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Sample records for acupuncture fear scale

  1. Acupuncture-brain interactions as hypothesized by mood scale recordings.

    PubMed

    Acker, Helmut; Schmidt-Rathjens, Claudia; Acker, Till; Fandrey, Joachim; Ehleben, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Mood expressions encompassing positive scales like "activity, elation, contemplation, calmness" and negative scales like "anger, excitement, depression, fatigue" were applied for introducing a new tool to assess the effects of acupuncture on brain structures. Traditional acupuncture points defined in the literature for their effects on task negative and task positive brain structures were applied to chronic disease patients supposed to have dominant negative mood scales. Burn-out syndrome (n=10) and female chronic pain patients (n=22) showed a significant improvement on positive mood scales and a decline in negative mood scales after 10 acupuncture sessions. We observed a direct effect of acupuncture on brain structures in 5 burn-out syndrome patients showing an immediate, fast suppression of unusual slow high amplitude EEG waves in response to acupuncture needle rotation. These EEG waves described here for the first time in awake patients disappeared after 10 sessions but gradually returned after 1-1.5 years without acupuncture. This was accompanied with deterioration of positive mood scales and a return to negative mood scales. Both male (n=16) and female chronic pain patients reported a significant decrease of pain intensity after 10 sessions. Female patients only, however, showed a linear correlation between initial pain intensity and pain relief as well as a linear correlation between changes in pain intensity and mood scales accompanied by a drop of their heart rate during the acupuncture sessions. We hypothesized that mood scale recordings are a sensitive and specific new tool to reveal individual acupuncture-brain interaction.

  2. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... but six to eight treatments are common. During acupuncture Acupuncture points are situated in all areas of ... no discomfort when the needles are removed. After acupuncture Some people feel relaxed and others feel energized ...

  3. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This ... functions of the body. Research has shown that acupuncture reduces nausea and vomiting after surgery and chemotherapy. ...

  4. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Acupuncture Posted under Health Guides . Updated 25 June 2015. + ... stomach problems, menstrual cramps , and more. What is acupuncture? Acupuncture is a type of East Asian Medicine ...

  5. Pregnant women's thoughts when assessing fear of birth on the Fear of Birth Scale.

    PubMed

    Ternström, Elin; Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Haines, Helen; Rubertsson, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Fear of childbirth is common during pregnancy but rarely assessed in clinical practice. The Fear of Birth Scale has been proposed as a valid measure suitable for assessing fear of birth in an antenatal clinical context. To make sure that the scale makes sense in relation to the known constructs of fear of birth, it is important to find out what women think when responding to the Fear of Birth Scale. To report what women in mid-pregnancy think when assessing fear of birth on the Fear of Birth Scale. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with a think aloud technique was used. Thirty-one women were recruited in gestational week 17-20. Content analysis was conducted to describe the different dimensions of fear of birth. Worry was described as unspecific feelings and thoughts, often with a negative loading. Fear was described as a strong feeling connected to something specific. Furthermore, the women thought about aspects that influence their worries and fears and explained the strategies that helped them to cope with their fear of birth. Women could clearly assess, describe, and discuss fear of birth using the Fear of Birth Scale. This supports the use of the Fear of Birth Scale in clinical settings as a starting point for further dialogue about women's fear of birth. The dialogue may identify women's need for information, treatment, and referral when necessary. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Personality Correlates of the Fear of Death and Dying Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Examined personality dimensions of the Fear of Death and Dying Scale compared to the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire in a study of 88 students. Findings supported the validity of the Fear of Death and Dying Scale and its independence of social desirability. (JAC)

  7. [Analysis and strategy report on overseas large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Hui; Su, Yang-Shuai; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Shi, Hong; Chen, Shu-Li; Zhang, Lu; Jin, Zhi-Gao

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, studies of large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture were carried out in overseas. The literatures were conducted in Cochrane Library and overseas journals about systematic review of clinical effectiveness of acupuncture. The Cochrane Library contained a series of systematic reviews for the treatment of 67 kinds of diseases by acupuncture in 2009. Preliminary evaluations of clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on 37 kinds of disease were conducted. The results indicated that acupuncture therapy was effective for 7 kinds of disease, such as idiopathic headache, neck disorders, glaucoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, primary dysmenorrhoea with TENS and knee osteoarthritis with TENS. However, these studies still need improved research designs and sufficient research evidence. The results also indicated that acupuncture was indecisive for the other 30 kinds of disease because of insufficient evidence. Through analysis, results of most systematic reviews indicated that there were no significant difference between therapeutic effects of acupuncture treatment and pseudo-acupuncture treatment. Effect of acupuncture treatment was equivalent to therapeutic effect of placebo. The likely reasons may be that some important clinical factors are disregarded in these researches, such as selection of acupoints, treatment with syndrome differentiation, the angel and depth of needle insertion, the proper time for treatment and so on. Therefore, the large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture was criticized by acupuncturists. Thus, the pressing problem is to establish a rational evaluation system of clinical acupuncture. The suggestions are strengthening the research on diagnosis and treatment standard, strengthening the quality control of clinical acupuncture and establishing sound acupuncture control group and placebo acupuncture group. The basic researches on the

  8. The Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale: An Independent Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkey, Frank H.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the factor structure and subscale reliabilities of an eight-dimensional measure of fear of death (the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) using a New Zealand sample. Comparison with the results of a United States study showed that both the subscale reliabilities and the factor structure were almost perfectly reproduced. (Author)

  9. Why do we fear death? The construction and validation of the Reasons for Death Fear Scale.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M

    2002-10-01

    Previous research has disclosed different meanings of death, varieties of death anxiety, and hundreds of factors extracted from the uni- and multi-dimensional death anxiety scales. However, there have been no empirical studies to elucidate the reasons for death fear. The Reasons for Death Fear Scale (RDFS) was constructed and validated. It consists of 18 brief items, with good reliabilities ( > .8). Four factors of the RDFS were labeled Fear of Pain and Punishment, Fear of Losing Worldly Involvements, Religious Transgressions and Failures, and Parting from Loved Ones. A high-loaded factor was extracted in which the RDFS's loading was .45, while the loadings of the scales of death anxiety, death depression, and death obsession ranged between .8 and .9. Of interest is that the correlation between the RDFS and death anxiety was higher than that with general anxiety. No gender-differences were detected with college students. It is important to note that the findings of this study were only researched through Arabic and mainly Muslim college students. The generalizability of the present results to other populations would seem to merit further investigation.

  10. Quantification of DeQi sensation by visual analog scales in healthy humans after immunostimulating acupuncture treatment.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wei; Gareus, Isabel; Bell, John D; Goebel, Marion U; Spahn, Günther; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Bäcker, Marcus; Schedlowski, Manfred; Dobos, Gustav J

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture is the most popular component of traditional Chinese medicine in Western countries. However, the mechanisms of its effects remain unclear. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture appears when a sensation of DeQi is achieved. We previously reported that repeated, but not single acupuncture treatment affected leukocyte circulation and blood pressure in healthy young humans. The objective of this study was to quantify DeQi sensation by using visual analog scales (VASs) and, to test whether DeQi induction is an important factor for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture in the same cohort. After either acupuncture or sham-acupuncture (placebo) treatment, a questionnaire containing five individual VASs was given to subjects to evaluate their DeQi sensation, including numbness, pressure, heaviness, warmth, and radiating paraesthesia, respectively. A separate VAS to measure their levels of anxiety during the treatment was also included. Our results showed that acupuncture significantly induced higher VAS values for numbness, pressure, warmth, and radiating paraesthesia, but not for heaviness than the placebo across three treatment sessions. Additionally, acupuncture did not induce higher anxiety levels than the placebo. These data confirm that VAS is an objective and reliable way to quantify DeQi sensation and, indicate that DeQi is unique to verum acupuncture treatment. Furthermore, either acupuncture-induced therapeutic effects or DeQi sensation should not be attributed to the stress-mediated effects. In summary, the induction of DeQi in each treatment session is an important factor for the physiological outcomes of repeated acupuncture treatment, and VASs offer objective, an easy and reliable way to assess it.

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; J. W. Weeks, R. G. Heimberg, & T. L. Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only 1 previous study has examined the…

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; J. W. Weeks, R. G. Heimberg, & T. L. Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only 1 previous study has examined the…

  13. Measuring Evaluation Fears in Adolescence: Psychometric Validation of the Portuguese Versions of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale and the Specific Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagos, Paula; Salvador, Maria do Céu; Rijo, Daniel; Santos, Isabel M.; Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Modified measures of Fear of Negative Evaluation and Fear of Positive Evaluation were examined among Portuguese adolescents. These measures demonstrated replicable factor structure, internal consistency, and positive relationships with social anxiety and avoidance. Gender differences were found. Implications for evaluation and intervention are…

  14. Measuring Evaluation Fears in Adolescence: Psychometric Validation of the Portuguese Versions of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale and the Specific Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagos, Paula; Salvador, Maria do Céu; Rijo, Daniel; Santos, Isabel M.; Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Modified measures of Fear of Negative Evaluation and Fear of Positive Evaluation were examined among Portuguese adolescents. These measures demonstrated replicable factor structure, internal consistency, and positive relationships with social anxiety and avoidance. Gender differences were found. Implications for evaluation and intervention are…

  15. Psychometric properties of the School Fears Survey Scale for preadolescents (SFSS-II).

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, José Manuel; Espada Sánchez, José Pedro; Orgilés Amorós, Mireia; Méndez Carrillo, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the psychometric properties of a new children's self-report measure. The School Fears Survey Scale, Form II (SFSS-II) assesses school fears in children from ages 8 to 11. The factor solution with a Spanish sample of 3,665 children isolated four factors: Fear of academic failure and punishment, fear of physical discomfort, fear of social and school assessment and anticipatory and separation anxiety. The questionnaire was tested by confirmatory factor analysis, which accounted for 55.80% of the total variance. Results indicated that the SFSS-II has a high internal consistency (alpha= .89). The results revealed high test-retest reliability and appropriate relationship with other scales. The age by gender interaction was significant. Two-way analysis of variance found that older children and girls had higher anxiety. The instrument shows adequate psychometric guarantees and can be used for the multidimensional assessment of anxiety in clinical and educational settings.

  16. Validation of Collett-Lester's Fear of Death Scale in a sample of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Maritza Espinoza; Alvarado, Olivia Sanhueza; Barriga, Omar

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of Collett-Lester's Fear of Death Scale. A sample of 349 nursing students answered Fear of Death and Attitude toward death scales. Content validity was checked by expert review; reliability was proven using Cronbach's alpha; statistical analysis of the items, correlation between items and construct validity were checked by the correlation of the Scale with the Attitude toward death Scale. The multidimensionality of the scale was reviewed through factor analysis with varimax rotation. The Fear of Death Scale possesses good internal consistency and construct validity, confirmed by the significant correlation with the Attitude toward death Scale. Factor analysis partially supports content validity of the subscale items, but presented a modified multidimensional structure that points towards the reconceptualization of the subscales in this sample.

  17. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  18. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  19. Fear of AIDS and Homophobia Scales in an ethnic population of university students.

    PubMed

    Long, Wesley; Millsap, C A

    2008-10-01

    This replication extended R. A. Bouton et al.'s (1987) Fear of AIDS and Homophobia Scales to an ethnic sample of university students in an attempt to understand the relation between the expression of fear of HIV/AIDS and homophobia in ethnic groups. The results of the present study suggest that ethnic groups have a greater fear of HIV/AIDS, as they were more homophobic than the sample surveyed by R. A. Bouton et al. Although the correlation between fear of AIDS and homophobia was significant, results suggest the relation between them is weaker than it was 20 years prior to the present study. The ethnic populations represented in this study did not have greater fear of AIDS by gender. Considering ethnicity, female and male participants showed significant differences in homophobia. As in the original study, male participants were more homophobic than were female participants.

  20. The Cancer Worry Scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Custers, José A E; van den Berg, Sanne W; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Prins, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. This study investigated if the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) could serve as an instrument to detect high levels of fear of recurrence in female breast cancer survivors. One hundred ninety-four female breast cancer patients were assessed up to 11 years after their primary treatment for cancer. The women returned the questionnaires including the 8-item CWS, 2 items of the Cancer Acceptance Scale, the Checklist Individual Strength-Fatigue subscale, and the Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire. A cutoff score of 13 versus 14 (low: ≤13, high: ≥14) on the CWS was optimal for detecting severe levels of fear of recurrence. A cutoff score of 11 versus 12 (low: ≤11, high: ≥12) was optimal for screening. The Cronbach α coefficient of the CWS was .87; evidence to support the convergent and divergent validity of the CWS was also obtained. The CWS is able to detect high levels of fear of recurrence. The CWS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors. With the CWS, it is possible for nurses to screen breast cancer survivors for severe levels of fear of cancer recurrence. Thereby, nurses can screen and assist survivors in accessing appropriate and available support.

  1. Ever-present threats from information technology: the Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale.

    PubMed

    Mason, Oliver J; Stevenson, Caroline; Freedman, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Delusions involving technology, and specifically the internet, are increasingly common, and fear-reality statistics suggest computer-related fears are very widespread. These fears form a continuum from the widely understandable and realistic to the unrealistic, and frankly paranoid. The present study investigated the validity of this construct in a non-clinical population by constructing a novel self-report measure. The new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale aims to measure the perception of information technology-related threats originating from or enabled by computers, smartphones, social networks, and digital surveillance. Psychometric properties of the new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale are reported alongside an established measure of suspiciousness and paranoia in 181 participants including a sub-group of fifty information technology professionals. Exploratory factor analysis suggested the presence of two, related, dimensions that we term cyber-paranoia and cyber-fear. Both sub-scales were internally consistent and produced a normal distribution of scores. The relationships of the sub-scales with age, gender, trait paranoia, digital literacy, and digital inclusion are supportive of construct validity. The distinctiveness of 'cyber-paranoia' from general trait paranoia appears to mirror the clinical distinctiveness of 'internet' and other technology-fuelled delusions. Knowledge provision to increase technological proficiency and awareness may bring about a reduction in cyber-paranoia.

  2. Ever-present threats from information technology: the Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Oliver J.; Stevenson, Caroline; Freedman, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Delusions involving technology, and specifically the internet, are increasingly common, and fear-reality statistics suggest computer-related fears are very widespread. These fears form a continuum from the widely understandable and realistic to the unrealistic, and frankly paranoid. The present study investigated the validity of this construct in a non-clinical population by constructing a novel self-report measure. The new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale aims to measure the perception of information technology-related threats originating from or enabled by computers, smartphones, social networks, and digital surveillance. Psychometric properties of the new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale are reported alongside an established measure of suspiciousness and paranoia in 181 participants including a sub-group of fifty information technology professionals. Exploratory factor analysis suggested the presence of two, related, dimensions that we term cyber-paranoia and cyber-fear. Both sub-scales were internally consistent and produced a normal distribution of scores. The relationships of the sub-scales with age, gender, trait paranoia, digital literacy, and digital inclusion are supportive of construct validity. The distinctiveness of ‘cyber-paranoia’ from general trait paranoia appears to mirror the clinical distinctiveness of ‘internet’ and other technology-fuelled delusions. Knowledge provision to increase technological proficiency and awareness may bring about a reduction in cyber-paranoia. PMID:25505431

  3. The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale: assessing a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Justin W; Heimberg, Richard G; Rodebaugh, Thomas L

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral models propose that fear of negative evaluation is the core feature of social anxiety disorder. However, it may be that fear of evaluation in general is important in social anxiety, including fears of positive as well as negative evaluation. To test this hypothesis, we developed the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES) and conducted analyses to examine the psychometric properties of the FPES, as well as test hypotheses regarding the construct of fear of positive evaluation (FPE). Responses from a large (n = 1711) undergraduate sample were utilized. The reliability, construct validity, and factorial validity of the FPES were examined; the distinction of FPE from fear of negative evaluation was evaluated utilizing confirmatory factor analysis; and the ability of FPE to predict social interaction anxiety above and beyond fear of negative evaluation was assessed. Results provide preliminary support for the psychometric properties of the FPES and the validity of the construct of FPE. The implications of FPE with respect to the study and treatment of social anxiety disorder are discussed.

  4. The Factorial Structure of the Revised Collett--Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    2004-01-01

    In a study of 144 college students, the factorial structure of the Collett?Lester Fear of Death Scale matched the face content of the subscales quite closely, ameliorating the criticism of the scale by R. A. Neimeyer et al. (2003).

  5. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy by Verbal Pain Scale in Patients with Abdominal Pain of Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Becel, Sinan; Sezgin, Yılmaz; Akçay, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy based on Verbal Pain Scale (VPS) scores in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients admitted to the emergency department with attacks of abdominal pain. This observational study was conducted in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital between August 2014 and December 2014. Twenty patients admitted to the emergency department with FMF attacks were included in the study. Acupuncture therapy was applied to three points including LI4 (Hegu), ST25 (Tianshu), and Ren12 (Zhongwan). The VPS test was applied to the patients before and after the treatment. Average VPS scores were found to be 8.45±0.75 before the treatment and 2.10±0.85 after the treatment. The difference of the VPS scores before and after treatment was statistically significant (p=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of FMF attacks. Our results suggest that acupuncture therapy can be used as an effective treatment method in patients with FMF attacks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The Concerns About Recurrence Scale (CARS): a systematic measure of women's fears about the possibility of breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Vickberg, Suzanne M Johnson

    2003-01-01

    The Concerns About Recurrence Scale (CARS) systematically assesses the extent and nature of women's fears about the possibility of breast cancer recurrence. In this study with 169 breast cancer survivors, scores on the CARS indicate moderate levels of fear about recurrence overall and demonstrate a range in levels of fear. Findings further suggest that women's fears of recurrence center around the possibility of death, future treatment, and threats to health more than issues related to roles, femininity, sexuality, or body image. Younger women and women who have had chemotherapy demonstrate greater fears. There is little evidence that cancer stage, time since diagnosis, or type of surgery relate to fears. The CARS was found to be internally consistent, and there is preliminary evidence of its validity, although future research is needed. The measure will likely be a useful tool for researchers and clinicians seeking to understand women's fears about the possibility of breast cancer recurrence.

  7. Czech Adaption of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale in a Sample of Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Bužgová, Radka; Janíková, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The use of multidimensional scales for assessing fear of death among nursing students can assist in teaching and evaluating the effectiveness of targeted training in thanatology. Research has demonstrated good psychometric characteristics of the Czech version of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS). It was applied to nursing students ( N = 256), who reported as their biggest fear the process of their own dying. Greater fear of death and dying was found in students who had no experience of the dying and death of a loved one. Good internal consistency was achieved for the four subscales of the Czech CL-FODS.

  8. Spanish Adaptation of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin; Limonero, Joaquin; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS) consists of 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish version of the CL-FODS and to explore its psychometric properties. The revised version of the scale was translated into Spanish from English. Then, the back…

  9. Spanish Adaptation of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin; Limonero, Joaquin; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS) consists of 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish version of the CL-FODS and to explore its psychometric properties. The revised version of the scale was translated into Spanish from English. Then, the back…

  10. Downrange Acupuncture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Downrange Acupuncture Robert L. Koffman, MD, Capt, US Navy* ABSTRACT Robert L. Koffman, MD, Capt, US Navy, reports his experiences using acupuncture ...satisfaction that acupuncture provides in the broad range of military medicine and psychiatry. Key Words: Acupuncture , Auricular, Battlefield, Trauma, PTSD...Medical Institute (HMI; in Berkeley, CA) military acupuncture program, and, in December, deployed to Afghanistan. My official assignment took me to

  11. Assessing fear in patients with cervical pain: development and validation of the Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale-Cervical (PFActS-C).

    PubMed

    Turk, Dennis C; Robinson, James P; Sherman, Jeffrey J; Burwinkle, Tasha; Swanson, Kimberly

    2008-09-30

    The fear avoidance model (FAM) postulates that fear of pain or reinjury is a risk factor for persistent pain and disability, because it leads to the avoidance of physical activity. Research on the FAM has not yielded consistent results, which may be attributed to the model itself, but could also be a product of the way fear of movement is assessed. Studies of the FAM have measured fear using verbal scales consisting of items that are often vague and have only an indirect relationship with fear. This study reports on the development of a Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale-Cervical (PFActS-C). The instrument consists of a set of photographs depicting movements in which four factors that determine biomechanical demands on the neck are systematically varied--Direction of Movement, Arm Position, Weight Bearing, and Extremity of Movement. Patients (n=355) who had been involved in motor vehicle collisions with minimal symptoms (n=143) and moderate to severe symptoms (n=212) rated their fear of engaging in a set of activities depicted in the PFActS-C. Based on a principle components analysis, a 19 item measure was developed. Internal consistency (alpha=.98), stability over time (n=44, IntraClass Correlation=.72), and construct validity were all good to excellent. The results indicate that the PFActS-C may be a useful tool for assessing fear of movement in patients with cervical pain. Research is needed to confirm the factor structure of the PFActS-C and to assess the generalizability of the results to other samples with neck pain.

  12. Investigation of the large-scale functional brain networks modulated by acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Bai, Lijun; Ren, Yanshuang; Wang, Hu; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Wensheng; Tian, Jie

    2011-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have primarily focused on the neural activities involving the acute effects of acupuncture. Considering that acupuncture can induce long-lasting effects, several researchers have begun to pay attention to the sustained effects of acupuncture on the resting brain. Most of these researchers adopted functional connectivity analysis based on one or a few preselected brain regions and demonstrated various function-guided brain networks underlying the specific effect of acupuncture. Few have investigated how these brain networks interacted at the whole-brain level. In this study, we sought to investigate the functional correlations throughout the entire brain following acupuncture at acupoint ST36 (ACUP) in comparison with acupuncture at nearby nonacupoint (SHAM). We divided the whole brain into 90 regions and constructed functional brain network for each condition. Then we examined the network hubs and identified statistically significant differences in functional correlations between the two conditions. Following ACUP, but not SHAM, the limbic/paralimbic regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus and anterior cingulate gyrus emerged as network hubs. For direct comparisons, increased correlations for ACUP compared to SHAM were primarily related with the limbic/paralimbic and subcortical regions such as the insula, amygdala, anterior cingulate gyrus, and thalamus, whereas decreased correlations were mainly related with the sensory and frontal cortex. The heterogeneous modulation patterns between the two conditions may relate to the functional specific modulatory effects of acupuncture. The preliminary findings may help us to better understand the long-lasting effects of acupuncture on the entire resting brain, as well as the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acupuncture.

  13. Empirical Validation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Fresco, David M.; Hart, Trevor A.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983a) is often used to assess fear of negative evaluation, the core feature of social anxiety disorder. However, few studies have examined its psychometric properties in large samples of socially anxious patients. Although the BFNE yields a single total score, confirmatory factor…

  14. Fear of intimacy with helping professionals scale: reliability and validity of English and Mandarin versions.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Travis Sky; Poulin, John; Deng, Rong; Shan, Xu; Witt, Heather; Swain, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    In this study the authors examine the reliability and validity of the Fear of Intimacy with Helping Professionals Scale (FIS-HP) with Chinese (N = 150) and American (N = 145) elderly persons. Factor analysis using principal component analysis with a varimax rotation was used to examine the FIS-HP factor structure for both samples. A three factor solution emerged for both samples. The FIS-HP has acceptable internal consistency reliability with both the United States and China samples. Correlation analysis supported five of the six hypotheses related to convergent validity. English and Mandarin versions of the scale are presented.

  15. The reliability and validity of revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (version 3) in a Nigerian population.

    PubMed

    Kolawole, Mosaku S; Olusegun, Ajenifuja Ko

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale in a Nigerian population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among medical students using the Collett-Lester fear of death questionnaire, demographic variables were also obtained. A total of 175 students completed the questionnaire. Reliability score was good and convergent validity was also good. We concluded that the scale has good validity and reliability score among this population.

  16. Cross-national measure of fear-based xenophobia: development of a cumulative scale.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Kees; Ommundsen, Reidar; Yakushko, Oksana; Higler, Laurens

    2011-08-01

    To apply a Mokken Scale Procedure in developing a hierarchical cross-national scale to measure xenophobia, a pool of 30 xenophobia-related items was collected from several sources and modified using established unidimensional criteria. The survey was administered to 608 undergraduate students in the USA, 193 undergraduate students in The Netherlands, and 303 undergraduate students in Norway. 14 items measuring perceived threat or fear and meeting the criteria of the Stereotype Content Model were selected for further analysis. A separate item analysis and, subsequently, Mokken Scale Procedure yielded a cumulative scale with the same five items for each of the three samples. The items and the total scale met criteria for homogeneity in all samples with H > .40.

  17. Development and validation of the Chinese version of the Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale: an exploratory and methodological study.

    PubMed

    Yu, David Tai Wai; Jones, Alice Yee Man; Pang, Marco Yiu Chung

    2012-09-01

    The Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) is a tool to measure needle sensations. The aims of the present study were to develop a Chinese version and to assess its psychometric properties. This study was a methodological and exploratory study. The English version of the MASS was translated into Chinese using standardised translation procedures. Content validity was conducted by nine acupuncture experts. The prefinal Chinese version (C-MASS) was then administered to 30 acupuncture-naïve, healthy subjects. Electroacupuncture was performed on the right LI4 and LI11 acupoints for 30 min. A test-retest reliability measurement was administered 1-2 weeks later. Construct validity was examined by comparing results from C-MASS and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). The construct validity was further assessed by the principle component analysis. C-MASS demonstrated a content validity ratio on relevance and importance from -0.04 to 1.00. Convergent validity was demonstrated by its significant association with the sensory dimension of SF-MPQ (γ=0.63, p<0.05). Discriminant validity was demonstrated by its low association with the affective dimension of SF-MPQ (γ=-0.3, p=0.111). A five-factor structure of C-MASS was established by factor analysis. C-MASS demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.71) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.92). Since the descriptor 'sharp pain' was not a valid needle sensation related to deqi, this was removed from C-MASS. We renamed the scale as the Modified MASS-Chinese version (C-MMASS). A 12-descriptor C-MMASS was established and shown to be a reliable and valid tool in reporting needle sensations associated with deqi among healthy young Chinese people.

  18. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Gross, Anita; Goldsmith, Charlie; Wang, Ellen; Cameron, Ian; Kay, Theresa

    2007-01-15

    Systematic review. To determine the effects of acupuncture for individuals with neck pain. Neck pain is one of the 3 most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are the perceptions of benefits. METHODS.: We searched CENTRAL (2006, issue 1) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature from their beginning to February 2006. We searched reference lists and the acupuncture database TCMLARS in China. Any published trials using randomized (RCT) or quasi-randomized (quasi-RCT) assignment to the intervention groups, either in full text or abstract form, were included. We found 10 trials that examined acupuncture treatments for chronic neck pain. Overall, methodologic quality had a mean of 2.3 of 5 on the Jadad scale. For chronic mechanical neck disorders, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective for pain relief than some types of sham controls, measured immediately posttreatment. There was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than inactive, sham treatments measured immediately posttreatment, and at short-term follow-up (pooled standardized mean difference, -0.37; 95% confidence interval, -0.61 to -0.12). There was limited evidence that acupuncture was more effective than massage at short-term follow-up. For chronic neck disorders with radicular symptoms, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than a wait-list control at short-term follow-up. There is moderate evidence that acupuncture relieves pain better than some sham treatments, measured at the end of the treatment. There is moderate evidence that those who received acupuncture reported less pain at short-term follow-up than those on a waiting list. There is also moderate evidence that acupuncture is more effective than inactive treatments for relieving pain posttreatment, and this is maintained at short-term follow-up.

  19. Validity of a Diagnostic Scale for Acupuncture: Application of the Item Response Theory to the Five Viscera Score

    PubMed Central

    Tomura, Taro; Fukumoto, Jin; Takemura, Shigeki; Sakaguchi, Shunji; Miyai, Nobuyuki; Miyashita, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    In acupuncture therapy, diagnosis, acupoints, and stimulation for patients with the same illness are often inconsistent among between Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners. This is in part due to the paucity of evidence-based diagnostic methods in TCM. To solve this problem, establishment of validated diagnostic tool is inevitable. We first applied the Item Response Theory (IRT) model to the Five Viscera Score (FVS) to test its validity by evaluating the ability of the questionnaire items to identify an individual's latent traits. Next, the health-related QOL scale (SF-36), a suitable instrument for evaluating acupuncture therapy, was administered to evaluate whether the FVS can be used to make a health-related diagnosis. All 20 items of the FVS had adequate item discrimination, and 13 items had high item discrimination power. Measurement accuracy was suited for application in a range of individuals, from healthy to symptomatic. When the FVS and SF-36 were administered to other subjects, a part of which overlap with the first subjects, we found an association between the two scales, and the same findings were obtained when symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects were compared regardless of age and sex. In conclusion, the FVS may be effective in clinical diagnosis. PMID:23690864

  20. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, K V; Graham, N; Gross, A R; Goldsmith, C H; Wang, E; Cameron, I D; Kay, T

    2006-07-19

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are the perceptions of benefits. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more traditional treatments for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarizes the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. To determine the effects of acupuncture for individuals with neck pain. We searched CENTRAL (2006, issue 1) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, CINAHL from their beginning to February 2006. We searched reference lists and the acupuncture database TCMLARS in China. Any published trial using randomized (RCT) or quasi-randomized (quasi-RCT) assignment to the intervention groups, either in full text or abstract form, were included. Two reviewers made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of trial methodological quality. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad criteria. Consensus was used to resolve disagreements. When clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies using random-effects meta-analysis models. We did not find any trials that examined the effects of acupuncture for acute or subacute pain, but we found 10 trials that examined acupuncture treatments for chronic neck pain. Overall, methodological quality had a mean of 2.3/5 on the Jadad Scale. For chronic mechanical neck disorders, there was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective for pain relief than some types of sham controls, measured immediately post-treatment. There was moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than inactive, sham treatments measured immediately post-treatment and at short-term follow-up (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.61 to -0.12). There was limited evidence that acupuncture was more effective than massage at short-term follow-up. For chronic

  1. Battlefield Acupuncture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    employed such as electrical and laser devices. For example, the author successfully used the "Battlefield Acupuncture " concept with the Laser Report...ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION BY MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE (SEPT 2007) COPYRIGHT Battlefield Acupuncture Richard C. Niemtzow, MD, PHD, MPH COLONEL, USAF, MC...FS INTRODUCTION 1 Battlefield acupuncture was developed by the author in 200 1 in the course of researching a more efficient auriculotherapy

  2. Effectiveness of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Yeon; Shim, So-Ra; Rhee, Hak Young; Park, Hi-Joon; Jung, Woo-Sang; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho; Park, Seong-Uk

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of both acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture as adjuvant therapies for idiopathic Parkinson's disease. We recruited 43 adults with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who had been on a stable dose of antiparkinsonian medication for at least 1 month. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: acupuncture, bee venom acupuncture, or control. All participants were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Berg Balance Scale, and the time and number of steps required to walk 30 m. Treatment groups underwent stimulation of 10 acupuncture points using acupuncture or bee venom acupuncture twice a week for 8 weeks. The initial assessment was repeated at the completion of treatment. The control group did not receive any treatment. Participants in the bee venom acupuncture group showed significant improvement on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (total score, as well as parts II and III individually), the Berg Balance Scale, and the 30 m walking time. When compared to the control group, the bee venom acupuncture group experienced significantly greater improvement on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. In the acupuncture group, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (part III and total scores) and the Beck Depression Inventory showed significant improvement. The control group showed no significant changes in any outcome after 8 weeks. In this pilot study, both acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture showed promising results as adjuvant therapies for Parkinson's disease.

  3. [Rasch analysis on stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) scale of acupuncture intervention on stroke].

    PubMed

    Hui, Jian-Rong; Pei, Jian; Wang, Yuan-Chun; Hui, Jian-Ping; Fu, Qin-Hui; Song, Yi; Li, Hai-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Dan

    2013-04-01

    To optimize the evaluation level of active motor threshold and the functional domain of upper limbs of stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) scale with Rasch analysis. Sixty patients with acute ischemic stroke that were in accord with research criterid were randomly divided into a test group (30 cases) and a control group (30 cases). Acupuncture treatment and routine western medicine were applied on the test group, and single treatment of routine western medicine was applied on the control group. Selected acupoints were MS 5, Fengchi (GB 20), Hegu (LI 4), etc. Active motor threshold and the functional domain of upper limbs of SS-QOL were self-tested by patients after one treating course. The characteristics of the above mentioned items were tested with Rasch model. The statistical result on fitness of active motor threshold and the functional domain of upper limbs of SS-QOL showed that every reference of samples and items wosin accord with the Rasch model and has well inner reliability and validity. The Infit and Outfit MnSq values of active motor threshold and the functional domain of upper limbs of SS-QOL are basically between 0.5 and 1.5. The application of Rasch analysis on the assessment of patient reported outcome (PRO) has optimized the PRO scale (the activity and upper limb function domain of SS-QOL scale) and enhanced evaluation level of active motor threshold and the functional domain of upper limbs of SS-QOL scale.

  4. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Spanish adaptation of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Limonero, Joaquín T; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M

    2007-03-01

    The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS) consists of 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish version of the CL-FODS and to explore its psychometric properties. The revised version of the scale was translated into Spanish from English. Then, the back translation technique was carried out. A sample of 281 Spanish nursing students and professionals responded to the Spanish CL-FODS, along with 2 instruments assessing death anxiety and general anxiety. Good internal consistency and satisfactory test-retest reliability of the 4 subscales of the Spanish CL-FODS were achieved. Its correlations with death anxiety were higher than that with general anxiety, supporting its discriminant validity. The principal component analysis forced to 4 components provided a distribution of loadings that is more coherent with the theoretical formulation of the 4 components than those obtained in previous studies. These results justify the use of the CL-FODS in Spanish-speaking health care professionals for the purpose of assessing attitudes toward death and dying in self and others.

