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Sample records for acupuncture clinical trial

  1. Acupuncture for Vascular Dementia: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Yan; Guan, Li-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, patients who agreed to random assignment were allocated to a randomized acupuncture group (R-acupuncture group) or control group. Those who declined randomization were assigned to a nonrandomized acupuncture group (NR-acupuncture group). Patients in the R-acupuncture group and NR-acupuncture group received up to 21 acupuncture sessions during a period of 6 weeks plus routine care, while the control group received routine care alone. Cognitive function, activities of daily living, and quality of life were assessed by mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), and dementia quality of life questionnaire (DEMQOL), respectively. All the data were collected at baseline, after 6-week treatment, and after 4-week follow-up. No significant differences of MMSE scores were observed among the three groups but pooled-acupuncture group had significant higher score than control group. Compared to control group, ADL score significantly decreased in NR-acupuncture group and pooled-acupuncture group. For DEMQOL scores, no significant differences were observed among the three groups, as well as between pooled-acupuncture group and control group. Additional acupuncture to routine care may have beneficial effects on the improvements of cognitive status and activities of daily living but have limited efficacy on health-related quality of life in VaD patients. PMID:26495416

  2. Acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has frequently been used to treat tinnitus, and acupuncture is a particularly popular option. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for tinnitus. Methods Fourteen databases were searched from the dates of their creation to July 4th, 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results A total of 9 RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor. Five RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture for treating tinnitus. The results failed to show statistically significant improvements. Two RCTs compared a short one-time scalp acupuncture treatment with the use of penetrating sham acupuncture at non-acupoints in achieving subjective symptom relief on a visual analog scale; these RCTs demonstrated significant positive effects with scalp acupuncture. Two RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional drug treatments. One of these RCTs demonstrated that acupuncture had statistically significant effects on the response rate in patients with nervous tinnitus, but the other RCT did not demonstrate significant effects in patients with senile tinnitus. Conclusions The number, size and quality of the RCTs on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus are not sufficient for drawing definitive conclusions. Further rigorous RCTs that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are warranted. PMID:22805113

  3. Analysis and Thoughts about the Negative Results of International Clinical Trials on Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hong; Hao, Yang; Han, Yan-jing; Wang, Xiao-hong; Li, Chen; Liu, Wan-ning

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture have proved the clinical benefits of acupuncture; however, there are some results that have shown negative results or placebo effects. The paper carried out an in-depth analysis on 33 RCTs in the 2011 SCI database, the quality of the reports was judged according to Jadad scores, and the “Necessary Information Included in Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA 2010)” was taken as the standard to analyze the rationality of the therapeutic principle. The difference between the methodology (Jadad) scores of the two types of research reports did not constitute statistical significance (P > 0.05). The studies with negative results or placebo effects showed the following deficiencies with respect to intervention details: (1) incompletely rational acupoint selection; (2) inconsistent ability of acupuncturists; (3) negligible needling response to needling; (4) acupuncture treatment frequency too low in most studies; and (5) irrational setting of placebo control. Thus, the primary basis for the negative results or placebo effects of international clinical trials on acupuncture is not in the quality of the methodology, but in noncompliance with the essential requirements proposed by acupuncture theory in terms of clinical manipulation details. PMID:26161126

  4. [Strategy on the recruitment of free community medical-consultation in acupuncture clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Fan, Hailong; Zhao, Ling; Li, Juan; Lv, Junling; Zhang, Linglin; Leng, Junyan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Dehua; Liang, Fanrong

    2016-04-01

    The difficulty in the participant recruitment is the common question in acupuncture clinical trial study. The existing recruitment of clinical trial is most applicable for the clinical trial of medicines. Because the intervention of acupuncture clinical trial is different from that of medicines, characterized as the specialties in "theory, principle, acupoints, technique", it is very necessary to develop the strategy on the participant recruitment in acupuncture clinical trial. The free community medical consultation is one of the important means of recruitment. In the paper, by taking the participant recruitment of acupuncture clinical trial on chronic stable angina pectoris as the example, the discussion is given on the strategy on the recruitment of free community medical consultation in the aspects of feasible investigation of recruitment approach, recruitment plan, participant screening, etc. The revisiting after the free community medical consultation is the important approach to the improvement of successful recruitment. This strategy on the recruitment of free community medical consultation is highly practical and improves the successful rate and compliance of the participant recruitment. Hence, this strategy deserves to be promoted. PMID:27352507

  5. Acupuncture for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Tae-Young; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We searched the literature using 15 databases. Eleven randomized clinical trials (RCTs) met our inclusion criteria. Most had significant methodological weaknesses. The studies' statistical and clinical heterogeneity prevented us from…

  6. [Evaluation on quality of large sample clinical trials of acupuncture in foreign countries].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mai-lan; Chang, Xiao-rong; Yuan, Yi-qin

    2014-10-01

    Following retrieving articles about foreign large sample clinical trials of acupuncture (more than 500 cases) from MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1996-2012) by using keywords of "acupuncture" and "clinical trial", a quality analysis was carried out independently by two researchers. A total of 1373 papers were collected and 37 were considered to meet our preformulated standards in accordance with the principles and methods of evidence-based medicine. Majority of these 37 articles were from some advanced countries including Germany, USA, Japan, Demark, Australia, et al. Their paper quality and research quality are varied including the methodology, standards for diagnosis, inclusive and exclusive criteria, follow-up survey, economic effectiveness, adverse effects, acupoint application and syndrome differentiation of traditional Chinese medicine. Of the 37 papers, 17 are multiple center clinical trials, 18 are one center clinical trials, and 2 are not clear. Our Chinese researchers should pay more attention to foreign well-designed, large example, randomized controlled clinical trials and draw their matured experience and strong points to compensate our weak points and to improve our levels in clinical study on acupuncture treatment of clinical disorders. PMID:25518121

  7. Acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow): study protocol for a randomized, practitioner-assessor blinded, controlled pilot clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -test and ANCOVA (P <0.05). Discussion The results of this study will allow evaluation of contralateral acupuncture from two aspects. First, if the contralateral acupuncture shows the effects similar to ipsilateral acupuncture, this will establish clinical basis for contralateral acupuncture. Second, if the effects of contralateral acupuncture are not comparable to the effects of ipsilateral acupuncture, but are shown to be similar to the effects of the sham acupuncture, we can establish the basis for using the same acupoints of the unaffected side as a control in acupuncture clinical studies. Trial registration This trial has been registered with the ‘Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS)’, Republic of Korea: KCT0000628. PMID:23768129

  8. Revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA): extending the CONSORT statement

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Hugh; Altman, Douglas G; Hammerschlag, Richard; Li, Youping; Wu, Taixiang; White, Adrian; Moher, David

    2010-01-01

    The STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) were published in five journals in 2001 and 2002. These guidelines, in the form of a checklist and explanations for use by authors and journal editors, were designed to improve reporting of acupuncture trials, particularly the interventions, thereby facilitating their interpretation and replication. Subsequent reviews of the application and impact of STRICTA have highlighted the value of STRICTA as well as scope for improvements and revision. To manage the revision process a collaboration between the STRICTA Group, the CONSORT Group and the Chinese Cochrane Centre was developed in 2008. An expert panel with 47 participants was convened that provided electronic feedback on a revised draft of the checklist. At a subsequent face-to-face meeting in Freiburg, a group of 21 participants further revised the STRICTA checklist and planned dissemination. The new STRICTA checklist, which is an official extension of CONSORT, includes 6 items and 17 subitems. These set out reporting guidelines for the acupuncture rationale, the details of needling, the treatment regimen, other components of treatment, the practitioner background and the control or comparator interventions. In addition, and as part of this revision process, the explanations for each item have been elaborated, and examples of good reporting for each item are provided. In addition, the word ‘controlled’ in STRICTA is replaced by ‘clinical’, to indicate that STRICTA is applicable to a broad range of clinical evaluation designs, including uncontrolled outcome studies and case reports. It is intended that the revised STRICTA checklist, in conjunction with both the main CONSORT statement and extension for non-pharmacological treatment, will raise the quality of reporting of clinical trials of acupuncture. PMID:20615861

  9. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Rafael Tardin Rosa Ferraz; Mares, Fernando Antonio Guedes; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-01-01

    Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study) and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control). We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p < 0.05). However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p < 0.05) already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term. PMID:26351510

  10. Placebo Devices as Effective Control Methods in Acupuncture Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, George Shengxi; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Xue, Charlie Changli; Xie, Yi Min

    2015-01-01

    While the use of acupuncture has been recognised by the World Health Organisation, its efficacy for many of the common clinical conditions is still undergoing validation through randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A credible placebo control for such RCTs to enable meaningful evaluation of its efficacy is to be established. While several non-penetrating acupuncture placebo devices, namely the Streitberger, the Park and the Takakura Devices, have been developed and used in RCTs, their suitability as inert placebo controls needs to be rigorously determined. This article systematically reviews these devices as placebo interventions. Electronic searches were conducted on four English and two Chinese databases from their inceptions to July 2014; hand searches of relevant references were also conducted. RCTs, in English or Chinese language, comparing acupuncture with one of the aforementioned devices as the control intervention on human participants with any clinical condition and evaluating clinically related outcomes were included. Thirty-six studies were included for qualitative analysis while 14 were in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis does not support the notion of either the Streitberger or the Park Device being inert control interventions while none of the studies involving the Takakura Device was included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen studies reported the occurrence of adverse events, with no significant difference between verum and placebo acupuncture. Author-reported blinding credibility showed that participant blinding was successful in most cases; however, when blinding index was calculated, only one study, which utilised the Park Device, seemed to have an ideal blinding scenario. Although the blinding index could not be calculated for the Takakura Device, it was the only device reported to enable practitioner blinding. There are limitations with each of the placebo devices and more rigorous studies are needed to further evaluate their effects and

  11. Placebo Devices as Effective Control Methods in Acupuncture Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, George Shengxi; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Xue, Charlie Changli; Xie, Yi Min

    2015-01-01

    While the use of acupuncture has been recognised by the World Health Organisation, its efficacy for many of the common clinical conditions is still undergoing validation through randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A credible placebo control for such RCTs to enable meaningful evaluation of its efficacy is to be established. While several non-penetrating acupuncture placebo devices, namely the Streitberger, the Park and the Takakura Devices, have been developed and used in RCTs, their suitability as inert placebo controls needs to be rigorously determined. This article systematically reviews these devices as placebo interventions. Electronic searches were conducted on four English and two Chinese databases from their inceptions to July 2014; hand searches of relevant references were also conducted. RCTs, in English or Chinese language, comparing acupuncture with one of the aforementioned devices as the control intervention on human participants with any clinical condition and evaluating clinically related outcomes were included. Thirty-six studies were included for qualitative analysis while 14 were in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis does not support the notion of either the Streitberger or the Park Device being inert control interventions while none of the studies involving the Takakura Device was included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen studies reported the occurrence of adverse events, with no significant difference between verum and placebo acupuncture. Author-reported blinding credibility showed that participant blinding was successful in most cases; however, when blinding index was calculated, only one study, which utilised the Park Device, seemed to have an ideal blinding scenario. Although the blinding index could not be calculated for the Takakura Device, it was the only device reported to enable practitioner blinding. There are limitations with each of the placebo devices and more rigorous studies are needed to further evaluate their effects and

  12. Recruitment strategies for an acupuncture randomized clinical trial of reproductive age women

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Lisa M.; Dalal, Parchayi

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objectives To assess the most effective recruitment strategies for an acupuncture clinical trial of reproductive age women. Design The underlying study is an acupuncture randomized clinical trial for an ovulatory disorder that affects approximately 6.5% of reproductive age women (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome). Study participation involved 2 months of intervention and 3 months of follow-up with US$170 compensation. Success of each recruitment method used during the first 37 study months was analyzed. Setting Clinical trial in the Dept. of OB/GYN at the University of Virginia, US. The original geographic residency target was an 80 mile radius around a college town in Virginia (population 155,000), and was expanded to the state capital (population 850,000) in recruitment year 2. Main outcome measures Number of study inquiries (phone calls or emails) over time and by recruitment source. Results In the first 37 months of recruitment (Jan 2006 – Jan 2009), there were 800 study inquiries (582 by phone, 218 by email), of which 749 were screened via telephone questionnaire. The most successful recruitment methods were flyers (28% of inquiries and 26 % of participants) and direct mailing to targeted zip codes (26% and 27%, respectively). The direct mailing cost US$110/inquiry, while the flyers cost less than US$300 in total. Study inquiries were least likely in May and November. Almost all prospective participants (94%) were acupuncture-naïve. Conclusions Posters/flyers and direct mailings proved to be the most successful recruitment methods for this CAM study. Active recruitment with multiple methods was needed for continual enrollment. PMID:19632551

  13. Acupuncture Anxiolytic Effects on Physiological and Psychological Assessments for a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shayestehfar, Monir; Seif-Barghi, Tohid; Zarei, Sahar; Mehran, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial we examined the effect of acupuncture on anxiety of the adolescent football players prior to the competition using psychological and physiological markers. A total of 45 athletes were equally allocated to either acupuncture group, sham group, or wait-list control group. Thereafter, all participants were asked to complete an anxiety questionnaire before and after the intervention. Their heart rate and skin conductance were also examined before and after the intervention. The results of ANOVA on posttest scores showed that acupuncture had a significant effect on cognitive anxiety (p = 0.001) and somatic anxiety (p < 0.001) but not on self-confidence (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the results showed that acupuncture significantly decreased the skin conductance in acupuncture group compared to sham group (p = 0.006) and wait-list control group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the results suggested that acupuncture has the capacity to decrease cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety prior to competition in adolescent athletes, while this was accompanied by significant physiological changes. This trial is registered with IRCT138904074264N1 (IRCT is a Primary Registry in the WHO Registry Network). PMID:27127679

  14. The Effectiveness of Individualized Acupuncture Protocols in the Treatment of Gulf War Illness: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Conboy, Lisa; Gerke, Travis; Hsu, Kai-Yin; St John, Meredith; Goldstein, Marc; Schnyer, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gulf War Illness is a Complex Medical Illness characterized by multiple symptoms, including fatigue, sleep and mood disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, and musculoskeletal pain affecting veterans of the first Gulf War. No standard of care treatment exists. Methods This pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial tested the effects of individualized acupuncture treatments offered in extant acupuncture practices in the community; practitioners had at least 5 years of experience plus additional training provided by the study. Veterans with diagnosed symptoms of Gulf War Illness were randomized to either six months of biweekly acupuncture treatments (group 1, n = 52) or 2 months of waitlist followed by weekly acupuncture treatments (group 2, n = 52). Measurements were taken at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months. The primary outcome is the SF-36 physical component scale score (SF-36P) and the secondary outcome is the McGill Pain scale. Results Of the 104 subjects who underwent randomization, 85 completed the protocol (82%). A clinically and statistically significant average improvement of 9.4 points (p = 0.03) in the SF-36P was observed for group 1 at month 6 compared to group 2, adjusting for baseline pain. The secondary outcome of McGill pain index produced similar results; at 6 months, group 1 was estimated to experience a reduction of approximately 3.6 points (p = 0.04) compared to group 2. Conclusions Individualized acupuncture treatment of sufficient dose appears to offer significant relief of physical disability and pain for veterans with Gulf War Illness. This work was supported by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs through the Gulf War Illness Research Program under Award No. W81XWH-09-2-0064. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01305811 PMID:27031099

  15. Ethical Considerations for Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine Clinical Trials: A Cross-cultural Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaslawski, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    MANY ETHICAL CONCERNS REVOLVE AROUND THE FOUR BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH: merit and integrity, respect for human beings, weighting of risk-benefit and justice. These principles form the basis for any discussion concerning human research ethics and are applicable to all areas of research including acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. World Health Organisation document, Guidelines for Clinical Research on Acupuncture, states that 'consideration should be given to the different value systems that are involved in human rights such as social, cultural and historical issues' and that 'further studies should be conducted in relation to ethical issues involved in clinical research on acupuncture'. In addition to outlining the four basic principles, this paper will also examine the effect of Asian culture on Western human research ethics and how this may impact upon issues such as informed consent and weighting of risk-benefit. PMID:18955359

  16. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. Methods and analysis In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. PMID:26739742

  17. Getting inside acupuncture trials - Exploring intervention theory and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture can be described as a complex intervention. In reports of clinical trials the mechanism of acupuncture (that is, the process by which change is effected) is often left unstated or not known. This is problematic in assisting understanding of how acupuncture might work and in drawing together evidence on the potential benefits of acupuncture. Our aim was to aid the identification of the assumed mechanisms underlying the acupuncture interventions in clinical trials by developing an analytical framework to differentiate two contrasting approaches to acupuncture (traditional acupuncture and Western medical acupuncture). Methods Based on the principles of realist review, an analytical framework to differentiate these two contrasting approaches was developed. In order to see how useful the framework was in uncovering the theoretical rationale, it was applied to a set of trials of acupuncture for fatigue and vasomotor symptoms, identified from a wider literature review of acupuncture and early stage breast cancer. Results When examined for the degree to which a study demonstrated adherence to a theoretical model, two of the fourteen selected studies could be considered TA, five MA, with the remaining seven not fitting into any recognisable model. When examined by symptom, five of the nine vasomotor studies, all from one group of researchers, are arguably in the MA category, and two a TA model; in contrast, none of the five fatigue studies could be classed as either MA or TA and all studies had a weak rationale for the chosen treatment for fatigue. Conclusion Our application of the framework to the selected studies suggests that it is a useful tool to help uncover the therapeutic rationale of acupuncture interventions in clinical trials, for distinguishing between TA and MA approaches and for exploring issues of model validity. English language acupuncture trials frequently fail to report enough detail relating to the intervention. We advocate using

  18. Comparison of clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture and amitriptyline in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN): a sham controlled randomized clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Khan, Imran; Anwar, Shahzad; Hanif, Asif; Ayub, Muhammad; Jamil Raja, Arsalan

    2014-02-01

    Background: Painful neuropathy is a very common complication in diabetic patients. Various treatment strategies like manual therapies, conservative management, drug therapy and exercise have been opted for this problem. Studies have shown clinical effectiveness of laser acupuncture as well. On the other hand, Amitryptaline is also a commonly used treatment for this disease. We aim to compare the efficacy of both treatments. Objective: To assess the effect of laser acupuncture in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy and its comparison with standard of care. Patients and Method: This study was conducted in Diabetic and Endocrine Management Center (DEMC) Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. A randomized control trial (RCT) was opted and a total of 164 patients were chosen using Non-probability purposive sampling technique. Pain was graded by using a patient friendly Visual Analogue Score (VAS), scoring from 0 to 10. Treatment was done involving organized fortnightly follow ups. Data of all patients was recorded on Performa and was entered and analyzed for descriptive statistics in PASW 18 (IBM®. SPSS). Results: A total of 164 subjects were included in the study who were subdivided into three groups labeled as A, B and C for laser therapy treatment, amitryptaline treatment and controls respectively. The mean age of subjects was 51.54+/-10.46 in Group A, 49.38+/-10.56 in Group B and 51.70+/-11.43 in Group C. The difference of mean ages in all study groups was statistically insignificant (p-value= 0.469). The average pain score in patients who received laser therapy was 5.95+/-0.91 before treatment, whereas after treatment it was 4.31+/-0.98. The mean pain score in subjects having Amitryptaline before starting the treatment was 6.87+/-0.71 and after treatment, it was 6.23+/-0.98. The mean score for daily life activities in subjects who received laser therapy was 9.562.37 before treatment, while after treatment it was 7.56+/-1.54. The average score

  19. Acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of sham-controlled randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qi-Ling; Wang, Peng; Liu, Liang; Sun, Fu; Cai, Yong-Song; Wu, Wen-Tao; Ye, Mao-Lin; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Xu, Bang-Bang; Zhang, Yin-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this systematic review were to study the analgesic effect of real acupuncture and to explore whether sham acupuncture (SA) type is related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain. Five databases were searched. The outcome was pain or disability immediately (≤1 week) following an intervention. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Meta-regression was used to explore possible sources of heterogeneity. Sixty-three studies (6382 individuals) were included. Eight condition types were included. The pooled effect size was moderate for pain relief (59 trials, 4980 individuals, SMD -0.61, 95% CI -0.76 to -0.47; P < 0.001) and large for disability improvement (31 trials, 4876 individuals, -0.77, -1.05 to -0.49; P < 0.001). In a univariate meta-regression model, sham needle location and/or depth could explain most or all heterogeneities for some conditions (e.g., shoulder pain, low back pain, osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia); however, the interactions between subgroups via these covariates were not significant (P < 0.05). Our review provided low-quality evidence that real acupuncture has a moderate effect (approximate 12-point reduction on the 100-mm visual analogue scale) on musculoskeletal pain. SA type did not appear to be related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture. PMID:27471137

  20. Acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of sham-controlled randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qi-ling; Wang, Peng; Liu, Liang; Sun, Fu; Cai, Yong-song; Wu, Wen-tao; Ye, Mao-lin; Ma, Jiang-tao; Xu, Bang-bang; Zhang, Yin-gang

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this systematic review were to study the analgesic effect of real acupuncture and to explore whether sham acupuncture (SA) type is related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain. Five databases were searched. The outcome was pain or disability immediately (≤1 week) following an intervention. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Meta-regression was used to explore possible sources of heterogeneity. Sixty-three studies (6382 individuals) were included. Eight condition types were included. The pooled effect size was moderate for pain relief (59 trials, 4980 individuals, SMD −0.61, 95% CI −0.76 to −0.47; P < 0.001) and large for disability improvement (31 trials, 4876 individuals, −0.77, −1.05 to −0.49; P < 0.001). In a univariate meta-regression model, sham needle location and/or depth could explain most or all heterogeneities for some conditions (e.g., shoulder pain, low back pain, osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia); however, the interactions between subgroups via these covariates were not significant (P < 0.05). Our review provided low-quality evidence that real acupuncture has a moderate effect (approximate 12-point reduction on the 100-mm visual analogue scale) on musculoskeletal pain. SA type did not appear to be related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture. PMID:27471137

  1. The Clinical Effect of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zheng-tao; Jiang, Wen-xiu; Huang, Jun-ming; Zhang, Jin-ming; Chen, An-min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to determine the clinical efficacy of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted in five databases including PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Wanfang, and CNKI to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of acupuncture therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. Meta-analysis was conducted using the RevMan version 5.3 software. Results. Six RCTs involving 362 subjects were included in our study. Compared with control groups, manual acupuncture (MA) was more effective in the improvement of apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), apnea index, hypopnea index, and mean SaO2. Electroacupuncture (EA) was better in improving the AHI and apnea index when compared with control treatment, but no statistically significant differences in hypopnea index and mean SaO2 were found. In the comparison of MA and nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the results favored MA in the improvement of AHI; there was no statistical difference in the improvement in mean SaO2. No adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were documented. Conclusion. Compared to control groups, both MA and EA were more effective in improving AHI and mean SaO2. In addition, MA could further improve apnea index and hypopnea index compared to control. PMID:27127530

  2. How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While several recent large randomized trials found clinically relevant effects of acupuncture over no treatment or routine care, blinded trials comparing acupuncture to sham interventions often reported only minor or no differences. This raises the question whether (sham) acupuncture is associated with particularly potent nonspecific effects. We aimed to investigate the size of nonspecific effects associated with acupuncture interventions. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials and reference lists were searched up to April 2010 to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for any condition, including both sham and no acupuncture control groups. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Pooled standardized mean differences were calculated using a random effects model with the inverse variance method. Results Thirty-seven trials with a total of 5754 patients met the inclusion criteria. The included studies varied strongly regarding patients, interventions, outcome measures, methodological quality and effect sizes reported. Among the 32 trials reporting a continuous outcome measure, the random effects standardized mean difference between sham acupuncture and no acupuncture groups was -0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.57, -0.34; I2 = 54%; Egger's test for funnel plot asymmetry, P = 0.25). Trials with larger effects of sham over no acupuncture reported smaller effects of acupuncture over sham intervention than trials with smaller nonspecific effects (β = -0.39, P = 0.029). Conclusions Sham acupuncture interventions are often associated with moderately large nonspecific effects which could make it difficult to detect small additional specific effects. Compared to inert placebo interventions, effects associated with sham acupuncture might be larger, which would have considerable implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:21092261

  3. A randomised multicentre trial of acupuncture in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis – trial intervention including physician and treatment characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a large randomised trial in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR), acupuncture was superior compared to sham acupuncture and rescue medication. The aim of this paper is to describe the characteristics of the trial’s participating physicians and to describe the trial intervention in accordance with the STRICTA (Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture) guidelines, to make details of the trial intervention more transparent to researchers and physicians. Methods ACUSAR (ACUpuncture in Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis) was a three-armed, randomised, controlled multicentre trial. 422 SAR patients were randomised to semi-standardised acupuncture plus rescue medication (RM, cetirizine), sham acupuncture plus RM or RM alone. We sent a questionnaire to trial physicians in order to evaluate their characteristics regarding their education about and experience in providing acupuncture. During the trial, acupuncturists were asked to diagnose all of their patients according to Chinese Medicine (CM) as a basis for the semi-standardised, individualized intervention in the acupuncture group. Every acupuncture point used in this trial had to be documented after each session Results Acupuncture was administered in outpatient clinics by 46 (mean age 47 ± 10 years; 24 female/ 22 male) conventionally-trained medical doctors (67% with postgraduate specialization such as internal or family medicine) with additional extensive acupuncture training (median 500 hours (1st quartile 350, 3rd quartile 1000 hours with 73% presenting a B-diploma in acupuncture training (350 hours)) and experience (mean 14 years in practice). The most reported traditional CM diagnosis was ‘wind-cold invading the lung’ (37%) and ‘wind-heat invading the lung’ (37%), followed by ‘lung and spleen qi deficiency’ (9%). The total number of needles used was higher in the acupuncture group compared to the sham acupuncture group (15.7 ± 2.5 vs. 10.0

  4. Clinical acupuncture research in the West.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianze; Xu, Shifen; Lao, Lixing

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, acupuncture has rapidly become part of mainstream medicine in the West, where new developments in acupuncture clinical research show extensive progress in evaluating the efficacy and safety of the modality in many categories of disease, especially in pain conditions. Although challenges and difficulties remain, the acupuncture research community has matured and its past experience may lead to even better methods and more innovative research. PMID:21695617

  5. Impact of Including Korean Randomized Controlled Trials in Cochrane Reviews of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Kong, Jae Cheol; Choi, Jun-Yong; Choi, Tae-Young; Shin, Byung-Cheul; McDonald, Steve; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture is commonly practiced in Korea and is regularly evaluated in clinical trials. Although many Cochrane reviews of acupuncture include searches of both English and Chinese databases, there is no information on the value of searching Korean databases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of searching Korean databasesand journals for trials eligible for inclusion in existing Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Methods We searched 12 Korean databases and seven Korean journals to identify randomised trials meeting the inclusion criteria for acupuncture reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We compared risk of bias assessments of the Korean trials with the trials included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Where possible, we added data from the Korean trials to the existing meta-analyses in the relevant Cochrane review and conducted sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of the results. Results Sixteen Korean trials (742 participants) met the inclusion criteria for eight Cochrane acupuncture reviews (125 trials; 13,041 participants). Inclusion of the Korean trials provided data for 20% of existing meta-analyses (24 out of 120). Inclusion of the Korean trials did not change the direction of effect in any of the existing meta-analyses. The effect size and heterogeneity remained mostly unchanged. In only one meta-analysis did the significance change. Compared to the studies included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews, the risk of bias in the Korean trials was higher in terms of outcome assessor blinding and allocation concealment. Conclusions Many Korean studies contributed additional data to the existing meta-analyses in Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Although inclusion of these studies did not alter the results of the meta-analyses, comprehensive searches of the literature are important to avoid potential language bias. The identification and inclusion of eligible Korean trials should be considered for reviews of acupuncture

  6. Crossover clinical trial to determine the effect of manual acupuncture at Siguan points (bilateral LI4 and LR3) on intestinal motility in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Yim, Y K; Kang, W C; Cho, J H; Shin, J W; Lee, N H; Choi, S M; Koo, S T; Park, K S; Son, C G

    2007-01-01

    This study examined whether manual acupuncture at the Siguan points (bilateral points LI4 and LR3) affects intestinal motility in healthy human subjects. Twenty healthy male subjects were randomly assigned either to real acupuncture (RA) at Siguan points or sham acupuncture (SA) groups in a crossover manner. All subjects underwent two experimental sessions; the RA group in the first session was treated with SA in the second session after a 2-week washout period, and vice versa. Each subject took 20 radio-markers and was treated with acupuncture 0, 12, 24, and 36 hours after radio-marker intake. Radiographs were taken at 6, 12.5, 24.5, and 48 hours, and the effect of acupuncture on intestinal motility was evaluated based on the distribution of the radio-markers in the ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid/ rectum, and outside the body. Defecating habit was monitored during the trial, and complete blood counts were checked before and after the two acupuncture sessions. The RA and SA results showed extremely similar distributions of the radio-markers in these five regions of the alimentary canal and outside the body in radiographs taken at four different times, verifying that there was no effect of manual acupuncture at the Siguan points on intestinal motility, at least in healthy human subjects. PMID:17436362

  7. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic dizziness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is one of the most challenging symptoms in medicine. No medication for dizziness in current use has well-established curative or prophylactic value or is suitable for long-term palliative use. Unconventional remedies, such as acupuncture, should be considered and scientifically evaluated. However, there has been relatively little evidence in randomized controlled clinical trials on acupuncture to treat chronic dizziness. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with dizziness. Methods/Design This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to two treatment groups receiving acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS). Treatment will be conducted over a period of 4 weeks, at a frequency of two sessions per week. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with chronic dizziness. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN52695239 PMID:24330810

  8. Acupuncture for acute stroke: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for more than 3,000 years. However, previous research has not yet shown that acupuncture is effective as a stroke treatment. We report a protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled, and outcome assessor-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on acute ischemic stroke. Methods/Design In a prospective trial involving three hospitals in the Zhejiang Province (China) 250 patients with a recent (less than 1 week previous) episode of ischemic stroke will be included. Patients will be randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group given scalp acupuncture and electroacupuncture, and a control group given no acupuncture. Eighteen treatment sessions will be performed over a three-week period. The primary outcome will be measured by changes in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at the one, three, and four-week follow-up. Secondary outcome measures will be: 1) the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor function; 2) the mini-mental state examination and Montreal cognitive assessment for cognitive function; 3) the video-fluoroscopic swallowing study for swallowing ability; and 4) the incidence of adverse events. Discussion This trial is expected to clarify whether or not acupuncture is effective for acute stroke. It will also show if acupuncture can improve motor, cognitive, or swallowing function. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12001971. PMID:24908241

  9. Are acupoints specific for diseases? A systematic review of the randomized controlled trials with sham acupuncture controls

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The results of many clinical trials and experimental studies regarding acupoint specificity are contradictory. This review aims to investigate whether a difference in efficacy exists between ordinary acupuncture on specific acupoints and sham acupuncture controls on non-acupoints or on irrelevant acupoints. Methods Databases including Medline, Embase, AMED and Chinese Biomedical Database were searched to identify randomized controlled trials published between 1998 and 2009 that compared traditional body acupuncture on acupoints with sham acupuncture controls on irrelevant acupoints or non-acupoints with the same needling depth. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was employed to address the quality of the included trials. Results Twelve acupuncture clinical trials with sham acupuncture controls were identified and included in the review. The conditions treated varied. Half of the included trials had positive results on the primary outcomes and demonstrated acupoint specificity. However, among those six trials (total sample size: 985) with low risk of bias, five trials (sample size: 940) showed no statistically significant difference between proper and sham acupuncture treatments. Conclusion This review did not demonstrate the existence of acupoint specificity. Further clinical trials with larger sample sizes, optimal acupuncture treatment protocols and appropriate sham acupuncture controls are required to resolve this important issue. PMID:20145733

  10. Acupuncture as a treatment for functional dyspepsia: design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Tian, Xiao-ping; Li, Ying; Liang, Fan-rong; Yu, Shu-guang; Liu, Xu-guang; Tang, Yong; Yang, Xu-guang; Yan, Jie; Sun, Guo-jie; Chang, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Hong-xing; Ma, Ting-ting; Yu, Shu-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is widely used in China to treat functional dyspepsia (FD). However, its effectiveness in the treatment of FD, and whether FD-specific acupoints exist, are controversial. So this study aims to determine if acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and if acupoint specificity exists according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. Design This multicenter randomized controlled trial will include four acupoint treatment groups, one non-acupoint control group and one drug (positive control) group. The four acupoint treatment groups will focus on: (1) specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (2) non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (3) specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; and (4) acupoints of the gallbladder meridian. These four groups of acupoints are thought to differ in terms of clinical efficacy, according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. A total of 120 FD patients will be included in each group. Each patient will receive 20 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 4 weeks. The trial will be conducted in eight hospitals located in three centers of China. The primary outcomes in this trial will include differences in Nepean Dyspepsia Index scores and differences in the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia before randomization, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after randomization, and 1 month and 3 months after completing treatment. Discussion The important features of this trial include the randomization procedures (controlled by a central randomization system), a standardized protocol of acupuncture manipulation, and the fact that this is the first multicenter randomized trial of FD and acupuncture to be performed in China. The results of this trial will determine whether acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and whether using different acupoints or different meridians leads to differences in clinical efficacy. Trial registration number Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00599677

  11. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Woon; Yi, Sook-Hee; Lee, Jung Ah; Hwang, Pil Woo; Yoo, Hyun Cheol; Kang, Kyoung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke. PMID:25192034

  12. Acupuncture for treating polycystic ovary syndrome: guidance for future randomized controlled trials*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Robinson, Nicola; Hardiman, Paul J.; Taw, Malcolm B.; Zhou, Jue; Wang, Fang-fang; Qu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To provide guidance for future randomized controlled trials (RCTs) based on a review concerning acupuncture for treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in October 2015 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCISEARCH, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group trials register, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and the Wanfang databases. RCTs comparing either acupuncture with no/sham/pharmacological intervention or a combination of acupuncture and conventional therapy with conventional therapy in the treatment of PCOS were included in this review. A quality evaluation was performed for each of the included studies. Results: Thirty-one RCTs were included in the review and were divided into four categories according to the type of intervention used in the comparator or control group. Menstrual frequency, hormones, anthropometrics, insulin sensitivity, blood lipids, and fertility were used as the main measurements to assess the effects of acupuncture on the patients with PCOS. Thirty trials, except for one, showed an improvement in at least one of the indicators of PCOS after acupuncture treatment. However, normalizing the methodological and reporting format remains an issue. Conclusions: Based upon this review of current clinical trials concerning acupuncture for treating PCOS, we provide guidelines for better clinical trial design in the future. PMID:26984837

  13. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  14. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to ...

  15. Acupuncture for dyspnea in advanced cancer: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial [ISRCTN89462491

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Feinstein, Marc B; Deng, Gary E; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2005-01-01

    Background Dyspnea, or shortness of breath, is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer. Pharmacologic management is of proven benefit, but it does not help all patients. Preliminary data suggest that acupuncture can relieve dyspnea in a variety of populations, including cancer patients. We conducted a pilot study (ISRCTN89462491) preparatory to a fully powered randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether acupuncture reduces dyspnea in patients with lung or breast cancer. Methods The study sample was comprised of forty-seven patients with lung or breast cancer presenting with dyspnea. Patients receiving symptomatic treatments were not excluded as long as no changes in management were planned during the trial. Patients were randomized to receive a single session of true or placebo acupuncture in addition to their existing dyspnea treatments. Semi-permanent acupuncture "studs" were then inserted: patients applied pressure to these studs twice a day to provide ongoing stimulation to acupuncture points. The subjective sensation of dyspnea was assessed with a 0 – 10 numerical rating scale immediately before and after acupuncture treatment and daily for a week thereafter. Results All but two of 47 randomized patients provided follow-up data. Dyspnea scores were slightly higher for patients receiving true versus placebo acupuncture, for both the period immediately following acupuncture treatment and for the daily one week follow-up (differences between means of 0.34, 95% C.I. -0.33, 1.02 and 0.56, 95% C.I. -0.39, 1.51). The 95% confidence interval excludes the prespecified minimum clinically significant difference of a 20% greater improvement in dyspnea for patients receiving acupuncture. Conclusion The acupuncture technique used in this trial is unlikely to have effects on dyspnea importantly larger than placebo for patients with advanced cancer. PMID:16109163

  16. The effect of TCM acupuncture on hot flushes among menopausal women (ACUFLASH) study: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Borud, Einar K; Alraek, Terje; White, Adrian; Fonnebo, Vinjar; Grimsgaard, Sameline

    2007-01-01

    Background After menopause, 10–20% of all women have nearly intolerable hot flushes. Long term use of hormone replacement therapy involves a health risk, and many women seek alternative strategies to relieve climacteric complaints. Acupuncture is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in Norway. We designed a study to evaluate whether Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture-care together with self-care is more effective than self-care alone to relieve climacteric complaints. Methods/Design The study is a multi-centre pragmatic randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants are postmenopausal women who document ≥7 flushes/24 hours and who are not using hormone replacement therapy or other medication that may influence flushes. According to power calculations 200 women are needed to detect a 50% reduction in flushes, and altogether 286 women will be recruited to allow for a 30% dropout rate. The treatment group receives 10 sessions of Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture-care and self-care; the control group will engage in self-care only. A team of experienced Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncturists give acupuncture treatments. Discussion The study tests acupuncture as a complete treatment package including the therapeutic relationship and expectation. The intervention period lasts for 12 weeks, with follow up at 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint is change in daily hot flush frequency in the two groups from baseline to 12 weeks; secondary endpoint is health related quality of life, assessed by the Women's Health Questionnaire. We also collect data on Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnoses, and we examine treatment experiences using a qualitative approach. Finally we measure biological variables, to examine potential mechanisms for the effect of acupuncture. The study is funded by The Research Council of Norway. PMID:17324253

  17. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    PubMed

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  18. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  19. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Galante, Antonia Herrera; Madrazo, Fernando; Medina, Ivan; Ortega, Caridad; Olmo, Victoria; Fernandez, Francisco Perez; Hernandez, Luz; Seminario, Jose Maria; Brioso, Mauricio; Luna, Francisco; Gordo, Isabel; Godoy, Ana Maria; Jimenez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel Anselmo; Montes, Joaquin; Hidalgo, Alonso; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Rosa; Bosch, Pablo; Vazquez, Antonio; Lozano, Juan Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Background Although the painful shoulder is one of the most common dysfunctions of the locomotor apparatus, and is frequently treated both at primary healthcare centres and by specialists, little evidence has been reported to support or refute the effectiveness of the treatments most commonly applied. According to the bibliography reviewed, physiotherapy, which is the most common action taken to alleviate this problem, has not yet been proven to be effective, because of the small size of sample groups and the lack of methodological rigor in the papers published on the subject. No reviews have been made to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating this complaint, but in recent years controlled randomised studies have been made and these demonstrate an increasing use of acupuncture to treat pathologies of the soft tissues of the shoulder. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy applied jointly with acupuncture, compared with physiotherapy applied with a TENS-placebo, in the treatment of painful shoulder caused by subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). Methods/design Randomised controlled multicentre study with blind evaluation by an independent observer and blind, independent analysis. A study will be made of 465 patients referred to the rehabilitation services at participating healthcare centres, belonging to the regional public health systems of Andalusia and Murcia, these patients presenting symptoms of painful shoulder and a diagnosis of subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). The patients will be randomised into two groups: 1) experimental (acupuncture + physiotherapy); 2) control (TENS-placebo + physiotherapy); the administration of rescue medication will also be allowed. The treatment period will have a duration of three weeks. The main result variable will be the change produced on Constant's Shoulder Function Assessment (SFA) Scale; as secondary

  20. Acupuncture for patients with functional dyspepsia: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Jing; Li, Juan; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Ling; Chang, Xiaorong; Liu, Mi; Gong, Biao; Li, Xuezhi; Liang, Fanrong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whether acupuncture is efficacious for patients with functional dyspepsia is still controversial. So we designed a randomised controlled trial to settle the problem. Methods and analysis We designed a multicentre, two-arm, sham-controlled clinical trial. 200 participants with functional dyspepsia will be randomly assigned to the true acupuncture (TA) group and sham acupuncture (SA) group in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the TA group will receive acupuncture at points selected according to syndrome differentiation. Participants in the sham acupuncture group will receive penetrations at sham points. Participants in both groups will receive 20 sessions of electroacupuncture in 4 weeks, five times continuously with a 2 day rest in a week. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients reporting the absence of dyspeptic symptoms at 16 weeks after inclusion. The secondary outcome includes a Short-Form Leeds Dyspepsia Questionnaire, the Chinese version of the 36-Item Short Form Survey, the Chinese version of the Nepean dyspepsia index, etc. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the institutional review boards and ethics committees of the first affiliated hospital of Chengdu University of TCM, the first affiliated hospital of Hunan University of TCM and Chongqing Medical University, respectively (from April to August 2012). The results of this trial will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. Trials registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671670. PMID:23901030

  1. Acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension: study protocol of an open-label multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies using acupuncture to treat essential hypertension have been carried out. However, whether acupuncture is efficacious for hypertension is still controversial. Therefore, this trial aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension. Methods/Design This is a large scale, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial with four parallel arms. We will recruit 428 hypertensive patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 140 and 159 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 90 and 99 mmHg. The participants will be randomly assigned to four different groups (three acupuncture groups and one waiting list group) (1).The affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the affected meridians (2).The non-affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the non-affected meridians (3).The invasive sham acupuncture group (n = 107) is provided with sham acupoints treatment (4).The waiting-list group (n = 107) is not offered any intervention until they complete the trial. Each patient allocated to acupuncture groups will receive 18 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 6 weeks. This trial will be conducted in 11 hospitals in China. The primary endpoint is the change in average 24-hSBP before and 6 weeks after randomization. The secondary endpoints are average SBP and average DBP during the daytime and night-time, and 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36), and so on. Discussion This is the first large scale, multicenter, randomized, sham controlled trial of acupuncture for essential hypertension in China. It may clarify the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for mild hypertension. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01701726 PMID:24216113

  2. [Enlightenment of big-data era on clinical research of TCM and acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyi; Chen, Bo; Pan, Xingfang; Guo, Yongming; Guo, Yi

    2015-09-01

    The big-data era has arrived, which involves all professions and trades. Its impact on the medical field has gradually revealed. With the characteristics of big data "4V" (volume, velocity, variety, value) and its theory generality with TCM (holistic thinking, correlativity) as well as regularity of disease development, combined with present status of acupuncture clinical research, the influences of big-data era on trial design, data collection, analysis and sharing of acupuncture clinical research are discussed in this paper, aiming to provide references for solving the difficulties of study design and determining the future research direction of acupuncture clinical research. PMID:26721155

  3. Validating a new non-penetrating sham acupuncture device: two randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbae; White, Adrian; Stevinson, Clare; Ernst, Edzard; James, Martin

    2002-12-01

    For clinical trials of acupuncture, it would be desirable to have a sham procedure that is indistinguishable from the real treatment, yet inactive. A sham needle has been designed which telescopes instead of penetrating the skin. The Park Sham Device involves an improved method of supporting the sham needle and requires validation. The objective of these studies was to test whether the sham procedure using the new device was 1) indistinguishable from the same procedure using real needles in acupuncture naïve subjects, and 2) inactive, where the specific needle sensation (de qi) is taken as a surrogate measure of activity. The studies were designed as subject and assessor blind, randomised controlled trials. Study 1) included 58 patients enrolled in a clinical trial of acupuncture for acute stroke. Study 2) included 63 healthy, acupuncture naïve, adult volunteers. The interventions used were real or sham acupuncture using the Park Sham Device. Study 1) was set in a district general hospital, and study 2) in a university laboratory. The outcome measure in study 1) was the form of treatment that patients believed they had received. In study 2) the outcome measure was experience of de qi, as judged by three acupuncture experts. No patient in either group(study 1) believed he or she had been treated with the sham needle. In 40 volunteers (study 2) for whom experts achieved consensus, the relative risk of experiencing de qi with real acupuncture to that with sham acupuncture was 15.38 (95% CI 2.26 to 104.86). The inter-rater reliability of all 13 experts (study 2), calculated from their judgements on 10 subjects selected by randomisation, was 0.52 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.61). In conclusion, the results suggest that the procedure using the new device is indistinguishable from the same procedure using real needles in acupuncture naïve subjects, and is inactive, where the specific needle sensation (de qi) is taken as a surrogate measure of activity. It is therefore a valid

  4. The optimized acupuncture treatment for neck pain caused by cervical spondylosis: a study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    versus placebo or non-classic acupuncture treatment and evaluate whether classic Chinese medical acupuncture is effective on CS neck pain. This study will provide evidence for the effects of acupuncture on CS neck pain. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-00000184. PMID:22776567

  5. Acupuncture for menopausal vasomotor symptoms: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    acupuncture, and adverse events. Participants will be analysed in the groups in which they were randomised using an intention-to-treat analysis strategy. Discussion Results from this trial will significantly add to the current body of evidence on the role of acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms. If found to be effective and safe, acupuncture will be a valuable additional treatment option for women who experience menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000393954 11/02/2009. PMID:24925094

  6. Adverse effects of acupuncture. Which are clinically significant?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ainee; Bui, Luke; Mills, Edward

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review potentially serious adverse events associated with acupuncture. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature primarily provide level II evidence from retrospective reviews, case reports, and prospective surveys of practitioners. MAIN MESSAGE: Both the general public and physicians are becoming more interested in the ancient Chinese medical practice of acupuncture. This paper discusses the basic philosophy of acupuncture and describes adverse events that might be associated with acupuncture treatment. Some events, such as nausea and syncope, can be mild and transient, but rare events, such as septicemia and hepatitis C infection, can be fatal. As the role of acupuncture in today's multidisciplinary clinics increases, the complications of acupuncture, although infrequent, cannot be overlooked. CONCLUSION: Responsible clinicians practising acupuncture and seeing patients who use acupuncture should be aware of the adverse events associated with it. PMID:12943357

  7. Effects of acupuncture treatment on depression insomnia: a study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 70% of patients with depression who see their doctors experience insomnia. Insomnia treatment is a very important link for depression treatment. Furthermore, antidepression treatment is also important for depression insomnia. In acupuncture, LU-7 (Lie Que) and KID-6 (Zhao Hai), which are two of the eight confluence points in meridian theory, are used as main points. An embedded needle technique is used, alternately, at two groups of points to consolidate the treatment effect. These two groups of points are BL-15 (Xin Shu) with BL-23 (Shen Shu) and BL-19 (Dan Shu) with N-HN-54 (An Mian). The effectiveness of these optimized acupuncture formulas is well proven in the practice by our senior acupuncturists in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM. This study has been designed to examine whether this set of optimized clinical formulas is able to increase the clinical efficacy of depression insomnia treatment. Methods/design In this randomized controlled multicenter trial, all the eligible participants are diagnosed with depression insomnia. All participants are randomly assigned to one of two groups in a ratio of 1:1 and receive either conventional acupuncture treatment or optimized acupuncture treatment. Patients are evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index(PSQI)and the Hamilton rating scale(HAMD) for depression. The use of antidepression and hypnotics drugs is also considered. Results are obtained at the start of treatment, 1 and 2 months after treatment has begun, and at the end of treatment. The entire duration of the study will be approximately 36 months. Discussion A high quality of trial methodologies is utilized in the study, and the results may provide better evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for depression insomnia. The optimized acupuncture formula has potential benefits in increasing the efficacy of treating depression insomnia. Trial registration The trial was registered in Chinese Clinical Trial

  8. Methods to Standardize a Multicenter Acupuncture Trial Protocol to Reduce Aromatase Inhibitor-related Joint Symptoms in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather; Crew, Katherine D.; Capodice, Jillian; Awad, Danielle; Jeffres, Anne; Unger, Joseph M.; Lew, Danika L.; Hansen, Lisa K.; Meyskens, Frank L.; Wade, James L.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Robust methods are needed to efficiently conduct large, multi-site, randomized controlled clinical trials of acupuncture protocols. SWOG S1200 is a randomized, controlled sham- and waitlist-controlled trial of a standardized acupuncture protocol treating aromatase inhibitor (AI)-associated arthralgias in early stage breast cancer patients (n=228). The primary objective is to determine whether true acupuncture administered twice weekly for 6 weeks compared to sham acupuncture or a waitlist control causes a reduction in AI-associated joint pain at 6 weeks as assessed by patient report. The study is conducted at 11 institutions across the US. The true acupuncture protocol was developed using a consensus-based process. Both the true acupuncture and sham acupuncture protocols consist of 12 sessions administered over 6 weeks, followed by 1 session per week for the remaining 6 weeks. The true acupuncture protocol uses standardized protocol points in addition to standardized acupoints tailored to a patient’s joint symptoms. The similarly standardized sham acupuncture protocol utilizes superficial needling of non-acupoints. Standardized methods were developed to train and monitor acupuncturists, including online and in-person training, study manuals, monthly phone calls, and remote quality assurance monitoring throughout the study period. Research staff was similarly trained using online and in-person training, and monthly phone calls. PMID:26100070

  9. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... of visits, and any adjustments to treatment. (back) Requirements for Participation Admission into a clinical trial is based on a rigid set of requirements. You must be diagnosed with the illness that ...

