regression of this non-operative time is performed. Results It was found that switches in surgeons, being a non-elective surgery as well as the previous surgery being non-elective, increase the probability of being classified into the second group. Only a few surgery types, anaesthesiologists and operating rooms can be found exclusively in one of the two groups. Analysis of variance demonstrates that the first group has significantly lower non-operative times. Switches in surgeons, anaesthesiologists and longer scheduled durations of the previous surgery increases the non-operative time. A switch in both surgeon and anaesthesiologist strengthens this negative effect. Only a few operating rooms and surgery types influence the non-operative time. Conclusion The use of the anaesthesia preparation room shortens the non-operative time and is determined by several human and structural factors. PMID:25496600

  5. Principles of operating room organization.

    PubMed

    Watkins, W D

    1997-01-01

    The importance of the changing health care climate has triggered important changes in the management of high-cost components of acute care facilities. By integrating and better managing various elements of the surgical process, health care institutions are able to rationally trim costs while maintaining high-quality services. The leadership that physicians can provide is crucial to the success of this undertaking (1). The importance of the use of primary data related to patient throughput and related resources should be strongly emphasized, for only when such data are converted to INFORMATION of functional value can participating healthcare personnel be reasonably expected to anticipate and respond to varying clinical demands with ever-limited resources. Despite the claims of specific commercial vendors, no single product will likely be sufficient to significantly change the perioperative process to the degree or for the duration demanded by healthcare reform. The most effective approach to achieving safety, cost-effectiveness, and predictable process in the realm of Surgical Services will occur by appropriate application of the "best of breed" contributions of: (a) medical/patient safety practice/oversight; (b) information technology; (c) contemporary management; and (d) innovative and functional cost-accounting methodology. S "modified activity-based cost accounting method" can serve as the basis for acquiring true direct-cost information related to the perioperative process. The proposed overall management strategy emphasizes process and feedback, rather than specific product, and although imposing initial demands and change on the traditional hospital setting, can advance the strongest competitive position in perioperative services. This comprehensive approach comprises a functional basis for important bench-marking activities among multiple surgical services. An active, comparative process of this type is of paramount importance in emphasizing patient care and

  6. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  7. The Whys and Hows of Training Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice on building and equipping a college athletic training room that can serve in preventing and treating athletic injuries. Issues concerning space utilization, protecting confidentiality, and making accommodations for amenities such as hydrotherapy pools are addressed. (GR)

  8. High Fidelity Simulation of a Computer Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim; Chan, William; Chaderjian, Neal; Pandya, Shishir

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Columbia supercomputer and the mesh technology used to test the adequacy of the fluid and cooling of a computer room. A technical description of the Columbia supercomputer is also presented along with its performance capability.

  9. The Portable War Room Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govers, Francis X., III; Fry, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The Portable War Room is an internal TASC project to research and develop a visualization and simulation environment to provide for decision makers the power to review the past, understand the present, and peer into the future.

  10. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, Lisa Anne

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  11. 24 CFR 3285.502 - Expanding rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... support and anchoring systems for expanding rooms must be installed in accordance with designs provided by the home manufacturer or prepared by a registered professional engineer or registered architect,...

  12. Radiation transport in a radiotherapy room

    SciTech Connect

    Agosteo, S.; Para, A.F.; Maggioni, B.

    1995-01-01

    The photoneutron dose equivalent in a linac radio-therapy room and its entrance maze was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations under different conditions. Particularly, the effect of neutron absorbers and moderator layers placed on the maze walls was considered. The contribution of prompt gamma rays emitted in absorption reactions of thermal neutrons was also taken into account. The simulation results are compared with some experimental measurements in the therapy room and in the maze. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Determining Camera Gain in Room Temperature Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati

    2010-12-01

    James R. Janesick provides a method for determining the amplification of a CCD or CMOS camera when only access to the raw images is provided. However, the equation that is provided ignores the contribution of dark current. For CCD or CMOS cameras that are cooled well below room temperature, this is not a problem, however, the technique needs adjustment for use with room temperature cameras. This article describes the adjustment made to the equation, and a test of this method.

  14. Conflict in the operating room: fight and flight or growth and communication.

    PubMed

    Stella, Cheryl

    2010-06-01

    Conflict is partial to no one. It ranges from within an individual and spirals in a ripple effect to others. Conflict among Registered Nurses (RNs) and Operating Room Technicians (ORTs) and between fellow RNs is prevalent in the operation room. The OR environment is filled with a number of personalities, each possessing varying methods for the implementation of patient care. Effective communication is key to preventing, and resolving, conflict situations.

  15. Rethinking theatre in modern operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robin; Manias, Elizabeth

    2005-03-01

    Metaphor is a means through which a widely accepted meaning of a word is used in a different context to add understanding that would otherwise be difficult to conceive. Through etymological and metaphorical associations, we contend that aspects of "theatre" are still relevant in the modern operating rooms and that the use of dramaturgical metaphors can add another layer of understanding about the social reality in this setting. We begin by exploring the historical roots and derivation of the word theatre as it applied to anatomical dissection and surgery. Briefly, we touch on the work of Erving Goffman and examine how his work has been used by others to explore aspects of operating room nursing. Then, drawing on data from a postmodern ethnographic study that has been used to examine communication in operating room nursing, four dramaturgical metaphors are used to illustrate the argument. They are drama, the script and learning the lines, the show must go on, and changing between back stage and front stage. To conclude, the small amount of previously published literature on this topic is compared and contrasted, and the relevance of using dramaturgical metaphors to understand modern operating rooms is discussed. Being able to distinguish between the inherent drama in operating room work and the dramatic realisation of individuals who work within, can help operating room nurses to think differently about, and perhaps re-evaluate their social situation and how they function within it.

  16. What Happens in the Operating Room? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? KidsHealth > For Kids > ...

  17. TRACES OF ORIGINAL PARTITIONS AT JUNCTURE OF FRONT ROOM, REAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRACES OF ORIGINAL PARTITIONS AT JUNCTURE OF FRONT ROOM, REAR ROOM AND HALL, SECOND FLOOR. ALSO SHOWS ORIGINAL STUCCO CORNICE OF FRONT AND REAR ROOMS (LEFT) AND HALL (RIGHT) - Kid-Chandler House, 323 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. 75 FR 67450 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management Implementation Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management... of Pipeline Safety Representatives (NAPSR) on the implementation of pipeline control room management. The workshop is intended to foster an understanding of the Control Room Management Rule issued...

  19. 18 CFR 1301.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... through its Web site at http://www.tva.gov. This electronic reading room contains the records that the... room records. The index is identified as the Reading Room Table of Contents on TVA's Web site and...

  20. 18 CFR 1301.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... through its Web site at http://www.tva.gov. This electronic reading room contains the records that the... room records. The index is identified as the Reading Room Table of Contents on TVA's Web site and...

  1. 18 CFR 1301.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... through its Web site at http://www.tva.gov. This electronic reading room contains the records that the... room records. The index is identified as the Reading Room Table of Contents on TVA's Web site and...

  2. Using acoustic information to perceive room size: effects of blindness, room reverberation time, and stimulus.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Pardhan, Shahina; Cirstea, Silvia; Moore, Brian C J

    2013-01-01

    Blind participants greatly rely on sound for spatial information regarding the surrounding environment. It is not yet established whether lack of vision to calibrate audition in far space affects blind participants' internal spatial representation of acoustic room size. Furthermore, blind participants may rely more on farthest distance estimates to sound sources compared with sighted participants when perceiving room size. Here we show that judgments of apparent room size and sound distance are correlated, more so for blind than for sighted participants. Sighted participants judged a reverberant virtual room to be larger for speech than for music or noise stimuli, whereas blind participants did not. The results suggest that blindness affects the use of room reverberation for distance and room-size judgments.

  3. [Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) in the emergency room. Is it suitable as an SOP?].

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, S; Tjardes, T; Steinhausen, E; Balke, M; Paffrath, T; Bouillon, B; Bäthis, H

    2010-08-01

    There is clinical evidence that a standardized management of trauma patients in the emergency room improves outcome. ATLS is a training course that teaches a systematic approach to the trauma patient in the emergency room. The aims are a rapid and accurate assessment of the patient's physiologic status, treatment according to priorities, and making decisions on whether the local resources are sufficient for adequate definitive treatment of the patient or if transfer to a trauma center is necessary. Above all it is important to prevent secondary injury, to realize timing as a relevant factor in the initial treatment, and to assure a high standard of care. A standard operating procedure (SOP) exactly regulates the approach to trauma patients and determines the responsibilities of the involved faculties. An SOP moreover incorporates the organizational structure in the treatment of trauma patients as well as the necessary technical equipment and staff requirements. To optimize process and result quality, priorities are in the fields of medical fundamentals of trauma care, education, and fault management. SOPs and training courses increase the process and result quality in the treatment of the trauma patient in the emergency room. These programs should be based on the special demands of the physiology of the trauma as well as the structural specifics of the hospital. ATLS does not equal an SOP but it qualifies as a standardized concept for management of trauma patients in the emergency room.

  4. [Simulation of neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room].

    PubMed

    Pfister, R E; Savoldelli, G L

    2011-07-01

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most cost-effective medical interventions, most often an emergency procedure involving a multidisciplinary team in the delivery room: doctors, nurses, midwives, obstetricians, anesthetists and other theatre staff. The success of resuscitation depends not only on individual competence but also on efficient teamwork between healthcare professionals in the delivery room; failure often results from the weakest link. Initiation of basic resuscitation procedures must be rapid and effective. Simple procedures must therefore be known by a large number of healthcare professionals, in fact all those potentially present at a delivery. Many complex neonatal diseases on the other hand are too infrequent for all to acquire sufficient personal experience. In addition, synchronization between the interventions of the different members in a perinatal team is complex. It is therefore necessary to train both individuals and teams to better manage perinatal crisis situations. The educational approach should remain multimodal, combining teaching of technical and non-techniques skills. Simulation of resuscitation scenarios can mimic emergency situations without any risk to the patient. It can be used for teaching and/or evaluation of the effectiveness of procedures and collaboration between actors. For maximum performance in complex pathologies, multidisciplinary teaching sessions are necessary. Simulation techniques adapted to neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room appear of great educational interest and proof of their efficiency gradually appears in literature.