  6. Dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning and extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Reutens, David C

    2016-07-01

    The high evolutionary value of learning when to respond to threats or when to inhibit previously learned associations after changing threat contingencies is reflected in dedicated networks in the animal and human brain. Recent evidence further suggests that adaptive learning may be dependent on the dynamic interaction of meta-stable functional brain networks. However, it is still unclear which functional brain networks compete with each other to facilitate associative learning and how changes in threat contingencies affect this competition. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic competition between large-scale networks related to associative learning in the human brain by combining a repeated differential conditioning and extinction paradigm with independent component analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The results (i) identify three task-related networks involved in initial and sustained conditioning as well as extinction, and demonstrate that (ii) the two main networks that underlie sustained conditioning and extinction are anti-correlated with each other and (iii) the dynamic competition between these two networks is modulated in response to changes in associative contingencies. These findings provide novel evidence for the view that dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning from extinction learning in the healthy brain and suggest that dysfunctional network dynamics might contribute to learning-related neuropsychiatric disorders. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Supra-threshold scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation: relationships to each other and anxiety/fear.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael E; Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2010-03-31

    This study investigated the relationship of thermal pain testing from three types of quantitative sensory testing (ie, supra-threshold stimulus response scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation) at three anatomical sites (ie, upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk). Pain ratings from these procedures were also compared with common psychological measures previously shown to be related to experimental pain responses and consistent with fear-avoidance models of pain. Results indicated that supra-threshold stimulus response scaling, temporal summation, and after-sensation, were significantly related to each other. The site of stimulation was also an important factor, with the trunk site showing the highest sensitivity in all three quantitative sensory testing procedures. Supra-threshold response measures were highly related to measures of fear of pain and anxiety sensitivity for all stimulation sites. For temporal summation and after-sensation, only the trunk site was significantly related to anxiety sensitivity, and fear of pain, respectively. Results suggest the importance of considering site of stimulation when designing and comparing studies. Furthermore, psychological influence on quantitative sensory testing is also of importance when designing and comparing studies. Although there was some variation by site of stimulation, fear of pain and anxiety sensitivity had consistent influences on pain ratings.

  8. Developing the Social Avoidance and Distressed (SAD) Scale and Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) Scale for Application to Thai University Students in the Northern Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowsilpa, Siriperm

    The reliability and validity of the Social Avoidance and Distress (SAD) and Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) scales developed by D. Watson and R. Friend (1969) were tested for their use with university students in Thailand. Thai translations of both tests were administered to 176 university students on two occasions, with a month between…

  9. [Acupuncture for postoperative pain, a literature review].

    PubMed

    Fuentealba Cargill, Francisca; Biagini Alarcón, Leandro

    2016-03-01

    There is evidence that acupuncture may relieve pain. To assess the evidence about the effectiveness of acupuncture to relieve postoperative pain. A systematic review of the literature selecting controlled clinical trials and systematic reviews comparing acupuncture with standard pain management. The value and quality of reports were evaluated using Jadad scale and STRICTA protocol. Pain intensity and analgesic consumption were the primary endpoints sought. Five controlled trials and two systematic reviews were selected. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to the heterogeneity of studies. In the postoperative period of tonsillectomy, acupuncture reduced pain by 36 and 22% at 20 minutes and two hours, respectively. In knee replacement, acupuncture reduced pain by 2% and analgesic consumption by 42%. In the postoperative period of dental interventions, acupuncture reduced pain by 24% at two hours. Acupuncture may be useful to manage postoperative pain, but more controlled studies are required.

  10. Acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai; Wu, Hong Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling; Xu, Li; Yang, Ming; Liu, Guan J

    2016-08-26

    was not high. The quality of evidence for the main outcomes was low or very low based on the assessment by the system of Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE).Two trials compared real acupuncture plus baseline treatment with sham acupuncture plus baseline treatment. There was no evidence of differences in the changes of motor function and quality of life between real acupuncture and sham acupuncture for people with stroke in the convalescent stage.Twenty-nine trials compared acupuncture plus baseline treatment versus baseline treatment alone. Compared with no acupuncture, for people with stroke in the convalescent phase, acupuncture had beneficial effects on the improvement of dependency (activity of daily living) measured by Barthel Index (nine trials, 616 participants; mean difference (MD) 9.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.34 to 14.05; GRADE very low), global neurological deficiency (seven trials, 543 participants; odds ratio (OR) 3.89, 95% CI 1.78 to 8.49; GRADE low), and specific neurological impairments including motor function measured by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (four trials, 245 participants; MD 6.16, 95% CI 4.20 to 8.11; GRADE low), cognitive function measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (five trials, 278 participants; MD 2.54, 95% CI 0.03 to 5.05; GRADE very low), depression measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale (six trials, 552 participants; MD -2.58, 95% CI -3.28 to -1.87; GRADE very low), swallowing function measured by drinking test (two trials, 200 participants; MD -1.11, 95% CI -2.08 to -0.14; GRADE very low), and pain measured by the Visual Analogue Scale (two trials, 118 participants; MD -2.88, 95% CI -3.68 to -2.09; GRADE low). Sickness caused by acupuncture and intolerance of pain at acupoints were reported in a few participants with stroke in the acupuncture groups. No data on death, the proportion of people requiring institutional care or requiring extensive family support, and all-cause mortality

  11. Context-Dependent Encoding of Fear and Extinction Memories in a Large-Scale Network Model of the Basal Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Herry, Cyril; Lüthi, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The basal nucleus of the amygdala (BA) is involved in the formation of context-dependent conditioned fear and extinction memories. To understand the underlying neural mechanisms we developed a large-scale neuron network model of the BA, composed of excitatory and inhibitory leaky-integrate-and-fire neurons. Excitatory BA neurons received conditioned stimulus (CS)-related input from the adjacent lateral nucleus (LA) and contextual input from the hippocampus or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We implemented a plasticity mechanism according to which CS and contextual synapses were potentiated if CS and contextual inputs temporally coincided on the afferents of the excitatory neurons. Our simulations revealed a differential recruitment of two distinct subpopulations of BA neurons during conditioning and extinction, mimicking the activation of experimentally observed cell populations. We propose that these two subgroups encode contextual specificity of fear and extinction memories, respectively. Mutual competition between them, mediated by feedback inhibition and driven by contextual inputs, regulates the activity in the central amygdala (CEA) thereby controlling amygdala output and fear behavior. The model makes multiple testable predictions that may advance our understanding of fear and extinction memories. PMID:21437238

  12. The Factorial Structure of the Arabic Version of the Revised Collett--Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed; Lester, David

    2004-01-01

    A sample of 209 volunteer Kuwaiti undergraduates responded to an Arabic version of the Revised Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale with 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. Reliabilities of the 4 subscales and of the grand total score ranged from 0.75 to 0.92, which is considered adequate. A 4-factor…

  13. Evaluation of the effect of laser acupuncture and cupping with ryodoraku and visual analog scale on low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Wu, Hung-Chien; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Su, Chuan-Tsung; Shih, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wu, Jih-Huah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture (LA) and soft cupping on low back pain. In this study, the subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: active group (real LA and soft cupping) and placebo group (sham laser and soft cupping). Visual analog scale (VAS) and Ryodoraku were used to evaluate the effect of treatment on low back pain in this trial. Laser, 40 mW, wavelength 808 nm, pulse rate 20 Hz, was used to irradiate Weizhong (BL40) and Ashi acupoints for 10 minutes. And the Ryodoraku values were measured 2 times, that is, before and 15 minutes after treatment. The results show that there were significant difference between the first day baseline and the fifth day treatment in VAS in the two groups. Therefore, LA combined with soft cupping or only soft cupping was effective on low back pain. However, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the placebo group have been decreased apparently, and didn't come back to their original values. It means that "cupping" plays the role of "leak or purge" in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). On the other hand, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the active group have been turned back to almost their original values; "mend or reinforcing" effect is attributed to the laser radiation.

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Laser Acupuncture and Cupping with Ryodoraku and Visual Analog Scale on Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Wu, Hung-Chien; Hsieh, Ya-Hui; Su, Chuan-Tsung; Shih, Yong-Sheng; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wu, Jih-Huah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture (LA) and soft cupping on low back pain. In this study, the subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: active group (real LA and soft cupping) and placebo group (sham laser and soft cupping). Visual analog scale (VAS) and Ryodoraku were used to evaluate the effect of treatment on low back pain in this trial. Laser, 40 mW, wavelength 808 nm, pulse rate 20 Hz, was used to irradiate Weizhong (BL40) and Ashi acupoints for 10 minutes. And the Ryodoraku values were measured 2 times, that is, before and 15 minutes after treatment. The results show that there were significant difference between the first day baseline and the fifth day treatment in VAS in the two groups. Therefore, LA combined with soft cupping or only soft cupping was effective on low back pain. However, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the placebo group have been decreased apparently, and didn't come back to their original values. It means that “cupping” plays the role of “leak or purge” in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). On the other hand, the Ryodoraku values of Bladder Meridian of the active group have been turned back to almost their original values; “mend or reinforcing” effect is attributed to the laser radiation. PMID:23118792

  15. Specifying the nonspecific components of acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially nonspecific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred one patients who developed pain of ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0 to 10) after third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients' perception of the treatment (active or placebo) and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed before and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P=.240), but there was a large and significant nonspecific effect of placebo acupuncture (P<.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P<.001), indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings after both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%). This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions, nonspecific factors such as patients' perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment. To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice, it may therefore be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Content analysis of 4 fear of falling rating scales by linking to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    PubMed

    Bladh, Stina; Nilsson, Maria H; Carlsson, Gunilla; Lexell, Jan

    2013-07-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the content of 4 fear of falling (FOF) rating scales by linking them to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Linking study according to the ICF linking rules. Not applicable. Not applicable. The rating scales were the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), the Swedish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale (FES[S]), the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE). The process followed the established and updated linking rules. Three linkers independently identified all meaningful concepts in the rating scales and linked them to the most precise ICF categories. The linkers then discussed their results to reach consensus. If consensus was not attained, the linkers pursued the discussions with a fourth person to reach consensus. Not applicable. Most meaningful concepts from the overall questions were linked to the ICF component of body functions. Of the 62 items, all but one meaningful concept were linked to the component of activities and participation. All 4 rating scales covered the chapters of mobility and domestic life and had most linkages to the mobility chapter. The linking process revealed similarities and differences between the 4 FOF rating scales, as well as methodologic challenges in linking instruments to the ICF. By providing a content description that allows for a direct comparison of the rating scales, the results may be helpful when choosing an appropriate rating scale assessing FOF in clinical practice and research. A further head-to-head comparison through psychometric analyses is required to recommend appropriate FOF rating scales. Studies are also needed to investigate how the overall question and response categories of a rating scale affect respondents' answers. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2013-05-31

    One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events). We pooled data using the random-effects model. Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used 'formula acupuncture' except for one, which used trigger points.Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale; EA reduced pain by a mean of 22 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 4 to 41), or 22% absolute

  18. Psychometric properties of the brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in a Turkish sample.

    PubMed

    Koydemir, Selda; Demir, Ayhan

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to report initial data on the psychometric properties of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale. The scale was applied to a nonclinical sample of 250 (137 women, 113 men) Turkish undergraduate students selected randomly from Middle East Technical University. Their mean age was 20.4 yr. (SD= 1.9). The factor structure of the Turkish version, its criterion validity, and internal reliability coefficients were assessed. Although maximum likelihood factor analysis initially indicated that the scale had only one factor, a forced two-factor solution accounted for more variance (61%) in scale scores than a single factor. The straightforward items loaded on the first factor, and the reverse-coded items loaded on the second factor. The total score was significantly positively correlated with scores on the Revised Cheek and Buss Shyness Scale and significantly negatively correlated with scores on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Factor 1 (straightforward items) correlated more highly with both Shyness and Self-esteem than Factor 2 (reverse-coded items). Internal consistency estimate was .94 for the Total scores, .91 for the Factor 1 (straightforward items), and .87 for the Factor 2 (reverse-coded items). No sex differences were evident for Fear of Negative Evaluation.

  19. Acupuncture (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in study design and size. Studies using strict scientific methods are needed to prove how acupuncture affects pain. ... CAM Therapies It is important that the same scientific methods used to test conventional therapies are used to ...

  20. The short form of the fear survey schedule for children-revised (FSSC-R-SF): an efficient, reliable, and valid scale for measuring fear in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Ollendick, Thomas H; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Austin, Kristin

    2014-12-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Short Form of the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R-SF) in non-clinical and clinically referred children and adolescents from the Netherlands and the United States. Exploratory as well as confirmatory factor analyses of the FSSC-R-SF yielded support for the hypothesized five-factor structure representing fears in the domains of (1) failure and criticism, (2) the unknown, (3) animals, (4) danger and death, and (5) medical affairs. The FSSC-R-SF showed satisfactory reliability and was capable of assessing gender and age differences in youths' fears and fearfulness that have been documented in previous research. Further, the convergent validity of the scale was good as shown by substantial and meaningful correlations with the full-length FSSC-R and alternative childhood anxiety measures. Finally, support was found for the discriminant validity of the scale. That is, clinically referred children and adolescents exhibited higher scores on the FSSC-R-SF total scale and most subscales as compared to their non-clinical counterparts. Moreover, within the clinical sample, children and adolescents with a major anxiety disorder generally displayed higher FSSC-R-SF scores than youths without such a diagnosis. Altogether, these findings indicate that the FSSC-R-SF is a brief, reliable, and valid scale for assessing fear sensitivities in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie CL; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Background One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. Objectives To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. Data collection and analysis Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95%confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events).We pooled data using the random-effects model. Main results Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used ’formula acupuncture’ except for one, which used trigger points. Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale

  2. Acupuncture for dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Armour, Mike; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Li, Xun; Lu, Zhi Yong; Song, Jing

    2016-04-18

    effects. We included 42 RCTs (4640 women). Acupuncture or acupressure was compared with a sham/placebo group, medication, no treatment or other treatment. Many of the continuous data were not suitable for calculation of means, mainly due to evidence of skew.1. Acupuncture studies Acupuncture versus sham or placebo control (6 RCTs)Findings were inconsistent and inconclusive. However, the only study in the review that was at low risk of bias in all domains found no evidence of a difference between the groups at three, six or 12 months. The overall quality of the evidence was low. No studies reported adverse events. Acupuncture versus NSAIDs Seven studies reported visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, but were unsuitable for pooling due to extreme heterogeneity (I² = 94%). In all studies the scores were lower in the acupuncture group, with the mean difference varying across studies from 0.64 to 4 points on a VAS 0 - 10 scale (low-quality evidence). Four RCTs reported rates of pain relief, and found a benefit for the acupuncture group (OR 4.99, 95% CI 2.82 to 8.82, 352 women, I² = 0%, low-quality evidence). Adverse events were less common in the acupuncture group (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.44, 4 RCTs, 239 women, 4 trials, I² = 15%, low-quality evidence). Acupuncture versus no treatment Data were unsuitable for analysis, but pain scores were lower in the acupuncture group in all six studies reporting this outcome. The quality of the evidence was low. No studies reported adverse events.2. Acupressure studiesNo studies of acupressure reported adverse events. Acupressure versus sham or placebo controlData were unsuitable for pooling, but two studies reported a mean benefit of one to three points on a 0 - 10 VAS pain scale. Another four studies reported data unsuitable for analysis: all found that pain scores were lower in the acupuncture group. No studies reported adverse events. The quality of the evidence was low. Acupressure versus NSAIDsOne study reported this outcome

  3. Introducing a placebo needle into acupuncture research.

    PubMed

    Streitberger, K; Kleinhenz, J

    1998-08-01

    A problem acupuncture research has to face is the concept of a control group. If, in control groups, non-acupoint needling is done, physiological acupuncture effects are implied. Therefore the effects shown in this group are often close to those shown in the acupuncture group. In other trials, control groups have received obviously different treatments, such as transcutaneous electrical nervous stimulation or TENS-laser treatment; it is not clear if the effects of acupuncture are due only to the psychological effects of the treatment. We developed a placebo acupuncture needle, with which it should be possible to simulate an acupuncture procedure without penetrating the skin. In a cross-over experiment with 60 volunteers we tested whether needling with the placebo needle feels any different from real acupuncture. Of 60 volunteers, 54 felt a penetration with acupuncture (mean visual analogue scale [VAS] 13.4; SD 10.58) and 47 felt it with placebo (VAS 8.86; SD 10.55), 34 felt a dull pain sensation (DEQI) with acupuncture and 13 with placebo. None of the volunteers suspected that the needle may not have penetrated the skin. The placebo needle is sufficiently credible to be used in investigations of the effects of acupuncture.

  4. [The Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE): psychometric properties of the French version].

    PubMed

    Musa, C; Kostogianni, N; Lépine, J-P

    2004-01-01

    The Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE: Watson and Friend, 1969) is the measure most commonly used to determine the degree to which people experience apprehension at the prospect of being negatively evaluated. Although the development of the FNE preceded the inclusion of social anxiety disorder (or social phobia) in the diagnostic classification system, it is widely used as a measure of cognitive symptoms because the feature tapped by this measure is at the core of recent cognitive models of social-anxiety. According to these models, socially anxious individuals divide their attention between the internal representations of their social self (negative images and "felt sense") and external cues that could be taken as a sign of negative evaluation by others. The FNE was validated in a student and patient population in English speaking countries. The English version demonstrates adequate empirical validity. It shows excellent internal consistency and one-factor structure. Test retest reliability is satisfying. It is proved to be sensible to change after treatment. It is well correlated with other measures of social anxiety demonstrating good convergent validity. However, divergent and discriminate validity have been a subject of controversy. The aim of the present study was to assess the psychometric properties of the French version of the FNE in order to obtain a valid instrument measuring the cognitive component of social anxiety. The social anxiety group consisted of 88 patients referred to our clinic for cognitive-behavioural group therapy. All met ICD-10 criteria for social phobia (generalized subtype) as determined by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (social phobia section). Additional axis-I diagnostic information was obtained using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI: Lecrubier et al., 1997) for ICD-10. The non-patient control group consisted of 80 participants who didn't respond to social anxiety CIDI criteria. All

  5. [Social anxiety and self-esteem: Hungarian validation of the "Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items"].

    PubMed

    Perczel-Forintos, Dóra; Kresznerits, Szilvia

    2017-06-01

    Although social anxiety disorder (SAD) is the third most frequent emotional disorder with 13-15% prevalence rate, it remains unrecognized very often. Social phobia is associated with low self-esteem, high self-criticism and fear of negative evaluation by others. It shows high comorbidity with depression, alcoholism, drug addiction and eating disorders. To adapt the widely used "Fear of Negative Evaluation" (FNE) social phobia questionnaire. Anxiety and mood disorder patients (n = 255) completed the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (30, 12 and 8 item-versions) as well as social cognition, anxiety and self-esteem questionnaires. All the three versions of the FNE have strong internal validity (α>0.83) and moderate significant correlation with low self-esteem, negative social cognitions and anxiety. The short 8-item BFNE-S has the strongest disciminative value in differentiating patients with social phobia and with other emotional disorders. The Hungarian version of the BFNE-S is an effective tool for the quick recognition of social phobia. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(22): 843-850.

  6. Agoraphobia: Fear of Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musetto, Andrew P.

    1984-01-01

    Agoraphobia is a complex phobia in which individuals react with intense anxiety to certain stress situations. Basically, agoraphobics live in fear of becoming afraid. Describes the psychotherapeutic treatment that helps agoraphobics to become more self-sufficient and to face their fears by understanding themselves better. (CS)

  7. Acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Zhu, Xiaoshu; He, Lin; Song, Jing

    2011-01-19

    This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of acupuncture to treat primary dysmenorrhoea. To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with a placebo, no treatment, or conventional medical treatment (for example oral contraceptives and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (NSAIDs)). The following databases were searched (from inception until March 2010): the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertillity Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP database, Dissertation Abstracts International, BIOSIS, AMED (The Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), Acubriefs, and Acubase. Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing acupuncture with placebo control, usual care, and pharmacological treatment. The following modes of treatment were included: acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and acupressure. Participants were women of reproductive age with primary dysmenorrhoea during the majority of the menstrual cycles or for three consecutive menstrual cycles, and moderate to severe symptoms. Meta-analyses were performed using odds ratios (OR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences or standard mean differences (SMD) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Primary outcomes were pain relief and improved menstrual symptoms, measured by self-rating scales. Other outcomes included use of analgesics, quality of life, and absence from school or work. Ten trials were included in the review with data reporting on 944 participants. Six trials reported on acupuncture (n = 673) and four trials (n = 271) reported on acupressure. There was an improvement in pain relief from acupuncture

  8. Acupuncture and addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Moner, S E

    1996-01-01

    Acupuncture has been advocated as a safe effective treatment for addictive diseases. This review highlights clinical trials using acupuncture in drug treatment. Clinical trials selected were those conducted for efficacy of acupuncture treatment with opiate, alcohol, cocaine and nicotine dependence.

  9. Assessing public speaking fear with the short form of the Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker scale: confirmatory factor analyses among a French-speaking community sample.

    PubMed

    Heeren, Alexandre; Ceschi, Grazia; Valentiner, David P; Dethier, Vincent; Philippot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess the reliability and structural validity of the French version of the 12-item version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker (PRCS), one of the most promising measurements of public speaking fear. A total of 611 French-speaking volunteers were administered the French versions of the short PRCS, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, as well as the Trait version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, which assess the level of anxious and depressive symptoms, respectively. Regarding its structural validity, confirmatory factor analyses indicated a single-factor solution, as implied by the original version. Good scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86) was observed. The item discrimination analysis suggested that all the items contribute to the overall scale score reliability. The French version of the short PRCS showed significant correlations with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r = 0.522), the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (r = 0.414), the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.516), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (r = 0.361). The French version of the short PRCS is a reliable and valid measure for the evaluation of the fear of public speaking among a French-speaking sample. These findings have critical consequences for the measurement of psychological and pharmacological treatment effectiveness in public speaking fear among a French-speaking sample.

  10. Identifying women who are afraid of giving birth: A comparison of the fear of birth scale with the WDEQ-A in a large Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Haines, H M; Pallant, J F; Fenwick, J; Gamble, J; Creedy, D K; Toohill, J; Hildingsson, I

    2015-12-01

    The WDEQ-A is the most widely used measure of childbirth fear in pregnant women; however there is increasing discussion in the literature that simpler, more culturally transferrable tools may offer a better solution to identifying fearful women in clinical practice. To compare the two item Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS) with the 33 item WDEQ-A in a large cohort of Australian pregnant women. Self-report questionnaires during second trimester including Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire (WDEQ-A) and Fear of Birth Scale (FOBS). Correlation of FOBS and WDEQ-A was tested using Spearman's correlation coefficients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve assessed the sensitivity and specificity of possible cut-points on the FOBS against WDEQ-A cut-point of ≥85. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were determined. Fearful and non-fearful women as classified by both instruments were compared for differences in demographic, psycho-social and obstetric characteristics. 1410 women participated. The correlation between the instruments was strong (Spearman's Rho = 0.66, p < 0.001). The area under the ROC was 0.89 indicating high sensitivity with a FOBS cut-point of 54. Sensitivity was 89%, specificity 79% and Youden index 0.68. Positive predictive value was 85% and negative predictive value 79%. Both instruments identified high fear as significantly associated with first time mothers, previous emergency caesarean and women with self-reported anxiety and/or depression. Additionally FOBS identified a significant association between fearful women and preference for caesarean. This study supports the use of the FOBS in clinical practice to identify childbirth fear in pregnant women. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Acupuncture and stress].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cisong; Zhu Yihui; Wei, Qin; Kou, Jun; Wen, Peipei

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between acupuncture and stress is discussed from three aspects, including is it possible for acupuncture stimulation to be a stressor, whether acupuncture will start stress reaction, and whether acupuncture effects contain some stress factors. It is believed that correct acupuncture manipulation will not cause stress response, however, under some circumstances, such as inaccurate manipulation, improper treatment or patients who are very nervous but do not receive effective intervention, acupuncture is likely to cause stress response. Acupuncture-induced stress response is totally different from acupuncture anti-stress. The possible stress factors in acupuncture effect are explored, which can provide a new angle for the research on action mechanism of acupuncture. From the view of stress to review acupuncture treatment, there are three enlightenments: emphasizing on communication between doctors and patients, avoiding over-pursuit of deqi and focusing on analysis of the body constitution.

  12. Acupuncture for Vascular Dementia: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Yan; Guan, Li-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, patients who agreed to random assignment were allocated to a randomized acupuncture group (R-acupuncture group) or control group. Those who declined randomization were assigned to a nonrandomized acupuncture group (NR-acupuncture group). Patients in the R-acupuncture group and NR-acupuncture group received up to 21 acupuncture sessions during a period of 6 weeks plus routine care, while the control group received routine care alone. Cognitive function, activities of daily living, and quality of life were assessed by mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), and dementia quality of life questionnaire (DEMQOL), respectively. All the data were collected at baseline, after 6-week treatment, and after 4-week follow-up. No significant differences of MMSE scores were observed among the three groups but pooled-acupuncture group had significant higher score than control group. Compared to control group, ADL score significantly decreased in NR-acupuncture group and pooled-acupuncture group. For DEMQOL scores, no significant differences were observed among the three groups, as well as between pooled-acupuncture group and control group. Additional acupuncture to routine care may have beneficial effects on the improvements of cognitive status and activities of daily living but have limited efficacy on health-related quality of life in VaD patients. PMID:26495416

  13. Acupuncture for pain in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoshu; Hamilton, Kindreth D; McNicol, Ewan D

    2011-09-07

    Research on New Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Pelvic Endometriosis scale. The total effective rate ('cured', 'significantly effective' or 'effective') for auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine was 91.9% and 60%, respectively (risk ratio 3.04, 95% confidence interval 1.65 to 5.62, P = 0.0004). The improvement rate did not differ significantly between auricular acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for cases of mild to moderate dysmenorrhoea, whereas auricular acupuncture did significantly reduce pain in cases of severe dysmenorrhoea. Data were not available for secondary outcomes measures. The evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for pain in endometriosis is limited, based on the results of only a single study that was included in this review. This review highlights the necessity for developing future studies that are well-designed, double-blinded, randomised controlled trials that assess various types of acupuncture in comparison to conventional therapies.

  14. Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S): psychometric properties in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, María José Gallego

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) in a non-clinical Spanish population. Rodebaugh et al. (2004) recommend the use of this scale composed of 8 straightforwardly-worded items, instead of the 12-item version of the BFNE. The sample consisted of 542 undergraduate students, 71.3% of whom were women and 28.7% were men; the mean age was 21.71 (4.78) years. Exploratory factor analysis produced one factor which accounted for 51.28% of variance. The internal consistency of the scale was alpha = .89. The BFNE-S correlated with the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (r = .44), the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker Modified (r = .44), the Public Speaking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (r = -.38) and both subscales of the Self-Statements during Public Speaking (SSPS-P r = -.22; SSPS-N r = .53). ANOVAs revealed significant differences in the BFNE-S amongst a non-clinical population, persons suffering from specific social phobia, non-generalized social phobia and generalized social phobia.

  15. Polar acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Apps, John

    2004-09-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are common in people who undertake adventure travel to the Antarctic, and in those who support them, because of the hard physical demands and lack of rest. This paper describes the successful use of acupuncture as first line treatment for ten patients in these circumstances, and comments on its advantages, particularly in its capacity to reduce the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  16. Use of acupuncture in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ting

    2009-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common and feared side effects of chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic antiemetic therapy, additional treatment for breakthrough CINV is needed. Acupuncture is a safe medical procedure with minimal side effects; several randomized controlled clinical trials have suggested its efficacy in controlling this side effect. A recent meta-analysis of those trials demonstrated that acupuncture significantly reduced the proportion of patients experiencing acute chemotherapy-induced vomiting. Those trials, however, did not show that acupuncture significantly alleviated acute chemotherapy-induced nausea or delayed CINV. The clinical relevance of these results were limited by the fact that they predated the use of aprepitant and that only 1 or 2 acupuncture points were stimulated during acupuncture treatment. More clinical trials to study the effect of acupuncture with additional antiemetic acupuncture points in adjunct to modern pharmacologic antiemetic therapy are needed.

  17. Utilization of Group-Based, Community Acupuncture Clinics: A Comparative Study with a Nationally Representative Sample of Acupuncture Users

    PubMed Central

    Tippens, Kimberly M.; Connelly, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Acupuncture utilization in the United States has increased in recent years, but is less common among racial/ethnic minorities and those of low socioeconomic status. Group-based, community acupuncture is a delivery model gaining in popularity around the United States, due in part to low-cost treatments provided on a sliding-fee scale. Affordable, community-based acupuncture may increase access to health care at a time when increasing numbers of people are uninsured. To assess the population using local community acupuncture clinics, sociodemographic factors, health status, and utilization patterns compared to national acupuncture users were examined. Design Data were employed from (1) a cross-sectional survey of 478 clients of two community acupuncture clinics in Portland, Oregon and (2) a nationally representative sample of acupuncture users from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Results Portland community acupuncture clients were more homogeneous racially, had higher educational attainment, lower household income, and were more likely to receive 10 or more treatments in the past 12 months (odds ratio=5.39, 95% confidence interval=3.54, 8.22), compared to a nationally representative sample of U.S. acupuncture users. Self-reported health status and medical reasons for seeking acupuncture treatment were similar in both groups. Back pain (21%), joint pain (17%), and depression (13%) were the most common conditions for seeking treatment at community acupuncture clinics. Conclusions Study findings suggest that local community acupuncture clinics reach individuals of a broad socioeconomic spectrum and may allow for increased frequency of treatment. Limited racial diversity among community acupuncture clients may reflect local demographics of Portland. In addition, exposure to and knowledge about acupuncture is likely to vary by race and ethnicity. Future studies should examine access, patient satisfaction, frequency of treatment, and clinical

  18. Assessing public speaking fear with the short form of the Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker scale: confirmatory factor analyses among a French-speaking community sample

    PubMed Central

    Heeren, Alexandre; Ceschi, Grazia; Valentiner, David P; Dethier, Vincent; Philippot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background: The main aim of this study was to assess the reliability and structural validity of the French version of the 12-item version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker (PRCS), one of the most promising measurements of public speaking fear. Methods: A total of 611 French-speaking volunteers were administered the French versions of the short PRCS, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, as well as the Trait version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, which assess the level of anxious and depressive symptoms, respectively. Results: Regarding its structural validity, confirmatory factor analyses indicated a single-factor solution, as implied by the original version. Good scale reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86) was observed. The item discrimination analysis suggested that all the items contribute to the overall scale score reliability. The French version of the short PRCS showed significant correlations with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r = 0.522), the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (r = 0.414), the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.516), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (r = 0.361). Conclusion: The French version of the short PRCS is a reliable and valid measure for the evaluation of the fear of public speaking among a French-speaking sample. These findings have critical consequences for the measurement of psychological and pharmacological treatment effectiveness in public speaking fear among a French-speaking sample. PMID:23662060

  19. More Information From Fewer Questions: The Factor Structure and Item Properties of the Original and Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Woods, Carol M.; Thissen, David M.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Chambless, Dianne L.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    Statistical methods designed for categorical data were used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory (IRT) analyses of the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE; D. Watson & R. Friend, 1969) and the Brief FNE (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983). Results suggested that a 2-factor model fit the data better for both the FNE and the…

  20. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Responsiveness to Functional Restoration Treatment in a Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Disorder (CMPD) Population.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Williams, Mark J; Asih, Sali; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I; Hartzell, Meredith M; Gatchel, Robert J

    2017-03-21

    To assess the clinical validity and factor structure of the Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS), a new fear-avoidance (FA) measure. In this study, 426 chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder (CMPD) patients were admitted to a functional restoration program (FRP). They were categorized into five FACS severity levels, from Subclinical to Extreme, at admission, and again at discharge. Associations with objective lifting performance and other patient-reported psychosocial measures were determined at admission and discharge, and objective work outcomes for this predominantly disabled cohort, were assessed one-year later. Those patients in the Severe and Extreme FACS severity groups at admission were more likely to "drop out" of treatment than those in the lower severity groups (P=0.05). At both admission and discharge, the FACS severity groups were highly and inversely correlated with objective lifting performance and patient-reported FA-related psychosocial variables, including kinesiophobia, pain intensity, depressive symptoms, perceived disability, perceived injustice, and insomnia (Ps<0.001). All variables showed improvement at FRP discharge. Patients in the Extreme FACS severity group at discharge were less likely to return to, or retain, work one-year later (P≤0.02). The factor analysis identified a two-factor solution. Strong associations were found among FACS scores and other patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables at both admission and discharge. High discharge FACS scores were associated with worse work outcomes one-year after discharge. The FACS appears to be a valid and clinically useful measure for predicting attendance, physical performance, distress and relevant work outcomes in FRP treatment of CMPD patients.

  1. Examination of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Version 2 and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Straightforward Items Factor Structure in a Sample of U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liu; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the factor structure of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Version 2 (BFNE-II) among 151 college students from the United States. Results indicated that the BFNE-S and the BFNE-II scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability.…

  2. Examination of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Version 2 and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Straightforward Items Factor Structure in a Sample of U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liu; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the factor structure of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Version 2 (BFNE-II) among 151 college students from the United States. Results indicated that the BFNE-S and the BFNE-II scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability.…

  3. Consciousness of Social Face: the development and validation of a scale measuring desire to gain face versus fear of losing face.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-An; Cao, Qing; Grigoriou, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of a scale that measures two distinct needs for individuals to manage their social "face". Scale development process resulted in an 11-item Consciousness of Social Face (CSF) scale made up of the following two correlated dimensions: desire to gain face and fear of losing face. The two-factor correlated structure of CSF scale was stable across multiple samples of both students and non-students subjects. The construct validity of CSF scale, including convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity was also demonstrated by examining relationships with other personality or demographical variables.

  4. [AMIKA: psychometric evaluation of a photo-based scale for the assessment of fear avoidance beliefs in elderly individuals].

    PubMed

    Quint, S; Luckmann, J; Wolf, U; Basler, H-D

    2007-10-01

    Confrontation therapy proved to be effective in the treatment of fear avoidance beliefs (FAB). Prior to treatment, it is necessary to establish a hierarchy of activities according to their perceived health hazards. For this purpose, we developed the AMIKA scale, which consists of 50 photos showing elderly individuals engaged in daily activities, and investigated its psychometric properties. We conducted a cross-sectional study with repeated measurement after 4 weeks. At the time of both measurements, apart from AMIKA, we assessed pain, disability, FAB, and physical activity. Furthermore, we used ultrasound topometry for the assessment of flexion and extension of the lumbar spine. At t1, a total of 103 elderly individuals with chronic low back pain participated in the study. Their average age was 71.41 years (SD = 5.2). Of these, 67 attended the t2 assessment. Retest reliability amounted to r=0.63 and internal consistency was alpha=0.97. Correlations of the AMIKA scores with pain and disability demonstrated large effect sizes, whereas effect sizes regarding other related FAB scales remained in the medium range. No correlations at all were found with respect to the objective ultrasound measurements and to self-reported physical activity. The results allow the use of AMIKA as an instrument for the generation of a FAB hierarchy in the context of confrontation treatment.

  5. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P < 0.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P < 0.001) indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  6. [Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD) and Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE)--reliability and the preliminary assessment of validity].