  10. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  11. Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zheng-Tao; Song, Wen; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jun; Wang, Tao; Wu, Cai-Hua; Gao, Fang; Yuan, Xiao-Cui; Liu, Ji-Hong; Li, Man

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed. PMID:26167190

  12. Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zheng-tao; Song, Wen; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jun; Wang, Tao; Wu, Cai-hua; Gao, Fang; Yuan, Xiao-cui; Liu, Ji-hong; Li, Man

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed. PMID:26167190

  13. [Acupuncture clinical studies and evidence-based medicine--an update].

    PubMed

    Lao, Li-xing

    2008-02-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used in the West in recent years and demand has been growing for scientific evaluation of its clinical efficacy. The practice of evidence-based medicine has brought new challenges in the design of acupuncture research, and publication of randomized clinical trials on acupuncture has significantly increased. While systematic reviews of these trials have advanced our current knowledge, they have exposed deficiencies in research design and revealed that one design can not answer all research questions. Few clinical studies conducted in China have been published in the West, and most published in Chinese suffer from methodological design flaws that render the results unreliable and unconvincing. Such flaws include inadequate or no randomization, inadequate control, unsatisfactory outcome measurements, lack of proper concealment, insufficient follow-up, and improper statistical analysis. To foster high quality acupuncture clinical research in China, we must cultivate innovation and creativity in research design. It is unwise to simply follow or copy the research methodology of Western pharmaceutical studies. Acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) must be evaluated using rigorous scientific methods that preserve the essence of TCM concepts, so that acupuncture and TCM, these ancient healing arts, can continue to play an important role in the health care systems of modern societies. PMID:18386647

  14. Auricular acupuncture for chemically dependent pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial of the NADA protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of maternal drug use during pregnancy in North America has been estimated to be as high as 6-10%. The consequences for the newborn include increased risk for perinatal mortality and ongoing physical, neurobehavioral, and psychosocial problems. Methadone is frequently used to wean women off street drugs but is implicated as a cause of adverse fetal/neonatal outcomes itself. The purpose of our study was to test the ability of maternal acupuncture treatment among mothers who use illicit drugs to reduce the frequency and severity of withdrawal symptoms among their newborns. Methods We randomly assigned chemically dependent pregnant women at BC Women’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia to daily acupuncture treatments versus usual care. By necessity, neither our participants nor acupuncturists were blinded as to treatment allocation. Our primary outcome was days of neonatal morphine treatment for symptoms of neonatal withdrawal. Secondary neonatal outcomes included admission to a neonatal ICU and transfer to foster care. Results We randomized 50 women to acupuncture and 39 to standard care. When analyzed by randomized groups, we did not find benefit of acupuncture; the average length of treatment with morphine for newborns in the acupuncture group was 2.7 (6.3) compared to 2.8 (7.0) in the control group. Among newborns of women who were compliant with the acupuncture regime, we observed a reduction of 2.1 and 1.5 days in length of treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome compared to the non-compliant and control groups, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible treatment to assist mothers to reduce their dosage of methadone. Our results should encourage ongoing studies to test the ability of acupuncture to mitigate the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome among their newborns. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov registry: W05

  15. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This ... functions of the body. Research has shown that acupuncture reduces nausea and vomiting after surgery and chemotherapy. ...

  16. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial in general practice investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture against migraine

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Rebollo, Ángel; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Méndez, Camila; Font, Carlos Ramos; Gómez-Río, Manuel; Martín-Ávila, Manuel; Carbrera-Iboleón, Justo; Caballero, M Dolores; Olmos, M Ángeles; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Faus, Vicente; Martos, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Background Migraine is a chronic neurologic disease that can severely affect the patient's quality of life. Although in recent years many randomised studies have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for migraine, it remains a controversial issue. Our aim is to determine whether acupuncture, applied under real conditions of clinical practice in the area of primary healthcare, is more effective than conventional treatment. Methods/Design The design consists of a pragmatic multi-centre, three-armed randomised controlled trial, complemented with an economic evaluation of the results achieved, comparing the effectiveness of verum acupuncture with sham acupuncture, and with a control group receiving normal care only. Patients eligible for inclusion will be those presenting in general practice with migraine and for whom their General Practitioner (GP) is considering referral for acupuncture. Sampling will be by consecutive selection, and by randomised allocation to the three branches of the study, in a centralised way following a 1:1:1 distribution (verum acupuncture; sham acupuncture; conventional treatment). Secondly, one patient in three will be randomly selected from each of the acupuncture (verum or sham) groups for a brain perfusion study (by single photon emission tomography). The treatment with verum acupuncture will consist of 8 treatment sessions, once a week, at points selected individually by the acupuncturist. The sham acupuncture group will receive 8 sessions, one per week, with treatment being applied at non-acupuncture points in the dorsal and lumbar regions, using the minimal puncture technique. The control group will be given conventional treatment, as will the other two groups. Discussion This trial will contribute to available evidence on acupuncture for the treatment of migraine. The primary endpoint is the difference in the number of days with migraine among the three groups, between the baseline period (the

  17. Effects of warm acupuncture on breast cancer–related chronic lymphedema: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yao, C.; Xu, Y.; Chen, L.; Jiang, H.; Ki, C.S.; Byun, J.S.; Bian, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective treatment for breast cancer–related chronic lymphedema (bcrl) remains a clinical challenge. Acupuncture and moxibustion treatments have been shown to be beneficial and safe for treating bcrl. In the present randomized controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of combined acupuncture and moxibustion (“warm acupuncture”) with that of diosmin in bcrl. Methods Breast cancer patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria (n = 30) were randomized to experimental and control groups (15 per group). On alternate days, patients in the experimental group received 30 minutes of acupuncture at 6 acupoints, with 3 of the needles each being topped by a 3-cm moxa stick. The control treatment was diosmin 900 mg 3 times daily. The control and experimental treatments were administered for 30 days. Outcome measures included arm circumferences (index of effectiveness), range of motion [rom (shoulder joint function)], quality of life, clinical safety, and adverse events. Results Measured by the index of effectiveness, bcrl improved by 51.46% in the experimental group and by 26.27% in the control group (p < 0.00001). Effects were greatest at 10 cm above the elbow and at the wrist, where the warm needling was provided. Impairments in shoulder joint rom were minimal at baseline in both treatment groups. However, the roms of rear protraction, abduction, intorsion, and extorsion in the experimental group improved significantly; they did not change in the control group. Self-reported quality of life was significantly better with warm acupuncture than with diosmin. No adverse effects were reported during the treatment period, and laboratory examinations for clinical safety fell within the normal ranges. Conclusions Compared with diosmin, warm acupuncture treatment can effectively reduce the degree of bcrl at the specific acupoints treated and can promote quality of life. Warm acupuncture showed good clinical safety, without any adverse effects on blood

  18. A clinical study of integrating acupuncture and Western medicine in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Pey; Chang, Ching-Mao; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Ta-Peng; Yang, Jen-Lin; Kung, Yen-Ying; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Complementary therapy with acupuncture for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied for quite a long time, but the effectiveness of the treatment still remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the integrated effects of acupuncture treatment in PD patients who received western medicine. In the short-term acupuncture treatment study, 20 patients received acupuncture therapy twice a week in acupoints DU 20, GB 20, LI 11, LI 10, LI 4, GB 31, ST 32, GB 34 and GB 38 along with western medicine for 18 weeks, and 20 controlled patients received western medicine only. In the long-term acupuncture treatment, 13 patients received acupuncture treatment twice a week for 36 weeks. The outcome parameters include Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory-Version 2 (BDI-II), and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL). In the short-term clinical trial, a higher percentage of patients in the acupuncture group had score improvement in UPDRS total scores (55% vs. 15%, p = 0.019), sub-score of mind, behavior and mood (85% vs. 25%, p < 0.001), activity of daily living (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003), mobility (40% vs. 15%, p = 0.155) and complication of treatment (75% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), BDI-II score (85% vs. 35%, p = 0.003), and WHOQOL score (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003) when compared to control group at the end of the 18 weeks' follow up. After 36 weeks of long-term acupuncture treatment, the mean UPDRS total scores and sub-score of mentation, behavior and mood, sub-score of complications of therapy and BDI-II score decreased significantly when compared to the pretreatment baseline. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment had integrated effects in reducing symptoms and signs of mind, behavior, mood, complications of therapy and depression in PD patients who received Western medicine. PMID:25967661

  19. Does Syndrome Differentiation Matter? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials in Cochrane Reviews of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Bourchier, Suzannah

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background One of the basic and important principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory is syndrome differentiation, which is widely utilized for individual diagnosis and in the application of acupuncture treatment. However, the impact of syndrome differentiation on therapeutic effect is unclear because of insufficient supportive clinical evidence. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze current Cochrane Database systematic reviews of acupuncture and to evaluate differences in therapeutic effects of acupuncture treatment when syndrome differentiation is utilized, compared to when this approach is not utilized. Methods Cochrane Database systematic reviews of acupuncture were included if the reviews had sufficient data to perform subgroup analyses by syndrome differentiation applied during acupoints' selection. Searching was conducted across all available articles of the Cochrane Library, and the search concluded in July 2011. Results Forty-four trials from five Cochrane reviews were included in 10 subgroup meta-analyses. Seven meta-analyses showed that there were no differences between trials using fixed acupoints prescriptions and trials using individualized treatment based on relevant symptom improvements in cases of acute stroke, depression, epilepsy, migraine, and peripheral joint osteoarthritis (OA). The remaining 3 meta-analyses showed that acupuncture with fixed prescriptions was superior to individualized acupuncture for pain relief of peripheral joint OA, compared to sham control. Conclusions The available evidence showed no significant difference between acupuncture treatment with or without syndrome differentiation. Large, well-designed trials are warranted to address the use of syndrome differentiation for specific diseases or conditions in order to confirm if there are any advantages of using syndrome differentiation to achieve better therapeutic effects with acupuncture. PMID:24761164

  20. The therapeutic effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Cheng, Yung-Yen; Hung, Hung-Chang; Li, Tsai-Chung; Yen, Sch-May; Huang, I-Shin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neck myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common disorder seen in clinics. There is no gold standard method to treat myofascial pain. We investigated the effects of acupuncture on patients with chronic neck MPS by a single-blind randomized controlled trial. A total of 35 patients were randomly allocated to an acupuncture group (AG) or a sham acupuncture group (SG). Each subject received acupuncture treatment twice per week for three consecutive weeks. The primary outcome measure was quality of life as assessed with Short Form-36, and secondary outcome measures were neck range of motion (ROM), motion-related pain, and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), as determined by a blinded investigator. The clinical assessments were made before treatment (BT) and after six acupuncture treatments (AT), as well as four weeks (F1) and 12 weeks (F2) after the end of the treatment. A total of 34 patients completed the trial. The results indicated that there is no significant difference in the ROM, motion-related pain, and SF-MPQ scores between AG and SG at AT, F1 and F2 (all p > 0.05). However, AG has greater improvement in physical functioning and role emotional of Short Form-36 quality of life at F2. The results indicate that acupuncture may be used to improve the quality of life in patients with chronic neck MPS. PMID:20821817

  1. Acupuncture for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Julia; Redman, Leanne; Veldhuis, Paula P.; Sazonova, Antonina; Labrie, Fernand; Holm, Göran; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been demonstrated to improve menstrual frequency and to decrease circulating testosterone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Our aim was to investigate whether acupuncture affects ovulation frequency and to understand the underlying mechanisms of any such effect by analyzing LH and sex steroid secretion in women with PCOS. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted between June 2009 and September 2010. Thirty-two women with PCOS were randomized to receive either acupuncture with manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation or to meetings with a physical therapist twice a week for 10–13 wk. Main outcome measures were changes in LH secretion patterns from baseline to after 10–13 wk of treatment and ovulation frequency during the treatment period. Secondary outcomes were changes in the secretion of sex steroids, anti-Müllerian hormone, inhibin B, and serum cortisol. Ovulation frequency during treatment was higher in the acupuncture group than in the control group. After 10–13 wk of intervention, circulating levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone glucuronide, androstane-3α,17β-diol-3-glucuronide, and androstane-3α,17β-diol-17-glucuronide decreased within the acupuncture group and were significantly lower than in the control group for all of these except androstenedione. We conclude that repeated acupuncture treatments resulted in higher ovulation frequency in lean/overweight women with PCOS and were more effective than just meeting with the therapist. Ovarian and adrenal sex steroid serum levels were reduced with no effect on LH secretion. PMID:23482444

  2. Acupuncture, psyche and the placebo response.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle; Zipfel, Stephan

    2010-10-28

    With growing use of acupuncture treatment in various clinical conditions, the question has been posed whether the reported effects reflect specific mechanisms of acupuncture or whether they represent placebo responses, as they often are similar in effect size and resemble similarities to placebo analgesia and its mechanisms. We reviewed the available literature for different placebos (sham procedures) used to control the acupuncture effects, for moderators and potential biases in respective clinical trials, and for central and peripheral mechanisms involved that would allow differentiation of placebo effects from acupuncture and sham acupuncture effects. While the evidence is still limited, it seems that biological differences exist between a placebo response, e.g. in placebo analgesia, and analgesic response during acupunture that does not occur with sham acupuncture. It seems advisable that clinical trials should include potential biomarkers of acupuncture, e.g. measures of the autonomic nervous system function to verify that acupuncture and sham acupuncture are different despite similar clinical effects. PMID:20359961

  3. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This is most often done by inserting thin needles ...

  4. Pediatric Acupuncture: A Review of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Colette D.; Belmont, Katharine A.; Katz, Aaron R.; Benaron, Daniel M.; Yu, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Practiced in China for more than 2000 years, acupuncture has recently gained increased attention in the United States as an alternative treatment approach for a variety of medical conditions. Despite its growing prevalence and anecdotal reports of success among pediatric populations, few empirically based studies have assessed the efficacy of acupuncture for children and adolescents. This article presents a review of the current literature, including a systematic appraisal of the methodological value of each study and a discussion of potential benefits and adverse effects of acupuncture. While acupuncture holds great promise as a treatment modality for diverse pediatric conditions, a significant amount of additional research is necessary to establish an empirical basis for the incorporation of acupuncture into standard care. PMID:18955306

  5. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Manyong; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective. PMID:26539231

  6. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Park, Manyong; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective. PMID:26539231

  7. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Oculomotor Paralysis: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jia-Qi; Li, Wei; Yang, Qi; Li, Bao-lin; Meng, Qing-Gang; Liu, Yu-fu

    2016-01-01

    This study consisted of a single centre randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group (n = 20) with 27 affected eyes and a sham group (n = 20) with 23 affected eyes. Participants in the acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment once daily, three times weekly for four weeks. Participants assigned to the control group received sham acupuncture, the same protocol as that used for the acupuncture group but without insertion of needles into the skin. The primary outcome measure was the cervical range of motion (CROM) score. Secondary outcome measures were the palpebral fissure size, response rate, and adverse events. All 40 participants completed the study. In the comparison of acupuncture and sham acupuncture, a significant difference was observed between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in CROM score (21.37 ± 15.16 and 32.21 ± 19.54, resp.) (P < 0.05) and palpebral fissure size (7.19 ± 2.94 and 5.41 ± 2.45, resp.) (P < 0.05). Response rate was also significantly different in the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). No adverse events were reported in both groups in this study. In summary, it was demonstrated that acupuncture had a feasibility positive effect on oculomotor paralysis. PMID:27313646

  8. Quality of reporting on randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Results from clinical studies on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation are contradictory. The reason for the inconsistent findings especially lie in the transparency and accuracy of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reports. This study aims to analyze the quality of reporting and its correlates in RCTs on acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation. Methods Quality of reporting for included papers was assessed against a subset of criteria adapted from the CONSORT 2010 statement and STRICTA. An overall quality score (OQS) and a combined key methodological index score (MIS) was calculated for each trial. Then, factors associated with OQS and MIS were identified. Results A total of 15 RCTs were included in full text. The median OQS based on the CONSORT statement and STRICTA was 8 and 12, respectively. The significant predictors for CONSORT OQS was funding source, for STRICTA was year of publication. With regard to the MIS, no variable was associated with improved methodological quality. Conclusions Our study found that the overall quality of reporting on RCTs of acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation was general or good. But some items’ reporting was found where information was insufficient or inadequate in most studies which needed substantial improvement. PMID:24885561

  9. Auricular Acupuncture Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Anxiety Disorders or Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Parallel Group Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de Lorent, Lukas; Agorastos, Agorastos; Yassouridis, Alexander; Kellner, Michael; Muhtz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Although acupuncture treatment is increasingly in demand among psychiatric patients, to date no studies have investigated the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture (AA) in treating anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. Thus, this study aimed to compare the effectiveness of AA versus progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), a standardized and accepted relaxation method. We examined 162 patients with a primary diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder, and each patient chose between treatment with AA, executed according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, and treatment with PMR. Each group had treatments twice a week for 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, each participant rated four items on a visual analog scale: anxiety, tension, anger/aggression, and mood. Statistical analyses were performed with the original visual analog scale scores and the Change-Intensity Index, an appropriate indicator of the difference between two values of a variable. Our results show that treatment with AA significantly decreased tension, anxiety, and anger/aggression throughout the 4 weeks, but did not elevate mood. Between AA and PMR, no statistically significant differences were found at any time. Thus, we suggest that both AA and PMR may be useful, equally-effective additional interventions in the treatment of the above-mentioned disorders. PMID:27555224

  10. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is best to check with your insurance company to find out if all or part of your acupuncture treatment will be covered. If your insurance does not cover acupuncture, you can talk to your acupuncturist about their fees and possible discounts if you are a student. Some college or ...

  11. Pain intensity and cervical range of motion in women with myofascial pain treated with acupuncture and electroacupuncture: a double-blinded, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Aranha, Maria F. M.; Müller, Cristina E. E.; Gavião, Maria B. D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture stimulates points on the body, influencing the perception of myofascial pain or altering physiologic functions. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EAC) and acupuncture (AC) for myofascial pain of the upper trapezius and cervical range of motion, using SHAM acupuncture as control. METHOD: Sixty women presenting at least one trigger point at the upper trapezius and local or referred pain for more than six months were randomized into EAC, AC, and SHAM groups. Eight sessions were scheduled and a follow-up was conducted after 28 days. The Visual Analog Scale assessed the intensity of local and general pain. A fleximeter assessed cervical movements. Data were analyzed using paired t or Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA or Friedman or Kruskal-Wallis tests and Pearson's correlation (α=0.05). RESULTS: There was reduction in general pain in the EAC and AC groups after eight sessions (P<0.001). A significant decrease in pain intensity occurred for the right trapezius in all groups and for the left trapezius in the EAC and AC groups. Intergroup comparisons showed improvement in general pain in the EAC and AC groups and in local pain intensity in the EAC group (P<0.05), which showed an increase in left rotation (P=0.049). The AC group showed increases in inclination (P=0.005) sustained until follow-up and rotation to the right (P=0.032). CONCLUSION : EAC and AC were effective in reducing the pain intensity compared with SHAM. EAC was better than AC for local pain relief. These treatments can assist in increasing cervical range of motion, albeit subtly. PMID:25714602

  12. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  13. ClinicalTrials.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of ... This Site ClinicalTrials.gov Background About the Results Database History, Policies, and Laws Media/Press Resources Linking ...

  14. Acupuncture in acute herpes zoster pain therapy (ACUZoster) – design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Kramer, Sybille; Hoffrogge, Philipp; Thoma, Sarah; Lang, Philip M; Lehmeyer, Lukas; Schober, Gabriel M; Pfab, Florian; Ring, Johannes; Weisenseel, Peter; Schotten, Klaus J; Mansmann, Ulrich; Irnich, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    provide valuable new information about the clinical and physiological effects of acupuncture and gabapentine in the treatment of acute herpes zoster pain. The study has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the study findings can be implemented into clinical practice if acupuncture can be shown to be an effective treatment strategy in acute herpes zoster pain. Trial registration NCT00885586 PMID:19674449

  15. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  16. Interaction and efficacy of Keigai-rengyo-to extract and acupuncture in male patients with acne vulgaris: A study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In consideration of patients seeking to use traditional Chinese medicine, an evidence-based potentiality for safe and effective use of herbal medicine and acupuncture in treatment of acne vulgaris has been suggested. However, despite common use of a combination of herbal medicine and acupuncture in clinical practice, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw a conclusion for an interaction and efficacy of herbal medicine and acupuncture. Therefore, considering these methodological flaws, this study was designed to assess the interaction and efficacy of an available herbal medicine, Keigai-rengyo-to extract (KRTE), and acupuncture for treatment of acne using the 2 × 2 factorial design and the feasibility of a large clinical trial. Methods/Design A randomized, assessor single blinded, 2 × 2 factorial pilot trial will be conducted. Forty four participants with acne vulgaris will be randomized into one of four groups: waiting list group (WL), KRTE only group (KO), acupuncture only group (AO), and KRTE and acupuncture combined treatment group (KA). After randomization, a total of 8 sessions of acupuncture treatment will be performed twice a week in the AO- and KA groups, respectively. Patients in the KO- and KA groups will be prescribed KRTE 3 times a day at a dose of 7.4 g after meals for 4 weeks. The following outcome measurements will be used in examination of subjects: the mean percentage change and the count change of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions, the Skindex 29, visual analogue scale (VAS) and investigator global assessment (IGA) from baseline to the end of the trial. Trial Registration The trial is registered with the Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS), Republic of Korea: KCT0000071. PMID:21418585

  17. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain. PMID:16734514

  18. Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic knee pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial using a Zelen design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    findings from this study will help determine whether laser and/or needle acupuncture is efficacious, and cost-effective, in the management of chronic knee pain in older people. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12609001001280 PMID:22992309

  19. Research Areas: Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  20. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  1. Is acupuncture efficacious therapy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to assess the evidences from recent clinical studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease. Relevant literatures were searched from 13 databases under the condition "published between 2000 and 2012" with language restrictions. Eleven studies were indentified including 6 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 4 uncontrolled open label studies, and 1 crossover trial. The number of trials, and their total sample size were not enough to prove the favorable effects of acupuncture. Five studies failed to report proper diagnostic criteria for enrollment. Two of the 6 RCTs did not include the randomization methods and whether the assessors were blinded. Drop-outs were unreported or insufficiently reported in 2 trials. Three RCTs compared the effects of acupuncture with placebo acupuncture. Two of these trials failed to show superiority of acupuncture. One RCT showed beneficial effects of constitutional acupuncture, but not needle acupuncture. Three RCTs that assessed the effects of acupuncture adjunctive to conventional drugs reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. The placebo response to acupuncture was not excluded, because there was no control acupuncture group in these studies. Two uncontrolled studies showed significant positive effects of acupuncture, while other two uncontrolled trials failed. There were no recognized validated acupuncture treatment protocols and a lack of consensus on the location of acupoints. Safety and tolerability were reported only in 5 studies. No study evaluated the long-lasting effect of acupuncture following cessation of the treatment. To date, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating Parkinson's disease is not convincing. There are needs for further studies with improved methodological quality. PMID:24798223

  2. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people who volunteer. ... about the treatment. How are clinical trials in vision different from other clinical trials? Eyes are one ...

  3. Review of Clinical Applications of Scalp Acupuncture for Paralysis: An Excerpt From Chinese Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years. PMID:24278807

  4. Effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture versus Sham Acupuncture: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Luís; da Cruz, Lóris Aparecida Prado; Leopoldo, Vanessa Cristina; de Campos, Fabrício Ribeiro; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and synthesize the evidence from randomized clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of traditional Chinese acupuncture in relation to sham acupuncture for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women with breast cancer. Method: systematic review guided by the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Citations were searched in the following databases: MEDLINE via PubMed, Web of Science, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and LILACS. A combination of the following keywords was used: breast neoplasm, acupuncture, acupuncture therapy, acupuncture points, placebos, sham treatment, hot flashes, hot flushes, menopause, climacteric, and vasomotor symptoms. Results: a total of 272 studies were identified, five of which were selected and analyzed. Slight superiority of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture was observed; however, there were no strong statistical associations. Conclusions: the evidence gathered was not sufficient to affirm the effectiveness of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. PMID:27533271

  5. Is sham acupuncture as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture? It's too early to say.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Chu, Qin; Wang, Shu; Lai, Hilary; Xie, Bing-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical trials and experimental studies claim that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. However, these studies have no standard sham acupuncture control and many other factors can affect the clinical effect. These factors include needle retention time, treatment frequency, and the total number of treatments needed for satisfactory results, and all can change the clinical effect. The majority of existing acupuncture treatment studies do not consider these factors and lack standard dosage criteria. Therefore, it is still too early to conclude that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. This article investigates the factors that influence the curative effect of acupuncture as to help set a standard for acupuncture studies in the future. PMID:27081001

  6. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  7. Evaluating Acupuncture and Standard carE for pregnant women with Back pain (EASE Back): a feasibility study and pilot randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nadine E; Bishop, Annette; Bartlam, Bernadette; Ogollah, Reuben; Barlas, Panos; Holden, Melanie; Ismail, Khaled; Jowett, Sue; Kettle, Christine; Kigozi, Jesse; Lewis, Martyn; Lloyd, Alison; Waterfield, Jackie; Young, Julie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many pregnant women experience low back pain. Acupuncture appears to be a safe, promising intervention but evidence is needed about its clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. OBJECTIVES To assess the feasibility of a future large randomised controlled trial (RCT) testing the additional benefit of adding acupuncture to standard care (SC) for pregnancy-related back pain. DESIGN Phase 1: a questionnaire survey described current care for pregnancy-related back pain. Focus groups and interviews with midwives, physiotherapists and pregnant women explored acceptability and feasibility of acupuncture and the proposed RCT. Phase 2: a single-centre pilot RCT. Participants were identified using six methods and randomised to SC, SC plus true acupuncture or SC plus non-penetrating acupuncture. PARTICIPANTS Phase 1: 1093 physiotherapists were surveyed and 15 midwives, 21 physiotherapists and 17 pregnant women participated in five focus groups and 20 individual interviews. Phase 2: 125 women with pregnancy-related back pain participated. INTERVENTIONS SC: a self-management booklet and onward referral for one-to-one physiotherapy (two to four sessions) for those who needed it. SC plus true acupuncture: the self-management booklet and six to eight treatments with a physiotherapist comprising true (penetrating) acupuncture, advice and exercise. SC plus non-penetrating acupuncture: the self-management booklet and six to eight treatments with a physiotherapist comprising non-penetrating acupuncture, advice and exercise. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Pilot RCT outcomes included recruitment rates, treatment fidelity, follow-up rate, patient-reported pain and function, quality of life and health-care resource use. Birth and neonatal outcomes were also assessed. Staff overseeing outcome data collection were blind to treatment allocation. RESULTS Phase 1: 629 (57.5%) physiotherapists responded to the survey, 499 were experienced in treating pregnancy-related back pain and

  8. Managing clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Barbara; Kenyon, Sara; Shakur, Haleema

    2010-01-01

    Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation. PMID:20626885

  9. Acupuncture for Spasticity after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Junghee; Lee, Euiju; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine how effective acupuncture or electroacupuncture (acupuncture with electrical stimulation) is in treating poststroke patients with spasticity. We searched publications in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library in English, 19 accredited journals in Korean, and the China Integrated Knowledge Resources Database in Chinese through to July 30, 2013. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared the effects of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with usual care or placebo acupuncture. The two investigators assessed the risk of bias and statistical analyses were performed. Three RCTs in English, 1 in Korean, and 1 in Chinese were included. Assessments were performed primarily with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture or electroacupuncture significantly decreased spasticity after stroke. A subgroup analysis showed that acupuncture significantly decreased wrist, knee, and elbow spasticity in poststroke patients. Heterogeneity could be explained by the differences in control, acupoints, and the duration after stroke occurrence. In conclusion, acupuncture could be effective in decreasing spasticity after stroke, but long-term studies are needed to determine the longevity of treatment effects. PMID:25628750

  10. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  11. INTEGRATING ACUPUNCTURE WITH EXERCISE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, LX; Mao, JJ; Fernandes, S; Galantino, ML; Guo, W; LaRiccia, P; Teal, V; Bowman, MA; Schumacher, HR; Farrar, JT

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee OA is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus non-penetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African-American) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and X-ray confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6–12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the Traditional Chinese “Bi” syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Results Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and non-penetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in WOMAC response rate (p=0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Conclusion Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than non-puncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit. PMID:23965480

  12. Design of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rollo, David; Machado, Sanjay; Ceschin, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    Clinical trial design for nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging radiopharmaceuticals must include a design for preclinical safety studies. These studies should establish that the investigational product (IP) does not have a toxic effect. As a further requirement, radiopharmaceutical clinical trials include a human study (phase 1) that provides biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and radiation dosimetry information. These studies demonstrate to the Food and Drug Administration that the IP either meets or exceeds the toxicology and radiation exposure safety limits. Satisfying this requirement can result in the Food and Drug Administration approving the performance of late-phase (phase 2/3) clinical trials that are designed to validate the clinical efficacy of the diagnostic imaging agent in patients who have a confirmed diagnosis for the intended application. Emphasis is placed on the most typical trial design for diagnostic imaging agents that use a comparator to demonstrate that the new IP is similar in efficacy to an established standard comparator. Such trials are called equivalence, or noninferiority, trials that attempt to show that the new IP is not less effective than the comparator by more than a statistically defined amount. Importantly, the trial design must not inappropriately favor one diagnostic imaging agent over the other. Bias is avoided by the use of a core laboratory with expert physicians who are not involved in the trial for interpreting and objectively scoring the image sets obtained at the clinical trial sites. Clinical trial design must also follow Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines. GCP stipulates the clinical trial process, including protocol and Case Report Form design, analyses planning, as well as analyzing and preparing interim and final clinical trial/study reports. PMID:20674592

  13. CLINICAL TRIALS.GOV

    EPA Science Inventory

    ClinicalTrials.gov provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions. The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), through its National Library of Medi...

  14. Acupuncture is a feasible treatment for post-thoracotomy pain: results of a prospective pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Rusch, Valerie W; Malhotra, Vivek T; Downey, Robert J; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2006-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy is associated with severe pain that may persist for years. Acupuncture is a complementary therapy with a proven role in pain control. A randomized trial showed that acupuncture was effective in controlling pain after abdominal surgery, but the efficacy of this technique for the treatment of thoracotomy pain has not been established. We developed a novel technique for convenient application of acupuncture to patients undergoing thoracotomy, and in a Phase II trial evaluated the safety of this intervention and the feasibility of doing a randomized trial. Methods Adult patients scheduled for unilateral thoracotomy with preoperative epidural catheter placement received acupuncture immediately prior to surgery. Eighteen semi-permanent intradermal needles were inserted on either side of the spine, and four were inserted in the legs and auricles. Needles were removed after four weeks. Using a numerical rating scale, pain was measured on the first five postoperative days. After discharge, pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days. Results Thirty-six patients were treated with acupuncture. Of these, 25, 23, and 22 patients provided data at 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. The intervention was well tolerated by patients with only one minor and transient adverse event of skin ulceration. Conclusion The rate of data completion met our predefined criterion for determining a randomized trial to be feasible (at least 75% of patients tolerated the intervention and provided evaluable data). This novel intervention is acceptable to patients undergoing thoracotomy and does not interfere with standard preoperative care. There was no evidence of important adverse events. We are now testing the hypothesis that acupuncture significantly adds to standard perioperative pain management in a randomized trial. PMID:16672065

  15. The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosén, Annelie; Lekander, Mats; Jensen, Karin; Sachs, Lisbeth; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Enblom, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The link between patient-clinician communication and its effect on clinical outcomes is an important clinical issue that is yet to be elucidated. Objective. Investigating if communication type (positive or neutral) about the expected treatment outcome affected (i) participants' expectations and (ii) short-term relaxation effects in response to genuine or sham acupuncture and investigating if expectations were related to outcome. Methods. Healthy volunteers (n = 243, mean age of 42) were randomized to one treatment with genuine or sham acupuncture. Within groups, participants were randomized to positive or neutral communication, regarding expected treatment effects. Visual Analogue Scales (0–100 millimeters) were used to measure treatment expectations and relaxation, directly before and after treatment. Results. Participants in the positive communication group reported higher treatment expectancy, compared to the neutral communication group (md 12 versus 6 mm, p = 0.002). There was no difference in relaxation effects between acupuncture groups or between communication groups. Participants with high baseline expectancy perceived greater improvement in relaxation, compared to participants with low baseline levels (md 27 versus 15 mm, p = 0.022). Conclusion. Our data highlights the importance of expectations for treatment outcome and demonstrates that expectations can be effectively manipulated using a standardized protocol that in future research may be implemented in clinical trials. PMID:26981138

  16. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Opiate Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chan, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is an accepted treatment worldwide for various clinical conditions, and the effects of acupuncture on opiate addiction have been investigated in many clinical trials. The present review systematically analyzed data from randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English since 1970. We found that the majority agreed on the efficacy of acupuncture as a strategy for the treatment of opiate addiction. However, some of the methods in several included trials have been criticized for their poor quality. This review summarizes the quality of the study design, the types of acupuncture applied, the commonly selected acupoints or sites of the body, the effectiveness of the treatment, and the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of acupuncture in these trials. PMID:22474521

  17. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  18. [Considerations about Acupuncture Treatment during Menstruation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    A dispute about whether women are suitable to receive acupuncture treatment in the period of menstruation has existed for many years. There are some reports about acupuncture treatment induced abnormal menstruation in women experiencing menstruation. However, according to long-term clinical practice and current development of acupuncture therapy, the authors of the present paper hold that there are no absolute contradictions for acupuncture treatment of women during menstruation. Additionally, acupuncture induced menstrual disorder has no enough data support of large size example clinical trials. The key points of acupuncture administration for women during menstruation are: (1) reasonable selection of acupoints prescriptions, and (2) appropriate acupuncture needle manipulations, particularly avoiding strong stimulation. PMID:27323450

  19. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Statistical and Data Management Center Glossaries Sites Clinical Trials About the Trial Process Trials Open to Enrollment Recent Study Results Access to Published Data Clinical Trials Resources Committees Executive Scientific Resource Community General Information ...

  20. [ZHANG Tangfa's characteristics of acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-10-01

    Through collecting and sorting of works, literature and medical cases regarding professor ZHANG Tangfa, it is found that his acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation can be summarized as: tracing the source and paying attention to basic theory, especially the meridian theory and conception vessel and governor vessel; focusing on acupuncture manipulation and emphasizing acupuncture basic skills; highly valuing treating spirit, acquiring and maintaining needling sensation; underlining "three differentiations" that is consisted of syndrome differentiation, disease differentiation and meridian differentiation to guide the clinical prescriptions of acupoints; exploring and ingenious use of scalp acupuncture; being concerned on research of difficult and complicated diseases; advocating comparative studies to optimize the clinical treatment plan; proposing the combination of Chinese and western medicine, including diagnosis, treatment and basic theory, to improve the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture. PMID:26790219

  1. Design of a randomised acupuncture trial on functional neck/shoulder stiffness with two placebo controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional neck/shoulder stiffness is one of the most well-known indications for acupuncture treatment in Japan. There is little evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for functional neck/shoulder stiffness. Research using two different placebos may allow an efficient method to tease apart the components of real acupuncture from various kinds of ‘non-specific’ effects such as ritual with touch or ritual alone. Herein, we describe a protocol of an ongoing, single-centre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial which aims to assess whether, in functional neck/shoulder stiffness, acupuncture treatment with skin piercing has a specific effect over two types of placebo: skin-touching plus ritual or ritual alone. Methods Six acupuncturists and 400 patients with functional neck/shoulder stiffness are randomly assigned to four treatment groups: genuine acupuncture penetrating the skin, skin-touch placebo or no-touch placebo needles in a double-blind manner (practitioner-patient blinding) or no-treatment control group. Each acupuncturist applies a needle to each of four acupoints (Bladder10, Small Intestine14, Gallbladder21 and Bladder42) in the neck/shoulder to 50 patients. Before, immediately after and 24 hours after the treatment, patients are asked about the intensity of their neck/shoulder stiffness. After the treatment, practitioners and patients are asked to guess whether the treatment is “penetrating”, “skin-touch” or “no-touch” or to record “cannot identify the treatment”. Discussion In addition to intention-to-treat analysis, we will conduct subgroup analysis based on practitioners’ or patients’ guesses to discuss the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments with skin piercing and various placebo controls. The results of practitioner and patient blinding will be discussed. We believe this study will further distinguish the role of different components of acupuncture. Trial registration Current Controlled Trial

  2. The Perfect Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bril, V

    2016-01-01

    Multiple phase III clinical trials have failed to show disease-modifying benefits for diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) and this may be due to the design of the clinical trials. The perfect clinical trial in DSP would enroll sufficiently large numbers of patients having early or minimal disease, as demonstrated by nerve conduction studies (NCS). These patients would be treated with an intervention given at an effective and well-tolerated dose for a sufficient duration of time to show change in the end points selected. For objective or surrogate measures such as NCS and for some small fiber measures, the duration needed to show positive change may be as brief as 6-12 months, but subsequently, trials lasting 5-8 years will be required to demonstrate clinical benefits. PMID:27133143

  3. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... participating in was reviewed by an IRB. Further Reading For more information about research protections, see: Office ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in ...

