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Sample records for aculus schlechtendali nalepa

  1. Phenology and structure of a phytoseiid community in an insecticide-free apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Jeffris, Rebecca A; Beers, Elizabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Commercial orchards have acarine communities that are reduced in biological diversity compared to their undisturbed counterparts. Examining the phenology of an unsprayed orchard allows for the examination of non-pesticide factors that drive changes in populations. This study examined the mite community in a largely unsprayed research orchard in 2013–2014. The phytoseiids Galendromus flumenis (Chant), Amblydromella caudiglans (Schuster), Kampimodromus corylosus Kolodochka, and Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) were found, in addition to Zetzellia mali (Ewing) and Aculus schlechtendali (Nalepa). Although G. occidentalis is typically the dominant phytoseiid in commercial orchards, G. flumenis was much more abundant in this unsprayed block. Aculus schlechtendali appeared to be the main source of prey for all predator species. The availability of this prey item and the lack of pesticides are likely the factors that allowed for G. flumenis to reach high abundances. Tetranychids were scarce, emphasizing the role of these mites as induced pests; without the application of disruptive sprays, the predatory mite community was able to maintain biological control. This study demonstrates that the species complex of generalist phytoseiids that is present in orchard systems undisturbed by pesticides is sufficient to maintain spider mite populations below damaging levels throughout the season. PMID:26477037

  2. Phenology and structure of a phytoseiid community in an insecticide-free apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Jeffris, Rebecca A; Beers, Elizabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Commercial orchards have acarine communities that are reduced in biological diversity compared to their undisturbed counterparts. Examining the phenology of an unsprayed orchard allows for the examination of non-pesticide factors that drive changes in populations. This study examined the mite community in a largely unsprayed research orchard in 2013–2014. The phytoseiids Galendromus flumenis (Chant), Amblydromella caudiglans (Schuster), Kampimodromus corylosus Kolodochka, and Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) were found, in addition to Zetzellia mali (Ewing) and Aculus schlechtendali (Nalepa). Although G. occidentalis is typically the dominant phytoseiid in commercial orchards, G. flumenis was much more abundant in this unsprayed block. Aculus schlechtendali appeared to be the main source of prey for all predator species. The availability of this prey item and the lack of pesticides are likely the factors that allowed for G. flumenis to reach high abundances. Tetranychids were scarce, emphasizing the role of these mites as induced pests; without the application of disruptive sprays, the predatory mite community was able to maintain biological control. This study demonstrates that the species complex of generalist phytoseiids that is present in orchard systems undisturbed by pesticides is sufficient to maintain spider mite populations below damaging levels throughout the season.

  3. Phytoseiid mites on unsprayed apple trees in Oregon, and other western states (USA): distributions, life-style types and relevance to commercial orchards.

    PubMed

    Croft, B A; Luh, H K

    2004-01-01

    In unsprayed apple trees in eastern Oregon, Galendromus flumenis (Chant), Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt), Typhlodromus caudiglans Schuster and Metaseiulus citri (Garman and McGregor) were common phytoseiid mites; common plant-feeding mites were the eriophyid, Aculus schlechtendali Nalepa, the brown mite, Bryobia rubrioculus (Scheuten) and Eotetranychus spp.; apple rust mites seemed to be the primary prey for phytoseiids; the spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch and Panonychus ulmi (Koch) were scarce except for a few local outbreaks; the stigmaeid Zetzellia mali (Ewing) was at 10% of sites and its densities were inversely related to phytoseiid densities; phytoseiids were absent at some sites, particularly at high elevations where winters are severe. In seven Oregon ecoregions, G. flumenis was often at lower elevations in valleys with moderate winters; T. caudiglans was often at higher elevations; G. occidentalis was often at intermediate elevations, in young trees, and near where pesticides were used; it dominated in unsprayed trees only in almost treeless, sage-covered areas; M. citri was usually in older apple trees near agriculture. In mixed phytoseiid populations, M. citri, a generalist, and G. occidentalis, a specialist, occurred more often than expected; G. occidentalis was mostly found with T. caudiglans, a generalist; G. flumenis, a generalist, occurred less with others, possibly because it competes with both specialists and generalists. Analyses of species' distributions with multiple regression and genetic models gave explanatory r2s of 0.019-0.318. Of 29 variables, altitude of site, intensity of agricultural management, tree age, plant types, and Z. mali levels helped explain phytoseiid species presence. In the western USA, G. flumenis dominated in middle-southern latitudes; T. caudiglans dominated in the north near the Canadian border; G. occidentalis dominated in middle latitudes in parts of Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming; M. citri was at

  4. Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Trombidiformes: Eriophyoidea) of Rosales trees in Iran: two new species and three new records.