    PubMed

    Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Dembińska, Edyta; Müldner-Nieckowski, Łukasz; Cyranka, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of reliability, cross-validity and usefulness in everyday clinical practice of two related tools: Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD) and Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE). Analysis of tests results of 453 females and 172 males diagnosed in the years 2008-2010 in the Outpatient Clinic for Neurotic and Behavioral Disorders of the Cracow University Hospital, including, inter alia, results of the questionnaires SAD and FNE. The scales have been, with the consent of their authors (R. Friend) and the copyright holder (APA), translated into Polish and back-translated. Subjects also completed the symptom checklist KO '0'(n = 512), and neurotic personality questionnaire KON-2006 (n = 505), as well as the NEO-PI-R personality inventory (n = 46). The reliability and cross-validity coefficients of Polish versions were assessed in the patient population and their results were compared with those of the group of 75 medical students. The translation was verified by retranslation. The reliability coefficients of Polish version of the SAD and FNE scales turned out to be high--Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.94 for both scales, Guttman's split-half reliability coefficient 0.93. Correlations with symptom checklist KO '0 'and neurotic personality questionnaire KON-2006, as well as with the NEO -PI-R personality inventory were significant and indicate a good cross-validity of the analyzed tools. The average results in the patient population for both scales were significantly higher than the results in the preliminary control group of medical students. Polish versions of SAD and FNE questionnaires, like their other translations from English, proved to be reliable and have a high cross-validity with other original Polish tools used in the diagnosis of neurotic disorders, which allows to recommend them to be used in further studies, also in comparing healthy persons with those suffering from a variety of neurotic disorders.

  7. Acupuncture and anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anna; Chan, Simon

    2006-06-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are increasingly practised in anaesthesia. This paper reviews the current evidence and applicability of acupuncture and related techniques for anaesthetic procedures and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Recent evidence suggests that manual acupuncture is effective for reducing preoperative anxiety and for postoperative pain relief. Current available data do not support the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to the general anaesthetic in the intraoperative setting. There are extensive and good quality data to support the use of P6 acupoint stimulation techniques for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting in combination with or as an alternative to conventional anti-emetics. The use of acupuncture for labour pain management appears promising but requires further research. Patient selection, acupoint selection, needling techniques, and mode of acupuncture need to be considered when applying acupuncture and related techniques in the perioperative setting. There are guidelines for the conduct and reporting of acupuncture research, and these should be followed to improve the quality of studies.

  8. Acupuncture: In Depth

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information on traditional Chinese medicine . What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Results from ... in some degree of pain relief. What the Science Says About Safety and Side Effects of Acupuncture ...

  9. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  10. Acupuncture and NATO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    MILITARY ACUPUNCTURE OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES Acupuncture and NATO Jean-Louis Belard, MD, Ret French Army Col,1 and Arnyce R. Pock, MD, Col, USAF...describes an opportunity by which acupuncture could be utilized as part of the initial military medical response to a cataclysmic disaster. Key Words... Acupuncture , NATO INTRODUCTION The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)was established in April 1949 as an intergovern- mental alliance aimed

  11. Battlefield Acupuncture: Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ACUPUNCTURE UPDATE 3 4C FIG. 3. Near-infrared spectroscopic measurements during electrical stimulation of battlefield acupuncture points in a 35-year-old fe...However, we have demonstrated for the first time that electric stimulation of the Battlefield Acupuncture points using an electric current, (1 mA), a...Battlefield Acupuncture points leads to dis- tinctive, reproducible changes in brain function. Perhaps comparatively small electric currents lead to similar

  12. Psychometric properties of Greek versions of the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS)

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Arapostathis, Konstantinos Nikolaos; Emmanouil, Dimitris; Dabarakis, Nikolaos; Patrikiou, Antonis; Economides, Nikolaos; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature describes the performance of dental fear questionnaires in various countries. We describe the psychometric properties of Greek versions of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey (DFS) in adult Greek patients. Methods Greek versions of the MDAS and DFS were administered to two samples of adult dental patients. In the first sample, 195 patients attending one of three private practice dental offices in a large city in Greece completed the questionnaires in the waiting room before dental treatment. After treatment, their dentists (who did not know how the patients had answered the questionnaire) rated their anxiety during dental treatment. In the second sample, 41 patients attending a Greek university dental school clinic completed the questionnaire twice at two separate visits, in order to provide test-retest data. Cronbach's alpha was used to compute the internal consistencies, while Spearman's rho was used to compute the test-retest reliabilities. Construct validity was assessed by correlating the responses to the MDAS and DFS by Spearman's rho. Spearman's rho was also used to examine the criterion validities, by comparing the questionnaire responses with the dentists' ratings of anxiety. Results The internal consistencies for the MDAS were 0.90 and 0.92 in the two samples; for the DFS, the internal consistencies were 0.96 in both samples. The test-retest reliabilities were 0.94 for the MDAS and 0.95 for the DFS. The correlation between the two questionnaires was 0.89. The patients' responses to both questionnaires were significantly related to the dentists' ratings of their anxiety during dental treatment (both p values <0.001). Conclusion The results indicate that the Greek versions of the MDAS and DFS have good internal consistencies and test-retest reliabilities, as well as good construct and criterion validities. The psychometric properties of the Greek versions of these questionnaires appear

  13. Acupuncture and Equine Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    le Jeune, Sarah; Henneman, Kimberly; May, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most common veterinary integrative medicine modalities. Acupuncture can greatly contribute to a rehabilitation protocol by promoting analgesia, tissue healing, and muscle strength. Acupuncture is safe, has minimal detrimental side effects, and is well tolerated by most horses.

  14. Acupuncture and women's health: an overview of the role of acupuncture and its clinical management in women's reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Suzanne; Smith, Caroline A; Possamai-Inesedy, Alphia; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture and other modalities of Chinese/East Asian medicine have been used to treat women's health for many centuries. Gynecology specialties focus particularly on menstrual and reproductive disorders. Both the adoption of the use of acupuncture outside Asia, and the incorporation of scientific analysis in Asia have challenged biomedical conceptions of what can be achieved with this treatment method. The scale of research activity in relation to acupuncture and women's health has increased over the last 20 years. This review aims to explore the research evidence in relation to acupuncture use for women's reproductive disorders, focusing on both clinical findings and experimental research on acupuncture's mechanisms of action in relation to women's health. A narrative literature search was undertaken using searches of electronic databases and manual searches of journals and textbooks. The search included all literature published prior to June 2013. The literature was assessed as to the nature of the study it was reporting and findings synthesized into a commentary. For acupuncture's mechanism of action the search resulted in 114 relevant documents; in relation to clinical reports on the use of acupuncture for women's health 204 documents were found and assessed. There is preliminary data indicating acupuncture may improve menstrual health and coping for women experiencing delays falling pregnant. There is experimental data showing that acupuncture can influence female reproductive functioning, although the actual mechanisms involved are not yet clarified. Further well-conducted clinical research would benefit our understanding of the usefulness of acupuncture to women's health.

  15. [Impacts of numerology on acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wu, Changqiu; Wu, Xueyi

    2016-04-01

    Numerology has a long history in China and has the profound impacts on every academic field in TCM, with acupuncture involved. In this paper, the impacts on acupuncture were discussed in different aspects such as the numbers of meridians, the length of meridian, the time taboo of acupuncture, acupuncture manipulation and time acupuncture. It was found that numerology had laid the critical impact on acupuncture and had the profound imprint nowadays. It is of great significance to study the numerology theory in its impacts on acupuncture, in the exploration on the theories behind acupuncture as well as the comprehensive understanding of acupuncture.

  16. Acupuncture in managing menopausal symptoms: hope or mirage?

    PubMed

    Alfhaily, F; Ewies, A A A

    2007-10-01

    There is an increased interest amongst women in seeking alternatives for hormone replacement therapy because of their fear of side-effects. It is claimed that acupuncture is effective for curing menopausal symptoms, and to be a safe treatment in the hands of well-trained and qualified practitioners. About one million acupuncture treatments are given in the National Health Service and two million privately each year in England for various indications. However, because its mechanism of action is not fully understood in physiological terms, acupuncture is considered by many clinicians to be of no value. This article reviews the currently available evidence as regards the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in treating menopausal symptoms.

  17. Acupuncture in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    So, Emily Wing Sze; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu

    2010-07-01

    Acupuncture is increasingly being used in reproductive medicine. This review summarizes the evidence of acupuncture in pain relief for oocyte retrieval, improving pregnancy outcomes of in vitro fertilization treatment, management of ovulation disorders, male subfertility, primary dysmenorrhea, endometriosis and menopausal symptoms. However, most of the studies are nonrandomized uncontrolled trials, case reports or case series. For randomized controlled trials, the sample size is underpowered and blinding of assessors is lacking. Different acupuncture protocols and controls are used. These heterogeneities make it difficult to compare studies and draw any firm conclusions. Further studies should also evaluate the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and investigate the underlying mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  18. Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Lim, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most-common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease. The long-term use of levodopa leads to a loss of efficacy and to complications. Therefore, many patients with PD have turned to complementary therapies to help relieve their symptoms. Acupuncture is most commonly used as a complementary therapy in patients with PD. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acupuncture for patients with PD. This study was performed to summarize and evaluate evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in the relief of PD symptoms. Methods: Seven databases, namely, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], and three Korean medical databases, were searched from their inception through August 2015 without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they contained reports of acupuncture compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone or acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for PD symptoms. Assessments were performed with the unified PD rating scales (UPDRS) I, II, III, and IV and the total score, the Webster scale, and effectiveness rating. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB). Results: In all, 982 potentially relevant articles were identified; 25 RCTs met our inclusion criterion, 19 of 25 RCTs were high-quality studies (i.e., a score of 6 or higher). The included RCTs showed favorable results for acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in the UPDRS II, III, and IV and the total score. Acupuncture was effective in relieving PD symptoms compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone, and acupuncture plus conventional treatment had a more significant effect than conventional treatment alone

  19. [German Acupuncture Trials (gerac) address problems of methodology associated with acupuncture studies].

    PubMed

    Endres, H G; Zenz, M; Schaub, C; Molsberger, A; Haake, M; Streitberger, K; Skipka, G; Maier, C

    2005-06-01

    Conflicting or ambivalent findings on the effectiveness of body acupuncture in pain treatment are often attributed to flaws in study methodology. The paper describes the methodology used for the German Acupuncture Trials (gerac), which demonstrates that it is possible to design acupuncture studies in accordance with the standards of good clinical practice. Approximately 1000 chronic pain sufferers per indication (migraine, tension-type headache, low back pain (cLBP), or gonarthrosis) are randomly allocated to one of three treatment groups (verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or established conservative therapy). Patients are blind to the type of acupuncture. All patients receive ten sessions of treatment (two per week) with an option of adding five more treatments in cases of slight but insufficient improvement (number of headache days or von Korff pain score). Participating physicians are in private practice, representing a variety of specialties. All have completed at least a 140-hour training course in acupuncture. Mandatory and optional verum and sham points are predefined. The point selection is individualized according to the criteria of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Primary outcome measures are number of headache days per month, von Korff Graded Chronic Pain Scale or Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire (cLBP), or WOMAC scores (gonarthrosis). Data are assessed by trained telephone interviewers not involved in treatment and blind to types of acupuncture. Over 500 participating physicians in ten urban areas of Germany. Patient recruitment for cLBP and gonarthrosis was completed in November 2003 and March 2004 respectively. Recruitment for chronic headaches will be completed in autumn 2004. The gerac trials prove that it is possible to design and carry out acupuncture studies in accordance to stringent standards of methodology and clinical practice. The results will form a basis for the assessment of acupuncture effectiveness in Germany and abroad.

  20. Acupuncture and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2010-10-28

    Acupuncture is probably the most popular alternative therapy practiced in the United States, Europe and many Asian countries. It has been applied clinically for more than 5 thousand years according to the ancient oriental medical theory. A great deal of acupuncture research has been achieved, with particular efforts toward understanding the pain control effects. In addition to the analgesic effect of acupuncture, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can control autonomic nerve system functions such as blood pressure regulation, sphincter Oddi relaxation, and immune modulation. Although only a limited number of controlled studies have assessed the efficacy of acupuncture, increasing clinical evidences support that EA treatment is effective for various immunological diseases including allergic disorders, infections, autoimmune diseases and immunodifficiency-syndromes. This review will address the mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various immune responses and the relationship between acupuncture mediated immune regulation and neurological involvement.

  1. [For an updated acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Faust, S

    1998-09-01

    The author proposes an acupuncture which is characterized by its complete break with the ancient chinese physiopathology and its concepts of "acupuncture points" (in the old sense of the term) of "meridians", "energies", "ying-yang" etc.. This process of renewal of the practice and the theory has been coined "contemporary acupuncture". Its originality stands out in comparison with most teachings of acupuncture which have remained faithful to traditional acupuncture. Contemporary acupuncture creates bridges between acupunture and classical medicine. It offers simple therapeutic gestures to general practitioners. Acupuncture acts, from a clinical point of view, particularly through the following forms of action: a) a relaxing action on striated muscle; b) an anti-inflammatory action on the ligaments; c) an antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

  2. Acupuncture and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Ma, Sheng-Xing; Feng, Lili

    2005-07-01

    Acupuncture as a complex therapeutic system has been used to treat a variety of diseases and pathological conditions. Although the exact mechanism(s) of acupuncture remains unknown, some evidence suggests a mechanism initially involving signal transduction through connective tissue, with secondary involvement of other systems including the nervous system. Acupuncture has become increasingly popular in the Western countries as a therapy for pain and several chronic disorders difficult to manage with conventional treatments. Acupuncture and acupuncture-like somatic nerve stimulation have been used in different kidney diseases and several complications related to them. The effect of acupuncture techniques in some kidney diseases is reviewed on the basis of clinical reports as well as mechanisms that may possibly explain the beneficial effects mediated by acupressure/acupuncture. The potential effect of acupressure techniques in renal inflammation and whether these effects could be mediated through the newly identified cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are discussed.

  3. [Quantitative research on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Grierson, Lawrence; Wu, Mary X; Breuer, Ronny; Carnahan, Heather

    2014-03-01

    To explore a method of quantitative evaluation on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation and further analyze behavior features of professional acupuncture manipulation. According to acupuncture basic manipulations, Scales for Operation Behavior of Acupuncture Basic Manipulation was made and Delphi method was adopted to test its validity. Two independent estimators utilized this scale to assess operation behavior of acupuncture manipulate among 12 acupuncturists and 12 acupuncture-novices and calculate interrater reliability, also the differences of total score of operation behavior in the two groups as well as single-step score, including sterilization, needle insertion, needle manipulation and needle withdrawal, were compared. The validity of this scale was satisfied. The inter-rater reliability was 0. 768. The total score of operation behavior in acupuncturist group was significantly higher than that in the acupuncture-novice group (13.80 +/- 1.05 vs 11.03 +/- 2.14, P < 0.01). The scores of needle insertion and needle manipulation in the acupuncturist group were significantly higher than those in the acupuncture-novice group (4.28 +/- 0.91 vs 2.54 +/- 1.51, P < 0.01; 2.56 +/- 0.65 vs 1.88 +/- 0.88, P < 0.05); however, the scores of sterilization and needle withdrawal in the acupuncturist group were not different from those in the acupuncture-novice group. This scale is suitable for quantitative evaluation on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation. The behavior features of professional acupuncture manipulation are mainly presented with needle insertion and needle manipulation which has superior difficulty, high coordination and accuracy.

  4. Hypochondriasis and fear of death.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Russell; Stuart, Scott; Longley, Susan L; Langbehn, Douglas R; Happel, Rachel L

    2002-08-01

    Although fear of death has been linked to hypochondriasis, the relationship of this fear to the disorder has received little study. To address this deficiency, we administered a fear of death scale along with measures of hypochondriasis, including the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory, to 162 general medical outpatients. Partial correlations, controlling for age, between the fear of death scale and both the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory were strongly positive. A factor analysis of the fear of death scale yielded three dimensions-fear of dying, loss of meaning, and fear of separation-that were also highly correlated with hypochondriasis. Fear of death and hypochondriasis showed comparable relationships to age and gender as well as to personality dimensions measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Fear of death appears to be an integral part of hypochondriasis. Its presence lends support to three models of hypochondriasis-the perceptual, existential, and interpersonal-that correspond to the dimensions of fear of death.

  5. Measuring Co-Presence and Social Presence in Virtual Environments - Psychometric Construction of a German Scale for a Fear of Public Speaking Scenario.

    PubMed

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) applications use high levels of fidelity in order to produce high levels of presence and thereby elicit an emotional response for the user (like fear for phobia treatment). State of research shows mixed results for the correlation between anxiety and presence in virtual reality exposure, with differing results depending on specific anxiety disorders. A positive correlation for anxiety and presence for social anxiety disorder is not proven up to now. One reason might be that plausibility of the simulation, namely including key triggers for social anxiety (for example verbal and non-verbal behavior of virtual agents that reflects potentially negative human evaluation) might not be acknowledged in current presence questionnaires. A German scale for measuring co-presence and social presence for virtual reality (VR) fear of public speaking scenarios was developed based on a translation and adaption of existing co-presence and social presence questionnaires. A sample of N = 151 students rated co-presence and social presence after using a fear of public speaking application. Four correlated factors were derived by item- and principle axis factor analysis (Promax rotation), representing the presenter's reaction to virtual agents, the reactions of the virtual agents as perceived by the presenter, impression of interaction possibilities, and (co-)presence of other people in the virtual environment. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and test construction for VR applications with a social context.

  6. Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Ivan; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C

    2016-04-01

    Fear memory is the best-studied form of memory. It was thoroughly investigated in the past 60 years mostly using two classical conditioning procedures (contextual fear conditioning and fear conditioning to a tone) and one instrumental procedure (one-trial inhibitory avoidance). Fear memory is formed in the hippocampus (contextual conditioning and inhibitory avoidance), in the basolateral amygdala (inhibitory avoidance), and in the lateral amygdala (conditioning to a tone). The circuitry involves, in addition, the pre- and infralimbic ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the central amygdala subnuclei, and the dentate gyrus. Fear learning models, notably inhibitory avoidance, have also been very useful for the analysis of the biochemical mechanisms of memory consolidation as a whole. These studies have capitalized on in vitro observations on long-term potentiation and other kinds of plasticity. The effect of a very large number of drugs on fear learning has been intensively studied, often as a prelude to the investigation of effects on anxiety. The extinction of fear learning involves to an extent a reversal of the flow of information in the mentioned structures and is used in the therapy of posttraumatic stress disorder and fear memories in general.

  7. Comparison of the effectiveness between manual acupuncture and electro-acupuncture on patients with tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Paul; Leung, Mason C P

    2002-01-01

    This is a single-blinded randomized controlled trial to compare the relative effectiveness between manual acupuncture (MA) and electro-acupuncture (EA) on the patients with chronic tennis elbow. Twenty patients recruited in the study were first introduced into control group for 2 weeks waiting period. Then, they were randomly assigned into either MA or EA group for acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture points of GB34 and ST38 were used in both treatment groups. In the MA group, the needle was retained for 20 minutes after the Deqi sensation obtained. In the EA group, electrical stimulation with 4 pulses/second frequency was applied and treatment lasted for 20 minutes. After 6 treatments within 2 weeks duration, significant differences were observed between groups favoring the electro-acupuncture in relation to pain relief (Pain visual analogue scale) and pain free hand grip strength (PFG). This study showed that electro-acupuncture is superior to manual acupuncture in treating patients with tennis elbow.

  8. Associations between Feeling and Judging the Emotions of Happiness and Fear: Findings from a Large-Scale Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Tony W.; Bibas, David; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Background How do we recognize emotions from other people? One possibility is that our own emotional experiences guide us in the online recognition of emotion in others. A distinct but related possibility is that emotion experience helps us to learn how to recognize emotions in childhood. Methodology/Principal Findings We explored these ideas in a large sample of people (N = 4,608) ranging from 5 to over 50 years old. Participants were asked to rate the intensity of emotional experience in their own lives, as well as to perform a task of facial emotion recognition. Those who reported more intense experience of fear and happiness were significantly more accurate (closer to prototypical) in recognizing facial expressions of fear and happiness, respectively, and intense experience of fear was associated also with more accurate recognition of surprised and happy facial expressions. The associations held across all age groups. Conclusions These results suggest that the intensity of one's own emotional experience of fear and happiness correlates with the ability to recognize these emotions in others, and demonstrate such an association as early as age 5. PMID:20498838

  9. Auricular Acupuncture with Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a method which has been successfully used in various fields of medicine especially in the treatment of pain relief. The introduction of lasers especially low-level lasers into medicine brought besides the already existing stimulation with needles and electricity an additional technique to auricular acupuncture. This literature research looks at the historical background, the development and the anatomical and neurological aspects of auricular acupuncture in general and auricular laser acupuncture in detail. Preliminary scientific findings on auricular acupuncture with laser have been described in detail and discussed critically in this review article. The results of the studies have shown evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison of these studies was impossible due to their different study designs. The most important technical as well as study parameters were described in detail in order to give more sufficient evidence and to improve the quality of future studies. PMID:23935695

  10. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  11. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2010-01-20

    Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most likely to have physiological activity), reduced heterogeneity and resulted in pooled short

  12. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  13. Hemopericardium Following Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Heon; Lee, Yong Jik; Hong, Jung Seok; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Eun Seog

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture-related hemopericardium is a rare but potentially fatal complication. We describe a hemopericardium that occurred shortly after acupuncture in a 55-year-old woman. A chest CT scan and echocardiography revealed a hemopericardium, and pericardiocentesis was then immediately and successfully performed. Subsequently, her clinical course improved. This case increases the attention of emergency physicians for acupuncture-related complications, especially hemopericardium, and the necessity of rapid diagnosis and management. PMID:21155058

  14. History of acupuncture research.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yi; Xing, Jing-jing; Li, Juan; Zeng, Bai-Yun; Liang, Fan-rong

    2013-01-01

    The acupuncture has been practiced in China for more than 3000 years and was spread to Europe and American from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The history of acupuncture research was initiated in the eighteenth century and developed rapidly since then. In the past, physicians tried hard to apply acupuncture into clinical practice, while scientists were focused on the possible characteristics of acupoints and meridians. In the modern time, scientists have strived hard to evaluate the real effectiveness of acupuncture and the underlying physiological and biological mechanisms of acupuncture. Reviewing research history from past to present, we are delighted to witness this wonderful development. Accumulated evidences that acupuncture is beneficial in various conditions significantly enhanced our understanding the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment. However, there is still no conclusive evidence in acupuncture clinical studies. The clinical research still needs great improving, while the basic research results need to be appropriately transformed into clinical outcomes. Based on current achievements, we believe that although the challenges and difficulties exist, a more collaborative, innovative, and integrated approach will help us to achieve further progress in future acupuncture research.

  15. Can a science-based definition of acupuncture improve clinical outcomes?

    PubMed

    Priebe, Ted; Stumpf, Steven H; Zalunardo, Rod

    2017-05-01

    Research on acupuncture has been muddled by attempts to bridge the ancient with the modern. Barriers to effectiveness research are reflected in recurring conflicts that include disagreement on use of the most basic terms, lack of standard intervention controls, and the absence of functional measures for assessing treatment effect. Acupuncture research has stalled at the "placebo barrier" wherein acupuncture is "no better than placebo." The most widely recognized comparative effectiveness research in acupuncture does not compare acupuncture treatment protocols within groups, thereby, mutating large scale effectiveness studies into large scale efficacy trials. Too often research in acupuncture attempts to tie outcomes to traditional belief systems thereby limiting usefulness of the research. The acupuncture research paradigm needs to focus more closely on a scientific definition of treatments and outcomes that compare protocols in terms of prevalent clinical issues such as relative effectiveness for treating pain.

  16. Short term effects by acupuncture to SP3 on the autonomic blood flow control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Chae, Younbyoung; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Ji-Yeun; Kwark, Young-Rong; Kang, O-Seok; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the short term effects of acupuncture on autonomic control of blood flow in healthy subjects. We also studied whether deqi (obtaining qi) sensations are correlated with these autonomic hemodynamic changes. The experiment had a randomized, crossover design. Five healthy volunteers (age: 18-26 years) participated in this study. Acupuncture (2 Hz rotations for 10 seconds to 20 mm deep) was applied either to the acupuncture point SP3 or KI2 for 5 minutes. Non-invasively obtained continuous hemodynamic measurements of ultrasound Dopplerography were recorded at the radial artery before, during and after acupuncture stimulation. Cardiovascular autonomic tone was also recorded using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. After acupuncture stimulation, the participants completed the acupuncture perception scales to measure the degree of deqi or pain they had experienced. Acupuncture stimulation to the acupuncture point SP3, when compared to the acupuncture point KI2, decreased the maximum systolic velocity. It also decreased low frequency component and increased high frequency component of heart rate variability, indicating that the decrease in systolic blood flow velocity was due to the increased parasympathetic response. Interestingly, warm, radiating and energetic feeling, which are related to deqi, had close correlations with the decrease in blood flow velocity. Acupuncture stimulation to the acupuncture point SP3 modulates the autonomic cardiovascular responses by enhancing parasympathetic function, and this may help to understand the therapeutic effects of acupuncture.

  17. [ZHU Lian's New Acupuncture Academic System and acupuncture science initialization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-11-01

    Acupuncture scientization was a consensus of most of acupuncture scholars who had long-term perspectives in the 20th century, among them Ms. ZHULian was the important one. Ms. ZHU Lian built a systemic new acupuncture" academic structure in practice and theory aspects. At the same time, as the main architect of Institute of Acupuncture-moxibustion of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ms. ZHU Lian was the first one who began to carry out the acupuncture clinical trail and laboratory experiment in modern way, which meant "acupuncture therapy" was transformed into "acupuncture science" by Ms. ZHULian's endeavor.

  18. Validity and sensitivity to change of the falls efficacy scales international to assess fear of falling in older adults with and without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Klaus A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Schwenk, Michael; Yardley, Lucy; Beyer, Nina; Todd, Chris; Oster, Peter; Zijlstra, G A Rixt

    2011-01-01

    Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences. The objectives of this study are to determine: (1) the validity of the 7-item Short Falls Efficacy Scale International (Short FES-I) in geriatric patients with and without cognitive impairment, and (2) the sensitivity to change of the 10-item Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), the 16-item FES-I and the 7-item Short FES-I in geriatric patients with dementia. Cross-sectional data of community-dwelling older adults and geriatric rehabilitation patients (n = 284) collected during face-to-face interviews were used to determine construct and discriminant validity by testing for differences within variables related to fear of falling. Sensitivity to change was studied in an intervention study including patients with mild to moderate dementia (n = 130) as determined by standard response means (SRMs). The Short FES-I showed excellent construct and discriminant validity in the total group and subsamples according to cognitive status. Sensitivity to change was adequate to good in the FES (range SRM: 0.18-0.77) and FES-I (range SRM: 0.21-0.74), with the Short FES-I showing the highest peak sensitivity to change (range SRM: 0.18-0.91). The Short FES-I is a valid measure to assess fear of falling in frail older adults with and without cognitive impairment, yet it may show floor effects in higher functioning older people. All scales, including the Short FES-I, were sensitive to detecting intervention-induced changes in concerns about falling in geriatric patients with dementia. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Acupuncture: quo vadis?].

    PubMed

    Bäcker, M; Tao, I; Dobos, G J

    2006-03-10

    On the current discussion about efficacy and "point-specificity" of the needle therapy To improve the evidence base for acupuncture in pain treatment the German health insurance initiated the so called "Acupuncture randomised trials (ART)" and "German Acupuncture Trials" (GERAC) with a sample size of 300 (ART) and 1000 (GERAC) patients, providing a new dimension in acupuncture research. These studies have yielded data, which indicate that acupuncture is effective in the treatment of migraine, tension type headache, osteoarthritis of the knee and chronic low back pain. For the two latter indications acupuncture showed an even higher therapeutic response rate than conventional standard treatment. In migraine acupuncture showed an effect comparable to pharmacological treatment. The studies moreover indicate that the relevance of point-specific effects may have been overestimated concerning some indications. This article discusses the results of ART and GERAC, based on differentiating the mechanisms of action in acupuncture therapy. It is shown that the current data neither support the postulate of a "no-matter-where acupuncture" nor the irrefutability of the theorems of Chinese Medicine. Future studies will have to determine more precisely the mechanism by which the therapeutic effect of acupuncture is mediated. Furthermore, it will be necessary to find out more clearly in what diseases the location of needling represents the crucial part of the treatment and in what diseases rather different factors, like the intensity of stimulation or the doctor-patient interaction, are more relevant for the therapeutic effect. Research into acupuncture is still at the beginning. For this reason it should be avoided to draw premature and untenable conclusions from the current data.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Persian versions of the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Askary-Ashtiani, Ahmadreza; Ebrahimi-Takamejani, Ismail; Torkaman, Giti; Amiri, Mohsen; Mousavi, Seyed Javad

    2014-08-15

    Validation of 2 self-report questionnaires. To evaluate the internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity of the Persian versions of the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FABQ) and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) in patients with acute and chronic neck pain. The FABQ and TSK are 2 important measures to evaluate fear of pain and fear avoidance beliefs in patients with spinal pain. To date, the psychometric properties of these questionnaires have not been demonstrated in Persian-speaking patients with neck pain in Iran. One hundred sixty-six patients with acute and chronic neck pain participated in the study. The construct validity of the questionnaires was evaluated by measuring convergent and known-groups validity. The visual analogue scale measure of pain, neck disability index, hospital anxiety and depression scale, and the physical (PCS-12) and mental (MCS-12) summary scores of the Short Form health survey (SF-12) were used to test construct validity of the Persian FABQ and TSK. In addition, 50 randomly selected patients with chronic neck pain were asked to complete the questionnaires 48 hours later for the second time. Cronbach α coefficient for the FABQ and TSK in patients with acute and chronic pain was in the range from 0.77 to 0.92 and 0.77 to 0.78, respectively. The Persian FABQ and TSK showed satisfactory test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficient of more than 0.80. There were moderate to strong correlations between the Persian FABQ and TSK scores and the neck disability index (r = 0.44-0.55), Depression subscales of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (r = 0.42-0.48), and PCS-12 (r =-0.34 to -0.62). The Persian FABQ and TSK have acceptable reliability and validity for measuring pain related fear and avoidance beliefs among Persian-speaking patients with acute and chronic neck pain. However, considering the study limitations, the findings should be interpreted with caution. 3.

  1. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    PubMed

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se.

  2. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  3. Clinical assessment of fear of falling after stroke: validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Persian version of the Fall Efficacy Scale-International.

    PubMed

    Azad, Akram; Hassani Mehraban, Afsoon; Mehrpour, Masoud; Mohammadi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Fear of falling may be related to falling during stroke onset. The Fall Efficacy ScaleInternational (FES-I) with excellent psychometric properties, is an instrument developed to assess patients' concerns about fallings. The aim of this study was to determine validation of this scale in Iranian patients with stroke. The "forward-backward" procedure was applied to translate the FES-I from English to Persian. One hundred-twenty patients who had suffered stroke, aged 40 to 80 years (55% male) completed the Persian FES-I, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15), General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed up and Go (TUG) questionnaires. The interval time for the test-retest of the Persian scale was 7-14 days. The test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities of the Persian FES-I were excellent (ICC2,1=0.98, p<0.001) and the internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha=0.78). Factor analysis of the 16 items in the Persian scale showed only one significant factor. The total Persian FES-I score had a significantly negative correlation (p<0.001) with the BBS, but it had significantly positive correlation with the TUG, GHQ-28, and GDS-15. The difference in responsiveness scores across fallers and non-fallers yielded a large effect size (0.46), which indicated a good discriminating validity. The Persian FES-I proved to be an effective and valuable measurement tool to assess stroke patients' fear of falling in practice and research setting.

  4. [Evaluation of a two-dimensional scale for the assessment of fear avoidance beliefs in elderly chronic low back pain patients].

    PubMed

    Quint, S; Raich, M; Luckmann, J

    2011-06-01

    There is evidence on the importance of fear avoidance beliefs (FAB) as prognostic risk factors in elderly patients suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, so far there is no validated German instrument for measuring FAB in elderly CLBP patients. The aim of the study presented was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Catastrophizing Avoidance Scale D-65+ (CAS-D-65+) within a population of elderly patients with CLBP. A cross-sectional study was conducted with measurement repeated after 4 weeks in 68 CLBP patients aged 64 years and older. The CAS-D-65+ was analyzed performing an item analysis and retest reliability. For validation standardized assessment methods (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia [TSK], Photography of Daily Activity - Short electronic Version [Phoda-SeV], 5-Item-FAB, pain, disability, well-being and strain) were used. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α) ranged from 0.87 to 0.92 for total scale and from 0.71 to 0.89 for the sub-scales "catastrophizing" and "avoidance", retest reliability (r(tt)) ranged from 0.67 for the sub-scale "catastrophizing" to 0.70 for total scale and sub-scale "avoidance". The CAS-D-65+ showed moderate and strong effect sizes (Cohen's d) with other related FAB scales and external criteria. As shown in this study the CAS-D-65+ is a reliable and a valid instrument for the assessment of FAB in older patients with CLBP.

  5. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  6. Acupuncture in human performance.

    PubMed

    Pelham, T W; Holt, L E; Stalker, R

    2001-05-01

    To this point in time, acupuncture has been used primarily as an analgesic, a therapeutic intervention that controls pain under pathological conditions. Although some of the mechanisms of acupuncture as it applies to pain relief have been studied, little is known of the positive and/or negative effects of this procedure on the physical performance parameters of healthy people, particularly highly trained athletes. After introducing acupuncture from historical and technique viewpoints, preliminary studies of the effects of acupuncture on strength, aerobic conditioning, flexibility, and sport performance are discussed, as well as concerns regarding the direction of research investigating the potential benefit and/ or adverse effects of this practice. Finally, an argument is put forward for the establishment of guidelines for the use of acupuncture in the sports community.

  7. Acupuncture in modern society.

    PubMed

    Vanderploeg, Kristin; Yi, Xiaobin

    2009-03-01

    For at least 2,500 years, acupuncture has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. However, recently as more people in western countries are diagnosed with chronic disease poorly treated with modern medical therapies, many are turning to acupuncture and other forms of alternative medical treatments. Based on the theory of harmonious flowing qi being the basis of good health, acupuncture focuses on restoring qi by manipulation of the complementary and opposing elements of yin and yang. However, in the modern medical community we struggle to with the concept of qi, given a lack of anatomic and histological evidence supporting its existence. However, with the surge in public interest in acupuncture, the scientific community begun heavy investigation of acupuncture's efficacy, as well as the physiologic basis behind it. Thus far, evidence supports the use of acupuncture in post-operative nausea and vomiting, postoperative dental pain, chronic pain conditions such as lower back pain, and possibly also such psychologic conditions as addiction. It is possible that by affecting afferent nerve signaling, acupuncture may influence the release of endogenous opioids to promote pain relief. This effect may be augmented by release of ACTH and cortisol, as well as through down-regulation of signaling through pain fibers. When treating patients who may utilize alternative forms of medicine, it is important that medical practitioners be educated in regards to the basic fundamental beliefs behind acupuncture, as well as the scientific evidence supporting its use and revealing its efficacy. The purpose of this review is to give western trained physicians exposure to history, basic knowledge and its clinical applications of acupuncture to accommodate accelerating interests in acupuncture in modern society.