  4. Participating in Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  5. Laser acupuncture for adolescent smokers--a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yiming, C; Changxin, Z; Ung, W S; Lei, Z; Kean, L S

    2000-01-01

    A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of laser acupuncture treatment in adolescent smokers. Three hundred and thirty adolescent smokers at the Smoking Cessation Clinic of Child Guidance Clinic, Institute of Health, Singapore, were randomly assigned in equal numbers to laser acupuncture treatment and sham acupuncture (control) groups. The proportions of patients with complete smoking cessation after completing treatment for four weeks were 21.9% in the treatment group and 21.4% in the control group. At three months post-treatment, the rates for complete cessation were 24.8% and 26.2%, respectively. Thus, there was no significant difference in the rates of smoking cessation in the treatment and control groups. PMID:11154059

  6. Shuffling Adaptive Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sanjay G; Gokhale, Sankalp

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are interventional studies on human beings, designed to test the hypothesis for diagnostic techniques, treatments, and disease preventions. Any novel medical technology should be evaluated for its efficacy and safety by clinical trials. The costs associated with developing drugs have increased dramatically over the past decade, and fewer drugs are obtaining regulatory approval. Because of this, the pharmaceutical industry is continually exploring new ways of improving drug developments, and one area of focus is adaptive clinical trial designs. Adaptive designs, which allow for some types of prospectively planned mid-study changes, can improve the efficiency of a trial and maximize the chance of success without undermining validity and integrity of the trial. However it is felt that in adaptive trials; perhaps by using accrued data the actual patient population after the adaptations could deviate from the originally target patient population and so to overcome this drawback; special methods like Bayesian Statistics, predicted probability are used to deduce data-analysis. Here, in this study, mathematical model of a new adaptive design (shuffling adaptive trial) is suggested which uses real-time data, and because there is no gap between expected and observed data, statistical modifications are not needed. Results are obviously clinically relevant. PMID:23751329

  7. Acupuncture and physical exercise for affective symptoms and health-related quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome: secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have symptoms of depression and anxiety and impaired health related quality of life (HRQoL). Here we test the post-hoc hypothesis that acupuncture and exercise improve depression and anxiety symptoms and HRQoL in PCOS women. Methods Seventy-two PCOS women were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of 1) acupuncture (n = 28); 2) exercise (n = 29); or 3) no intervention (control) (n = 15). Outcome measures included: change in Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA-S), Swedish Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and PCOS Questionnaire (PCOSQ) scores from baseline to after 16-week intervention, and to 16-week post-intervention follow-up. Results A reduction in MADRS-S and BSA-S from baseline to 16-weeks post-intervention follow-up was observed for the acupuncture group. The SF-36 domains role physical, energy/vitality, general health perception and the mental component of summary scores improved in the acupuncture group after intervention and at follow-up. Within the exercise group the role physical decreased after treatment, while physical functioning and general health perception scores increased at follow-up. The emotion domain in the PCOSQ improved after 16-weeks of intervention within all three groups, and at follow-up in acupuncture and exercise groups. At follow-up, improvement in the infertility domain was observed within the exercise group. Conclusion There was a modest improvement in depression and anxiety scores in women treated with acupuncture, and improved HRQoL scores were noted in both intervention groups. While not a primary focus of the trial, these data suggest continued investigation of mental health outcomes in women treated for PCOS. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00484705 PMID:23763822

  8. Acupuncture and Clomiphene Citrate for Live Birth in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Study Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Hongying; Li, Yan; Hou, Lihui; Wu, Taixiang; Liu, Jianping; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Legro, Richard S.; Zhang, Heping

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy to induce ovulation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but there is no study reporting the live birth rate following ovulation induction by acupuncture or its potential as an adjuvant treatment to clomiphene citrate (CC). We assess the efficacy of acupuncture with or without CC in achieving live births among 1000 PCOS women in Mainland China. This paper reports the methodology of an ongoing multicenter randomized controlled trial. The randomization scheme is coordinated through the central mechanism and stratified by the participating sites. Participants will be randomized into one of the four treatment arms: (A) true acupuncture and CC, (B) control acupuncture and CC, (C) true acupuncture and placebo CC, and (D) control acupuncture and placebo CC. To ensure the quality and integrity of the trial we have developed a unique multinational team of investigators and Data and Safety Monitoring Board. Up to the end of April 2013, 326 subjects were recruited. In conclusion, the success of this trial will allow us to evaluate the additional benefit of acupuncture beyond the first line medicine for fertility treatment in PCOS women in an unbiased manner. PMID:24023577

  9. The Role of Acupuncture in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Cui Hong; Zhang, Ming Min; Huang, Guang Ying; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide reliable evidence by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis for evaluating the role of acupuncture in assisted reproductive technology. All randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of acupuncture, including manual, electrical, and laser acupuncture (LA) techniques, on the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) and live birth rate (LBR) of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or artificial insemination were included. The controlled groups consisted of no acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. The sham acupuncture included sham acupuncture at acupoints, sham acupuncture at non- or inappropriate points, sham LA, and adhesive tapes. Twenty-three trials (a total of 5598 participants) were included in this paper. The pooled CPR from all acupuncture groups was significantly higher than that from all controlled groups, whereas the LBR was not significantly different between the two groups. However, the results were quite distinct when the type of control and/or different acupuncture times were examined in a sensitivity analysis. The results mainly indicate that acupuncture, especially around the time of the controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, improves pregnancy outcomes in women undergoing IVF. More positive effects from acupuncture in IVF can be expected if a more individualized acupuncture programs are used. PMID:22811747

  10. [Explanation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Wu, Zhongchao; Zhou, Wenna; Si, Xiaohua; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jincao; Chen, Zhongjie; Li, Rongjun; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Xiao, Liwei

    2016-05-01

    The development and compilation of Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice with Acupuncture and Moxibustion: Adult Bronchial Asthma are introduced from three aspects, named the guideline methodology, the guideline structure and the guideline content. Based on the acupuncture-moxibustion practice and clinical research, the evidence-based medicine method is adopted. During the development and compilation of the guideline, the characteristics and advantages of acupuncture and moxibustion are specially considered in the treatment of this disease; the latest optimum evidences at home and abroad, experts' experience and patients' value are closely integrated with each other. Additionally, the worldwide accepted assessments of evidence quality and the recommendation (GRADE system) are combined with the clinical evidences of the ancient and modern famous acupuncture-moxibustion experts, and the clinical research evidences are with the experts' consensus to the large extent. The purpose of the guideline is to provide the maximal guidance to the clinical physicians. PMID:27509620

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (Z)-4-Hydroxytamoxifen, [18F]-FPS; Adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Belatacept, bortezomib; C340, caspofungin acetate, clazosentan sodium, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, DB-289, decitabine, dronedarone hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eletriptan, entecavir, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib; Gaboxadol, gadofosveset sodium, galiximab, gemifloxacin mesilate, glutamine; Human insulin; I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, indiplon, inhaled insulin, isatoribine; L-Arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Magnesium sulfate; Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, omapatrilat, OncoVEX (GM-CSF); rDNA insulin, rupatadine fumarate; Sorafenib; Tadalafil, teduglutide, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tiotropium bromide; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate. PMID:16357953

  12. Acupuncture at Houxi (SI 3) acupoint for acute neck pain caused by stiff neck: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhong-ren; Yue, Jin-huan; Tian, Hong-zhao; Zhang, Qin-hong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The use of acupuncture has been suggested for the treatment of acute neck pain caused by stiff neck in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw any conclusions about its efficacy. Therefore this pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture at the Houxi (SI3) acupoint for treatment of acute neck pain. Methods/analysis This pilot study will be a two-parallel-group, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Thirty-six stiff neck participants with acute neck pain will be recruited and randomly divided into two groups in a 1:1 ratio. Participants in the control group will receive massage on the local neck region (5 min each session, three times a day for 3 days). In addition to massage, patients in the treatment group will receive acupuncture (one session a day for 3 days). Measures will be taken at 0, 3 and 15 days. The primary outcome is the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). The secondary outcome is the Short Form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Ethics/dissemination The protocol for this pilot randomised clinical trial has undergone ethics scrutiny and been approved by the ethics review boards of the First Affiliated Hospital of Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Permission number: HZYLL201303502). The findings of this study will provide important clinical evidence on the feasibility and efficacy of acupuncture treatment for stiff neck patients with acute neck pain. In addition, it will explore the feasibility of further acupuncture research. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-13003911. PMID:25537784

  13. Effect of acupuncture on sleep quality and hyperarousal state in patients with primary insomnia: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Huang, Wei; Tang, Chu-ying; Wang, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Lin-peng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Primary insomnia (PI) is commonly defined as a state of having disturbed daytime activities due to poor night-time sleep quality. Studies have demonstrated that it is a disorder of 24 h hyperarousal, expressed in terms of physiological, cognitive and cortical activation. Acupuncture is considered to be beneficial to restore the normal sleep–wake cycle. The aim of the trial is to assess the therapeutic effects of acupuncture on sleep quality and hyperarousal state in patients with PI. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, patient-assessor-blinded, sham controlled trial. –88 eligible patients with PI will be randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to the intervention group (real acupuncture) and control group (sham acupuncture, superficial insertion at irrelevant acupuncture points). Acupuncture intervention will be given to all participants three times a week for 4 weeks, followed up for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hyperarousal scale (HAS). The secondary outcomes are Fatigue scale-14 (FS-14), polysomnography (PSG), heart rate variability (HRV) and Morning Salivary Cortisol Level (MSCL). Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, post-treatment period and 8 weeks follow-up. All main analyses will be carried out on the basis of the intention-to-treat principle. Ethics/dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital (Beijing TCM Hospital) on 5 January 2015. The permission number is 2014BL-056-02. The study will present data concerning the clinical effects of treating primary insomnia with acupuncture. The results will help to demonstrate if acupuncture is an effective therapy for improving sleep quality in association with a decreased hyperarousal level as a possible underlying mechanism. The findings from this study will be shared with the healthcare professionals, general public and relevant organisations

  14. Efficacy of Acupuncture for Bell’s Palsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pingping; Qiu, Tangmeng; Qin, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has emerged as an alternative therapy for Bell’s palsy in both adults and children. However, the use of acupuncture is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for Bell’s palsy. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, irrespective of any language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials comparing acupuncture with other therapies for Bell’s palsy in adults or children were included. Fourteen randomized controlled trials involving 1541 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. Significant association was observed in acupuncture with a higher effective response rate for Bell’s palsy (relative risk, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–1.25; P = 0.005) but there was a heterogeneity among the studies (I2 = 87%). An assessment of the included studies revealed a high risk of bias in methodological quality. An evaluation of the incidence of complications was not available, owing to incomplete data. Acupuncture seems to be an effective therapy for Bell’s palsy, but there was insufficient evidence to support the efficacy and safety of acupuncture. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously, because of the poor quality and heterogeneity of the included studies. PMID:25974022

  15. Clinical Trials: CSDRG Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent importance placed upon efficacy research has spawned the development of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group (CSDRG). This group, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was organized by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association to address the need for more treatment efficacy research…

  16. The Acceptability of Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study of Patient’s Experiences Nested within a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hopton, Ann; Thomas, Kate; MacPherson, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend acupuncture as a clinically effective treatment for chronic back pain. However, there is insufficient knowledge of what factors contribute to patients’ positive and negative experiences of acupuncture, and how those factors interact in terms of the acceptability of treatment. This study used patient interviews following acupuncture treatment for back pain to identify, understand and describe the elements that contribute or detract from acceptability of treatment. Methods The study used semi-structured interviews. Twelve patients were interviewed using an interview schedule as a sub-study nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic back pain. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Results and Discussion Three over-arching themes emerged from the analysis. The first entitled facilitators of acceptability contained five subthemes; experience of pain relief, improvements in physical activity, relaxation, psychological benefit, reduced reliance on medication. The second over-arching theme identified barriers to acceptability, which included needle-related discomfort and temporary worsening of symptoms, pressure to continue treatment and financial cost. The third over-arching theme comprised mediators of acceptability, which included pre-treatment mediators such as expectation and previous experience, and treatment-related mediators of time, therapeutic alliance, lifestyle advice and the patient’s active involvement in recovery. These themes inform our understanding of the acceptability of acupuncture to patients with low back pain. Conclusion The acceptability of acupuncture treatment for low back pain is complex and multifaceted. The therapeutic relationship between the practitioner and patient emerged as a strong driver for acceptability, and as a useful vehicle to develop the patients’ self-efficacy in pain management in the

  17. Assessing the Quality of Reports about Randomized Controlled Trials of Acupuncture Treatment on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo; Zelin, Chen; Yang, Bai; Zixu, Wang; Yajun, Wang

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the reports’ qualities which are about randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture treatment on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN). Methodology/Principal Findings Eight databases including The Cochrane Library(1993–Sept.,2011), PubMed (1980–Sept., 2011), EMbase (1980–Sept.,2011), SCI Expanded (1998–Sept.,2011), China Biomedicine Database Disc (CBMdisc, 1978–Sept., 2011), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979–Sept., 2011 ), VIP (a full text issues database of China, 1989–Sept., 2011), Wan Fang (another full text issues database of China 1998–Sept., 2011) were searched systematically. Hand search for further references was conducted. Language was limited to Chinese and English. We identified 75 RCTs that used acupuncture as an intervention and assessed the quality of these reports with the Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials statement 2010 (CONSORT2010) and Standards for Reporting Interventions Controlled Trials of Acupuncture 2010(STRICTA2010). 24 articles (32%) applied the method of random allocation of sequences. No article gave the description of the mechanism of allocation concealment, no experiment applied the method of blinding. Only one article (1.47%) could be identified directly from its title as about the Randomized Controlled Trials, and only 4 articles gave description of the experimental design. No article mentioned the number of cases lost or eliminated. During one experiment, acupuncture syncope led to temporal interruption of the therapy. Two articles (2.94%) recorded the number of needles, and 8 articles (11.76%) mentioned the depth of needle insertion. None of articles reported the base of calculation of sample size, or has any analysis about the metaphase of an experiment or an explanation of its interruption. One (1.47%) mentioned intentional analysis (ITT). Conclusions/Significance The quality of the reports on RCTs of acupuncture for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is

  18. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific acute low back pain: a randomised controlled multicentre trial protocol [ISRCTN65814467

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Silva, Luis Carlos; Herrera Galante, Antonia; Aranda Regules, Jose Manuel; Martinez Barquin, Dulce M; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Faus, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain and its associated incapacitating effects constitute an important healthcare and socioeconomic problem, as well as being one of the main causes of disability among adults of working age. The prevalence of non-specific low back pain is very high among the general population, and 60–70% of adults are believed to have suffered this problem at some time. Nevertheless, few randomised clinical trials have been made of the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture with respect to acute low back pain. The present study is intended to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for acute low back pain in terms of the improvement reported on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) on low back pain incapacity, to estimate the specific and non-specific effects produced by the technique, and to carry out a cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods/Design Randomised four-branch controlled multicentre prospective study made to compare semi-standardised real acupuncture, sham acupuncture (acupuncture at non-specific points), placebo acupuncture and conventional treatment. The patients are blinded to the real, sham and placebo acupuncture treatments. Patients in the sample present symptoms of non specific acute low back pain, with a case history of 2 weeks or less, and will be selected from working-age patients, whether in paid employment or not, referred by General Practitioners from Primary Healthcare Clinics to the four clinics participating in this study. In order to assess the primary and secondary result measures, the patients will be requested to fill in a questionnaire before the randomisation and again at 3, 12 and 48 weeks after starting the treatment. The primary result measure will be the clinical relevant improvement (CRI) at 3 weeks after randomisation. We define CRI as a reduction of 35% or more in the RMQ results. Discussion This study is intended to obtain further evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture on acute low back pain and to isolate the

  19. [Theory analysis and clinical application of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method].

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Tang, Lewei; Du, Huaibin; Zheng, Hui; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical foundation and scientific connotation of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method as well as its clinical application for pain are discussed. During spirit regulation, attention should be paid on regulating heart and brain, while acupoints should be selected mainly from the Heart Meridian, Pericardium Meridian and Governor Vessel. It has significant efficacy for refractory pain in clinical treatment. Spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method is development of acupuncture treating spirit, and it is an important method for pain in clinic. Improvement on sensitization of pain center and brain function is considered as one of the mechanisms in spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method. PMID:26054155

  20. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  1. Short-Term Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Lower Back Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Ku, Boncho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Lee, Yu Jung; Kang, Jae Hui; Heo, Hyun; Choi, Hyo-Joon; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This trial was performed to investigate the efficacy of laser acupuncture for the alleviation of lower back pain. Methods. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group (n = 28) or the sham laser acupuncture group (n = 28). Participants in both groups received three treatment sessions over the course of one week. Thirteen acupuncture points were selected. The visual analogue scale for pain, pressure pain threshold, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Euro-Quality-of-Life Five Dimensions questionnaire (Korean version) were used to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture treatment on lower back pain. Results. There were no significant differences in any outcome between the two groups, although the participants in both groups showed a significant improvement in each assessed parameter relative to the baseline values. Conclusion. Although there was no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups, the results suggest that laser acupuncture can provide effective pain alleviation and can be considered an option for relief from lower back pain. Further studies using long-term intervention, a larger sample size, and rigorous methodology are required to clarify the effect of laser acupuncture on lower back pain. PMID:26516333

  2. Laser acupuncture in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Guerra; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; De Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz

    2013-11-01

    A prospective, double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial was conducted in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) to check the analgesic efficacy of infrared low-power GaAlAs diode laser applied to acupuncture points. Forty female subjects, ranging in age from 20 to 40 years, with diagnoses of chronic myofascial pain and arthralgia were randomly allocated to two groups: an experimental group (EG) who received the laser acupuncture as adjunct to reversible occlusal splint therapy and a control group (CG) who received a placebo laser associated with occlusal splint therapy. Both approaches were applied once a week for 3 months. Laser acupuncture was defined by the following parameters: 50-mW continuous radiation for 90 s to acupoints ST6, SI19, GB20, GB43, LI4, LR3, NT3, and EX-HN3; defining 4.5-J energy; 1250-W/cm(2) density point; and 112.5-J/cm(2) total density. The outcome measurements included a symptom evolution assessment carried out by checking spontaneous and palpation pain intensity, which was indicated on a visual analog scale (VAS). All evaluations were made by an assessor who was blind to the treatment. The symptom reduction was significant in both groups (EG: VAS = 0, n = 20; CG: VAS between 2 and 4, n = 18). The measurements showed significantly faster and lower pain intensity values in the EG (p ≤ 0.002), where there was a higher proportion of patients with remission of symptoms related to the action of laser acupuncture. For patients in whom conservative treatment was adopted, the laser acupuncture is a secure, noninvasive, and effective treatment modality because it improves the chronic pain associated with TMD and has no side effects. PMID:23380907

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in the current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-NGFbeta, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; beta-Methyl-6-chloromelatonin, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, CEA-TRICOM, cetuximab, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, Dexamet, drospirenone, drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone; Fenretinide; Gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, iodine (i131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISS-1018; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, liposomal doxorubicin; Nemifitide ditriflutate, nesiritide; Omalizumab; Pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride; Satraplatin, St. John's Wort extract, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tanaproget, Taxus, tiotropium bromide, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zileuton. PMID:16258596

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, 667-coumate, 9-aminocamptothecin; Ad5CMV-p53, AES-14, alefacept, anecortave acetate, APC-8024, APD-356, asoprisnil; Bevacizumab, bimakalim, bimatoprost, BLP-25, BR-1; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DNA.HIVA; Efaproxiral sodium, ertapenem sodium; Frovatriptan; HuMax-EGFr, HYB-2055, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate; Lapatinib, lonafarnib, Motexafin lutetium, MVA.HIVA, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide, NS-2330; Olmesartan medoxomil; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, pregabalin; QbG-10; Ralfinamide, rasburicase, rFGF-2, Ro-31-7453; Sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; Tadalafil, TC-1734, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, thymus nuclear protein, tipifarnib; Vandetanib, vibriolysin, vildagliptin, voriconazole. PMID:15834466

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib

  7. Bee venom acupuncture, NSAIDs or combined treatment for chronic neck pain: study protocol for a randomized, assessor-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain (CNP) is a common painful medical condition with a significant socioeconomic impact. In spite of widespread usage, the effectiveness and safety of combined treatments between conventional and complementary alternative medical treatment modalities has not been fully established in a rigorous randomized clinical trial (RCT). This pilot study will provide the clinical evidence to evaluate the feasibility and refine the protocol for a full-scale RCT on combined treatment of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with CNP. Methods/Design This is a randomized, single-blind clinical trial with three parallel arms. Sixty patients between 18 and 65 years of age with non-specific, uncomplicated neck pain lasting for at least three months will be enrolled. Participants will be randomly allocated into the BVA, NSAIDs or combined treatment group. Assessors and statisticians will be blinded to the random allocation. All researchers will receive training to ensure their strict adherence to the study protocol. Patients from the BVA and combined treatment group will be treated with a bee venom increment protocol into predefined acupoints for six sessions over a three week period. BVA intervention is developed through a comprehensive discussion among interdisciplinary spine disorder experts, according to the guidelines of Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Patients from the NSAIDs and combined treatment groups will be prescribed loxoprofen (one tablet to be taken orally, three times a day for three weeks). Bothersomeness from CNP measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) will be the primary outcome assessed at screening, visit two (baseline), four, six, eight (4th week assessment) and nine (8th week assessment) follow-up session. VAS for pain intensity, neck disability index (NDI), quality of life, depressive status and adverse experiences will also be

  8. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AdGVVEGF121.10, anastrozole, anecortave acetate, aripiprazole, asulacrine isethionate, atazanavir, ATL-962, 16-Aza-epothilone B; Bevacizumab, bicalutamide, blonanserin, BMS-188667, bosentan; Celecoxib, celmoleukin, cetuximab, cilomilast, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CNTF(Ax15), colesevelam hydrochloride; Daclizumab, delavirdine mesilate, desogestrel, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, emtricitabine, epalrestat, escitalopram oxalate, examorelin, exendin-4, ezetimibe; Fidarestat, frovatriptan; HIV-1 Immunogen; Iloperidone, insulin detemir, insulin lispro, irinotecan hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levetiracetam, levormeloxifene, levosimendan, lumiracoxib, LY-307161 SR; Memantine hydrochloride, MEN-10755, metformin hydrochloride, metreleptin, motexafin gadolinium; Naratriptan hydrochloride, natalizumab, nesiritide, nicotine, NN-2211, NN-414; Olanzapine, omalizumab; Pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pimecrolimus, pirfenidone, pramlintide acetate prasterone, pregabalin; Quetiapine fumarate; Rabeprazole sodium, raloxifene hydrochloride, raltitrexed, rDNA insulin, rFGF-2, risedronate sodium, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosiglitazone maleate; SN-22995; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, tiotropium bromide, tomoxetine hydrochloride, trastuzumab, trimegestone; Voglibose, Voriconazole; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:12616707

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables can be retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, acarbose, alefacept, alteplase, amisulpride, amoxicillin trihydrate, apomorphine hydrochloride, aprepitant, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atenolol; Betamethasone dipropionate, betamethasone valerate, bicalutamide, bleomycin sulfate; Calcium carbonate, candesartan cilexetil, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clomethiazole edisilate, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, cyclophosphamide, chorionic gonadotropin (human); Dalteparin sodium, desloratadine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, DPC-083; Efalizumab, efavirenz, enoxaparin sodium, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoposide, ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, fenofibrate, fluocinolone acetonide, flutamide, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin beta, fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin, glibenclamide, goserelin, granisetron hydrochloride; Haloperidol, hydrochlorothiazide; Imiquimod, interferon beta-1a, irbesartan, iseganan hydrochloride; L-758298, lamivudine, lanoteplase, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, loratadine, losartan potassium; Melagatran, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metronidazole, micafungin sodium, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Nelfinavir mesilate, neutral insulin injection, nizatidine; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omeprazole, ondansetron hydrochloride; Pamidronate sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine hydrochloride, perindopril, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, piroxicam, pleconaril, pralmorelin, pravastatin sodium, prednisolone, prednisone, propofol; Raloxifene hydrochloride, ranpirnase, remifentanil hydrochloride, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib, ropinirole

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran. PMID:11980386

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, AMGN-0007, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride, astemizole, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab; Belimumab, BG-9928, binodenoson, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, BufferGel; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide,cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, CVT-3146; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, diflomotecan, doripenem, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DT388-GM-CSF, duloxetine hydrochloride, E-5564, efalizumab, enfuvirtide, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, ETC-642, exenatide, exisulind, ezetimib; Febuxostat; Gallium maltolate, ganirelix acetate, garenoxacin mesilate, gefitinib; H11, HuMax; IL-15, IDD-1, IGIV-C, imatinib mesylate, ISIS-14803, ITF-1697, ivabradine hydrochloride; KRN-5500; L-365260, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, linezolid, LJP-1082, lopinavir lumiracoxib; MCC-478, melatonin, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, moxidectin; N-Acetylcarnosine, natalizumab, NM-702, NNC-05-1869, NSC-703940; Ocinaplon OM-89, omalizumab, omeprazole/ sodium bicarbonate, OPC-28326, ospemifene; PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2a, pegsunercept, pirfenidone, pralmorelin, pregabalin; Recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repifermin, RSD-1235; S-8184, selodenoson, sodium dichloroacetate, suberanilohydroxamic acid; TAS-102, terfenadine, teriparatide, tipranavir troxacitabine; Ximelagatran; YM-337. PMID:14735233

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-04-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5A8; Agomelatine, alefacept, almotriptan, anakinra, APC-8015, atazanavir, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bicifadine; Cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CAT-213, CGP-51901, ciclesonide, cipamfylline; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dibotermin alfa, DX-9065a; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, eniluracil, EPI-KAL2, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, etilevodopa, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Fosamprenavir calcium, fosamprenavir sodium, fumagillin; Gadofosveset sodium, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin; HSPPC-96, human papillomavirus vaccine; Icatibant Id-KLH, imatinib mesylate, INS-37217, iodine (I131) tositumomab; LAS-34475, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levocetirizine, linezolid, 131I-lipiodol, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-450108; Magnetites, MBI-594AN, melagatran, melatonin, mepolizumab, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NC-100100; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, omapatrilat, onercept; PEG-filgrastim, (PE)HRG21, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pleconaril, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, prasterone; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasagiline mesilate, reslizumab, rFGF-2, rhOP-1, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate; Sitaxsentan sodium, sodium lauryl sulfate; Tadalafil, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tipranavir, TMC-114, tucaresol; Valdecoxib, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Zofenopril calcium, zosuquidar trihydrochloride. PMID:12743628

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com/. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alemtuzumab, alendronate sodium/cholecalciferol, aliskiren fumarate, AMGN-0007, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan; Calcipotriol/beta methasone dipropionate, caldaret hydrate, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, cocaine-BSA conjugate, conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, delmitide, desloratadine, desmoteplase, desoxyepothilone B, disufenton sodium, DU-176b, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; EBV-specific CTLs, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fanapanel, fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, GTI-2040, GW-501516; Her2 E75-peptide vaccine, human insulin; Ibogaine, icatibant acetate, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate, immune globulin subcutaneous [human], indacaterol, inolimomab, ipilimumab, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa methyl ester hydrochloride/carbidopa, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine; Maraviroc, mecasermin, melevodopa hydrochloride, mepolizumab, mitumomab; Nesiritide; Omalizumab, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), patupilone, pegaptanib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, pemetrexed disodium, photochlor, pimecrolimus, posaconazole, prasterone, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine, PRX-00023; QS-21; Ranibizumab, ranirestat, rhodamine 123, rotigaptide; Sarcosine, sirolimus

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, adalimumab, alefacept, ambrisentan, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, armodafinil, aselizumab, asenapine maleate, azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, bexarotene, bimosiamose, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, BQ-123; C340, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilansetron, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), dimethyl fumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, eglumetad hydrate, emoxipin hydrochloride, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol; Garenoxacin mesilate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, human growth hormone-(177-191), human insulin; Indacaterol, INKP-100, INKP-102, insulin glargine, i.v. gamma-globulin; KLH; Lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, levocetirizine, licochalcone A, LMI vaccine, lomefloxacin, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; Miglustat, mycograb; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, nortopixantrone hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, OrM3; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, photochlor, pimecrolimus, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, polyphenon E; R-126638, R-411, resveratrol, roflumilast, RS-86, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, rupatadine fumarate; Sipuleucel-T, somatropin, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, Taxus

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

    2008-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  12. Likelihood and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hill, G; Forbes, W; Kozak, J; MacNeill, I

    2000-03-01

    The history of the application of statistical theory to the analysis of clinical trials is reviewed. The current orthodoxy is a somewhat illogical hybrid of the original theory of significance tests of Edgeworth, Karl Pearson, and Fisher, and the subsequent decision theory approach of Neyman, Egon Pearson, and Wald. This hegemony is under threat from Bayesian statisticians. A third approach is that of likelihood, stemming from the work of Fisher and Barnard. This approach is illustrated using hypothetical data from the Lancet articles by Bradford Hill, which introduced clinicians to statistical theory. PMID:10760630

  13. Development of laser diode deep-acupuncture stimulator and its clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Haitao; Wang, Qingguo; Wang, Jishan; Li, Fangzheng; Cheng, Dongan

    2000-10-01

    The laser acupuncture stimulation has been applied extensively, but the laser is diffusely reflected by the skin as well as scattered and absorbed by the subcutaneous tissue, so the curative effect of the laser irradiation on the acupoints is limited. To solve above problem, we have developed the new laser deep acupuncture stimulator of diode. Its lasing wavelength is 630nm. The lasing beam is modulated into the special wave forms (such as sine wave, rectangular wave, etc.). The modulation frequency and phase may be self-synchronized in the patient's pulse. For the multi-acupoint are stimulated simultaneously, there are 3-7 laser pins on this stimulator. The modulated laser beams are coupled into 50/125 micrometers nonofil optical fibers separately. After that they enter into the laser acupuncture pins through the fiber optic connectors. The lasing beams and pins are stimulated as the customary acupuncture in the depth of the acupoints simultaneously. The output power of the single pin is 0.5-1.5 mW. The outside diameter of the pin is 0.4mm. For the price of the acupuncture pin is lower, thus the laser acupuncture pin can be used only once. Seven hundred patients were treated on the period of the clinical practice. The case of illness contains palsy, post-palsy, apoplexy, tenositis and sactalgia etc. The rate of efficiency (cure of improvement) is 85%.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  15. Acupuncture and women’s health: an overview of the role of acupuncture and its clinical management in women’s reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Suzanne; Smith, Caroline A; Possamai-Inesedy, Alphia; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture and other modalities of Chinese/East Asian medicine have been used to treat women’s health for many centuries. Gynecology specialties focus particularly on menstrual and reproductive disorders. Both the adoption of the use of acupuncture outside Asia, and the incorporation of scientific analysis in Asia have challenged biomedical conceptions of what can be achieved with this treatment method. The scale of research activity in relation to acupuncture and women’s health has increased over the last 20 years. Objective This review aims to explore the research evidence in relation to acupuncture use for women’s reproductive disorders, focusing on both clinical findings and experimental research on acupuncture’s mechanisms of action in relation to women’s health. Methods A narrative literature search was undertaken using searches of electronic databases and manual searches of journals and textbooks. The search included all literature published prior to June 2013. The literature was assessed as to the nature of the study it was reporting and findings synthesized into a commentary. Results For acupuncture’s mechanism of action the search resulted in 114 relevant documents; in relation to clinical reports on the use of acupuncture for women’s health 204 documents were found and assessed. Conclusion There is preliminary data indicating acupuncture may improve menstrual health and coping for women experiencing delays falling pregnant. There is experimental data showing that acupuncture can influence female reproductive functioning, although the actual mechanisms involved are not yet clarified. Further well-conducted clinical research would benefit our understanding of the usefulness of acupuncture to women’s health. PMID:24669195

  16. [Discussion on clinical research thinking of insulin resistance and its related di-seases treated with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Liang, Feng-Xia; Chen, Rui; Wang, Hua

    2012-07-01

    According to the analysis of current clinical research situation on insulin resistance and its related diseases: obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, some clinical research thinking are proposed: based on national, international acupuncture-moxibustion standard, setting a normalized clinical research programme in accordance with the clinical practice; addressing effective acupoints combination and prescription, emphasizing the role played by vital qi strengthening in the treatment of insulin resistance and its related diseases; taking advantage of acupuncture and moxibustion in treatment apportunity, that is to say , mainly focus on prevention; setting proper control group, grasping the theoretical and clinical characteristics of acupuncture and moxibustion. In this way, some reference could be provided for insulin resistance and its related diseases treated with acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:22997798

  17. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, and provides information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiciximab, acetylcholine chloride, acetylcysteine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen, alteplase, aminopterin, amoxicillin sodium, amphotericin B, anastrozole, argatroban monohydrate, arsenic trioxide, aspirin, atazanavir, atorvastatin, augmerosen, azathioprine; Benzylpenicillin, BMS-284756, botulinum toxin type A, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, budesonide, BXT-51072; Calcium folinate, carbamazepine, carboplatin, carmustine, ceftriaxone sodium, cefuroxime axetil, chorionic gonadotropin (human), cimetidine, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, cisplatin, citalopram hydrobromide, cladribine, clarithromycin, clavulanic acid, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clotrimazole, CNI-1493, colesevelam hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Dalteparin sodium, daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, debrisoquine sulfate, dexrazoxane, diaziquone, didanosine, docetaxel, donezepil, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection, DX-9065a; Eberconazole, ecogramostim, eletriptan, enoxaparin sodium, epoetin, epoprostenol sodium, erlizumab, ertapenem sodium, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenofibrate, filgrastim, fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil, 5-fluorouracil/epinephrine, fondaparinux sodium, formoterol fumarate; Gabapentin, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glatiramer; Heparin sodium, homoharringtonine; Ibuprofen, iloprost, imatinib mesilate, imiquimod, interferon alpha-2b, interferon alpha-2c, interferon-beta; KW-6002; Lamotrigine, lanoteplase, metoprolol tartrate, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan, Natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 81C6; Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase alfa, AGM-1470, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alosetron hydrochloride, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir; BAY-43-9006, BBR-3438, beta-L-Fd4C, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentanBR96-doxorubicin; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide, cilengitide, cilomilast, COL-1621, COL-3, CpG-7909, cyclosporine; DCVax-Brain, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), donepezil hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTI-015, [99Tc]-DTPA-mannosyldextran, duloxetine hydrochloride; Emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, epothilone B, estradiol-MNP, etonogestrel/etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoricoxib; Febuxostat, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GVS-111; Heparinase I, HspE7, human alpha-glucosidase, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, INGN-241, interferon alfa B/D hybrid, interferon alfa Biphasix, ISIS-14803; Lanicemine hydrochloride, 1311-lipiodol, liposome-encapsulated mitoxantrone, lixivaptan, lumiracoxib, lupus-AHP, LY-466700; Marimastat, MEN-10755, micafungin sodium; Nitronaproxen, NSC-683864 Omalizumab, oral insulin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, peginterferon alfa-2a, pimecrolimus, pralnacasan, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, pyrazoloacridine; R-165335, ranolazine, risperidone, RPR-109881;, RSD-1235, Satraplatin, seocalcitol, sertindole, SMART anti-interferon gamma antibody, sulfasalazine; T-138067, TAK-013, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, TP-38; Valdecoxib, vatalanib succinate, voriconazole; ZD-9331. PMID:12690708

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M; Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, adenosine triphosphate, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, autologous renal tumor vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; C340, cantuzumab mertansine, caspofungin acetate, CGP-36742, CHAMPION everolimus-eluting coronary stent, cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, everolimus, ezetimibe; Flesinoxan hydrochloride, fosamprenavir calcium, FR-901228, frovatriptan; Gadofosveset sodium, gadomer-17, galiximab, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); IDN-6556, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, iseganan hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; LB-80380, levocetirizine, liposomal doxorubicin, LMB-9, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Mecasermin, midostaurin, morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, nelfinavir, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; Olcegepant, omalizumab, oregovomab; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, prinomastat; Resiquimod, rhIGFBP-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, ritanserin, ro-31-7453, rosuvastatin calcium; SCIO-469, SDZ-SID-791, SU-11248, suberanilohydroxamic acid; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-286, tezosentan disodium, TH-9507, tipifarnib, tipranavir, tolvaptan, tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen, travoprost, treprostinil sodium, tucaresol

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adefovir dipivoxil, AGI-1067, alefacept, alemtuzumab, ALVAC-p53, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AOD-9604, apafant, aprinocarsen sodium, arsenic trioxide; Balaglitazone, BIM-23190, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Canertinib dihydrochloride, CDP-850, cevimeline hydrochloride, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clenoliximab, clevudine, CN-787; D-003, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine dexanabinol, duloxetine hydrochloride; E-5564, edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, elvucitabine emfilermin, EN-101, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epithalon, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, etilefrine pivalate hydrochloride etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Fidarestat, fondaparinux sodium; Ganstigmine hydrochloride; Homoharringtonine, HuMax-IL-15, hyperimmune IVIG; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-1C11, Inhaled insulin, irofulven, iseganan hydrochloride, ISIS-14803, ISIS-5132, ivabradine hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lafutidine, lanthanum carbonate, LAS-34475, levocetirizine, liraglutide, LY-307161 SR; Magnesium sulfate, maribavir, melatonin, mycobacterium cell wall complex; NN-414, NO-aspirin, nociceptin, nolomirole hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil oral insulin, ospemifene; PDX, perillyl alcohol, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PRO-542, PV-701, pyrazoloacridine; R-744, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rDNA insulin, resiniferatoxin, reslizumab, ridogrel, riplizumab ropivacaine, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate, ruboxistaurin mesilate

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, Ad5-FGF4, adeno-Interferon gamma, AE-941, AERx, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alpharadin, anakinra, anatumomab mafenatox, ANG-453, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AP-12009, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, astemizole, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, BufferGel; Caffeine, CDP-870, cetuximab, cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator, CP-461; Darbepoetin alfa, deferasirox, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diflomotecan, dolasetron, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EKB-569, eletriptan, EMD-72000, enfuvirtide, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib; Fampridine, ferumoxytol, fondaparinux sodium; Gadofosveset sodium, gastrazole, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride glutamine; hLM609, HSPPC-96, human insulin; IDD-1, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lapatinib, laquinimod, LDP-02, LE-SN38, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal NDDP, lopinavir, lumiracoxib, LY-156735; Morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, motexafin gadolinium, MS-27-275, MVA-5T4, MVA-Muc1-IL-2; Nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid nitronaproxen, NSC-683864, NSC-703940, NVP-LAF-237; Oblimersen sodium, ocinaplon, oncomyc-NG, OPC-28326, ortataxel, ospemifene; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pemetrexed disodium, pregabalin, prilocaine, pyridoxamine; RDP

  4. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Davis, Robert T.; Harris, Richard E.; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M.; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M.; Wayne, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies. PMID:26745452

  5. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Hugh; Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R; Davis, Robert T; Harris, Richard E; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies. PMID:26745452

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  10. Auricular Acupuncture and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Li, Liang; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture has been utilized in the treatment of diseases for thousands of years. Dr. Paul Nogier firstly originated the concept of an inverted fetus map on the external ear. In the present study, the relationship between the auricular acupuncture and the vagal regulation has been reviewed. It has been shown that auricular acupuncture plays a role in vagal activity of autonomic functions of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Mechanism studies suggested that afferent projections from especially the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) form the anatomical basis for the vagal regulation of auricular acupuncture. Therefore, we proposed the “auriculovagal afferent pathway” (AVAP): both the autonomic and the central nervous system could be modified by auricular vagal stimulation via projections from the ABVN to the NTS. Auricular acupuncture is also proposed to prevent neurodegenerative diseases via vagal regulation. There is a controversy on the specificity and the efficacy of auricular acupoints for treating diseases. More clinical RCT trials on auricular acupuncture and experimental studies on the mechanism of auricular acupuncture should be further investigated. PMID:23304215

  11. Acupuncture therapy for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid Esmaeili; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rashid, Rusdi Abd; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been used to treat substance abuse. This study aims to review experimental studies examining the effects of acupuncture on addiction. Research and review articles on acupuncture treatment of substance abuse published between January 2000 and September 2014 were searched using the databases ISI Web of Science Core Collection and EBSCO's MEDLINE Complete. Clinical trial studies on the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for substance abuse were classified according to substance (cocaine, opioid, nicotine, and alcohol), and their treatment protocols, assessments, and findings were examined. A total of 119 studies were identified, of which 85 research articles addressed the efficacy of acupuncture for treating addiction. There were substantial variations in study protocols, particularly regarding treatment duration, frequency of electroacupuncture, duration of stimulation, and choice of acupoints. Contradictory results, intergroup differences, variation in sample sizes, and acupuncture placebo effects made it difficult to evaluate acupuncture effectiveness in drug addiction treatment. This review also identified a lack of rigorous study design, such as control of confounding variables by incorporating sham controls, sufficient sample sizes, reliable assessments, and adequately replicated experiments. PMID:27053944

  12. Sharp-Hook Acupuncture (Feng Gou Zhen) for Patients with Periarthritis of Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Laixi; Wang, Haijun; Cao, Yuxia; Yan, Ping; Jin, Xiaofei; Nie, Peirui; Wang, Chaojian; Li, Rangqian; Zhang, Chunlong; Yang, Mingxiao; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The Feng Gou Zhen (sharp-hook acupuncture) as a traditional form of ancient acupuncture is said to be particularly effective for managing periarthritis of shoulder. We conducted this randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Feng Gou Zhen as an add-on compared to conventional analgesics for patients with PAS. 132 patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 ratio to either a acupuncture group receiving sharp-hook acupuncture plus acupoint injection with conventional analgesics or a control group. Patients from both groups were evaluated at week 0 (baseline), week 1, and week 4. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline shoulder pain, measured by Visual Analogue Scale at 7 days after treatment. Secondary outcome measures include the (i) function of shoulder joint and (ii) McGill pain questionnaire. The results showed that patients in acupuncture group had better pain relief and function recovery compared with control group (P < 0.05) at 1 week after treatment. Moreover, there were statistical differences between two groups in VAS and shoulder joint function and McGill pain questionnaire at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Therefore, the sharp-hook acupuncture helps to relieve the pain and restore the shoulder function for patients with periarthritis of shoulder. PMID:26640496

  13. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. PMID:21992992

  14. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get involved. Doing your own clinical research project? Then select the Guidance for Clinical Researchers link to learn more about the NICHD's clinical research processes and policies. Last Reviewed: 03/06/2012 ...