  5. Three-dimensional conformal setup (3D-CSU) of patients using the coordinate system provided by three internal fiducial markers and two orthogonal diagnostic X-ray systems in the treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, Hiroki . E-mail: hshirato@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Oita, Masataka; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Uegaki, Shinji; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Kato, Norio; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy of a system for correcting for the rotational error of the clinical target volume (CTV) without having to reposition the patient using three fiducial markers and two orthogonal fluoroscopic images. We call this system 'three-dimensional conformal setup' (3D-CSU). Methods and materials: Three 2.0-mm gold markers are inserted into or adjacent to the CTV. On the treatment couch, the actual positions of the three markers are calculated based on two orthogonal fluoroscopies crossing at the isocenter of the linear accelerator. Discrepancy of the actual coordinates of gravity center of three markers from its planned coordinates is calculated. Translational setup error is corrected by adjustment of the treatment couch. The rotation angles ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) of the coordinates of the actual CTV relative to the planned CTV are calculated around the lateral (x), craniocaudal (y), and anteroposterior (z) axes of the planned CTV. The angles of the gantry head, collimator, and treatment couch of the linear accelerator are adjusted according to the rotation of the actual coordinates of the tumor in relation to the planned coordinates. We have measured the accuracy of 3D-CSU using a static cubic phantom. Results: The gravity center of the phantom was corrected within 0.9 {+-} 0.3 mm (mean {+-} SD), 0.4 {+-} 0.2 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm for the rotation of the phantom from 0-30 degrees around the x, y, and z axes, respectively, every 5 degrees. Dose distribution was shown to be consistent with the planned dose distribution every 10 degrees of the rotation from 0-30 degrees. The mean rotational error after 3D-CSU was -0.4 {+-} 0.4 (mean {+-} SD), -0.2 {+-} 0.4, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 degrees around the x, y, and z axis, respectively, for the rotation from 0-90 degrees. Conclusions: Phantom studies showed that 3D-CSU is useful for performing rotational correction of the target volume without correcting the position of the patient on the treatment couch

  6. Common questions about herpes: analysis of chat-room transcripts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lisa K; Omisore, Folashade

    2009-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with genital herpes typically undergo a period of psychological adjustment. Although healthcare providers can play a key role in this adjustment, in several patient surveys patients have expressed dissatisfaction with the information and counselling offered by professionals. To address this gap, providers must first identify the common questions and myths that are not addressed, or are addressed inadequately. This article is that first step. Through a content analysis of herpes chat-room transcripts captured on their website from autumn 2001 to spring 2006, researchers from the American Social Health Association identified common herpes questions and myths. The 1968 chat passages were coded into 12 themes and 50 sub-themes. Frequently, visitors' questions concerned transmission, symptoms and diagnosis followed by natural history, psychosocial issues and treatment options. The results of this analysis will aid in the creation of tailored messages to address common factual questions and provide psychosocial support.

  7. Medical robotics and the operating room of the future.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Medical robotics is an evolving field with a relatively short history and limited market penetration, although some recent systems have shown some commercial success. Nevertheless, medical robotics shows great promise for improving patient care and may become a key component in the Operating Room of the Future (ORF), where high technology equipment will be integrated with medical imaging. This paper gives an overview of the medical robotics field and summarizes a recent ORF workshop in which participants concluded that standards are critical for an integrated approach.

  8. Tobacco smoke removal with room air cleaners.

    PubMed

    Olander, L; Johansson, J; Johansson, R

    1988-12-01

    The ability of room air cleaners to remove gases and particles from air contaminated with tobacco smoke has been studied. Thirty-one air cleaners were tested. Various air-cleaning devices were used, ie, electrostatic precipitators, electret fiber filters, ionizers, activated carbon, impregnated alumina, ionizing lamps, and an electron generator. The airflow rates were in the range of 0-500 m3/h. The measurements covered particle sizes of 0.01-7.5 microns and the following gases: carbon monoxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrocarbons, and hydrogen cyanide. No formal standard procedure exists for testing room air cleaners; therefore the tests were made in the following way. Tobacco smoke was generated and mixed in a closed room. The room air cleaner was started, and the decay rates for the gases and particles were measured. The results were calculated as equivalent airflow rates, ie, the clean airflow rate causing the same decay rate for contaminant concentrations in a room. The equivalent airflow rates were 0-360 m3/h. The rate of ozone emission by electrostatic precipitators and ionizers was also measured. One general conclusion was that it is much more difficult to remove gases than particles.

  9. The operating room as a clinical learning environment: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rhoda; Van Schalkwyk, Susan C; Prakaschandra, Rosaley

    2016-05-01

    Students undertake their clinical placement in various clinical settings for the exposure to and acquisition of skills related to that particular context. The operating room is a context that offers the opportunity to develop critical skills related to the perioperative care of the patient. Despite numerous studies that have been undertaken in this field, few have investigated the operating room as a clinical learning environment in the South African private healthcare context. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' perceptions of the operating room as a clinical learning environment. An exploratory, interpretive and descriptive design generating qualitative data was utilized. Eight nursing students completed an open-ended questionnaire, and twelve nursing students participated in the focus group discussion. Four themes emerged, namely, 'interpersonal factors', 'educational factors', 'private operating room context', and 'recommendations'. The opinion that the operating room offers an opportunity to gain skills unique to this context was expressed. However, despite the potential learning opportunities, the key findings of this study reveal negative perceptions of nursing students regarding learning experiences in the operating room. Exploration into the preparatory needs of students specific to learning outcomes before operating room placement should be considered. It will also be necessary to improve collaboration between lecturers, mentors and theatre managers.

  10. Interior building details of Building C, Room C003 and Room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building C, Room C-003 and Room C-002 catwalk above false ceiling, east brick retaining wall, brick north wall, 1930 retrofit pillars, wood floor joints; northeasterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  11. ADM. Administration Building (TAN602). Early room layout, door and room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Administration Building (TAN-602). Early room layout, door and room schedules. Ralph M. Parsons 902-2-ANP-602-A 31. Date: December 1952. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 033-0602-00-693-106710 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  13. Method of Remotely Constructing a Room

    DOEpatents

    Michie, J. D.; De Hart, R. C.

    1971-10-05

    The testing of nuclear devices of high explosive yield has required that cavities of relatively large size be provided at considerable distances below the surface of the earth for the pre-detonation emplacement of the device. The construction of an essentially watertight chamber or room in the cavity is generally required for the actual emplacement of the device. A method is described of constructing such a room deep within the earth by personnel at the surface. A dual wall bladder of a watertight, pliable fabric material is lowered down a shaft into a selected position. The bladder is filled with a concrete grout while a heavy fluid having essentially the same density as the grout is maintained on both sides of the bladder, to facilitate complete deployment of the bladder by the grout to form a room of desired configuration. (10 claims)

  14. Method of remotely constructing a room

    DOEpatents

    Michie, J.D.; De Hart, R.C.

    1971-10-05

    The testing of nuclear devices of high explosive yield has required that cavities of relatively large size be provided at considerable distances below the surface of the earth for the pre-detonation emplacement of the device. The construction of an essentially watertight chamber or room in the cavity is generally required for the actual emplacement of the device. A method is described of constructing such a room deep within the earth by personnel at the surface. A dual wall bladder of a watertight, pliable fabric material is lowered down a shaft into a selected position. The bladder is filled with a concrete grout while a heavy fluid having essentially the same density as the grout is maintained on both sides of the bladder, to facilitate complete deployment of the bladder by the grout to form a room of desired configuration. (10 claims)

  15. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo(2)Ti(2)Fe(8)O(19), large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them.

  16. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  17. Computerized control of the procedure for detecting and removing airborne particles in operating rooms.

    PubMed

    Bay, Omer Faruk; Ergül, Nesip

    2004-04-01

    Surgical-site infections are still a major problem in modern medicine. Normal skin fora of patients or healthcare workers causes more than half of all infections following clean surgery, but the importance of airborne particles in this setting remains controversial. The use of ultraclean air in operating rooms has been shown to reduce infection rates significantly. High efficiency particlulate air (HEPA) filters are used in some modern operating rooms. Although the uses of HEPA filters, the air quality should be controlled by another device to make safe the air in operating rooms and intensive care units. In this study, a computerized system was established to control the cleanliness of the air by measuring the presence of airborne particles of varying sizes and numbers in operating rooms. When the maximum values are exceeded, the system warns the authorized people by phone, sound, or displays.

  18. Investigation of gaseous ozone for MRSA decontamination of hospital side-rooms.

    PubMed

    Berrington, A W; Pedler, S J

    1998-09-01

    A domestic, gaseous ozone generator was investigated for use in the decontamination of hospital side-rooms that have housed patients colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Three models of bacterial contamination were used. These were exposed to ozone generation in a standard hospital side-room for 4 and 7 h. A methicillin-sensitive and a methicillin-resistant strain of S. aureus were compared. Ozone concentrations of 0.14 ppm were reached, levels which are sufficient to cause mild pulmonary toxicity. Bacterial counts were reduced in the vicinity of the gas generator in most instances, but the effect elsewhere in the room was, at best, limited. MRSA appeared more resistant to the effects of ozone than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. We conclude that the device tested would be inadequate for the decontamination of such hospital side-rooms.

  19. Widely tunable room temperature semiconductor terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Slivken, S.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Bai, Y.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-11-17

    We present a widely tunable, monolithic terahertz source based on intracavity difference frequency generation within a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser at room temperature. A three-section ridge waveguide laser design with two sampled grating sections and a distributed-Bragg section is used to achieve the terahertz (THz) frequency tuning. Room temperature single mode THz emission with a wide tunable frequency range of 2.6–4.2 THz (∼47% of the central frequency) and THz power up to 0.1 mW is demonstrated, making such device an ideal candidate for THz spectroscopy and sensing.

  20. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  1. Lightning Effects in the Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Garland L.; Fisher, Franklin A.; Collier, Richard S.; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical and empirical studies have been performed to provide better understanding of the electromagnetic environment inside the Payload Changeout Room and Orbiter payload bay resulting from lightning strikes to the launch pad lightning protection system. The analytical studies consisted of physical and mathematical modeling of the pad structure and the Payload Changeout Room. Empirical testing was performed using a lightning simulator to simulate controlled (8 kA) lightning strikes to the catenary wire lightning protection system. In addition to the analyses and testing listed above, an analysis of the configuration with the vehicle present was conducted, in lieu of testing, by the Finite Difference, Time Domain method.

  2. Control room habitability system review models

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpin, H. )

    1990-12-01

    This report provides a method of calculating control room operator doses from postulated reactor accidents and chemical spills as part of the resolution of TMI Action Plan III.D.3.4. The computer codes contained in this report use source concentrations calculated by either TACT5, FPFP, or EXTRAN, and transport them via user-defined flow rates to the control room envelope. The codes compute doses to six organs from up to 150 radionuclides (or 1 toxic chemical) for time steps as short as one second. Supporting codes written in Clipper assist in data entry and manipulation, and graphically display the results of the FORTRAN calculations. 7 refs., 22 figs.