    PubMed

    Lotfollahi, Parisa; Irani-Nejad, Karim Haddad; De Lillo, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two new species of Eriophyoidea associated with trees belonging to the order Rosales in the south-western portion of East Azerbaijan province, Iran, collected during a survey in 2011: Aceria lobolinguae n. sp. on Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (Elaeagnaceae) and Rhinophytoptus nemalobos n. sp. on Prunus domestica L. (Rosaceae). Additionally, Phyllocoptes abaenus Keifer on Prunus armeniaca L. (Rosaceae), Aculus fockeui (Nalepa & Trouessart) on Prunus amygdalus Stokes and Malus domestica Borkh. (Rosaceae), and Aceria mori (Keifer) on Morus alba L. (Moraceae) were collected and are new records for the mite fauna of Iran. New locality records and host plant data are provided for Eriophyes similis (Nalepa), Eriophyes pyri (Pagenstecher) and Calepitrimerus baileyi (Keifer) which are eriophyoid species previously known from Iran. 

  5. Influence of Life Diet on the Biology and Demographic Parameters of Agistemus olivi Romeih, a Specific Predator of Eriophyid Pest Mites (Acari: Stigmaeidae and Eriophyidae).

    PubMed

    Momen, Faten Mamdouh

    2012-05-01

    The influence of various life diets on the biology and demographic parameters of the predatory mite, Agistemus olivi Romeih, was studied under laboratory conditions. A. olivi successfully developed and reproduced on all of the tested eriophyid mites. Feeding on Aceria mangiferae Sayed enhanced the development of A. olivi, resulted in the shortest mean generation time and was the most commensurate food for the ovipostion of the predator, as exhibited by the highest fecundity and net reproductive rate. Preying on Aculops lycopersici (Massee) gave the lowest fecundity and net reproductive rate; therefore, this prey was the least suitable for the oviposition of A. olivi. Preying on Aculus fockeui (Nalepa et Trouessart) and A. mangiferae produced higher intrinsic rates of increase and finite rates of increase for the predator in comparison to A. lycopersici, which showed the lowest value. These differences in response to various eriophyid pests should be considered for the production of healthy cultures of A. olivi.

  6. Influence of Life Diet on the Biology and Demographic Parameters of Agistemus olivi Romeih, a Specific Predator of Eriophyid Pest Mites (Acari: Stigmaeidae and Eriophyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Momen, Faten Mamdouh

    2012-01-01

    The influence of various life diets on the biology and demographic parameters of the predatory mite, Agistemus olivi Romeih, was studied under laboratory conditions. A. olivi successfully developed and reproduced on all of the tested eriophyid mites. Feeding on Aceria mangiferae Sayed enhanced the development of A. olivi, resulted in the shortest mean generation time and was the most commensurate food for the ovipostion of the predator, as exhibited by the highest fecundity and net reproductive rate. Preying on Aculops lycopersici (Massee) gave the lowest fecundity and net reproductive rate; therefore, this prey was the least suitable for the oviposition of A. olivi. Preying on Aculus fockeui (Nalepa et Trouessart) and A. mangiferae produced higher intrinsic rates of increase and finite rates of increase for the predator in comparison to A. lycopersici, which showed the lowest value. These differences in response to various eriophyid pests should be considered for the production of healthy cultures of A. olivi. PMID:24575223

  7. Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) from Turkey: description of five new species.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowicz, Agnieszka; Denizhan, Evsel; Bromberek, Klaudia; Szydło, Wiktoria; Skoracka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Five new eriophyoid mite species (Eriophyidae) from Turkey are described and illustrated in this paper: Aceria vanensis n. sp., Aceria onosmae n. sp., Aculus lydii n. sp., Aculus gebeliae n. sp. and Aculus spectabilis n. sp.. The descriptions are based on the morphology of females collected from weedy plants, respectively: Amaranthus retroflexus L. (Amaranthaceae), Onosma isauricum Boiss. et Heldr. (Boraginaceae), Hypericum lydium Boiss. (Hypericaceae), Lotus gebelia Vent. (Fabaceae) and Stachys spectabilis Choisy ex DC. (Lamiaceae). The new species were found to be vagrant on their host plants with no visible damage symptoms observed. PMID:27395550

  8. Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) from Hungary: a new species on Agrimonia eupatoria (Rosaceae) and new record on Convolvulus arvensis (Convolvulaceae).