  8. Acupuncture in posttonsillectomy pain : A prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dingemann, J; Plewig, B; Baumann, I; Plinkert, P K; Sertel, S

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative swallowing pain is one of the most unpleasant after-effects of tonsillectomy. During recent years, the demand for alternatives to drug-based pain therapy has continued to grow, although the topic has received little research attention until now. A total of 46 patients were randomized into verum acupuncture, control acupuncture, and drug-based treatment groups. All patients received nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs (NSAIDs). One hour after drug intake, the verum group also received acupuncture according to classical acupuncture rules (S34, S44 and PC5). The control group had acupuncture needles placed at nonspecific acupuncture points in the midaxillary line. Acupuncture was performed by a blinded acupuncturist, who had learnt exclusively these techniques in the run up to the study. Patients were asked to evaluate their pain before, and at intervals of 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h after drug intake/acupuncture treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). The analgesic effect of acupuncture was significant up to 3 hours in the verum group (p < 0.05). The analgesic effect in the control acupuncture group was significant for up to 1 h after acupuncture (p < 0.05). With reference to the time point before acupuncture, the differences between both acupuncture groups and the drug group were significant (p < 0.01) over the whole time. Acupuncture is an effective complement to NSAIDs in the treatment of posttonsillectomy pain. Particularly patients with allergies, drug intolerance, or reduced response to the commonly administered drugs may benefit from acupuncture.

  9. [Acupuncture in posttonsillectomy pain : A prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial. German version].

    PubMed

    Dingemann, J; Plewig, B; Baumann, I; Plinkert, P K; Sertel, S

    2017-08-01

    Postoperative swallowing pain is one of the most unpleasant after-effects of tonsillectomy. During recent years, the demand for alternatives to drug-based pain therapy has continued to grow, although the topic has received little research attention until now. A total of 46 patients were randomized into verum acupuncture, control acupuncture, and drug-based treatment groups. All patients received nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs (NSAIDs). One hour after drug intake, the verum group also received acupuncture according to classical acupuncture rules (S34, S44 and PC5). The control group had acupuncture needles placed at nonspecific acupuncture points in the midaxillary line. Acupuncture was performed by a blinded acupuncturist, who had learnt exclusively these techniques in the run up to the study. Patients were asked to evaluate their pain before, and at intervals of 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h after drug intake/acupuncture treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). The analgesic effect of acupuncture was significant up to 3 hours in the verum group (p < 0.05). The analgesic effect in the control acupuncture group was significant for up to 1 h after acupuncture (p < 0.05). With reference to the time point before acupuncture, the differences between both acupuncture groups and the drug group were significant (p < 0.01) over the whole time. Acupuncture is an effective complement to NSAIDs in the treatment of posttonsillectomy pain. Particularly patients with allergies, drug intolerance, or reduced response to the commonly administered drugs may benefit from acupuncture.

  10. Neuronal circuits of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Herry, Cyril; Ferraguti, Francesco; Singewald, Nicolas; Letzkus, Johannes J; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Lüthi, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Fear extinction is a form of inhibitory learning that allows for the adaptive control of conditioned fear responses. Although fear extinction is an active learning process that eventually leads to the formation of a consolidated extinction memory, it is a fragile behavioural state. Fear responses can recover spontaneously or subsequent to environmental influences, such as context changes or stress. Understanding the neuronal substrates of fear extinction is of tremendous clinical relevance, as extinction is the cornerstone of psychological therapy of several anxiety disorders and because the relapse of maladaptative fear and anxiety is a major clinical problem. Recent research has begun to shed light on the molecular and cellular processes underlying fear extinction. In particular, the acquisition, consolidation and expression of extinction memories are thought to be mediated by highly specific neuronal circuits embedded in a large-scale brain network including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. Moreover, recent findings indicate that the neuronal circuitry of extinction is developmentally regulated. Here, we review emerging concepts of the neuronal circuitry of fear extinction, and highlight novel findings suggesting that the fragile phenomenon of extinction can be converted into a permanent erasure of fear memories. Finally, we discuss how research on genetic animal models of impaired extinction can further our understanding of the molecular and genetic bases of human anxiety disorders.

  11. Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2009-01-21

    Acupuncture is often used for migraine prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on 'Acupuncture for tension-type headache') represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than 'sham' (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with migraine. The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with migraine. Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (outcome of primary interest), migraine attacks, migraine days, headache days and analgesic use. Pooled effect size estimates were calculated using a random-effects model. Twenty-two trials with 4419 participants (mean 201, median 42, range 27 to 1715) met the inclusion criteria. Six trials (including two large trials with 401 and 1715 patients) compared acupuncture to no prophylactic treatment or routine care only. After 3 to 4 months patients receiving acupuncture had higher response rates and fewer headaches. The only study with long-term follow up saw no evidence that effects dissipated up to 9 months after cessation of treatment. Fourteen trials compared a 'true' acupuncture intervention with a variety of sham

  12. Treating Postlaparoscopic Surgery Shoulder Pain with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Attias, Samuel; Kreindler, Anna; Hen, Haim; Haj, Bassel; Matter, Ibrahim; Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) which is a common side effect in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Patients with moderate to severe PLSP in spite of analgesic treatment, which were referred by the medical staff to the Complementary-Integrative Surgery Service (CISS) at our institution, were provided with acupuncture treatment. The severity of PLSP and of general pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) from 0 to 10. Pain assessment was conducted prior to and two hours following acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture treatment was individualized based on traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis. Results. A total of 25 patients were evaluated during a 14-month period, from March 2011 to May 2012. A significant reduction in PLSP (mean reduction of 6.4 ± 2.3 P < 0.0001) and general pain (mean reduction 6.4 ± 2.1 P < 0.0001) were observed, and no significant side effects were reported. Conclusion. Individualized acupuncture treatments according to traditional Chinese medicine principles may improve postlaparoscopic shoulder pain and general pain when used in conjunction with conventional therapy. The primary findings of this study warrant verification in controlled studies. PMID:24864149

  13. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the fear of negative evaluation scale-brief (BFNE) and the BFNE-straightforward for middle school students.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Yadan; Xue, Song; Zhang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    The 12-item brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE) is one of the most widely used instruments to assess fear of negative evaluation. Recent evidence strongly supports the version composed of 8 straightforward items (BFNE-S), which possessesstronger psychometric properties. The purpose of the current study is to examine the psychometric prop-erties of the Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S for middle school students. A total of 1009 middle school students were recruited in this study. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Friedman-Bendas Text Anxiety Scale (FBTAS), and the Social Anxiety Scale (SAS) were administered to 497 participants, and 52 participants were re-tested after four weeks. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) wereadministered to 492 participants. The BFNE and BFNE-S significantly cor-related with all the scales, supporting their convergent, divergent and concurrent validity. The Cronbach's alpha of the BFNE (BFNE-S) was 0.864 (0.867) with 497 par-ticipants and 0.886 (0.844) with 492 participants, and the test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.791 (0.855) (ICC). Although the EFA identified a two-factor solution in which the 8 straightfor-ward items loaded on one factor and the 4 reversed items loaded on the other, the CFA, using a random intercept model to control the wording effect, supported a unidimensional factor struc-ture of the BFNE. Both EFA and CFA supported the unidimensional assumption of the BFNE-S. The correlations of the BFNE and BFNE-S were 0.929 and 0.952 in two samples. The Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S demonstrate adequate psychometric properties for assessing fear of negative evaluation. The results support their use among the Chinese middle school students. Considering its greater parsimony and excellent reliability and validity, the BFNE-S is a better tool.

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Brief (BFNE) and the BFNE-Straightforward for Middle School Students

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Yadan; Xue, Song; Zhang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    Background The 12-item brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE) is one of the most widely used instruments to assess fear of negative evaluation. Recent evidence strongly supports the version composed of 8 straightforward items (BFNE-S), which possessesstronger psychometric properties. The purpose of the current study is to examine the psychometric prop-erties of the Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S for middle school students. Methodology A total of 1009 middle school students were recruited in this study. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Friedman-Bendas Text Anxiety Scale (FBTAS), and the Social Anxiety Scale (SAS) were administered to 497 participants, and 52 participants were re-tested after four weeks. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) wereadministered to 492 participants. The BFNE and BFNE-S significantly cor-related with all the scales, supporting their convergent, divergent and concurrent validity. Principal Findings The Cronbach's alpha of the BFNE (BFNE-S) was 0.864 (0.867) with 497 par-ticipants and 0.886 (0.844) with 492 participants, and the test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.791 (0.855) (ICC). Although the EFA identified a two-factor solution in which the 8 straightfor-ward items loaded on one factor and the 4 reversed items loaded on the other, the CFA, using a random intercept model to control the wording effect, supported a unidimensional factor struc-ture of the BFNE. Both EFA and CFA supported the unidimensional assumption of the BFNE-S. The correlations of the BFNE and BFNE-S were 0.929 and 0.952 in two samples. Conclusions The Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S demonstrate adequate psychometric properties for assessing fear of negative evaluation. The results support their use among the Chinese middle school students. Considering its greater parsimony and excellent reliability and validity, the BFNE-S is a better tool. PMID

  15. The geriatric depression scale and the timed up and go test predict fear of falling in community-dwelling elderly women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Bruno de Souza; Dos Anjos, Daniela Maria da Cruz; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa; Kirkwood, Renata Noce

    2016-03-03

    Fear of falling is a common and potentially disabling problem among older adults. However, little is known about this condition in older adults with diabetes mellitus. The aims of this study were to investigate the impact of the fear of falling on clinical, functional and gait variables in older women with type 2 diabetes and to identify which variables could predict the fear of falling in this population. Ninety-nine community-dwelling older women with type 2 diabetes (aged 65 to 89 years) were stratified in two groups based on their Falls Efficacy Scale-International score. Participants with a score < 23 were assigned to the group without the fear of falling (n = 50) and those with a score ≥ 23 were assigned to the group with the fear of falling (n = 49). Clinical data included demographics, anthropometrics, number of diseases and medications, physical activity level, fall history, frailty level, cognition, depressive symptoms, fasting glucose level and disease duration. Functional measures included the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the five times sit-to-stand test (5-STS) and handgrip strength. Gait parameters were obtained using the GAITRite® system. Participants with a fear of falling were frailer and presented more depressive symptoms and worse performance on the TUG and 5-STS tests compared with those without a fear of falling. The group with the fear of falling also walked with a lower velocity, cadence and step length and increased step time and swing time variability. The multivariate regression analysis showed that the likelihood of having a fear of falling increased 1.34 times (OR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.11-1.61) for a one-point increase in the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) score and 1.36 times (OR 1.36, 95 % CI 1.07-1.73) for each second of increase in the TUG performance. The fear of falling in community-dwelling older women with type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with frailty, depressive symptoms and dynamic balance, functional mobility and gait

  16. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbae J; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2011-12-01

    Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation+rotation. In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation+rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted.

  17. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  18. A longitudinal study of the reliability of acupuncture deqi sensations in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Rosa B; Camhi, Stephanie; Hashmi, Javeria A; Vangel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deqi is one of the core concepts in acupuncture theory and encompasses a range of sensations. In this study, we used the MGH Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) to measure and assess the reliability of the sensations evoked by acupuncture needle stimulation in a longitudinal clinical trial on knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the clinical outcome. Thirty OA patients were randomized into one of three groups (high dose, low dose, and sham acupuncture) for 4 weeks. We found that, compared with sham acupuncture, real acupuncture (combining high and low doses) produced significant improvement in knee pain (P = .025) and function in sport (P = .049). Intraclass correlation analysis showed that patients reliably rated 11 of the 12 acupuncture sensations listed on the MASS and that heaviness was rated most consistently. Overall perceived sensation (MASS Index) (P = .014), ratings of soreness (P = .002), and aching (P = .002) differed significantly across acupuncture groups. Compared to sham acupuncture, real acupuncture reliably evoked stronger deqi sensations and led to better clinical outcomes when measured in a chronic pain population. Our findings highlight the MASS as a useful tool for measuring deqi in acupuncture research.

  19. A Longitudinal Study of the Reliability of Acupuncture Deqi Sensations in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Rosa B.; Camhi, Stephanie; Hashmi, Javeria A.; Vangel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D.; Edwards, Robert R.; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deqi is one of the core concepts in acupuncture theory and encompasses a range of sensations. In this study, we used the MGH Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) to measure and assess the reliability of the sensations evoked by acupuncture needle stimulation in a longitudinal clinical trial on knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the clinical outcome. Thirty OA patients were randomized into one of three groups (high dose, low dose, and sham acupuncture) for 4 weeks. We found that, compared with sham acupuncture, real acupuncture (combining high and low doses) produced significant improvement in knee pain (P = .025) and function in sport (P = .049). Intraclass correlation analysis showed that patients reliably rated 11 of the 12 acupuncture sensations listed on the MASS and that heaviness was rated most consistently. Overall perceived sensation (MASS Index) (P = .014), ratings of soreness (P = .002), and aching (P = .002) differed significantly across acupuncture groups. Compared to sham acupuncture, real acupuncture reliably evoked stronger deqi sensations and led to better clinical outcomes when measured in a chronic pain population. Our findings highlight the MASS as a useful tool for measuring deqi in acupuncture research. PMID:23935656

  20. Acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has frequently been used to treat tinnitus, and acupuncture is a particularly popular option. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for tinnitus. Methods Fourteen databases were searched from the dates of their creation to July 4th, 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results A total of 9 RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor. Five RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture for treating tinnitus. The results failed to show statistically significant improvements. Two RCTs compared a short one-time scalp acupuncture treatment with the use of penetrating sham acupuncture at non-acupoints in achieving subjective symptom relief on a visual analog scale; these RCTs demonstrated significant positive effects with scalp acupuncture. Two RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional drug treatments. One of these RCTs demonstrated that acupuncture had statistically significant effects on the response rate in patients with nervous tinnitus, but the other RCT did not demonstrate significant effects in patients with senile tinnitus. Conclusions The number, size and quality of the RCTs on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus are not sufficient for drawing definitive conclusions. Further rigorous RCTs that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are warranted. PMID:22805113

  1. Fears about treatment among young drug abusers in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yida Y H; Shek, Daniel T L

    2011-01-01

    This study examined fears about drug treatment among 300 young male heroin abusers in Hong Kong (172 newcomers and 128 repeaters) recruited from non-government treatment agencies. An indigenous 35-item Fears about Treatment Scale (Fears Scale) was developed to measure fears about treatment among the participants. Results showed that four factors (fear of failure, fear of labeling or disclosure, fear of maladaptation and fear of withdrawal) were abstracted from the scale. Reliability analyses showed that subscales based on these four factors and the total scale were internally consistent. The findings showed that treatment failure was the major fear in the respondents. The present findings suggest that drug treatment and rehabilitation services should help clients, particularly young substance abusers, mitigate their treatment fears.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of acupuncture versus sham acupuncture in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei; Sun, Jie-Guang

    2010-05-01

    We aim to study the efficacy of acupuncture versus sham acupuncture in children with autism spectrum disorder. A single-blind randomized control trial was conducted in 50 children. These children were randomly assigned to the treatment group with tongue acupuncture (40 sessions over 8 weeks) or the control group (sham tongue acupuncture to nonacupoints in the tongue). There was improvement in both the treatment and control groups in all assessed measures but more so in the treatment than in the control group: (1) eye-hand coordination, performance, and practical reasoning of Griffiths Mental Developmental Scale; (2) sensory-motor, social, affectual, language, and total score of Ritvo-Freeman Real Life Scale; (3) Comprehension Language age in the Reynell Language Developmental Scale; and (4) Total Score and Mental Age in Symbolic Play Test. The only statistically significant improvement in the treatment as compared to the control group was seen in self-care and cognition domains of the Functional Independence Measure for children. We had demonstrated that a short course of acupuncture had efficacy in improving various developmental and behavioral aspects of children with autism. The long-term efficacy in functional gain needs to be further explored.

  3. [Clinical observation on therapeutic effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation at trigger points for lumbar myofascial pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong

    2014-08-01

    To observe the clinical effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation of trigger points on lumbar myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Sixty MPS patients were randomly divided into acupuncture + TDP group (n = 30), and cupping + acupuncture group (n = 30). Patients in the acupuncture + TDP group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of trigger points and local TDP irradiation, and patients of the cupping + acupuncture group treated by intensive cupping applied to the myofascial band and acupuncture stimulation of the locus according to the position of muscular tension band. The therapeutic effects were assessed according to the score of the McGill pain questionnaire composing of pain rating index (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS) and present pain intensity (PPI) before, immediately and 1 month after the treatment. After the treatment, the total effective rates of the acupuncture+ TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 83.3% (25/30) and 96.6% (29/30), respectively, without significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). One month's follow-up showed that the total effective rates of the acupuncture + TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 40.0% and 90.0% respectively, and the latter group was significantly better than the acupuncture + TDP group in the therapeutic effect (P < 0.05). The scores of PRI, VAS, PPI after the treatment were markedly decreased in both groups (P < 0.05). One month later, the scores of PRI, VAS and PPI in the cupping + acupuncture group were obviously lower than those of the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). Both acupuncture stimulation of trigger points plus TDP and cupping plus acupuncture can effectively relieve pain in MPS patients, while the therapeutic effect of cupping plus acupuncture treatment lasts longer analgesic effect.

  4. [Acupuncture and moxibustion in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shi-Lin; Xu, Jin-Shui

    2013-04-01

    The development status of acupuncture and moxibustion in Tunisia is introduced in this article. Although acupuncture and moxibustion only has a history of more than 30 years in Tunisia, it is very popular among the local people. Until now, there is one acupuncture and moxibustion center aided and built with the help of the Chinese government. Acupuncture and moxibustion clinical department has been set in some of the hospitals, and acupuncture and moxibustion clinical practice is also carried out in some private clinics. Cost of acupuncture and moxibustion in public hospitals has already been covered by medical insurance. As for education of acupuncture and moxibustion, training courses were set up in medical colleges of Tunisia by Tunisian government which is lectured by Chinese acupuncture experts. Acupuncture and moxibustion has been used to treat many diseases in Tunisia and is warmly welcomed by Tunisian.

  5. Neurotrophins and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Manni, Luigi; Albanesi, Marcello; Guaragna, Morena; Barbaro Paparo, Samuele; Aloe, Luigi

    2010-10-28

    The aim of this review is to report recent findings and ongoing studies on the effects of acupuncture on endogenous biological mediators, in particular on neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and is a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Western descriptions of the clinical efficacy of acupuncture on pain, inflammation, motor dysfunction, mood disorders, and seizures are based on the stimulation of several classes of sensory afferent fibers and the consequent activation of physiological processes similar to those resulting from physical exercise or deep massage. The established research on the neuro-physiological correlates of acupuncture has pointed towards endogenous opioids as the principal biological mediators of the therapeutic actions of this ancient technique. More recently, several classes of molecules, such as neurotransmitters, cytokines and growth factors, have also been identified as possible mediators for specific acupuncture effects. This review will focus on the links between acupuncture and a class of growth factors known as neurotrophins (NTs), which are the main mediators of neural activity, plasticity and repair following neurodegeneration and/or traumatic injury. A special emphasis will be placed on the work of our laboratory investigating the role of nerve growth factor (NGF), the prototypical member of the neurotrophin family, as a mediator of acupuncture effects in the central nervous system (CNS) and as a modulator of sensory and autonomic activity.

  6. Trigger point acupuncture for treatment of knee osteoarthritis--a preliminary RCT for a pragmatic trial.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Hirota, Satoko; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Ochi, Hideki; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    There is evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture treatment in knee osteoarthritis, but it remains unclear which acupuncture modes are most effective. We evaluated the effects of trigger point acupuncture on pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis patients, compared with acupuncture at standard points, and sham acupuncture. Thirty patients (27 women, 3 men; aged 61-82 years) with non-radiating knee osteoarthritis pain for at least six months and normal neurological examination were randomised to one of three groups for the study period of 21 weeks. Each group received five acupuncture treatment sessions. The standard acupuncture point group (n=10) received treatment at traditional acupuncture points for knee pain; the trigger point acupuncture group (n=10) received treatment at trigger points; and the third group (n=10) received sham acupuncture treatment at the trigger points. Outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS) and WOMAC index (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index). The groups were compared by the area under the curve method. Five patients dropped out of the study because of lack of improvement, and one patient (in the trigger point acupuncture group) dropped out because of deterioration of symptoms; the remaining 24 patients were included in the analysis. After treatment, the trigger point acupuncture group reported less pain intensity on VAS than the standard acupuncture or sham treatment group, but both the trigger point acupuncture and standard acupuncture groups reported improvement of function of knee. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity between pre-treatment and five weeks after treatment for the trigger point acupuncture (P<0.01) and standard acupuncture groups (P<0.01) included in the analysis, but not for the sham treatment group. Group comparison using the area under the curves demonstrated a significant difference only between trigger point acupuncture and sham treatment groups

  7. Randomized clinical trials of constitutional acupuncture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD). Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85-2.54, P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 0.00, P = 0.96, I(2) = 0%). Our results provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of constitutional acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls.

  8. Fears and Phobias

    MedlinePlus

    ... a strong swimmer might have a fear of deep water. In this case, the fear is helpful because it cautions the person to stay safe. Someone could overcome this fear by learning how to swim safely. A fear can be ...

  9. Acupuncture for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    White, A R; Rampes, H; Ernst, E

    2002-01-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are promoted as a treatment for smoking cessation in the belief that they may reduce nicotine withdrawal symptoms. The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture and the allied therapies of acupressure, laser therapy and electrostimulation, in smoking cessation in comparison with: a) sham treatment, b) other interventions, or c) no intervention. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group trials register, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline, Embase, BIOSIS Previews, PsycINFO, Science and Social Sciences Citation Index, AMED and CISCOM. Date of last search January 2002. Randomised trials comparing a form of acupuncture, acupressure, laser therapy or electrostimulation with either sham treatment, another intervention or no intervention for smoking cessation. We extracted data in duplicate on the type of smokers recruited, the nature of the acupuncture and control procedures, the outcome measures, method of randomisation, and completeness of follow-up. We assessed abstinence from smoking at the earliest time-point (before 6 weeks), at six months and at one year or more follow-up in patients smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence for each trial, and biochemically validated rates if available. Those lost to follow-up were counted as continuing to smoke. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed effects model. We identified 22 studies. Acupuncture was not superior to sham acupuncture in smoking cessation at any time point. The odds ratio (OR) for early outcomes was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.49); the OR after 6 months was 1.50 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 2.27) and after 12 months 1.08 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to 1.52). Similarly, when acupuncture was compared with other anti-smoking interventions, there were no differences in outcome at any time point. Acupuncture appeared to be superior to no intervention in the early

  10. An international expert survey on acupuncture in randomized controlled trials for low back pain and a validation of the low back pain acupuncture score

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a promising treatment approach in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) but little is known about the quality of acupuncture in randomized controlled trials (RCT) of acupuncture cLBP. Objective To determine how international experts (IES) rate the quality of acupuncture in RCTs of cLBP; independent international validation of the Low Back Pain Acupuncture Score (LBPAS). Methodology Fifteen experts from 9 different countries outside China were surveyed (IES). They were asked to read anonymized excerpts of 24 RCTs of cLBP and answer a three-item questionnaire on how the method of acupuncture conformed to 1) Chinese textbook standards, 2) the expert's personally preferred style, and 3) how acupuncture is performed in the expert's country. Likert scale rating, calculation of the mode for each answer, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between all three answers and the LBPAS were calculated. Results On comparison with Chinese textbook standards (question 1), 6 RCTs received a good rating, 8 trials a fair and 10 trials a poor or very poor rating. 5 of the 6 trials rated good, received at least a good rating also in question 2 or 3. We found a high correlation of 0.85 (p < 0.0001) between the IES and LBPAS ratings for question 1 and question 2, and a correlation of 0.66 (p < 0.0001) for question 3. Conclusion The international expert survey (IES) revealed that only 6 out of 24 (25%) RCTs of acupuncture for cLBP were rated "good" in respect to Chinese textbook acupuncture standards. There were only small differences in how the acupuncture quality was rated in comparison to Chinese textbook acupuncture, personally preferred and local styles of acupuncture. The rating showed a high correlation with the Low Back Pain Acupuncture Score LBPAS. PMID:21486726

  11. Acupuncture for hot flushes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women: a randomised, sham-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Il; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kim, Kun Hyung; Rho, Jin Ju; Choi, Min Sun; Yoon, Sang Ho; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kang, Kyung Won; Ahn, Hong Yup; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2011-12-01

    To determine the effect of acupuncture in treating hot flushes in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. The study was a randomised single-blind sham-controlled clinical trial. Perimenopausal or postmenopausal women with moderate or severe hot flushes were randomised to receive real or sham acupuncture. Both groups underwent a 4-week run-in period before the treatment. The real acupuncture group received 11 acupuncture treatments for 7 weeks, and the control group underwent sham acupuncture on non-acupuncture points during the same period. Both groups were followed for 8 weeks after the end of treatment period. Changes from baseline in the hot flush scores at week 7, measured by multiplying the hot flush frequency and severity, were the primary outcome. Hot flush frequency, severity and menopause-related symptoms measured with the Menopause Rating Scale Questionnaire were regarded as secondary outcomes. 54 participants were randomised into the real acupuncture group (n=27) and the sham acupuncture group (n=27). The mean change in hot flush scores was -6.4±5.2 in the real acupuncture group and -5.6±9.2 in the sham group at week 7 from values at the start of the acupuncture treatment (10.0±8.1 vs 11.7±12.6), respectively (p=0.0810). No serious adverse events were observed during the whole study period. Compared to sham acupuncture, acupuncture failed to show significantly different effects on the hot flush scores but showed partial benefits on the hot flush severity. Further consideration is needed to develop appropriate strategies for distinguishing non-specific effects from observed overall effectiveness of acupuncture for hot flushes. Whether acupuncture has point-specific effects for hot flushes should be also considered in designing future researches.

  12. Acupuncture for substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Arthur

    2003-10-01

    Acupuncture, in the form of insertion of needles bilaterally in the outer ears, is widely used for the treatment of addiction in the US. However, support for this form of treatment from controlled studies has not been consistent. This article examines recent clinical trials of acupuncture for addiction treatment, with a goal of conveying to the reader some of the complex issues involved in conducting studies in this area. Acupuncture trials in addictions frequently have been conducted without preliminary dose-ranging studies to establish efficacious doses of the experimental treatment, use needle insertion controls of unknown degrees of activity, and present no rationale for the type or intensity of concurrently offered psychotherapy. At the present time, it is premature to put forth recommendations for or against acupuncture for the treatment of addiction based on evidence from extant studies.

  13. A TREATMENT TRIAL OF ACUPUNCTURE IN IBS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, Anthony J.; Conboy, Lisa; Kelley, John M.; Schnyer, Rosa S; McManus, Claire; Quilty, Mary T.; Kerr, Catherine E.; Jacobson, Eric E.; Davis, Roger B; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of true and sham acupuncture in relieving symptoms of IBS. Methods A total of 230 adult IBS patients (75% females, average age 38.4 yrs) were randomly assigned to 3 weeks of true or sham acupuncture (6 treatments) following a 3 week ‘run-in’ with sham acupuncture in an ‘augmented’ or ‘limited’ patient-practitioner interaction. A third arm of the study included a waitlist control group. The primary outcome was the IBS Global Improvement Scale (IBS-GIS) (range 1–7); secondary outcomes included IBS Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS), Adequate Relief (IBS-AR) and IBS-Quality of life (IBS-QOL). Results Though there was no statistically significant difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture on the IBS-GIS (41% vs. 32%, p=0.25), both groups improved significantly compared to the wait list control group (37% vs. 4%, p=0.001). Similarly, small differences that were not statistically significant favored acupuncture on the other three outcomes: IBS-AR (59% vs 57%, p=0.83), IBS-SSS (31% vs 21%, p=0.18) and IBS-QOL (17% vs 13%, p=0.56). Eliminating responders during the run-in period did not substantively change the results. Side effects were generally mild and only slightly greater in the acupuncture group. Conclusion This study did not find evidence to support the superiority of acupuncture compared to sham acupuncture in the treatment of IBS. PMID:19455132

  14. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Germany to Joint Andrews Base and another pilot study examining acupuncture for phantom limb pain that yielded promising preliminary data. In 2006 a...persistent, multi-system symptoms of varying degrees and severities. This is reminiscent of “Gulf War Syndrome ” or “Chronic Multi-symptom Illness” defined...illness syndrome . Acupuncture is more than the act of needle insertion. It is embedded in a ritual that includes a narrative interaction and trusting

  15. [Treatment of autism with scalp acupunctur].

    PubMed

    Li, Nuo; Jin, Bing-Xu; Li, Jie-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Huan

    2011-08-01

    To verify the efficacy on autism treated with scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice in children. Seventy cases of child autism were divided into an observation group (30 cases) and a control group (40 cases). In observation group, the cases were treated with scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice, in combination with music therapy and structure education method. Scalp acupuncture was applied to intelligent nine needles (frontal five needles, Sishencong (EX-HN 1)), affection area, heart and liver area, once a day, at the interval once every one week. Totally, 60 treatments made one session. In control group, music therapy and structure education method were applied simply. Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, Childhood Autism Behavior Scale (CARS), Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) and Gesell Developmental Scale (social adaptive behaviors and language development) were adopted to assess the scores before treatment and after 1 session of treatment. After treatment, the scores in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, CARS and ABC were lower apparently in observation group as compared with those before treatment (all P < 0.01), and the scores in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale and ABC were lower than those in control group (both P < 0.01). In observation group, the scores of social adaptive behavior scale and language development scale were improved obviously after treatment (both P < 0.01), which were all higher than those in control group (both P < 0.01). In observation, between the group aged from 4 to 6 years and the group aged from 2 to 3 years, the value differences in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, ABC and social adaptive development scale did not present statistical significance in group comparison before and after treatment (all P > 0.05). Scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice can significantly improve the efficacy on autism, effectively relieve child autism symptoms and

  16. Galactorrhoea following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Chris; Filshie, Jacqueline

    2002-08-01

    A 41-year-old woman with breast cancer was referred to the pain management clinic for a course of acupuncture for intense pain following a subcutaneous mastectomy and a latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction. She was treated with a standard course of acupuncture for breast pain, using paravertebral segmental points, trigger points, plus contralateral L14 on the non-lymphoedematous arm. She experienced an episode of galactorrhoea six days following the first treatment and during the second treatment. She had not previously lactated for four years. CT and MRI of the brain revealed no focal abnormality. Acupuncture has been used in to promote lactation in the Traditional Chinese literature using the 'Tianzong' acupoint SI11. This acupoint coincided with a trigger point over infraspinatus that was included in the neurophysiologically based acupuncture treatment. Quantitative analysis has shown an increase in the production of prolactin and oxytocin following acupuncture. These hormones are involved in the synthesis and release of milk from mammary glands respectively. This is the first report of galactorrhoea, in the contralateral normal breast, following acupuncture in a patient with breast cancer.

  17. Integration of rehabilitation and acupuncture in the treatment of a professional musician with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emma K

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes the use of acupuncture in a professional musician with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction. The 3-year history of symptoms was associated with persistent episodic tension-type headaches. Acupuncture was used for trigger point release, primarily of the masticatory muscles, in conjunction with exercise therapy. After 8 weekly acupuncture sessions, the patient's pain had completely resloved, headaches had resolved and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale showed significant improvements.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of acupuncture and moxibustion to treat Bell's palsy according to different stages: design and protocol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Li, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Hu, Kaming; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhao, Ling; Li, Yan; Liu, Lian; Mang, Lingling; Yu, Shuyuan

    2009-07-01

    Acupuncture to treat Bell's palsy is one of the most commonly used methods in China. There are a variety of acupuncture treatment options to treat Bell's palsy in clinical practice. Since Bell's palsy has three different path-stages (acute stage, resting stage and restoration stage), so whether acupuncture is effective in the different path-stages and which acupuncture treatment is the best method are major issues in acupuncture clinical trials about Bell's palsy. In this article, we report the design and protocol of a large sample multi-center randomized controlled trial to treat Bell's palsy with acupuncture. There are five acupuncture groups, with four according to different path-stages and one not. In total, 900 patients with Bell's palsy are enrolled in this study. These patients are randomly assigned to receive one of the following four treatment groups according to different path-stages, i.e. 1) staging acupuncture group, 2) staging acupuncture and moxibustion group, 3) staging electro-acupuncture group, 4) staging acupuncture along yangming musculature group or non-staging acupuncture control group. The outcome measurements in this trial are the effect comparison achieved among these five groups in terms of House-Brackmann scale (Global Score and Regional Score), Facial Disability Index scale, Classification scale of Facial Paralysis, and WHOQOL-BREF scale before randomization (baseline phase) and after randomization. The result of this trial will certify the efficacy of using staging acupuncture and moxibustion to treat Bell's palsy, and to approach a best acupuncture treatment among these five different methods for treating Bell's palsy.

  19. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties

    PubMed Central

    In, Su-ll; Gwak, Young S.; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, SuChan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A.; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect. PMID:27713547

  20. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Su-Ll; Gwak, Young S.; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A.; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-10-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect.

  1. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties.

    PubMed

    In, Su-Ll; Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, SuChan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-10-07

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect.

  2. Effects of trigger point acupuncture treatment on temporomandibular disorders: a preliminary randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Asai, Sayo; Ohyabu, Hideaki; Imai, Kenji; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    We compared the effects of trigger point acupuncture with that of sham acupuncture treatments on pain and oral function in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This 10-week study included 16 volunteers from an acupuncture school with complaints of chronic temporomandibular joint myofascial pain for at least 6 months. The participants were randomized to one of two groups, each receiving five acupuncture treatment sessions. The trigger point acupuncture group received treatment at trigger points for the same muscle, while the other acupuncture group received sham treatment on the trigger points. Outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale) and oral function (maximal mouth opening). After treatment, pain intensity was less in the trigger point acupuncture group than in the sham treatment group, but oral function remained unchanged in both groups. Pain intensity decreased significantly between pretreatment and 5 weeks after trigger point (p<0.001) and sham acupunctures (p<0.050). Group comparison using the area under the curve demonstrated a significant difference between groups (p=0.0152). Compared with sham acupuncture therapy, trigger point acupuncture therapy may be more effective for chronic temporomandibular joint myofascial pain. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Acupuncture in Nevada, Second Report

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, William M.