  3. Human factors aspects of control room design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A plan for the design and analysis of a multistation control room is reviewed. It is found that acceptance of the computer based information system by the uses in the control room is mandatory for mission and system success. Criteria to improve computer/user interface include: match of system input/output with user; reliability, compatibility and maintainability; easy to learn and little training needed; self descriptive system; system under user control; transparent language, format and organization; corresponds to user expectations; adaptable to user experience level; fault tolerant; dialog capability user communications needs reflected in flexibility, complexity, power and information load; integrated system; and documentation.

  4. Overview of geometrical room acoustic modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Savioja, Lauri; Svensson, U Peter

    2015-08-01

    Computerized room acoustics modeling has been practiced for almost 50 years up to date. These modeling techniques play an important role in room acoustic design nowadays, often including auralization, but can also help in the construction of virtual environments for such applications as computer games, cognitive research, and training. This overview describes the main principles, landmarks in the development, and state-of-the-art for techniques that are based on geometrical acoustics principles. A focus is given to their capabilities to model the different aspects of sound propagation: specular vs diffuse reflections, and diffraction.

  5. Persons with Mild or Moderate Alzheimer's Disease Use a Basic Orientation Technology to Travel to Different Rooms within a Day Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; De Caro, Maria Fara; Cassano, Germana; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed whether three patients with Alzheimer's disease could learn to use a basic orientation technology to reach different rooms within a day center. At each travel instance, the technology provided verbal messages (cues) from the room to reach. For the first two patients, the messages were presented at intervals of about 15 s. For…

  6. Interior of the shipping room with doorway leading to processing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of the shipping room with doorway leading to processing room. A pass-through window with conveyor allowed the fresh packed oysters to be sent from the processing room into the shipping room. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  7. 11. BUILDING 324, INTERIOR, DINING ROOM, FROM WEST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BUILDING 324, INTERIOR, DINING ROOM, FROM WEST SIDE OF ROOM, LOOKING EAST, WITH ENTRY, LIVING ROOM AND SUN ROOM THROUGH SEQUENTIAL DOORWAYS. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Commanding Officers Residences, Between E & F Streets, West of Fourth Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. 7 CFR 58.413 - Cutting and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cutting and packaging rooms. 58.413 Section 58.413....413 Cutting and packaging rooms. When small packages of cheese are cut and wrapped, separate rooms... outward to minimize the entrance of unfiltered air into the cutting and packaging room. The...

  9. 22 CFR 303.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Public reading room. 303.5 Section 303.5 Foreign... Public reading room. (a) The Peace Corps will maintain a public reading room at its headquarters at 1111... records will be made available in the public reading room: (1) All final public opinions,...

  10. 22 CFR 303.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public reading room. 303.5 Section 303.5... ACT § 303.5 Public reading room. (a) The Peace Corps will maintain a public reading room at its... following records will be made available in the public reading room: (1) All final public...

  11. 18 CFR 1301.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public reading rooms... Freedom of Information Act § 1301.2 Public reading rooms. TVA maintains a public electronic reading room through its Web site at http://www.tva.gov. This electronic reading room contains the records that...

  12. 22 CFR 171.3 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public reading room. 171.3 Section 171.3... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.3 Public reading room. A reading room providing public access..., NW., Washington, DC. The reading room contains material pertaining to access to information under...

  13. 18 CFR 1301.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public reading rooms... Freedom of Information Act § 1301.2 Public reading rooms. TVA maintains a public electronic reading room through its Web site at http://www.tva.gov. This electronic reading room contains the records that...

  14. 22 CFR 171.3 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public reading room. 171.3 Section 171.3... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.3 Public reading room. A reading room providing public access..., NW., Washington, DC. The reading room contains material pertaining to access to information under...

  15. 22 CFR 303.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Public reading room. 303.5 Section 303.5 Foreign... Public reading room. (a) The Peace Corps will maintain a public reading room at its headquarters at 1111... records will be made available in the public reading room: (1) All final public opinions,...

  16. 19 CFR 103.1 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public reading rooms. 103.1 Section 103.1 Customs... reading rooms. Each office listed below will maintain a public reading room or public reading area where... Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. The reading rooms are open to the public during...

  17. 22 CFR 171.3 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public reading room. 171.3 Section 171.3... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.3 Public reading room. A reading room providing public access..., NW., Washington, DC. The reading room contains material pertaining to access to information under...

  18. 22 CFR 171.3 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public reading room. 171.3 Section 171.3... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.3 Public reading room. A reading room providing public access..., NW., Washington, DC. The reading room contains material pertaining to access to information under...

  19. 19 CFR 103.1 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public reading rooms. 103.1 Section 103.1 Customs... reading rooms. Each office listed below will maintain a public reading room or public reading area where... Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. The reading rooms are open to the public during...

  20. 19 CFR 103.1 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public reading rooms. 103.1 Section 103.1 Customs... reading rooms. Each office listed below will maintain a public reading room or public reading area where... Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. The reading rooms are open to the public during...

  1. 19 CFR 103.1 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public reading rooms. 103.1 Section 103.1 Customs... reading rooms. Each office listed below will maintain a public reading room or public reading area where... Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. The reading rooms are open to the public during...

  2. 19 CFR 103.1 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public reading rooms. 103.1 Section 103.1 Customs... reading rooms. Each office listed below will maintain a public reading room or public reading area where... Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. The reading rooms are open to the public during...

  3. 22 CFR 303.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Public reading room. 303.5 Section 303.5 Foreign... Public reading room. (a) The Peace Corps will maintain a public reading room at its headquarters at 1111... records will be made available in the public reading room: (1) All final public opinions,...

  4. 7 CFR 58.412 - Coolers or curing rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coolers or curing rooms. 58.412 Section 58.412... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.412 Coolers or curing rooms. Coolers or curing rooms where cheese is held for curing or storage...

  5. 30 CFR 42.50 - Charges for room and board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charges for room and board. 42.50 Section 42.50... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS NATIONAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACADEMY Room and Board § 42.50 Charges for room and board. The Academy will charge room and board to all persons staying at the Academy, except...

  6. 7 CFR 58.212 - Hopper or dump room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hopper or dump room. 58.212 Section 58.212 Agriculture... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.212 Hopper or dump room. A separate room shall be provided for the transfer of bulk dry dairy...

  7. 10 CFR 1003.13 - Public reference room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public reference room. 1003.13 Section 1003.13 Energy... Provisions § 1003.13 Public reference room. A public reference room shall be maintained at the OHA, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W., Washington, DC. In this room, the following information shall be made available...

  8. Press room of the Crew reception Area, Lunar Receivng Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Room 190 of the Support and Administrative Facilities, Crew Reception Area (CRA), Lunar Receiving Laboratory, Bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas. The room is a debriefing room which facilitates indirect contact with the astronauts and CRA medical staff during quarantine periods. Also called the press room.

  9. Room temperature synthesis of biodiesel using sulfonated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sulfonation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) affords a polar and strongly acidic catalyst, Sg-CN, which displays unprecedented reactivity and selectivity in biodiesel synthesis and esterification reactions at room temperature. Prepared for submission to Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) journal, Green Chemistry as a communication.

  10. The Art of Graffiti and Room 161

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forseth, Sonia

    1972-01-01

    Covering the walls of the art room with white paper and sealing off all the open edges with masking tape, students proceeded to do their thing'' by using tempera, oil crayons and India ink to create an environment that was completely their own. (Author/CB)

  11. A Tribute to Waiting Room Moms Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansfield, Mara

    2008-01-01

    Waiting rooms are oases for mothers of children with special needs. They congregate in these small holding areas, sitting on musty couches, while their children receive the latest therapeutic interventions. Sometimes they sit quietly, sneaking glances at each other while pretending to read year-old "People" magazines. Sometimes they crawl under a…

  12. The One-Room School in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Jean

    A unique collection of photographs and personal letters, journals and diaries, newspaper clippings, official reports, readers and textbooks, mail-order catalogues, architectural plans and diagrams recreate the flavor of the Canadian one-room school and the rural communities it served from the 1840's to 1960's. The emphasis is on the human…

  13. On Air Shutter for Cold Storage Room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Isamu; Tsuji, Katsuhiko

    Air curtains are frequently placed at doorway of cold storage room or freezing chamber. As an opening of jet flow in these air curtains is relatively narrow and speed of jet flow is fast, air entrained from surroundings increases in quantity. Therefore, we consider that jet flow with narrow opening can not effectively isolate inside air from the external atmosphere, but the one with relatively wide opening can decrease air entrained from surroundings. Then, when air curtain which has a wide opening (we call it air shutter) is installed at cold storage room, and isolating performances of air shutter are compared with the air curtain. First, as various conditions can be easily changed in numerical calculation, we compare a velocity and temperature field in cold storage room under these conditions when velocity of jet flow is changed by using numerical method. Second, we measure a temperature and velocity distribution in an actual cold storage room under three conditions (air shutter operates, air curtain operates and no operation). From these results, it was found that air shutter is more efficient than air curtain.

  14. Steps for Washroom and Locker Room Sustainability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Administrators and design teams can use proven approaches to create sustainable washrooms and locker rooms. Presents design strategies related to lighting, flooring, and water conservation that contribute to sustainability, then describes one college's experiences developing sustainable architecture, explaining how the building takes full…

  15. General Semantics in the Labor Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Jo

    This paper provides a review of some basic general semantic principles and then applies them to the area of prenatal classes and labor room practices. It first presents an overview of the principle that language is not a neutral factor in human perceptions but an active, reactive force. Next, it looks at the relationship between language and…

  16. Guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. M.; Bocast, A. K.; Stewart, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The anthropometry, workstation design, and environmental design of control rooms are outlined. The automated interface and VDTs and displays and various modes of communication between the system and the human operator using VDTs are discussed. The man in the loop is examined, the single controller single task framework and multiple controller multiple tasks issues are considered.

  17. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  18. Making a room-sized camera obscura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynt, Halima; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe how to convert a room into a camera obscura as a project for introductory geometrical optics. The view for our camera obscura is a busy street scene set against a beautiful mountain skyline. We include a short video with project instructions, ray diagrams and delightful moving images of cars driving on the road outside.

  19. Tales from a One-Room Schoolhouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaesshaefer, Megan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Lyn Huston, who teaches in a one-room schoolhouse--Duckwater School--in Duckwater, Nevada. The school, which has a class of only 15 students, is set on a plot of land between alfalfa farms, an Indian reservation, and a 20,500-acre wilderness area. Huston discusses the challenges that exist when teaching in a…

  20. Followup Behavioral Research in Resource Rooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glavin, John P.

    1973-01-01

    Five groups of approximately 50 children, grades 2 through 6, from each of five schools (four in low socioeconomic mostly black areas), originally referred for 1 or 2 years' support in a behaviorally oriented resource room, were followed up after regular class placement for 2 or 3 years. (MC)

  1. NCI Resource Room at AACR 2017

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers interested in meeting with their Program Directors should contact them ahead of AACR to arrange a time to meet at the NCI Resource Room. This space will be used for one-on-one consultations with NCI staff as well as small group meetings facilitated by the NCI.