    PubMed

    Ripka, Géza

    2014-12-22

    A new species of eriophyoid mite, Aculus castriferrei n. sp., associated with Agrimonia eupatoria (Rosaceae) is described and illustrated from Hungary. Morphological differences distinguishing this vagrant species from other rosaceous inhabiting congeners are discussed. Aceria malherbae Nuzzaci is a new record for the eriophyoid fauna of Hungary after it was found causing severe damage symptoms to Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae).

  9. A new species, of Aceria neopaederiae (Acari: Eriophyidae), infesting Paederia foetida L. (Rubiaceae) in Thailand, Hong Kong and Singapore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aceria paederiae (Nalepa) infesting leaves of Paederia foetida L. (Family Rubiaceae) in Thailand, Hong Kong and Singapore is reported for the first time. The mite induces small, round galls on both leaf surfaces. The complete descriptions of both males and females, including line drawings and SEM ...

  10. Cryptic speciation within Phytoptus avellanae s.l. (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) revealed by molecular data and observations on molting Tegonotus-like nymphs.

    PubMed

    Cvrković, Tatjana; Chetverikov, Philipp; Vidović, Biljana; Petanović, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut big bud mite, Phytoptus avellanae Nalepa, is one of the most harmful pests of Corylus spp. (Corylaceae) worldwide. Herein, we show that this species represents a complex of two cryptic species: one that lives and reproduces in buds causing their enlargement ('big buds') and drying, whereas the other is a vagrant living on leaves, under bud scales and in catkins, based on phylogenetic analyzes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA sequences. A molecular assessment based on mtCOI DNA and nuclear D2 28S rDNA revealed consistent differences of 16.8 and 3.5% between the two species, respectively. Molecular analysis also revealed that atypical flattened nymphs (Tegonotus-like nymphs sensu Keifer in Mites Injurious to Economic Plants, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 327-562, 1975) with differently annulated opisthosoma, which appear in the life cycle of P. avellanae s.l., belong to the 'vagrant' lineage, i.e. vagrant cryptic species. Light microscopy images of Tegonotus-like nymphs molting into males and females are presented for the first time. Our results suggest that the name P. avellanae comprise two species. Big bud mite should keep the name P. avellanae, and the vagrant cryptic species should be re-named after a proper morphological description is made.

  11. A revision of the genus Arenivaga (Rehn) (Blattodea, Corydiidae), with descriptions of new species and key to the males of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cockroach genus Arenivaga is revised. Forty-eight Arenivaga species are recognized with nine previously known species and 39 described as new including the following: A. pagana sp. n., A. grandiscanyonensis sp. n., A. haringtoni sp. n., A. hopkinsorum sp. n., A. umbratilis sp. n., A. tenax sp. n., A. impensa sp. n., A. trypheros sp. n., A. darwini sp. n., A. nalepae sp. n., A. sequoia sp. n., A. mckittrickae sp. n., A. gaiophanes sp. n., A. belli sp. n., A. estelleae sp. n., A. delicata sp. n., A. mortisvallisensis sp. n., A. milleri sp. n., A. pratchetti sp. n., A. gumperzae sp. n., A. rothi sp. n., A. ricei sp. n., A. adamsi sp. n., A. nicklei sp. n., A. akanthikos sp. n., A. moctezuma sp. n., A. paradoxa sp. n., A. apaeninsula sp. n., A. hebardi sp. n., A. dnopheros sp. n., A. aquila sp. n., A. florilega sp. n., A. galeana sp. n., A. gurneyi sp. n., A. pumila sp. n., A. hypogaios sp. n., A. diaphana sp. n., A. nocturna sp. n., A. alichenas sp. n. All species are described or redescribed, major morphological features are illustrated, distributions are characterized, and the biology of the species is reviewed. A neotype series is designated for A. investigata Friauf & Edney. PMID:24624022

  12. Cryptic speciation within Phytoptus avellanae s.l. (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) revealed by molecular data and observations on molting Tegonotus-like nymphs.