  15. A pilot controlled trial of a combination of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation and body acupuncture for post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have demonstrated the treatment benefits of dense cranial electroacupuncture stimulation (DCEAS), a novel brain stimulation therapy in patients with major depression, postpartum depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of DCEAS combined with body acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). Methods In a single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 43 patients with PSD were randomly assigned to 12 sessions of DCEAS plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 23), or sham (non-invasive cranial electroacupuncture, n-CEA) plus SSRI plus body electroacupuncture (n = 20) for 3 sessions per week over 4 weeks. Treatment outcomes were measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), the Clinical Global Impression - Severity scale (CGI-S) and Barthel Index (BI), a measure used to evaluate movement ability associated with daily self-caring activity. Results DCEAS produced a significantly greater reduction of both HAMD-17 and CGI-S as early as week 1 and CGI-S at endpoint compared to n-CEA, but subjects of n-CEA group exhibited a significantly greater improvement on BI at week 4 than DCEAS. Incidence of adverse events was not different in the two groups. Conclusions These results indicate that DCEAS could be effective in reducing stroke patients’ depressive symptoms. Superficial electrical stimulation in n-CEA group may be beneficial in improving movement disability of stroke patients. A combination of DCEAS and body acupuncture can be considered a treatment option for neuropsychiatric sequelae of stroke. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01174394. PMID:25038733

  16. Randomized controlled trial: Moxibustion and acupuncture for the treatment of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Liu, Hui-Rong; Lu, Yuan; Zhu, Yi-Fang; Shi, Yin; Weng, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Hui; Guan, Xin; Li, Jing; Chen, Wei-Feng; Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Dou, Chuan-Zi; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of active Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Ninety-two patients were equally and randomly divided into the treatment group and received herb-partitioned moxibustion combined with acupuncture, and the control group received wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion combined with superficial acupuncture. The patients received three treatment sessions per week for 12 wk and were followed up for 24 wk. The main outcome was evaluated using the CD Activity Index (CDAI) score, and the secondary outcomes were evaluated using laboratory indicators such as hemoglobin (HGB), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, quality-of-life, endoscopic ratings, and intestinal histology scores. RESULTS: The CDAI scores of both the treatment and control groups were significantly reduced after treatment compared with those measured before treatment. However, the degree of improvement in the treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control group. The improvement in symptoms in patients of the treatment group was sustained at follow-up, whereas that of the control group was not. The overall efficacy of the treatment was significantly greater than that of the control. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in quality-of-life ratings after treatment, but the improvement was significantly greater in the treatment group than in the control group. In addition, the patients in the treatment group showed significantly increased HGB and significantly decreased CRP levels and histopathological scores at the end of treatment, whereas the control group did not exhibit significant changes. CONCLUSION: Moxibustion with acupuncture provided significant therapeutic benefits in patients with active CD beyond the placebo effect and is therefore an effective and safe treatment for active CD. PMID:25152604

  17. Teasing apart quality and validity in systematic reviews: an example from acupuncture trials in chronic neck and back pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Oldman, A D; McQuay, H J; Moore, R A

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to carry out a systematic review to assess the analgesic efficacy and the adverse effects of acupuncture compared with placebo for back and neck pain and (2) to develop a new tool, the Oxford Pain Validity Scale (OPVS), to measure validity of findings from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and to enable ranking of trial findings according to validity within qualitative reviews. Published RCTs (of acupuncture at both traditional and non-traditional points) were identified from systematic searching of bibliographic databases (e.g. MEDLINE) and reference lists of retrieved reports. Pain outcome data were extracted with preference given to standardized outcomes such as pain intensity. Information on adverse effects was also extracted. All included trials were scored using a five-item 0-16 point validity scale (OPVS). The individual RCTs were ranked according to their OPVS score to enable more weight to be placed on the trials of greater validity when drawing an overall conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for relieving neck and back pain. Statistical analyses were carried out on the OPVS scores to assess the relationship between trial finding (positive or negative) and validity. Thirteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Five trials concluded that acupuncture was effective, and eight concluded that it was not effective for relieving back or neck pain. There was no obvious difference between the findings of trials using traditional and non-traditional points. Using the new OPVS scale, the validity scores of the included trials ranged from 4 to 14. There was no significant relationship between OPVS score and trial finding (positive versus negative). Authors' conclusions did not always agree with their data. We drew our own conclusions (positive/negative) based on the data presented in the reports. Re-analysis using our conclusions showed a significant relationship between OPVS score and trial finding, with higher validity

  18. Acupuncture for Chronic Pain in Japan: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Many Japanese reports of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain are not listed in medical databases such as Medline. Therefore, they are not easily accessible to researchers outside of Japan. To complement existing reviews of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain and to provide more detailed discussion and analysis, we did a literature search using ‘Igaku Chuo Zasshi Wed’ (Japana Centra Revuo Medicina) and ‘Citation Information by National Institute of Information’ covering the period 1978–2006. Original articles and case reports of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment of chronic pain were included. Animal studies, surveys, and news articles were excluded. Two independent reviewers extracted data from located articles in a pre-defined structured way, and assessed the likelihood of causality in each case. We located 57 papers written in Japanese (20 full papers, 37 case reports). Conditions examined were headache (12 trials), chronic low back pain (9 trials), rheumatoid arthritis (8 trials), temporomandibular dysfunction (8 trials), katakori (8 trials) and others (12 trials). While 23 were described as clinical control trials (CCTs), 11 employed a quasi-random method. Applying the 5-point Jadad quality assessment scoring system, the mean score was 1.5 ± 1.3 (SD). Eleven (52%) of the CCTs were conducted to determine a more effective procedure for acupuncture; these compared a certain type of acupuncture with another type of acupuncture or specific additional points. In particular, the trigger point acupuncture was widely used to treat chronic low back pain in Japan. Many reports of chronic pain treatment by acupuncture and moxibustion are listed in Japanese databases. From the data, we conclude that there is limited evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment, and inconclusive evidence that trigger point acupuncture is more effective than placebo, sham acupuncture or standard care. PMID:18227910

  19. Electro-acupuncture for fatigue, sleep, and psychological distress in breast cancer patients with aromatase inhibitor-related arthralgia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mao, J.J.; Farrar, J.T.; Bruner, D.; Zee, J.; Bowman, M.; Seluzicki, C.; DeMichele, A.; Xie, S.X.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety are associated with pain in breast cancer patients, it is unknown if acupuncture can decrease these co-morbid symptoms in cancer patients with pain. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of electro-acupuncture on fatigue, sleep, and psychological distress in breast cancer survivors who experience joint pain related to aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of an eight-week course of electro-acupuncture (EA) as compared to waitlist control (WLC) and sham acupuncture (SA) in postmenopausal women with breast cancer who self-reported joint pain attributable to aromatase inhibitors. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depression were measured by the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The effects of EA and SA vs. WLC on these outcomes were evaluated using mixed-effects models. Results Of the 67 randomly assigned patients, baseline pain interference was associated with fatigue (Pearson correlation coefficient r =0.75, p<0.001), sleep disturbance (r=0.38, p=0.0026), and depression (r= 0.58, p<0.001). Compared to the WLC, EA produced significant improvement in fatigue (p=0.0095), anxiety (p=0.044), and depression (p=0.015) and non-significant improvement in sleep disturbance (p=0.058) during the 12 week intervention and follow up period. In contrast, SA did not produce significant reduction in fatigue and anxiety symptoms, but produced significant improvement in depression compared with WLC (p=0.0088). Conclusion Compared to usual care, EA produced significant improvement in fatigue, anxiety, and depression, whereas SA improved only depression in women experiencing AI-related arthralgia. Clinical Trial Registration NCT01013337 PMID:25077452

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, acyline, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, AEE-788, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, AK-602, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alprazolam, amdoxovir, AMG-162, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminophylline hydrate, anakinra, anecortave acetate, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, APC-8015, aripiprazole, aspirin, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan, AVE-5883, AZD-2171; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, bimatoprost, biphasic human insulin (prb), bortezomib, BR-A-657, BRL-55730, budesonide, busulfan; Calcipotriol, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, calcium folinate, capecitabine, capravirine, carmustine, caspofungin acetate, cefdinir, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, chlorambucil, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cisplatin, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, co-trimoxazole, CP-122721, creatine, CY-2301, cyclophosphamide, cypher, cytarabine, cytolin; D0401, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DASB, desipramine hydrochloride, desloratadine, desvenlafaxine succinate, dexamethasone, didanosine, diquafosol tetrasodium, docetaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecallantide, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, estramustine phosphate sodium, etanercept, ethinylestradiol, etonogestrel, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoposide, exenatide; Famciclovir, fampridine, febuxostat, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluocinolone acetonide, fluorouracil, fluticasone propionate

  1. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Hollifield, Michael; Sinclair-Lian, Nityamo; Warner, Teddy D; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential efficacy and acceptability of accupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People diagnosed with PTSD were randomized to either an empirically developed accupuncture treatment (ACU), a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a wait-list control (WLC). The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms at baseline, end treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect predicted Group X Time effects in both intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment completion models. Compared with the WLC condition in the ITT model, accupuncture provided large treatment effects for PTSD (F [1, 46] = 12.60; p < 0.01; Cohen's d = 1.29), similar in magnitude to group CBT (F [1, 47] = 12.45; p < 0.01; d = 1.42) (ACU vs. CBT, d = 0.29). Symptom reductions at end treatment were maintained at 3-month follow-up for both interventions. Accupuncture may be an efficacious and acceptable nonexposure treatment option for PTSD. Larger trials with additional controls and methods are warranted to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:17568299

  2. Effects of Wonli Acupuncture Procedure in Patients with LSS: A Clinical, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geon-Mok; Lee, Eun-Yong; Han, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Kyong-Ha; Kang, Se-Rin; Yoon, Sang-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a disease with increasing prevalence due to prolongation of average life span. Despite various treatment methods, many limitations remain unsolved. Objective. We are reporting cases of patients who have been treated with Wonli Acupuncture, a method of treating LSS by directly approaching the intervertebral foramen and interlaminar space with acupuncture needles different from those used in original acupuncture. Methods. A total of 82 patients with LSS were treated with Wonli Acupuncture, and out of those, 47 patients without exclusion criteria were selected for the following research. We compared the pretreatment VAS and ODI scores based on 1-year follow-up measurements. Results. The ODI value dropped by 15.3 ± 24.8 on average (from 35.2 ± 19.9 at the baseline to 19.8 ± 20.6 at the reading) (P < 0.01) and the average VAS also dropped by 19.2 ± 37.2 (from 60.7 ± 23.1 at baseline to 41.5 ± 31.9 at the reading) (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Wonli Acupuncture was found to have clinical efficacy for lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25045387

  3. Clinical observations on laser acupuncture in simple obesity therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Long; Chang, Chih-Hao; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A previous study has shown that laser acupuncture is a useful healing method for the treatment of visceral postmenopausal obesity in combination with a low-calorie diet. We observe and evaluate the therapeutic effect of laser acupuncture in subjects of simple obesity with a non-restrictive diet protocol. Subjects included 73 women and 22 men with simple obesity and body mass indices > or = 27 kg/m2. Daily energy intake recommendations for obese females and males were 1620.0 and 1894.2 kcal in average, respectively. The gallium aluminum arsenide Handylaser Trion was used to apply 0.25 J of energy to each of the following acupuncture points three times per week for four consecutive weeks: Stomach, Hunger, ST25, ST28, ST40, SP15, and CV9. The subjects' body weights and body mass indices were recorded before treatment, and four weeks after treatment, and the percent reduction in each parameter was calculated. Statistically significant reductions in body weight and body mass index were detected after four weeks of treatment. The mean reduction and mean percent reduction in body weight were 3.17 kg and 3.80% (p < 0.0001), respectively. The corresponding values for the body mass index were 1.22 kg/m2 and 3.78% (p < 0.0001), respectively. We concluded that laser acupuncture was found to exert a therapeutic effect on simple obesity by reducing both body weight and body mass index. Moreover, subjects showed good compliance with this comfortable and non-restrictive diet protocol. PMID:20821818

  4. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  5. Social media in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape. PMID:24857086

  6. Acupuncture Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-chang; Xu, Xiu-ping; Xu, Wen-tao; Hou, Wen-zhen; Cheng, Ying-ying; Li, Chang-xi; Ni, Guang-xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has commonly been used in China, either alone or in combination with Western medicine, to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL). The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for patients with SSHL. Methods We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), and Chinese Biomedical literature service system (SinoMed) to collect randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for SSHL published before July 2014. A meta-analysis was conducted according to the Cochrane systematic review method using RevMan 5.2 software. The evidence level for each outcome was assessed using the GRADE methodology. Results Twelve trials involving 863 patients were included. A meta-analysis showed that the effect of manual acupuncture combined with Western medicine comprehensive treatment (WMCT) was better than WMCT alone (RR 1.33, 95%CI 1.19–1.49) and the same as the effect of electroacupuncture combined with WMCT (RR 1.33, 95%CI 1.19–1.50). One study showed a better effect of electroacupuncture than of WMCT (RR 1.34, 95%CI 1.24–1.45). For mean changes in hearing over all frequencies, the meta-analysis showed a better effect with the combination of acupuncture and WMCT than with WMCT alone (MD 10.85, 95%CI 6.84–14.86). However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or very low due to a high risk of bias and small sample sizes in the included studies. Conclusion There was not sufficient evidence showing that acupuncture therapy alone was beneficial for treating SSHL. However, interventions combining acupuncture with WMCT had more efficacious results in the treatment of SSHL than WMCT alone. Electroacupuncture alone might be a viable alternative treatment besides WMCT for SSHL. However, given that there were fewer eligible RCTs and limitations in the included trials, such as methodological drawbacks

  7. Data fraud in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  8. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  9. Hybrid 10 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gantz, Bruce J.; Hansen, Marlan R.; Turner, Christopher W.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Reiss, Lina A.; Parkinson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic plus electric (electric-acoustic) speech processing has been successful in highlighting the important role of articulation information in consonant recognition in those adults that have profound high-frequency hearing loss at frequencies greater than 1500 Hz and less than 60% discrimination scores. Eighty-seven subjects were enrolled in an adult Hybrid multicenter Food and Drug Administration clinical trial. Immediate hearing preservation was accomplished in 85/87 subjects. Over time (3 months to 5 years), some hearing preservation was maintained in 91% of the group. Combined electric-acoustic processing enabled most of this group of volunteers to gain improved speech understanding, compared to their preoperative hearing, with bilateral hearing aids. Most have preservation of low-frequency acoustic hearing within 15 dB of their preoperative pure tone levels. Those with greater losses (> 30 dB) also benefited from the combination of electric-acoustic speech processing. Postoperatively, in the electric-acoustic processing condition, loss of low-frequency hearing did not correlate with improvements in speech perception scores in quiet. Sixteen subjects were identified as poor performers in that they did not achieve a significant improvement through electric-acoustic processing. A multiple regression analysis determined that 91% of the variance in the poorly performing group can be explained by the preoperative speech recognition score and duration of deafness. Signal-to-noise ratios for speech understanding in noise improved more than 9 dB in some individuals in the electric-acoustic processing condition. The relation between speech understanding in noise thresholds and residual low-frequency acoustic hearing is significant (r = 0.62; p < 0.05). The data suggest that, in general, the advantages gained for speech recognition in noise by preserving residual hearing exist, unless the hearing loss approaches profound levels. Preservation of residual low

  10. Inept media trials of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    The Indian media in general, with the exception of a few domain expert journalists, have failed to comprehend the complexities involved in the clinical trial process. In the run up to the deadline-based coverage of a story, a majority of them fall short in conveying the right perspective to readers, but nevertheless they have been successful in sensationalizing an event in this arena. Possibly by unintended misrepresentation, or mostly out of ignorance of the nuances involved in the clinical trials process, the media has done more harm than good, and got away with it. On the other side, the industry has been reluctant to engage with the media in a meaningful dialog for too long now. It bears not only the consequences of damage to its professional reputation following such reportage, but also the repercussions of unnecessary clampdowns by the regulators. Science journalism in India has yet to rise as a profession. PMID:22701819

  11. Clinical Trials and Older People

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a much wider applicability. Researchers need the participation of older people in their clinical trials so ... contact with questions about the study or your participation. Control group —the group of participants who get ...

  12. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K.; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E.; Snell, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations. PMID:25922615

  13. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  14. CHoosing Options for Insomnia in Cancer Effectively (CHOICE): Design of a patient centered comparative effectiveness trial of acupuncture and cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Garland, Sheila N; Gehrman, Philip; Barg, Frances K; Xie, Sharon X; Mao, Jun J

    2016-03-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent and persistent side effect of cancer, which if left unaddressed, can be unremitting and negatively influence physical and mental well-being. Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are commonly used non-pharmacological treatments that are efficacious for treating insomnia in cancer patients; however, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of these options. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine which treatments are most effective for which individuals, and patient preference for treatment is a particularly important contributor to adherence and outcomes. Here we describe the design of a clinical trial that begins to determine how best to personalize the treatment of insomnia for cancer survivors. This project is a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial with a nested qualitative study comparing acupuncture and CBT for insomnia and co-morbid symptoms in a heterogeneous sample of 160 cancer survivors. The primary aim is to determine which treatment is associated with the largest reduction in insomnia severity. The secondary aim is to examine the demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics that predict and/or moderate treatment effect. Patients will receive ten treatments of acupuncture or 7 sessions of CBT over eight weeks and complete validated patient-reported outcome measures of sleep and co-morbid symptoms at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at three-months to assess durability of effect. The results of the proposed study have the potential to improve healthcare outcomes by helping cancer survivors and their caregivers make informed and evidence-based decisions, leading to patient-centered and personalized care for cancer survivors with insomnia. PMID:26956541

  15. Malaria diagnostics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Shott, Joseph P; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R; Stewart, V Ann

    2013-11-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  16. Malaria Diagnostics in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C.; Shott, Joseph P.; Parikh, Sunil; Etter, Paige; Prescott, William R.; Stewart, V. Ann

    2013-01-01

    Malaria diagnostics are widely used in epidemiologic studies to investigate natural history of disease and in drug and vaccine clinical trials to exclude participants or evaluate efficacy. The Malaria Laboratory Network (MLN), managed by the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, is an international working group with mutual interests in malaria disease and diagnosis and in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome clinical trials. The MLN considered and studied the wide array of available malaria diagnostic tests for their suitability for screening trial participants and/or obtaining study endpoints for malaria clinical trials, including studies of HIV/malaria co-infection and other malaria natural history studies. The MLN provides recommendations on microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, and molecular assays to guide selection of the most appropriate test(s) for specific research objectives. In addition, this report provides recommendations regarding quality management to ensure reproducibility across sites in clinical trials. Performance evaluation, quality control, and external quality assessment are critical processes that must be implemented in all clinical trials using malaria tests. PMID:24062484

  17. [Randomized clinical trials and real clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Heerlein, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    One of the emerging problems in modern medicine is that part of its highly efficacious treatments do not show significant effectiveness in real world systems of care. Efficacy studies address the appropriate dosages, short term response and feasibility of treatments in carefully selected populations, but they do not necessarily provide information for decisions in clinical practice. This review aims to present strengths and limitations of different methodological types of trials and to offer an overview of how knowledge from clinical trials can be used for clinical practice. The important effect of funding source on the outcome of randomized controlled trials is discussed. Some key questions in the treatment assessment of depression, schizophrenia and different medical conditions are discussed, with a focus on the possibilities and restrictions of translating clinical trial results into real-world settings. Empirical evidence shows that although randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for proving efficacy of a therapeutic procedure they often suffer from funding source bias and from lack of generalizability. Effectiveness studies evaluate effects of treatments under conditions approximating usual care. Another key area that can be addressed by effectiveness studies is the impact on important health policy measures such as disability days, days of work or medical costs, etc. Conclusions show that the future assessment of treatment regimes for clinical utility requires less biased efficacy studies and more effectiveness studies addressing major issues from all relevant perspectives. PMID:19543562

  18. [Survey of clinical and experimental researches on mechanisms of acupuncture treatment of bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Zhao, Ji-ping; Zhang, Chang

    2011-08-01

    In the present paper, the authors review the development of experimental and clinical studies on acupuncture treatment of bronchial asthma in recent 10 years. Regarding clinical studies, results showed that acupuncture could (1) regulate cardiac-pulmonary function; and (2) adjust immune state and relieve inflammatory reactions in bronchial asthma patients. Animal experiments showed that acupuncture could function in (1) improving pulmonary function; (2) reducing accumulation of the peripheral eosinophile granulocytes (EOS), relieving the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the air-passage mucosa and promoting the apoptosis of EOS in the lung and air-passages; (3) down-regulating the expression of air-passage remodeling-related protein insulin growth factor-1; (4) suppressing the secretion of tumor necrosis factor and endothelin; (5) attenuating allergic reaction; (6) regulating neuroendocrine activity; and (7) modulating intracellular second messenger activities. However, rigorous clinical study design is not enough, so that the reliability of the results is limited. In spite of many indicators of animal experiments have been selected, but their correlations are not in close association, resulting in poor complementation and mutual identification of the acquired findings. For this reason, its clinical efficacies need to be researched further according to principles of evidence-based medicine. PMID:21942186

  19. Integrating Massage, Chiropractic, and Acupuncture in University Clinics: A Guided Student Observation

    PubMed Central

    Estrin Dashe, Alejandra A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported on the health benefits of applying an integrated complementary health care model. Purpose This paper presents the results of pilot research focusing on the observations massage therapy students made about complementary health care education and integration during massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture treatments at two university clinics. Setting: Observations took place at Northwestern Health Sciences University’s associated clinics that offered massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture. Research Design: Students directly observed how clinicians and interns educated their patients and integrated other forms of complementary health care into their practice. Participants: chiropractors, massage therapists, and acupuncturists, and their patients. All participants were English-speaking and 18–65 years old. Main Outcome Measures: Observations recorded by students in journals about education and integration during massage therapy, chiropractic, and acupuncture treatments were coded and counted. Results Qualitative observations showed that clinicians and interns educated patients to some degree, but the clinicians were less apt to integrate other modalities than the interns. Conclusions Observations support that professional integrity may limit clinicians in their ability to integrate multiple modalities of health care while treating patients. Since it is well established that integration of multiple health care modalities is beneficial to patient health, it is recommended that clinics assist their clinical staff in applying an integrative approach to their practice. PMID:22811755

  20. COMPETING COMMITMENTS in CLINICAL TRIALS

    PubMed Central

    Lidz, Charles W.; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Joffe, Steven; Albert, Karen; Rosenbaum, Jill; Simon, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Most discussion about clinical care in clinical trials has concerned whether subjects’ care may be compromised by research procedures. The possibility that clinical researchers might give priority to helping their “patients” even if that required deviating from the imperatives of the research protocol largely has been ignored. We conducted an on-line survey with clinical researchers, including physicians, research nurses and other research staff, to assess the ways and frequency with which clinical trials may be at risk for being compromised by clinical researchers’ attempting to address the clinical needs of subjects. The survey covered recruitment, clinical management while in the trial, and termination decisions. It produced a 72.0% response rate. Over 20% of respondents agreed that researchers should deviate from the protocol to improve subjects’ care; 28% reported that medications restricted by the protocol were given; 21% reported that subjects who were not eligible had been recruited; and 9% said subjects had been retained in a trial despite meeting termination criteria. Some respondents reported that these deviations from the protocol happened many times. The ramifications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19873835

  1. [Quality control in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M

    1996-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in clinical trials means the procedures which insure protection of human subjects from research risk, reliability of the data, and thereby assures internal consistency. This has been developed since 1970s in the US, by establishing various regulations which are now called GCP. From the viewpoint of total QC, it should be emphasized that rigorous review of protocol by the Institutional Review Board and obtaining Informed Consent are prerequisites for insuring the quality of the given trial at high scientific level. When pursuing a clinical trial, first of all, facilities of the institutions and the ability of investigators must be of high quality. For this reason, at each institution previous data related to trials should be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed prior to developing a protocol. Educational courses in QC in clinical practice are invaluable. QC of diagnosis means, for example, central pathology review and standardization of diagnostic procedures and process. Secondly, at each institution, data managers collect the data and submit them to the central office at the indicated time. In order to evolve clinical trial, continuous education for data managers and expansion of their job are encouraged. Thirdly, at the statistical center independent from the research group office, subject-specific data managers, the biostatistical staff, must check submitted forms for completeness, consistency and accuracy. Finally, at the data analysis, quality evaluation of the research should also be carried out. Throughout the trial, monitoring and audit are particularly important to assure quality. The sponsor has the responsibility of monitoring the trial and make rigorous onsite visits, and the individual study group also have a monitoring program, while the FDA and the NCI audit by themselves. The purpose of audit is not only to assure data reliability but also to check out patient compliance to drug, education as to regulations and rules of clinical

  2. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  3. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials (Last updated 9/15/2015; last reviewed 9/15/2015) Key Points HIV/AIDS clinical trials are ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ...

  4. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chu, Heng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority. PMID:23935678

  5. [ZHU Lian's New Acupuncture Academic System and acupuncture science initialization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-11-01

    Acupuncture scientization was a consensus of most of acupuncture scholars who had long-term perspectives in the 20th century, among them Ms. ZHULian was the important one. Ms. ZHU Lian built a systemic new acupuncture" academic structure in practice and theory aspects. At the same time, as the main architect of Institute of Acupuncture-moxibustion of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ms. ZHU Lian was the first one who began to carry out the acupuncture clinical trail and laboratory experiment in modern way, which meant "acupuncture therapy" was transformed into "acupuncture science" by Ms. ZHULian's endeavor. PMID:26939349

  6. Cancer nanotherapeutics in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Kauffman, Kevin J; Kaczmarek, James C; Langer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To be legally sold in the United States, all drugs must go through the FDA approval process. This chapter introduces the FDA approval process and describes the clinical trials required for a drug to gain approval. We then look at the different cancer nanotherapeutics and in vivo diagnostics that are currently in clinical trials or have already received approval. These nanotechnologies are catagorized and described based on the delivery vehicle: liposomes, polymer micelles, albumin-bound chemotherapeutics, polymer-bound chemotherapeutics, and inorganic particles. PMID:25895874

  7. Outbreak of primary inoculation tuberculosis in an acupuncture clinic in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhu, M Y; Li, C; Zhang, H B; Zuo, G B; Wang, M H; Teng, H L

    2015-04-01

    Outbreak of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections associated with acupuncture has not been reported. Thirteen patients with a painful swollen lump were referred to our hospital. The index patient received acupuncture and paraspinal muscular injection at a local acupuncture clinic in April 2011 and was diagnosed with M. tuberculosis 1 month later. From May 2011 to August 2011, 12 more patients with a swollen lump on the nuchal region or in the lower back or the buttocks region were referred to our hospital. Tuberculin skin test (TST), T-SPOT.TB, acid-fast stain, M. tuberculosis culture, chest radiograph, and lump magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and the patients were diagnosed with tuberculous abscess of the lump. All 13 patients received intramuscular injection at the paraspinal muscle by two acupuncturists at a local clinic and reported a swollen lump at the injection site. The needles and syringes were reused after autoclave sterilization. The TST was positive in all patients. Twelve patients had positive acid-fast stains. Mycobacterial cultures of abscess specimens were positive in all 13 patients. T-SPOT.TB tests were positive in all patients who underwent the test. The lesions and biopsies were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing by the Disease Control Center of Zhejiang Province, China and the causative agent was identified as M. tuberculosis, Beijing type. In conclusion, physicians should consider the possibility of mycobacterial infections, apart from other bacterial agents, in patients with a swollen paraspinal lump following intramuscular injection. PMID:25148461

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients. Currently, what cancer clinical trials are the NCI and medical community sponsoring involving CAM modalities? Cancer CAM clinical trials are listed in NCI’s PDQ ® (Physician Data Query) computer database of clinical ...

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Cancer Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients. Currently, what cancer clinical trials are the NCI and medical community sponsoring involving CAM modalities? Cancer CAM clinical trials are listed in NCI's PDQ ® (Physician Data Query) computer database of clinical ...

  10. Acupuncture in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brittner, Mindy; Le Pertel, Noemie; Gold, Melanie A

    2016-06-01

    There has been extensive research on the use of acupuncture in adults with a wide array of conditions. Much less research has been conducted on the use of acupuncture in children. In this article, we review the history and philosophy of acupuncture, and the literature on its effectiveness and safety in children and adolescents, giving special attention to the pediatric and adolescent conditions that have been most studied in high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:26867822

  11. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian. PMID:26946752

  12. [A review of international clinical trial registration].

    PubMed

    Yu, He; Liu, Jian-ping

    2007-05-01

    Clinical trials play a critical role in medical research. However, only a few clinical trials conducted at present have been registered at various clinical trial registries. Clinical trial registration can prevent bias in these registered trials effectively and avoid unnecessary waste of resources due to meaningless repeats. Moreover, it will benefit the development of evidence-based medicine, and promote human welfare. Great attention has been paid to the importance and necessity of clinical trial registration. This review briefly introduced the definition, justification, contents, history, current status of clinical trial registration, and introduced the information regarding important international clinical trial registries in detail. Clinical trial registration should be developed toward a transparent, compulsory and comprehensive stage. PMID:17498477

  13. Feasibility Trial of Electro-acupuncture for Aromatase Inhibitor Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, JJ; Bruner, DW; Stricker, C; Farrar, JT; Xie, SX; Bowman, MA; Pucci, D; Han, X; DeMichele, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthralgia affects postmenopausal women receiving aromatase inhibitors (AI) for breast cancer. Given the existing evidence for electro-acupuncture (EA) for treatment of osteoarthritis in the general population, this study aims to establish the feasibility of studying EA for treating AI-related arthralgia. Patients and Methods Postmenopausal women with stage I-III breast cancer who reported AI-related arthralgia were enrolled in a single arm feasibility trial. EA was provided twice a week for two weeks followed by six weekly treatments. The protocol was based on Chinese medicine diagnosis of “Bi” syndrome with electro-stimulation of needles around the painful joint(s). Pain severity of the modified Brief Pain Inventory was used as the primary outcome. Joint stiffness, Joint interference, and Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) were secondary outcomes. Paired-t tests were used for analysis. Results Twelve women were enrolled and all provided data for analysis. From baseline to the end of intervention, patients reported reduction in pain severity (5.3 to 1.9), stiffness (6.9 to 2.4), and joint symptom interference (4.7 to 0.8), all P<0.001; 11/12 considered joint symptoms “very much better” based on PGIC. Subjects also reported significant decrease in fatigue (4.4 to 1.9, p=0.005) and anxiety (7.1 to 4.8, p=0.01). No infection or development or worsening of lymphedema was observed. Conclusion Preliminary data establishes the feasibility of recruitment and acceptance as well as promising preliminary safety and effectiveness. A randomized controlled trial is warranted to establish the efficacy of EA for AI-related arthralgia in breast cancer survivors. PMID:19679620

  14. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  15. Influence of Control Group on Effect Size in Trials of Acupuncture for Chronic Pain: A Secondary Analysis of an Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Hugh; Vertosick, Emily; Lewith, George; Linde, Klaus; Sherman, Karen J.; Witt, Claudia M.; Vickers, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In a recent individual patient data meta-analysis, acupuncture was found to be superior to both sham and non-sham controls in patients with chronic pain. In this paper we identify variations in types of sham and non-sham controls used and analyze their impact on the effect size of acupuncture. Methods Based on literature searches of acupuncture trials involving patients with headache and migraine, osteoarthritis, and back, neck and shoulder pain, 29 trials met inclusion criteria, 20 involving sham controls (n = 5,230) and 18 non-sham controls (n = 14,597). For sham controls, we analysed non-needle sham, penetrating sham needles and non-penetrating sham needles. For non-sham controls, we analysed non-specified routine care and protocol-guided care. Using meta-regression we explored impact of choice of control on effect of acupuncture. Findings Acupuncture was significantly superior to all categories of control group. For trials that used penetrating needles for sham control, acupuncture had smaller effect sizes than for trials with non-penetrating sham or sham control without needles. The difference in effect size was −0.45 (95% C.I. −0.78, −0.12; p = 0.007), or −0.19 (95% C.I. −0.39, 0.01; p = 0.058) after exclusion of outlying studies showing very large effects of acupuncture. In trials with non-sham controls, larger effect sizes associated with acupuncture vs. non-specified routine care than vs. protocol-guided care. Although the difference in effect size was large (0.26), it was not significant with a wide confidence interval (95% C.I. −0.05, 0.57, p = 0.1). Conclusion Acupuncture is significantly superior to control irrespective of the subtype of control. While the choice of control should be driven by the study question, our findings can help inform study design in acupuncture, particularly with respect to sample size. Penetrating needles appear to have important physiologic activity. We recommend that this type of

  16. [Discussion on acupuncture treatment amount].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Liang, Fengxia; Wang, Hua; Li, Jia

    2015-05-01

    The amount of acupuncture treatment refers to the sum of acupuncture effects during the treatment. From the factors that constitutes the amount of acupuncture treatment, including the numbers of needling, the size of acupuncture instruments, the depth of acupuncture, the manipulation, the retained time of needle, etc., and combined with teaching and clinical experience, it is believed that the amount of acupuncture treatment is closely related with clinical efficacy, besides, moderate amount of acupuncture treatment is a key factor to improve acupuncture efficacy and guarantee the safety of acupuncture. The basic principles of regular treatment amount are arrival of qi and being moderate, indicating the retained time of needle, treatment frequency and course should be based on individual condition, time, location and disease. PMID:26255521

  17. The ethics of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  18. Auricular acupuncture for primary care treatment of low back pain and posterior pelvic pain in pregnancy: study protocol for a multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background About 45% of all pregnant women suffer low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain (LBPGP). This study seeks to evaluate the effect of auricular acupuncture on LBPGP compared with placebo auricular acupuncture and with standard obstetric care in the field of primary health care. Methods and design This study will be a four-parallel-arm, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 212 pregnant women (24 to 36 weeks’ gestation), aged at least 17 years, with LBPGP, will be randomly assigned to the verum auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (VAAc), to the non-specific auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (NSAAc), to the non-specific placebo auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (PAAc), or the standard obstetric care group (SOC). The VAAc, NSAAc, and PAAc groups will receive treatment at three auricular acupuncture points (specific points for the VAAc group or non-specific ones for the NSAAc and PAAc groups), once a week for 2 weeks; the SOC group will receive only standard obstetric care during the same period. The primary outcome will be the reduction in pain intensity, according to the visual analogue scale (iVAS), at 2 weeks after the start of treatment. The secondary outcomes will be functional status with respect to LBPGP (according to the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire), health-related quality of life (SF12) at 2 weeks after the start of treatment, and iVAS at 12 and 48 weeks postpartum. Discussion This trial will implement a high-quality methodology and may provide evidence for the efficacy, safety, and specificity of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for pregnant women with LBPGP. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41033073 (date 20/03/2014). PMID:25027493

  19. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  20. Manipulation Therapy Relieved Pain More Rapidly Than Acupuncture among Lateral Epicondylalgia (Tennis Elbow) Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial with 8-Week Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chung-Yuan; Lee, Ko-Hung; Huang, Hsin-Chia; Chang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Yang, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Radial bone adjustment manipulation treatment may be effective to reduce pain rapidly in lateral epicondylalgia patients and the pathological tension in the biceps brachii muscle is highly concerned. To prove this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized controlled trial and included 35 patients with lateral epicondylalgia for more than 2 months. Either manipulation treatment (n = 16) or acupuncture (n = 19) was given to these patients for 2 weeks and all patients' symptoms were followed up for 8 weeks after treatment. Both groups demonstrated changes in pain VAS score, grip strength, and DASH questionnaire. Lateral epicondylalgia patients who received manipulation treatment felt pain relief sooner than those who had acupuncture treatments during the first few treatments. However, both acupuncture and manipulation are effective, while the difference has no significance at the 8-week follow-up. The trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81308551 on 5 February 2016. PMID:27143983

  1. Manipulation Therapy Relieved Pain More Rapidly Than Acupuncture among Lateral Epicondylalgia (Tennis Elbow) Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial with 8-Week Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko-Hung; Chang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Radial bone adjustment manipulation treatment may be effective to reduce pain rapidly in lateral epicondylalgia patients and the pathological tension in the biceps brachii muscle is highly concerned. To prove this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized controlled trial and included 35 patients with lateral epicondylalgia for more than 2 months. Either manipulation treatment (n = 16) or acupuncture (n = 19) was given to these patients for 2 weeks and all patients' symptoms were followed up for 8 weeks after treatment. Both groups demonstrated changes in pain VAS score, grip strength, and DASH questionnaire. Lateral epicondylalgia patients who received manipulation treatment felt pain relief sooner than those who had acupuncture treatments during the first few treatments. However, both acupuncture and manipulation are effective, while the difference has no significance at the 8-week follow-up. The trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81308551 on 5 February 2016. PMID:27143983

  2. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  3. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K P; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  4. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  5. Clinical Trials in Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

  6. [Internet use in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    Recruiting patients is a critical point of today's clinical research and, along the years, several solutions have been proposed, even if their efficacy seems to be doubtful. On the other hand, nowadays, Internet represents a great opportunity for improving clinical trial recruitments. Nevertheless, on-line recruitment services (e-recruitment) could ensure some advantages (such as facilitating interaction between supply and demand of clinical research, time and money savings/optimizations, data entry errors reduction), but also raise some issues (such as those related to sampling, information, consent, real identity of participants and risks for data breaches). The article debates on the difficulties to recruit patients for clinical research, in general, and e-recruitment particularly, discussing some ethical issues raised by internet enrolment. PMID:24589968

  7. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  8. MindTrial: An Intelligent System for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yugyung; Dinakarpandian, Deendayal; Katakam, Nikhilesh; Owens, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The recruitment of human subjects for clinical trials research is a critically important step in the discovery of new cures for diseases. However, the current recruitment methodologies are inherently inefficient. Considerable resources are expended in efforts to recruit adequate numbers of patient volunteers who meet the inclusion/exclusion criteria for clinical trials. Recruitment is particularly challenging for trials involving vulnerable, psychiatrically disordered groups. We have developed a prototype system, called MindTrial, that is based on an online model to enhance the efficiency and quality of recruitment of patients with psychiatric disorders for clinical research. The intelligent component of the MindTrial system can facilitate highly specific matches between clinical trial criteria and volunteers for self-enrollment of sufficient numbers of patient volunteers. We believe this system is particularly valuable in optimizing recruitment for clinical trial studies for development of new drugs. PMID:21347017

  9. Establishing an animal model for National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) auricular acupuncture protocol.

    PubMed

    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; Anand, Preeti; Melyan, Zara

    2016-06-15

    The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain has increased dramatically in the past few decades making them one of the most commonly prescribed medications in the US. However, long-term use of opioids is limited by development of tolerance (decreased antinociceptive efficacy) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia - paradoxical sensitization to noxious (hyperalgesia) and non-noxious (allodynia) stimuli. Novel adjunctive therapies are needed to increase the efficacy and prolong the duration of action of opioids in chronic pain treatment. Acupuncture is often used as an adjunct therapy for the treatment of symptoms induced by non-clinical use of opioids. The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) auricular acupuncture protocol is the most common form of acupuncture treatment for substance abuse. The standardized, easy to use and virtually painless procedure make it an attractive complementary treatment option for patients suffering from opioid-induced adverse effects. Clinical trials designed to test the efficacy of the NADA protocol yielded contradictory results. The mechanism by which NADA acupuncture could serve as a successful treatment remains unknown. Therefore, establishing an animal model of NADA acupuncture can provide a tool for investigating the efficacy and cellular mechanisms of NADA treatment. Previous studies have shown that repeated morphine administration in rodents can produce locomotor sensitization and reduce analgesic potency of a challenge dose of morphine, indicating development of morphine tolerance. Here we show that NADA acupuncture treatment can both reduce morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and prevent the development of morphine tolerance in rats, thus validating a new model for NADA acupuncture studies. Our data provides support for evidence-based use of NADA acupuncture as a new adjunctive approach that can potentially improve the side-effect profile of morphine and other prescription opioids. PMID:27155456

  10. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  11. Target population for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Studenski, S

    2016-01-01

    The target population for clinical trials aimed at sarcopenia depends on the goals of treatment and the expected natural history of sarcopenia. Based on a natural history where loss of muscle mass and/or quality leads to loss of strength, and eventually to reduced mobility and functional dependence, treatment goals can be defined for both preventive and therapeutic interventions. For example, a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength could be treated to prevent the onset of mobility disability, or a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength with mobility disability could be treated therapeutically to improve mobility. Eligibility for a trial should also be based on careful consideration of factors that affect 1) the ability to respond to treatment, 2) the safety of treatment, 3) expected prevalence and 4) feasibility. PMID:19657558

  12. Pharmacogenomics in cardiovascular clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shah, R; Darne, B; Atar, D; Abadie, E; Adams, K F; Zannad, F

    2004-12-01

    Genomics - having quickly emerged as the central discipline in basic science and biomedical research - is poised to take the center stage in clinical medicine as well over the next few decades. Although there is no specific regulatory guideline on the application of pharmacogenetics to drug development, some recommendations are already included in several published guidelines on drug development. The patients more likely to provide the most valuable information on the specific contribution of a given gene or its variant are those who fail to respond to a drug ('therapeutic failures') and those who develop toxicity to the drug. However, before drawing definite conclusions on subgroups following pharmacogenomic analyses, one must be aware of disease classification, data collection, and how much is known about the disease process. It seems reasonable to collect genomic DNA from all patients enrolled in clinical drug trials (along with appropriate consent to permit pharmacogenetic studies) for the purpose of post hoc analyses. One exception to post hoc genomic analysis is when patients with a specific genotype are excluded from randomization into a clinical trial. Physicians will need to understand the concept of genetic variability, its interactions with the environment (e.g. drug-drug or drug-disease interactions), and its implication for patient care. PMID:15548243

  13. Prior to Conception: The Role of an Acupuncture Protocol in Improving Women's Reproductive Functioning Assessed by a Pilot Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Suzanne; Smith, Caroline A.; Possamai-Inesedy, Alphia; Bensoussan, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The global average of couples with fertility problems is 9%. Assisted reproductive technologies are often inaccessible. Evidence points to acupuncture offering an opportunity to promote natural fertility. This study asked whether providing a multiphasic fertility acupuncture protocol to women with sub/infertility would increase their awareness of fertility and achieve normalisation of their menstrual cycle compared with a lifestyle control. In a pragmatic randomised controlled trial sub/infertile women were offered an intervention of acupuncture and lifestyle modification or lifestyle modification only. There was a statistically significant increase in fertility awareness in the acupuncture group (86.4%, 19) compared to 40% (n = 8) of the lifestyle only participants (Relative Risk (RR) 2.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.25, 4.50), with an adjusted p value of 0.011. Changes in menstrual regularity were not statistically significant. There was no statistical difference in the pregnancy rate with seven women (adjusted p = 0.992) achieving pregnancy during the course of the study intervention. Those receiving the acupuncture conceived within an average of 5.5 weeks compared to 10.67 weeks for the lifestyle only group (p = 0.422). The acupuncture protocol tested influenced women who received it compared to women who used lifestyle modification alone: their fertility awareness and wellbeing increased, and those who conceived did so in half the time. PMID:27242910

  14. Clinical trials and gender medicine.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Mariarita; Zuber, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22%) which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa) which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society. PMID:21430348

  15. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  16. What Are Clinical Trials? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified ...