    1976-01-01

    The State of Nevada has now given its fourth series of acupuncture licensing examinations. In all, 62 candidates have taken examinations. Licenses have been granted to 27 persons as master acupuncturists (Doctors of Traditional Chinese Medicine or Doctors of Acupuncture) and to 6 as Acupuncture Assistants. At present, 4 acupuncturists practice in the Reno area and 13 in Las Vegas. PMID:1246891

  4. Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Irnich, Dominik; Cameron, Ian D; Forget, Mario

    2016-05-04

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are perceptions of benefit. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. This update replaces our 2006 Cochrane review update on this topic. To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015. We searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005. We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two review authors made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of quality of trial methods. We assessed study quality by using the Cochrane Back Review Group 'Risk of bias' tool. We used consensus to resolve disagreements, and when clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies by using random-effects meta-analysis models. Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non

  5. The Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5 (YAM-5): Correlations with anxiety, fear, and depression scales in non-clinical children.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Mannens, Janne; Peters, Lisanne; Meesters, Cor

    2017-10-01

    The Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5 (YAM-5) is a newly developed rating scale for assessing anxiety disorder symptoms of children and adolescents in terms of the contemporary classification system. In the present study, 187 children aged 8-12 years completed the new measure as well as the trait version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC), the Short Form of the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R-SF), the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), the Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ), and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Results indicated that part one of the YAM-5, which measures symptoms of the major anxiety disorders, was most substantially linked with the trait anxiety scale of the STAIC, whereas part two, which measures phobic symptoms, was most clearly associated with the FSSC-R-SF. The correlation between the YAM-5 and the SCAS was also robust, and particularly strong correlations were found between subscales of both questionnaires that assessed similar symptoms. Further, the selective mutism subscale of the YAM-5 was most clearly linked to the SMQ. Finally, the YAM-5 was also significantly correlated with depression symptoms as indexed by the CDI. These findings provide further support for the concurrent validity of the YAM-5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Muke; He, Li; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Bo; Li, Ning; Kong, Shuangyan; Zhang, Dongping; Li, Qifu; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Xia

    2009-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1966-April 2006), EMBASE (January 1980-April 2006), LILACS (January 1982-April 2006), and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978-April 2006) for randomized controlled trials using "Bell's palsy" and its synonyms, "idiopathic facial paralysis" or "facial palsy" as well as search terms including "acupuncture." Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were hand searched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomized trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy, irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups, and completeness of follow-up. Two (2) review authors assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. Six (6) studies including a total of 537 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five (5) of them used acupuncture while another one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side-effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in study design or reporting (particularly uncertain allocation concealment and substantial loss to follow-up) and clinical differences between trials prevented conclusions about the efficacy of acupuncture. The

  7. Acupuncture for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaohong; Xia, Jun; Adams, Clive E

    2014-10-20

    Acupuncture, with many categories such as traditional acupuncture, electroacupuncture, laser acupuncture, and acupoint injection, has been shown to be relatively safe with few adverse effects. It is accessible and inexpensive, at least in China, and is likely to be widely used there for psychotic symptoms. To review the effects of acupuncture, alone or in combination treatments compared with placebo (or no treatment) or any other treatments for people with schizophrenia or related psychoses. We searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (February 2012), which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and clinical trials registries. We also inspected references of identified studies and contacted relevant authors for additional information. We included all relevant randomised controlled trials involving people with schizophrenia-like illnesses, comparing acupuncture added to standard dose antipsychotics with standard dose antipsychotics alone, acupuncture added to low dose antipsychotics with standard dose antipsychotics, acupuncture with antipsychotics, acupuncture added to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) drug with TCM drug, acupuncture with TCM drug, electric acupuncture convulsive therapy with electroconvulsive therapy. We reliably extracted data from all included studies, discussed any disagreement, documented decisions and contacted authors of studies when necessary. We analysed binary outcomes using a standard estimation of risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI). For continuous data, we calculated mean differences with 95% CI. For homogeneous data we used fixed-effect model. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created 'Summary of findings' tables using GRADE. After an update search in 2012 the review now includes 30 studies testing different forms of acupuncture across six different comparisons. All studies were at moderate risk of bias.When acupuncture plus standard

  8. Activation of the hypothalamus characterizes the response to acupuncture stimulation in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Wenhua; Ruan, Xingzhong; Li, Ronghui; Lee, Tatia; Weng, Xuchu; Hu, Jun; Yang, Guodong

    2007-06-29

    Acupuncture stimulation elicited a composite of sensations termed deqi that is related to clinical efficacy. Neurobiological studies have identified the hypothalamus as an important component in mediating the deqi. Functional changes in hypothalamus persist after abstinence in addicts. We investigated the activation in the hypothalamus associated with acupuncture stimulation in healthy volunteers and heroin addicts by fMRI. Cortisol level and psychophysical responses, including the deqi sensation (an acupuncture effect of needle-manipulation), anxiety, and sharp pain, were also assessed. The activation of the hypothalamus was more robust in the addicts than that in the healthy subjects during acupuncture stimulation. The deqi scores of the heroin addicts were significantly higher than those of the healthy subjects during acupuncture treatment. An acupuncture sensation scale predicted the activation of the hypothalamus associated with the deqi sensation.

  9. The Acupuncture Effect on Median Nerve Morphology in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: An Ultrasonographic Study.

    PubMed

    Ural, Fatma Gülçin; Öztürk, Gökhan Tuna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the acupuncture effect on the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and, additionally, to identify whether clinical, electrophysiological, and ultrasonographic changes show any association. Forty-five limbs of 27 female patients were randomly divided into two groups (acupuncture and control). All patients used night wrist splint. The patients in the acupuncture group received additional acupuncture therapy. Visual analog scale (VAS), Duruöz Hand Index (DHI), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire scores, electrophysiologic measurements, and median nerve CSAs were noted before and after the treatment in both groups. VAS, DHI, Quick DASH scores, and electrophysiological measurements were improved in both groups. The median nerve CSA significantly decreased in the acupuncture group, whereas there was no change in the control group. After acupuncture therapy, the patients with CTS might have both clinical and morphological improvement.

  10. [Main influencing factors of functional magnetic resonance imaging for acupuncture mechanism research].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Ping; Wu, Wen; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2013-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in the research of acupuncture mechanism in recent years. This article analyzes the effect of four main influencing factors, i.e., research subject, selection of acupoints, manipulation of acupuncture and evaluation of Deqi, and examples are given to explain research application of these four aspects. Based on those mentioned above, the authors presumed that removing ex terior and interior factors of research subject, optimizing compatibility of acupoints and manipulations of acupuncture and making use of correct evaluation scale of Deqi can improve the scientificity and objectivity of fMRI for evaluation of acupuncture mechanism research.

  11. Psychometric assessment of scales measuring HIV public stigma, drug-use public stigma and fear of HIV infection among young adolescents and their parents.

    PubMed

    Ha, Toan Huu; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jian; Nield, Jennifer; Lu, Zhouping

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and assess measurement instruments that accurately measure the levels of stigma among individuals with a primarily collectivist culture. A cross-sectional study was conducted among middle school students and their parents or guardians in a rural area of China. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine and determine the latent factors of the sub-scales of stigma respectively, among students and their parents. Factor analyses identified three sub-scales: HIV public stigma (seven items), drug-use public stigma (nine items), and fear of HIV infection (seven items). There were no items with cross-loading onto multiple factors, supporting the distinctness of the constructs that these scales were meant to measure. Goodness of fit indices indicated that a three-factor solution fit, the data at an acceptable level in the student sample (χ(2) /degree ratio=1.98, comparative fit index [CFI]=0.92, root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]=0.055, standardized root mean square residual [SRMR]=0.057) and in the parent sample (χ(2)/degree ratio=1.95, CFI=0.91, RMSEA=0.06, SRMR=0.059). Reliability of the three scales was excellent (Cronbach's alpha: 0.78-0.92 for students; 0.80-0.94 for parents or guardians) and stable across split samples and for the data as a whole. The scales are brief and suitable for use in developing countries where the collectivist culture prevails.

  12. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  13. [History of acupuncture in Iran].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xinghua

    2015-10-01

    Iran is the neighbor of western China, and is a key transport junction on ancient Silk Road. The medical communication between China and Iran dates back to the 10th century, however, according to current evidences, it is indicated that acupuncture has not been introduced to Iran until the early 1970s. Unfortunately over the last 40 years, the acupuncture in Iran has not presented great development. The history of acupuncture development in Iran implies that geographical advantage and personnel exchanges are not essential to the international exchange of acupuncture, while language and cultural background may hinder the spread of acupuncture in foreign countries.

  14. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, L; Zhou, D; Wu, B; Li, N; Zhou, M K

    2004-01-01

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to December 2002), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2002), LILACS (from January 1982 to December 2002) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to December 2002) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two reviewers assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the reviewers. Three studies including a total of 238 patients met the inclusion criteria. Two of them used acupuncture while the third used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Three included studies showed that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture alone was

  15. [Application and research of acupuncture in military].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Li, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Hong-Yun; Li, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Shuang; Zhou, Qing-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture has remarkable effects of pain relieving and functional restoration on injuries of soft tissue and joint due to military training. As more and more attention has been attached to the impact of psychological states and biorhythm disorder on the fighting ability of military staff, acupuncture has found its place in treating chronic fatigue, combat stress reaction, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder as well as regulating circadian rhythms. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture in military training-related physical damage and psychological trauma has already been proved by numerous clinical practices and researches. It is held that using acupuncture as an alternative could not only save medical resources, but also enhance the fighting ability of the army. However, the current clinical studies is facing the problem of limited sample size. Therefore, randomized controlled trials in large scale and multiple centers should be further carried out toward military staff, so as to provide more speaking evidences to the prevention and treatment of physical and psychological diseases.

  16. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role.

  17. How effective is acupuncture for reducing pain due to plantar fasciitis?

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Anandan Gerard

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. METHODS Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected. The Delphi list was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies retrieved. RESULTS Three studies that compared acupuncture with standard treatment and one study on real versus sham acupuncture were found. These showed that acupuncture significantly reduced pain levels in patients with plantar fasciitis, as measured on the visual analogue scale and the Plantar Fasciitis Pain/Disability Scale. These benefits were noted between four and eight weeks of treatment, with no further significant reduction in pain beyond this duration. Side effects were found to be minimal. CONCLUSION Although acupuncture may reduce plantar fasciitis pain in the short term, there is insufficient evidence for a definitive conclusion regarding its effectiveness in the longer term. Further research is required to strengthen the acceptance of acupuncture among healthcare providers. PMID:27526703

  18. Randomized Clinical Trial of Acupuncture for Myofascial Pain of the Jaw Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yoshi F.; Younger, Jarred; Goddard, Greg; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating symptoms associated with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Methods Twenty-eight subjects over the age of 18 and diagnosed with chronic myofascial pain of the jaw muscles were randomized to receive real (n = 16) or sham (n = 12) acupuncture. Prior to treatment, each subject clenched his or her teeth for 2 minutes. Acupuncture or sham acupuncture was then administered at the Hegu large intestine 4 (LI4) acupoint for 15 minutes. Real acupuncture was given by penetrating the needle through a sticky foam pad at the acupoint. Sham acupuncture was conducted by pricking the skin, without penetration, with a shortened, blunted acupuncture needle through a foam pad placed away from the acupoint. General head and neck pain ratings were obtained before and after treatment on a numerical rating scale. A mechanical pain stimulus on the masseter muscle was given before and after treatment and rated on a visual analog scale to measure pain tolerance level. Paired t tests were performed to detect significant changes in pain levels. Results Subjects receiving real acupuncture experienced a significant reduction in jaw pain (P = .04), jaw/face tightness (P = .04), and neck pain (P = .04), and a significant increase in pain tolerance of the masseter muscle (P = .001). Subjects were not able to determine whether they received real or sham acupuncture (P = .69). No significant pain reductions were observed in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion A single acupuncture session using one acupoint at Hegu large intestine 4 significantly reduced most myofascial pain endpoints when compared to sham acupuncture. PMID:19888488

  19. Somato stimulation and acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jun; Rong, Pei-Jing; Shi, Li; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Acupuncture is an oldest somato stimulus medical technique. As the most representative peripheral nerve stimulation therapy, it has a complete system of theory and application and is applicable to a large population. This paper expounds the bionic origins of acupuncture and analyzes the physiological mechanism by which acupuncture works. For living creatures, functionally sound viscera and effective endurance of pain are essential for survival. This paper discusses the way in which acupuncture increases the pain threshold of living creatures and the underlying mechanism from the perspective of bionics. Acupuncture can also help to adjust visceral functions and works most effectively in facilitating the process of digestion and restraining visceral pain. This paper makes an in-depth overview of peripheral nerve stimulation therapy represented by acupuncture. We look forward to the revival of acupuncture, a long-standing somato stimulus medicine, in the modern medical systems.

  20. Measuring Fear of Death: A Reliability Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrabee, Marva J.

    1978-01-01

    Finds that the test/retest reliability coefficients for the "Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale" and the "Lester Attitude toward Death Scale" were significant, but only low to moderate in significance. (RL)

  1. Smoking withdrawal and acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Fuller, J A

    1982-01-09

    Nicotine addiction makes it very difficult for most smokers to quit. This study examined the relapse rate of 194 people (118 men and 76 women) who were given acupuncture treatment to help them stop smoking. Ninety five per cent of patients quit smoking after three acupuncture treatments. Fifty-five (32%) of the 174 patients who replied to a mailed questionnaire said they had not smoked since treatment; the success rate was: one week, 86%; six months 41%; 12 months, 34% and 24 months, 30%. There were no further relapses amongst those patients who abstained for more than 24 months. Eighty-five per cent of those who responded reported that acupuncture had eased the symptoms of smoking withdrawal. However, if the patient's motivation is weak, subsequent relapse will occur.

  2. Acupuncture for hot flashes: Decision making by breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Leed, Rana; Bowman, Marjorie A.; Desai, Krupali; Bramble, Manuel; Armstrong, Katrina; Barg, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Hot flashes (HFs) are a particularly common and distressing symptom in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Given its low rate of side effects, acupuncture shows promise as a therapeutic approach for HFs but little is known about BCS’s decision-making about use of acupuncture. This study seeks to identify attitudes and beliefs about using acupuncture for HFs by BCS. Methods Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a conceptual framework, we conducted semi-structured interviews among women with stage I–III breast cancer who had finished primary treatment and were currently experiencing HFs. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and coded. We used a modified grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Results Twenty-five BCS (13 Caucasian/12 African American) participated in the study. Respondents stated that their intended use of acupuncture for HFs would be dependent on: 1) Expected therapeutic effects (e.g. pain relief, energy); 2) Practical concerns (e.g. fear of needles, practitioner experience, time commitment); and 3) Source of decision support/validation (e.g. family members, physicians, self). Although constructs in the TPB accounted for many decision factors, respondents identified two major themes outside of the TPB: 1) Viewing acupuncture as a natural alternative to medications, and 2) Assessing the degree of HFs as bothersome enough in the context of other medical co-morbidities to trigger the need for therapy. Conclusion BCS expressed varied expected therapeutic benefits, practical concerns, and decision support, emphasizing the “natural appeal” and symptom appraisal as key determinants in using acupuncture for HFs. Incorporating these factors in counseling BCS may promote patient-centered communication leading to improved hot flash management and quality of life. PMID:22570396

  3. Acupuncture for hot flashes: decision making by breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jun J; Leed, Rana; Bowman, Marjorie A; Desai, Krupali; Bramble, Manuel; Armstrong, Katrina; Barg, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Hot flashes (HFs) are a particularly common and distressing symptom among breast cancer survivors (BCSs). Given its low rate of side effects, acupuncture shows promise as a therapeutic approach for HFs, but little is known about BCS's decision making about the use of acupuncture. This study seeks to identify attitudes and beliefs about using acupuncture for HFs by BCSs. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a conceptual framework, we conducted semistructured interviews among women with stage I-III breast cancer who had finished primary treatment and were currently experiencing HFs. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and coded. We used a modified grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Twenty-five BCSs (13 whites/12 African American) participated in the study. Respondents stated that their intended use of acupuncture for HFs would be dependent on (1) expected therapeutic effects (eg, pain relief, energy); (2) practical concerns (eg, fear of needles, practitioner experience, time commitment); and (3) source of decision support/validation (eg, family members, physicians, self). Although constructs in the TPB accounted for many decision factors, respondents identified 2 major themes outside of the TPB: (1) viewing acupuncture as a natural alternative to medications, and (2) assessing the degree of HFs as bothersome enough in the context of other medical comorbidities to trigger the need for therapy. BCSs expressed varied expected therapeutic benefits, practical concerns, and decision support, emphasizing the "natural appeal" and symptom appraisal as key determinants when using acupuncture for HFs. Incorporating these factors in counseling BCSs may promote patient-centered communication, leading to improved hot flash management and quality of life.

  4. Validation of Three Measures of Fear of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffore, Robert J.

    1977-01-01

    Three fear of success measures correlated positively with the Alpert Haber Debilitating Anxiety Scale. Correlations between the Pappo Fear of Success Questionnaire (FOS) and the Zuckerman and Allison Fear of Success Scale (FOSS) were significant and positive. The Horner Scoring System was not significantly correlated with the FOS or FOSS. (EVH)

  5. Children's dental fear in relation to dental health and parental dental fear.

    PubMed

    Olak, Jana; Saag, Mare; Honkala, Sisko; Nõmmela, Rita; Runnel, Riina; Honkala, Eino; Karjalainen, Sára

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to (1) assess the proportion of children with dental fear, to (2) compare results obtained by a single fear question to those obtained by using a set of 11 fear questions, to (3) study associations between children's dental fear and their dental health, and to (4) compare children's dental fears to those of their parents. A cross-sectional sample of 344 8-10-year-old schoolchildren from South Estonian primary schools participated. Children's fears were measured with the modified Dental Subscale of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS). The scale includes 11 fear items amongst which five represent less invasive (noninvasive items), another five invasive aspects of dental treatment (invasive items), and one question represents general dental fear of the child. In addition, two questions were included to assess parental dental fear. The dental health of children was examined using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) criteria. The proportion of children with general dental fear was 6.1%. The mean score of noninvasive fears was higher among the youngest than among the oldest age group (p<0.02). Children whose dmft/DMFT-scores were >0 had higher fear scores than those whose dmft/DMFT-scores were =0 (p<0.01). A total of 16.8% and 15.7% of mothers and fathers afraid of dentistry in general. There were strong correlations between children's dental fears and maternal (p<0.01), and paternal (p<0.01) dental fear. Children's fears were strongly associated with untreated caries and experience of dental treatment, and with parental fears.

  6. Fear of Crime: The Influence of General Fear, Risk, and Time Perspective.

    PubMed

    Chadee, Derek; Ng Ying, Nikita K; Chadee, Mary; Heath, Linda

    2016-05-24

    Prior research on fear of crime has focused less on psychological causes than on sociological and demographic factors. This study, however, introduces time perspective (TP) as an important psychological variable in the understanding of fear of crime. Specifically, the article assesses the relationship between TP as a stable personality factor and the mediation of risk and general fear on fear of crime levels. Data were collected using the survey method from a sample of 375 respondents utilizing the following scales: Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) consisting of five TP subscales, Ferraro's perceived risk of victimization and fear of crime scales, and a general (non-crime) fear scale measuring pragmatic and abstract fear. Path analysis shows no significant direct relationships between the five TP subscales and fear of crime. However, indirect effects are observed for Past Negative TP and Present Fatalistic TP, with general fear (pragmatic and abstract) and risk of victimization mediating the relationship, and pragmatic fear having the greatest significant effect size. Results are discussed in the context of risk and general fear sensitivity and construal level theory. We conclude with recommendations for future research.

  7. [Ideas of standardization evaluation on acupuncture skills: enlightened by quantitative appraisal of surgical skills in Europe and North America].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Mary X

    2011-12-01

    Acupuncture manipulation skills are the core of acupuncture therapy. Traditional acupuncture skills evaluation is based on experts' subjective assessment which is deficient in reliability and validity. Certain progresses on the quantitative research on acupuncture skills have been made in China, while there is still a long way to go before the formation of the consummate standardization evaluation system on acupuncture skills. Actually, quantitative appraisal on surgical skills has been developed for a long time in Europe and North America. Since acupuncture could be considered as a kind of skills of minimally invasive surgery because small wounds would be generated by needles, the theories and methods in surgical quantitative appraisal could be utilized. For instance, scales could be designed to evaluate the operation modes in acupuncture skills and precise instruments could be used in the measurement of acupuncture skills. Then standard databases on common acupuncture manipulations would be built. Moreover, in terms of the characteristics of acupuncture skills, high-fidelity simulators should be designed or standardized patients should be trained for the assessment of "Deqi" (arrival of qi)feelings. Thereby, an appropriate standardization evaluation system for acupuncture skills would be created gradually.

  8. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Zhou, Muke; He, Li; Zhou, Dong; Li, N

    2010-08-04

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We updated the searches of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (24 May 2010), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2010), AMED (January 1985 to May 2010), LILACS (from January 1982 to May 2010) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to May 2010) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture by needle insertion in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search, extracted data and assessed quality of each trial independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. The literature search and handsearching identified 49 potentially relevant articles. Of these, six RCTs were included involving 537 participants with Bell's palsy. Two more possible trials were identified in the update than the previous version of this systematic review, but both were excluded because they were not real RCTs. Of the six included trials, five used acupuncture while the other one used

  9. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    He, L; Zhou, M K; Zhou, D; Wu, B; Li, N; Kong, S Y; Zhang, D P; Li, Q F; Yang, J; Zhang, X

    2007-10-17

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2006), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2006), LILACS (from January 1982 to April 2006) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to April 2006) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. The assessment of methodological quality included allocation concealment, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups and completeness of follow-up. Two review authors assessed quality independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. Six studies including a total of 537 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five of them used acupuncture while another one used acupuncture combined with drugs. No trials reported on the outcomes specified for this review. Harmful side effects were not reported in any of the trials. Flaws in

  10. Propane fear

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1992-02-12

    A minor feature of a Congressional energy bill is causing consternation for a number of propane-consuming chemical companies. The firms are fighting the bill`s inclusion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on a list of alternative fuels that can be used to meet its urban fleet vehicles requirements. The firms fear that this added use would drive up the price of propane-an LPG-for homeowners, farmers, and themselves. Speaking for the Propane Consumers Coalition, a Dow Chemical spokesman says 7.7 million households use propane, as does agriculture, and current demand is such that December saw a 23-year low in US inventories. The US depends on imports of propane, he says, and about half the propane sold in the US is derived from the refining of oil, much of which is also imported. Adding demand for vehicle fuel would drive up imports and process, the spokesman says, thereby damaging all users, including the petrochemical industry.

  11. Acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow): study protocol for a randomized, practitioner-assessor blinded, controlled pilot clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylitis is the most frequent cause of pain around the elbow joint. It causes pain in the region of the elbow joint and results in dysfunction of the elbow and deterioration of the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of ipsilateral acupuncture, contralateral acupuncture and sham acupuncture on lateral epicondylitis. Methods/design Forty-five subjects with lateral epicondylitis will be randomized into three groups: the ipsilateral acupuncture group, contralateral acupuncture group and the sham acupuncture group. The inclusion criteria will be as follows: (1) age between 19 and 65 years with pain due to one-sided lateral epicondylitis that persisted for at least four weeks, (2) with tenderness on pressure limited to regions around the elbow joint, (3) complaining of pain during resistive extension of the middle finger or the wrist, (4) with average pain of NRS 4 or higher during the last one week at a screening visit and (5) voluntarily agree to this study and sign a written consent. Acupuncture treatment will be given 10 times in total for 4 weeks to all groups. Follow up observations will be conducted after the completion of the treatment, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after the random assignment. Ipsilateral acupuncture group and contralateral acupuncture group will receive acupuncture on LI4, TE5, LI10, LI11, LU5, LI12 and two Ashi points. The sham acupuncture group will receive treatment on acupuncture points not related to the lateral epicondylitis using a non-invasive method. The needles will be maintained for 20 minutes. The primary outcome will be differences in the visual analogue scale (VAS) for elbow pain between the groups. The secondary outcome will be differences in patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE), pain-free/maximum grip strength (Dynamometer), pressure pain threshold, clinically relevant improvement, patient global assessment, and the EQ-5D. The data will be analyzed with the paired t

  12. Fear of Fear and the Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    The fear of fear present in agoraphobics can be broken down into a fear of the body sensations associated with the panic attacks that plague agoraphobics and maladaptive thoughts about the possible consequences of panic. In a retrospective examination of clinical files, 32 agoraphobic patients were compared to 36 patients with simple social…

  13. Perioperative Acupuncture and Related Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory V.; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2005-01-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are increasingly practiced in conventional medical settings, and the number of patients willing to use these techniques is increasing. Despite more than 30 years of research, the exact mechanism of action and efficacy of acupuncture have not been established. Furthermore, most aspects of acupuncture have yet to be adequately tested. There thus remains considerable controversy about the role of acupuncture in clinical medicine. Acupuncture apparently does not reduce volatile anesthetic requirement by a clinically important amount. However, preoperative sedation seems to be a promising application of acupuncture in perioperative settings. Acupuncture may be effective for postoperative pain relief but requires a high level of expertise by the acupuncture practitioner. Acupuncture and related techniques can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in routine clinical practice in combination with, or as an alternative to, conventional antiemetics when administered before induction of general anesthesia. Summary Statement: The use of acupuncture for perioperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, sedation, anesthesia, and complications is reviewed. PMID:15851892

  14. Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pach, Daniel; Yang-Strobel, Xiaoli; Lüdtke, Rainer; Icke, Katja; Brinkhaus, Benno; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture). Patients received either standardized acupuncture or individualized acupuncture. Treatment encompassed between 10 and 15 treatments based on individual symptoms with two treatments per week. The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC) summarizing eight weeks of daily rated pain severity measured with a visual analogue scale (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst imaginable pain). No significant differences between groups were observed for the AUC (individualized acupuncture mean: 1768.7 (95% CI, 1460.4; 2077.1); standardized acupuncture 1482.9 (1177.2; 1788.7); group difference, 285.8 (−33.9; 605.5) P = 0.080). In this single-center trial, individualized acupuncture was not superior to standardized acupuncture for patients suffering from chronic pain. As a next step, a multicenter noninferiority study should be performed to investigate whether standardised acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain might be applicable in a broader usual care setting. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00758017. PMID:24288556

  15. Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Pach, Daniel; Yang-Strobel, Xiaoli; Lüdtke, Rainer; Roll, Stephanie; Icke, Katja; Brinkhaus, Benno; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture). Patients received either standardized acupuncture or individualized acupuncture. Treatment encompassed between 10 and 15 treatments based on individual symptoms with two treatments per week. The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC) summarizing eight weeks of daily rated pain severity measured with a visual analogue scale (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst imaginable pain). No significant differences between groups were observed for the AUC (individualized acupuncture mean: 1768.7 (95% CI, 1460.4; 2077.1); standardized acupuncture 1482.9 (1177.2; 1788.7); group difference, 285.8 (-33.9; 605.5) P = 0.080). In this single-center trial, individualized acupuncture was not superior to standardized acupuncture for patients suffering from chronic pain. As a next step, a multicenter noninferiority study should be performed to investigate whether standardised acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain might be applicable in a broader usual care setting. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00758017.

  16. Effects of painful stimulation and acupuncture on attention networks in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a subjective sensory and emotional experience, and it has been reported that many different brain regions are regulated by pain, and that pain can impact attention. Acupuncture is an important treatment component of Chinese traditional medicine, and has been used for thousands of years to treat a wide variety of conditions. Although several studies have shown that acupuncture improves consciousness, the precise impact of both acupuncture and painful stimulation on attention is unclear. Are all of the attention networks modulated, or do these stimuli act on a specific network? Is the effect of painful stimulation similar to that of acupuncture? We administered the attention network test to 30 participants (15 males) to investigate the relative efficiencies of three independent attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control networks) under three conditions: baseline, after painful stimulation, and after acupuncture. The degree of pain experienced was assessed on a horizontally oriented visual analogue scale. The results showed that painful stimulation and acupuncture had similar effects on the orienting and executive control networks; however, there was a significantly different effect between the three conditions on the alerting network. In conclusion, (1) painful stimulation can selectively impact attention; (2) acupuncture can also selectively impact attention; i.e., both have selective influences on the alerting and executive control networks, but not on the orienting network; (3) the effects of acupuncture and painful stimulation are not identical. The mechanisms by which painful stimulation and acupuncture influence attention warrant further research. PMID:23758880

  17. The effect of acupuncture on postmenopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones: a sham controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sunay, Didem; Ozdiken, Muruvvet; Arslan, Huseyin; Seven, Ali; Aral, Yalcin

    2011-03-01

    Acupuncture is commonly used to treat menopausal symptoms and other gynaecological conditions. In this study, the authors aimed to investigate whether acupuncture has an effect on menopausal symptoms and to explore whether this effect is related to changes in hormone levels. Materials and methods A total of 53 postmenopausal women were alternately assigned into two treatment groups: acupuncture (n=27) and sham acupuncture (n=26). Menopausal symptoms were assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS). The serum oestradiol, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) levels were measured at baseline and again after the first and last sessions. The Student t test was used for normally distributed data and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for not normally distributed data. The group differences in MRS scores were assessed using non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. After treatment, total MRS, and the somatic and psychological subscale scores were significantly lower in the acupuncture group than the sham group (all p=0.001). The severity of hot flushes was found to be significantly decreased after treatment in acupuncture group (p=0.001). In the acupuncture group LH levels were lower and oestradiol levels were significantly higher than sham group (p=0.046 and p=0.045, respectively) after treatment, but there was no difference in FSH levels. Acupuncture was effective in reducing menopausal complaints when compared to sham acupuncture and can be considered as an alternative therapy in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

  18. The analgesic effect of acupuncture in chronic tennis elbow pain.

    PubMed

    Molsberger, A; Hille, E

    1994-12-01

    The immediate analgesic effect of a single non-segmental acupuncture stimulation treatment on chronic tennis elbow pain was studied in a placebo-controlled single-blind trial completed by 48 patients. Before and after treatment, all patients were examined physically by an unbiased independent examiner. Eleven-point box scales were used [13] for pain measurement. Patients in the verum group were treated at non-segmental distal points (homolateral leg) for elbow pain following Chinese acupuncture rules, whereas patients in the placebo group were treated with placebo acupuncture avoiding penetration of the skin with an acupuncture needle. Overall reduction in the pain score was 55.8% (S = 2.95) in the verum group and 15% (S = 2.77) in the placebo group. After one treatment 19 out of 24 patients in the verum group (79.2%) reported pain relief of at least 50% (placebo group: six patients out of 24). The average duration of analgesia after one treatment was 20.2 h in the verum group (S = 21.54) and 1.4 h (S = 3.50) in the placebo group. The results are statistically significant (P < 0.01); they show that non-segmental verum acupuncture has an intrinsic analgesic effect in the clinical treatment of tennis elbow pain which exceeds that of placebo acupuncture.

  19. Acupuncture as Adjuvant Therapy for Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Aroxa, Fábio Henrique de Amorim; Gondim, Ihana Thaís Guerra de Oliveira; Santos, Elba Lúcia Wanderley; Coriolano, Maria das Graças Wanderley de Sales; Asano, Amdore Guescel C; Asano, Nadja Maria Jorge

    2017-01-01

    There are few studies which attest the efficacy of acupuncture on treatment of sleep disturbs in Parkinson disease. The aimed of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on sleep disturbs of 22 patients with diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson disease (Hoehn-Yahr 1 to 3) who have assistance on the Pro-Parkinson Program of Clinical Hospital at Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. All participants were evaluated by Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) before and after 8 weeks. The experimental group was submitted to 8 sections (once a week) which had duration of 30 minutes. The control group had no intervention. The intervention was executed using the acupuncture points LR3 (Taichong), SP6 (Sanyinjiao), LI4 (Hegu), TE5 (Wai-Guan), HT7 (Shenmen), PC6 (Neiguan), LI11 (Quchi), GB20 (Fengchi). Paired analyses were obtained by Wilcoxon test and independent analyses were made according to Mann-Whitney test. This study presented a potential therapeutic benefit of acupuncture on sleep disturbs of Parkinson's disease patients. This study showed a possible therapeutic benefit through acupuncture in sleep disorders in patients with PD. However, we propose new studies related to the effects of acupuncture on the clinical symptoms and evolution of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of Acupuncture Stimulation on Cerebral Network in Functional Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siyuan; Zeng, Fang; Liu, Jixin; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Wenjing; Liu, Ting; Chen, Dashuai; Qin, Wei; Gong, Qiyong; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is a commonly used therapy for treating functional diarrhea (FD), although there is limited knowledge on the mechanism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in brain activities elicited by acupuncture between FD patients and healthy controls (HC) so as to explore the possible mechanism. Eighteen FD patients and eighteen HC received 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment at ST25 acupoints. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans were, respectively, performed before and after acupuncture. The defecation frequency, Bristol stool form scale (SBFS), and MOS 36-item Short Healthy Survey (SF-36) were employed to evaluate the clinical efficacy. After acupuncture, the FD patients showed a significant decrease in defecation frequency and BSFS score. The regional homogeneity (ReHo) map showed a decrease in the paracentral lobule and postcentral gyrus, and an increase in the angular gyrus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and precuneus in the FD group. Moreover, the changes in ReHo values in the ACC were correlated with the reduction in defecation frequency. Decreasing functional connectivity among the ACC, insula, thalamus, and orbital frontal cortex only existed in the FD group. Conclusively, acupuncture alleviated defecation frequency and improved stool formation in FD patients. The efficacy might result from the regulation of the homeostasis afferent processing network. PMID:24459533

  1. Fear of falling after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Collicutt McGrath, Joanna

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and nature of fear of falling in a sample of people with severe acquired brain injury. A descriptive study. A regional inpatient neurological rehabilitation unit. One hundred and five adults with acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. All 105 participants were rated by observers who were asked to judge the degree to which fear behaviour interfered with rehabilitation therapy (activity limitation). Eighty-two participants also rated themselves. They were asked to report the degree of distress caused by fear. Both participants and observers were asked to describe the focus of any reported fear. Two stepwise logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify variables that predicted fear giving rise to significant activity limitation and fear giving rise to significant subjective distress. Self and observer rating scales designed and constructed specifically for the study. Raters reported significant fear-related activity limitation in 12-15% of participants. Significant fear-related subjective distress was reported by 40% of participants. Fear of falling, fear of physical harm and fear of not making sufficient rehabilitation progress dominated the reports of both observers and participants. The variables predicting significant activity limitation were premorbid alcohol misuse, low functional ability and the occurrence of a fall since onset. The variables predicting significant subjective distress were poor motor coordination and organization, and good verbal comprehension. Fear of falling is a clinically significant phenomenon in younger adults recovering from severe acquired brain injury. Fear sufficient to cause high degrees of subjective distress was often not evident to observers. Proactive questioning about fear of falling is therefore advisable when working clinically with this group.