  2. Challenges and solutions for realistic room simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2002-05-01

    Virtual room acoustic simulation (auralization) techniques have traditionally focused on answering questions related to speech intelligibility or musical quality, typically in large volumetric spaces. More recently, auralization techniques have been found to be important for the externalization of headphone-reproduced virtual acoustic images. Although externalization can be accomplished using a minimal simulation, data indicate that realistic auralizations need to be responsive to head motion cues for accurate localization. Computational demands increase when providing for the simulation of coupled spaces, small rooms lacking meaningful reverberant decays, or reflective surfaces in outdoor environments. Auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy levels indicate that much of the information captured in acoustical measurements is inaudible, minimizing the intensive computational requirements of real-time auralization systems. Results are presented for early reflection thresholds as a function of azimuth angle, arrival time, and sound-source type, and reverberation thresholds as a function of reverberation time and level within 250-Hz-2-kHz octave bands. Good agreement is found between data obtained in virtual room simulations and those obtained in real rooms, allowing a strategy for minimizing computational requirements of real-time auralization systems.

  3. Sports medicine training room clinic model for the military.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Stephen; Fairbanks, Keith; Nguyen, William; Blivin, Steve; Frantz, Earl

    2012-02-01

    A transition from traditional problem-based clinics to the Sports Medicine and Reconditioning Team (SMART) clinic model was completed by January 2009 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. The SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and enhances coordinated care between providers. The objective of this research is to show the advantages of implementing a training room team approach for the care of musculoskeletal injuries in active duty members by comparing the number of patients seen, the number of limited duty (LIMDU) periods, the number of physical evaluation boards (PEBs), and the percentage of orthopedic referrals. Electronic medical records for patients seen at sports medicine clinics between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 were reviewed. Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune provided a database of patients placed on LIMDU and PEB from 2007 through 2010. Fifty-eight and twenty-four percent more encounters occurred in 2009 and 2010, respectively, than that in 2007. The percentage of LIMDU referred for PEB in 2010 was reduced to 9% compared to that in 2007. In conclusion, the SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and a reduction in the percentage of patients recommended for PEB from LIMDU.

  4. Measurement Adherence in the Blood Pressure Self-Measurement Room

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Ahrendt, Peter; Bertelsen, Olav W.; Toftegaard, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with hypertension or receiving blood pressure (BP)-lowering treatment are often required to self-measure their BP in a dedicated self-measurement room before consultation. Current praxis does not guarantee valid measurements, possibly leading to misdiagnoses or inappropriate antihypertensive medication. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' ability to correctly self-report and follow recommendations. Patients and Methods: We used a context-aware system to gather information on BP measurements and relevant context parameters. Patients were not informed that the system automatically collected behavior data and were instructed to self-report their measurements on a paper sheet as usual. We then compared the automatically recorded data with the self-reported data in order to detect any nonadherent reporting behavior. Also, we investigated the patients' ability to adhere to the measurement recommendations. Results: We found that (1) a third of all 113 participating patients failed to self-report measured BP data correctly and (2) none of the 642 measurements obtained adhered fully to the recommendations. Conclusions: Results indicate that context-aware technology may be useful for accurately modeling aspects of nonadherent patient behavior. This may be used to inform staff of the validity of the measurement and pinpoint patients in need of additional training or to design better aids to assist the patients. The developed system is generally applicable to other self-measurement environments, including the home setting and remote outpatient clinics, as it is built using telemedicine technology and thus well suited for remote monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23631589

  5. [Interface interconnection and data integration in implementing of digital operating room].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingyi; Chen, Hua; Liu, Jiquan

    2011-10-01

    The digital operating-room, with highly integrated clinical information, is very important for rescuing lives of patients and improving quality of operations. Since equipments in domestic operating-rooms have diversified interface and nonstandard communication protocols, designing and implementing an integrated data sharing program for different kinds of diagnosing, monitoring, and treatment equipments become a key point in construction of digital operating room. This paper addresses interface interconnection and data integration for commonly used clinical equipments from aspects of hardware interface, interface connection and communication protocol, and offers a solution for interconnection and integration of clinical equipments in heterogeneous environment. Based on the solution, a case of an optimal digital operating-room is presented in this paper. Comparing with the international solution for digital operating-room, the solution proposed in this paper is more economical and effective. And finally, this paper provides a proposal for the platform construction of digital perating-room as well as a viewpoint for standardization of domestic clinical equipments.

  6. Increase in voice level and speaker comfort in lecture rooms.

    PubMed

    Brunskog, Jonas; Gade, Anders Christian; Bellester, Gaspar Payá; Calbo, Lilian Reig

    2009-04-01

    Teachers often suffer from health problems related to their voice. These problems are related to their working environment, including the acoustics of the lecture rooms. However, there is a lack of studies linking the room acoustic parameters to the voice produced by the speaker. In this pilot study, the main goals are to investigate whether objectively measurable parameters of the rooms can be related to an increase in the voice sound power produced by speakers and to the speakers' subjective judgments about the rooms. In six different rooms with different sizes, reverberation times, and other physical attributes, the sound power level produced by six speakers was measured. Objective room acoustic parameters were measured in the same rooms, including reverberation time and room gain, and questionnaires were handed out to people who had experience talking in the rooms. It is found that in different rooms significant changes in the sound power produced by the speaker can be found. It is also found that these changes mainly have to do with the size of the room and to the gain produced by the room. To describe this quality, a new room acoustic quantity called "room gain" is proposed.

  7. Computational study of room scattering influence in the THOR BNCT treatment room.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    BNCT dosimetry has often employed heavy Monte Carlo calculations for the beam characterization and the dose determination. However, these calculations commonly ignored the scattering influence between the radiations and the room structure materials in order to facilitate the calculation speed. The aim of this article attempts to explore how the room scattering affects the physical quantities such as the capture reaction rate and the gamma-ray dose rate under in-phantom and free-air conditions in the THOR BNCT treatment room. The geometry and structure materials of the treatment room were simulated in detail. The capture reaction rates per atom, as well as the gamma-ray dose rate were calculated in various sizes of phantoms and in the free-air condition. Results of this study showed that the room scattering has significant influence on the physical quantities, whether in small phantoms or in the free-air condition. This paper may be of importance in explaining the discrepancies between measurements and calculations in the BNCT dosimetry using small phantoms, in addition to provide a useful consideration with a better understanding of how the room scattering influence acts in a BNCT facility.

  8. Local public document room directory. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This directory (NUREG/BR-0088, Revision 7) lists local public document rooms (LPDRs) for commercial nuclear power plants with operating or possession-only licenses or under construction, plus the LPDRs for potential high-level radioactive waste repository sites, gaseous diffusion plants, certain fuel cycle facilities, certain low-level waste disposal facilities, and any temporary LPDRs established for the duration of licensing proceedings. In some instances, the LPDR libraries maintain document collections for more than one licensed facility. The library staff members listed are the persons most familiar with the LPDR collections. Reference librarians in the NRC Headquarters Public Document Room (PDR) are also available to assist the public in locating NRC documents.

  9. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  10. Redesigning the nuclear medicine reading room.

    PubMed

    Zemariame, Nigist; Knight, Nancy; Siegel, Eliot L

    2011-11-01

    The process of image review and interpretation has become increasingly complex and challenging for today's nuclear medicine physician from many perspectives, especially with regard to workstation integration and reading room ergonomics. With the recent proliferation of hybrid imaging systems, this complexity has increased rapidly, along with the number of studies performed. At the same time, clinicians throughout the health care enterprise are expecting remote access to nuclear medicine images whereas nuclear medicine physicians require reliable access at the point of care to the electronic medical record and to medical images from radiology and cardiology. The authors discuss the background and challenges related to integration of nuclear medicine into the health care enterprise and provide a series of recommendations for advancing successful integration efforts. Also addressed are unique characteristics of the nuclear medicine environment as well as ergonomic, lighting, and environmental considerations in the design and redesign of the modern reading room.

  11. Pilot Ashby in the White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby is checked out by white room closeout crew members before entering the orbiter Columbia. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X- ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 27 at 11:20 p.m. EDT.

  12. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  13. 51-L Challenger Crew in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Crew members of mission STS-51L stand in the White Room at Pad 39B following the end of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). From left to right they are: Teacher in Space Participant, Sharon 'Christa' McAuliffe, Payload Specialist, Gregory Jarvis, Mission Specialist, Judy Resnik, Commander Dick Scobee Mission Specialist, Ronald McNair, Pilot, Michael Smith and Mission Specialist, Ellison Onizuka

  14. Priority coding for control room alarms

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    Indicating the priority of a spatially fixed, activated alarm tile on an alarm tile array by a shape coding at the tile, and preferably using the same shape coding wherever the same alarm condition is indicated elsewhere in the control room. The status of an alarm tile can change automatically or by operator acknowledgement, but tones and/or flashing cues continue to provide status information to the operator.

  15. 32 CFR 296.6 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...″ Floppy diskette $0.50 (2) 3.5″ Floppy diskette $0.50 (3) CD-R Media $3.75 (4) Video Tape $4.00. (b) The NRO FOIA Electronic Reading Room is located on the NRO Home Page: www.nro.odci.gov. ... at 14675 Lee Road, Chantilly VA, 20151-1715 and is open weekdays only from 8:00 am until 4:00...

  16. 32 CFR 296.6 - Reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...″ Floppy diskette $0.50 (2) 3.5″ Floppy diskette $0.50 (3) CD-R Media $3.75 (4) Video Tape $4.00. (b) The NRO FOIA Electronic Reading Room is located on the NRO Home Page: www.nro.odci.gov. ... at 14675 Lee Road, Chantilly VA, 20151-1715 and is open weekdays only from 8:00 am until 4:00...

  17. White Paper for Virtual Control Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, William; Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Control Room (VCR) Proof of Concept (PoC) project is the result of an award given by the Fourth Annual NASA T&I Labs Challenge Project Call. This paper will outline the work done over the award period to build and enhance the capabilities of the Augmented/Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to create the VCR.