  17. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  18. Acupuncture and Immune Function in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Liong, Men Long; Yuen, Kah Hay; Krieger, John N

    2014-01-01

    Objective The immune system has been implicated as one mechanism underlying the benefits of acupuncture therapy. Evidence suggests that acupuncture can ameliorate symptoms of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), but the association between clinical response and the immune system has not been investigated. Design/Setting We investigated 12 CP/CPPS patients participating in a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing acupuncture versus sham acupuncture for effects on cellular immunity. Blood samples were taken before the first needling and after the last of 20 treatment sessions (week 10). Patients also completed questionnaires examining their CP/CPPS symptoms and mood status at the baseline and end of study visits. Results At the end of study 8 of 12 participants (67%) were classified as treatment responders, 4 participants each from the acupuncture and sham groups. The acupuncture group averaged a 5% increase in natural killer cell levels compared to corresponding sham (-13%; p=0.03). Similarly, patients randomized to acupuncture reported a reduction in other white blood cell parameters examined, supporting the possibility that immunity might be important in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS. Conclusions The specific effect of acupuncture on CP/CPPS remains unclear. Further research is warranted to examine the mechanisms by which acupuncture therapy may improve clinical symptoms in patients with CP/CPPS. PMID:25453515

  19. Developing clinical trials for biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Bui, Lynne A; Taylor, Carrie

    2014-02-01

    Biosimilars offer the prospect of providing efficacious and safe treatment options for many diseases, including cancer, while potentially increasing accessibility with greater affordability relative to biologics. Because biologics are large, complex molecules that cannot be exactly duplicated, biosimilars cannot be considered "generic" versions of biologic drugs. This review will examine important considerations for biosimilar clinical trials. Since the aim of biosimilar manufacturing is to produce a molecule highly similar to the reference biologic, a comparability exercise is needed to demonstrate similarity with the reference biologic product based on physicochemical characterization. In vitro analytical studies and in vivo studies as well as pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) assessments also are conducted. Lastly, because it may not be possible to fully characterize a biosimilar in relation to its reference biologic, robust pharmacovigilance strategies are utilized to ensure that any matters in regard to safety can be monitored. Other key topics will be discussed, including regulatory guidance for the evaluation of biosimilars, clinical trial design considerations, and whether data submitted for the approval of a biosimilar for one indication can be extrapolated to other indications for which the reference biologic is approved. European and Canadian experiences in biosimilar development will be reviewed. PMID:24560024

  20. Contraceptive development and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fraser, I S

    1986-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the contraceptive development process, with particular emphasis on the importance of clinical trials. Development of a new contraceptive drug begins with chemical synthesis of a large number of substances that may have antifertility effects. Before human trials are considered, drugs must undergo a complex process of animal toxicology testing. Such studies assess acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity. Once a drug has passed the initial screening process, human testing must follow a logical sequence of clinical trials: phase I, pharmacology testing; phase II, initial assessment of efficacy, safety, acceptability, and ease of use; phase III, acurate assessment of efficacy, side effects, and reasons for discontinuation under controlled conditions; and phase IV, evaluation of effectiveness under field conditions. When these have been satisfactorily completed, a detailed marketing application must be submitted to the drug regulatory agency in each country. The process of assessment of the application often takes as long as 2 years. Once marketing approval has been received, there is still a need for postmarketing surveillance of the performance of the new contraceptive method. In many cases, a careful program of training is required. Among the research and recording strategies for postmarketing surveillance are voluntary recording of possible adverse reactions, longterm prospective cohort studies, retrospective case-control studies, and registered release. As controls on the safety and performance of new contraceptive methods are being tightened, the time scale and costs of development are increasing. The time from the 1st synthesis of a drug to marketing approval often takes 13-14 years and costs US$25-50 million. Since the patent life of a new substance is limited to 17 years in most countries, pharmaceutical companies have little time to recoup development costs, which has caused fewer new methods to be developed. PMID:3708511

  1. Acupuncture for Limb Conditions: Pinpointing the Evidence.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture therapies include a range of interventions and are commonly used for managing musculoskeletal disorders of the extremities; however, their use is still controversial. A study published in the June 2016 issue of JOSPT conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of various acupuncture therapies for any musculoskeletal condition affecting the limbs. Importantly, the review critically appraised the quality of the evidence to reveal risks of bias. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating patients with such musculoskeletal conditions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):430. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0502. PMID:27245489

  2. [Acupuncture and tuina clinical thoughts of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinlong; Li, Rui

    2015-07-01

    In clinical treatment, it is found that certain patients always have some positive reaction points those are relevant with low back pain in the abdomen area. When the simple treatment on the low back is ineffective, the efficacy could be significantly improved if acupuncture or tuina is performed at the abdomen areas, which is called "regulating yin to treat yang", or "treating the back from abdomen". In this paper, with the diagnosis and treatment method of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain as principal line, the detailed manipulation is explained for low back pain that is induced by TCM meridian diseases or modern anatomy, which could open the methods for clinical treatment of low back pain and enrich the therapeutic options. PMID:26521591

  3. Genomic sequencing in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human genome sequencing is the process by which the exact order of nucleic acid base pairs in the 24 human chromosomes is determined. Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, genomic sequencing is rapidly becoming a major part of our translational research efforts to understand and improve human health and disease. This article reviews the current and future directions of clinical research with respect to genomic sequencing, a technology that is just beginning to find its way into clinical trials both nationally and worldwide. We highlight the currently available types of genomic sequencing platforms, outline the advantages and disadvantages of each, and compare first- and next-generation techniques with respect to capabilities, quality, and cost. We describe the current geographical distributions and types of disease conditions in which these technologies are used, and how next-generation sequencing is strategically being incorporated into new and existing studies. Lastly, recent major breakthroughs and the ongoing challenges of using genomic sequencing in clinical research are discussed. PMID:22206293

  4. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  5. GP Participation and Recruitment of Patients to RCTs: Lessons from Trials of Acupuncture and Exercise for Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Syer, Sally E. M.; Thorpe, Lucy N.; Thomas, Kate; MacPherson, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with general practitioner (GP) participation and the recruitment of people to trials in primary care, based on data from two trials of interventions for treating chronic low back pain. The study was based on data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs), one involving exercise, the other acupuncture, and subsequent reporting by GPs in a postal questionnaire. The exercise trial achieved 62% recruitment whereas the acupuncture trial achieved 100% recruitment. In both trials GPs most efficient at referring patients were those with a special interest in the subject area, and those known personally to the research team. A follow-up GP questionnaire found that both trials had maintained a high profile with over 80% of GPs, and successful recruitment strategies included project reminder letters, updates and personal contacts. Achieving target recruitment of patients in the acupuncture trial was aided by the deliberate application of lessons learned in the exercise trial, in particular the need to keep initial study entry criteria broad, with subsequent filtering undertaken by the study researcher. In addition the use of effective methods of maintaining the trial profile, the involvement of a GP advisor, the decision to maximize the recruitment of GPs early in the trial and the direct recruitment of interested individual GPs. The successful recruitment of patients to trials in primary care requires careful planning and continuous monitoring from the outset. Prior to starting recruitment, it is useful to identify previous trials in a similar environment in order to learn from their experience and optimize patient recruitment. PMID:18955352

  6. International Clinical Trial Day and clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, Abebaw; Teferra, Solomon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige; Addissie, Adamu; Deressa, Wakgari; Yimer, Getnet; Reja, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Low income countries like Ethiopia are underrepresented in clinical research. As a major public commitment to clinical research, Ethiopia celebrated the International Clinical Trial Day (ICTD) for the first time on 20 May 2014 under the auspices of Addis Ababa University. The motto for the day was 'Clinical Trials for Excellence in Patient Care'. The celebration offered an opportunity to inform academic staff, researchers, students and the leadership about clinical trials being conducted and to discuss the future of clinical trials in the country. Although clear challenges to the conduct of trials abound, clinical trials registered from Ethiopia in trial registration databases is increasing. Cross-country collaborations, international funding support, motivation of academic staff to conduct clinical trials and the commitment and engagement of the leadership in research are all improving. The overall impact of clinical trials is also encouraging. For example, some of the trials conducted in Ethiopia have informed treatment guidelines. However, administrative capacity, research infrastructure as well as financial support remain weak. There is a need for enhanced university-industry linkage and translation of research findings into locally relevant evidence. Ethiopia, as well as the whole of Africa, has an unparalleled opportunity to lead the way in clinical trials, given its prospect of development and the need to have locally relevant evidence for its growing population. In this commentary we reflect on the celebration of ICTD, the status and opportunities for conducting clinical trials and the way forward for facilitating clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa. PMID:25526797

  7. Analyzing the study of using acupuncture in delivery in the past ten years in china.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingru; Zhang, Xuekai; Fang, Yigong; Yang, Jinsheng

    2014-01-01

    The use of acupuncture in inducing delivery has a long history in China. With progress over time, it has been applied in many aspects. For further study of acupuncture in delivery, this paper analyzed the papers using acupuncture in delivery in the past ten years in mainland China. 87 literatures were picked out by searching relevant electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant journals. The analysis showed randomized controlled trials that were the major type of research, while preclinical researches and literature reviews only account for around ten percent, respectively. Clinical researches indicated that acupuncture can relieve labor pain, promote maternal uterine contraction, shorten birth process, and treat postpartum disorders. Preclinical researches found that acupuncture can adjust certain hormones and improve uterus contraction of late-stage pregnant rats. However, due to lack of large multicenter randomized controlled clinical trials, standardized evaluations of clinical effects in clinical researches and detailed mechanism study in preclinical researches and unequivocal conclusions about the effectiveness, efficacy, and mechanisms of acupuncture in this field cannot be obtained from those researches yet. Further clinical and preclinical studies about the use of acupuncture in delivery with improved methodology is still needed. PMID:24688593

  8. Analyzing the Study of Using Acupuncture in Delivery in the Past Ten Years in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingru; Zhang, Xuekai; Fang, Yigong; Yang, Jinsheng

    2014-01-01

    The use of acupuncture in inducing delivery has a long history in China. With progress over time, it has been applied in many aspects. For further study of acupuncture in delivery, this paper analyzed the papers using acupuncture in delivery in the past ten years in mainland China. 87 literatures were picked out by searching relevant electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant journals. The analysis showed randomized controlled trials that were the major type of research, while preclinical researches and literature reviews only account for around ten percent, respectively. Clinical researches indicated that acupuncture can relieve labor pain, promote maternal uterine contraction, shorten birth process, and treat postpartum disorders. Preclinical researches found that acupuncture can adjust certain hormones and improve uterus contraction of late-stage pregnant rats. However, due to lack of large multicenter randomized controlled clinical trials, standardized evaluations of clinical effects in clinical researches and detailed mechanism study in preclinical researches and unequivocal conclusions about the effectiveness, efficacy, and mechanisms of acupuncture in this field cannot be obtained from those researches yet. Further clinical and preclinical studies about the use of acupuncture in delivery with improved methodology is still needed. PMID:24688593

  9. Traditional Chinese Acupuncture and Placebo (Sham) Acupuncture Are Differentiated by Their Effects on μ-Opioid Receptors (MORs)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Richard E.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Scott, David J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Gracely, Richard H.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy remains regarding the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia. A prevailing theory, largely unproven in humans, is that it involves the activation of endogenous opioid antinociceptive systems and μ-opioid receptors (MORs). This is also a neurotransmitter system that mediates the effects of placebo-induced analgesia. This overlap in potential mechanisms may explain the lack of differentiation between traditional acupuncture and either non-traditional or sham acupuncture in multiple controlled clinical trials. We compared both short- and long-term effects of traditional Chinese acupuncture (TA) versus sham acupuncture (SA) treatment on in vivo MOR binding availability in chronic pain patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FM). Patients were randomized to receive either TA or SA treatment over the course of four weeks. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-carfentanil was performed once during the first treatment session and then repeated a month later following the eighth treatment. Acupuncture therapy evoked short-term increases in MOR binding potential, in multiple pain and sensory processing regions including the cingulate (dorsal and subgenual), insula, caudate, thalamus, and amygdala. Acupuncture therapy also evoked long-term increases in MOR binding potential in some of the same structures including the cingulate (dorsal and perigenual), caudate, and amygdala. These short- and long-term effects were absent in the sham group where small reductions were observed, an effect more consistent with previous placebo PET studies. Long-term increases in MOR BP following TA were also associated with greater reductions in clinical pain. These findings suggest that divergent MOR processes may mediate clinically relevant analgesic effects for acupuncture and sham acupuncture. PMID:19501658

  10. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Patrick I.

    2014-01-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria. PMID:25013247

  11. Why are clinical trials necessary in India?

    PubMed Central

    Poongothai, Subramani; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Balasubramanian, Jeyakumar; Nair, Mohan Damodaran; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are emerging as an important activity in India as it is an essential component of the drug discovery and development program to which India is committed. The only robust way to evaluate a new medicine is by doing properly designed clinical trials. In addition to advancing science, clinical trials offer myriad benefits to the participants. The recent hue that created in India about clinical trials is probably an exaggeration of facts. However, these points to the need for ensuring proper compliance with the regulatory norms and proper training of concerned personnel in good clinical practice (GCP). This will ensure that India continues to reap the benefits of clinical trials and also become a world leader in this field. PMID:24741480

  12. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Alex D; Conway, David I; Macdonald, Tom M; McInnes, Gordon T

    2009-11-01

    Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidance on good clinical practice (GCP), arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe. PMID:19918557

  13. Enhancing clinical evidence by proactively building quality into clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Glessner, Coleen; Behm, Mark; Mulinde, Jean; Roach, Nancy; Sweeney, Fergus; Tenaerts, Pamela; Landray, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stakeholders across the clinical trial enterprise have expressed concern that the current clinical trial enterprise is unsustainable. The cost and complexity of trials have continued to increase, threatening our ability to generate reliable evidence essential for making appropriate decisions concerning the benefits and harms associated with clinical interventions. Overcoming this inefficiency rests on improving protocol design, trial planning, and quality oversight. Methods: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a project to evaluate methods to prospectively build quality into the scientific and operational design of clinical trials (“quality-by-design”), such that trials are feasible to conduct and important errors are prevented rather than remediated. A working group evaluated aspects of trial design and oversight and developed the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles document, outlining a series of factors generally relevant to the reliability of trial conclusions and to patient safety. These principles were then applied and further refined during a series of hands-on workshops to evaluate their utility in facilitating proactive, cross-functional dialogue, and decision-making about trial design and planning. Following these workshops, independent qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 workshop attendees to explore the potential challenges for implementing a quality-by-design approach to clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative project team subsequently developed recommendations and an online resource guide to support implementation of this approach. Conclusion: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative quality-by-design principles provide a framework for assuring that clinical trials adequately safeguard participants and provide reliable information on which to make decisions on the effects of treatments. The quality-by-design workshops highlighted the value of

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Special Acupuncture Technique for Pain after Thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gary; Rusch, Valerie; Vickers, Andrew; Malhortra, Vivek; Ginex, Pamela; Downey, Robert; Bains, Manjit; Park, Bernard; Rizk, Nabil; Flores, Raja; Yeung, Simon; Cassileth, Barrie

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an acupuncture technique specially developed for a surgical oncology population (intervention) reduces pain or analgesic use after thoracotomy compared to a sham acupuncture technique (control). Methods One hundred and sixty two cancer patients undergoing thoracotomy were randomized to group A) preoperative implantation of small intradermal needles which were retained for 4 weeks or B) preoperative placement of sham needles at the same schedule. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain and total opioid use we evaluated during the in-patient stay; Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and Medication Quantification Scale (MQS) were evaluated after discharge up to 3 months after the surgery. Results The principal analysis, a comparison of BPI pain intensity scores at the 30 day follow-up, showed no significant difference between the intervention and control group. Pain scores were marginally higher in the intervention group 0.05 (95% C.I.: 0.74, -0.64; p=0.9). There were also no statistically significant differences between groups for secondary endpoints, including chronic pain assessments at 60 and 90 days, in-patient pain, and medication use in hospital and after discharge. Conclusion A special acupuncture technique as provided in this study did not reduce pain or use of pain medication after thoracotomy more than a sham technique. PMID:19114190

  15. How transparent are migraine clinical trials?

    PubMed Central

    Dufka, Faustine L.; Dworkin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Transparency in research requires public access to unbiased information prior to trial initiation and openly available results upon study completion. The Repository of Registered Migraine Trials is a global snapshot of registered migraine clinical trials and scorecard of results availability via the peer-reviewed literature, registry databases, and gray literature. The 295 unique clinical trials identified employed 447 investigational agents, with 30% of 154 acute migraine trials and 11% of 141 migraine prophylaxis trials testing combinations of agents. The most frequently studied categories in acute migraine trials were triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiemetics, calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists, and acetaminophen. Migraine prophylaxis trials frequently studied anticonvulsants, β-blockers, complementary/alternative therapies, antidepressants, and botulinum toxin. Overall, 237 trials were eligible for a results search. Of 163 trials completed at least 12 months earlier, 57% had peer-reviewed literature results, and registries/gray literature added another 13%. Using logistic regression analysis, studies with a sample size below the median of 141 subjects were significantly less likely to have results, but the dominant factor associated with availability of results was time since study completion. In unadjusted models, trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and trials with industry primary sponsorship were significantly more likely to have results. Recently completed trials rarely have publicly available results; 2 years after completion, the peer-reviewed literature contains results for fewer than 60% of completed migraine trials. To avoid bias, evidence-based therapy algorithms should consider factors affecting results availability. As negative trials are less likely to be published, special caution should be exercised before recommending a therapy with a high proportion of missing trial results. PMID:25194013

  16. Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot; McDonough, Suzanne; Mabire, Leon; Baxter, George David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area. PMID:25821485

  17. Prudent precaution in clinical trials of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Lindor, Rachel A

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials of nanotechnology medical products present complex risk management challenges that involve many uncertainties and important risk-risk trade-offs. This paper inquires whether the precautionary principle can help to inform risk management approaches to nanomedicine clinical trials. It concludes that prudent precaution may be appropriate for ensuring the safety of such trials, but that the precautionary principle itself, especially in its more extreme forms, does not provide useful guidance for specific safety measures. PMID:23289685

  18. Acupuncture ( zhēn jiǔ) - an emerging adjunct in routine oral care.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Swapnadeep; Mehta, Parul; Indra, B Niranjanaprasad; Rastogi, Saurabh; Jain, Ankita; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Sharma, Saumya; Singh, Sanjeev; Gill, Shruti; Singh, Nisha; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) ('acus' (needle) + 'punctura' (to puncture)) is the stimulation of specific points along the skin of the body involving various methods such as penetration by thin needles or the application of heat, pressure, or laser light. Acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) aims to treat a range of medical and dental ailments, though is most commonly used for pain relief. This article reviews about the various possible roles of acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) in clinical dental practice. Acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) has potential in supplementing conventional treatment procedures by its diverse applicability outreach. Role of acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) in dental practice has been well supported by clinical trials. Its role in alleviating facial pain, pre-operative and post-operative dental pain has led to its widespread application. Its role as sole analgesic for treatment procedure has to be tested. It's It is a thought that acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) may prove an indispensible supplement to conventional treatment modalities and more of clinical trials and studies are required to prove the efficacy. Acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) is not a miracle cure and is not going to replace the drill. However, the technique can be a supplement to conventional treatments in TMDs, facial pain, pain management Sjoegrens syndrome, and in phobias and anxiety. The application and use of Acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ) comes with some side effects. Proper training needs to be obtained before commencement of any procedure related to acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ). Various training programs are offered to train clinical practitioners the apt method to use acupuncture ( Zhēn Jiǔ). PMID:25379462

  19. [Standardizing the manipulation procedure of acupuncture-moxibustion, reinforcing the training of' clinical skill: learning experience of Acupuncture-moxibustion Clinical Skills Training: Chapter of Commonly Used Needling and Moxibustion Techniques].

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongfang; Yang, Chao; Tang, Jie; Qin, Qiuguo; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhao, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    The book Acupuncture-moxibustion Clinical Skills Training is one of "Twelfth Five-Year Plan" in novative teaching materials, which is published by People's Medical Publishing House. Through learning the first half of the book commonly used needling and moxibustion techniques, it is realized that the selection of book content is reasonable and much attention is paid to needling and moxibustion techniques; the chapter arrangement is well-organized, and the form is novel, which is concise and intuitive; for every technique, great attention is paid to standardize the manipulation procedure and clarify the technique key, simultaneously the safety of acupuncture and moxibustion is also emphasized. The characteristics of the book, including innovativeness, practicability, are highlighted, and it greatly helps to improve students' clinical skills and examination ability. PMID:26521599

  20. The Cooperative Landscape of Multinational Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hsiehchen, David; Espinoza, Magdalena; Hsieh, Antony

    2015-01-01

    The scale and nature of cooperative efforts spanning geopolitical borders in clinical research have not been elucidated to date. In a cross-sectional study of 110,428 interventional trials registered in Clinicaltrials.gov, we characterized the evolution, trial demographics, and network properties of multinational clinical research. We reveal that the relative growth of international collaboratives has remained stagnant in the last two decades, although clinical trials have evolved to become much larger in scale. Multinational clinical trials are also characterized by higher patient enrollments, industry funding, and specific clinical disciplines including oncology and infectious disease. Network analyses demonstrate temporal shifts in collaboration patterns between countries and world regions, with developing nations now collaborating more within themselves, although Europe remains the dominant contributor to multinational clinical trials worldwide. Performances in network centrality measures also highlight the differential contribution of nations in the global research network. A city-level clinical trial network analysis further demonstrates how collaborative ties decline with physical distance. This study clarifies evolving themes and highlights potential growth mechanisms and barriers in multinational clinical trials, which may be useful in evaluating the role of national and local policies in organizing transborder efforts in clinical endeavors. PMID:26103155

  1. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:27555221

  2. Acupuncture in the treatment of obesity: a narrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Belivani, Maria; Dimitroula, Charikleia; Katsiki, Niki; Apostolopoulou, Martha; Cummings, Mike; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is one of the leading health risk factors worldwide and is associated with several other risk factors and health problems including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and malignancies. Current conventional therapeutic strategies for obesity cannot achieve adequate weight control in all patients, so complementary types of treatment are also performed. Acupuncture, one of the oldest healing practices, represents the most rapidly growing complementary therapy which is recognised by both the National Institutes of Health and the WHO. A previous review concluded that acupuncture was superior to lifestyle advice, to sham acupuncture and to conventional medication. In this narrative review, the possible mechanisms of actions and the results of recent experimental and clinical studies with different forms of acupuncture (eg, body, auricular, manual and electroacupuncture) are presented. In particular, the effects of acupuncture on anorexigenic and orexigenic peptides, insulin resistance, lipid metabolism and inflammatory markers are discussed. Both experimental and clinical current data suggest that acupuncture exerts beneficial effects on the mechanisms of obesity. Some data suggest that electroacupuncture may be more effective than manual acupuncture; however, the most effective frequency remains controversial. Combination of different forms of acupuncture with diet and exercise seems to be necessary for achieving and maintaining weight loss.  Further prospective clinical trials are needed to establish the effectiveness of this complementary method for obesity treatment. PMID:23153472

  3. Lessons learned from radiation oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J; Stone, Helen B; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2013-11-15

    A workshop entitled "Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials" was held on December 7-8, 2011, in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted radiation oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the preclinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, and to consider possible solutions to these challenges for the design of future clinical trials. Several themes emerged from the discussions: (i) opportunities to learn from null-hypothesis trials through tissue and imaging studies; (ii) value of preclinical data supporting the design of combinatorial therapies; (iii) significance of validated biomarkers; (iv) necessity of quality assurance in radiotherapy delivery; (v) conduct of sufficiently powered studies to address the central hypotheses; and (vi) importance of publishing results of the trials regardless of the outcome. The fact that well-designed hypothesis-driven clinical trials produce null or negative results is expected given the limitations of trial design and complexities of cancer biology. It is important to understand the reasons underlying such null results, however, to effectively merge the technologic innovations with the rapidly evolving biology for maximal patient benefit through the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24043463

  4. Methodology Series Module 4: Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually) divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care). We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1) parallel study design, (2) cross-over design, (3) factorial design, and (4) withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV) or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials). Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an “open trial.” However, many of the trials are not open – they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India. PMID:27512184

  5. Methodology Series Module 4: Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually) divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care). We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1) parallel study design, (2) cross-over design, (3) factorial design, and (4) withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV) or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials). Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an "open trial." However, many of the trials are not open - they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India. PMID:27512184

  6. Personalized medicine: ethics for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sharrer, G Terry

    2012-01-01

    Modern ethical codes in medicine were developed following World War II to provide respect for persons, beneficence, and justice in clinical research. Clinical trial medicine involves greater scrutiny than most research activities. In every instance, clinical trials have institutional review boards to ensure the medical procedure under study complies with regulatory requirements, privacy, informed consent, good practices, safety monitoring, adverse events reporting, and is free of conflicting interests. Mandatory training in medical ethics for all clinical staff is becoming more common, and at some institutions, knowledgeable patient advocates play a watchdog role. In personalized medicine, each patient becomes a clinical trial of one, based on the uniqueness of the person's illness and the relatively tailored treatment. These features imply a shared responsibility between the patient and the researchers because uncertainty exists over the outcome for each individual patient. This chapter introduces ethical considerations using case studies, with historical context, and describes general ethical guidelines for initiating a clinical trial. PMID:22081337

  7. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep K

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  8. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI).

    PubMed

    Grignolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) is a public-private partnership created in 2007 between the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Duke University for the purpose of identifying practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials. The initiative was generated from the realization that the clinical trials system in the United States has been suffering as a result of increasingly longer study start-up times, slowing enrollment of patients into trials, increasing clinical trial costs, and declining investigator interest in participating in clinical trials. Although CTTI was created to address a crisis for US clinical research, it seeks to identify practice improvements that can be applied internationally, and is therefore engaging international collaborators with international efforts that have similar objectives. CTTI's approach is to involve all sectors in the selection, conduct, and interpretation of its projects; to keep the dialogue open across sectors; to provide evidence that can influence regulatory guidance, and to attempt to create a "level playing field" when recommending change. The hope is that a broad and diverse data-driven discussion of the important issues in clinical trials will lead to meaningful change for the benefit of all concerned, and importantly for patients. PMID:21430332

  9. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    PubMed

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-01-01

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs. PMID:23561044

  10. Multiple comparisons in complex clinical trial designs.

    PubMed

    Hung, H M James; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2013-05-01

    Multiple comparisons have drawn a great deal of attention in evaluation of statistical evidence in clinical trials for regulatory applications. As the clinical trial methodology is increasingly more complex to properly take into consideration many practical factors, the multiple testing paradigm widely employed for regulatory applications may not suffice to interpret the results of an individual trial and of multiple trials. In a large outcome trial, an increasing need of studying more than one dose complicates a proper application of multiple comparison procedures. Additional challenges surface when a special endpoint, such as mortality, may need to be tested with multiple clinical trials combined, especially under group sequential designs. Another interesting question is how to study mortality or morbidity endpoints together with symptomatic endpoints in an efficient way, where the former type of endpoints are often studied in only one single trial but the latter type of endpoints are usually studied in at least two independent trials. This article is devoted to discussion of insufficiency of such a widely used paradigm applying only per-trial based multiple comparison procedures and to expand the utility of the procedures to such complex trial designs. A number of viable expanded strategies are stipulated. PMID:23620458

  11. Globalization of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies are increasingly being tested in global clinical trials. A search of ClincalTrials.gov revealed that of 269 currently active trials, 28% are currently being conducted in the United States; the majority of trials and the majority of trial sites are ex-US. The US has the largest number of trial sites of any single country; cumulatively, nearly half of all sites are outside the US. The US conducts more trials in all phases of drug development but has a greater proportion of phase 3 trials. The increasing importance of global participants in clinical trials emphasizes the importance of considering the ethnic and international factors that may influence trial outcome. The International Conference on Harmonization guidelines divide ethnic factors that may affect drug development into intrinsic and extrinsic influences. These include language, cultural factors, educational levels, the general level of health and standard of care, as well as nutrition and diet. Ethnic influences on pharmacokinetics are known for some metabolic pathways. The biology of AD may also differ among the world's populations. The frequency of the apolipoprotein e4 allele, a major risk factor for AD, differs internationally. Genetic variations might also affect inflammatory, excitotoxic, and oxidative components of AD. Diagnostic standards and experience vary from country to country. Levels of practitioner training and experience, diagnostic approaches to AD, and attitudes regarding aging and AD may differ. Experience and sophistication with regard to clinical trial conduct also vary within and between countries. Experience with conducting the necessary examinations, as well as the linguistic and cultural validity of instrument translations, may affect trial outcomes. Operational and regulatory aspects of clinical trials vary and provide important barriers to seamless conduct of multiregional clinical trials. Collection and testing of biological samples, continuous

  12. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors. PMID:18028537

  13. Trials on Trial: The Push for Clinical Data Disclosure

    PubMed Central

    CARROLL, JOHN

    2004-01-01

    Momentum is growing for disclosure of all clinical trial data, not just information that supports a trial sponsor’s product. The importance to patients and P&T committees is clear: Ideally, they would use this information to make informed decisions. The result of this activity, though, could be a cacophony of competing registries with the potential to muddy the very waters they’re designed to clear up. PMID:23390393

  14. IPF clinical trial design and endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Steven D.; Meyer, Keith C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review There remains a dire need for therapies that impact the clinical course of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Indeed, there is a surge of interest in IPF therapeutics, with many candidate agents in various stages of development. Optimal design and implementation of the appropriate prospective clinical trials are essential to demonstrate clinical efficacy of promising drugs for the treatment of IPF. A key element in the success of such clinical trials is the choice of the best endpoint(s) to match the design of the study. Recent findings Although the results of many IPF clinical trials have been disappointing, these trials have provided valuable insights into the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and have sparked debate into the best clinical trial designs and endpoints. Summary This review will discuss the various clinical trial endpoints that have been used or proposed with a focus on their potential utility, as well as possible pitfalls that investigators should consider in the design of such studies. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/COPM/A13 PMID:25022315

  15. Perioperative Acupuncture and Related Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory V.; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2005-01-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are increasingly practiced in conventional medical settings, and the number of patients willing to use these techniques is increasing. Despite more than 30 years of research, the exact mechanism of action and efficacy of acupuncture have not been established. Furthermore, most aspects of acupuncture have yet to be adequately tested. There thus remains considerable controversy about the role of acupuncture in clinical medicine. Acupuncture apparently does not reduce volatile anesthetic requirement by a clinically important amount. However, preoperative sedation seems to be a promising application of acupuncture in perioperative settings. Acupuncture may be effective for postoperative pain relief but requires a high level of expertise by the acupuncture practitioner. Acupuncture and related techniques can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in routine clinical practice in combination with, or as an alternative to, conventional antiemetics when administered before induction of general anesthesia. Summary Statement: The use of acupuncture for perioperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, sedation, anesthesia, and complications is reviewed. PMID:15851892

  16. Randomized Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (1997–2007): An Assessment of Reporting Quality with a CONSORT- and STRICTA-Based Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Milley, Ryan; Colbert, Agatha; Weih, Jeffrey; Yohalem-Ilsley, Beth; Mist, Scott; Aickin, Mikel

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a comprehensive quality of reporting assessment tool and its application to acupuncture RCTs from 1997–2007. This Oregon CONSORT STRICTA Instrument (OCSI) is based on the revised CONSORT guidelines as modified by the STRICTA recommendations for acupuncture trials. Each of the resulting 27 OCSI items were applied to English language prospective RCTs that compared acupuncture, using manual and/or electro-stimulation, to no treatment, a sham procedure, or usual biomedical care. The 333 RCTs that met inclusion criteria were dispersed among 27 countries and 141 journals. Mean quality of reporting score for all articles was 63.0% (SD 16.5). Mean OCSI scores revealed a 30.9% improvement over the ten-year period (P < .001). Our findings suggest that to enhance quality of reporting, authors should better attend to seven specific OCSI items in three categories: practitioner training, adverse events, and aspects of randomization and blinding (n = 5). The broad diversity in geographical origin, publication site and quality of reporting, viewed in light of the considerable room for improvement in mean OCSI scores, emphasizes the importance of making STRICTA as well as CONSORT more widely known to journals and to the acupuncture research community. PMID:20953418

  17. Randomized Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (1997-2007): An Assessment of Reporting Quality with a CONSORT- and STRICTA-Based Instrument.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Milley, Ryan; Colbert, Agatha; Weih, Jeffrey; Yohalem-Ilsley, Beth; Mist, Scott; Aickin, Mikel

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a comprehensive quality of reporting assessment tool and its application to acupuncture RCTs from 1997-2007. This Oregon CONSORT STRICTA Instrument (OCSI) is based on the revised CONSORT guidelines as modified by the STRICTA recommendations for acupuncture trials. Each of the resulting 27 OCSI items were applied to English language prospective RCTs that compared acupuncture, using manual and/or electro-stimulation, to no treatment, a sham procedure, or usual biomedical care. The 333 RCTs that met inclusion criteria were dispersed among 27 countries and 141 journals. Mean quality of reporting score for all articles was 63.0% (SD 16.5). Mean OCSI scores revealed a 30.9% improvement over the ten-year period (P < .001). Our findings suggest that to enhance quality of reporting, authors should better attend to seven specific OCSI items in three categories: practitioner training, adverse events, and aspects of randomization and blinding (n = 5). The broad diversity in geographical origin, publication site and quality of reporting, viewed in light of the considerable room for improvement in mean OCSI scores, emphasizes the importance of making STRICTA as well as CONSORT more widely known to journals and to the acupuncture research community. PMID:20953418

  18. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. PMID:26135330

  19. A guide to clinical trials for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    There are strict federal rules in place to protect your safety during a clinical trial. Safety guidelines (protocols) are agreed to before the study begins. These guidelines are reviewed by health ...

  20. Subcutaneous electrical stimulation (acupuncture) in the clinical practice of physical medicine.

    PubMed

    Waylonis, G W

    1976-04-01

    There has been a rapid growth in both interest and concern over the value of acupuncture in this country during the last three years. Initially it was regarded with doubt, then with overwhelming interest, but only recently have any research data appeared as to its true value and applicability to western medicine. An acupuncture research project was initiated in November 1972 by the author to assess the immediate and long-range benefits of acupuncture in a group of 179 patients with various neuromuscular-skeletal pain and mobility problems. A total of 1,112 treatments have been administered. A follow-up survey of these patients was completed in October 1974 with 126 (70%) of the patients responding to a subjective questionnaire. In 49% of the patients the initial response to acupuncture treatments was some reduction of symptoms and in a significant percentage there was persistence of beneficial response for greater than three months. PMID:1083724

  1. Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongzhi; Fan, Huaying; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Yi, Xuebing; Dai, Guogang; Chen, Junrong; Tang, Liugang; Rong, Haibo; Wu, Junhua; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE). Methods. Seven databases and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal were searched to identify relevant studies. The data were extracted and assessed by two independent authors, and Review Manager Software (V.5.3) was used for data synthesis with effect estimate presented as standard mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the level of evidence. Results. Four RCTs with 309 participants were included with poor methodological quality. Participants who received acupuncture and acupuncture plus moxibustion with material insulation were likely to have an improvement in elbow functional status and/or myodynamia. The overall quality rated by GRADE was from very low to low. Two studies reported that the needle pain would be the main reason for the dropout. Conclusion. For the small number of included studies with poor methodological quality, no firm conclusion can be drawn regarding the effect of acupuncture of elbow functional status and myodynamia for LE. This trial is registered with CRD42015016199. PMID:26843886

  2. Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongzhi; Fan, Huaying; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Yi, Xuebing; Dai, Guogang; Chen, Junrong; Tang, Liugang; Rong, Haibo; Wu, Junhua; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE). Methods. Seven databases and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal were searched to identify relevant studies. The data were extracted and assessed by two independent authors, and Review Manager Software (V.5.3) was used for data synthesis with effect estimate presented as standard mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the level of evidence. Results. Four RCTs with 309 participants were included with poor methodological quality. Participants who received acupuncture and acupuncture plus moxibustion with material insulation were likely to have an improvement in elbow functional status and/or myodynamia. The overall quality rated by GRADE was from very low to low. Two studies reported that the needle pain would be the main reason for the dropout. Conclusion. For the small number of included studies with poor methodological quality, no firm conclusion can be drawn regarding the effect of acupuncture of elbow functional status and myodynamia for LE. This trial is registered with CRD42015016199. PMID:26843886

  3. Patient-reported Outcomes of Acupuncture for Symptom Control in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lora M A; Osian, Sarah Rausch; Jacobsen, Paul B; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2015-06-01

    Acupuncture is increasingly offered as a treatment option for managing cancer-related symptoms. In addition to randomized controlled trials, patient-reported outcomes may be needed to establish treatment effectiveness. This study retrospectively examined the symptoms and the satisfaction ratings of 90 patients receiving acupuncture at an integrative oncology clinic. At least two acupuncture sessions were completed by 72% of the sample. The prevalence rates of fatigue, pain, anxiety, physical distress, emotional distress, and poor quality of life before acupuncture were > 62%. Paired t tests revealed a significant reduction in symptoms from baseline until after the first acupuncture session and after the last session (p < 0.05). Fewer (21%) patients reported nausea, which was significantly reduced after the first session, but not the last session. Reductions represented clinically meaningful differences in 33-41% of patients after the first session and in 41-53% of patients after the last session for all symptoms, except nausea. A small subset of patients (0-8%) reported worsening symptoms after acupuncture. The majority were satisfied with the service. The results of this study suggest that acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment for cancer symptom management. While high-quality trials are still needed to establish the treatment's efficacy, patients may benefit from these primarily safe, low-cost services. PMID:26100066

  4. Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schnyer, Rosa; MacPherson, Hugh; Davis, Robert; Harris, Richard E.; Napadow, Vitaly; Wayne, Peter M.; Milley, Ryan J.; Lao, Lixing; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25710206

  5. Swiss regulations for controlling clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zanini, G M

    1998-04-01

    Switzerland has recently issued regulations designed to control all trials with drugs in human subjects, namely the 'Regolamento dell'Ufficio Intercantonale per il controllo dei medicamenti in fase di studio clinico' (Intercantonal Regulations Controlling Drugs used in Clinical Trials), which have been operating since 1st January 1995. These new regulations are generally consistent with other international regulations and have introduced the concept of good clinical practice (GCP) into Switzerland. There are other regulations in Switzerland, such as Federal regulations on immunobiological products, special rules governing the administration of radiolabelled drugs to humans, drugs of abuse and medical devices. Any gap in the central regulations must be filled by cantonal regulations, where they exist. This is a comprehensive review of the regulations governing clinical trials in Switzerland, with special attention being devoted to trials with therapeutic compounds and to compatibility between Swiss and international procedures. PMID:9634649

  6. Are clinical trials really the answer?

    PubMed

    Block, G

    1995-12-01

    It has been asserted that clinical trials hold the answer to questions about the role of nutrients in preventing chronic diseases. This is not the case. Clinical trials give us rigorous answers to restricted questions. Rarely can more than one or two substances be tested, usually at a single dose. Subjects usually have to be persons with precancerous conditions or an extremely high risk of the disease in question. Rarely can any diseases other than the most common ones be studied. Most important, clinical trials test the efficacy of an agent that is administered for a limited time, beginning fairly late in life. Few trials will tell us anything about whether dietary amounts of nutrients might contribute to prevention of long-term chronic diseases. They also tell us nothing about whether agents at high doses might reduce disease risk if taken throughout the lifetime. Furthermore, they tell us nothing about other antioxidants, other combinations, or other doses. Clinical trials were developed for therapeutic situations to determine which treatment was better for curing a specific disease. However, the questions about prevention that are of interest may involve persons with no unusual risk of disease, lifetimes of exposure, enormously complex interactions among nutrients, and the effects of these nutrients on hundreds of often uncommon disease conditions. Clinical trials simply cannot answer these questions. Only a solid examination of the laboratory and epidemiologic evidence can approximate the answers to most of the questions of interest. PMID:7495253

  7. Special article: 2014 Pediatric Clinical Trials Forum.

    PubMed

    Bogue, Clifford; DiMeglio, Linda A; Maldonado, Samuel; Portman, Ronald J; Smith, P Brian; Sullivan, Janice E; Thompson, Charles; Woo, Heide; Flinn, Susan

    2016-04-01

    In November 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened key stakeholders to discuss the feasibility of accelerating children's medical advances by creating an independent global Pediatric Clinical Trials Network. The Forum identified challenges posed by the US and global clinical trial systems regarding testing and disseminating drugs and devices for pediatric patients. Stakeholders mapped a vision to improve the safety and efficacy of pediatric drugs, biological products, and medical devices by creating a global Pediatric Clinical Trials Network. Such a Network would act as a central infrastructure for pediatric subspecialties and enable dedicated staff to provide clinical research sites with scientific, medical, and operational support. A Network would facilitate development and availability of innovative, high-quality therapies to extend and enhance the lives of neonates, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Participants expressed strong interest in forming such a Network, since drugs and devices still come to market without adequate pediatric indications-particularly in neonatology and rare diseases. Participants developed a Consensus Statement expressing their shared vision for a Network: Attendees of the Pediatric Clinical Trials Stakeholder Forum resolved to establish a Global Pediatric Clinical Trials Network and are committed to engage in the work to create and sustain it. PMID:26650344

  8. Choosing Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trial populations.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Monsell, Sarah E

    2014-03-01

    To assist investigators in making design choices, we modeled Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. We used longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes data, retention rates, and the proportions of trial-eligible cognitively normal participants age 65 and older in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to model trial sample sizes, the numbers needed to enroll to account for drop out, and the numbers needed to screen to successfully complete enrollment. We examined how enrichment strategies affected each component of the model. Relative to trials enrolling 65-year-old individuals, trials enriching for older (minimum 70 or 75) age required reduced sample sizes, numbers needed to enroll, and numbers needed to screen. Enriching for subjective memory complaints reduced sample sizes and numbers needed to enroll more than age enrichment, but increased the number needed to screen. We conclude that Alzheimer's disease prevention trials can enroll elderly participants with minimal effect on trial retention and that enriching for older individuals with memory complaints might afford efficient trial designs. PMID:24119546

  9. Social Media Ups Clinical Trial Enrollment.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    In just seven months, the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project has collected clinical and genetic data from more than 2,000 patients who learned about this effort from social media and volunteered to participate. The project could become a model for other cancer types where recruiting sufficient patients for clinical trials through traditional channels is often a challenge. PMID:27329925

  10. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  11. Research misconduct among clinical trial staff.

    PubMed

    Redman, Barbara K; Templin, Thomas N; Merz, Jon F

    2006-07-01

    Between 1993 and 2002, 39 clinical trial staff were investigated for scientific misconduct by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). Analysis of ORI case records reveals practices regarding workload, training and supervision that enable misconduct. Considering the potential effects on human subjects protection, quality and reliability of data, and the trustworthiness of the clinical research enterprise, regulations or guidance on use of clinical trial staff ought to be available. Current ORI regulations do not hold investigators or institutions responsible for supervision and training of clinical trial staff. Given the important issues at stake, the definition of research misconduct should encompass the intentional or negligent mismanagement of scientific projects. Individual institutions and professional associations not only can but should adopt stricter standards of conduct than those reflected in federal regulations. PMID:16909150

  12. [Meta analysis on acupuncture-moxibustion for amblyopia [correction of agrypnia] ].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Hua; Li, Tie; Han, Dong-Yue; Wang, Xi-Chen; Wang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-02-01

    The effectiveness and safety of acupuncture-moxibustion for the treatment of agrypnia was systematically reviewed. The clinical randomized controlled trial (RCT) of acupuncture-moxibustion for agrypnia were collected. The literature and document on acupuncture-moxibustion RCT for the treatment of agrypnia that published from January of 2001 to March of 2012 was searched with computer in PubMed, CNKI, Wanfang and VIP database. According to Cochrane Handbook 5. 1. 0, the bias risk and quality assessment were performed on every included trial and RevMan 5. 0 software was applied to make the Meta analysis. Totally 14 researches were included, involving 2662 cases. The Meta analysis showed that the differences of total effective rate between acupuncture-moxibustion and clinical routine treatment were significant [RR = 1.16, 95% CI (1.12, 1.19), Z = 9.32, P < 0.000 01]. The results indicate that total effective rate of acupuncture-moxibustion for agrypnia is obviously superior to that of clinical routine treatment, meaning clinical efficacy of acupuncture-moxibustion is served credit. PMID:24796072

  13. Can Acupuncture Treatment Be Double-Blinded? An Evaluation of Double-Blind Acupuncture Treatment of Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Takayama, Miho; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Kawase, Akiko; Schuster, Lars; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Blinding protects against bias but the success of blinding is seldom assessed and reported in clinical trials including studies of acupuncture where blinding represents a major challenge. Recently, needles with the potential for double-blinding were developed, so we tested if acupuncture can be double-blinded in a randomized study of sixty-seven patients with acute pain ≥ 3 (0-10 scale following third molar removal) who received active acupuncture with a penetrating needle or placebo acupuncture with a non-penetrating needle. To test if acupuncture was administered double-blind, patients and acupuncturists were asked about perceived treatment allocation at the end of the study. To test if there were clues which led to identification of the treatment, deep dull pain associated with needle application and rotation (termed “de qi” in East Asian medicine), and patients’ pain levels were assessed. Perceived treatment allocation depended on actual group allocation (p < 0.015) for both patients and acupuncturists, indicating that the needles were not successful in double-blinding. Up to 68% of patients and 83% of acupuncturists correctly identified the treatment, but for patients the distribution was not far from 50/50. Also, there was a significant interaction between actual or perceived treatment and the experience of de qi (p = 0.027), suggesting that the experience of de qi and possible non-verbal clues contributed to correct identification of the treatment. Yet, of the patients who perceived the treatment as active or placebo, 50% and 23%, respectively, reported de qi. Patients’ acute pain levels did not influence the perceived treatment. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment was not fully double-blinded which is similar to observations in pharmacological studies. Still, the non-penetrating needle is the only needle that allows some degree of practitioner blinding. The study raises questions about alternatives to double-blind randomized clinical trials in

  14. Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints In Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Thomas R.; Powers, John H

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important considerations in designing clinical trials is the choice of outcome measures. These outcome measures could be clinically meaningful endpoints that are direct measures of how patients feel, function and survive. Alternatively, indirect measures, such as biomarkers that include physical signs of disease, laboratory measures and radiological tests, often are considered as replacement endpoints or “surrogates” for clinically meaningful endpoints. We discuss the definitions of clinically meaningful endpoints and surrogate endpoints, and provide examples from recent clinical trials. We provide insight into why indirect measures such as biomarkers may fail to provide reliable evidence about the benefit-to-risk profile of interventions. We also discuss the nature of evidence that is important in assessing whether treatment effects on a biomarker reliably predict effects on a clinically meaningful endpoint, and provide insights into why this reliability is specific to the context of use of the biomarker. . PMID:22711298

  15. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials. PMID:22145122

  16. Clinical trial designs incorporating predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Renfro, Lindsay A; Mallick, Himel; An, Ming-Wen; Sargent, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J

    2016-02-01

    Development of oncologic therapies has traditionally been performed in a sequence of clinical trials intended to assess safety (phase I), preliminary efficacy (phase II), and improvement over the standard of care (phase III) in homogeneous (in terms of tumor type and disease stage) patient populations. As cancer has become increasingly understood on the molecular level, newer "targeted" drugs that inhibit specific cancer cell growth and survival mechanisms have increased the need for new clinical trial designs, wherein pertinent questions on the relationship between patient biomarkers and response to treatment can be answered. Herein, we review the clinical trial design literature from initial to more recently proposed designs for targeted agents or those treatments hypothesized to have enhanced effectiveness within patient subgroups (e.g., those with a certain biomarker value or who harbor a certain genetic tumor mutation). We also describe a number of real clinical trials where biomarker-based designs have been utilized, including a discussion of their respective advantages and challenges. As cancers become further categorized and/or reclassified according to individual patient and tumor features, we anticipate a continued need for novel trial designs to keep pace with the changing frontier of clinical cancer research. PMID:26827695

  17. Elderly patients’ participation in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Premnath; Harugeri, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The elderly population is a large and the fastest-growing portion of the population worldwide. The elderly make up the lion's share of patients for certain health conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and Parkinson's disease, among others in most parts of the world. Furthermore, elderly make up the majority of patients for many medications treating chronic conditions. Typically, clinical trials conducted in adult population include patients between the ages of 18 and 64 years. However, drugs should be studied in all age groups and trial participants should be representative of the patient population receiving the therapy in daily medical practice. Elderly patients are poorly represented in clinical trials. Hence, there is inadequate evidence and knowledge about responses of geriatric patients to medications. Regulatory authorities in developed countries urge to avoid arbitrary upper age limits and advise researchers and industry not to exclude elderly people from clinical trials without a valid reason. Since last few years Indian regulatory authority has been stipulating upper age limit for studies conducted in India. The Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) will be doing a great contribution to the researchers if it changes its view on stipulating upper age restrictions in clinical studies. This article describes the need for including elderly patients in the clinical trials in order to garner data from geriatric patients who form major medication users in most of the chronic diseases. PMID:26623388

  18. RECENT CLINICAL TRIALS IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Recent clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil as induction treatment for patients with proliferative lupus nephritis in comparative trials with standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Trials of maintenance treatments have had more variable results, but suggest that mycophenolate mofetil may be similar to quarterly standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and somewhat more efficacious than azathioprine. Differential responses to mycophenolate mofetil based on ethnicity suggest that it may be more effective in black and Hispanic patients. Rituximab was not efficacious as an adjunct to induction treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:25034160

  19. Sino-European Transcontinental Basic and Clinical High-Tech Acupuncture Studies—Part 1: Auricular Acupuncture Increases Heart Rate Variability in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin-Yan; Liu, Kun; Zhu, Bing; Litscher, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based research concerning the effects of high-tech acupuncture on autonomic function was performed by two research teams from China and Austria. This study describes the first transcontinental teleacupuncture measurements in animals. Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) recordings in 10 male Sprague-Dawley anesthetized rats were performed under stable conditions in Beijing, China, and the data analysis was completed in Graz, Austria. The electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded by an HRV Medilog AR12 system during acupuncture of the ear and body (PC6 Neiguan, CV12 Zhongwan, ST36 Zusanli). The data were analyzed using specially adapted novel Austrian software. HR did not change significantly during any acupuncture stimulation in anesthetized rats (ear acupuncture, PC6, CV12, or ST36). Total HRV only changed significantly (P = 0.025) during auricular acupuncture (acupoint heart). The low-frequency/high-frequency ratio parameter decreased significantly (P = 0.03) during stimulation of ST36. This change was based on intensification of the related mechanism of blood pressure regulation that has been demonstrated in previous studies in humans. Modernization of acupuncture research performed as a collaboration between China and Austria has also been demonstrated. PMID:22454685

  20. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  1. Advances in cardiology: clinical trial update.