    PubMed

    Cvrković, Tatjana; Chetverikov, Philipp; Vidović, Biljana; Petanović, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut big bud mite, Phytoptus avellanae Nalepa, is one of the most harmful pests of Corylus spp. (Corylaceae) worldwide. Herein, we show that this species represents a complex of two cryptic species: one that lives and reproduces in buds causing their enlargement ('big buds') and drying, whereas the other is a vagrant living on leaves, under bud scales and in catkins, based on phylogenetic analyzes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA sequences. A molecular assessment based on mtCOI DNA and nuclear D2 28S rDNA revealed consistent differences of 16.8 and 3.5% between the two species, respectively. Molecular analysis also revealed that atypical flattened nymphs (Tegonotus-like nymphs sensu Keifer in Mites Injurious to Economic Plants, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 327-562, 1975) with differently annulated opisthosoma, which appear in the life cycle of P. avellanae s.l., belong to the 'vagrant' lineage, i.e. vagrant cryptic species. Light microscopy images of Tegonotus-like nymphs molting into males and females are presented for the first time. Our results suggest that the name P. avellanae comprise two species. Big bud mite should keep the name P. avellanae, and the vagrant cryptic species should be re-named after a proper morphological description is made. PMID:26530992

  13. Misapplied survey data and model uncertainty result in incorrect conclusions about the role of predation on alewife population dynamics in Lake Huron: a comment on He et al. (2015)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Dunlop, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Drastic recent and ongoing changes to fish populations and food webs in the Great Lakes have been well-described (Riley et al. 2008; Barbiero et al. 2009; Nalepa et al. 2009; Fahnenstiel et al. 2010;Evans et al. 2011; Gobin et al. 2015), and uncertainty regarding their potential effects on fisheries has caused concern among scientists and fishery managers (e.g., Dettmers et al. 2012). In particular, the relative importance of “bottom-up” (e.g., lower trophic level changes) versus “top-down” (e.g., predation) factors to fish community changes in the Great Lakes have been widely debated (e.g.,Barbiero et al. 2011; Eshenroder and Lantry 2012; Bunnell et al. 2014). In Lake Huron, recent ecosystem changes have been particularly profound, and populations of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), an offshore pelagic prey fish, collapsed in 2003 and have yet to recover (Riley et al. 2008, 2014). He et al. (2015) recently used a series of linked ecological models to assess the role of predation in the dynamics of the offshore prey fish community in Lake Huron. While we believe that they provide a novel method for combining bioenergetics and stock assessment modeling, we question the validity of their conclusions because of the misapplication of survey data and the lack of critical interpretation of their modeling efforts. Here we describe how He et al. (2015) have misapplied bottom trawl data from Lake Huron, and we provide examples of how this has resulted in erroneous conclusions regarding the importance of predation to the population dynamics and collapse of alewife in Lake Huron.

  14. Molecular detection assay of the bud mite Trisetacus juniperinus on Cupressus sempervirens in nurseries of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bouneb, Mabrouk; de Lillo, Enrico; Roversi, Pio Federico; Simoni, Sauro

    2014-02-01

    Trisetacus juniperinus (Nalepa) sensu Keifer (Acari: Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) causes irregular development of buds, shoot deformations and stunted growth of trees, resulting in a serious threat to nurseries and young stands of Cupressus sempervirens L. (Mediterranean cypress). Recently, some cypress clones selected for their resistance to the fungal canker agent Seiridium cardinale (Wag.) have shown high susceptibility to the mite. Considering its tiny body, its hidden lifestyle inside the buds and the probable occurrence of other species (the vagrant Epitrimerus cupressi (Keifer) is common on the Mediterranean cypress in Italy), detection and monitoring of T. juniperinus require taxonomic expertise and are often time-consuming and challenging before serious damage is discernible. In the present study, a rapid, cost-effective PCR-based method was developed and validated to detect T. juniperinus on cypresses. The cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene was amplified with degenerate and specific primers, but the latter were the only ones able to discriminate between T. juniperinus and E. cupressi. PCR products distinguished the two species both in a pool of individuals in a mixed population of both species and in single individuals, indicating the sensitivity of the detection method. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) by means of XmnI and XbaI endonucleases separated the two species. Furthermore, a washing-sieving protocol was used to make mite collection from the tree sample faster and simpler; this procedure did not interfere with the molecular detection of the species. The possibility of the routine use of this assay to monitor quarantine eriophyoids infesting plant material is discussed. PMID:24030201