  18. Simplified models for heat transfer in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graca, Guilherme C. C. Carrilho Da

    Buildings protect their occupants from the outside environment. As a semi-enclosed environment, buildings tend to contain the internally generated heat and air pollutants, as well as the solar and conductive heat gains that can occur in the facade. In the warmer months of the year this generally leads to overheating, creating a need for a cooling system. Ventilation air replaces contaminated air in the building and is often used as the dominant medium for heat transfer between indoor and outdoor environments. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to develop a better understanding of the important parameters in the performance of ventilation systems and to develop simplified convective heat transfer models. The general approach used in this study seeks to capture the dominant physical processes for these problems with first order accuracy, and develop simple models that show the correct system behavior trends. Dimensional analysis, in conjunction with simple momentum and energy conservation, scaled model experiments and numerical simulations, is used to improve airflow and heat transfer rate predictions in both single and multi room ventilation systems. This study includes the three commonly used room ventilation modes: mixing, displacement and cross-ventilation. A new modeling approach to convective heat transfer between the building and the outside is presented: the concept of equivalent room heat transfer coefficient. The new model quantifies the reduction in heat transfer between ventilation air and internal room surfaces caused by limited thermal capacity and temperature variation of the air for the three modes studied. Particular emphasis is placed on cross-ventilation, and on the development of a simple model to characterize the airflow patterns that occur in this case. The implementation of the models in a building thermal simulation software tool is presented as well as comparisons between model predictions, experimental results and complex

  19. Virtual acoustics for music practice rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiheit, Ron

    2003-04-01

    The use of virtual acoustics has provided a new level of practice experience for the musician. By integrating the sound isolation of music practice rooms with the signal processing of an active acoustic system (with time variant-gain before feedback) musicians can now benefit from the experience of practicing in multiple acoustic environments. Musicians select from various acoustics environments from a typical small practice room to that of a large space such as a sports arena. The variability of the acoustic environment allows the musician to hear clearly their intonation and articulation, which may be difficult to discern in a small practice room. To effectively communicate the various acoustics environments, the musicians must be immersed in the sound field of the active acoustics without being able to discern source locations of the speakers. The system must also be able to support the dynamic range of the musicians without presenting artifacts of its own such as system noise or audible distortion. This paper deals with the design constraints needed to meet these requirements as well the antidotal responses from musicians who have used these environments for practice.

  20. [The endoscopic operating room OR 1].

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, J B; Chapron, C

    2003-04-01

    During the last few years, the development of surgical laparoscopy has been the major turning point, and the most important progress in the field of surgery. The specific installation requirements of surgical laparoscopy, as well as the technological progress proper to this surgical technique, justify the need of a new organization of the operating theatre. The new operating room OR 1 is especially designed to fit and satisfy the requirements of a modern operating theatre, where surgical laparoscopy plays a major role. The organization and the design of this new operating room (OR 1) rely on 2 main concepts: architectural, and computerized, through 2 PC systems SCB and AIDA. The main objectives of this new concept are: allowing the surgeon to control and command all the functions and the instruments, as well as the lighting of the room and the operating field; managing the surgical data and images required for medical files; establishing a communication network either from the inside or outside the sterile zone.

  1. Display Developer for Firing Room Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The firing room at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is responsible for all NASA human spaceflight launch operations, therefore it is vital that all displays within the firing room be properly tested, up-to-date, and user-friendly during a launch. The Ground Main Propulsion System (GMPS) requires a number of remote displays for Vehicle Integration and Launch (VIL) Operations at KSC. My project is to develop remote displays for the GMPS using the Display Services and Framework (DSF) editor. These remote displays will be based on model images provided by GMPS through PowerPoint. Using the DSF editor, the PowerPoint images can be recreated with active buttons associated with the correct Compact Unique Identifiers (CUIs). These displays will be documented in the Software Requirements and Design Specifications (SRDS) at the 90% GMPS Design Review. In the future, these remote displays will be available for other developers to improve, edit, or add on to so that the display may be incorporated into the firing room to be used for launches.

  2. Effect of Ventilation on Occupational Exposure to Airborne Biological Contaminants in an Isolation Room

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Omidi, Leila; Jafari, Mina; Tabarsi, Payam; Salehpour, Soussan; Amiri, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Airborne pathogens play an important role in a hospital air quality. Respiratory infections are the most common occupational disease among the health care staff. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ventilation system parameters and patient bed arrangements on concentration of airborne pathogens in indoor air of an isolation room. Materials and Methods: A single-bed room was considered in which a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis had been admitted. Five different ventilation types, each at four different capacities were installed in the room while two different locations for the patient’s bed were assessed. A direct-impact sampling method (blood agar plate) was used in order to determine the intensity of the bio-aerosols in indoor air of the isolation room. Results: The results showed that when the air was supplied through a circular vent located on the northern wall and the vented air was exhausted via a linear vent located on the southern wall, the average concentration of the bio-aerosols in the air, (with 12 air changes per hour) was reduced to 25 colonies per cubic meter (cfu/m3) (in the range of 25–88 cfu/m3 and a 95 percent confidence interval). In accordance with the analysis applied upon the two different locations of the bed, no significant difference was observed (P>0.05). Conclusion: Installation of ventilation systems as determined by the study is recommended for tuberculosis isolation rooms. PMID:26528369

  3. The filmless radiology reading room: a survey of established picture archiving and communication system sites.

    PubMed

    Siegel, E; Reiner, B; Abiri, M; Chacko, A; Morin, R; Ro, D W; Spicer, K; Strickland, N; Young, J

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey radiologists experienced in soft-copy diagnosis using computer workstations about their current reading room environment, their impressions of the efficacy of their reading room design, and their recommendations based on their experience for improvement of the soft-copy reading environment. Surveys were obtained from radiologists at seven sites representing three major picture archiving and communication system (PACS) vendors throughout the world that have had extensive experience with soft-copy interpretation of radiology studies. The radiologists filled out a detailed survey, which was designed to assess their current reading room environment and to provide them with the opportunity to make suggestions about improvement of the PACS reading rooms. The survey data were entered into a database and results were correlated with multiple parameters, including experience with PACS, types of modalities interpreted on the system, and number of years of experience in radiology. The factors judged to be most important in promoting radiologist productivity were room lighting, monitor number, and monitor brightness. Almost all of the radiologists indicated that their lighting source was from overhead rather than indirect or portable light sources. Approximately half indicated they had the capability of dimming the brightness of the overhead lighting. Most radiologists indicated that they were able to adjust room temperature but that they did not have individual temperature controls at their workstations. The radiologists indicated that the most troublesome sources of noise included background noise, other radiologists, and clinicians much more than noise from computer monitors, technologists, or patients. Most radiologists did not have chairs that could recline or arm rests. Most did have wheels and the capability to swivel, both of which were judged important. The majority of chairs also had lumbar support, which was also seen to be

  4. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken.

  5. Burn center management of operating room fire injuries.

    PubMed

    Haith, Linwood R; Santavasi, Wil; Shapiro, Tyler K; Reigart, Cynthia L; Patton, Mary Lou; Guilday, Robert E; Ackerman, Bruce H

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 operating room (OR) fires occur per year in the United States, with 15% resulting in serious injuries. Intraoperative cautery was frequently associated with OR fires before 1994; however, use of supplemental oxygen (O(2)), ethanol-based products, and disposable drapes have been more frequently associated with OR fires. Fires resulting from cosmetic and other small procedures involving use of nasal canula O(2) and electrocautery have been described in six published reports. We report five thermal injury cases admitted to our burn treatment center because of fires during surgical procedures over a 5-year period. Two patients undergoing supraorbital excision experienced 2.5 and 3% TBSA involvement burns; in a third patient surgical excision of a nasal polyp resulted in a 1% TBSA burn; in a fourth patient an excisional biopsy of a lymph node resulted in a 2.75% TBSA burn; and the last patient was burned during placement of a pacemaker, with resulting TBSA of 10.5%. Two of the five patients required intubation for inhalational injury. Two patients required tangential excision and grafting of their thermal injuries. All patients had received local or parenteral anesthesia with supplemental O(2)/nitrous oxide (N(2)O) for surgical procedure. There are a number of ignition sources in the OR, including electrocautery, lasers, and faulty OR equipment. The risk of OR fires increases with surgical procedures involving the face and neck, including tracheostomy and tracheobronchial surgery. The common use of O(2)/N(2)O mixtures or enriched O(2) for minimally complex surgical procedures and disposable drapes adds to the risk of an OR fire: the O(2)/N(2)O provides a fuel source, and the disposable drapes trap thedelivered gas. Electrocautery near an O(2)/N(2)O source resulted in the five thermal injuries and warrants careful reconsideration of technique for surgical procedures.

  6. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  7. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  8. TENANT HOUSE INTERIOR, LIVING ROOM, SOUTH AND EAST WALLS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENANT HOUSE INTERIOR, LIVING ROOM, SOUTH AND EAST WALLS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM CENTER OF ROOM - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Carillo Tenant House, Southwest of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  9. TENANT HOUSE INTERIOR, LIVING ROOM, NORTH AND EAST WALLS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENANT HOUSE INTERIOR, LIVING ROOM, NORTH AND EAST WALLS, LOOKING NORTH FROM CENTER OF ROOM - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Carillo Tenant House, Southwest of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  10. 20. INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN ROOM. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD HALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN ROOM. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARD HALL CONNECTING WITH CENTRAL ROOM. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Transmitter Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  11. 124. INTERIOR, SIXTH FLOOR, WING 6100 WEST, SUITE 6000, ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. INTERIOR, SIXTH FLOOR, WING 6100 WEST, SUITE 6000, ROOM 6154, SUPPORT STAFF ROOM (FORMERLY STUDY) (4' x 5' negative; 8' x 10' print) - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. INTERIOR, ROOF, A view looking southwest through Room 205 at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR, ROOF, A view looking southwest through Room 205 at the doorway that leads to Room 206P, a shower and clean area in the penthouse - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, B Building, One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  13. Living Room Mantel Profile, Door Jamb, Window Sill, Baseboard, Living ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Living Room Mantel Profile, Door Jamb, Window Sill, Baseboard, Living Room Fireplace Details, Door Profile - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Governor's Quarters, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  14. 12. Forward end of Boiler Room showing open firing doors ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Forward end of Boiler Room showing open firing doors for boilers. Note ladderway retracted overhead by which firemen entered and left Boiler Room. Coal ejectors shown at extreme left of view. - Ferry TICONDEROGA, Route 7, Shelburne, Chittenden County, VT

  15. 48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHWEST, FIRST FLOOR ROOM, EAST WALL, WITH SECRET DOOR TO BOXED STAIRWAY TO ROOM ABOVE OPEN IN PANELLED WALL - Montpelier, Montpelier Drive & State Route 197, Laurel, Prince George's County, MD