    PubMed

    Howe, Andrew J; Shand, James A; Menown, Ian B A

    2011-05-01

    Multiple key cardiology trials have been presented or published over recent months, several with the potential to change clinical practice. In this article, we summarize and place in clinical context new trial findings regarding anticoagulation in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (enoxaparin, fondaparinux and unfractionated heparin), the implications of genetic polymorphisms and functional testing for antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and ticagrelor), new oral anticoagulants for use in atrial fibrillation (apixiban and rivaroxaban), optimal pacing strategies and pharmacological agents in heart failure (ivabradine, eplerenone, cardiac resynchronization therapy, telemonitoring and intracoronary bone marrow stem cell infusion). Clinical trials in percutaneous structural intervention (transcatheter aortic valve implantation, MONARC™ mitral annular implant, STARFlex(®) patent foramen ovale device) and advanced percutaneous coronary intervention (everolimus-eluting stents, biodegradable polymer/polymer-free technologies and contemporary use of intravascular ultrasound) are also discussed. PMID:21627472

  2. Disease-mongering through clinical trials.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, María; Saborido, Cristian; Teira, David

    2015-06-01

    Our goal in this paper is to articulate a precise concept of at least a certain kind of disease-mongering, showing how pharmaceutical marketing can commercially exploit certain diseases when their best definition is given through the success of a treatment in a clinical trial. We distinguish two types of disease-mongering according to the way they exploit the definition of the trial population for marketing purposes. We argue that behind these two forms of disease-mongering there are two well-known problems in the statistical methodology of clinical trials (the reference class problem and the distinction between statistical and clinical significance). Overcoming them is far from simple. PMID:25863220

  3. Participants’ Experiences of Being Debriefed to Placebo Allocation in a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Felicity L.; Jacobsen, Eric E.; Shaw, Jessica; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2013-01-01

    Participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials give informed consent to be randomized to verum or placebo. However, researchers rarely tell participants which treatment they actually received. We interviewed four participants in a trial of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome, before, during, and after they received a course of placebo treatments over six weeks. During the final interview, we informed participants that they had received a course of placebo treatments. We used an idiographic phenomenological approach based on the Sheffield School to describe each participant’s experiences of being blinded to and then debriefed to placebo allocation. Our participants’ experiences of blinding and debriefing were embodied, related to their goals in undertaking the study, and social (e.g., embedded in trusting and valued relationships with acupuncturists). We suggest ways in which debriefing to placebo allocation can be managed sensitively to facilitate positive outcomes for participants. PMID:22673094

  4. Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157996.html Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients Italian trial finds ... News) -- Acupuncture can help alleviate the often-debilitating hot flashes that afflict many breast cancer patients, new ...

  5. Ethical Issues in Clinical Trials Involving Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Tinkle, Sally S.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine shows tremendous promise for improving medical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, but it also raises a variety of ethical concerns. Because of the paucity of data on the physicochemical properties of nanoscale materials in biological systems, clinical trials of nanomedicine products present some unique challenges related to risk minimization, management and communication involving human subjects. Although these clinical trials do not raise any truly novel ethical issues, the rapid development of nanotechnology and its potentially profound social and environmental impacts, add a sense of urgency to the problems that arise. PMID:17166777

  6. Implications of Look AHEAD for Clinical Trials and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Look AHEAD was a randomized clinical trial designed to examine the long-term health effects of weight loss in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. The primary result was that the incidence of cardiovascular events over a median follow up of 9.6 years was not reduced in the intensive lifestyle group relative to the control group. This finding is discussed, with emphasis on its implications for design of clinical trials and clinical treatment of obese people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24853636

  7. Neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture for some common illnesses: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwokming James

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents some previously proposed neurobiological mechanisms on how acupuncture may work in some clinical applications from a clinician's perspective. For the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions, the proposed mechanisms included microinjury, increased local blood flow, facilitated healing, and analgesia. Acupuncture may trigger a somatic autonomic reflex, thereby affecting the gastric and cardiovascular functions. Acupuncture may also change the levels of neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, thereby affecting the emotional state and craving. This mechanism may form the basis for the treatment of smoking cessation. By affecting other pain-modulating neurotransmitters such as met-enkephalin and substance P along the nociceptive pathway, acupuncture may relieve headache. Acupuncture may affect the hypothalamus pituitary axis and reduce the release of the luteinizing hormone in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome. In addition, two other approaches to the acupuncture mechanism, the fascia connective tissue network and the primo vascular system, are briefly reviewed. Finally, the idea of true versus sham acupuncture points, which are commonly used in clinical trials, is examined because the difference between true and sham points does not exist in the neurobiological model. PMID:24929454

  8. Needle Sensation and Personality Factors Influence Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncture for Treating Bell's Palsy: A Secondary Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Yan; Xu, Sha-Bei; Huang, Bo; Du, Peng; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Luo, Xiang; Huang, Guang-Ying; Xie, Min-Jie; Zhou, Zong-Kui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has not been solved what kind of needle sensation might influence outcomes of acupuncture treatment. Effects of personality factors on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture have not been investigated. This study aimed to find the effects of the traits of personality on the objective outcome when different acupuncture techniques were used in treating patients with Bell's palsy. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial of acupuncture for Bell's palsy. Patients were randomly assigned to the de qi and control groups, respectively. The primary outcome was facial nerve function at month 6. The intensity of each needle sensation was rated by a visual analog scale. Psychosocial factors were assessed by the pretreatment mediator questionnaire; 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) was used for assessing personality factors and digit cancellation test for assessing attention. Results: After 6 months, patients in the de qi group had better facial function (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.23–7.78). Path analysis showed that intensity of needle sensation of fullness had direct effect on House-Brackmann (HB) score at month 6. In de qi group, the low HB score on day 1 (OR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03–0.45) and the low Social Boldness score (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.41–0.97) in 16PF were associated with better facial function. In control group, low HB score on day 1 (OR: 0.25, 95% CI: 0.13–0.50), low Vigilance score (OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.50–0.88), and high Tension score (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.12–1.77) in 16PF were related to better facial function. Conclusions: The needle sensation of fullness could predict better facial function and personality traits might influence outcomes of acupuncture treatment. Both of them should be considered seriously in acupuncture treatment and research. PMID:27453226

  9. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials. PMID:21851646

  10. Clinical trials at AHCs: the perspective of an academic clinical trials office.

    PubMed

    Paller, Mark S; Hostetler, Lisa; Dykhuis, Debra A

    2002-12-01

    Industry-sponsored clinical trials represent a substantial portion of the clinical investigator's portfolio of patient-oriented research. In academia's efforts to reclaim lost ground with respect to the performance of industry-sponsored clinical trials, many academic health centers have established clinical trials offices. An underlying assumption has been that with improved service on the part of universities will come new opportunities for clinical research. The experiences and vantage points of academic research offices have sometimes been ignored and an analysis of what new business might ensue has not been reported. The authors discuss the rationale for creating a centralized clinical trials office and the means of financing such an effort. They then describe the initial experiences (1997-2000) of a central clinical trials office (the Research Services Organization, or RSO) at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, analyze the value of such an office to the academic health center, and, based on their experiences with the RSO and elsewhere, consider how industry and academia might further enhance their collaborations. Of 354 clinical research proposals evaluated by the RSO, only 62% were found to be acceptable or highly likely to be acceptable to investigators and the institution. Reasons for not participating in specific clinical trials are discussed. Academic health centers contemplating developing clinical trials offices must be aware of the significant overhead cost associated with evaluating the appropriateness and feasibility of clinical trial proposals that may never be performed. Valuable lessons learned from working with sponsors and from working with investigators are also reviewed. PMID:12480622

  11. Building data quality into clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Crerand, William J; Lamb, Jana; Rulon, Vera; Karal, Bilun; Mardekian, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Meaningful data begin with the collection process. Pharmaceutical companies are using several different strategies in clinical trials to ensure the highest quality of data. This article will examine these approaches, with an emphasis on case report form development through database release. PMID:12432815

  12. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of depression: a study protocol for a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are the most common form of mental disorders in community and health care settings. Unfortunately, the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is far from satisfactory. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a relatively new and promising physical treatment for depressive disorders. One particularly appealing element of VNS is the long-term benefit in mood regulation. However, because this intervention involves surgery, perioperative risks, and potentially significant side effects, this treatment has been limited to those patients with treatment-resistant depression who have failed medication trials and exhausted established somatic treatments for major depression, due to intolerance or lack of response. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial aims to overcome these limitations by introducing a novel method of stimulating superficial branches of the vagus nerve on the ear to treat MDD. The rationale is that direct stimulation of the afferent nerve fibers on the ear area with afferent vagus nerve distribution should produce a similar effect as classic VNS in reducing depressive symptoms without the burden of surgical intervention. Design One hundred twenty cases (60 males) of volunteer patients with mild and moderate depression will be randomly divided into transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation group (tVNS) and sham tVNS group. The treatment period lasts 4 months and all clinical and physiological measurements are acquired at the beginning and the end of the treatment period. Discussion This study has the potential to significantly extend the application of VNS treatment for MDD and other disorders (including epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and morbid obesity), resulting in direct benefit to the patients suffering from these highly prevalent disorders. In addition, the results of this double-blinded clinical trial will shed new light on our understanding of acupuncture point specificity, and development of methodologies in clinical

  13. Consent to clinical trials in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J E; Sneyd, J R

    1998-03-01

    In order to evaluate satisfaction with, and recollection of, the consent process, we sent a postal questionnaire to 204 patients who had taken part in one of six clinical trials. Three trials were multicentre commercial studies and three were 'in house'. The readability of the different patient information sheets was compared. Seventy-seven per cent of patients responded, of whom 82% remembered having an information sheet. Most (99%) thought this was easy to read and understand. Five patients claimed that they had felt pressurised to take part in the trials. Nearly all patients (97%) realised that participation was voluntary and that other treatment would not be affected; 83% knew they could have changed their minds. There were no differences in the response patterns between the patients taking part in the different trials although the patient information sheets produced by pharmaceutical companies were longer and more complex than the 'in hospital' variety. We conclude that increasing the amount and complexity of information does not alter patient satisfaction. Taken overall, patients were content with the way they were approached when asked for consent for clinical trials. PMID:9613266

  14. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Areas covered Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. Expert opinion The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy. PMID:23425047

  15. Regulatory aspects of clinical trials in children.

    PubMed

    Mentzer, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Since introduction of the EU Paediatric Regulation in January 2007 the development and the life cycle of a drug in pre- and post-authorisation period has changed significantly. Pharmacovigilance science has traditionally been a discipline focussed on the post-marketing or post-authorisation period, with due attention directed towards pre-clinical safety data, clinical trials and adverse events. As the biological sciences have evolved, pharmacovigilance has slowly shifted toward earlier, proactive consideration of risks and potential benefits of drugs in the pre- and post-approval stages of drug development, leading to a maturing of drug safety risk management. The development of drugs for the paediatric population has changed the awareness that not only the safety issues need to be thoroughly investigated for a safe treatment of the children. In conjunction with the knowledge about efficacy, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and the age appropriate formulation for the concerned drug, the impact on the aim to apply safe medicines for children will steadily increase. Therefore, a proposal for a joint effort performing clinical research and appropriate drug development and clinical trials in children needs a strong support from a number of stakeholders like Clinical Trial Network, Paediatric Society, pharmaceutical industry and authorities. PMID:20799462

  16. Effectiveness of recruitment in clinical trials: an analysis of methods used in a trial for irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chin Feman, Siu Ping; Nguyen, Long T; Quilty, Mary T; Kerr, Catherine E; Nam, Bong Hyun; Conboy, Lisa A; Singer, Joyce P; Park, Min; Lembo, Anthony J; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Davis, Roger B

    2008-03-01

    A successful clinical trial is dependent on recruitment. Between December 2003 and February 2006, our team successfully enrolled 289 participants in a large, single-center, randomized placebo-controlled trial (RCT) studying the impact of the patient-doctor relationship and acupuncture on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. This paper reports on the effectiveness of standard recruitment methods such as physician referral, newspaper advertisements, fliers, audio and video media (radio and television commercials) as well as relatively new methods not previously extensively reported on such as internet ads, ads in mass-transit vehicles and movie theater previews. We also report the fraction of cost each method consumed and fraction of recruitment each method generated. Our cost per call from potential participants varied from $3-$103 and cost per enrollment participant varied from $12-$584. Using a novel metric, the efficacy index, we found that physician referrals and flyers were the most effective recruitment method in our trial. Despite some methods being more efficient than others, all methods contributed to the successful recruitment. The iterative use of the efficacy index during a recruitment campaign may be helpful to calibrate and focus on the most effective recruitment methods. PMID:17919993

  17. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored. PMID:26176884

  18. Surgeons: A Future Role in Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Rusch

    1997-01-01

    Clinical trials, particularly large cooperative group trials, establish the standards that we use to treat many of our cancer patients. The process by which multi-institutional clinical trials are developed, performed and peer-reviewed in the United States is equaled by few other countries around the world. Our clinical cooperative groups should be considered an important national resource. However, they stand at an embattled crossroads. Traditionally, only two to three percent of cancer patients have been entered onto clinical trials. In the past few years, national accrual has declined even further-from approximately 22,000 to 16,000 patients annually. The reasons for this decline are unclear. Although it could simply reflect a hiatus in the activity of some groups (such as the recent reorganization of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP]), it more likely reflects changes in our health care environment. Few managed care insurance plans permit patient entry into clinical studies on the premise that trials increase patient care costs. Yet, individualized patient care not delivered according to strict peer-reviewed standards may cost more. While this remains undetermined, oncologists in both academic and private practice are being pressured to work harder for fewer rewards. They are being told that investigational treatments are not allowed even if trials evaluating these treatments may ultimately lead to better and more cost-effective patient care. This is a sad state of affairs at a time when, on one hand, treatment for many solid tumors remains desperately inadequate and, on the other hand, new insights into tumor biology promise to alter fundamentally our approach to cancer care. Where do surgeons fit into this picture? The cooperative groups were initiated in the mid-1950s, primarily to evaluate the potential role of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. During the past forty years, surgeons have usually played a supporting role in

  19. Acupuncture for Erectile Dysfunction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing; Qin, Zongshi; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture is increasingly used to treat patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), and our systematic review aimed to evaluate the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in treating ED. Methods. An electronic search was conducted in eight databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for treating erectile dysfunction that were published in English and Chinese. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results. Three RCTs with a total of 183 participants met the inclusion criteria. One trial showed the beneficial effects of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture while the others did not. One trial suggested that acupuncture combined with psychological therapy was superior to psychological therapy alone. However, the overall methodological and reporting quality of the studies was low. The safety of acupuncture for ED was unclear because there were too few reports on this topic. Conclusion. The available evidence supporting that acupuncture alone improves ED was insufficient and the available studies failed to show the specific therapeutic effect of acupuncture. Future well-designed and rigorous RCTs with a large sample size are required. This trial is registered with CRD42014013575. PMID:26885501

  20. Creating clinical trial designs that incorporate clinical outcome assessments.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark R; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Lesser, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcome assessments (COAs) are increasingly being used in determining the efficacy of new treatment regimens. This was typified in the recent use of a symptom-based instrument combined with an organ-based measure of response for the approval of ruxolitinib in myelofibrosis. There are challenges in incorporating these COAs into clinical trials, including designating the level of priority, incorporating these measures into a combined or composite endpoint, and dealing with issues related to compliance and interpretation of results accounting for missing data. This article describes the results of a recent panel discussion that attempted to address these issues and provide guidance to the incorporation of COAs into clinical trials, including novel statistical designs, so that the testing of new treatments in patients with cancers of the central nervous system can incorporate these important clinical endpoints. PMID:26989129

  1. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations. PMID:26374682

  2. Is acupuncture a useful adjunct to physiotherapy for older adults with knee pain?: The "Acupuncture, Physiotherapy and Exercise" (APEX) study [ISRCTN88597683

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Elaine; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine; Hill, Jonathan; Thomas, Elaine; Young, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a popular non-pharmacological modality for treating musculoskeletal pain. Physiotherapists are one of the largest groups of acupuncture providers within the NHS, and they commonly use it alongside advice and exercise. Conclusive evidence of acupuncture's clinical effectiveness and its superiority over sham interventions is lacking. The Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) has funded this randomised sham-controlled trial which addresses three important questions. Firstly, we will determine the additional benefit of true acupuncture when used by physiotherapists alongside advice and exercise for older people presenting to primary care with knee pain. Secondly, we will evaluate sham acupuncture in the same way. Thirdly, we will investigate the treatment preferences and expectations of both the participants and physiotherapists participating in the study, and explore the effect of these on clinical outcome. We will thus investigate whether acupuncture is a useful adjunct to advice and exercise for treating knee pain and gain insight into whether this effect is due to specific needling properties. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will recruit 350 participants with knee pain to three intervention arms. It is based in 43 community physiotherapy departments in 21 NHS Trusts in the West Midlands and Cheshire regions in England. Patients aged 50 years and over with knee pain will be recruited. Outcome data will be collected by self-complete questionnaires before randomisation, and 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation and by telephone interview 2 weeks after treatment commences. The questionnaires collect demographic details as well as information on knee-related pain, movement and function, pain intensity and affect, main functional problem, illness perceptions, self-efficacy, treatment preference and expectations, general health and quality of life. Participants are randomised to receive a package of advice and exercise; or

  3. Narrative Review of Perioperative Acupuncture for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Gliedt, Jordan A; Daniels, Clinton J; Wuollet, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Acupuncture is one of the oldest forms of the natural healing arts. The exact mechanisms of action are unknown at this time; however, current theories to explain the benefits experienced after acupuncture include Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine concepts. Acupuncture may improve the quality of perioperative care and reduce associated complications. Perioperative acupuncture is apparently effective in reducing preoperative anxiety, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and postoperative pain. The Pericardium-6 (P-6; Nei Guan), Yintang (Extra 1), and Shenmen acupuncture points are the most studied and effective acupuncture points in reducing preoperative anxiety, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and postoperative pain experiences. Intraoperatively administered acupuncture may reduce immunosuppression in patients and lessen intraoperative anesthetic requirements, although the clinical usefulness of acupuncture in the intraoperative period remains inconclusive. Perioperative acupuncture is a promising intervention, but additional studies are needed to further understand and define acupuncture's role throughout the perioperative period and determine its clinical usefulness. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief clinical review concerning acupuncture and its application for common issues that occur in the perioperative period. PMID:26433805

  4. Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Treating Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Liu, Xiaoxu; Wu, Jiani; Zhai, Yanbing; Liu, Zhishun

    2015-01-01

    This is a systematic review and meta-analysis, which aimed to assess the current evidence on the effects and safety of acupuncture for treating sciatica. In this review, a total of 11 randomized controlled trials were included. As a result, we found that the use of acupuncture may be more effective than drugs and may enhance the effect of drugs for patients with sciatica, but because of the insufficient number of relevant and rigorous studies, the evidence is limited. Future trials using rigorous methodology, appropriate comparisons, and clinically relevant outcomes should be conducted. PMID:26576192

  5. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  6. Rett Syndrome: Reaching for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Pati, Sandipan; Percy, Alan K

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a syndromic autism spectrum disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2. The methyl CpG binding protein 2 binds methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethycytosine at CpG sites in promoter regions of target genes, controlling their transcription by recruiting co-repressors and co-activators. Several preclinical studies in mouse models have identified rational molecular targets for drug therapies aimed at correcting the underlying neural dysfunction. These targeted therapies are increasingly translating into human clinical trials. In this review, we present an overview of RTT and describe the current state of preclinical studies in methyl CpG binding protein 2-based mouse models, as well as current clinical trials in individuals with RTT. PMID:25861995

  7. Novel ocular antihypertensive compounds in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen A; Robinson, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive optic nerve injury and visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most widely recognized risk factor for the onset and progression of open-angle glaucoma, and IOP-lowering medications comprise the primary treatment strategy. IOP elevation in glaucoma is associated with diminished or obstructed aqueous humor outflow. Pharmacotherapy reduces IOP by suppressing aqueous inflow and/or increasing aqueous outflow. Purpose: This review focuses on novel non-FDA approved ocular antihypertensive compounds being investigated for IOP reduction in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients in active clinical trials within approximately the past 2 years. Methods: The mode of IOP reduction, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these new agents were assessed. Relevant drug efficacy and safety trials were identified from searches of various scientific literature databases and clinical trial registries. Compounds with no specified drug class, insufficient background information, reformulations, and fixed-combinations of marketed drugs were not considered. Results: The investigational agents identified comprise those that act on the same targets of established drug classes approved by the FDA (ie, prostaglandin analogs and β-adrenergic blockers) as well as agents belonging to novel drug classes with unique mechanisms of action. Novel targets and compounds evaluated in clinical trials include an actin polymerization inhibitor (ie, latrunculin), Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitors, adenosine receptor analogs, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a serotonin receptor antagonist. Conclusion: The clinical value of novel compounds for the treatment of glaucoma will depend ultimately on demonstrating favorable efficacy and benefit-to-risk ratios relative to currently approved prostaglandin analogs and β-blockers and/or having complementary

  8. How ethical is your clinical trial?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L; Folayan, M; Allman, D; Nkala, B; Kasirye, L M; Mingote, L R; Calazans, G; Mburu, R; Ntombela, F; Ditmore, M

    2010-01-01

    Is Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and a rigorous informed consent process enough? It is our view that this is no longer the case. Conventional research ethics emphasise the importance of weighing the risks and benefits for prospective participants as one of the key determinants of deeming a clinical trial ethical. We support the notion that ethical obligations of research should include considerations not only at the individual level, but also at the community level (1,2). PMID:20561091

  9. Gateways to clinical trials. December 2008.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, Aflibercept, Afobazole, Aliskiren fumarate, Anakinra, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Aviscumine, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Briobacept; Carmoterol hydrochloride, CCX-282, Ceftobiprole medocaril, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Dasatinib, Denosumab, Doripenem, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7080, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Gefitinib, Golimumab; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; Imatinib mesylate, Insulin detemir, Insulin glulisine, IVX-0142; Laquinimod sodium, Linezolid, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Ocrelizumab, Omalizumab; Parecoxib sodium, Pemetrexed disodium, Pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine; Sorafenib, Sugammadex sodium; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tocilizumab; Ularitide, Ustekinumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate, Vatalanib succinate, Vildagliptin, Vorinostat. PMID:19271026

  10. Women’s health and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Schiebinger, Londa

    2003-01-01

    Women have traditionally been underrepresented in clinical trials. In order to translate recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and physiological bases of sex differences into new therapeutics and health practices, sound sex-specific clinical data are imperative. Since the founding of the Office of Research on Women’s Health within the Office of the Director at the NIH in 1990, inequities in federally funded biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases affecting women in the US have been reviewed. Discussed herein is the evolution of gender-related research innovations, primarily within the last decade, and strategies and challenges involved in the success of this recent development. PMID:14523031

  11. Remote ischemic conditioning: a clinical trial's update.

    PubMed

    Candilio, Luciano; Hausenloy, Derek J; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve clinical outcome. This process can, however, induce further myocardial damage, namely acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and worsen clinical outcome. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the myocardium against IRI in patients with CAD. In this regard, the endogenous cardioprotective phenomenon of "ischemic conditioning," in which the heart is put into a protected state by subjecting it to one or more brief nonlethal episodes of ischemia and reperfusion, has the potential to attenuate myocardial injury during acute IRI. Intriguingly, the heart can be protected in this manner by applying the "ischemic conditioning" stimulus to an organ or tissue remote from the heart (termed remote ischemic conditioning or RIC). Furthermore, the discovery that RIC can be noninvasively applied using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce brief episodes of nonlethal ischemia and reperfusion in the forearm has greatly facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical arena. Several recently published proof-of-concept clinical studies have reported encouraging results with RIC, and large multicenter randomized clinical trials are now underway to investigate whether this simple noninvasive and virtually cost-free intervention has the potential to improve clinical outcomes in patients with CAD. In this review article, we provide an update of recently published and ongoing clinical trials in the field of RIC. PMID:21821533

  12. Cytomegalovirus vaccine: phase II clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Steininger, C

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Antiviral prophylactic strategies are limited by toxicities, drug-drug interactions and development of antiviral resistance. A safe and protective vaccine against CMV is highly desirable in view of the potential positive impact on CMV-associated morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Unfortunately, this demand could not be met in the past four decades although development of a CMV vaccine has been ranked at the highest priority by the US Institute of Medicine. Multiple different vaccine candidates have been developed and evaluated in phase I clinical trials and few succeeded to phase II trials. Nevertheless, two different vaccines showed recently promising results in trials that studied healthy adults and immunocompromised solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, respectively. The gB/MF59 vaccine exhibited a vaccine efficacy of 50% in healthy, postpartum females. In transplant patients, gB/MF59 and the DNA vaccine TransVax both limited the periods of viraemia and consequently the need for antiviral treatment. The success of these trials is encouraging and will probably give new impetus to the development of an effective CMV vaccine. Sterilizing immunity may not be attainable in the near future and may not be necessary for a CMV vaccine to have a significant impact on health care as discussed in the present review. PMID:24283990

  13. Treatment of blepharitis: recent clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Karpecki, Paul M; Perez, Victor L

    2014-10-01

    Blepharitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the eyelids that is frequently encountered in clinical practice. The etiology of the disorder is complex and not fully understood, but the general consensus is that bacteria and inflammation contribute to the pathology. Blepharitis can be classified into anterior blepharitis, involving the anterior lid margin and eyelashes, and posterior blepharitis, characterized by dysfunction of the meibomian glands. Long-term management of symptoms may include daily eyelid cleansing routines and the use of therapeutic agents that reduce infection and inflammation. A cure is not possible in most cases, and subjective symptoms may persist even when a clinical assessment of signs indicates that the condition has improved. There are no established guidelines regarding therapeutic regimens, but recent clinical trials have shown that antibiotics and topical corticosteroids can produce significant improvement in signs and symptoms of blepharitis. Fixed combinations of a topical antibiotic and a corticosteroid offer an effective and convenient treatment modality that addresses both infectious and inflammatory components of the disease. Further clinical trials are needed to determine optimal therapies for managing blepharitis. PMID:25284773

  14. [Difficulties with conducting clinical trials in France].

    PubMed

    Zannad, F; Plétan, Y

    2001-01-01

    France ranks third among European countries as regards the level of investment in clinical R&D and, overall, accounts for a contributive effort proportional to the size of its population and pharmaceutical market respectively. However, there is a trend for phase II and III studies to become proportionally fewer than in the past, while the number of phase IV studies is increasing. In a growing proportion of the mega-trials, which are instrumental for establishing evidence-based practice, French experts, investigators and, even more seriously, French patients, are insufficiently represented. Though studies in France are initiated relatively fast due to a clear regulatory framework and perform equally well as far as quantitative and qualitative factors are concerned, compared with most European countries involved in clinical research the costs incurred per completed patient are higher than those recorded in the other countries. Academic research shares most of these constraints and suffers from a lack of financial and human resources, while it faces additional delays in implementing studies because of longer administrative processes. Given the stakes in play, specific solutions should be implemented to maintain and further develop French competitiveness in clinical R&D. At the patient level, positive perception and awareness of the usefulness and safety of participating in clinical trials need to be emphasized. Education at the school level and using the lay media should be developed. Intervention of institutional and government officials is much needed. Direct patient recruitment should be developed through advertisement and the Internet, as well as within doctors' offices and through collaboration with patients' organizations. Patient information and consent forms should be made much simpler than those imposed within the framework of global studies because of FDA requirements. The French health system discourages the recruitment of patients by investigators who are

  15. The Joys of Clinical Trials: A Case Study of a Multicenter Pharmaceutical Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soronson, Bryan M.; Shaw, Diana V.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry describes typical processes and administrative issues, then presents a case in which a foreign pharmaceutical company negotiated with a university for sponsorship of a multicenter clinical trial of a new drug therapy. Problems and important considerations in clinical trials are…

  16. Tyranny of the randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rosenbek, John C

    2016-06-01

    Researchers and clinicians often disagree about what it means to provide the best possible care. This paper's purpose is to propose ways of resolving the disagreements. The first is to have both groups re-examine the three equal components of evidence-based practice, a re-examination that begins with rejection of the randomised clinical trial's tyranny. The second is for researchers to design rehabilitation research based on a biopsychosocial rather than a biomedical model. The third is for both groups to redefine translational research so that it means both translation from the laboratory to the clinic and from the clinic to the laboratory. The fourth is to advocate for a science of dissemination that is as robust as rehabilitation's present science of discovery. Most examples are drawn from the literature on acquired neurologic speech and language disorders. PMID:27124262

  17. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Hand imaging in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D J; Arden, N; Cicuttini, F; Crema, M D; Dardzinski, B; Duryea, J; Guermazi, A; Haugen, I K; Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Miller, C G; Martel-Pelletier, J; Ochoa-Albíztegui, R E; Pelletier, J-P; Peterfy, C; Roemer, F; Gold, G E

    2015-05-01

    Tremendous advances have occurred in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hand osteoarthritis (OA) and these are beginning to be applied to trials targeted at modification of the disease course. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide detail on how one might use and apply hand imaging assessments in disease modifying clinical trials. It includes information on acquisition methods/techniques (including guidance on positioning for radiography, sequence/protocol recommendations/hardware for MRI); commonly encountered problems (including positioning, hardware and coil failures, sequences artifacts); quality assurance/control procedures; measurement methods; measurement performance (reliability, responsiveness, validity); recommendations for trials; and research recommendations. PMID:25952345

  18. Prostate Cancer Prevention: Concepts and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Zachary; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-04-01

    Prevention is an important treatment strategy for diminishing prostate cancer morbidity and mortality and is applicable to both early- and late-stage disease. There are three basic classifications of cancer prevention: primary (prevention of incident disease), secondary (identification and treatment of preclinical disease), and tertiary (prevention of progression or recurrence). Based on level I evidence, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) should be considered in selected men to prevent incident prostate cancer. Level I evidence also supports the consideration of dutasteride, a 5-ARI, for tertiary prevention in active surveillance and biochemical recurrence patients. Vitamins and supplements, including selenium or vitamin E, have not been proven in clinical trials to prevent prostate cancer and in the case of Vitamin E has been found to increase the risk of incident prostate cancer. Ongoing and future trials may further elucidate the role of diet and immunotherapy for prevention of prostate cancer. PMID:26957512

  19. Gender Analysis of Moxifloxacin Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Cantero, Ma Teresa; Pardo, Ma Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the inclusion of women and the sex-stratification of results in moxifloxacin Clinical Trials (CTs), and to establish whether these CTs considered issues that specifically affect women, such as pregnancy and use of hormonal therapies. Previous publications about women's inclusion in CTs have not specifically studied therapeutic drugs. Although this type of drug is taken by men and women at a similar rate, adverse effects occur more frequently in the latter. Methods: We reviewed 158 published moxifloxacin trials on humans, retrieved from MedLine and the Cochrane Library (1998–2010), to determine whether they complied with the gender recommendations published by U.S. Food and Drug Administration Guideline. Results: Of a total of 80,417 subjects included in the moxifloxacin CTs, only 33.7% were women in phase I, in contrast to phase II, where women accounted for 45%, phase III, where they represented 38.3% and phase IV, where 51.3% were women. About 40.9% (n=52) of trials were stratified by sex and 15.3% (n=13) and 9% (n=7) provided data by sex on efficacy and adverse effects, respectively. We found little information about the influence of issues that specifically affect women. Only 3 of the 59 journals that published the moxifloxacin CTs stated that authors should stratify their results by sex. Conclusions: Women are under-represented in the published moxifloxacin trials, and this trend is more marked in phase I, as they comprise a higher proportion in the other phases. Data by sex on efficacy and adverse effects are scarce in moxifloxacin trials. These facts, together with the lack of data on women-specific issues, suggest that the therapeutic drug moxifloxacin is only a partially evidence-based medicine. PMID:24180298

  20. Integrated safety in tocilizumab clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been evaluated in a comprehensive phase 3 program. Patients from these randomized trials could receive tocilizumab treatment in open-label extension trials. Here, the long-term safety profile of tocilizumab, using pooled data from all of these trials, is reported. Methods Cumulative safety data (as of February 6, 2009) from five core phase 3 trials, two ongoing extension trials, and one clinical pharmacology study were analyzed. Two patient populations were evaluated: an all-control population (n = 4,199), which included all patients randomly assigned in the placebo-controlled portions of the five core studies, and an all-exposed population (n = 4,009), which included patients from any of the eight studies who received at least one dose of tocilizumab. Results Total exposure to tocilizumab was 8,580 patient years (PY), and total duration of observation was 9,414 PY. Overall adverse event (AE) and serious AE (SAE) rates were 278.2/100 PY and 14.4/100 PY, respectively. These events included serious infections (4.7/100 PY), opportunistic infections (0.23/100 PY), gastrointestinal perforations (0.28/100 PY), malignancy (1.1/100 PY), myocardial infarction (0.25/100 PY), and stroke (0.19/100 PY). The rates of SAEs and serious infections were stable over time; no increase with prolonged exposure was noted. Conclusions The longer-term safety profile of tocilizumab (mean treatment duration, 2.4 years) is consistent with that observed in the phase 3 studies (duration up to 1 year). PMID:21884601

  1. Gateways to clinical trials. March 2003.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-03-01

    Gateways to clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and devlopment protal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-CF, adalimumab, ademetionine, afeletecan hydrochloride, agomelatine, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, amdoxovir, aplidine, aranose, arsenic sulfide, atazanavir, atlizumab; Bimatoprost, BMS-181176, BMS-188667, bortezomib, bryostatin 1; Combretastatin A-4 phosphate; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine, DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib-vaccine, DTI-0009; Eculizumab, edodekin alfa, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, epoetin, esomeprazole magnesium etoricoxib; Fampridine, fenretinide, FR-146687; Galiximab, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, ganirelix acetate, gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gimatecan; HEA125xOKT3, hIL-13-PE38QQR, HSV-2 theracine, Hu14.18-IL-2, human gammaglobulin; Idraparinux sodium, imatinib mesylate, IMiD3, insulin detemir, interleukin-4, irofulven, ISAtx-247; JT-1001; Levetiracetam, levosimendan, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lixivaptan, lopinavir, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melatonin, midostaurin, MLN-518; Neridronic acid, nesiritide, nitronaproxen; Oblimersen sodium, oregovomab; PEG-filgrastim polyglutamate paclitaxel, prasterone, pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; SGN-30; T-1249, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipranavir, TMC-114, trabectedin, transdermal selegiline; UK-427857; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vardenafil, vatalanib succinate, vincristine sulfate TCS; Zofenopril calcium. PMID:12731460

  2. Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor–Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsai-Ju; Liu, Chia-Yu; Chang, Yi-Fang; Fang, Ching-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment (n=82; pain, mean difference: −2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), −4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: −86.10 [95% CI, −249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS. PMID:25915433

  3. From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Keevil, C. William; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial. Background: There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission. Methods: In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components. Results: Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials. Conclusions: Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs. PMID:26163568

  4. Epothilones: from discovery to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Forli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Epothilones are natural compounds isolated from a myxobacterium at the beginning of the 1990s, and showed a remarkable anti-neoplastic activity. They act through the same mechanism of action of paclitaxel, by stabilizing microtubules and inducing apoptosis. Although, their chemical structure, simpler than taxanes, makes them more suitable for derivatization. Their interesting pharmacokinetic and bioavailabilty profiles, and the activity against paclitaxel-resistant cell lines make them interesting therapeutic agents. Here a brief historical perspective of epothilones is presented, since their isolation, the identification of their mechanism of action and activity, to the recent clinical trials. PMID:25434353

  5. A survey of clinical trials with fenbufen.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, P

    1980-01-01

    To date, the efficacy and safety of gamma-oxo(1,1'-biphenyl)-4-butanoic acid (fenbufen) have been evaluated in over 200 clinical trials involving several thousand patients. The program of clinical investigation consisted of open dose ranging studies in patients; short-term, double-blind controlled studies of both cross-over and parallel group design to evaluate efficacy and safety compared to placebo and active reference drugs; long-term, double-blind controlled studies of parallel group design versus an active reference agent; open studies to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of fenbufen; and special studies to investigate possible effects on eyes, ears and heart. The overall experience with fenbufen in 60 US and 37 foreign clinical trials is summarized in this report with respect to the following: therapeutic efficacy and safety in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, analgesia and gout. The age range covered in these studies was 13 to 87 years, and included 206 patients over the age of 70. 3457 patients received fenbufen in all phases of these clinical trials, including short-term and long-term studies. The patient total includes: 1462 patients (664 US, 798 foreign) with rheumatoid arthritis, 1225 (420 US, 805 foreign) with osteoarthritis, 55 (19 US, 36 foreign) with ankylosing spondylitis, 39 (foreign) with gout, and 676 patients (103 US, 573 (foreign) who participated in analgesia studies. The worldwide clinical studies have demonstrated very good clinical efficacy of fenbufen in comparison to other non-steroidal antirheumatic (nsa) drugs. The tolerance was much better in many cases compared with tolerance levels of other nsa-drugs. The good results were confirmed by new papers presented during IX International Congress of Rheumatology, Wiesbaden/FR Germany, September 1979. Fenbufen is currently marketed in Brazil, Columbia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Great Britain, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras

  6. Is acupuncture effective in the treatment of pain in endometriosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Iréne; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometriosis is a multifactorial, estrogen-dependent, inflammatory gynecological condition – often with long-lasting visceral pelvic pain of different origin, and infertility among women. Current management options for patients’ are often inadequate, with side effects for many for whom acupuncture techniques could be an alternative. Earlier studies have discussed the efficacy of acupuncture, but not its methodological aspects. Objectives To summarize the documented clinical effects of acupuncture on rated visceral pelvic endometriosis-related pain, and associated variables among individuals, within and between studied groups, and to discuss the methodological treatment aspects. Methods Published full text clinical studies, case reports, and observational studies with abstracts written in English were searched by using the keywords “Acupuncture and Endometriosis” in databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL. The reporting guidelines, Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture was used for the methodological report. Results Three studies were found including 99 women, 13–40 years old, with diagnosed endometriosis. The studies were different in research design, needle stimulation techniques, and evaluation instruments. Methodological similarities were seven to12 needle insertions per subject/session, and 15–25 minutes of needle retention time. The needles were placed in lower back/pelvic-abdominal area, in the shank, feet, and hands. Treatment numbers varied from nine to 16 and patients received one to two treatments per week. Similarity in reported treatment effects in the quoted studies, irrespective of research design or treatment technique, was reported decrease of rated pain intensity. Discussion Meta-analysis is the standard procedure for the evaluation of evidence of treatment effects, ie, on a group level, usually without analysis of the individual responses even with obvious spread in the

  7. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies. PMID:27121227

  8. Do the CONSORT and STRICTA Checklists Improve the Reporting Quality of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Randomized Controlled Trials Published in Chinese Journals? A Systematic Review and Analysis of Trends

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bin; Chen, Zhi-min; Xu, Jia-ke; Wang, Ya-nan; Chen, Kuang-yang; Ke, Fa-yong; Niu, Jun-qiang; Li, Li; Huang, Cheng-ben; Zheng, Jian-xun; Yang, Jia-hui; Zhu, Qian-ge; Wang, Ya-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated whether there had been an improvement in the quality of reporting for randomised controlled trials of acupuncture and moxibustion published in Chinese journals. We compared the compliance rate for the quality of reporting following the publication of both the STRICTA and CONSORT recommendations in China. Methods Four Chinese databases were searched for RCTs of acupuncture from January 1978 through to December 2012. The CONSORT and STRICTA checklists were used to assess the quality of reporting. Data were collected using a standardised form. All included RCTs were divided into three distinct time periods based on the time that CONSORT and STRICTA were introduced in China, respectively. Pearson's χ2 test and/or Fisher's exact test were used to assess differences in reporting among three groups. Principal Findings A total of 1978 RCTs were identified. Although the percentage of all the items has increased over time with the introduction of CONSORT and STRICTA in China, the actual compliance in several important methodological components, including sample size calculation (0% vs. 0% vs. 1.2%, for pre-CONSORT and pre-STRICTA, post-CONSORT but pre-STRICTA, and post-CONSORT and post-STRICTA, respectively), randomisation sequence generation (1.4% vs. 15% vs. 26.3%) and implementation (0% vs. 0% vs. 1.3%), allocation concealment (0% vs. 1.4% vs. 4.9%), and blinding (0% vs. 5.7% vs. 9.1%), remains low. Moreover, no RCTs have reported the setting and context of treatment and no descriptions of the participating acupuncturists have been provided thus far. Conclusions Overall, the quality of the reporting of RCTs of acupuncture and moxibustion published in Chinese journals has improved since CONSORT and STRICTA were introduced in China, though the actual compliance rate of some important items were still low as of 2012. In the future, Chinese journals should enhance the adoption of the CONSORT and STRICTA statement to improve the reporting quality of

  9. 76 FR 51375 - Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials....

  10. Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research Past ... very emotional." Should You Be Interested in a Clinical Trial People volunteer to take part in clinical trials ...

  11. Statistical properties of randomization in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lachin, J M

    1988-12-01

    This is the first of five articles on the properties of different randomization procedures used in clinical trials. This paper presents definitions and discussions of the statistical properties of randomization procedures as they relate to both the design of a clinical trial and the statistical analysis of trial results. The subsequent papers consider, respectively, the properties of simple (complete), permuted-block (i.e., blocked), and urn (adaptive biased-coin) randomization. The properties described herein are the probabilities of treatment imbalances and the potential effects on the power of statistical tests; the permutational basis for statistical tests; and the potential for experimental biases in the assessment of treatment effects due either to the predictability of the random allocations (selection bias) or the susceptibility of the randomization procedure to covariate imbalances (accidental bias). For most randomization procedures, the probabilities of overall treatment imbalances are readily computed, even when a stratified randomization is used. This is important because treatment imbalance may affect statistical power. It is shown, however, that treatment imbalance must be substantial before power is more than trivially affected. The differences between a population versus a permutation model as a basis for a statistical test are reviewed. It is argued that a population model can only be invoked in clinical trials as an untestable assumption, rather than being formally based on sampling at random from a population. On the other hand, a permutational analysis based on the randomization actually employed requires no assumptions regarding the origin of the samples of patients studied. The large sample permutational distribution of the family of linear rank tests is described as a basis for easily conducting a variety of permutation tests. Subgroup (stratified) analyses, analyses when some data are missing, and regression model analyses are also

  12. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  13. Clinical Research Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Clinical Research Trials Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Let the Opportunities to Join A Clinical Study Find You How does clinical research work? ...