  2. [Effect of acupuncture therapy on appetite of obesity patients].

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Zi-Qian; Pan, Yu; Zheng, Jie; Tong, Juan

    2012-12-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture intervention on the appetite of obesity patients. A total of 118 obesity patients were randomized into acupuncture group (76 cases, treated by true acupuncture needles) and placebo group (42 cases, treated by placebo acupuncture needles) using single-blind method. All the patients of the two groups were ordered to control their diet during the treatment. The acupoints around the umbilicus [Zhongwan (CV 12), Zhongji (CV 3), Daheng (SP 15), Xiawan (CV 10), Shimen (CV 5) and Tianshu (ST 25), etc.] and Liangqiu (ST 34), Zusanli (ST 36), and Yin-lingquan (SP 9) were punctured with filiform needles which were manipulated with uniform reducing and reinforcing method for a while tijl "Deqi" and retained for 30 min. The treatment was conducted once every other day, 12 times altogether. Body mass index (BMI), and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of eating-desire and hunger feeling and prospective food consumption were measured before and after the treatment. The gastric fluid survival rate (GFSR) was evaluated by using ultrasound scanning. The BMI in the acupuncture group was obviously declined after the treatment in comparison with the placebo group (P < 0.01). Compared to the placebo group, the VAS scores of eating-desire, hunger feeling and prospective food consumption were significantly decreased in the acupuncture group ( P < 0.05), but there are no significant difference between two groups in the VAS score of gastric fullness feeling (P > 0.05). The GFSR was obviously increased in the acupuncture group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.05). Acupuncture therapy can significantly decrease BMI and delay the digesting time and control the appetite in obesity patients, which may contribute to its effect in body weight reduction.

  3. Acupuncture and moxibustion for stress-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture and moxibustion, which medical doctors are licensed by the government of Japan to perform, can improve the psychological relationship between doctors and patients, especially when it is disturbed by a “game”, a dysfunctional interpersonal interaction that is repeated unintentionally. This advantage is due to the essential properties of acupuncture and moxibustion. Acupuncture and moxibustion are helpful in treating somatoform disorders, especially musculoskeletal symptoms. In Japan, a holistic acupuncture and moxibustion therapy called Sawada-style has been developed. This is based on fundamental meridian points that are considered to have effects on central, autonomic nervous, immune, metabolic, and endocrine systems to regulate the whole body balance. In addition, some of the fundamental points have effects on Qi, blood, and water patterns associated with major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, eating disorders, and somatoform disorders. The fixed protocol of Sawada-style would be suitable for large-scale, randomized, controlled studies in the future. Recent systematic reviews indicate that electroacupuncture would be a useful addition to antidepressant therapy for some symptoms accompanying fibromyalgia. Acupuncture and moxibustion are also recommended for irritable bowel syndrome, instead of Western drug therapy. Surprisingly, the dorsal prefrontal cerebral cortex, which is associated with a method of scalp acupuncture applied for gastrointestinal disorders, has been found to be activated in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. It is quite possible that regulation of this cortical area is related to the effect of scalp acupuncture. This acupuncture method can be effective not only for irritable bowel syndrome but also for other stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:24456818

  4. Effectiveness of acupuncture for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Kong, Jae Cheol; Ernst, Edzard

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence for or against acupuncture as a treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). We searched the literature using 17 databases from their inception to September 2007 (searched again 3rd January 2008), without language restrictions. We included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) regardless of their design. Methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad score. Eleven RCTs met all inclusion criteria. Three RCTs assessed the effectiveness of acupuncture on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) compared with placebo acupuncture. A meta-analysis of these studies showed no significant effect (n = 96, WMD, 5.7; 95% CI -2.8 to 14.2, P = 0.19, heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0, chi(2) = 0.97, P = 0.62, I(2) = 0%). Another six RCTs compared acupuncture plus conventional drugs on improvement of symptoms of PD with drugs only. A meta-analysis of two of these studies suggested a positive effect of scalp acupuncture (n = 106, RR, 1.46, 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.87, P = 0.002; heterogeneity: tau(2) = 0.00, chi(2) = 1.14, P = 0.29, I(2) = 12%). Two further RCTs tested acupuncture versus no treatment. The meta-analysis of these studies also suggested beneficial effects of acupuncture. The results of the latter two types of RCTs fail to adequately control for nonspecific effects. In conclusion, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating PD is not convincing. The number and quality of trials as well as their total sample size are too low to draw any firm conclusion. Further rigorous trials are warranted.

  5. Characterization of the "deqi" response in acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kathleen K S; Nixon, Erika E; Vangel, Mark G; Liu, Jing; Marina, Ovidiu; Napadow, Vitaly; Hodge, Steven M; Rosen, Bruce R; Makris, Nikos; Kennedy, David N

    2007-10-31

    Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations that is essential for clinical efficacy according to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is lack of adequate experimental data to indicate what sensations comprise deqi, their prevalence and intensity, their relationship to acupoints, how they compare with conventional somatosensory or noxious response. The objective of this study is to provide scientific evidence on these issues and to characterize the nature of the deqi phenomenon in terms of the prevalence of sensations as well as the uniqueness of the sensations underlying the deqi experience. Manual acupuncture was performed at LI4, ST36 and LV3 on the extremities in randomized order during fMRI in 42 acupuncture naïve healthy adult volunteers. Non-invasive tactile stimulation was delivered to the acupoints by gentle tapping with a von Frey monofilament prior to acupuncture to serve as a sensory control. At the end of each procedure, the subject was asked if each of the sensations listed in a questionnaire or any other sensations occurred during stimulation, and if present to rate its intensity on a numerical scale of 1-10. Statistical analysis including paired t-test, analysis of variance, Spearman's correlation and Fisher's exact test were performed to compare responses between acupuncture and sensory stimulation. The deqi response was elicited in 71% of the acupuncture procedures compared with 24% for tactile stimulation when thresholded at a minimum total score of 3 for all the sensations. The frequency and intensity of individual sensations were significantly higher in acupuncture. Among the sensations typically associated with deqi, aching, soreness and pressure were most common, followed by tingling, numbness, dull pain, heaviness, warmth, fullness and coolness. Sharp pain of brief duration that occurred in occasional subjects was regarded as inadvertent noxious stimulation. The most significant differences in the deqi

  6. Characterization of the "deqi" response in acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Kathleen KS; Nixon, Erika E; Vangel, Mark G; Liu, Jing; Marina, Ovidiu; Napadow, Vitaly; Hodge, Steven M; Rosen, Bruce R; Makris, Nikos; Kennedy, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations that is essential for clinical efficacy according to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is lack of adequate experimental data to indicate what sensations comprise deqi, their prevalence and intensity, their relationship to acupoints, how they compare with conventional somatosensory or noxious response. The objective of this study is to provide scientific evidence on these issues and to characterize the nature of the deqi phenomenon in terms of the prevalence of sensations as well as the uniqueness of the sensations underlying the deqi experience. Methods Manual acupuncture was performed at LI4, ST36 and LV3 on the extremities in randomized order during fMRI in 42 acupuncture naïve healthy adult volunteers. Non-invasive tactile stimulation was delivered to the acupoints by gentle tapping with a von Frey monofilament prior to acupuncture to serve as a sensory control. At the end of each procedure, the subject was asked if each of the sensations listed in a questionnaire or any other sensations occurred during stimulation, and if present to rate its intensity on a numerical scale of 1–10. Statistical analysis including paired t-test, analysis of variance, Spearman's correlation and Fisher's exact test were performed to compare responses between acupuncture and sensory stimulation. Results The deqi response was elicited in 71% of the acupuncture procedures compared with 24% for tactile stimulation when thresholded at a minimum total score of 3 for all the sensations. The frequency and intensity of individual sensations were significantly higher in acupuncture. Among the sensations typically associated with deqi, aching, soreness and pressure were most common, followed by tingling, numbness, dull pain, heaviness, warmth, fullness and coolness. Sharp pain of brief duration that occurred in occasional subjects was regarded as inadvertent noxious stimulation. The most significant

  7. Pre- and post-treatment experiences of fear, anxiety, and pain among chronic periodontitis patients treated by scaling and root planing per quadrant versus one-stage full-mouth disinfection: a 6-month randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Santuchi, Camila Carvalho; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cortelli, José Roberto; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Alencar, Camila Oliveira; Costa, Fernando Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    To relate the clinical effects of two different forms of non-surgical periodontal therapy - scaling and root planing per quadrant (SRP-Q) and one-stage full-mouth disinfection (FMD) - to patient-based outcomes such as fear, anxiety, and pain of moderate chronic periodontitis patients. Dental Fear Survey (DFS) and Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) questionnaires and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were applied to 78 patients randomized into two groups: SRP-Q (n = 37) and FMD (n = 41). Periodontal clinical parameters: probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI), and gingival index (GI) were monitored at baseline and 6 months after treatment. Data were statistically analysed by chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon tests, Pearson's correlation, and Cluster analysis. All periodontal clinical parameters improved from baseline to 6 months. Patients with higher fear and anxiety showed a worse clinical periodontal status before and after treatment (mean CAL, PI, and GI). After both types of treatment, fear and anxiety decreased (FMD: p = 0.019; SRP-Q: p = 0.043) with no differences between the groups. Pain did not differ between groups (FMD: 20.6 ± 19.0 and SRP: 20.7 ± 20.0; p = 0.930). In moderate chronic periodontitis patients, SRP-Q and FMD provided periodontal clinical improvements and similar experiences of fear, anxiety, and pain. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Acupuncture in Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, William M.

    1974-01-01

    Nevada's Senate Bill 448 was signed into law by Governor Mike O'Callaghan on 20 April 1973. The law permits the practice of Chinese medicine, including acupuncture, by practitioners who do not have to be physicians. The state legislature rapidly approved it with only two dissenters, one of them a physician. Similar legislation may be considered in other states this year. PMID:4845928

  9. [Acupuncture and insomnia].

    PubMed

    Montakab, H

    1999-02-01

    40 patients with primary difficulties in either falling asleep or remaining asleep were diagnosed according to the traditional Chinese medicine, allocated to specific diagnostic subgroups and treated individually by a practitioner in his private practice. The patients were randomized into two groups, one receiving true acupuncture, the other needled at non-acupuncture points for 3-5 sessions at weekly intervals. The outcome of the therapy was assessed in several ways, first and foremost by an objective measurement of the sleep quality by polysomnography in a specialized sleep laboratory, performed once before and once after termination of the series of treatments. Additional qualitative results were obtained from several questionnaires. The objective measurement showed a statistically significant effect only in the patients who received the true acupuncture. The subjective, qualitative assessment was better in the proper treatment group than in the control group but was not calculated statistically for methodological reasons. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that true and individualized acupuncture indeed shows efficacy in primary sleep disorders. However, a direct influence by the therapist cannot be excluded.

  10. [Osteoarthritis of knee joint treated with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ru; Fu, Wen-Bin

    2010-05-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy of osteoarthritis of knee joint treated by acupuncture and moxibustion and simple acupuncture. Sixty-two cases were randomized into an observation group (32 cases) and a control group (30 cases). In the observation group, acupuncture and non-scarring moxibustion were applied. Acupuncture was applied on the local acupoints of knee and moxibustion was performed on Shenshu (BL 23) and Xuehai (SP 10). In the control group, only acupuncture was adopted. The clinical efficacy was observed after 2 courses of treatment. Lysholm knee joint motor function scale, visual analogue scale (VAS) and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) were used for the assessment of scores before and after treatment and the statistical analysis of clinical efficacy. The total effective rate (93.8%, 30/32) in the observation group was superior to that (87.7%, 26/30) in the control group (P < 0.05). The scores in Lysholm knee joint motor function scale and VAS were improved after treatment compared with those before treatment in two groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The degree of improvement in the observation group was superior to that in the control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). There was no statistical significance in the scores of WHOQOL-BREF before and after treatment in two groups as well as in intra-group comparison (all P > 0.05). Acupuncture and moxibustion in combination achieve the definite clinical efficacy on osteoarthritis of knee joint and this therapy is superior to simple acupuncture in the improvement of motor function of knee joint and the alleviation of pain.

  11. Acupuncture Injection Combined with Electrokinetic Injection for Polydimethylsiloxane Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We recently reported acupuncture sample injection that leads to reproducible injection of nL-scale sample segments into a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for microchip capillary electrophoresis. The advantages of the acupuncture injection in microchip capillary electrophoresis include capability of minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware and capability of introducing sample plugs into any desired position of a microchannel. However, the challenge in the previous study was to achieve reproducible, pL-scale sample injections into PDMS microchannels. In the present study, we introduce an acupuncture injection technique combined with electrokinetic injection (AICEI) technique to inject pL-scale sample segments for microchip capillary electrophoresis. We carried out the capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) separation of FITC and fluorescein, and the mixture of 10 μM FITC and 10 μM fluorescein was separated completely by using the AICEI method. PMID:28326222

  12. [Acupuncture: basics, practice, and evidence].

    PubMed

    Stör, W; Irnich, D

    2009-08-01

    Acupuncture, which originated with traditional Chinese medicine, has been increasingly used in Western medicine over the last three decades. A huge body of scientific literature reports the physiological and clinical effects of acupuncture. In Germany, about 30,000 physicians apply acupuncture at least occasionally, and German health insurances reimburse acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee. This overview discusses the most important historical, theoretical, practical, and scientific aspects of acupuncture in general, with a special look at anaesthesia. Regarding anaesthesia, supportive acupuncture treatment is performed for postoperative pain, anxiolysis, and postoperative nausea and vomiting, based on promising results of rigorous randomised trials. However, many unresolved questions remain, such as regarding specificity of concepts, indications, and optimum dose.

  13. [Acupuncture. Basics, practice, and evidence].

    PubMed

    Stör, W; Irnich, D

    2009-03-01

    Acupuncture, which originated with traditional Chinese medicine, has been increasingly used in Western medicine over the last three decades. A huge body of scientific literature reports the physiological and clinical effects of acupuncture. In Germany, about 30,000 physicians apply acupuncture at least occasionally, and German health insurances reimburse acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee. This overview discusses the most important historical, theoretical, practical, and scientific aspects of acupuncture in general, with a special look at anaesthesia. Regarding anaesthesia, supportive acupuncture treatment is performed for postoperative pain, anxiolysis, and postoperative nausea and vomiting, based on promising results of rigorous randomised trials. However, many unresolved questions remain, such as regarding specificity of concepts, indications, and optimum dose.

  14. [Observation on therapeutic effect of nuchal acupuncture and abdominal acupuncture for treatment of stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xue-qun; Zhang, Zhi-long

    2009-12-01

    To probe the effect and mechanism of the nuchal acupuncture and abdominal acupuncture for treatment of stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia. Sixty cases were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 30 cases in each group. Nuchal acupuncture and abdominal acupuncture treatment was used and Fengfu (GV 16), Fengchi (GB 20), Tianzhu (BL 10), Zhongwan (CV 12) and Guanyuan (CV 4) etc. were selected in observation group, routine acupuncture was applied on Binao (LI 14), Quchi (LI 11), Huantiao (GB 30) and Futu (ST 32) etc. in control group. The scale of Ashworth and score of Fugel-Meyer of the spastic lateral upper and lower limbs and the changes of the EMG F-wave in spastic upper limb of patients in two groups were observed before and after treatment. The Ashworth scale and Fugel-Meyer score of the upper and lower limbs were obviously improved, the amplitude was decreased, the duration was shorten and the threshold of the EMG F-wave of the spastic upper limb was increased (all P < 0.01) in the observation group. The observation group was superior to the control group in Fugel-Meyer score of the upper and lower limbs of the patients the Ashworth scale of the lower limb, and the amplitude, duration and threshold of the EMG F-wave of the spastic upper limb (all P < 0.01). The total effective rate of 90.0% in observation group was superior to that of 50.0% in control group (P < 0.01). The nuchal acupuncture and abdominal acupuncture treatment can decrease the muscle tension of the stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia.

  15. Measuring Fear of Death: A Multidimensional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Christine; Fleming, Stephen

    1985-01-01

    Examined fear of death in 87 students who viewed films designed to manipulate anxiety. Results showed high scores on the Templer fear of death scale correlated with longer response latencies to death than neutral words on the word association test, indicating a positive association between direct and indirect measures. (JAC)

  16. Measuring Fear of Death: A Multidimensional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Christine; Fleming, Stephen

    1985-01-01

    Examined fear of death in 87 students who viewed films designed to manipulate anxiety. Results showed high scores on the Templer fear of death scale correlated with longer response latencies to death than neutral words on the word association test, indicating a positive association between direct and indirect measures. (JAC)

  17. [Rehabilitation evaluation on post-stroke abnormal movement pattern prevented and treated with acupuncture and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-min; Tang, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    To explore the impacts of acupuncture and rehabilitation on post-stroke abnormal patterns of limb movement and evaluate them via rehabilitation method. Ninety cases of post-stroke movement disorder were randomly divided into an acupuncture-rehabilitation group, a body acupuncture group and a medication group, 30 cases in each group. In medication group, the conventional medication in neurological department was administered. In acupuncture-rehabilitation group and body acupuncture group, on the basis of the therapy as medication group, scalp acupuncture (such as parietal area and anterior parietal area, etc.), rehabilitation training and traditional body acupuncture [such as Jianyu (LI 15) and Fengshi (GB 31),etc.] were supplemented. The continuous electric stimulation was applied in body acupuncture group. The treatment lasted for 8 weeks. The assessment of clinical efficacy, Fugl-Meyer score, Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM) and shoulder pain score were taken as observation indices for rehabilitation evaluation before and after treatment in each group. The effective rate was 93.1% (27/29) in acupuncture-rehabilitation group, which was superior to 66.7% (20/30) in body acupuncture group and 57.1% (16/28) in control group (both P<0.01) separately. After treatment, Fugl-Meyer score, MAS, ROM of the lower limbs and shoulder joint and shoulder pain score (except medication group) were all remarkably improved as compared with those before treatment in each group (all P<0.01). The improvements in Fugl-Meyer score, MAS, ROM of the upper limbs and shoulder pain score in acupuncture-rehabilitation group were significantly superior to those in body acupuncture group and medication group (P<0.05, P<0.01). Acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy and traditional body acupuncture remarkably improve in post-stroke movement disorder. But acupuncture and rehabilitation therapy is apparently superior to traditional body acupuncture. This therapy can effectively

  18. Acupuncture for chronic diarrhea in adults

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Li, Bo; Wu, Jiani; Tian, Jinhui; Xie, Shang; Mao, Zhi; Zhou, Jing; Kim, Tae-Hun; Liu, Zhishun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: As 2 major common types of chronic diarrhea, functional diarrhea (FD) and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) affect 1.54% to 1.72% of people in China. Acupuncture is commonly used in clinical practice for patients with chronic diarrhea. Here, we present a protocol of systematic review aimed at systematically review all the clinical evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating FD and IBS-D in adults. Methods: The review will be performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We will search the following databases from their inception to January 2017: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, China Biology Medicine disc, Wan-Fang Data, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Citation Information by National Institute of Informatics, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System by Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, and Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator (J-stage). Clinical trial registrations will also be searched. Primary outcome measures are the change of bowel movements. The secondary outcomes include stool consistency, quality of life scales, other standardized rating scales, patient satisfaction, and acupuncture-related adverse effects assessment. Ethics and dissemination: This review does not require ethical approval and will be disseminated electronically or in print. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015017574. PMID:28121941

  19. Acupuncture for acute stroke: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Ma, Ruijie; Froym, Ronen; Gu, Xudong; Li, Jianhua; Chen, Lina; Xu, Shouyu; Ji, Conghua

    2014-06-08

    Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for more than 3,000 years. However, previous research has not yet shown that acupuncture is effective as a stroke treatment. We report a protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled, and outcome assessor-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on acute ischemic stroke. In a prospective trial involving three hospitals in the Zhejiang Province (China) 250 patients with a recent (less than 1 week previous) episode of ischemic stroke will be included. Patients will be randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group given scalp acupuncture and electroacupuncture, and a control group given no acupuncture. Eighteen treatment sessions will be performed over a three-week period. The primary outcome will be measured by changes in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at the one, three, and four-week follow-up. Secondary outcome measures will be: 1) the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor function; 2) the mini-mental state examination and Montreal cognitive assessment for cognitive function; 3) the video-fluoroscopic swallowing study for swallowing ability; and 4) the incidence of adverse events. This trial is expected to clarify whether or not acupuncture is effective for acute stroke. It will also show if acupuncture can improve motor, cognitive, or swallowing function. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12001971.

  20. Repeated acupuncture treatments modulate amygdala resting state functional connectivity of depressive patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zengjian; Liu, Jian; Chen, Jun; Liu, Xian; Nie, Guangning; Byun, Joon-Seok; Liang, Yilin; Park, Joel; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming; Liu, Bo; Kong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    As a widely-applied alternative therapy, acupuncture is gaining popularity in Western society. One challenge that remains, however, is incorporating it into mainstream medicine. One solution is to combine acupuncture with other conventional, mainstream treatments. In this study, we investigated the combination effect of acupuncture and the antidepressant fluoxetine, as well as its underlying mechanism using resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) in patients with major depressive disorders. Forty-six female depressed patients were randomized into a verum acupuncture plus fluoxetine or a sham acupuncture plus fluoxetine group for eight weeks. Resting-state fMRI data was collected before the first and last treatments. Results showed that compared with those in the sham acupuncture treatment, verum acupuncture treatment patients showed 1) greater clinical improvement as indicated by Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) scores; 2) increased rsFC between the left amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC)/preguenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC); 3) increased rsFC between the right amygdala and left parahippocampus (Para)/putamen (Pu). The strength of the amygdala-sgACC/pgACC rsFC was positively associated with corresponding clinical improvement (as indicated by a negative correlation with MADRS and SDS scores). Our findings demonstrate the additive effect of acupuncture to antidepressant treatment and suggest that this effect may be achieved through the limbic system, especially the amygdala and the ACC.

  1. The Impact of Placebo, Psychopathology, and Expectations on the Response to Acupuncture Needling in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wasan, Ajay Darsh; Kong, Jian; Pham, Loc-Duyen; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Edwards, Robert; Gollub, Randy L.

    2010-01-01

    Comorbid psychopathology is a variable not explored in the acupuncture RCTs that could explain whether subgroups of patients with chronic low back pain have differential responses to acupuncture or placebo treatments. This was a controlled, blinded, crossover trial of verum acupuncture and validated sham acupuncture in 40 CLBP patients, with a Low or High level of psychiatric comorbidity. They completed a 0–10 rating scale for pain at the beginning and end of each treatment session, and rated their expectations for change in pain. Verum acupuncture was performed at Large Intestine 4 on the dorsal right hand for 30 minutes by a licensed acupuncturist. Data analysis used percent improvement in pain as the primary outcome for each of the treatment sessions. Both groups (21 Low and 19 High) reported significant analgesia with verum acupuncture needling, mean 33%, p=.90 for difference between groups; and with placebo, 26%, p=.09. In both groups expectations were only a significant predictor of verum acupuncture response, p=.002, such that those with greater expectations had greater pain relief. Psychiatric comorbidity does not significantly impact acupuncture or placebo acupuncture analgesia in CLBP. It does not affect the positive impact of expectations on reported pain relief from real acupuncture. PMID:20075014

  2. Psychophysical outcomes from a randomized pilot study of manual, electro, and sham acupuncture treatment on experimentally induced thermal pain.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jian; Fufa, Duretti T; Gerber, Andrew J; Rosman, Ilana S; Vangel, Mark G; Gracely, Richard H; Gollub, Randy L

    2005-01-01

    In this pilot study comparing the analgesic effects of three acupuncture modes--manual, electro, and placebo (with Streitberger placebo needles)--in a cohort of healthy subjects, we found that verum acupuncture treatment, but not placebo, lowered pain ratings in response to calibrated noxious thermal stimuli. This finding was mainly the result of highly significant analgesia in 5 of the 11 subjects who completed the 5-session study. Of the 5 responders, 2 responded only to electroacupuncture and 3 only to manual acupuncture, suggesting that acupuncture's analgesic effects on experimental pain may be dependent on both subject and mode. We developed a simple quantitative assessment tool, the Subjective Acupuncture Sensation Scale (SASS), comprised of 9 descriptors and an anxiety measure to study the relationship between the deqi sensation induced by acupuncture and the putative therapeutic effects of acupuncture. The SASS results confirm that the deqi sensation is complex, with all subjects rating multiple descriptors during each mode. We found significant correlations of analgesia with SASS ratings of numbness and soreness, but not with ratings of stabbing, throbbing, tingling, burning, heaviness, fullness, or aching. This suggests that attributes of the deqi sensation may be useful clinical indicators of effective treatment. The results of this study indicate the existence of both individual subject and acupuncture mode variability in the analgesic effects of acupuncture. This suggests that switching acupuncture mode may be a treatment option for unresponsive patients.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle....

  8. Actigraph Evaluation of Acupuncture for Treating Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingzhe; Li, Mao; Wang, Qiudong; Kwak, Shin; Jiang, Wenfei; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of acupuncture in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) by actigraph recordings. Among the 38 patients with RLS enrolled, 31 (M = 12, F = 19; mean age, 47.2 ± 9.7 years old) completed the study. Patients were treated with either standard acupuncture (n = 15) or randomized acupuncture (n = 16) in a single-blind manner for 6 weeks. Changes in nocturnal activity (NA) and early sleep activity (ESA) between week 0 (baseline), week 2, week 4, and week 6 were assessed using leg actigraph recordings, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Rating Scale (IRLSRS), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Standard but not randomized acupuncture reduced the abnormal leg activity of NA and ESA significantly in week 2, week 4, and week 6 based on the changes in the clinical scores for IRLSRS and ESS in week 4 and week 6 compared with the baseline. No side effects were observed. The results indicate that standard acupuncture might improve the abnormal leg activity in RLS patients and thus is a potentially suitable integrative treatment for long-term use. PMID:25763089

  9. Acupuncture Provides Short-term Pain Relief for Patients in a Total Joint Replacement Program

    PubMed Central

    Crespin, Daniel J.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Johnson, Jill R.; Miller, Cynthia; Finch, Michael D.; Rivard, Rachael L.; Anseth, Scott; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Given the risks of opioid medications, non-pharmacological strategies should be considered for total joint replacement patients. We investigated acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for post-surgical pain management in a total joint replacement program by examining which total hip and knee replacement patients elected to receive acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture on short-term pain. Design A total joint replacement program using fast-track physiotherapy offered elective post-surgical acupuncture to all patients, at no additional cost, as an adjunct therapy to opioids for pain management. Setting The Joint Replacement Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a 630-bed teaching and specialty hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 2010 to 2012. Subjects Our sample included 2,500 admissions of total hip and total knee replacement patients. Methods Self-reported pain was assessed before and after acupuncture using a 0-10 scale and categorized as none/mild (0-4) and moderate/severe pain (5-10). Results Seventy-five percent of admissions included acupuncture. Women (Odds Ratio: 1.48, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.22, 1.81) had higher odds of receiving acupuncture compared to men, and non-white patients (Odds Ratio: 0.55, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.39, 0.78) had lower odds of receiving acupuncture compared to white patients. Average short-term pain reduction was 1.91 points (95% Confidence Interval: 1.83, 1.99), a 45% reduction from the mean pre-pain score. Forty-one percent of patients reported moderate/severe pain prior to receiving acupuncture, while only 15% indicated moderate/severe pain after acupuncture. Conclusions Acupuncture may be a viable adjunct to pharmacological approaches for pain management after total hip or total knee replacement. PMID:25586769

  10. Acupuncture provides short-term pain relief for patients in a total joint replacement program.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Daniel J; Griffin, Kristen H; Johnson, Jill R; Miller, Cynthia; Finch, Michael D; Rivard, Rachael L; Anseth, Scott; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2015-06-01

    Given the risks of opioid medications, nonpharmacological strategies should be considered for total joint replacement patients. We investigated acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for postsurgical pain management in a total joint replacement program by examining which total hip and knee replacement patients elected to receive acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture on short-term pain. A total joint replacement program using fast-track physiotherapy offered elective postsurgical acupuncture to all patients, at no additional cost, as an adjunct therapy to opioids for pain management. The Joint Replacement Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a 630-bed teaching and specialty hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 2010 to 2012. Our sample included 2,500 admissions of total hip (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) patients. Self-reported pain was assessed before and after acupuncture using a 0-10 scale and categorized as none/mild (0-4) and moderate/severe pain (5-10). Seventy-five percent of admissions included acupuncture. Women (Odds Ratio: 1.48, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.22, 1.81) had higher odds of receiving acupuncture compared to men, and nonwhite patients (Odds Ratio: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.78) had lower odds of receiving acupuncture compared to white patients. Average short-term pain reduction was 1.91 points (95% CI: 1.83, 1.99), a 45% reduction from the mean prepain score. Forty-one percent of patients reported moderate/severe pain prior to receiving acupuncture, while only 15% indicated moderate/severe pain after acupuncture. Acupuncture may be a viable adjunct to pharmacological approaches for pain management after THR or TKR. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Rana S; McCrory, Paul; Pirotta, Marie; Relf, Ian; Forbes, Andrew; Crossley, Kay M; Williamson, Elizabeth; Kyriakides, Mary; Novy, Kitty; Metcalf, Ben R; Harris, Anthony; Reddy, Prasuna; Conaghan, Philip G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-10-01

    There is debate about benefits of acupuncture for knee pain. To determine the efficacy of laser and needle acupuncture for chronic knee pain. Zelen-design clinical trial (randomization occurred before informed consent), in Victoria, Australia (February 2010-December 2012). Community volunteers (282 patients aged ≥50 years with chronic knee pain) were treated by family physician acupuncturists. No acupuncture (control group, n = 71) and needle (n = 70), laser (n = 71), and sham laser (n = 70) acupuncture. Treatments were delivered for 12 weeks. Participants and acupuncturists were blinded to laser and sham laser acupuncture. Control participants were unaware of the trial. Primary outcomes were average knee pain (numeric rating scale, 0 [no pain] to 10 [worst pain possible]; minimal clinically important difference [MCID], 1.8 units) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, 0 [no difficulty] to 68 [extreme difficulty]; MCID, 6 units) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included other pain and function measures, quality of life, global change, and 1-year follow-up. Analyses were by intention-to-treat using multiple imputation for missing outcome data. At 12 weeks and 1 year, 26 (9%) and 50 (18%) participants were lost to follow-up, respectively. Analyses showed neither needle nor laser acupuncture significantly improved pain (mean difference; -0.4 units; 95% CI, -1.2 to 0.4, and -0.1; 95% CI, -0.9 to 0.7, respectively) or function (-1.7; 95% CI, -6.1 to 2.6, and 0.5; 95% CI, -3.4 to 4.4, respectively) compared with sham at 12 weeks. Compared with control, needle and laser acupuncture resulted in modest improvements in pain (-1.1; 95% CI, -1.8 to -0.4, and -0.8; 95% CI, -1.5 to -0.1, respectively) at 12 weeks, but not at 1 year. Needle acupuncture resulted in modest improvement in function compared with control at 12 weeks (-3.9; 95% CI, -7.7 to -0.2) but was not significantly different from sham (-1.7; 95% CI

  12. Bilateral pneumothoraces following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, Palmi; Walker, Craig Andrew; Leigh-Smith, Simon

    2017-08-03

    A 50-year-old woman was brought to the emergency department with shortness of breath and chest tightness following acupuncture to her upper back for a chronically painful left shoulder. She had symptoms of respiratory distress and chest X-ray revealed bilateral pneumothoraces. Symptoms resolved after insertion of bilateral Seldinger chest drains. She was admitted to the Cardiothoracic Surgery ward, chest drains were removed on the second and third days and the patient was discharged from hospital after 3 days. Clinicians and acupuncturists should be aware of this adverse event following acupuncture. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. [Considerations about Acupuncture Treatment during Menstruation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    A dispute about whether women are suitable to receive acupuncture treatment in the period of menstruation has existed for many years. There are some reports about acupuncture treatment induced abnormal menstruation in women experiencing menstruation. However, according to long-term clinical practice and current development of acupuncture therapy, the authors of the present paper hold that there are no absolute contradictions for acupuncture treatment of women during menstruation. Additionally, acupuncture induced menstrual disorder has no enough data support of large size example clinical trials. The key points of acupuncture administration for women during menstruation are: (1) reasonable selection of acupoints prescriptions, and (2) appropriate acupuncture needle manipulations, particularly avoiding strong stimulation.

  14. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  15. [Thinking on controlled setting of plarebo acupuncture in clinical trial of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Mao, Wen-Chao; Liu, Bao-Yan; He, Li-Yun; Liu, Zhi-Shun

    2013-04-01

    Differences and relations between effects of acupuncture therapy and sham acupuncture are systematically analyzed in this article through the influential factors of acupuncture effect. And it is held that sham acupuncture effect is not exactly equal to placebo effect. The effects of both acupuncture and sham acupuncture are composed by specific effects and non-specific effects, and the differences of non-specific effects between acupunc ture and sham acupuncture can be minimized furthest with blinding and randomized method. Therefore, the difference of acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment rests with the degree of differences of the specific effects. Only when both of the specific effect of acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture are minimized, can it be applied as the ideal placebo control. Consequently when placebo acupunture are setted up, factors such as the body condition, site of stimulation and stimulation parameters which can influence the specific effect of acupuncture should be taken into consideration to produce the relatively minimum specific effect.

  16. Acupuncture and facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John B

    2005-01-01

    In traditional Oriental medicine, facial rejuvenation is achieved by inserting acupuncture needles at different points along designated channels to attain tonification or sedation effects. According to the author, treatment benefits include elimination of some wrinkles and decrease in length and depth of others, decrease of facial edema, decrease of acne, improvement of facial muscle tone, improved skin texture with tighter pores, and decrease of sagging around the eyes, cheeks, chin, and neck.