  16. 82. REGENTS' ROOM WEST WALL, WITH ORIGINAL CHAIRS BY JAMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. REGENTS' ROOM WEST WALL, WITH ORIGINAL CHAIRS BY JAMES RENWICK, JR. MANTELPIECE AND MIRROR ARE NOT ORIGINAL TO THE ROOM. - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 26. GENERAL VIEW OF SHIPPING AND RECEIVING ROOM, 1923 ADDITION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. GENERAL VIEW OF SHIPPING AND RECEIVING ROOM, 1923 ADDITION, FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING NORTHWEST. FLAMMABLE TEST ROOM IS ON EXTREME RIGHT - Underwriters' Laboratories, 207-231 East Ohio Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. Interior view showing south wall and windows of living room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view showing south wall and windows of living room and dining room. Entrance to kitchen is at extreme right center. - Clara E. Stoltz House, 817-823 North Hunter Street, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  19. 16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. 15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. 25. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF ROOM 109, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF ROOM 109, THE WARM AND COLD STORAGE ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  2. 3. GENERAL VIEW OF BOILER ROOM, LOOKING NORTH; CONTROL PANEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW OF BOILER ROOM, LOOKING NORTH; CONTROL PANEL AT CENTER; BOXLIKE, RIVETED HOUSING AT TOP CENTER CONTAINED AUGER FOR COAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM - Rath Packing Company, Boiler Room, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  3. 28. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #302, signal process and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #302, signal process and analog receiver room - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  4. 4. INTERIOR, CENTRAL BOILER ROOM, LOWER LEVEL, BOILERS, FROM SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, CENTRAL BOILER ROOM, LOWER LEVEL, BOILERS, FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Heating Plant, North of B Street & West of Third Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  6. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  7. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  8. North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North rear, east part. Ramp leads to basement utility rooms and specimen preparation rooms. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. 12. Interior view of workout room in rehabilitation and testing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of workout room in rehabilitation and testing facilities; showing break/dressing rooms beyond; near southeast corner of occupied portion; view to southwest. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  10. 14. Interior view of vestibule separating rehabilitation space, testing room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of vestibule separating rehabilitation space, testing room, and corridor to workout room looking into corridor; near center of occupied portion; view to southeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  11. Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at northeast corner supporting flight room dome - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  12. Room 113, chemistry laboratory with benches perpendicular to the long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room 113, chemistry laboratory with benches perpendicular to the long axis of the room. A view to the southwest. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from entry hall leads to toilets and bathing rooms. A coat and hat rack is on each side of the door. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  14. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ROOM; PASS-THROUGH FOR EXPOSED FILM ON RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1031, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  15. 52. Detail of electrical contacts in the south machinery room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Detail of electrical contacts in the south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing south. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day Room Mantel Shelf, Northeast Elevation - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Ward 4, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  17. 15. ROOMS 48 AND 49, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ENTRANCE TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. ROOMS 48 AND 49, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ENTRANCE TO ROOM 47. THE OAK CABINETS ARE USED TO STORE ROCK CORE SAMPLES. - U.S. Geological Survey, Rock Magnetics Laboratory, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, San Mateo County, CA

  18. 13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM 2, RADIATION EFFECTS ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell A Facility, Test Cell A Building & Addition, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road F, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  19. 2. INTERIOR, CENTRAL BLOCK, FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, GENERAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR, CENTRAL BLOCK, FIRST FLOOR, EAST ROOM, GENERAL VIEW OF NORTH WALL WITH ARCHED WINDOW, AND WEST WALL WITH DOORWAY LEADING INTO NORTHEAST ROOM OF CENTRAL BLOCK - Bulows Minde Estate House, Bulows Minde, Bulows Minde, St. Croix, VI

  20. 2. VIEW OF THREE ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 5), FACING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF THREE ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 5), FACING SOUTHWEST. DUPLEX (FEATURE 6) IS SHOWN AT LEFT. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Three Room Residence, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  1. 1. VIEW OF THREE ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 5), FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF THREE ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 5), FACING NORTHEAST. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Three Room Residence, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  2. 2. VIEW OF FOUR ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 1), FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF FOUR ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 1), FACING NORTHEAST. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Four Room Residence, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  3. 3. VIEW OF FOUR ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 1), FACING SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF FOUR ROOM RESIDENCE (FEATURE 1), FACING SOUTHEAST. 'PRES. HOUSE' (FEATURE 3) VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Four Room Residence, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  4. 49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR OF GILLEY ROOM: Interior view towards southeast of the Gilley Room on the second floor of the powerhouse and ear barn. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 18. Process area room. Incinerator to the left. Filter boxes ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Process area room. Incinerator to the left. Filter boxes on the right. Looking north towards change room. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  6. 54. West emergency brake in the south machinery room (interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. West emergency brake in the south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing west. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 51. Electrical contacts and relays in the south machinery room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Electrical contacts and relays in the south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing south. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 25. FIRST FLOOR, EAST DRAWING ROOM MANTLE. Details of mantle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FIRST FLOOR, EAST DRAWING ROOM MANTLE. Details of mantle are copied in the major first floor rooms on the door and window cornices and architraves. - Charles Edmonston House, 21 East Battery Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  9. 3. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING CHECK WEIGHMAN'S ROOM (LEFT CENTER), CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING CHECK WEIGHMAN'S ROOM (LEFT CENTER), CONVEYOR MOTOR ROOM (RIGHT CENTER) AND CONVEYOR (RIGHT), LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Nuttallburg Mine Complex, Headhouse, North side of New River, 2.7 miles upstream from Fayette Landing, Lookout, Fayette County, WV

  10. 15. Photocopy, photographer unknown, c. 1933 INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy, photographer unknown, c. 1933 INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM LOOKING EAST-NORTHEAST - White Deer Lake Camp, Living Room Cabin, Cyrus H. McCormick Experimental Forest, Champion, Marquette County, MI

  11. Inactivation of poxviruses by upper-room UVC light in a simulated hospital room environment.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, James J; Milton, Donald K; Rudnick, Stephen N; First, Melvin W

    2008-09-10

    In the event of a smallpox outbreak due to bioterrorism, delays in vaccination programs may lead to significant secondary transmission. In the early phases of such an outbreak, transmission of smallpox will take place especially in locations where infected persons may congregate, such as hospital emergency rooms. Air disinfection using upper-room 254 nm (UVC) light can lower the airborne concentrations of infective viruses in the lower part of the room, and thereby control the spread of airborne infections among room occupants without exposing occupants to a significant amount of UVC. Using vaccinia virus aerosols as a surrogate for smallpox we report on the effectiveness of air disinfection, via upper-room UVC light, under simulated real world conditions including the effects of convection, mechanical mixing, temperature and relative humidity. In decay experiments, upper-room UVC fixtures used with mixing by a conventional ceiling fan produced decreases in airborne virus concentrations that would require additional ventilation of more than 87 air changes per hour. Under steady state conditions the effective air changes per hour associated with upper-room UVC ranged from 18 to 1000. The surprisingly high end of the observed range resulted from the extreme susceptibility of vaccinia virus to UVC at low relative humidity and use of 4 UVC fixtures in a small room with efficient air mixing. Increasing the number of UVC fixtures or mechanical ventilation rates resulted in greater fractional reduction in virus aerosol and UVC effectiveness was higher in winter compared to summer for each scenario tested. These data demonstrate that upper-room UVC has the potential to greatly reduce exposure to susceptible viral aerosols. The greater survival at baseline and greater UVC susceptibility of vaccinia under winter conditions suggest that while risk from an aerosol attack with smallpox would be greatest in winter, protective measures using UVC may also be most efficient at this

  12. 22. (Credit JTL) Detail, south elevation of boiler room; view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. (Credit JTL) Detail, south elevation of boiler room; view looking NNW at Adolphous Custodis stack base (1900), boiler room doors, boiler backheads and edge of old high service pump room. Note joint in bricks to right of Poller room doors showing extent of wall replacement when doors were installed. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  13. The use of mobile technology in waiting rooms to leverage women's empowerment: A conceptual context.

    PubMed

    Reychav, Iris; Parush, Avi; McHaney, Roger; Hazan, Maya; Moshonov, Rami

    2016-10-13

    This article focuses on a conceptual framework that can be applied to the use of mobile technology in the waiting room with the goal of empowering women recently diagnosed with abnormal Pap test results. It further describes trends which indicate a need for improved and timely information dissemination. Genecology practice outpatients report a predominant feeling of worry on receipt of abnormal medical test results, along with a clearly expressed wish for additional information. This research suggests that there is room for improvement in existing processes through use of mobile technology with carefully vetted materials which indicate a doctor is interested in the patient's well-being.

  14. Racism in the consulting room: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Msebele, Naison; Brown, Hilary

    2011-08-01

    This paper explores ways in which issues of race might impact on, and/or be ignored within, the practice of psychotherapy. Racial difference, that is being white as well as being black, taps into ingrained patterns of binary thinking that create hierarchies of "otherness." This generates anxiety which leads some therapists to avoid seeing race or naming its resonance in the therapeutic alliance. The origins of this splitting may lie in the unconscious, from whence it can be subtly nudged into more conscious awareness, as a seminal paper by Andrew Curry, published in this journal, suggested some forty-five years ago. Other modalities bring these dynamics more directly into the therapeutic space by exploring the patient's familial history or their daily lived experiences of racial (dis)advantage from an explicitly empowering standpoint. But whatever route is taken, racism is not an animal that can, or should, be left sleeping in the corner of the consulting room.

  15. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; dos Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; da Costa, Fernanda Marques; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Results Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Conclusion Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself. PMID:26313440

  16. Improving pharmacy supply-chain management in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Martin, V; Frank, S

    2000-12-01

    Anesthesia services can account for a significant portion of a healthcare organization's costs. Deaconess Hospital of Evansville, Indiana, used a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort to implement process improvements that yielded significant cost savings while improving patient care. Shifting responsibility for drug distribution from the operating room (OR) nurses to a pharmacist, the hospital established a satellite pharmacy service for the OR. As a result, the hospital was able to improve control of drug distribution and record-keeping, reduce turnaround time for medication preparation, lower its medication charge error rate, and increase the percentage of surgeries that start on time. The success of the OR satellite pharmacy led the hospital to expand satellite pharmacy services to labor and delivery, the cardiac cath laboratory, and the intensive care units.

  17. Music in the operating room: is it a safety hazard?

    PubMed

    Shambo, Lyda; Umadhay, Tony; Pedoto, Alessia

    2015-02-01

    Noise is a health hazard and a source of stress, and it impairs concentration and communication. Since 1960, hospital noise levels have risen around the world. Nowhere in the healthcare setting is noise more prevalent than in the operating room (OR). The genetic makeup of humans does not evolve at the rate of technology. Noise exposure, sensory overload, and the capacity to adapt without physical and psychological consequences are absent from the human condition. The World Health Organization has recognized environmental noise as harmful pollution that causesadverse effects on health. Although noise in the OR is unavoidable, music is a choice. The purpose of this literature review is to provide further insight into the ramifications of the presence of music in the OR, evaluate its appropriateness in relation to care and safety for the patient and staff, and provide information for future research.