  14. Future Clinical Trials in DIPG: Bringing Epigenetics to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Morales La Madrid, Andres; Hashizume, Rintaro; Kieran, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of major recent advances in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments. To date, more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone. The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis; ideally, in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety. These pre-treatment tumor samples, and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem, have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular pathogenesis. We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high-grade glioma, other non-pontine pediatric high-grade gliomas, and even between pontine gliomas. The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation, maintenance, and progression. Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG. To date, clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic (histone) modifiers have been unsuccessful. Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used, their CNS penetration, redundant pathways within the tumor, or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth, suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways and the drugs designed to target them. In this review, we will discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment

  15. Women's involvement in clinical trials: historical perspective and future implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Katherine A; Mager, Natalie A Dipietro

    2016-01-01

    The importance of considering the differences between the male and female sex in clinical decision-making is crucial. However, it has been acknowledged in recent decades that clinical trials have not always adequately enrolled women or analyzed sex-specific differences in the data. As these deficiencies have hindered the progress of understanding women's response to medications, agencies in the United States have worked towards the inclusion of women in clinical trials and appropriate analysis of sex-specific data from clinical trials. This review outlines the history and progress of women's inclusion in clinical trials for prescription drugs and presents considerations for researchers, clinicians, and academicians on this issue. PMID:27011778

  16. Neuroimaging and Neuromonitoring Effects of Electro and Manual Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System: A Literature Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Scheffold, Brigitte Elisabeth; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different effects of manual and electroacupuncture on the central nervous system in studies with different neuroimaging interventions. The Database PubMed was searched from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2014 with restriction to human studies in English language. Data collection for functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) studies was restricted to the period from 1/1/2010 to 1/6/2014 due to a recently published review which included all published randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies as well as observational studies with control groups, no blinding required. Only studies comparing manual or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture were eligible. All participants were healthy adult men and women. A majority of 25 studies compared manual versus sham, a minority of 7 trials compared electro versus sham and only 1 study compared electro versus manual acupuncture. In 29 out of 33 studies verum acupuncture results were found to present either more or different modulation effects on neurological components measured by neuroimaging and neuromonitoring methods than sham acupuncture. Only four studies reported no effects of verum in comparison to sham acupuncture. Evaluation of the very heterogeneous results shows evidence that verum acupuncture elicits more modulation effects on neurological components than sham acupuncture. PMID:26339269

  17. Neuroimaging and Neuromonitoring Effects of Electro and Manual Acupuncture on the Central Nervous System: A Literature Review and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scheffold, Brigitte Elisabeth; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different effects of manual and electroacupuncture on the central nervous system in studies with different neuroimaging interventions. The Database PubMed was searched from 1/1/2000 to 1/6/2014 with restriction to human studies in English language. Data collection for functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) studies was restricted to the period from 1/1/2010 to 1/6/2014 due to a recently published review which included all published randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies as well as observational studies with control groups, no blinding required. Only studies comparing manual or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture were eligible. All participants were healthy adult men and women. A majority of 25 studies compared manual versus sham, a minority of 7 trials compared electro versus sham and only 1 study compared electro versus manual acupuncture. In 29 out of 33 studies verum acupuncture results were found to present either more or different modulation effects on neurological components measured by neuroimaging and neuromonitoring methods than sham acupuncture. Only four studies reported no effects of verum in comparison to sham acupuncture. Evaluation of the very heterogeneous results shows evidence that verum acupuncture elicits more modulation effects on neurological components than sham acupuncture. PMID:26339269

  18. The Effects of Acupuncture on Cerebral and Muscular Microcirculation: A Systematic Review of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ming-Yu; Ong, Ming Wei; Chen, Wei-Yu; Sun, Wei-Zen; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture produces physiological effects via stimulating acupoints, proximal or distal to the region of effect. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) noninvasively measures tissue-level hemodynamics in real time. We review the literature investigating the effect of acupuncture on muscular and/or cerebral microcirculation. As the basis, we queried PubMed in June 2014 for articles mentioning both acupuncture and NIRS in title/abstract. The reviewed papers investigated either cerebral (n = 11) or muscular hemodynamics (n = 5) and, based on STRICTA for reporting acupuncture methodology, were overall poor in quality. Acupuncture was found to influence regional oxygen saturation in cerebral and muscular tissue. The cortical response in healthy subjects varied across studies. For subjects with stroke or cerebrovascular dementia, findings suggest that acupuncture may modulate dysfunction in cerebral autoregulation. The muscular response to pressure techniques was more intense than that to needling or laser. Probe proximity could impact measurement sensitivity. No one study simultaneously investigated the direct and remote responses. Research utilizing NIRS to investigate the hemodynamics of acupuncture presently lacks in scope and quality. Improved designs, for example, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, and standardized intervention reporting will raise study quality. Exploiting NIRS in clinical settings, such as stroke, migraine, or other pain conditions, is worthwhile. PMID:26221180

  19. An Updated Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy and Safety of Acupuncture Treatment for Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhang, Hong; Meng, Shu-qing; Qian, Hai-zhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death and the primary cause of disability throughout the world. Acupuncture is frequently advocated as an adjunct treatment during stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to update the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral infarction. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCT) on acupuncture treating cerebral infarction were searched from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CMB and VIP from inception to October 2013. The data of RCTs meeting the inclusive criteria were extracted according to Cochrane methods. The meta-analyses were conducted using Rev Man 5.0 software. Results A total of 25 trials involving 2224 patients were included. The results of this meta-analysis showed that the groups receiving acupuncture (observation group) were superior to the comparison groups (control group), with significant differences in the Clinical Efficacy Rates [OR = 4.04, 95%CI (2.93, 5.57), P<0.001], Fugl-Meyer Assessment [MD = 11.22, 95%CI (7.62, 14.82), P<0.001], Barthel Index Score [MD = 12.84, 95%CI (9.85, 15.82), P<0.001], and Neurological Deficit Score [MD = −2.71, 95% CI (−3.84, −1.94), P<0.001]. Three trials reported minor adverse events. Conclusion Current evidence provisionally demonstrates that acupuncture treatment is superior to either non-acupuncture or conventional therapy for cerebral infarction. Despite this conclusion, given the often low quality of the available trials, further large scale RCTs of better quality are still needed. PMID:25438041

  20. Gateways to Clinical Trials. June 2002.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alteplase, amlodipine, amoxicillin trihydrate, amprenavir, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atorvastatin calcium, azathioprine; Baclofen, benidipine hydrochloride, benserazide, BMS-214662, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Candesartan cilexetil, carbamazepine, carbidopa, carboplatin, ceftriaxone sodium, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, CPI-1189, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Darbepoetin alfa, denileukin diftitox, dexamethasone, dipyridamole, droperidol, DW-166HC; Ebastine, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, enalapril maleate, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, enrasentan, entacapone, epoetin, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoricoxib; Fenofibratefexofenadine hydrochloride, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluoxetine hydrochloride fluvoxamine maleate, frovatriptan, furosemide; Gabapentin, galantamine hydrobromide, gatifloxacin, gefitinib, ghrelin (human), glatiramer acetate; Haloperidol; Ibuprofen, ibuprofen, guaiacol ester, idarubicin hydrochloride, imipramine hydrochloride, imiquimod, interferon beta, interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, interferon omega, irbesartan, itraconazole; Ketorolac, ketorolac tromethamine; Lamifiban, lamotrigine, lanoteplase, lansoprazole, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, levetiracetam, levocetirizine, levodopa, lisinopril, loratadine; Manidipine, methylprednisolone, metronidazole, mirtazapine, mizolastine, modafinil, morphine sulfate; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan hydrochloride, nifedipine, NSC-683864; Ofloxacin, olanzapine

  1. Key concepts of clinical trials: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Umscheid, Craig A; Margolis, David J; Grossman, Craig E

    2011-09-01

    The recent focus of federal funding on comparative effectiveness research underscores the importance of clinical trials in the practice of evidence-based medicine and health care reform. The impact of clinical trials not only extends to the individual patient by establishing a broader selection of effective therapies, but also to society as a whole by enhancing the value of health care provided. However, clinical trials also have the potential to pose unknown risks to their participants, and biased knowledge extracted from flawed clinical trials may lead to the inadvertent harm of patients. Although conducting a well-designed clinical trial may appear straightforward, it is founded on rigorous methodology and oversight governed by key ethical principles. In this review, we provide an overview of the ethical foundations of trial design, trial oversight, and the process of obtaining approval of a therapeutic, from its pre-clinical phase to post-marketing surveillance. This narrative review is based on a course in clinical trials developed by one of the authors (DJM), and is supplemented by a PubMed search predating January 2011 using the keywords "randomized controlled trial," "patient/clinical research," "ethics," "phase IV," "data and safety monitoring board," and "surrogate endpoint." With an understanding of the key principles in designing and implementing clinical trials, health care providers can partner with the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies to effectively compare medical therapies and thereby meet one of the essential goals of health care reform. PMID:21904102

  2. [Effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for supraventricular tachycardia: a systematic review and meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Wen, Wan-xin; Li, Xian-sheng; Guo, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Lv, Wei-hui

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia were systematically reviewed. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding acupuncture for supraventricular tachycardia were searched in domestic and overseas databases, and the evaluation tool of bias risk in Cochrane Handbook 5.1.0 software was used to perform the evaluation of bias risk in literature, and RevMan 5.2 software was applied for statistics and Meta-analysis. Five RCTs involving 323 patients were included. The results showed that compared with the blank control group, the acupuncture reduced the heart rate by 18.8 times/min [95% CI (12.68, 24.92)]; the clinical effective rate in the acupuncture group was superior to that in the diltiazem group [OR= 3.11, 95% CI (1.50, 6.46)]; the difference of immediate effect between propafenone and acupuncture was not significant. No reports regarding adverse events was described in 5 RCTs. As was shown in the present evidence, acupuncture is safe and effective for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia, but the level of evidence was low and the intensity of conclusion needed to be improved. PMID:25675588

  3. The Evaluation of Curative Effect of Acupuncture: A Review of Systematic and Meta-Analysis Studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Alireza; Marzban, Maryam; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-07-01

    The present study attempts to critically evaluate previously published research articles on the efficiency of acupuncture in the treatment of diseases. First, 35 systematic reviews or meta-analysis were found in the Cochrane database. Second, 54 related articles were selected by searching important scientific databases. Based on the results obtained regarding the efficacy of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases, the articles were divided into 3 groups. The first group of articles confirmed the efficacy of treatment by acupuncture. In the second group of articles, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture was shown; however, further research is required to verify the results. In the third group of articles there is no evidence regarding the therapeutic effect of acupuncture till now. There is an urgent need to design and conduct double-blinded randomized clinical trials with high-quality methodologies. This provides a more careful evaluation of acupuncture efficiency in relation to the treatment of a vast array of diseases, based on scientific evidence. PMID:26260046

  4. Developing methods for acupuncture research: rationale for and design of a pilot study evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2003-01-01

    Rigorously evaluating acupuncture and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies presents researches with many challenges. The failure to satisfactorily address these challenges has resulted in poorly designed studies, which yield findings that are difficult to interpret. Despite the publication of more than 10 randomized trials evaluating acupuncture as a treatment for chronic low back pain, the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for this common problem remain unclear. We discuss the rationale for and design of a five-arm randomized controlled pilot clinical trial that addresses the major methodological shortcomings of previous studies (e.g., poorly justified treatment and control groups and lack of masking) and that lays the groundwork for a full scale trial evaluating acupuncture as a treatment for chronic low back pain. Although development and pilot testing of these design features required substantial time and resources, we believe that this investment in rigorous groundwork is essential to ensure that full-scale trials evaluating CAM treatments produce valid and interpretable results. PMID:14526711

  5. Visualization of the Meridian System Based on Biomedical Information about Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Soon-Ho; Kim, Song-Yi; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the concept of the meridian system is closely connected with the treatment effects of acupuncture, and it serves as an empirical reference system in the clinical setting. Understanding the meridian channels would be a first step in enhancing the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment. To understand the relationship between the location of the disease and the sites of relevant acupoints, we investigated acupuncture treatment regimens for low-back pain in 37 clinical studies. We found that the most frequently used acupoints in the treatment of low-back pain were BL23 (51%), BL25 (43%), BL24 (32%), BL40 (32%), BL60 (32%), GB30 (32%), BL26 (28%), BL32 (28%), and GB34 (21%). For the example of low-back pain, we visualized the biomedical information (frequency rates) about acupuncture treatment on the meridians of a three-dimensional (3D) model of the human body. We found that both local and distal acupoints were used to treat low-back pain in clinical trials based on the meridian theory. We suggest a new model for the visualization of a data-driven 3D meridian system of biomedical information about the meridians and acupoints. These findings may be helpful in understanding the meridian system and revealing the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment. PMID:23781270

  6. Effects and treatment methods of acupuncture and herbal medicine for premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During their reproductive years about 10% of women experience some kind of symptoms before menstruation (PMS) in a degree that affects their quality of life (QOL). Acupuncture and herbal medicine has been a recent favorable therapeutic approach. Thus we aimed to review the effects of acupuncture and herbal medicine in the past decade as a preceding research in order to further investigate the most effective Korean Medicine treatment for PMS/PMDD. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using electronic databases on studies published between 2002 and 2012. Our review included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and herbal medicine for PMS/PMDD. Interventions include acupuncture or herbal medicine. Clinical information including statistical tests was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text. Study outcomes were presented as the rate of improvement (%) and/or end-of-treatment scores. Results The search yielded 19 studies. In screening the RCTs, 8 studies in acupuncture and 11 studies in herbal medicine that matched the criteria were identified. Different acupuncture techniques including traditional acupuncture, hand acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional acupuncture technique with auricular points, have been selected for analysis. In herbal medicine, studies on Vitex Agnus castus, Hypericum perforatum, Xiao yao san, Elsholtzia splendens, Cirsium japonicum, and Gingko biloba L. were identified. Experimental groups with Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatment (all herbal medicine except Cirsium japonicum) had significantly improved results regarding PMS/PMDD. Conclusions Limited evidence supports the efficacy of alternative medicinal interventions such as acupuncture and herbal medicine in controlling premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatments for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder showed a 50% or

  7. Acupuncture for urinary incontinence after stroke: a protocol for systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongren; Yu, Nannan; Yue, Jinhuan; Zhang, Qinhong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study, which will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), is to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. Methods and analysis RCTs will be searched electronically in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases from their inception to present. Manual retrieval will also be conducted. RCTs will be included if acupuncture was evaluated as the sole or adjunct treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The primary outcome will be measured by using the pad-weighing test. The secondary outcomes will include urination diary, bladder capacity, clinical symptom scores, the number of patients healed completely in trial follow-up period and adverse events. The study selection, data extraction and evaluation of study quality will be performed independently by two researchers. The methodological quality of the included trials will be assessed by using the Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence of acupuncture treatment for patients with stroke and urinary incontinence. The findings of this study will be published through a peer-reviewed journal and presented at a relevant conference. Trial registration number CRD42014015611. PMID:26908510

  8. A data grid for imaging-based clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng; Chao, Sander S.; Lee, Jasper; Liu, Brent; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    Clinical trials play a crucial role in testing new drugs or devices in modern medicine. Medical imaging has also become an important tool in clinical trials because images provide a unique and fast diagnosis with visual observation and quantitative assessment. A typical imaging-based clinical trial consists of: 1) A well-defined rigorous clinical trial protocol, 2) a radiology core that has a quality control mechanism, a biostatistics component, and a server for storing and distributing data and analysis results; and 3) many field sites that generate and send image studies to the radiology core. As the number of clinical trials increases, it becomes a challenge for a radiology core servicing multiple trials to have a server robust enough to administrate and quickly distribute information to participating radiologists/clinicians worldwide. The Data Grid can satisfy the aforementioned requirements of imaging based clinical trials. In this paper, we present a Data Grid architecture for imaging-based clinical trials. A Data Grid prototype has been implemented in the Image Processing and Informatics (IPI) Laboratory at the University of Southern California to test and evaluate performance in storing trial images and analysis results for a clinical trial. The implementation methodology and evaluation protocol of the Data Grid are presented.

  9. Analyzing acute procedural pain in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Tan, Gabriel; Amihai, Ido; Jensen, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    Because acute procedural pain tends to increase with procedure time, assessments of pain management strategies must take that time relationship into account. Statistical time-course analyses are, however, complex and require large patient numbers to detect differences. The current study evaluated the abilities of various single and simple composite measures such as averaged pain or individual patient pain slopes to detect treatment effects. Secondary analyses were performed with the data from 3 prospective randomized clinical trials that assessed the effect of a self-hypnotic relaxation intervention on procedural pain, measured every 10-15 minutes during vascular/renal interventions, breast biopsies, and tumor embolizations. Single point-in-time and maximal pain comparisons were poor in detecting treatment effects. Linear data sets of individual patient slopes yielded the same qualitative results as the more complex repeated measures analyses, allowing the use of standard statistical approaches (eg, Kruskal-Wallis), and promising analyses of smaller subgroups, which otherwise would be underpowered. With nonlinear data, a simple averaged score was highly sensitive in detecting differences. Use of these 2 workable and relatively simple approaches may be a first step towards facilitating the development of data sets that could enable meta-analyses of data from acute pain trials. PMID:24731852

  10. Clinical trials in India: Where do we stand globally?

    PubMed Central

    Selvarajan, Sandhiya; George, Melvin; Kumar, Suresh S; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the trend of clinical trials in India over the last 4 years compared to the well-established countries using clinical trial registries since the advent of clinical trial registry of India (CTRI). Materials and Methods: The data of clinical trials registered in India, United States (US), and European Union (EU) were obtained from websites of CTRI, clinicaltrial.gov and EU clinical trial registry, respectively from July 20, 2007 to August 29, 2011 for a period of 4 years. Trials registered in Australia, Canada, China, and Japan were obtained from WHO's international clinical trial registry platform for the same period. We used search words for the common diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, etc., Results: The total number of clinical trials registered during the study period was 67,448 across seven study nations. Clinical trials from India constituted only 2.7% of the total number of trials carried out, compared to US constituting 47% of the total number of trials registered, followed by 18% from EU and 11% from Japan. However, India, China, and Japan have been found to show an increase of 3.7%, 5.1%, and 13.1% increase in the number of trials registered in 2011 compared to 2007. In contrast, US and EU showed a decline of 11.3% and 11.95% respectively in the total number of trials registered in 2011 compared to 2007. Conclusions: Although India shows gradual increase in trials registered since the advent of CTRI, still it continues to lag behind established countries in clinical research. PMID:24010056

  11. Newer Antibacterials in Therapy and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Paknikar, Simi S; Narayana, Sarala

    2012-01-01

    In order to deal with the rising problem of antibiotic resistance, newer antibacterials are being discovered and added to existing pool. Since the year 2000, however, only four new classes of antibacterials have been discovered. These include the oxazolidinones, glycolipopeptides, glycolipodepepsipeptide and pleuromutilins. Newer drugs were added to existing classes of antibiotics, such as streptogramins, quinolones, beta-lactam antibiotics, and macrolide-, tetracycline- and trimethoprim-related drugs. Most of the antibacterials are directed against resistant S. aureus infections, with very few against resistant gram-negative infections. The following article reviews the antibacterials approved by the FDA after the year 2000 as well as some of those in clinical trials. Data was obtained through a literature search via Pubmed and google as well as a detailed search of our library database. PMID:23181224

  12. Using Clinical Trial Simulators to Analyse the Sources of Variance in Clinical Trials of Novel Therapies for Acute Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Weverling, Gerrit-Jan; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background About 90% of drugs fail in clinical development. The question is whether trials fail because of insufficient efficacy of the new treatment, or rather because of poor trial design that is unable to detect the true efficacy. The variance of the measured endpoints is a major, largely underestimated source of uncertainty in clinical trial design, particularly in acute viral infections. We use a clinical trial simulator to demonstrate how a thorough consideration of the variability inherent in clinical trials of novel therapies for acute viral infections can improve trial design. Methods and Findings We developed a clinical trial simulator to analyse the impact of three different types of variation on the outcome of a challenge study of influenza treatments for infected patients, including individual patient variability in the response to the drug, the variance of the measurement procedure, and the variance of the lower limit of quantification of endpoint measurements. In addition, we investigated the impact of protocol variation on clinical trial outcome. We found that the greatest source of variance was inter-individual variability in the natural course of infection. Running a larger phase II study can save up to $38 million, if an unlikely to succeed phase III trial is avoided. In addition, low-sensitivity viral load assays can lead to falsely negative trial outcomes. Conclusions Due to high inter-individual variability in natural infection, the most important variable in clinical trial design for challenge studies of potential novel influenza treatments is the number of participants. 100 participants are preferable over 50. Using more sensitive viral load assays increases the probability of a positive trial outcome, but may in some circumstances lead to false positive outcomes. Clinical trial simulations are powerful tools to identify the most important sources of variance in clinical trials and thereby help improve trial design. PMID:27332704

  13. Perceptions of Reimbursement for Clinical Trial Participation

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa; Vincent, Kathleen; Moench, Thomas; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    A greater understanding of participant views regarding reimbursement will help investigators plan studies that have better potential for reaching target enrollment, maximize efficient recruitment, maintain scientific integrity, and enhance retention over time. As part of a clinical trial in the area of sexual health, healthy women’s perceptions of reimbursement for research participation were investigated. Semi-structured, audio-recorded, qualitative interviews were conducted immediately upon women’s completion of the clinical trial to enable a participant-driven understanding of perceptions about monetary reimbursement. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analyzed using framework analysis. Women (N = 30) had a mean age of 29.5 ± 5.7 years (range 22–45 years). Sixty-three percent of participants (n = 19) were non-Hispanic (white n = 13, black n = 4, and Asian n = 2), while the remaining were Hispanic (n = 11). Seventy-three percent (n = 22) reported previous participation in research. In general, women viewed reimbursement as a benefit to research participation, the amount of which should reflect time, the inconvenience to the research subject, and the potential for unknown risks in the short- and long-term. They believed reimbursement should take into account the degree of risk of the study, with investigations of experimental products offering greater reimbursement. Women believed that monetary reimbursement is unlikely to coerce an individual to volunteer for a study involving procedures or requirements that they found unacceptable. The results of this study can be used to provide guidance to those planning and evaluating reimbursement for research participation. PMID:21931235

  14. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cofield, Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment and retention issues with specific strategies will help researchers deal with these issues in their funding applications and in turn develop the necessary infrastructure to participate in emergency medicine clinical trials. PMID:21040112

  15. [Global views on clinical trials and data quality].

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel; Han, Xiu-lan; Sun, Hua-long; Dai, Nan

    2015-11-01

    The quality and integrity of clinical trials and associated data are not only derived from accuracy of trial data analyses, but also closely embodied to the authenticity and integrity of those data and data documents as well as the compliant procedures obtaining those data and relevant files in the life cycle of clinical trials. The compliances of good clinical practices and standards suggest the reliability, complete and accuracy of data and data documents, which is constructing the convincible foundation of drug efficacy and safety validated via clinical trials. Therefore, the monitoring and auditing on clinical trials and associated data quality keep eyes on not only verifications of reliability and correctness on the data analytic outcomes, but also validation of science and compliance of the trial management procedure and documentations in the process of data collections. PMID:26911039

  16. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the... FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards (IRBs). Individual...

  17. Trial design innovations: Clinical trials for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J; Zhong, K

    2015-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent progress has been made with clinical trials, advancing new therapies for psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD), agitation in AD, and apathy in AD. Definitions have emerged for agitation and apathy in patients with cognitive impairment, facilitating recruitment of clinical trial populations. Progress in clinical trial design and the agents being assessed promise to advance therapies for disabling symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and caregivers. PMID:26206713

  18. Acupuncture and Auricular Acupressure in Relieving Menopausal Hot Flashes of Bilaterally Ovariectomized Chinese Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jue; Qu, Fan; Sang, Xisheng; Wang, Xiaotong; Nan, Rui

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the effects of acupuncture and auricular acupressure in relieving menopausal hot flashes of bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women. Between May 2006 and March 2008, 46 bilaterally ovariectomized Chinese women were randomized into an acupuncture and auricular acupressure group (n = 21) and a hormone replacement therapy (HRT) group (Tibolone, n = 25). Each patient was given a standard daily log and was required to record the frequency and severity of hot flashes and side effects of the treatment felt daily, from 1 week before the treatment started to the fourth week after the treatment ended. The serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), LH and E2 were detected before and after the treatment. After the treatment and the follow-up, both the severity and frequency of hot flashes in the two groups were relieved significantly when compared with pre-treatment (P <  .05). There was no significant difference in the severity of hot flashes between them after treatment (P >  .05), while after the follow-up, the severity of hot flashes in the HRT group was alleviated more. After the treatment and the follow-up, the frequency of menopausal hot flashes in the HRT group was reduced more (P <  .05). After treatment, the levels of FSH decreased significantly and the levels of E2 increased significantly in both groups (P <  .05), and they changed more in the HRT group (P <  .05). Acupuncture and auricular acupressure can be used as alternative treatments to relieve menopausal hot flashes for those bilaterally ovariectomized women who are unable or unwilling to receive HRT. PMID:19189989

  19. Acupuncture: A Useful Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Rapson, Linda M.

    1984-01-01

    Scientists have established that acupuncture's effects have a neurophysiological explanation. The procedure can be used to relieve musculoskeletal and facial pain, to treat allergies, headache, anxiety and depression, and to help rehabilitate addicted patients. The response rate is high, especially in patients with musculoskeletal pain or headaches. Clinical outcomes in a large Toronto acupuncture practice have consistently shown that about 80% of patients respond to acupuncture. The incidence of complications and side effects is low. The anatomical approach to this procedure is easily learned and can be incorporated into family practice. Failure to achieve the expected results from acupuncture should raise suspicions that the working diagnosis is incorrect and lead to further investigation. PMID:21283497

  20. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M.; Miner, Caroline S.; Staman, Karen L.; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-01-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons,—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy,—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly PCTs. In this paper we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in PCTs. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations. PMID:26374682

  1. Acupuncture for functional constipation: protocol of an individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qianhua; Zheng, Hui; Lu, Lingyun; Leng, Jincheng; Zhou, Siyuan; Zheng, Huabin; Huang, Wenjing; Liu, Zhishun; Zhu, Bing; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Functional constipation (FC) is a common gastrointestinal disease. Systematic reviews indicate that acupuncture may be effective for patients with FC. However, this conclusion is not convincing due to the quality, sample size and methodological heterogeneity of the studies included by these systematic reviews. Therefore, it is necessary for us to conduct a meta-analysis of individual patient data (IPD) from high-quality clinical trials to determine whether acupuncture is effective for patients with FC. Methods and analysis Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for adult patients with FC will be searched in several databases from inception to April 2015. The corresponding authors of eligible studies will be contacted and invited to contribute raw data. The primary outcome is the change in spontaneous defaecation per week from baseline. The secondary outcomes include the proportion of responders, changes in stool quality, mean transit time, proportion of patients using laxatives and adverse events. We will check all of the data and perform reanalysis according to the statistical methodology reported in previous publications. Then we will harmonise the raw data and use a two-step method to conduct the IPD meta-analysis. First, we will calculate the effect size of acupuncture of each trial by analysis of covariance, with the principal end point as the dependent variable and the baseline scores as the covariates. Second, the effect size of acupuncture in each original study will be combined in the meta-analysis. Dissemination On the basis of the IPD meta-analysis of high-quality RCTs, this review will answer the question of whether acupuncture is effective for FC. The findings of the review will be disseminated through peer-review publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO 2014 CRD42014009901. PMID:25986636

  2. Timing and Completeness of Trial Results Posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and Published in Journals

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Carolina; Dechartres, Agnes; Perrodeau, Elodie; Haneef, Romana; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background The US Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act requires results from clinical trials of Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs to be posted at ClinicalTrials.gov within 1 y after trial completion. We compared the timing and completeness of results of drug trials posted at ClinicalTrials.gov and published in journals. Methods and Findings We searched ClinicalTrials.gov on March 27, 2012, for randomized controlled trials of drugs with posted results. For a random sample of these trials, we searched PubMed for corresponding publications. Data were extracted independently from ClinicalTrials.gov and from the published articles for trials with results both posted and published. We assessed the time to first public posting or publishing of results and compared the completeness of results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov versus published in journal articles. Completeness was defined as the reporting of all key elements, according to three experts, for the flow of participants, efficacy results, adverse events, and serious adverse events (e.g., for adverse events, reporting of the number of adverse events per arm, without restriction to statistically significant differences between arms for all randomized patients or for those who received at least one treatment dose). From the 600 trials with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we randomly sampled 50% (n = 297) had no corresponding published article. For trials with both posted and published results (n = 202), the median time between primary completion date and first results publicly posted was 19 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 30 mo), and the median time between primary completion date and journal publication was 21 mo (first quartile = 14, third quartile = 28 mo). Reporting was significantly more complete at ClinicalTrials.gov than in the published article for the flow of participants (64% versus 48% of trials, p<0.001), efficacy results (79% versus 69%, p = 0

  3. Acupuncture for Detoxification in Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Ly; Leung, A Wn; Yew, D Tw

    2016-06-01

    Opioid is a popular drug of abuse and addiction. We evaluated acupuncture as a non-pharmacological treatment with a focus on managing withdrawal symptoms. Electrical stimulation at a low frequency (2 Hz) accelerates endorphin and encephalin production. High-frequency stimulation (100 Hz) up-regulates the dynorphin level that in turn suppresses withdrawal at the spinal level. The effect of 100-Hz electroacupuncture may be associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation at the ventral tegmental area, down-regulation of cAMP response element-binding protein, and enhanced dynorphin synthesis in the spinal cord, periaqueductal grey, and hypothalamus. Clinical trials of acupuncture for the management of different withdrawal symptoms were reviewed. The potential of acupuncture to allay opioid-associated depression and anxiety, and its possible use as an adjuvant treatment were evident. A lack of effect was indicated for opioid craving. Most studies were hampered by inadequate reporting details and heterogeneity, thus future well-designed studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in opioid addiction treatment. PMID:27377488

  4. The challenge of comorbidity in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron; Sormani, Maria Pia; Thompson, Alan; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Trojano, Maria; O'Connor, Paul; Reingold, Stephen; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to provide recommendations for addressing comorbidity in clinical trial design and conduct in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We held an international workshop, informed by a systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of comorbidity in MS and an international survey about research priorities for studying comorbidity including their relation to clinical trials in MS. Results: We recommend establishing age- and sex-specific incidence estimates for comorbidities in the MS population, including those that commonly raise concern in clinical trials of immunomodulatory agents; shifting phase III clinical trials of new therapies from explanatory to more pragmatic trials; describing comorbidity status of the enrolled population in publications reporting clinical trials; evaluating treatment response, tolerability, and safety in clinical trials according to comorbidity status; and considering comorbidity status in the design of pharmacovigilance strategies. Conclusion: Our recommendations will help address knowledge gaps regarding comorbidity that interfere with the ability to interpret safety in monitored trials and will enhance the generalizability of findings from clinical trials to “real world” settings where the MS population commonly has comorbid conditions. PMID:26888986

  5. End points in dermatologic clinical trials: A review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erin X; Kirsner, Robert S; Eaglstein, William H

    2016-07-01

    Clinical trials are critical for the development of new therapies in dermatology, and their results help determine US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and guide care. Of special relevance is the clinical trial efficacy end point, the metric from which statistically significant outcome is derived. Clinicians' understanding of a clinical trial's end point is necessary for critical analysis of the trial results and for applying those results to daily practice. This review provides practical knowledge and critical evaluation of end points used in treatment approvals by the FDA. The end points for actinic keratosis, acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, onychomycosis, and cutaneous ulcer serve as examples. PMID:26936300

  6. Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year. The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initia

  7. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Bosch, Walter R; Curran, Walter J; Followill, David S; Galvin, James M; Hanusik, Richard; King, Steven R; Knopp, Michael V; Laurie, Fran; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Michalski, Jeff M; Saltz, Joel H; Schnall, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Lawrence; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; Urie, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy, and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real-time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial. PMID:23508883

  8. [Reporting adverse reactions and events in randomised clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Støy, Lina; Wetterslev, Jørn; Tarnow, Lise; Friis, Karin Bach; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Sales, Nader; Gluud, Christian

    2010-08-30

    "Good clinical practice" (GCP) is an international guideline on how to conduct clinical trials on medical products involving human participants. Danish statute follows the EU trial directive (2001/20/EF) including the GCP guidelines. This article summarises the practical implementation of reporting adverse events and adverse reactions to the Danish Medicines Agency and the regional ethics committee based on the protocol of the ongoing Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CIMT) trial. PMID:20825743

  9. Acupuncture in ancient China: how important was it really?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Although acupuncture theory is a fundamental part of the Huangdi Neijing, the clinical application of the needle therapy in ancient China was always a limited one. From early times there have been warnings that acupuncture might do harm. In books like Zhang Zhongjing's Shanghanlun it plays only a marginal role. Among the 400 emperors in Chinese history, acupuncture was hardly ever applied. After Xu Dachun called acupuncture a "lost tradition" in 1757, the abolition of acupuncture and moxibustion from the Imperial Medical Academy in 1822 was a radical, but consequent act. When traditional Chinese medicine was revived after 1954, the "New Acupuncture" was completely different from what it had been in ancient China. The conclusion, however, is a positive one: The best time acupuncture ever had was not the Song dynasty or Yuan dynasty, but is now - and the future of acupuncture does not lie in old scripts, but in ourselves. PMID:23464646

  10. Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research ... very emotional." Should You Be Interested in a Clinical Trial People volunteer to take part in clinical ...

  11. Placebos used in clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guan D; We, Ding A; Chung, Leung P; Fai, Cheng K

    2008-06-01

    One of the important components in randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is blinding. The gold standard of clinical trials is to achieve a double blind design. However, only a small number of randomized controlled trials in traditional Chinese medicine have been reported, most of them are of poor quality in methodology including placebo preparation and verification. The purpose of the article is to review the validity of placebo used in blinded clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in recent years and related patents. We searched the Wanfang Database (total of 827 Chinese journals of medicine and/or pharmacy, from 1999 to 2005) and 598 full-length articles related to placebo clinical trials were found. 77 placebo blinded clinical trials for Chinese medicine were extracted by manual search from the 598 articles. After reviewing the 77 full-length articles, we found that nearly half of the clinical trials did not pay attention to the physical quality of the testing drug and placebo and whether they were of comparable physical quality. The rest provided very limited placebo information so that blinding assurance could not be assumed. Only 2 articles (2.6%) specifically validated the comparability between the testing drug and the placebo. Researchers in Chinese medicine commonly ignored the quality of the placebo in comparison to the test drug. This may be causing bias in the clinical trials. Quality specifications and evaluation of the placebo should deserve special attention to reduce bias in randomized controlled trials in TCM study. PMID:19076001

  12. [Clinical trials registers. Introduction to the topic and backgrounds].

    PubMed

    Antes, G; Dreier, G; Hasselblatt, H; Blümle, A; Schumacher, M

    2009-04-01

    It is a moral responsibility of those performing clinical studies towards patients, funding organizations, the scientific community and towards the general public to publish the results of clinical trials. Under-reporting of clinical trials with null or even negative results as well as over-reporting of trials with positive results can lead to a biased assessment of (new) treatments, which leads to overestimation of potential benefits and underestimation of potential risks. Comprehensive, publicly accessible clinical trial registries are now widely accepted as an essential tool to fill the information gap. Here, the background for implementing a clinical trials register in Germany is described, whereby publication bias, in particular, is addressed. PMID:19343283

  13. The duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Liao, S Matthew; Sheehan, Mark; Clarke, Steve

    2009-08-01

    Participants in some clinical trials are at risk of being harmed and sometimes are seriously harmed as a result of not being provided with available, relevant risk information. We argue that this situation is unacceptable and that there is a moral duty to disclose all adverse clinical trial results to participants in clinical trials. This duty is grounded in the human right not to be placed at risk of harm without informed consent. We consider objections to disclosure grounded in considerations of commercial interest, and we argue that these concerns are insufficient to override the moral duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results. However, we also develop a proposal that enables commercial interests to be protected, while promoting the duty to disclose adverse clinical trial results. PMID:19998154

  14. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  15. Effectiveness of acupuncture to treat irritable bowel syndrome: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. METHODS: We searched MEDLIINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to February 2013 for double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating the efficacy of acupuncture in the management of IBS. Studies were screened for inclusion based on randomization, controls, and measurable outcomes reported. We used the modified Jadad score for assessing the quality of the articles. STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0 were used for meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed by Begg’s and Egger’s tests. RESULTS: Six randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The modified Jadad score of the articles was > 3, and five articles were of high quality. We analyzed the heterogeneity and found that these studies did not cause heterogeneity in our meta-analysis. Begg’s test showed P = 0.707 and Egger’s test showed P = 0.334. There was no publication bias in our meta-analysis (Begg’s test, P = 0.707; Egger’s test, P = 0.334). From the forest plot, the diamond was on the right side of the vertical line and did not intersect with the line. The pooled relative risk for clinical improvement with acupuncture was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.24-2.46, P = 0.001). Using the two different systems of STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0, we confirmed the significant efficacy of acupuncture for treating IBS. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture exhibits clinically and statistically significant control of IBS symptoms. PMID:24587665

  16. Integrating pain metrics into oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cleeland, Charles S; O'Mara, Ann; Zagari, Martin; Baas, Carole

    2011-11-01

    Cancer-related pain is highly prevalent and often severe, and as a result is often one of the defining experiences for patients with malignancy. Patients and patients' families almost always live with the ever-present reality that cancer treatment and progression may be accompanied by pain. For patients nearing the end of life, most fear that their final days will be spent living with the terrible effects of the disease, the most important of which is pain. Despite this, there is far less systematic research on the mechanisms of cancer-related pain or on the development of new agents to reduce or eliminate pain in cancer patients compared with research to combat the disease itself. Further, even when the focus of research is treatment of the tumor, the effects of anticancer treatments on pain are often underreported in publications and other forums. To illustrate the relative drought in the cancer pain control area, there have been no new drugs approved for cancer-related pain in recent years. A number of methodologic and logistical challenges that hinder the ability to assess pain response in clinical trials are discussed in this article. Possible ways to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:22046026

  17. Improving Alzheimer's disease phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry D; Carrillo, Maria C; Ryan, J Michael; Gold, Michael; Gallagher, Kim; Grundman, Michael; Berman, Robert M; Ashwood, Timothy; Siemers, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many drugs have been studied as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease, but only four have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be approved as treatments, of which three are in the same class. This lack of success has raised questions both in the pharmaceutical industry and academia about the future of Alzheimer's disease therapy. The high cost and low success rate of drug development across many disease areas can be attributed, in large part, to late-stage clinical failures (Schachter and Ramoni, Nat Rev Drug Discov 2007;6:107-8). Thus, identifying in phase II, or preferably phase I, drugs that are likely to fail would have a dramatic impact on the costs associated with developing new drugs. With this in mind, the Alzheimer's Association convened a Research Roundtable on June 23 and 24, 2011, in Washington, DC, bringing together scientists from academia, industry, and government regulatory agencies to discuss strategies for improving the probability of phase II trial results predicting success when considering the go/no-go decision-making process leading to the initiation of phase III. PMID:23164548

  18. The Clinical Trials Involvement of Latino and White Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Wildes, Kimberly; Talavera, Greg; Nápoles-Springer, Anna; Gallion, Kipling; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Ethnic differences in physicians’ attitudes and behaviors related to clinical trials might partially account for disparities in clinical trial participation among Latino patients. Literature regarding Latino physicians’ involvement in clinical trials, in comparison to White physicians, could not be found. Methods Cross-sectional data from randomly selected physicians (N=695), stratified by ethnicity, were analyzed to test associations of ethnicity with physicians’ participation in and attitudes toward referral of patients to clinical trials. Results Chi-square analyses showed significant (p<0.05) associations of physician race/ethnicity and clinical trials involvement, type of trial for which the physician is likely to recommend a patient, belief in scientific value, and factors that would influence recommendation for a patient to participate. Multivariate analyses resulted in several significant (p<0.05) predictors of clinical trials outcomes, including physician race/ethnicity. Conclusions Latino physicians were significantly less involved in clinical trials than White physicians and found less scientific value in them, highlighting areas for future education and intervention. PMID:18155966

  19. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent CH; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric TC; Ng, Bacon FL; Ho, Robin ST; Tsoi, Kelvin KF; Wong, Samuel YS; Wu, Justin CY

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients’ quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited. PMID:26608664

  20. Effectiveness of acupuncture and related therapies for palliative care of cancer: overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyin; Chung, Vincent C H; Hui, Edwin P; Ziea, Eric T C; Ng, Bacon F L; Ho, Robin S T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Justin C Y

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and related therapies such as moxibustion and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are often used to manage cancer-related symptoms, but their effectiveness and safety are controversial. We conducted this overview to summarise the evidence on acupuncture for palliative care of cancer. Our systematic review synthesised the results from clinical trials of patients with any type of cancer. The methodological quality of the 23 systematic reviews in this overview, assessed using the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews Instrument, was found to be satisfactory. There is evidence for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture for the management of cancer-related fatigue, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and leucopenia in patients with cancer. There is conflicting evidence regarding the treatment of cancer-related pain, hot flashes and hiccups, and improving patients' quality of life. The available evidence is currently insufficient to support or refute the potential of acupuncture and related therapies in the management of xerostomia, dyspnea and lymphedema and in the improvement of psychological well-being. No serious adverse effects were reported in any study. Because acupuncture appears to be relatively safe, it could be considered as a complementary form of palliative care for cancer, especially for clinical problems for which conventional care options are limited. PMID:26608664

  1. How transparent are migraine clinical trials? Repository of Registered Migraine Trials (RReMiT).

    PubMed

    Dufka, Faustine L; Dworkin, Robert H; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2014-10-01

    Transparency in research requires public access to unbiased information prior to trial initiation and openly available results upon study completion. The Repository of Registered Migraine Trials is a global snapshot of registered migraine clinical trials and scorecard of results availability via the peer-reviewed literature, registry databases, and gray literature. The 295 unique clinical trials identified employed 447 investigational agents, with 30% of 154 acute migraine trials and 11% of 141 migraine prophylaxis trials testing combinations of agents. The most frequently studied categories in acute migraine trials were triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiemetics, calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists, and acetaminophen. Migraine prophylaxis trials frequently studied anticonvulsants, β-blockers, complementary/alternative therapies, antidepressants, and botulinum toxin. Overall, 237 trials were eligible for a results search. Of 163 trials completed at least 12 months earlier, 57% had peer-reviewed literature results, and registries/gray literature added another 13%. Using logistic regression analysis, studies with a sample size below the median of 141 subjects were significantly less likely to have results, but the dominant factor associated with availability of results was time since study completion. In unadjusted models, trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and trials with industry primary sponsorship were significantly more likely to have results. Recently completed trials rarely have publicly available results; 2 years after completion, the peer-reviewed literature contains results for fewer than 60% of completed migraine trials. To avoid bias, evidence-based therapy algorithms should consider factors affecting results availability. As negative trials are less likely to be published, special caution should be exercised before recommending a therapy with a high proportion of missing trial results. PMID:25194013

  2. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  3. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) – An Emerging Adjunct in Routine Oral Care

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Swapnadeep; Mehta, Parul; Indra, B Niranjanaprasad; Rastogi, Saurabh; Jain, Ankita; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Sharma, Saumya; Singh, Sanjeev; Gill, Shruti; Singh, Nisha; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) (‘acus’ (needle) + ‘punctura’ (to puncture)) is the stimulation of specific points along the skin of the body involving various methods such as penetration by thin needles or the application of heat, pressure, or laser light. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) aims to treat a range of medical and dental ailments, though is most commonly used for pain relief. This article reviews about the various possible roles of acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) in clinical dental practice. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) has potential in supplementing conventional treatment procedures by its diverse applicability outreach. Role of acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) in dental practice has been well supported by clinical trials. Its role in alleviating facial pain, pre-operative and post-operative dental pain has led to its widespread application. Its role as sole analgesic for treatment procedure has to be tested. It's It is a thought that acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) may prove an indispensible supplement to conventional treatment modalities and more of clinical trials and studies are required to prove the efficacy. Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) is not a miracle cure and is not going to replace the drill. However, the technique can be a supplement to conventional treatments in TMDs, facial pain, pain management Sjoegrens syndrome, and in phobias and anxiety. The application and use of Acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ) comes with some side effects. Proper training needs to be obtained before commencement of any procedure related to acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ). Various training programs are offered to train clinical practitioners the apt method to use acupuncture (針灸 Zhēn Jiǔ). PMID:25379462

  4. Statistical challenges for central monitoring in clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Oba, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the complexity and costs of clinical trials have increased dramatically, especially in the area of new drug development. Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has been attracting attention as an efficient and effective trial monitoring approach, which can be applied irrespectively of the trial sponsor, i.e., academic institution or pharmaceutical company. In the RBM paradigm, it is expected that a statistical approach to central monitoring can help improve the effectiveness of on-site monitoring by prioritizing and guiding site visits according to central statistical data checks, as evidenced by examples of actual trial datasets. In this review, several statistical methods for central monitoring are presented. It is important to share knowledge about the role and performance capabilities of statistical methodology among clinical trial team members (i.e., sponsors, investigators, data managers, monitors, and biostatisticians) in order to adopt central statistical monitoring for assessing data quality in the actual clinical trial. PMID:26499195

  5. [International clinical trials: perspectives of clinical research coordinators].