  17. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    for phantom limb pain and it is used in the Specialized Care Program (SCP) at the Deployment Health Clinical Center. The SCP is a three-week, multidis...Ramstien Air Base, Germany to Joint Andrews Base and another pilot study examining acupuncture for phantom limb pain that yielded promising preliminary data...describe persistent, multi-system symptoms of varying degrees and severities. This is reminiscent of “Gulf War Syndrome ” or “Chronic Multi-symptom

  18. Acupuncture as anticancer treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Kilian-Kita, Aneta; Püsküllüoglu, Mirosława; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The mystery of Traditional Chinese Medicine has been attracting people for years. Acupuncture, ranked among the most common services of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, has recently gained a lot of interest in the scientific world. Contemporary researchers have been continuously trying to shed light on its possible mechanism of action in human organism. Numerous studies pertaining to acupuncture’s application in cancer symptoms or treatment-related side effects management have already been published. Moreover, since the modern idea of acupuncture’s immunomodulating effect seems to be promising, scientists have propounded a concept of its potential application as part of direct anti-tumor therapy. In our previous study we summarized possible use of acupuncture in management of cancer symptoms and treatment-related ailments, such as chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, xerostomia, vasomotor symptoms, neutropenia, fatigue, anxiety, insomnia, lymphoedema after mastectomy and peripheral neuropathy. This article reviews the studies concerning acupuncture as a possible tool in modern anticancer treatment. PMID:28239282

  19. Acupuncture for anxiety.

    PubMed

    Errington-Evans, Nick

    2012-04-01

    This review aims to examine the volume and quality of the evidence base which supports the use of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety disorders. A literature review was conducted using Pubmed, Google scholar, AMED, BMJ, Embase, Psychinfo, Cochrane library, Ingenta connect, and Cinahl databases. Keywords were "anxiety,"anxious,"panic,"stress,"phobia," and "acupuncture" limited to year 2000 onwards and English language where available. The quality of research examining the use of acupuncture in the treatment of anxiety disorders is extremely variable. There is enormous variety regarding points used, number of points used in a session, duration of sessions, frequency of treatment and duration of treatment programme. While the generally poor methodological quality, combined with the wide range of outcome measures used, number and variety of points, frequency of sessions, and duration of treatment makes firm conclusions difficult. Against this, the volume of literature, consistency of statistically significant results, wide range of conditions treated and use of animal test subjects suggests very real, positive outcomes using a treatment method preferred by a population of individuals who tend to be resistant to conventional medicine. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Acupuncture and Acupressure in Labor.

    PubMed

    Schlaeger, Judith M; Gabzdyl, Elizabeth M; Bussell, Jeanie L; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Wilkie, Diana J

    2017-01-01

    Acupuncture and acupressure, 2 modalities of Traditional Chinese Medicine, are based on reducing pain and symptoms of disease through balancing yin and yang. Acupuncture and acupressure have been used in China for reduction of labor pain, labor augmentation, and other intrapartum indications for more than 2 millennia. This article presents a review of the current literature that has addressed the effects of acupuncture and acupressure on intrapartum events. Studies of acupuncture have demonstrated that acupuncture may reduce labor pain, the use of pharmacologic agents, the use of forceps and vacuum-assisted births, and the length of labor. Studies that examined the effect of acupuncture on labor that is induced or augmented for premature rupture of membranes have found that acupuncture may increase the degree of cervical ripening but does not reduce the amount of oxytocin or epidural analgesia administration, nor does it shorten length of induced labor. Acupressure may reduce labor pain and labor duration, but acupressure has not been found to increase cervical ripening or induce labor. There are insufficient studies about acupuncture and acupressure and their effects on labor at this time, and there is need for further research. Areas of uncertainty include efficacy, optimal point selection, best techniques, and length of time for point stimulation.

  1. WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sabina

    2010-06-01

    'WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations in the Western Pacific Region (WHO Standard) was released in 2008. Initially, there were 92/361 controversial acupuncture points (acupoints). Through seven informal consultations and four task force team meetings, 86 points were agreed upon among the 92 controversial acupoints, leaving 6 remaining controversial acupoints, demanding active research in the future. This will enhance the reproducibility and validity of acupuncture studies. It will also lead to a better understanding of acupuncture mechanisms in order to optimize its clinical efficacy for a range of diseases and syndromes. This book has two parts: General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations and WHO Standard Acupuncture Point Locations. First of all, familiarity with the General Guidelines for Acupuncture Point Locations in this book can help the reader to understand and use the contents of this book in depth. I would like to thank all of the participating experts and scholars for this great work, who have overcome the limits of previous acupuncture references. I also appreciate the dedicated effort and harmonious leadership of Dr Choi Seung-hoon, former Regional Adviser in Traditional Medicine of Western Pacific Office, WHO.

  2. Incubation of fear

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sam A.; Nair, Sunila G.

    2013-01-01

    While fear and anxiety can grow over time in anxiety disorders, most efforts to model this phenomenon with fear conditioning in rodents causes fear that remains stable or decreases across weeks or months. Here, we describe several methods to induce conditioned fear that grows over the course of 1 month and is sustained for at least 2 months using an extended fear conditioning approach. These methods include a very reliable standard method that causes multiple fear measures to increase over months, as well as alternative methods. PMID:23853110

  3. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Acupuncture Effect on Common Extensor Tendon Thickness in Patients with Lateral Epicondylitis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Ural, Fatma Gülçin; Öztürk, Gökhan Tuna; Bölük, Hüma; Akkuş, Selami

    2017-06-07

    To explore the effect of acupuncture on common extensor tendon (CET) thickness in patients with lateral epicondylitis (LE). Additionally, to identify whether clinical and ultrasonographic changes showed any correlation. Forty-one patients were randomly assigned to acupuncture and control groups. Conventional treatment (rest, NSAİİ, bracing, exercise) methods for LE were applied to all patients. In addition to this, the acupuncture treatment was applied to the acupuncture group. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Duruoz Hand Index (DHI) for functioning of the affected limb, the pressure pain threshold, and CET thickness (via ultrasound imaging) were assessed before and end of the treatment in both groups. The VAS and DHI scores in both groups decreased. The pressure pain threshold and CET thickness only demonstrated improvement in the acupuncture group. These findings show that the CET thickness was reduced after 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment in LE patients.

  4. Effectiveness of Acupuncture Therapy on Stress in a Large Urban College Population.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Stefanie; Burnis, James; Denton, Antony; Krasnow, Aaron; Raghu, T S; Mathis, Kimberly

    2017-06-01

    This study is a randomized controlled clinical trial to study the effectiveness of acupuncture on the perception of stress in patients who study or work on a large, urban college campus. The hypothesis was that verum acupuncture would demonstrate a significant positive impact on perceived stress as compared to sham acupuncture. This study included 111 participants with high self-reported stress levels who either studied or worked at a large, urban public university in the southwestern United States. However, only 62 participants completed the study. The participants were randomized into a verum acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both the groups received treatment once a week for 12 weeks. The Cohen's global measure of perceived stress scale (PSS-14) was completed by each participant prior to treatment, at 6 weeks, at 12 weeks, and 6 weeks and 12 weeks post-treatment completion. While participants of both the groups showed a substantial initial decrease in perceived stress scores, at 12 weeks post treatment, the verum acupuncture group showed a significantly greater treatment effect than the sham acupuncture group. This study indicates that acupuncture may be successful in decreasing the perception of stress in students and staff at a large urban university, and this effect persists for at least 3 months after the completion of treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Efficacy of acupuncture in reducing preoperative anxiety: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyojeong; Bae, Hyunsu; Min, Byung-Il; Cho, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce preoperative anxiety in several previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In order to assess the preoperative anxiolytic efficacy of acupuncture therapy, this study conducted a meta-analysis of an array of appropriate studies. Methods. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL) were searched up to February 2014. In the meta-analysis data were included from RCT studies in which groups receiving preoperative acupuncture treatment were compared with control groups receiving a placebo for anxiety. Results. Fourteen publications (N = 1,034) were included. Six publications, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S), reported that acupuncture interventions led to greater reductions in preoperative anxiety relative to sham acupuncture (mean difference = 5.63, P < .00001, 95% CI [4.14, 7.11]). Further eight publications, employing visual analogue scales (VAS), also indicated significant differences in preoperative anxiety amelioration between acupuncture and sham acupuncture (mean difference = 19.23, P < .00001, 95% CI [16.34, 22.12]). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy aiming at reducing preoperative anxiety has a statistically significant effect relative to placebo or nontreatment conditions. Well-designed and rigorous studies that employ large sample sizes are necessary to corroborate this finding.

  6. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic dizziness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is one of the most challenging symptoms in medicine. No medication for dizziness in current use has well-established curative or prophylactic value or is suitable for long-term palliative use. Unconventional remedies, such as acupuncture, should be considered and scientifically evaluated. However, there has been relatively little evidence in randomized controlled clinical trials on acupuncture to treat chronic dizziness. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with dizziness. Methods/Design This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to two treatment groups receiving acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS). Treatment will be conducted over a period of 4 weeks, at a frequency of two sessions per week. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with chronic dizziness. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN52695239 PMID:24330810

  7. [Thinking about academic development of acupuncture and moxibustion in recent ten years].

    PubMed

    Wen, Bi-ling; Jia, Chun-sheng; Liu, Wei-hong; Yang, Yong-qing; Wang, Ling-ling; Yang, Hua-yuan; Wu, Xiao-dong; Shen, Xue-yong; Xu, Ping; Zhao, Jing-shen; Liu, Jun-ling; Cheng, Kai; Zhu, Wen-zeng

    2009-12-01

    Through combing the academic development of acupuncture in recent ten years, objectively reflects the real development status of acupuncture subject on these aspects sucl as basis, clinic, equipment, teaching and standardization, etc., shows the scientific and technological achievements and the highlights of the acupuncture academic development, analyzes the bottleneck and dilemma of the acupuncture academic development. It is indicated that there are several problems existed in acupuncture researche at present, such as the scale and the input of the acupuncture theory research are not enough, the basic research and clinical application is disjointed, the correlation between the acupoints and viscera need more systematic and further researches, the design level of clinical research on acupoints' main indications should be improved. From now on we should follow the inherent rule of the traditional theory of Chinese medicine and the way of integrated thinking, explore the new rule of acupuncture academic development, in order to fit the new historical period, and comprehensively promote the sustainable and coordinated development of acupuncture science.

  8. Acupuncture in the postoperative setting for breast cancer patients: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Molly J; Croghan, Katrina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Lemaine, Valerie; Degnim, Amy C; Bauer, Brent A; Cha, Stephen S; Croghan, Ivana T

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is used to treat a variety of symptoms and conditions associated with cancer and cancer treatments. The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of providing acupuncture in the hospital setting for breast cancer patients and to evaluate the short-term effect of acupuncture on stress, anxiety, and pain. This was an open label study conducted at Mayo Clinic Hospital, Methodist and Saint Marys Campus, Rochester, Minnesota. A total of 20 adult breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy and/or breast reconstruction were recruited and offered daily acupuncture intervention beginning postoperative day 1 and continuing for the duration of the hospital stay. Outcome measures included the Symptom Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Satisfaction Question and Was-it-Worth-it (WIWI) Questionnaire. It was found that acupuncture is a feasible option for postoperative breast cancer patients. In addition, it can significantly decrease the levels of anxiety (p = 0.0065), tension/muscular discomfort (p < 0.001) and pain (p = 0.023). The association between acupuncture and relaxation was found to be statistically borderline (p = 0.053). This feasibility study showed that acupuncture can be integrated into a busy postsurgical clinical practice. These results also suggest that acupuncture may be an important intervention in the postoperative setting for breast cancer patients.

  9. Acupuncture mechanism and redox equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Li, Qian-Qian; Xu, Qian; Li, Fang; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  10. Religiosity, fear of death and suicide acceptability.

    PubMed

    Hoelter, J W

    1979-01-01

    The present research was an attempt to test two hypotheses derived from a recently proposed social psychological model of suicide: The acceptability of suicide is a decreasing function of religiosity and fear of death. Questionnaire data were collected for 205 undergraduates at a midwestern university in 1978. The questionnaire included several measures of religiosity, a factor analysis multidimensional fear of death scale, and a suicide acceptability scale. Results, showing that all of the religiosity measures and certain types of fear of death were significantly related to the acceptability of suicide, supported to the hypotheses under examination.

  11. Can Acupuncture Treatment Be Double-Blinded? An Evaluation of Double-Blind Acupuncture Treatment of Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Takayama, Miho; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Kawase, Akiko; Schuster, Lars; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Blinding protects against bias but the success of blinding is seldom assessed and reported in clinical trials including studies of acupuncture where blinding represents a major challenge. Recently, needles with the potential for double-blinding were developed, so we tested if acupuncture can be double-blinded in a randomized study of sixty-seven patients with acute pain ≥ 3 (0-10 scale following third molar removal) who received active acupuncture with a penetrating needle or placebo acupuncture with a non-penetrating needle. To test if acupuncture was administered double-blind, patients and acupuncturists were asked about perceived treatment allocation at the end of the study. To test if there were clues which led to identification of the treatment, deep dull pain associated with needle application and rotation (termed “de qi” in East Asian medicine), and patients’ pain levels were assessed. Perceived treatment allocation depended on actual group allocation (p < 0.015) for both patients and acupuncturists, indicating that the needles were not successful in double-blinding. Up to 68% of patients and 83% of acupuncturists correctly identified the treatment, but for patients the distribution was not far from 50/50. Also, there was a significant interaction between actual or perceived treatment and the experience of de qi (p = 0.027), suggesting that the experience of de qi and possible non-verbal clues contributed to correct identification of the treatment. Yet, of the patients who perceived the treatment as active or placebo, 50% and 23%, respectively, reported de qi. Patients’ acute pain levels did not influence the perceived treatment. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment was not fully double-blinded which is similar to observations in pharmacological studies. Still, the non-penetrating needle is the only needle that allows some degree of practitioner blinding. The study raises questions about alternatives to double-blind randomized clinical trials in

  12. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    1998-11-04

    To provide clinicians, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the representatives of the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Presentations and discussions were divided into 3 phases over 2 1/2 days: (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that were part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. The conference was organized and supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine and the Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The literature, produced from January 1970 to October 1997, was searched through MEDLINE, Allied and Alternative Medicine, EMBASE, and MANTIS, as well as through a hand search of 9 journals that were not indexed by the National Library of Medicine. An extensive bibliography of 2302 references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Expert speakers prepared abstracts of their own conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in the open forum and scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience

  13. Acupuncture attenuates autonomic responses to smoking-related visual cues.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Park, Hi-Joon; Kang, O-Seok; Lee, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Song-Yi; Yin, Chang-Shik; Lee, Hyejung

    2011-01-01

    In smokers, smoking-associated cues produce smoking urges and cravings, which are accompanied by autonomic dysfunction in response to these cues. We investigated whether or not acupuncture ameliorated cigarette withdrawal symptoms, as well as attenuated the autonomic responses to smoking-related visual cues in smokers using a power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Fifteen subjects were treated with real acupuncture (RA) at HT7 and 14 subjects received sham acupuncture (SA) at LI10 using the Park Sham Device. The cigarette withdrawal scale (CWS) was measured on the third day after the subjects had quit smoking. We compared the low-frequency/high-frequency (HF/LF) ratio in the HRV of the RA and SA groups during a distraction task using neutral and smoking visual cues. The CWS of the RA group was significantly lower than that of the SA group. The increase in the LF/HF ratio of HRV induced by the smoking-related visual cues was also significantly lower in the RA group when compared with the SA group. Acupuncture not only ameliorated cigarette withdrawal, but also weakened the autonomic responses to smoking cues during withdrawal. These findings suggest that acupuncture might help in smoking cessation by attenuating withdrawal symptoms and smoking cues-induced autonomic responses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A randomized pilot study of acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Gurkan; Gumusalan, Yakup; Ekerbicer, Hasan C; Kiran, Hakan; Coskun, Ayhan; Arikan, Deniz C

    2013-07-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of acupuncture and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy in primary dysmenorrhea patients. Thirty-five young women with a diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea were recruited for the study. Their dysmenorrhea severity was rated by visual analog scale (VAS) immediately prior to entry into the study. They were randomly divided into two groups; and the following month they were given NSAID (group 1, n=24) or acupuncture treatment (group 2, n=11). Pain was rated again using VAS during menstruation in both groups. After one month's treatment, pain scores were significantly lower in both groups (p<0.05). Mean pain scores decreased by 52.2% and 69.5% in the NSAID and acupuncture groups, respectively. Acupuncture was as effective as NSAID therapy for patients with primary dysmenorrhea. Since this was a pilot study with a small sample size and short follow-up period, larger studies are needed to clarify the effect of acupuncture in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Efficacy observation of knee osteoarthritis treated with acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhong; Liu, Qiang; Bai, Wen; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Yang, Jia-Yi; Wang, Shao-Jie

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the conventional acupuncture on knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Seventy-three cases of KOA were treated with the conventional acupuncture therapy at Liang-qiu (ST 34), Dubi (ST 35), Zusanli (ST 36), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Yinlingquan (SP 9), etc. The conventional acupuncture therapy lasted for 4 weeks (at least 3 treatments and less than 5 times each week). At the end of treatment, the follow-up visit lasted for 4 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were adopted for the efficacy assessments of the patients. Of 73 cases, 49 cases accomplished the trial. The data of the lost cases were included in the final data analysis. At the end of 4-week treatment and the follow-up visit, every score in VAS and WOMAC was decreased The conventional acupuncture therapy reduces the joint pain for apparently (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). the patients with KOA and improves the joint function. The 4-week follow-up visit indicates that the efficacy of acupuncture is still sustained.

  16. Phantom acupuncture: dissociating somatosensory and cognitive/affective components of acupuncture stimulation with a novel form of placebo acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeungchan; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Seunggi; Choi, Woojin; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Park, Kyungmo

    2014-01-01

    In a clinical setting, acupuncture treatment consists of multiple components including somatosensory stimulation, treatment context, and attention to needle-based procedures. In order to dissociate somatosensory versus contextual and attentional aspects of acupuncture, we devised a novel form of placebo acupuncture, a visual manipulation dubbed phantom acupuncture, which reproduces the acupuncture needling ritual without somatosensory tactile stimulation. Subjects (N = 20) received both real (REAL) and phantom (PHNT) acupuncture. Subjects were retrospectively classified into two groups based on PHNT credibility (PHNTc, who found phantom acupuncture credible; and PHNTnc, who did not). Autonomic and psychophysical responses were monitored. We found that PHNT can be delivered in a credible manner. Acupuncture needling, a complex, ritualistic somatosensory intervention, induces sympathetic activation (phasic skin conductance [SC] response), which may be specific to the somatosensory component of acupuncture. In contrast, contextual effects, such as needling credibility, are instead associated with a shift toward relative cardiovagal activation (decreased heart rate) during needling and sympathetic inhibition (decreased SC) and parasympathetic activation (decreased pupil size) following acupuncture needling. Visual stimulation characterizing the needling ritual is an important factor for phasic autonomic responses to acupuncture and may undelie the needling orienting response. Our study suggests that phantom acupuncture can be a viable sham control for acupuncture as it completely excludes the somatosensory component of real needling while maintaining the credibility of the acupuncture treatment context in many subjects.

  17. [Fear of falling].

    PubMed

    Alcalde Tirado, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Fear of falling (FF) can be considered as a protective response to a real threat, preventing the elderly from performing activities with high risk of falling, but can also lead to a restriction of the activities that will result in a long-term adverse effect on social, physical or cognitive functions. There is a prevalence of FF in 30% in the elderly who have no history of falls, and double that in those with a history of falling. Its prevalence is increased in women and with advanced age. Several scales have been developed to measure the psychological effects of FF, among which are noted are, the Fall Efficacy Scale (FES), the Activities-specific Balance and Confidence Scale (ABC), and the survey of activities and fear of falling in the elderly (SAFE). It has negative consequences in the functionality, the subjective feeling of well-being, and in the consequent loss of independence. The functional and physical deterioration, or the quality of life is clearly related to the FF, although it has not been established if these factors are cause or effect. Multiple interventions have been recommended, bringing about changes that reinforce their confidence to carry out activities. Interventions and research should promote a realistic and appropriate approach to the risk of falls and teach the elderly to perform activities safely. The reduction in FF is an important goal in itself to improve the subjective feeling of well-being, and the benefits could be increased if this reduction was also accompanied by an increase in safe behaviour, social participation, and activities of the daily life.

  18. Increasing Fears in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddeo, Danielle

    This study involved a survey based on a preliminary poll asking children in a Bronx (New York) classroom (N=26) to list their fears. Many children have fears at all levels of severity. The general perception seems to be that in recent years children are more stressed and less equipped to handle fear. The initial poll revealed that children's fears…

  19. Fear in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Fear is powerful and pervasive in English schools and central to many education discourses. However, it has received very little "focussed" attention in the education literature, despite the increasing interest afforded to it in other disciplines. Understanding how fear works is extremely important as fear and wellbeing are inextricably…

  20. Fear in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Fear is powerful and pervasive in English schools and central to many education discourses. However, it has received very little "focussed" attention in the education literature, despite the increasing interest afforded to it in other disciplines. Understanding how fear works is extremely important as fear and wellbeing are inextricably…

  1. The Effectiveness and Safety of Acupuncture for Patients With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Peng, Weina; Xu, Min; Li, Wang; Liu, Zhishun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The use of acupuncture for treating Alzheimer disease (AD) has been increasing in frequency over recent years. As more studies are conducted on the use of acupuncture for treating AD, it is necessary to re-assess the effectiveness and safety of this practice. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for treating AD. Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedicine Literature (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC) and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched from their inception to June 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with AD treated by acupuncture or by acupuncture combined with 1 kind of drugs were included. Two authors extracted data independently. The continuous data were expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Weighted MD (WMD) was used instead of standardized MD (SMD) when the same scales were used. Adverse reactions related to acupuncture were also investigated. Ten randomized controlled trials with a total of 585 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The combined results of 6 trials showed that acupuncture was better than drugs at improving scores on the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale (MD 1.05, 95% CI 0.16–1.93). Evidence from the pooled results of 3 trials showed that acupuncture plus donepezil was more effective than donepezil alone at improving the MMSE scale score (MD 2.37, 95% CI 1.53–3.21). Out of 141 clinical trials, 2 trials reported the incidence of adverse reactions related to acupuncture. Seven out of 3416 patients had adverse reactions related to acupuncture during or after treatment; the reactions were described as tolerable and not severe. Acupuncture may be more effective than drugs and may enhance the effect of drugs for treating AD in terms of improving cognitive function. Acupuncture may also be more effective than drugs at improving AD

  2. Joint hypermobility, fears, and chocolate consumption.

    PubMed

    Pailhez, Guillem; Rosado, Silvia; Bulbena Cabré, Andrea; Bulbena, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate joint hypermobility, an inherited disorder of the connective tissue significantly associated with anxiety disorders, in a sample of nonclinical students in relation to the frequency of severe fears and consumption of chocolate, coffee, cigarettes, and alcohol. One hundred fifty students completed the Hakim and Grahame Simple Questionnaire to detect hypermobility and the self-administered modified Wolpe Fear Scale (100 items). Severe fears and daily consumption of cigarettes, alcohol, coffee, and chocolate were compared with the hypermobility scores. We found significant differences when comparing severe fears between the groups with and without hypermobility (7.6 vs. 11; p = 0.001), reinforcing the hypothesis that the intensity of fears is greater in subjects with hypermobility. Only the frequency of chocolate intake was significantly higher among subjects with hypermobility (31.2% vs. 51.2%; p = 0.038) and may correspond to attempts of self-treatment of the collagen condition.

  3. Acupuncture, psyche and the placebo response.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle; Zipfel, Stephan

    2010-10-28

    With growing use of acupuncture treatment in various clinical conditions, the question has been posed whether the reported effects reflect specific mechanisms of acupuncture or whether they represent placebo responses, as they often are similar in effect size and resemble similarities to placebo analgesia and its mechanisms. We reviewed the available literature for different placebos (sham procedures) used to control the acupuncture effects, for moderators and potential biases in respective clinical trials, and for central and peripheral mechanisms involved that would allow differentiation of placebo effects from acupuncture and sham acupuncture effects. While the evidence is still limited, it seems that biological differences exist between a placebo response, e.g. in placebo analgesia, and analgesic response during acupunture that does not occur with sham acupuncture. It seems advisable that clinical trials should include potential biomarkers of acupuncture, e.g. measures of the autonomic nervous system function to verify that acupuncture and sham acupuncture are different despite similar clinical effects.

  4. The relationship between fear and death and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hoelter, J W; Hoelter, J A

    1978-07-01

    Studies examining fear of death and anxiety have consistently shown these constructs to be positively related. Although several measures of anxiety have been examined, fear of death has always been treated unidimensionally. The present research was an attempt to examine eight types of fear of death in relation to two types of anxiety. Questionnaire data were collected from 375 male and female undergraduates at a Mid-western university. Anxiety was measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and fear of death by a factor analytic multidimensional scale. Significant correlations were found between seven of the eight fear of death dimensions and both measures of anxiety. Regression analysis showed fear of premature death and fear of the dead to be the most important death-related fears associated with anxiety.

  5. Auricular Acupuncture and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Li, Liang; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture has been utilized in the treatment of diseases for thousands of years. Dr. Paul Nogier firstly originated the concept of an inverted fetus map on the external ear. In the present study, the relationship between the auricular acupuncture and the vagal regulation has been reviewed. It has been shown that auricular acupuncture plays a role in vagal activity of autonomic functions of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Mechanism studies suggested that afferent projections from especially the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) form the anatomical basis for the vagal regulation of auricular acupuncture. Therefore, we proposed the “auriculovagal afferent pathway” (AVAP): both the autonomic and the central nervous system could be modified by auricular vagal stimulation via projections from the ABVN to the NTS. Auricular acupuncture is also proposed to prevent neurodegenerative diseases via vagal regulation. There is a controversy on the specificity and the efficacy of auricular acupoints for treating diseases. More clinical RCT trials on auricular acupuncture and experimental studies on the mechanism of auricular acupuncture should be further investigated. PMID:23304215

  6. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  7. Acupuncture therapy for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid Esmaeili; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rashid, Rusdi Abd; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been used to treat substance abuse. This study aims to review experimental studies examining the effects of acupuncture on addiction. Research and review articles on acupuncture treatment of substance abuse published between January 2000 and September 2014 were searched using the databases ISI Web of Science Core Collection and EBSCO's MEDLINE Complete. Clinical trial studies on the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for substance abuse were classified according to substance (cocaine, opioid, nicotine, and alcohol), and their treatment protocols, assessments, and findings were examined. A total of 119 studies were identified, of which 85 research articles addressed the efficacy of acupuncture for treating addiction. There were substantial variations in study protocols, particularly regarding treatment duration, frequency of electroacupuncture, duration of stimulation, and choice of acupoints. Contradictory results, intergroup differences, variation in sample sizes, and acupuncture placebo effects made it difficult to evaluate acupuncture effectiveness in drug addiction treatment. This review also identified a lack of rigorous study design, such as control of confounding variables by incorporating sham controls, sufficient sample sizes, reliable assessments, and adequately replicated experiments.

  8. [Acupuncture resources in Cochrane Library].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mai-Lan; Lan, Lei; Wu, Xi; Du, Huai-Bin; Tang, Hong-Zhi; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2011-07-01

    To identify acupuncture resources in six databases of Cochrane Library (CL) with computer retrieve. Seventy-two literatures were identified in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Among them, 12 Cochrane systematic review (CSR) verified the effectiveness of acupuncture, 29 concerning the indeterminacy of the efficacy of acupuncture with 1 didn't support acupuncture for epilepsy and 31 remained as protocols; 121 literatures were found in Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) with more types of diseases or symptoms and rich modality comparing to CSR; 4218 randomized controlled trials and clinical controlled trials were identified in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CCRCT); 43 literatures in Cochrane Methodology Register Database (CMRD) which focused on blindness study, quality assessment of methodology of research and publication bias and so on; 25 literatures in Health Technology Assessment Database (HTAD) and 18 in NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) which were centered on acupuncture analgesia. Consequently, acupuncture literatures in 6 databases of CL do provide good resources for acupuncture researchers due to its abundant content, concrete classification and high quality evidence.

  9. Acupuncture for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Simon K; Li, Tianjing

    2013-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy in which there is an acquired loss of retinal ganglion cells at levels beyond normal age-related loss and corresponding atrophy of the optic nerve. Although there are many existing treatments, glaucoma is a chronic condition. Some patients may seek complementary or alternative medicine such as acupuncture to supplement their regular treatment. The underlying plausibility of acupuncture is that disorders related to the flow of Chi (the traditional Chinese concept translated as vital force or energy) can be prevented or treated by stimulating the relevant points on the body surface. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with glaucoma. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1950 to March 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2010), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to March 2010), ZETOC (January 1993 to March 2010), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to March 2010), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine web site (NCCAM) (http://nccam.nih.gov). There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 23 March 2010 with the exception of NCCAM which was last searched on 14 July 2010. We also handsearched Chinese medical journals at Peking Union Medical College Library in April 2007. Although the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Chinese Acupuncture Trials Register, the Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS), and the Chinese

  10. Efficacy and safety of penetration acupuncture on head for acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Qiao; Bao, Chun-Ling; Jiao, Zhi-Hua; Dong, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture, especially acupuncture treatment on head for acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), has long been disputable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of penetration acupuncture on head in patients with acute ICH. Methods: Eighty-two patients with acute ICH were randomized to receive penetration acupuncture treatment on head combined with conventional treatment (treatment group [TG]) or conventional treatment only (control group [CG]). Acupuncture treatments were given in 24 sessions over 4 weeks, with 3-month follow-up period. Measures included Clinical Neurological Function Deficit Scale (CNFDS), Barthel Index (BI), vital signs (respiration, heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation), and hematoma absorption ratio. Results: Both groups showed a progressively improvement in CNFDS and BI scores from day 7 to 90. The TG showed a significantly greater improvement in CNFDS than CG over time (P < 0.05). However, BI failed to show significant difference between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The vital signs were stable and no expansion of hematoma occurred over the course of acupuncture treatment. Conclusion: Penetration acupuncture treatment on head appeared to be safe over the course of treatment on acute ICH and may result in additional functional improvements detected in the CNFDS but not reflected in the BI. A larger-scale clinical trial with longer follow-up assessments is required to confirm these findings. PMID:27902622

  11. [Acupuncture: an information therapy?].

    PubMed

    Nissel, H

    1998-01-01

    Even though modern medicine continues to be governed by the morphological point of view, cybernetics and systems theory are beginning to gain in importance. The concept of "Infomedicine" serves as the basis for a discussion of regulation and the information mechanisms necessary for this to occur. Some of the new insights being made in physics, such as the theory of relativity, quantum physics, and chaos theory provide many valuable explanations. Acupuncture represents a regulation and information therapy, and many parallels can be drawn between traditional Chinese medicine and the discoveries being made in today's physics.

  12. NOTE: Do acupuncture points exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Liu, Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2009-05-01

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian.

  13. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  14. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its benefits in treating AF. We report a 57-year-old man who was admitted after having an allergic reaction to amiodarone administered to treat paroxysmal AF with fast ventricular response. Cardioversion with intravenous propafenone was uneventful. Before an attempt of electric cardioversion, he was treated with acupuncture as additional therapy to peroral propafenone. After acupuncture treatment consisting of 10 treatments during 30 days period, both immediate cardioversion to sinus rhythm and no paroxysmal AF during 30 days period were recorded.

  15. [Acupuncture and Tuina in Namibia].

    PubMed

    Chu, Hai-lin; Zhu, Cai-yin; Cai, Xiao-ying

    2011-06-01

    The development of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina in Namibia was introduced in the article. The history of acupuncture in Namibia is only 15 years, and there are 3 acupuncturists and Tuina practitioners with permanent resident permit in Namibia. The University of Namibia has already established a medical college, which is now cooperating with the concerning Chinese medical university of China and carrying out education for the undergraduate students. The development of acupuncture-moxibustion and Tuina has a great potential in Namibia with an extensive indication involving diseases of internal medicine, surgery, gynecology, pediatrics, orthopedics, and neurology.

  16. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Ralf C.

    2016-01-01

    persists only during the most intense concentration. For events long enough to differentiate time within the events, fear and thrill can arise and fade in different fine-scale sequences. PMID:27559323

  17. [Cervical tinnitus treated by acupuncture based on "jin" theory: a clinical observation].

    PubMed

    Dong, Youkang; Wang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    To compare the efficacy among acupuncture based on "jin" theory, regular acupuncture and western medication. A total of 95 cases, by using incomplete randomization method, were divided into a "jin" theory acupuncture group (32 cases), a regular acupuncture group (31 cases) and a medication group (32 cases). Patients in the "jin" theory acupuncture group were treated with acupuncture based on "jin" theory which included the "gather" and "knot" points on the affected side: positive reacted points, Fengchi (GB 20), Tianrong (SI 17), Tianyou (TE16) and Yiming (EX-HN14) as the main acupoints, while the Ermen (TE 21), Tinggong (SI 19) and Tinghui (GB 2) and zhigou (TE 6) as the auxiliary acpoints; the treatment was given once a day. Patients in the regular acupuncture group were treated with regular acupuncture at Tinggong (SI 19), Tin- ghui (GB 2) and Ermen (TE 21) and other matched acupoints based on syndrome differentiation, once a day. Pa- tients in the medication group were treated with oral administration of betahistine mesylate, three times a day. Ten days of treatment were taken as one session in three groups, and totally 2 sessions were given. Visual analogue scale (VAS), tinnitus handicap inventory (THD), and tinnitus severity assessment scale (TSIS) were evaluated before and after treatment; also the clinical efficacy was compared among three groups. There are 5 drop-out cases du- ring the study. After the treatment, the VAS, THI and TSIS were improved in three groups (all P < 0.05); the VAS, THI and TSIS in the "jin" theory acupuncture group were lower than those in the regular acupuncture group and medication group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The total effective rate was 90.0% (27/30), 80.0% (24/30) and 63.3% (19/30), which was higher in the "jin" theory acupuncture group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The acupuncture based on "jin" theory is superior to regular acupuncture and western medication for cervical tinnitus.

  18. [Teaching design of mastering scalp acupuncture fast].

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Niu, Wenmin

    2016-05-01

    Scalp acupuncture is a method of treating whole-body diseases. The author takes the easy positioning of scalp acupuncture as starting point, covers the positioning of scalp acupuncture and needle insertion points, acupuncture manipulation and the selection of acupoints, so as to introduce the design of teaching the international standardized scalp acupuncture with texts and illustrations. The positions of scalp acupuncture are 4 lines in frontal area, 5 lines in parietal area, 2 lines in temporal area and 3 lines in occipital area. The needle insertion angle is 30° to the skin. Acupoints can be selected crossly and correspondingly in clinic.

  19. [Acupuncture messenger--Pu Xiang-cheng].

    PubMed

    Du, Huai-bin; Liang, Fan-rong

    2011-06-01

    PU Xiang-cheng is the eminent acupuncture master in modern history of China. He studied diligently in early years and devoted his life to the cause of acupuncture practice and education in Chinese medicine. Combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine, coordination of acupuncture and moxibustion, unique application of acupoints, flexible combination of acupoints and focusing on needling techniques are the essence of his academic thoughts. The life of PU Xiang-cheng, the acupuncture master, and his major academic thoughts are described in this paper, so as to commemorate his contributions to acupuncture theory, practice and promotions.