  18. Observations on maternal preference for rooming-in facilities.

    PubMed

    Dharamraj, C; Sia, C G; Kierney, C M; Parekh, A; Harper, R G; Weissman, B

    1981-05-01

    To determine the length of time mothers prefer their infants with them, 1,000 mothers at North Shore University Hospital (NSUH) and 435 mothers at Kings County Hospital (KCH) were asked postpartum whether they would prefer their infants with them every four hours for 1/2 hour for feeding or rooming-in with their infants during the daytime only or 24 hours a day. Approximately one third of the mothers at NSUH preferred rooming-in whereas approximately three quarters of the mothers at KCH preferred rooming-in. Significantly more mothers at KCH preferred 24-hour rooming-in than at NSUH. Factors such as primiparity, attendance at Lamaze classes, and breast-feeding were significantly associated with the mother's preference to room-in at NSUH, but there was no such association at KCH. This study suggests that: (1) the desire to room-in is not universal; (2) each institution must individualize rooming-in facilities according to the needs of the population; (3) although the demand for rooming-in varies, more mothers prefer rooming-in than there are accommodations presently available; and (4) factors that may be associated with rooming-in are not the same in all populations. It appears that it is as inappropriate to impose rooming-in as it is to deprive mothers of rooming-in.

  19. 1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort rings in foreground were once located in Engine Room Building. See photo WA-131-A-2. Building on left is Machine Shop. Boiler Building is in front of stack. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  20. 9 CFR 354.241 - Cleaning of rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and free from debris and unused equipment and utensils. (d) Live rabbit receiving docks and receiving... rooms should be kept clean at all times. (e) Floors in live rabbit holding rooms shall be cleaned with... skinning room shall be kept clean and free from offensive odors at all times. (g) The walls, floors,...

  1. West wall, display area (room 101), view 1 of 4: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, display area (room 101), view 1 of 4: southwest corner, showing stairs to commander's quarters and viewing bridge, windows to controller's room (room 102), south end of control consoles, and holes in pedestal floor for computer equipment cables (tape drive I/O?) - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related...

  3. Interior of display area (room 101), looking south towards TV ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of display area (room 101), looking south towards TV control panel room (room 139) at far left corner. The stairway leads to the commander's quarters and the senior battle viewing bridge at top right. Control and communication consoles at the right - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  4. 5 CFR 9800.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public reading room. 9800.5 Section 9800.5 Administrative Personnel COUNCIL OF THE INSPECTORS GENERAL ON INTEGRITY AND EFFICIENCY FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REGULATIONS § 9800.5 Public reading room. CIGIE maintains an electronic public reading room...

  5. 12 CFR 505.2 - Public Reading Room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public Reading Room. 505.2 Section 505.2 Banks....2 Public Reading Room. OTS will make materials available for review on an ad hoc basis when..., or you may visit the Public Reading Room at 1700 G Street, NW., by appointment only. (Please...

  6. 45 CFR 1602.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public reading room. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 Public... DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1602.5 Public reading room. (a) The Corporation will maintain a public reading room its office at 3333 K St. NW., Washington, DC, 20007. This...

  7. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  8. 12 CFR 505.2 - Public Reading Room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public Reading Room. 505.2 Section 505.2 Banks....2 Public Reading Room. OTS will make materials available for review on an ad hoc basis when..., or you may visit the Public Reading Room at 1700 G Street, NW., by appointment only. (Please...

  9. 22 CFR 171.4 - Electronic reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic reading room. 171.4 Section 171.4... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.4 Electronic reading room. The Department has established a... public reading room. This site also contains information on accessing records under the FOIA and...

  10. 40 CFR 1601.12 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading room. 1601.12 Section... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Administration § 1601.12 Public reading room. (a) The CSB maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be...

  11. 29 CFR 70.4 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Public reading rooms. 70.4 Section 70.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION OR MATERIALS General § 70.4 Public reading rooms... this section are available through public reading rooms, and, to the extent indicated in this...

  12. 22 CFR 171.4 - Electronic reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic reading room. 171.4 Section 171.4... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.4 Electronic reading room. The Department has established a... public reading room. This site also contains information on accessing records under the FOIA and...

  13. 33 CFR 52.81 - Reading room and index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reading room and index. 52.81... FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Public Access to Decisions § 52.81 Reading room... at a public reading room. Final decisions created on or after November 1, 1996, shall be...

  14. 36 CFR 1600.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public reading room. 1600.2... Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.2 Public reading room. (a) The Foundation maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made regularly available...

  15. 1 CFR 304.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public reading room. 304.2 Section 304.2... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 304.2 Public reading room. (a) ACUS maintains a public reading room that affords access to the records that the FOIA requires it...

  16. 40 CFR 1601.12 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading room. 1601.12 Section... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Administration § 1601.12 Public reading room. (a) The CSB maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be...

  17. 40 CFR 1601.12 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reading room. 1601.12 Section... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Administration § 1601.12 Public reading room. (a) The CSB maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be...

  18. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  19. 22 CFR 171.4 - Electronic reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic reading room. 171.4 Section 171.4... PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.4 Electronic reading room. The Department has established a... public reading room. This site also contains information on accessing records under the FOIA and...

  20. 28 CFR 16.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 16.2 Section 16.2... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 16.2 Public reading rooms. (a) The Department maintains public reading rooms that contain the records that the FOIA requires to...

  1. 39 CFR 265.5 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 265.5 Section 265.5 Postal... reading rooms. The Library of the Postal Service Headquarters, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20260-1641, serves as public reading room for the materials which are listed in paragraphs (a)(2), (3),...

  2. 39 CFR 265.5 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 265.5 Section 265.5 Postal... reading rooms. The Library of the Postal Service Headquarters, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20260-1641, serves as public reading room for the materials which are listed in paragraphs (a)(2), (3),...

  3. 36 CFR 1600.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Public reading room. 1600.2... Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.2 Public reading room. (a) The Foundation maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made regularly available...

  4. 28 CFR 16.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 16.2 Section 16.2... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 16.2 Public reading rooms. (a) The Department maintains public reading rooms that contain the records that the FOIA requires to...

  5. 39 CFR 265.5 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 265.5 Section 265.5 Postal... reading rooms. The Library of the Postal Service Headquarters, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20260-1641, serves as public reading room for the materials which are listed in paragraphs (a)(2), (3),...

  6. 45 CFR 1602.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public reading room. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 Public... DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1602.5 Public reading room. (a) The Corporation will maintain a public reading room its office at 3333 K St. NW., Washington, DC, 20007. This...

  7. 33 CFR 52.81 - Reading room and index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reading room and index. 52.81... FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Public Access to Decisions § 52.81 Reading room... at a public reading room. Final decisions created on or after November 1, 1996, shall be...

  8. 5 CFR 9800.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public reading room. 9800.5 Section 9800.5 Administrative Personnel COUNCIL OF THE INSPECTORS GENERAL ON INTEGRITY AND EFFICIENCY FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REGULATIONS § 9800.5 Public reading room. CIGIE maintains an electronic public reading room...

  9. 39 CFR 265.5 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 265.5 Section 265.5 Postal... reading rooms. The Library of the Postal Service Headquarters, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20260-1641, serves as public reading room for the materials which are listed in paragraphs (a)(2), (3),...

  10. 36 CFR 1600.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reading room. 1600.2... Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.2 Public reading room. (a) The Foundation maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made regularly available...

  11. 36 CFR 1600.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading room. 1600.2... Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.2 Public reading room. (a) The Foundation maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made regularly available...

  12. 39 CFR 265.5 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 265.5 Section 265.5 Postal... reading rooms. The Library of the Postal Service Headquarters, 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20260-1641, serves as public reading room for the materials which are listed in paragraphs (a)(2), (3),...

  13. 36 CFR 1600.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading room. 1600.2... Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 1600.2 Public reading room. (a) The Foundation maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be made regularly available...

  14. 1 CFR 304.2 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Public reading room. 304.2 Section 304.2 General... Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 304.2 Public reading room. (a) ACUS maintains a public reading room that affords access to the records that the FOIA requires it to make...

  15. 28 CFR 16.2 - Public reading rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading rooms. 16.2 Section 16.2... Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act § 16.2 Public reading rooms. (a) The Department maintains public reading rooms that contain the records that the FOIA requires to...

  16. 45 CFR 1602.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public reading room. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 Public... DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1602.5 Public reading room. (a) The Corporation will maintain a public reading room its office at 3333 K St. NW., Washington, DC, 20007. This...

  17. 34 CFR 5.10 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reading room. 5.10 Section 5.10 Education Office... Available to the Public § 5.10 Public reading room. (a) General. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), the Department maintains a public reading room containing agency records that the FOIA requires to be...

  18. 40 CFR 1601.12 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reading room. 1601.12 Section... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Administration § 1601.12 Public reading room. (a) The CSB maintains a public reading room that contains the records that the FOIA requires to be...

  19. 33 CFR 52.81 - Reading room and index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reading room and index. 52.81... FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS OF THE COAST GUARD Public Access to Decisions § 52.81 Reading room... at a public reading room. Final decisions created on or after November 1, 1996, shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 58.413 - Cutting and packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cutting and packaging rooms. 58.413 Section 58.413....413 Cutting and packaging rooms. When small packages of cheese are cut and wrapped, separate rooms shall be provided for the cleaning and preparation of the bulk cheese and for the cutting and...

  1. 113. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM (110), LSB (BLDG. 770). QUALITY ASSURANCE ROOM (106A) ON RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTO; CABLE TRAYS OVERHEAD AT TOP; STAIRS TO LSB (BLDG. 770) ADDITION (ROOMS 117 THROUGH 120) IN CENTER OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. 29 CFR 779.113 - Warehouse and stock room employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Warehouse and stock room employees. 779.113 Section 779.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS....113 Warehouse and stock room employees. Warehouse and stock room employees of retail businesses...

  3. 29 CFR 779.113 - Warehouse and stock room employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Warehouse and stock room employees. 779.113 Section 779.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS....113 Warehouse and stock room employees. Warehouse and stock room employees of retail businesses...

  4. 29 CFR 779.113 - Warehouse and stock room employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Warehouse and stock room employees. 779.113 Section 779.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS....113 Warehouse and stock room employees. Warehouse and stock room employees of retail businesses...

  5. 29 CFR 779.113 - Warehouse and stock room employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Warehouse and stock room employees. 779.113 Section 779.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS....113 Warehouse and stock room employees. Warehouse and stock room employees of retail businesses...

  6. 22 CFR 303.5 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Public reading room. 303.5 Section 303.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 303.5 Public reading room. (a) The Peace Corps will maintain a public reading room at its headquarters at...