    PubMed

    Aotani, Eriko

    2007-02-01

    There are several different task roles among the co-medicals who are involved in international clinical trials (ICTs). In this review article, several issues related with ICTs from the view point of clinical research coordinators (CRCs) will be discussed. The discussions include interview results from eight CRCs of four institutions who have been involved in ICTs, current status of education for co-medicals in the field of ICTs, and future perspectives of ICTs from the CRC's view point. The following topics are especially focused in the discussion. 1) It is necessary to establish the infra-structure for free discussion among the ICT team so that opinions of co-medicals as the operation managers of the participating institutions can be openly shared and importantly taken into account. 2) It is also important for co-medicals to conduct research studies to clarify the problems in the current ICT support systems. 3) Lastly, the significance of early involvement of CRCs into the ICT protocol development must be emphasized, because the quality of protocols will be better improved by the practical insight of CRCs, and consequently, the accomplishment of the ICT, such as the speed and the data quality, may be accelerated. PMID:17301551

  6. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials. PMID:27458530

  7. Clinical study of electro-acupuncture treatment with different intensities for functional constipation patients.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fan; Wang, Ying; Li, Shi-Qi; Tian, Man; Zheng, Cui-Hong; Huang, Guang-Ying

    2014-10-01

    Functional constipation (FC) is a common functional bowel disorder disease that affects life quality of a large number of people. This study aimed to explore the impact of different intensities of electro-acupuncture (EA) treatment for FC patients. Totally, 111 patients with FC meeting the Rome III criteria were randomly assigned to different intensities of EA groups (low and high intensity of EA groups) and medicine-controlled (MC) group. In EA groups, patients were treated with EA at quchi (LI11) and shangjuxu (ST37) bilaterally for 4 weeks, 5 times/week in the first 2 weeks, and 3 times/week in the last 2 weeks. In MC group, 5 mg mosapride citrate was administered orally 3 times/day for 4 weeks. Spontaneous bowel movement frequency each day was recorded using a constipation diary. Self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS) were used to assess the patients' psychological state. Cortisol (CORT), substance P (SP), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of 4 weeks after treatment. As compared with the baseline, there was statistically significant increase in stool frequency every week (P<0.01), but there was no statistically significant difference among the three groups. As compared with the baseline, after 4 weeks of EA therapy, the scores of SDS and serum levels of CORT were decreased significantly in low intensity of EA group (P<0.01), and the serum levels of SP and VIP were increased significantly (P<0.05); the scores of SAS and SDS and serum levels of CORT were decreased significantly in high intensity of EA group (P<0.05), and the serum levels of SP and VIP were increased significantly (P<0.05); the serum levels of CORT and VIP were increased significantly in MC group (P<0.05). As compared with MC group, after 4 weeks of treatment, the serum levels of SP were signifcicantly increased in low intensity of EA group (P<0.01). Low and high intensities of EA could increase the stool frequency

  8. Key Concepts of Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Umscheid, Craig A.; Margolis, David J.; Grossman, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    The recent focus of federal funding on comparative effectiveness research underscores the importance of clinical trials in the practice of evidence-based medicine and health care reform. The impact of clinical trials not only extends to the individual patient by establishing a broader selection of effective therapies, but also to society as a whole by enhancing the value of health care provided. However, clinical trials also have the potential to pose unknown risks to their participants, and biased knowledge extracted from flawed clinical trials may lead to the inadvertent harm of patients. Although conducting a well-designed clinical trial may appear straightforward, it is founded on rigorous methodology and oversight governed by key ethical principles. In this review, we provide an overview of the ethical foundations of trial design, trial oversight, and the process of obtaining approval of a therapeutic, from its pre-clinical phase to post-marketing surveillance. This narrative review is based on a course in clinical trials developed by one of the authors (DJM), and is supplemented by a PubMed search predating January 2011 using the keywords “randomized controlled trial,” “patient/clinical research,” “ethics,” “phase IV,” “data and safety monitoring board,” and “surrogate endpoint.” With an understanding of the key principles in designing and implementing clinical trials, health care providers can partner with the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies to effectively compare medical therapies and thereby meet one of the essential goals of health care reform. PMID:21904102

  9. [Acupuncture and stress].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cisong; Zhu Yihui; Wei, Qin; Kou, Jun; Wen, Peipei

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between acupuncture and stress is discussed from three aspects, including is it possible for acupuncture stimulation to be a stressor, whether acupuncture will start stress reaction, and whether acupuncture effects contain some stress factors. It is believed that correct acupuncture manipulation will not cause stress response, however, under some circumstances, such as inaccurate manipulation, improper treatment or patients who are very nervous but do not receive effective intervention, acupuncture is likely to cause stress response. Acupuncture-induced stress response is totally different from acupuncture anti-stress. The possible stress factors in acupuncture effect are explored, which can provide a new angle for the research on action mechanism of acupuncture. From the view of stress to review acupuncture treatment, there are three enlightenments: emphasizing on communication between doctors and patients, avoiding over-pursuit of deqi and focusing on analysis of the body constitution. PMID:26054156

  10. Money and morals: ending clinical trials for financial reasons.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Margaret L; Kwon, Brian K; Scott, Christopher Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Too often, biopharmaceutical companies stop their clinical trials solely for financial reasons. In this chapter, we discuss this phenomenon against the backdrop of a 2011 decision by Geron Corporation to abandon its stem cell clinical trial for spinal cord injury (SCI), the preliminary results of which were released in May 2014. We argue that the resultant harms are widespread and are different in nature from the consequences of stopping trials for scientific or medical reasons. We examine the ethical and social effects that arise from such decisions and discuss them in light of ethical frameworks, including duties of individual stakeholders and corporate sponsors. We offer ways that sponsors and clinical sites can ensure that trials are responsibly started, and once started adequately protect the interests of participants. We conclude with recommendations that industry sponsors of clinical trials should adopt in order to advance a collective and patient-centered research ethic. PMID:25062706

  11. Mitigating the Effects of Nonadherence in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Shiovitz, Thomas M; Bain, Earle E; McCann, David J; Skolnick, Phil; Laughren, Thomas; Hanina, Adam; Burch, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Accounting for subject nonadherence and eliminating inappropriate subjects in clinical trials are critical elements of a successful study. Nonadherence can increase variance, lower study power, and reduce the magnitude of treatment effects. Inappropriate subjects (including those who do not have the illness under study, fail to report exclusionary conditions, falsely report medication adherence, or participate in concurrent trials) confound safety and efficacy signals. This paper, a product of the International Society for CNS Clinical Trial Methodology (ISCTM) Working Group on Nonadherence in Clinical Trials, explores and models nonadherence in clinical trials and puts forth specific recommendations to identify and mitigate its negative effects. These include statistical analyses of nonadherence data, novel protocol design, and the use of biomarkers, subject registries, and/or medication adherence technologies. PMID:26634893

  12. DICOM Structured Reporting and Cancer Clinical Trials Results

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David A

    2007-01-01

    The use of biomarkers derived from radiological images as surrogate end-points in therapeutic cancer clinical trials is well established. DICOM is the ubiquitous standard for the interchange of images for both clinical use as well as research. It also has capabilities for the exchange of image-related information, including categorical and quantitative information derived from images. The use of DICOM Structured Reporting for the encoding and interchange of clinical trial results in a standard manner is reviewed. PMID:19390663

  13. Learning from hackers: open-source clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adam G; Day, Richard O; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico

    2012-05-01

    Open sharing of clinical trial data has been proposed as a way to address the gap between the production of clinical evidence and the decision-making of physicians. A similar gap was addressed in the software industry by their open-source software movement. Here, we examine how the social and technical principles of the movement can guide the growth of an open-source clinical trial community. PMID:22553248

  14. Clinical Trial Design Issues in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The field of clinical trials and therapeutics in Alzheimer Disease (AD) is little more than 20 years old. Considerable progress has been made in crafting appropriate designs for clinical trials of promising therapeutic agents for AD. This article reviews basic issues in diagnostic criteria, choice of outcome measures, duration of trials and analytic strategies. Through trial and error, a general set of strategies has evolved for the assessment of putative therapies for mild to moderate AD. The experience of the past two decades has set the stage for discovering the next generation of anti-AD drugs and introducing those therapies at milder stages of the disease. PMID:19057167

  15. Randomization in clinical trials: conclusions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lachin, J M; Matts, J P; Wei, L J

    1988-12-01

    The statistical properties of simple (complete) randomization, permuted-block (or simply blocked) randomization, and the urn adaptive biased-coin randomization are summarized. These procedures are contrasted to covariate adaptive procedures such as minimization and to response adaptive procedures such as the play-the-winner rule. General recommendations are offered regarding the use of complete, permuted-block, or urn randomization. In a large double-masked trial, any of these procedures may be acceptable. For a given trial, the relative merits of each procedure should be carefully weighed in relation to the characteristics of the trial. Important considerations are the size of the trial, overall as well as within the smallest subgroup to be employed in a subgroup-specific analysis, whether or not the trial is to be masked, and the resources needed to perform the proper randomization-based permutational analysis. PMID:3203526

  16. Is Religiosity Related to Attitudes Towards Clinical Trials Participation?

    PubMed Central

    Daverio-Zanetti, Svetlana; Schultz, Kathryn; del Campo, Miguel A. Martin; Malcarne, Vanessa; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that a low percentage of cancer patients enroll in cancer clinical trials. This is especially true among minority groups such as Hispanic Americans. Considering the importance of religion in the Hispanic American community, it is important to understand its relationship to perceptions of clinical trials. Five hundred and three Latina women completed the Barriers to Clinical Trials Participation Scale and the Duke University Religion Index. For the total sample, higher organizational and intrinsic religiosity were significantly associated with perceived lack of community support for clinical trials participation. In subgroup analysis, the relationship between organizational religiosity and lack of support was stronger among Latinas who were Spanish language-preference, and Latinas who were Catholic. Intrinsic religiosity was associated with mistrust among Spanish language-preference Latinas, and both organizational and intrinsic religiosity were associated with lack of familiarity with clinical trials among Christian (non-Catholic) Latinas. These results indicate religious institutions that serve Latinas may be an effective venue for disseminating clinical trial education programs to improve attitudes toward clinical trials participation. PMID:24953236

  17. Is religiosity related to attitudes toward clinical trials participation?

    PubMed

    Daverio-Zanetti, Svetlana; Schultz, Kathryn; del Campo, Miguel A Martin; Malcarne, Vanessa; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that a low percentage of cancer patients enroll in cancer clinical trials. This is especially true among minority groups such as Hispanic Americans. Considering the importance of religion in the Hispanic American community, it is important to understand its relationship to perceptions of clinical trials. Five hundred and three Latina women completed the Barriers to Clinical Trials Participation Scale and the Duke University Religion Index. For the total sample, higher organizational and intrinsic religiosity was significantly associated with a perceived lack of community support for clinical trials participation. In subgroup analysis, the relationship between organizational religiosity and lack of support was stronger among Latinas who were Spanish language preferred and Latinas who were Catholic. Intrinsic religiosity was associated with mistrust among Spanish language-preferred Latinas, and both organizational and intrinsic religiosities were associated with a lack of familiarity with clinical trials among Christian (non-Catholic) Latinas. These results indicate that religious institutions that serve Latinas may be an effective venue for disseminating clinical trial education programs to improve attitudes toward clinical trials participation. PMID:24953236

  18. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    PubMed

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level. PMID:25315593

  19. [Design and establishment of modern literature database about acupuncture Deqi].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng-rong; Qian, Gui-feng; Pan, Qiu-yin; Wang, Yang; Xin, Si-yuan; Li, Jing; Hao, Jie; Hu, Ni-juan; Zhu, Jiang; Ma, Liang-xiao

    2015-02-01

    A search on acupuncture Deqi was conducted using four Chinese-language biomedical databases (CNKI, Wan-Fang, VIP and CBM) and PubMed database and using keywords "Deqi" or "needle sensation" "needling feeling" "needle feel" "obtaining qi", etc. Then, a "Modern Literature Database for Acupuncture Deqi" was established by employing Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition, introducing the contents, data types, information structure and logic constraint of the system table fields. From this Database, detailed inquiries about general information of clinical trials, acupuncturists' experience, ancient medical works, comprehensive literature, etc. can be obtained. The present databank lays a foundation for subsequent evaluation of literature quality about Deqi and data mining of undetected Deqi knowledge. PMID:25845226

  20. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age. PMID:26927005

  1. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide 1989-2004-an overview.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo; Edelstein, Richard M

    2004-06-01

    In 1989, Rosenberg et al. performed the first human gene therapy trial when they used a retrovirus to introduce the gene coding for resistance to neomycin into human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes before infusing them into five patients with advanced melanoma. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using retroviral gene transduction in humans and set the stage for further studies. Since then, over 900 clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. These trials have been designed to establish feasibility and safety, to demonstrate the reality of expression of therapeutic protein(s) in vivo by the genes transferred and, in some cases, to show therapeutic benefit. There is no single source of information that presents an overview of all the clinical trials undertaken worldwide. In 1997 we set up a database to bring all the information on clinical trials together as comprehensively and as globally as possible. The data were compiled and are regularly updated from official agency sources, the published literature, presentations at conferences and from information kindly provided by investigators or trial sponsors themselves. As of January 31, 2004, we have identified 918 trials in 24 countries. The USA accounts for two-thirds of these trials. Cancer is by far the most common disease indication, followed by inherited monogenic diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Viral vectors have been the most frequently used vehicles for transferring genes into human cells, with retroviruses and adenoviruses representing the vast majority. Plasmid (naked) DNA and other non-viral vectors have been used in one-quarter of the trials. Over 100 distinct genes have been transferred. This article aims to provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. Details of the data presented, including an interactive, searchable database that currently holds information on 918

  2. Acupuncture compared to oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis – a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Pfab, Florian; Kirchner, Marie-Therese; Huss-Marp, Johannes; Schuster, Tibor; Schalock, Peter C.; Fuqin, Jiang; Athanasiadis, Georgios I.; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Darsow, Ulf; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Background Itch is the major symptom of atopic dermatitis (AD). Acupuncture has been shown to exhibit a significant effect on experimental itch in AD. Our study evaluated acupuncture and anti-histamine itch therapy (cetirizine) on type-I-hypersensitivity itch and skin reaction in AD using a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Methods Allergen–induced itch was evaluated in 20 AD patients after several interventions in separate sessions: preventive (preceding) and abortive (concurrent) verum acupuncture (VAp and VAa), cetirizine (10mg, VC), corresponding placebo interventions (preventive, PAp, and abortive, PAa, placebo acupuncture; placebo cetirizine pill, PC), and a no-intervention control (NI). Itch was induced on the forearm and temperature modulated over 20 minutes, using our validated model. Outcome parameters included itch intensity, wheal and flare size, and the D2 Attention test. Results Mean itch intensity (SE: 0.31 each) was significantly lower following VAa (31.9) compared to all other groups (PAa: 36.5; VC: 36.8; VAp: 37.6; PC: 39.8; PAp: 39.9; NI: 45.7, p<0.05). There was no significant difference between VAp and VC (p>0.1), though both therapies were significantly superior to their respective placebo interventions (p<0.05). Flare size following VAp was significantly smaller (p=0.034) than PAp. D2 attention test score was significantly lower following VC compared to all other groups (p<0.001). Conclusions Both VA and cetirizine significantly reduced type-I-hypersensitivity itch in AD patients, compared to both placebo and NI. Timing of acupuncture application was important, as VAa had the most significant effect on itch, potentially due to counter-irritation and/or distraction. Itch reduction following cetirizine coincided with reduced attention. PMID:22313287

  3. Acupuncture for postoperative pain in laparoscopic surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghoon; Park, Jimin; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jung Won; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sun Jin; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Jae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This review aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for patients with postoperative pain after laparoscopic surgery. Methods and analysis We will search the following databases from their inception to October 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), three Chinese databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP) and the Wanfang database), one Japanese database (Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic (J-STAGE)) and eight Korean databases (Korean Association of Medical Journal Edition, Korean Medical Database, Korean Studies Information Service System, National Discovery for Science Leaders, Database Periodical Information Academic, Korean National Assembly Digital Library, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System and Korean Traditional Knowledge Portal). All randomised controlled trials of acupuncture for postoperative pain after laparoscopic surgery will be considered for inclusion. The risk of bias and reporting quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and the revised STandards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). The risk ratio for dichotomous data and mean difference or standard mean difference for continuous data will be calculated with 95% CIs. Dissemination The results of this review will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication or conference presentation. Our findings will summarise the current evidence of acupuncture to treat postoperative pain after laparoscopic surgery, and may provide important guidance for acupuncture usage after laparoscopic surgery for clinicians and patients. Trial registration number

  4. Clinical Trials For Cytoprotection In Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Labiche, Lise A.; Grotta, James C.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: To date, many cytoprotective drugs have reached the stage of pivotal phase 3 efficacy trials in acute stroke patients. (Table 1) Unfortunately, throughout the neuroprotective literature, the phrase “failure to demonstrate efficacy” prevails as a common thread among the many neutral or negative trials, despite the largely encouraging results encountered in preclinical studies. The reasons for this discrepancy are multiple, and have been discussed by Dr. Zivin in his review. Many of the recent trials have addressed deficiencies of the previous ones with more rigorous trial design, including more specific patient selection criteria (ensure homogeneity of stroke location and severity), stratified randomization algorithms (time-to-treat), narrowed therapeutic time-window and pharmacokinetic monitoring. Current trials have also incorporated biologic surrogate markers of toxicity and outcome such as drug levels and neuroimaging. Lastly, multi-modal therapies and coupled cytoprotection/reperfusion strategies are being investigated to optimize tissue salvage. This review will focus on individual therapeutic strategies and we will emphasize what we have learned from these trials both in terms of trial design and the biologic effect (or lack thereof) of these agents. PMID:15717007

  5. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies. PMID:26220186

  6. A comparison of the clinical effectiveness of various acupuncture points in reducing anxiety to facilitate hypnotic induction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Gabriel P

    2013-01-01

    This study determined if any acupuncture point (acupoint) known for its calming effects also aided hypnotic induction. Hypnosis was offered to 108 patients requiring minor surgical or dental procedures. All had a history of panic attacks and surgical or dental phobias that complicated or prevented treatment. Unpleasant intruding thoughts of imminent invasive treatments handicapped their ability to accept hypnotic induction; however, acupuncture therapy was proposed to the consenting patient to facilitate hypnotic induction and augment its effects. Each patient received one selected acupoint for acupuncture therapy. Of the 6 acupoints used (LI 4, H 7, SP 6, P 6, GV 24, and Ext-hn-21), GV 24 was best at enhancing hypnotic induction whereas LI 4 produced the best muscular relaxation and P 6 for reducing tension. PMID:23679111

  7. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Rashmi Ashish; Borde, Sanghratna Umakant; Madas, Sapna Amol; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Limaye, Sneha Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. Objective: To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. Methods: We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Results: Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%), lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%), and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%). About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%), and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject's fear for study procedures (47%) and side effects (44%) were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Conclusion: Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India. PMID:27453831

  8. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS

    PubMed Central

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J.

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine. PMID:26776196

  9. [Clinical randomized controlled trials of acupoint catgut-embedding for simple obesity: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian-Qiong; Song, Xiang; Chen, Ying; Liang, Li-Chang; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2014-06-01

    The clinical therapeutic effect of acupoint catgut-embedding for simple obesity was systemically analyzed to provide reference and assistance for its clinical treatment and research. By searching in the CBM, CNKI, VIP, Wanfang, Pubmed, Springer and Medline databases, clinical randomized controlled trials (RCT) of acupoint catgut-embedding for simple obesity published from Jan, 2009 to July, 2013 were collected while Revman 5. 2 software was applied to perform the Meta-analysis. Totally 19 articles were acquired with 1 658 cases involved. The effective rate was selected as primary outcome measure in 19 articles. The Meta-analysis was performed among homogeneous researches. The results indicated that compared with other therapies, pooled OR of acupoint catgut-embedding was 2.45 with 95% CI [1.81, 3.32]; in the test for overall effect, Z = 5.81, implying the efficacy difference of two therapies was significant in the treatment of simple obesity (P < 0.01). In subgroups analysis, in the event of treatment session with more than 3 months, compared with other therapies, pooled OR of acupoint catgut-embedding was 2.61 with 95% CI [1.53, 4.46]; in test for overall effect, Z = 3.51, implying the efficacy difference of two therapies was significant in the treatment of simple obesity (P < 0.01); in the event of treatment session with less than 3 months, compared with other therapies, pooled OR of acupoint catgut-embedding was 2.38 with 95% CI [1.65, 3.44]; in test for overall effect, Z = 4.46, implying in the treatment of simple obesity the efficacy difference of two therapies was significant (P < 0.01). Compared with electroacupuncture, OR of acupoint catgut-embedding was 1.79, 95% CI [1.08, 2.95] (P = 0.02). Compared with acupuncture, OR of acupoint catgut-embedding was 1.89, 95% CI [1.16, 3.09] (P = 0.01), which explained that compared with electroacupuncture and acupuncture, the efficacy of acupoint catgut-embedding was significantly different. In a word, the clinical

  10. Statistical Controversies in Reporting of Clinical Trials: Part 2 of a 4-Part Series on Statistics for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Stuart J; McMurray, John J V; Collier, Tim J

    2015-12-15

    This paper tackles several statistical controversies that are commonly faced when reporting a major clinical trial. Topics covered include: multiplicity of data, interpreting secondary endpoints and composite endpoints, the value of covariate adjustment, the traumas of subgroup analysis, assessing individual benefits and risks, alternatives to analysis by intention to treat, interpreting surprise findings (good and bad), and the overall quality of clinical trial reports. All is put in the context of topical cardiology trial examples and is geared to help trialists steer a wise course in their statistical reporting, thereby giving readers a balanced account of trial findings. PMID:26670066

  11. Project Management of Randomized Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Context: A well-structured protocol for a clinical trial may be able to answer clinical questions, but it cannot be deemed enough to ensure success in the face of incompetent management of time as well as human and economic resources. To address this problem, in this article, we present our literature review on evidence as to how a good knowledge of proper management among researchers can enhance the likelihood of the success of clinical trial projects. Evidence Acquisition: Using multiple search strategies, we conducted a literature review on published studies in the English language from 2002 to 2012 by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and EMBASE. Results: Our review suggests that a successful trial requires a work plan or work scope as well as a timeline. The trial manager should subsequently manage the study in accordance with the plan and the timeline. Many research units have called for a clinical project manager with scientific background and regulatory skills to effect coordination among various aspects of a clinical trial. Conclusions: Project management may benefit both the managerial and scientific aspects of medical projects and reduce fund waste. However, little has been written to date on project management in the context of clinical research. The suggestions represent the views of the individual authors. To provide a high level of evidence in this regard, we recommend that a randomized controlled trial be performed to compare trial projects progressed with and without the use of project management. PMID:26430517

  12. Sample sizes in dosage investigational clinical trials: a systematic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji-Han; Su, Qian-Min; Yang, Juan; Lv, Ying-Hua; He, Ying-Chun; Chen, Jun-Chao; Xu, Ling; Wang, Kun; Zheng, Qing-Shan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of investigational phase II clinical trials is to explore indications and effective doses. However, as yet, there is no clear rule and no related published literature about the precise suitable sample sizes to be used in phase II clinical trials. To explore this, we searched for clinical trials in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry using the keywords "dose-finding" or "dose-response" and "Phase II". The time span of the search was September 20, 1999, to December 31, 2013. A total of 2103 clinical trials were finally included in our review. Regarding sample sizes, 1,156 clinical trials had <40 participants in each group, accounting for 55.0% of the studies reviewed, and only 17.2% of the studies reviewed had >100 patient cases in a single group. Sample sizes used in parallel study designs tended to be larger than those of crossover designs (median sample size 151 and 37, respectively). In conclusion, in the earlier phases of drug research and development, there are a variety of designs for dosage investigational studies. The sample size of each trial should be comprehensively considered and selected according to the study design and purpose. PMID:25609916

  13. Perception of acupuncture among users and nonusers: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kara; Siu, Judy Yuen-Man; Fung, Timothy K F

    2016-01-01

    This study uses a qualitative methodology to examine the perception of acupuncture among users and nonusers. Altogether 37 participants, age 35 or older, were interviewed. Participants' perception of advantages and disadvantages of adopting acupuncture, and their criteria in selecting acupuncturists, were collected. Results found that among the user group, acupuncture was perceived as being effective, having little side effects, and generating lasting impact. Among nonusers, acupuncture was perceived as lacking a clinical base, high risk, and nonstandardized. Nonusers had less confidence in acupuncture than biomedicine. Participants relied on social communication and the practitioner's professional qualifications in choosing acupuncturists. Marketing implications are discussed. PMID:26950540

  14. Feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials: A case study of breast cancer trials from ClinicalTrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Gao, Junfeng; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background When standard therapies fail, clinical trials provide experimental treatment opportunities for patients with drug-resistant illnesses or terminal diseases. Clinical Trials can also provide free treatment and education for individuals who otherwise may not have access to such care. To find relevant clinical trials, patients often search online; however, they often encounter a significant barrier due to the large number of trials and in-effective indexing methods for reducing the trial search space. Objectives This study explores the feasibility of feature-based indexing, clustering, and search of clinical trials and informs designs to automate these processes. Methods We decomposed 80 randomly selected stage III breast cancer clinical trials into a vector of eligibility features, which were organized into a hierarchy. We clustered trials based on their eligibility feature similarities. In a simulated search process, manually selected features were used to generate specific eligibility questions to filter trials iteratively. Results We extracted 1,437 distinct eligibility features and achieved an inter-rater agreement of 0.73 for feature extraction for 37 frequent features occurring in more than 20 trials. Using all the 1,437 features we stratified the 80 trials into six clusters containing trials recruiting similar patients by patient-characteristic features, five clusters by disease-characteristic features, and two clusters by mixed features. Most of the features were mapped to one or more Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, demonstrating the utility of named entity recognition prior to mapping with the UMLS for automatic feature extraction. Conclusions It is feasible to develop feature-based indexing and clustering methods for clinical trials to identify trials with similar target populations and to improve trial search efficiency. PMID:23666475

  15. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  16. Acupuncture for chronic pain: individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Maschino, Alexandra C.; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh; Victor, Norbert; Foster, Nadine E.; Sherman, Karen J.; Witt, Claudia M.; Linde, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for four chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain where allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible trials, with a total of 17,922 patients analyzed. Results In the primary analysis including all eligible trials, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no acupuncture control for each pain condition (all p<0.001). After exclusion of an outlying set of trials that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores 0.23 (95% C.I. 0.13, 0.33), 0.16 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.25) and 0.15 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.24) standard deviations lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% C.I. 0.51, 0.58), 0.57 (95% C.I. 0.50, 0.64) and 0.42 (95% C.I. 0.37, 0.46). These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias. Conclusions Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. PMID:22965186

  17. African American women's perceptions of cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Godley, Paul; Dimartino, Lisa; White, Brandolyn; Odom, Janice; Richmond, Alan; Carpenter, William

    2014-10-01

    Cancer clinical trials are important for resolving cancer health disparities for several reasons; however, clinical trial participation among African Americans is significantly lower than Caucasians. This study engaged focus groups of 82 female African American cancer survivors or cancer caregivers, including those in better resourced, more urban areas and less resourced, more rural areas. Informed by an integrated conceptual model, the focus groups examined perceptions of cancer clinical trials and identified leverage points that future interventions may use to improve enrollment rates. Study findings highlight variation in community knowledge regarding cancer clinical trials, and the importance of community education regarding clinical trials and overcoming historical stigma associated with clinical research specifically and the health care system more generally. Study participants commented on the centrality of churches in their communities, and thus the promise of the church as loci of such education. Findings also suggested the value of informed community leaders as community information sources, including community members who have a previous diagnosis of cancer and clinical trial experience. The sample size and location of the focus groups may limit the generalizability of the results. Since the women in the focus groups were either cancer survivors or caregivers, they may have different experiences than nonparticipants who lack the close connection with cancer. Trust in the health system and in one's physician was seen as important factors associated with patient willingness to enroll in clinical trials, and participants suggested that physicians who were compassionate and who engaged and educated their patients would build important trust requisite for patient participation in clinical trials. PMID:24905181

  18. African American women's perceptions of cancer clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Godley, Paul; Dimartino, Lisa; White, Brandolyn; Odom, Janice; Richmond, Alan; Carpenter, William

    2014-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials are important for resolving cancer health disparities for several reasons; however, clinical trial participation among African Americans is significantly lower than Caucasians. This study engaged focus groups of 82 female African American cancer survivors or cancer caregivers, including those in better resourced, more urban areas and less resourced, more rural areas. Informed by an integrated conceptual model, the focus groups examined perceptions of cancer clinical trials and identified leverage points that future interventions may use to improve enrollment rates. Study findings highlight variation in community knowledge regarding cancer clinical trials, and the importance of community education regarding clinical trials and overcoming historical stigma associated with clinical research specifically and the health care system more generally. Study participants commented on the centrality of churches in their communities, and thus the promise of the church as loci of such education. Findings also suggested the value of informed community leaders as community information sources, including community members who have a previous diagnosis of cancer and clinical trial experience. The sample size and location of the focus groups may limit the generalizability of the results. Since the women in the focus groups were either cancer survivors or caregivers, they may have different experiences than nonparticipants who lack the close connection with cancer. Trust in the health system and in one's physician was seen as important factors associated with patient willingness to enroll in clinical trials, and participants suggested that physicians who were compassionate and who engaged and educated their patients would build important trust requisite for patient participation in clinical trials. PMID:24905181

  19. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... other federal agencies, pharmaceutical companies, universities and nonprofit organizations. Here's how it works. After you enter the ClinicalTrials.gov Web site, you can search for a trial by the name of the disease, the location of the study, the type of treatment or the sponsoring institution. ...

  20. Reforms speed initiation of NCI-sponsored clinical trials

    Cancer.gov

    The process of opening a cancer clinical trial for patient accrual often takes years, and research has shown that trials which are slow to register patients often fail to finish. Following a thorough review, NCI’s Operational Efficiency Working Group prod

  1. The Place of Adoption in the NIDA Clinical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Jessup, Martha A.; Guydish, Joseph; Manser, Sarah Turcotte; Tajima, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was established in 1999 to determine effectiveness of drug abuse treatment interventions among diverse client populations and settings. To address dissemination of research findings, the CTN also has as its mission the transfer of research findings to treatment providers. In a qualitative study of adoption of evidence based practice in the context of two CTN clinical trials, we interviewed 29 participants from seven organizational levels of the multisite study organization about post-trial adoption, their role in the clinical trial, and interactions between the research initiative and clinic staff and setting. Analysis of interview data revealed a range of opinion among participants on the place of adoption within the CTN. Innovation within the CTN to support adoption and further observational research on dynamics of adoption within the CTN can increase dissemination of evidence-based drug abuse treatment interventions in the future. PMID:20126428

  2. Textual inference for eligibility criteria resolution in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Hebert, Courtney; Lopetegui, Marcelo; de Marneffe, Marie-Catherine; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Lai, Albert M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical trials are essential for determining whether new interventions are effective. In order to determine the eligibility of patients to enroll into these trials, clinical trial coordinators often perform a manual review of clinical notes in the electronic health record of patients. This is a very time-consuming and exhausting task. Efforts in this process can be expedited if these coordinators are directed toward specific parts of the text that are relevant for eligibility determination. In this study, we describe the creation of a dataset that can be used to evaluate automated methods capable of identifying sentences in a note that are relevant for screening a patient's eligibility in clinical trials. Using this dataset, we also present results for four simple methods in natural language processing that can be used to automate this task. We found that this is a challenging task (maximum F-score=26.25), but it is a promising direction for further research. PMID:26376462

  3. Temporal knowledge representation for scheduling tasks in clinical trial protocols.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Kahn, Michael; Gennari, John

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trial protocols include detailed temporal constraints on treatment and associated tasks. Unlike health-care guidelines, protocols are highly prescriptive. Therefore, informatics applications that enforce such temporal constraints are more directly useful with protocols than with guidelines. Although there are some temporal knowledge representation efforts for health-care guidelines, we find these to be insufficiently expressive for clinical trial protocols. In this paper, we focus on temporal knowledge representation for clinical trial protocols and the task of patient-specific scheduling in protocols. We define a temporal ontology, use it to encode clinical trial protocols, and describe a prototype tool to carry out patient-specific scheduling for the tasks in protocols. We predict that an expressive temporal knowledge representation can support a number of scheduling and management tasks for protocol-based care. PMID:12463951

  4. Clinical Research Trials and You: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... volunteers and to preserve the integrity of the science. Ethical guidelines in place today were primarily a response to past research abuses. Informed Consent Informed consent is the process of learning the key facts about a clinical trial before ...

  5. What Are the Possible Benefits and Risks of Clinical Trials?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of questions to ask your doctor and the research staff, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" Featured Video ... children and their own motivations for pursuing research in this field. Learn more at http://www. ...

  6. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    PubMed Central

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  7. ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Contents “...a powerful tool for the healthcare consumer” Clinical trials are research studies that use volunteers to help medical professionals test new treatments for a wide array of diseases and ...

  8. Processes for quality improvements in radiation oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, T J; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials. PMID:18406943

  9. NIH-Supported Clinical Trial Finds Antidepressant Reduces Alzheimer's Agitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR NIH-supported clinical trial finds antidepressant reduces Alzheimer’s agitation February 25, 2014 NIH-funded researchers are testing interventions to alleviate psychiatric ...

  10. Strategies for dealing with fraud in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Herson, Jay

    2016-02-01

    Research misconduct and fraud in clinical research is an increasing problem facing the scientific community. This problem is expected to increase due to discoveries in central statistical monitoring and with the increase in first-time clinical trial investigators in the increasingly global reach of oncology clinical trials. This paper explores the most common forms of fraud in clinical trials in order to develop offensive and defensive strategies to deal with fraud. The offensive strategies are used when fraud is detected during a trial and the defensive strategies are those design strategies that seek to minimize or eliminate the effect of fraud. This leads to a proposed fraud recovery plan (FRP) that would be specified before the start of a clinical trial and would indicate actions to be taken upon detecting fraud of different types. Statistical/regulatory issues related to fraud include: dropping all patients from a site that committed fraud, or just the fraudulent data (perhaps replacing the latter through imputation); the role of intent-to-treat analysis; effect on a planned interim analysis; effect on stratified analyses and model adjustment when fraud is detected in covariates; effect on trial-wide randomization, etc. The details of a typical defensive strategy are also presented. It is concluded that it is best to follow a defensive strategy and to have an FRP in place to follow if fraud is detected during the trial. PMID:26194810

  11. Review of clinical trials for mitochondrial disorders: 1997-2012.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 15 years, some 16 open and controlled clinical trials for potential treatments of mitochondrial diseases have been reported or are in progress, and are summarized and reviewed herein. These include trials of administering dichloroacetate (an activator of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex), arginine or citrulline (precursors of nitric oxide), coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10; part of the electron transport chain and an antioxidant), idebenone (a synthetic analogue of CoQ10), EPI-743 (a novel oral potent 2-electron redox cycling agent), creatine (a precursor of phosphocreatine), combined administration (of creatine, α-lipoate, and CoQ10), and exercise training (to increase muscle mitochondria). These trials have included patients with various mitochondrial disorders, a selected subcategory of mitochondrial disorders, or specific mitochondrial disorders (Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). The trial designs have varied from open-label/uncontrolled, open-label/controlled, or double-blind/placebo-controlled/crossover. Primary outcomes have ranged from single, clinically-relevant scores to multiple measures. Eight of these trials have been well-controlled, completed trials. Of these only 1 (treatment with creatine) showed a significant change in primary outcomes, but this was not reproduced in 2 subsequent trials with creatine with different patients. One trial (idebenone treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy) did not show significant improvement in the primary outcome, but there was significant improvement in a subgroup of patients. Despite the paucity of benefits found so far, well-controlled clinical trials are essential building blocks in the continuing search for more effective treatment of mitochondrial disease, and current trials based on information gained from these prior experiences are in progress. Because of difficulties in recruiting sufficient mitochondrial disease patients

  12. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  13. Acupuncture research is part of my life.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used in China for more than 3,000 years. Although the clinical application of acupuncture is very popular, its mechanisms of action are still unclear. Beginning in the middle of the 20th century, a boost of research on acupuncture emerged in China, and I was one of the researchers involved in this episode. With the help of modern neuroscience, the mechanisms of acupuncture for pain management have been unraveled at least partly. This article describes my decision as a young medical graduate to devote my life to research on acupuncture and pain medicine; it has since been my life's journey-one full of challenges and happiness, pitfalls and achievements. PMID:19638141

  14. Unconventional Anticancer Agents: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Kuo, Joyce; Cassileth, Barrie R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose A substantial number of cancer patients turn to treatments other than those recommended by mainstream oncologists in an effort to sustain tumor remission or halt the spread of cancer. These unconventional approaches include botanicals, high-dose nutritional supplementation, off-label pharmaceuticals, and animal products. The objective of this study was to review systematically the methodologies applied in clinical trials of unconventional treatments specifically for cancer. Methods MEDLINE 1966 to 2005 was searched using approximately 200 different medical subject heading terms (eg, alternative medicine) and free text words (eg, laetrile). We sought prospective clinical trials of unconventional treatments in cancer patients, excluding studies with only symptom control or nonclinical (eg, immune) end points. Trial data were extracted by two reviewers using a standardized protocol. Results We identified 14,735 articles, of which 214, describing 198 different clinical trials, were included. Twenty trials were phase I, three were phase I and II, 70 were phase II, and 105 were phase III. Approximately half of the trials investigated fungal products, 20% investigated other botanicals, 10% investigated vitamins and supplements, and 10% investigated off-label pharmaceuticals. Only eight of the phase I trials were dose-finding trials, and a mere 20% of phase II trials reported a statistical design. Of the 27 different agents tested in phase III, only one agent had a prior dose-finding trial, and only for three agents was the definitive study initiated after the publication of phase II data. Conclusion Unconventional cancer treatments have not been subject to appropriate early-phase trial development. Future research on unconventional therapies should involve dose-finding and phase II studies to determine the suitability of definitive trials. PMID:16382123

  15. 78 FR 7437 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN); The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... publication. Proposed Collection: The Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, 0925-0600,...

  16. Using Registries to Recruit Subjects for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng H; Thomas, Matthew; MacEachern, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Aim We studied the use of patient/disease registries to recruit potential subjects for prospective clinical trials - describing the number, types and major benefits of using this approach. Methods In December 2013, we conducted a focused database search in PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science for studies (English language only) that used registries to recruit subjects for clinical trials published in 2004-2013. Of the 233 unique citations identified, 21 used registries to recruit subjects - 10 papers and 11 abstracts. Pearling and search for subsequent full papers of the abstracts identified 4 more papers. Results Our analysis, based on these 25 citations, showed 14 are related to cancer, 3 to diabetes mellitus, 1 each to stroke, asthma, and celiac disease and 5 are disease neutral. Many types of registries (population-based cancer, quality improvement, disease-specific, web-based disease-neutral registries, local general practice registers, and national health database) are used to recruit subjects for clinical trials and uncover new knowledge. Overall, 16 registries are in the US, 4 in UK, 1 each in Canada, Spain, Australia and I in many countries. Registries can identify very large number of subjects for screening for eligibility for clinical trials, especially in very large trials, rare disease trials, and trials involving minority patients. Conclusions Registries can retrospectively identify very large numbers of potential subjects for screening for eligibility and enrollment in prospective clinical trials. This matching can lead to more timely recruitment and help solve a major problem in conducting clinical trials. PMID:25545027

  17. Meta-analysis of five photodisinfection clinical trials for periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. To evaluate the efficacy of PDT in vivo a series of clinical trials was carried out in multiple centers and populations. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment level, pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing were all evaluated. All groups received the standard of care, scaling and root planing, and the treatment group additionally received a single treatment of PDT. Of the total 309 patients and over 40,000 pockets treated in these 5 trials it was determined that photodynamic therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters over scaling and root planing alone.

  18. Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: clinical trial in fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). The Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, successfully enrolled 189 community-living adu...

  19. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Cancer.gov

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  20. Bach flower remedies: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Edzard

    2010-01-01

    Bach flower remedies continue to be popular and its proponents make a range of medicinal claims for them. The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence for these claims. Five electronic databases were searched without restrictions on time or language. All randomised clinical trials of flower remedies were included. Seven such studies were located. All but one were placebo-controlled. All placebo-controlled trials failed to demonstrate efficacy. It is concluded that the most reliable clinical trials do not show any differences between flower remedies and placebos. PMID:20734279

  1. Access to medications and conducting clinical trials in LMICs.

    PubMed

    Okpechi, Ikechi G; Swanepoel, Charles R; Venter, Francois

    2015-03-01

    Access to essential medications is limited in many low-to-middle income countries (LMICs) and those that are available may be prohibitively expensive to the general population. Clinical trials have been suggested as an approach to improve drug access in LMICs but the number of trials conducted in these countries is small because of regulatory issues and a lack of infrastructure. In this article, Nature Reviews Nephrology asks three experts their opinions on how to improve drug access and increase the numbers of clinical trials conducted in LMICs. PMID:25668002

  2. Clinical Trials: past, current and future for atypical parkinsonian syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Richard M.; Boxer, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no effective, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatments for atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), dementia with lewy bodies (DLB) or multiple system atrophy (MSA). Previous treatment trials for these disorders were focused on symptomatic support and did not affect disease progression. Recent breakthroughs in neuropathology and pathophysiology have allowed a new eunderstanding of these disorders and investigation into potentially disease modifying therapies. Randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these disorders will be reviewed here. Suggestions for future therapeutic targets, clinical trial design, with a focus on PSP will also be provided. PMID:24963682

  3. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge generated by site representatives through their participation in clinical trials is valuable for testing new products in use and obtaining final market approval. The leverage of this important knowledge is however challenged as the former direct relationships between in-house staff in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited research exists on the full range of clinical practice insights obtained by investigators during and after clinical trials and how well these insights are transferred to study sponsors. This study explores the important knowledge-transfer processes between sites and sponsors and to what extent sites' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process. PMID:23454567

  4. A General Framework for the Evaluation of Clinical Trial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.; Alperson, Sunny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Flawed evaluation of clinical trial quality allows flawed trials to thrive (get funded, obtain IRB approval, get published, serve as the basis of regulatory approval, and set policy). A reasonable evaluation of clinical trial quality must recognize that any one of a large number of potential biases could by itself completely invalidate the trial results. In addition, clever new ways to distort trial results toward a favored outcome may be devised at any time. Finally, the vested financial and other interests of those conducting the experiments and publishing the reports must cast suspicion on any inadequately reported aspect of clinical trial quality. Putting these ideas together, we see that an adequate evaluation of clinical quality would need to enumerate all known biases, update this list periodically, score the trial with regard to each potential bias on a scale of 0% to 100%, offer partial credit for only that which can be substantiated, and then multiply (not add) the component scores to obtain an overall score between 0% and 100%. We will demonstrate that current evaluations fall well short of these ideals. PMID:19463104

  5. [The origin of pediatric acupuncture technique: beginnings and historical background of pediatric acupuncture practitioners].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hitoshi; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2010-09-01

    Pediatric acupuncture for infants in Japan has its own special method. There is no specialized literature about it that was published before the 20th century and it has not been investigated systematically. To elucidate the history of pediatric acupuncture, we investigated fragmented information on pediatric acupuncture written in the medical literature published before the Meiji Restoration and articles on traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) and acupuncture published after the Meiji Restoration. We analyzed the history of Japanese pediatric acupuncture from the viewpoints of the acupuncture needles and the methods. As a result, we found that pediatricians used fragments of broken pottery for the treatment in the 1650's. This finding suggests that the present pediatric acupuncture needles originated from "ho-shin" which was used for the treatment of "oketsu" for infants (in ancient China) and that the present pediatric acupressure technique was derived from the pediatric acupressure by using friction with small stones. In addition, our analysis suggests that the integration of the edged pediatric acupuncture needles and the acupressure-like technique correlates with the "Regulations for Acupuncture and Moxibustion clinics" published by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Japan and enforced in 1912. PMID:21560321

  6. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Kendle, Andrew P.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  7. Building clinical trial priorities at the University of Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Condo, Jeanine; Kateera, Brenda; Mutimura, Eugene; Birungi, Francine; Ndagijimana, Albert; Jansen, Stefan; Kamwesiga, Julius; Forrest, Jamie I; Mills, Edward J; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    After the genocide in Rwanda, the country's healthcare system collapsed. Remarkable gains have since been made by the state to provide greater clinical service capacity and expand health policies that are grounded on locally relevant evidence. This commentary explores the challenges faced by Rwanda in building an infrastructure for clinical trials. Through local examples, we discuss how a clinical trial infrastructure can be constructed by (1) building educational capacity; (2) encouraging the testing of relevant interventions using appropriate and cost-effective designs; and, (3) promoting ethical and regulatory standards. The future is bright for clinical research in Rwanda and with a renewed appetite for locally generated evidence it is necessary that we discuss the challenges and opportunities in drawing up a clinical trials agenda. PMID:25429819

  8. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Kendle, Andrew P; Hajjar, Roger J; Bridges, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  9. Acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Wieland, L. Susan; Min, Li Shih; Shen, Xueyong; Berman, Brian M; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, costly, and difficult to treat disorder that impairs health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide guidance on the effects of acupuncture for IBS because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous and methodologically unsound trials. Objectives The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating IBS. Search methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and RCTs that evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment, in adults with IBS were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We extracted data for the outcomes overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. For dichotomous data (e.g. the IBS Adequate Relief Question), we calculated a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for substantial improvement in symptom severity after treatment. For continuous data (e.g. the IBS Severity Scoring System), we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% CI in post-treatment scores between groups. Main results Seventeen RCTs (1806 participants) were included. Five RCTs compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. The risk of bias in these studies was low.