  15. Acarological diagnostic research at the Diagnostic Centre for Plants during the period 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Witters, J; De Bondt, G; Desamblanx, J; Casteels, H

    2007-01-01

    During the period 2004-2006, 1691 samples of different origin were examined at the Diagnostic Centre for Plants. We received 1046 samples of imported plant material for detection and identification of quarantine organisms. More than 200 samples were checked on mites and insects to get a phytosanitary certificate for export and 391 samples were investigated for diagnostic reason. The Berlese-funnel and dissecting microscopy technique were used to separate mites from the samples. For identification, the mites were slide mounted in Berlese-Hoyer's medium and examined by using phase-contrast microscopy. In 3% of the samples examined on the presence of quarantine organisms, phytophagous mites belonging to the superfamily Tetranychoidea were found, but none with the quarantine status in accordance with the EPPO A1/A2 list. Besides Tetranychus urticae detected on different crops, the cassava green mite Mononychellus progresivus was found on cassava (import Cameroon) in 2006. Tenuipalpus elegans (Tenuipalpidae) was found on cut foliage (import South Africa) in 2004. In 19.9% of the investigated samples for diagnostic reason mites were found. In 47.7% of the infested samples mites were definitely the reason for the damage; in 15.9% mites were secondary and in 36.4% the occurrence of mites was not relevant for the injury. An overview of the determined mites will be given. During this 3 years diagnostic research a few new pest mites belonging to families Tetranychidae and Eriophyidae can be reported. In 2006 Panonychus citri was found on Prunus laurocerasus and later on Eleaegnus sp. and Skimmia sp.. Aceria silvicola was determined on Rubus idaeus in 2006 and Aculus ulae and Aceria carpini on Carpinus betulus in 2005. Besides new pest mites, never seen problems with the broad mite Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Fam. Tarsonemidae) occurred in tree-nurseries in 2005 and 2006. Also 20 samples coming from private persons were investigated. The main problems indoor were caused by

  16. Eriophyoid mite damage in Vitis vinifera (grapevine) in Australia: Calepitrimerus vitis and Colomerus vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae) as the common cause of the widespread 'Restricted Spring Growth' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Martina B; Horne, Paul A; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2005-01-01

    Leaf and shoot distortions and retarded shoot growth in Vitis vinifera L. prevalent in Australian vineyards in early spring, were investigated in replicated field experiments over 3 yrs. Leaf distortion and retarded shoot growth were identified as damage due to feeding of extremely high populations of over-wintered deutogynes of Calepitrimerus vitis (Nalepa) (grape rust mite). This damage was hitherto known in Australia as 'Restricted Spring Growth' (RSG), a syndrome comprising several growth abnormality symptoms, none with a clearly identified cause or a successful treatment. A successful treatment against C. vitis was used to selectively eliminate RSG, while C. vitis numbers were recorded using a validated trapping technique; intercepting deutogynes migrating from winter shelters in the wooden vine structure, to emerging green tissues. Severe leaf distortion was associated with > 400 C. vitis deutogynes per spur, while > 1000 per spur had the added effect of severely retarding shoot growth. A 43.0-47.2% shoot length reduction was recorded for Cabernet Sauvignon, 27.1-32.8% for Sauvignon Blanc, when 4-6 leaves were separated. Symptoms were most prominent up to 8-9 separated leaves, however 24.7-30.4% shoot length reduction was still evident at flowering, and 12.8% circa fruit set. C. vitis effect on vine fruitfulness, and yield parameters at fruit set, were also studied. Once successfully treated to prevent C. vitis damage, poor bud burst remained evident in some vineyards. Surveys of unburst buds from such vineyards revealed presence of Colomerus vitis (Pagenstecher) (grape bud mite). When Col. vitis numbers in unburst buds reached 100-500 per bud, apical meristems of primary, and commonly also secondary buds were dead, preventing bud burst. The remaining living scale tissue was distinctly scarred. Bud and associated shoot damage were documented. Retarded shoot growth and leaf distortion, previously attributed to RSG, are misdiagnosed C. vitis spring feeding