  7. 15. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING RECESSED TELEPHONE ALCOVE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR OF DINING ROOM SHOWING RECESSED TELEPHONE ALCOVE IN PARTION WALL BETWEEN LIVING ROOM AND DINING ROOM AT PHOTO RIGHT CENTER. OPEN DOOR AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER LEADS TO BEDROOM NO.2. VIEW TO NORTH. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  8. 10 CFR 205.15 - Public docket room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public docket room. 205.15 Section 205.15 Energy... room. There shall be established at the DOE National Office, 12th and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC, a public docket room in which shall be made available for public inspection and copying:...

  9. 46 CFR 190.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washrooms and toilet rooms. 190.20-25 Section 190.20-25... and toilet rooms. (a) There must be provided at least 1 toilet, 1 washbasin, and 1 shower or bathtub for each 8 members or portion thereof in the crew to be accommodated who do not occupy rooms to...

  10. 11 CFR 114.13 - Use of meeting rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of meeting rooms. 114.13 Section 114.13... Use of meeting rooms. Notwithstanding any other provisions of part 114, a corporation or labor organization which customarily makes its meeting rooms available to clubs, civic or community organizations,...

  11. 30 CFR 56.19063 - Persons allowed in hoist room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons allowed in hoist room. 56.19063 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19063 Persons allowed in hoist room. Only authorized persons shall be in hoist rooms....

  12. 30 CFR 57.19063 - Persons allowed in hoist room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons allowed in hoist room. 57.19063 Section... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19063 Persons allowed in hoist room. Only authorized persons shall be in hoist rooms....

  13. 46 CFR 69.121 - Engine room deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Engine room deduction. 69.121 Section 69.121 Shipping... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Standard Measurement System § 69.121 Engine room deduction. (a) General. The engine...) Space below the crown. The crown is the top of the main space of the engine room to which the heights...

  14. 46 CFR 69.121 - Engine room deduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Engine room deduction. 69.121 Section 69.121 Shipping... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Standard Measurement System § 69.121 Engine room deduction. (a) General. The engine...) Space below the crown. The crown is the top of the main space of the engine room to which the heights...

  15. Telco maintenance (room 228) looking south into the telephone equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Telco maintenance (room 228) looking south into the telephone equipment room (room 227). Note workbench in left corner, lighting fixtures, and air handling ducts - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  16. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  1. 29 CFR 779.113 - Warehouse and stock room employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warehouse and stock room employees. 779.113 Section 779.113 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS....113 Warehouse and stock room employees. Warehouse and stock room employees of retail businesses...

  2. 49 CFR 195.446 - Control room management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(5) of this section. (f) Change management. Each operator must assure... reference, see § 195.3) for control room management change and require coordination between control room... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control room management. 195.446 Section...

  3. 49 CFR 195.446 - Control room management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(5) of this section. (f) Change management. Each operator must assure... reference, see § 195.3) for control room management change and require coordination between control room... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control room management. 195.446 Section...

  4. What should we expect from the hybrid room?

    PubMed

    Hertault, Adrien; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Spear, Rafaëlle; Azzaoui, Richard; Delloye, Matthieu; Fabre, Dominique; Haulon, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    The concept of hybrid room was defined as an optimized surgical theater, offering the best compromise between asepsis criteria from standard surgical rooms and high quality imaging equipment from fixed radiological suites. This review aimed at summarizing what vascular surgeons should expect from hybrid rooms in daily practice and in the near future.

  5. 112. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM (110), LSB (BLDG. 770). VEHICLE MECHANICAL SYSTEMS ROOM (111) AND PNEUMATIC SUPPLY PANEL VISIBLE AT SOUTH END OF MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM (110). PAYLOAD CABLE DISTRIBUTION BOX ON LEFT OF PHOTO, FACING WEST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 122. SOUTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), LSB (BLDG. 770), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. SOUTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), LSB (BLDG. 770), WITH MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM (110) AND LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106) VISIBLE THROUGH OPEN DOORS. POWER PANEL 2A AT LEFT EDGE OF PHOTO. FIRE SUPPRESSION DELUGE PANEL ON RIGHT EDGE OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. 133. SOUTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), LSB (BLDG. 751), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    133. SOUTH SIDE OF TRANSFORMER ROOM (212), LSB (BLDG. 751), WITH MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ROOM (210) AND LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206) VISIBLE THROUGH OPEN DOORS. POWER PANEL A, FACING WEST, AT LEFT EDGE OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 1. TERMINAL ROOM, INTERIOR, SHOP LEVEL, SHOWING FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TERMINAL ROOM, INTERIOR, SHOP LEVEL, SHOWING FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM PIPES AND VALVES AT LEFT. Looking southeast from entrance to terminal room. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 9 CFR 354.241 - Cleaning of rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... skinning room shall be kept clean and free from offensive odors at all times. (g) The walls, floors, and all equipment and utensils used in the killing and skinning room shall be thoroughly washed and cleaned after each day's operation. (h) The floor in the killing and skinning rooms shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 354.241 - Cleaning of rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... skinning room shall be kept clean and free from offensive odors at all times. (g) The walls, floors, and all equipment and utensils used in the killing and skinning room shall be thoroughly washed and cleaned after each day's operation. (h) The floor in the killing and skinning rooms shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 354.241 - Cleaning of rooms and compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cleaning of rooms and compartments... Sanitary Conditions and Precautions Against Contamination of Products § 354.241 Cleaning of rooms and... rooms shall be of such construction as readily to permit their thorough cleaning, and such docks...

  12. 27 CFR 24.166 - Buildings or rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buildings or rooms. 24.166... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Construction and Equipment § 24.166 Buildings or rooms. All buildings or... afford adequate protection to the revenue. Each building or room will be constructed of...

  13. 27 CFR 24.166 - Buildings or rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Buildings or rooms. 24.166... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Construction and Equipment § 24.166 Buildings or rooms. All buildings or... afford adequate protection to the revenue. Each building or room will be constructed of...

  14. 31. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS EXPOSED STUD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF ROOM 212 LOOKING NORTHWEST TOWARDS EXPOSED STUD WALL THAT SERVES AS DIVIDER TO ROOM 211. EXPOSED TRUSSWORK VISIBLE THROUGH TO NEXT ROOM. WOOD PANELED WALLS ARE PAINTED; FLOORS ARE WOOD. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Lessons Learned from War Room Designs and Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    acquisition programs, defense investment decisionmaking, government and commercial strategic planning, corporate competitive intelligence , mergers and...War Room Case Study 3. Telecommunications Competitive Intelligence War Room A competitive intelligence (CI) unit for a telecommunications giant was...corporation’s CI manager thought a war room might help elevate the use and importance placed on competitive intelligence by senior decisionmakers. The war

  16. 22 CFR 171.3 - Public reading room.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC General Policy and Procedures § 171.3 Public reading room. A reading room providing public access..., NW., Washington, DC. The reading room contains material pertaining to access to information under...

  17. Room airflow studies using sonic anemometry.

    PubMed

    Wasiolek, P T; Whicker, J J; Gong, H; Rodgers, J C

    1999-06-01

    To ensure prompt response by real-time air monitors to an accidental release of toxic aerosols in a workplace, safety professionals should understand airflow patterns. This understanding can be achieved with validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer simulations, or with experimental techniques, such as measurements with smoke, neutrally buoyant markers, trace gases, or trace aerosol particles. As a supplementary technique to quantify airflows, the use of a state-of-the art, three-dimensional sonic anemometer was explored. This instrument allows for the precise measurements of the air-velocity vector components in the range of a few centimeters per second, which is common in many indoor work environments. Measurements of air velocities and directions at selected locations were made for the purpose of providing data for characterizing fundamental aspects of indoor air movement in two ventilated rooms and for comparison to CFD model predictions. One room was a mockup of a plutonium workroom, and the other was an actual functioning plutonium workroom. In the mockup room, air-velocity vector components were measured at 19 locations at three heights (60, 120 and 180 cm) with average velocities varying from 1.4 cm s-1 to 9.7 cm s-1. There were complex flow patterns observed with turbulence intensities from 39% up to 108%. In the plutonium workroom, measurements were made at the breathing-zone height, recording average velocities ranging from 9.9 cm s-1 to 35.5 cm s-1 with turbulence intensities from 33% to 108%.

  18. Protective lung ventilation in operating room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Constantin, J M; Jaber, S

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications adversely affect clinical outcomes and healthcare utilization, so that prevention has become a measure of the quality of perioperative care. Mechanical ventilation is an essential support therapy to maintain adequate gas exchange during general anesthesia for surgery. Mechanical ventilation using high tidal volume (VT) (between 10 and 15 mL/kg) has been historically encouraged to prevent hypoxemia and atelectasis formation in anesthetized patients undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery. However, there is accumulating evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that mechanical ventilation, especially the use of high VT and plateau pressure, may potentially aggravate or even initiate lung injury. Ventilator-associated lung injury can result from cyclic alveolar overdistension of non-dependent lung tissue, and repetitive opening and closing of dependent lung tissue resulting in ultrastructural damage at the junction of closed and open alveoli. Lung-protective ventilation, which refers to the use of lower VT and limited plateau pressure to minimize overdistension, and positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration, was shown to improve outcome in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been recently suggested that this approach might also be beneficial in a broader population, especially in critically ill patients without ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. There is, however, little evidence regarding a potential beneficial effect of lung protective ventilation during surgery, especially in patients with healthy lungs. Although surgical patients are frequently exposed to much shorter periods of mechanical ventilation, this is an important gap in knowledge given the number of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the operating room. This review developed the benefits of lung protective ventilation during surgery

  19. Local anaesthesia outside the operating room.

    PubMed

    Chan, S K; Karmakar, M K; Chui, P T

    2002-04-01

    An increasing number of minor surgical procedures are performed under local anaesthesia in clinical settings outside the operating room, where monitoring and resuscitation equipment--as well as personnel skilled in resuscitation--may not be readily available. Serious adverse effects and even fatalities may result from the use of local anaesthetic agents, arising from a variety of causes such as systemic toxicity, allergy, vasovagal syncope, and reaction to additives present in the local anaesthetic. This article briefly reviews the pharmacology of local anaesthetic agents, and describes various techniques commonly used for local anaesthesia, with special emphasis on safety. Clinical features of toxicity, and its differential diagnosis and management, are also discussed.

  20. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kan

    2014-01-01

    The Engineering and Technology Directorate (NE) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is designing a new command and control system for the checkout and launch of Space Launch System (SLS) and future rockets. The purposes of the semester long internship as a remote application software developer include the design, development, integration, and verification of the software and hardware in the firing rooms, in particular with the Mobile Launcher (ML) Launch Accessories subsystem. In addition, a Conversion Fusion project was created to show specific approved checkout and launch engineering data for public-friendly display purposes.