  20. [Exploration of the application of detective pressing method in LIN's scalp acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Li

    2011-05-01

    The origin, theoretic basis and operation of detective pressing method in clinical application of LIN's scalp acupuncture are introduced in this paper and its advantages in clinical practice are explored. It is found that the therapy could reduce the sense of fear in patients, localize the points precisely, guide treatment and develop the ideas of treatment. Under the guide of modern science in the brain, the therapy could be used to treat much more cerebral diseases.

  1. Practice guidelines for acupuncturists using acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Sarah; Ramjan, Lucie Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder where people intentionally refuse to eat sufficient amounts to maintain a healthy body-weight for fear of becoming fat. The intense preoccupation with restriction of food and control of body weight makes this one of the most complex and confusing conditions for practitioners to treat. While no single treatment has been found to be superior to another in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, general practice guidelines are available to guide mainstream treatment, however there are no guidelines for practitioners of complementary therapies. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture show promise as an adjunctive therapy in improving co-morbidities such as depression and anxiety levels among people with anorexia nervosa, by strengthening mind, body and overall well-being. The aim of this guideline is to assist and support acupuncture practitioners to deliver effective and safe adjunctive acupuncture treatments to people with anorexia nervosa, by providing a practice guideline that is underpinned by an ethical and evidence-based framework. The use of complementary therapies and specifically acupuncture in the treatment of anorexia nervosa may provide important adjunctive care to allow a comprehensive treatment approach that potentially improves quality of life, reduces anxiety and instils hope for recovery. It is hoped that acupuncture practitioners treating patients with anorexia nervosa will refer to these guidelines and apply the guidance (as deemed appropriate).

  2. Information biology of laser acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Laser acupuncture as an alternative, noninvasive, painless and cost-effective therapy is widely used for acute and chronic pain, nausea, circulatory functions, and mood-related behavioral disorders. It was suggested one of the pathways mediated laser acupuncture was from laser biomodulation on acupuncture point cells to autonomic nervous subsystems through meridian. As laser irradiation used for acupuncture is red or infra red, we put forward the following model: at dose 1(100-3 J/m2), the irradiation activates parasympathetic nervous subsystem (PSN); at dose 2(103-5 J/m2), the irradiation activates sympathetic nervous subsystem (SN); at dose 3(105-6 J/m2), the irradiation activates PSN; and at dose 4(106-7 J/m2), the irradiation activates SN. This model was verified by its successful applications.

  3. Acupuncture: A Useful Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Rapson, Linda M.

    1984-01-01

    Scientists have established that acupuncture's effects have a neurophysiological explanation. The procedure can be used to relieve musculoskeletal and facial pain, to treat allergies, headache, anxiety and depression, and to help rehabilitate addicted patients. The response rate is high, especially in patients with musculoskeletal pain or headaches. Clinical outcomes in a large Toronto acupuncture practice have consistently shown that about 80% of patients respond to acupuncture. The incidence of complications and side effects is low. The anatomical approach to this procedure is easily learned and can be incorporated into family practice. Failure to achieve the expected results from acupuncture should raise suspicions that the working diagnosis is incorrect and lead to further investigation. PMID:21283497

  4. Acupuncture therapy for psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has traditionally been used for problems including anxiety, insomnia, stress, and depression in China and other East Asian countries. A range of different neurobiological responses to acupuncture have been investigated including modulation of serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems; effects on GABA and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; and inflammatory responses. Interpretation of the findings is challenging because the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders has yet to be fully elucidated. Limitations also arise from the use of animal models and the selection of appropriate control treatments. Further complexity is added by acupuncture treatment being nonstandardized with acupuncture points often selected on the basis on traditional practice and theory. Potentially promising findings require further investigation and substantiation.

  5. Acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension: study protocol of an open-label multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies using acupuncture to treat essential hypertension have been carried out. However, whether acupuncture is efficacious for hypertension is still controversial. Therefore, this trial aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension. Methods/Design This is a large scale, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial with four parallel arms. We will recruit 428 hypertensive patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 140 and 159 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 90 and 99 mmHg. The participants will be randomly assigned to four different groups (three acupuncture groups and one waiting list group) (1).The affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the affected meridians (2).The non-affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the non-affected meridians (3).The invasive sham acupuncture group (n = 107) is provided with sham acupoints treatment (4).The waiting-list group (n = 107) is not offered any intervention until they complete the trial. Each patient allocated to acupuncture groups will receive 18 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 6 weeks. This trial will be conducted in 11 hospitals in China. The primary endpoint is the change in average 24-hSBP before and 6 weeks after randomization. The secondary endpoints are average SBP and average DBP during the daytime and night-time, and 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36), and so on. Discussion This is the first large scale, multicenter, randomized, sham controlled trial of acupuncture for essential hypertension in China. It may clarify the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for mild hypertension. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01701726 PMID:24216113

  6. Early filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression: a meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiping; Chen, Jing; Chen, Junqi; Li, Xiaohui; Lai, Xueyan; Zhang, Shaoqun; Wang, Shengxu

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression, and to compare acupuncture with the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant drugs. DATA RETRIEVAL: We retrieved data from the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979–2012), Wanfang (1980–2012), VIP (1989–2012), Chinese Biomedical Literature (1975–2012), PubMed (1966–2012), Ovid Lww (–2012), and Cochrane Library (–2012) Database using the internet. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials on filiform needle acupuncture versus antidepressant drugs for treatment of poststroke depression were included. Moreover, the included articles scored at least 4 points on the Jadad scale. Exclusion criteria: other acupuncture therapies as treatment group, not stroke-induced depression patients, score < 4 points, non-randomized controlled trials, or animal trials. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: These were the Hamilton Depression Scale scores, clinical effective rate, Self-Rating Depression Scale scores, Side Effect Rating Scale scores, and incidence of adverse reaction and events. RESULTS: A total of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials were included. Meta-analysis results displayed that after 4 weeks of treatment, clinical effective rate was better in patients treated with filiform needle acupuncture than those treated with simple antidepressant drugs [relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.21, P = 0.01]. At 6 weeks, clinical effective rate was similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. At 2 weeks after filiform needle acupuncture, Hamilton Depression Scale (17 items) scores were lower than in the antidepressant drug group (mean difference = −2.34, 95%CI: −3.46 to −1.22, P < 0.000,1). At 4 weeks, Hamilton Depression Scale (24 items) scores were similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. Self-Rating Depression Scale scores were lower in filiform needle

  7. Acupuncture and related interventions for symptoms of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kang, Jung Won; Choi, Tae-Young; Lee, Jae Dong

    2016-06-28

    outcomes were changes in pain and depression, and occurrence of serious of adverse events. We included 24 studies that involved a total of 1787 participants. Studies reported on various types of acupuncture and related interventions including manual acupuncture and acupressure, ear acupressure, transcutaneous electrical acupuncture point stimulation, far-infrared radiation on acupuncture points and indirect moxibustion. CKD stages included pre-dialysis stage 3 or 4 and end-stage kidney disease on either haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.None of the included studies assessed pain outcomes, nor formally addressed occurrence of serious adverse events, although three studies reported three participant deaths and three hospitalisations as reasons for attrition. Three studies reported minor acupuncture-related harms; the remainder did not report if those events occurred.All studies were assessed at high or unclear risk of bias in terms of allocation concealment. Seventeen studies reported outcomes measured for only two months.There was very low quality of evidence that compared with routine care, manual acupressure reduced scores of the Beck Depression Inventory score (scale from 0 to 63) (3 studies, 128 participants: MD -4.29, 95% CI -7.48 to -1.11, I(2) = 0%), the revised Piper Fatigue Scale (scale from 0 to 10) (3 studies, 128 participants: MD -1.19, 95% CI -1.77 to -0.60, I(2) = 0%), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (scale from 0 to 21) (4 studies, 180 participants: MD -2.46, 95% CI -4.23 to -0.69, I(2) = 50%).We were unable to perform further meta-analyses because of the paucity of data and problems with clinical heterogeneity, such as different interventions, comparisons and timing of outcome measurements. There was very low quality of evidence of the short-term effects of manual acupressure as an adjuvant intervention for fatigue, depression, sleep disturbance and uraemic pruritus in patients undergoing regular haemodialysis. The paucity of evidence indicates

  8. Prevalence of dental fear and phobia relative to other fear and phobia subtypes.

    PubMed

    Oosterink, Floor M D; de Jongh, Ad; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the point prevalence of dental fear and dental phobia relative to 10 other common fears and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR subtypes of specific phobia. Data were also analysed to examine differences with regard to severity, presence of distressing recollections of fear-related events, gender, and prevalence across age. Data were obtained by means of a survey of 1,959 Dutch adults, 18-93 yr of age. Phobias were assessed based on DSM-IV-TR criteria, whereas severity of present fears was assessed using visual analogue scales. The prevalence of dental fear was 24.3%, which is lower than for fear of snakes (34.8%), heights (30.8%), and physical injuries (27.2%). Among phobias, dental phobia was the most common (3.7%), followed by height phobia (3.1%) and spider phobia (2.7%). Fear of dental treatment was associated with female gender, rated as more severe than any other fear, and was most strongly associated with intrusive re-experiencing (49.4%). The findings suggest that dental fear is a remarkably severe and stable condition with a long duration. The high prevalence of dental phobia in the Netherlands is intriguing and warrants investigation in other countries.

  9. Neurobiology of Acupuncture: Toward CAM

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    It has long been accepted that acupuncture, puncturing and scraping needles at certain points on the body, can have analgesic and anesthetic effects, as well as therapeutic effects in the treatment of various diseases. This therapy, including acupuncture anesthesia, has drawn the attention of many investigators and become a research subject of international interest around the world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the nervous system, neurotransmitters, endogenous substances and Jingluo (meridians) may respond to needling stimulation and electrical acupuncture. An abundance of information has now accumulated concerning the neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture, in relation to both neural pathways and neurotransmitters/hormonal factors that mediate autonomic regulation, pain relief and other therapeutics. Early studies demonstrated that the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) are mediated by opioid peptides in the periaqueductal gray. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide plays an important role in mediating the cardiovascular responses to EA stimulation through the gracile nucleus-thalamic pathway. Other substances, including serotonin, catecholamines, inorganic chemicals and amino acids such as glutamate and α-aminobutyric acid (GABA), are proposed to mediate certain cardiovascular and analgesic effects of acupuncture, but at present their role is poorly understood. The increased interest in acupuncture health care has led to an ever-growing number of investigators pursuing research in the processes of the sense of needling touch, transduction of needling stimulation signals, stimulation parameters and placebos. In this Review, the evidence and understanding of the neurobiological processes of acupuncture research have been summarized with an emphasis on recent developments of nitric oxide mediating acupuncture signals through the dorsal medulla-thalamic pathways. PMID:15257325

  10. Identifying danger and anxiety expectancies as components of common fears.

    PubMed

    Gursky, D M; Reiss, S

    1987-12-01

    The hypothesis was the common fears can be analyzed into separate factors for danger and anxiety expectancies. Six scales were constructed to measure danger and anxiety expectancies for the fears of flying, heights, and public speaking. The internal reliabilities of the scales were assessed in Study 1. The unreliable items were then deleted, and the revised scales were assessed in Study 2. The revised scales were found to have a satisfactory degree of internal consistency and test/retest reliability. For each fear, the items of the danger and anxiety expectancy scales were pooled and then submitted to a factor analysis. The danger and anxiety expectancy scales formed separate factors for each fear. The results were near-perfect; 51 of 53 items had factor loadings that were consistent with the distinction between danger and anxiety expectancies. It also was found that danger and anxiety expectancies are specific for each fear; that is, a person can have one fear that is danger-based and another that is anxiety-based. The findings have implications for understanding fears. Future research is suggested to test Reiss and McNally's (1985) hypothesis that desensitization might be more effective than credible placebo in the treatment of danger-based fear but that both desensitization and credible placebo are about equally effective in the treatment of anxiety-based fear.

  11. A tale of two foxes--case reports: 1. Radial nerve paralysis treated with acupuncture in a wild fox. 2. Acupuncture in a fox with aggressive and obsessive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Lorena; Hayhoe, Simon

    2005-12-01

    Case 1. This is believed to be the first report of acupuncture treatment for traumatic radial nerve paralysis in a wild fox. From the first treatment, improvement in the range of mobility and sensation of the limb was evident. Additionally, the attitude of this wild animal changed from fear and aggression to complete cooperation: he lay peacefully during every treatment in a calm, drowsy state. Case 2. This reports the calming effects of acupuncture on a fox which had been showing aggressive behaviour and obsessive circling following toxoplasma infection.

  12. Why acupuncture in pain treatment?

    PubMed

    Ondrejkovicova, Alena; Petrovics, Gabriel; Svitkova, Katarína; Bajtekova, Bibiana; Bangha, Ondrej

    2016-07-01

    Acupuncture is one of the branches of Chinese Traditional Medicine dating back almost 5 000 years. The expansion of China's trade and business relations with other Asian countries brought about the spreading of acupuncture in 7th Century. Nowadays, acupuncture is an interdisciplinary clinical field of Medicine dealing with treatment, diagnostics and prevention of mainly functional disorders, algic, allergic and addictive conditions of various etiology, localization and intensity. It draws from the millennia of experience of Oriental Medicine as well as contemporary knowledge of morphology, physiology and neurophysiology. The acupuncture method is based on influencing the body functions in a precise way by controlled irritation of particular active meridian points using special needles, heat (moxibustion), pressure (acupressure), underpressure (cupping), electricity (electroacupuncture), light (laser therapy), ultrasound (sonopuncture), static or pulsating electromagnetic field (magnetic therapy) and solutions (pharmacopuncture).The use of acupuncture as a method of pain relief in Modern Western Medicine is based on a wide range of clinical trials, and there is no doubt that it has significant effect in the treatment of acute and chronic pain classification. The introduction of gate-control theory and endogenous opioids facilitated the recognition of acupuncture in pain treatment.

  13. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Alexandra; Murchison, Charles; Oken, Barry

    2017-03-01

    Neuropathy and its associated pain pose great therapeutic challenges. While there has been a recent surge in acupuncture use and research, little remains known about its effects on nerve function. This review aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of neuropathy of various etiologies. The Medline, AMED, Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL, and clintrials.gov databases were systematically searched from inception to July 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing acupuncture's efficacy for poly- and mononeuropathy were reviewed. Parallel and crossover RCTs focused on acupuncture's efficacy were reviewed and screened for eligibility. The Scale for Assessing Scientific Quality of Investigations in Complementary and Alternative Medicine was used to assess RCT quality. RCTs with score of >9 and active control treatments such as sham acupuncture or medical therapy were included. Fifteen studies were included: 13 original RCTs, a long-term follow-up, and a re-analysis of a prior RCT. The selected RCTs studied acupuncture for neuropathy caused by diabetes, Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and idiopathic conditions. Acupuncture regimens, control conditions, and outcome measures differed among studies, and various methodological issues were identified. Still, the majority of RCTs showed benefit for acupuncture over control in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy, Bell's palsy, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Acupuncture is probably effective in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathy, and there is insufficient evidence for its benefits in idiopathic neuropathy. Acupuncture appears to improve nerve conduction study parameters in both sensory and motor nerves. Meta-analyses were conducted on all diabetic neuropathy and Bell's palsy individual subject data (six RCTs; a total of 680 subjects) using a summary estimate random effects model, which showed combined odds ratio of 4.23 (95% confidence interval 2.3-7.8; p < 0

  15. Traditional Chinese acupuncture: a potentially useful antiemetic?

    PubMed Central

    Dundee, J W; Chestnutt, W N; Ghaly, R G; Lynas, A G

    1986-01-01

    Two consecutive studies were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as an antiemetic used in addition to premedication with opioids in patients undergoing minor gynaecological operations. In the first study 25 of the 50 patients underwent acupuncture immediately after premedication with 100 mg meptazinol, the rest receiving the drug alone, and in the second 75 patients were allocated randomly to one of three groups: a group receiving 10 mg nalbuphine and acupuncture, a group receiving premedication and dummy acupuncture, and a group receiving premedication alone. Manual needling for five minutes at the P6 acupuncture point (Neiguan) resulted in a significant reduction in perioperative nausea and vomiting in the 50 patients who underwent acupuncture compared with the 75 patients who received no acupuncture. These findings cannot be explained, but it is recommended that the use of acupuncture as an antiemetic should be explored further. PMID:3092933

  16. Pain treatment by means of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Nissel, H

    1993-01-01

    Acupuncture has played an important part in pain research. Bischko was the first in the Western hemisphere to undertake surgery using acupuncture analgesia. This tonsillectomy was performed in 1972. Decisive research work has been carried out at the Ludwig Boltzmann Acupuncture Institute in Vienna. We now have far more knowledge about the importance of the basic system. Furthermore, we know that the theories on chaos research, and, especially the fractals play an important role. Various ways of treating pain by means of acupuncture will be discussed: e.g. body acupuncture (with or without supportive transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation); treatment via the so-called somatotopies (ear, oral mucous membrane, scalp acupuncture according to Yamamoto etc.). The Ludwig Boltzmann Acupuncture Institute, in close collaboration with the II. Dept. of Internal Medicine at the Kaiserin-Elisabeth Hospital, Vienna, has been able to demonstrate on inpatients with a variety of conditions, that acupuncture could significantly reduce the quantity of analgesics required.

  17. Acupuncture for nasal congestion: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sertel, Serkan; Bergmann, Zazie; Ratzlaff, Kerstin; Baumann, Ingo; Greten, Henry Johannes; Plinkert, Peter Karl

    2009-01-01

    Nasal congestion is one of the most common complaints dealt with in otorhinolaryngology. Side effects of decongestants are frequently seen in patients with chronic nasal congestion. This leads to an increasing demand of alternative treatments such as acupuncture. Future studies on acupuncture should aim at objectifying effects by both physical measuring and double blinding. Therefore, we were interested in whether these effects can potentially be measured as increase in nasal airflow (NAF) in ventus ("wind") disease of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Twenty-four patients with a history of nasal congestion due to hypertrophic inferior turbinates or chronic sinusitis without polyposis were additionally diagnosed according to the Heidelberg model of TCM. They were asked to score the severity of their nasal congestion on a visual analog scale (VAS). The acupuncturist was blinded according to the Heidelberg blinding assay. NAF was measured by using active anterior rhinomanometry (ARM). Specific verum acupoints according to the Chinese medical diagnosis were tested against nonspecific control acupoints. VAS and NAF were scored and measured before and 15 and 30 minutes after acupuncture. Control acupuncture showed a significant improvement in VAS and a deterioration of NAF. Verum acupuncture showed highly significant improvements in VAS and NAF. In addition, verum acupuncture improved NAF and VAS significantly over time. Our control and verum acupoints fulfill the condition of a control and verum treatment, respectively. Measuring NAF by RRM and scoring VAS are possible and reflect acupuncture effects in vivo.

  18. [Effects of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) for cerebral function laterality].

    PubMed

    Wang, Linying; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Yang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    To explore the cerebral function laterality of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and provide objective evidences for side selection of Hegu (LI 4) in the clinical application. Eighty healthy volunteers were randomly divided into a left-acupoint group and a right-acupoint group, and they were treated with acupuncture at left Hegu (LI 4) and right Hegu (LI 4) respectively. After the arrival of qi, the task-state fMRI data in both groups was collected, and analysis of functional neuroimages (AFNI) software was used to perform intra-group and between-group comparisons. After acupuncture, acupuncture feelings were recorded and MGH acupuncture sensation scale (MASS) was recorded. The difference of MASS between the two groups was not significant (P>0. 05). The result of left-acupoint group showed an increased signal on right cerebral hemisphere, while the right-acupoint group showed extensive signal changes in both cerebral hemispheres. The analysis between left-acupoint group and retroflex right-acupoint group showed differences in brain areas. The central effect of acupuncture at left and right Hegu (LI 4) is dissymmetry, indicating right hemisphere laterality. The right lobus insularis and cingulate gyrus may be the key regions in the acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4).

  19. Acupuncture for sequelae of Bell's palsy: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Incomplete recovery from facial palsy has a long-term impact on the quality of life, and medical options for the sequelae of Bell's palsy are limited. Invasive treatments and physiotherapy have been employed to relieve symptoms, but there is limited clinical evidence for their effectiveness. Acupuncture is widely used on Bell's palsy patients in East Asia, but there is insufficient evidence for its effectiveness on Bell's palsy sequelae. The objective is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with sequelae of Bell's palsy. Method/Design This study consists of a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group and a waitlist group. The acupuncture group will receive acupuncture treatment three times per week for a total of 24 sessions over 8 weeks. Participants in the waitlist group will not receive any acupuncture treatments during this 8 week period, but they will participate in the evaluations of symptoms at the start of the study, at 5 weeks and at 8 weeks after randomization, at which point the same treatment as the acupuncture group will be provided. The primary outcome will be analyzed by the change in the Facial Disability Index (FDI) from baseline to week eight. The secondary outcome measures will include FDI from baseline to week five, House-Brackmann Grade, lip mobility, and stiffness scales. Trial registration Current Controlled-Trials ISRCTN43104115; registration date: 06 July 2010; the date of the first patient's randomization: 04 August 2010 PMID:21388554

  20. Acupuncture as prophylaxis for menstrual-related migraine: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Menstrual-related migraine is a common form of migraine affecting >50% of female migraineurs. Acupuncture may be a choice for menstrual-related migraine, when pharmacological prophylaxis is not suitable. However, the efficacy of acupuncture has not been confirmed. We design and perform a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared with naproxen in menstrual-related migraine patients. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. A total of 184 participants will be randomly assigned to two different groups. Participants will receive verum acupuncture and placebo medicine in the treatment group, while participants in the control group will be treated with sham acupuncture and medicine (Naproxen Sustained Release Tablets). All treatments will be given for 3 months (menstrual cycles). The primary outcome measures are the change of migraine days inside the menstrual cycle and the proportion of responders (defined as the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in the number of menstrual migraine days). The secondary outcome measures are the change of migraine days outside the menstrual cycle, duration of migraine attack, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and intake of acute medication. The assessment will be made at baseline (before treatment), 3 months (menstrual cycles), and 4 months (menstrual cycles) after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results of this trial will be helpful to supply the efficacy of acupuncture for menstrual-related migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57133712 PMID:24195839

  1. [ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a clinical observation].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Zhang, Xinghua; Sun, Runjie; Qin, Xiaoguang

    2016-04-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences between Zheng's gold hook, fishing acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Sixty patients of LDH were randomly allocated to a gold hook fishing acupuncture group and an EA group, 30 cases in each one. Lumbar Jiaji (EX-1 B 2), Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Shenshu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25), Guanyuanshu (BL 26) and ashi points were selected in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group; after the needles were inserted, the manipulation of gold hook fishing acupuncture was applied at tendon junction points and ashi points. The identical acupoints were selected in the EA group and patients were treated with EA. The treatment was both given once a day; ten days of treatment were taken as one session, and totally 3 sessions were given. The clinical effective rate, visual analogue scale (VAS), low back pain score and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used for efficacy evaluation. The effective rate was 93.3% (28/30) in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group, which was superior to 86.7% (26/30) in the EA group (P < 0.05). The VAS, low back pain score and ODI were both significantly improved after treatment (all P < 0.05), which were more significant in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group (all P < 0.05). ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture could effectively improve the symptoms and sings of LDH, reduce the disability index and improve the quality of life, which is superior to EA.

  2. Efficacy of Yamamoto new scalp acupuncture versus Traditional Chinese acupuncture for migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Mehran; Yaraghi, Ahmad; Mohseni, Masood; Fathimoghadam, Farshid

    2014-05-01

    Traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA) is an effective alternative treatment in migraine headache. The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic effect of Yamamoto new scalp acupuncture (YNSA), a recently developed microcupuncture system, with TCA for the prophylaxis and treatment of migraine headache. In a randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with migraine headache were assigned to receive YNSA or TCA. A pain visual analogue scale (VAS) and migraine therapy assessment questionnaire (MTAQ) were completed before treatment, after 6 and 18 sections of treatment, and 1 month after completion of therapy. All the recruited patients completed the study. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Frequency and severity of migraine attacks, nausea, the need for rescue treatment, and work absence rate decreased similarly in both groups. Recovery from headache and ability to continue daily activities 2 hours after medical treatment showed similar improvement in both groups (p>0.05). Classic acupuncture and YNSA are similarly effective in the prophylaxis and treatment of migraine headache and may be considered as alternatives to pharmacotherapy.

  3. Chronic respiratory conditions and acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C

    1992-03-01

    Acupuncture effectively enhances the treatment of chronic allergic bronchitis and asthma in the cat and dog. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, chronic respiratory conditions can arise from lung, spleen/pancreas, liver or kidney deficiencies. Proper diagnosis is made from patient history, as well as examination of tongue and pulse. Acupuncture points are chosen according to involved energy pathways (meridians) and classical acupuncture combinations. In most cases, medication can be reduced as the acupuncture takes effect.

  4. Personal Fear of Death and Grief in Bereaved Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Peter; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the relation of fear of death (Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) to maternal grief (Perinatal Grief Scale-33) following miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, or infant/child death. The 400 women participants were recruited from the website, e-mail lists, and parent groups of an organization that supports bereaved parents.…

  5. Personal Fear of Death and Grief in Bereaved Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Peter; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the relation of fear of death (Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) to maternal grief (Perinatal Grief Scale-33) following miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, or infant/child death. The 400 women participants were recruited from the website, e-mail lists, and parent groups of an organization that supports bereaved parents.…

  6. Attachment Without Fear.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C

    2009-12-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, openness, and dependence interact with the caregiving elements of caring, empathy, and responsibility.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Acupuncture as Treatment for Complications of Cerebrovascular Accidents: A Randomized, Sham-Controlled, Subject- and Assessor-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Wen-Chao; Chen, Chun-Chung; Chang, Chia-chi; Chen, Liang-Yu; Lee, De-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The effect of acupuncture as treatment for poststroke complications is questionable. We performed a randomized, sham-controlled double-blind study to investigate it. Methods. Patients with first-time acute stroke were randomized to receive 24 sessions of either real or sham acupuncture during an eight-week period. The primary outcome measure was change in National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Secondary outcome measures included changes in Barthel Index (BI), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain scores. Results. Of the 52 patients who were randomized to receive acupuncture (n = 28) or placebo (n = 24), 10 patients in the acupuncture group and 9 patients in the placebo group failed to complete the treatment. In total, 18 patients in the acupuncture group and 15 patients in the control group completed the treatment course. Reduction in pain was significantly greater in the acupuncture group than in the control group (p value = 0.04). There were no significant differences in the other measures between the two groups. Conclusions. Acupuncture provided more effective poststroke pain relief than sham acupuncture treatment. However, acupuncture had no better effect on neurological, functional, and psychological improvement. PMID:28408941

  8. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J; Solomon, L M; Lichter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of acupuncture on histamine-induced itch and flare in healthy volunteers (n = 25) and compared it with the effect of a pseudo-acupuncture procedure and of no-intervention in a single-blind randomized cross-over study. A cumulative itch index is defined and was found to be smaller with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.02) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.005). The duration of itching was shorter with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p = 0.006) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.001). In addition, maximal flare area was decreased with acupuncture compared with pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.04) and with no intervention (p = 0.003). Acupuncture had little or no effect on the itch onset time or on the maximal itch intensity after intradermal injection of histamine. Measurements of itching correlated poorly with measurements of flare size in all three experimental groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective inhibitor of histamine-induced itch and flare. Moreover, acupuncture points displayed specificity in that needling near-by, non-acupuncture sites resulted in greater itching and larger flares.

  9. Measuring the Tangible Fear of Heterosexist Violence.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Asquith, Nicole L

    2015-11-25

    Fear of crime (FoC) has dominated the political landscape over the last 20 years, with many crime policy developments during this period linked not to actual experiences of violence but to the fear of victimization. Fear of crime studies, in most cases, are conducted with populations that have only a passing, mediated knowledge of crime victimization. The research discussed in this article, in contrast, considers the impact of FoC with a highly victimized community, and establishes psychometric testing to validate an instrument to measure the impact of that fear (Fear of Heterosexism Scale [FoHS]). If FoC is related to experiences of crime as the existing research suggests, then victims of heterosexist prejudice, discrimination, and/or violence would be more likely to fear such incidents in the future. It was also predicted that participants who concealed their sexual and/or gender identity and had lower levels of social connectedness would experience higher levels of fear. The findings highlight the importance of contextual factors in FoH, and identify the critical roles that disclosure and social connectedness play in ameliorating the damaging effects of heterosexist victimization. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. WITHDRAWN: Acupuncture for neck disorders.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Kien; Graham, Nadine; Irnich, Dominik; Cameron, Ian D; Forget, Mario

    2016-11-17

    Neck pain is one of the three most frequently reported complaints of the musculoskeletal system. Treatments for neck pain are varied, as are perceptions of benefit. Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain. This update replaces our 2006 Cochrane review update on this topic. To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015. We searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005. We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two review authors made independent decisions for each step of the review: article inclusion, data abstraction and assessment of quality of trial methods. We assessed study quality by using the Cochrane Back Review Group 'Risk of bias' tool. We used consensus to resolve disagreements, and when clinical heterogeneity was absent, we combined studies by using random-effects meta-analysis models. Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non

  11. Acupuncture-Related Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Robert T.; Simeon, Erika; Moren, Alexis; Rowell, Susan; Watters, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture-related pneumothorax (PTX) is a poorly reported complication of thoracic needling. Recent Chinese literature reviews cited PTXs as the most common adverse outcome. Because of delayed presentation, this complication is thought to be underrecognized by acupuncturists and is largely addressed by hospital and emergency room personnel. The goal of this case study was to demonstrate common risk factors for a PTX, the mechanisms for its development, and protocols to use if one is suspected. Case: A 43-year-old, athletic female with chronic neck pain that was poorly managed with oral medications sought an alternative intervention for pain control. Her treatment plan consisted of weekly acupuncture sessions in the prone and supine positions targeting points along the Bladder, Gall Bladder, and Small Intestine meridians, as well as the right scapular Ah Shi point. She also received infrared lamp therapy. The aim of this approach was to help the patient achieve subjective pain reduction and increased range of motion. Results: One hour after her third treatment session, this patient experienced pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. She was transported to a local Level-1 trauma center by emergency medical services and was diagnosed with a right-sided PTX. Conclusions: The acupoints addressed, a practitioner's knowledge of variations in anatomy, and a patient's body habitus and medical history are risk factors for PTX development. A patient's initial presentation does not predict future outcome. A benign presentation can evolve into a potentially life-threatening cardiovascular collapse. When PTX is suspected, discussing it with the patient and facilitating appropriate evaluation and intervention by a tertiary-care facility is warranted. PMID:25184016

  12. Meta-analysis of acupuncture for relieving non-organic dyspeptic symptoms suggestive of diabetic gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is widely used to treat diabetic patients with dyspeptic symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis in China. We conducted this systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for diabetic gastroparesis (DGP). Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and four Chinese databases including China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and WanFang Data up to January 2013 without language restriction. Eligible RCTs were designed to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in improving dyspeptic symptoms and gastric emptying in DGP. Risk of bias, study design and outcomes were extracted from trials. Relative risk (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Mean difference (MD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) were selected for continuous data to pool the overall effect. Results We searched 744 studies, among which 14 RCTs were considered eligible. Overall, acupuncture treatment had a higher response rate than controls (RR, 1.20 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12 to 1.29], P < 0.00001), and significantly improved dyspeptic symptoms compared with the control group. There was no difference in solid gastric emptying between acupuncture and control. Acupuncture improved single dyspeptic symptom such as nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and stomach fullness. However, most studies were in unclear and high risk of bias and with small sample size (median = 62). The majority of the RCTs reported positive effect of acupuncture in improving dyspeptic symptoms. Conclusions The results suggested that acupuncture might be effective to improve dyspeptic symptoms in DGP, while a definite conclusion about whether acupuncture was effective for DGP could not be drawn due to the low quality of trials and possibility of publication bias. Further large-scale, high

  13. A clinical study of integrating acupuncture and Western medicine in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Pey; Chang, Ching-Mao; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Ta-Peng; Yang, Jen-Lin; Kung, Yen-Ying; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Complementary therapy with acupuncture for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied for quite a long time, but the effectiveness of the treatment still remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the integrated effects of acupuncture treatment in PD patients who received western medicine. In the short-term acupuncture treatment study, 20 patients received acupuncture therapy twice a week in acupoints DU 20, GB 20, LI 11, LI 10, LI 4, GB 31, ST 32, GB 34 and GB 38 along with western medicine for 18 weeks, and 20 controlled patients received western medicine only. In the long-term acupuncture treatment, 13 patients received acupuncture treatment twice a week for 36 weeks. The outcome parameters include Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory-Version 2 (BDI-II), and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL). In the short-term clinical trial, a higher percentage of patients in the acupuncture group had score improvement in UPDRS total scores (55% vs. 15%, p = 0.019), sub-score of mind, behavior and mood (85% vs. 25%, p < 0.001), activity of daily living (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003), mobility (40% vs. 15%, p = 0.155) and complication of treatment (75% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), BDI-II score (85% vs. 35%, p = 0.003), and WHOQOL score (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003) when compared to control group at the end of the 18 weeks' follow up. After 36 weeks of long-term acupuncture treatment, the mean UPDRS total scores and sub-score of mentation, behavior and mood, sub-score of complications of therapy and BDI-II score decreased significantly when compared to the pretreatment baseline. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment had integrated effects in reducing symptoms and signs of mind, behavior, mood, complications of therapy and depression in PD patients who received Western medicine.

  14. The effect of acupuncture on the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis--an open randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tukmachi, Emad; Jubb, Ronald; Dempsey, Emma; Jones, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Using an open randomised controlled study, we examined the effectiveness of manual and electroacupuncture on symptom relief for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee were randomised to one of three treatment groups. Group A had acupuncture alone, group B had acupuncture but continued on their symptomatic medication, and group C used their symptomatic medication for the first five weeks and then had a course of acupuncture added. Patients receiving acupuncture were treated twice weekly over five weeks. Needles were inserted (with manual and electrical stimulation) in acupuncture points for pain and stiffness, selected according to traditional acupuncture theory for treating Bi syndrome. Patients were assessed by a blinded observer before treatment, after five weeks' treatment and at one month follow up, using a visual analogue pain scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) questionnaire for osteoarthritis of the knee. The 30 patients in our study were well matched for age, body mass index, disease duration, baseline VAS pain score and baseline WOMAC scores. Repeated measure analyses gave a highly significant improvement in pain (VAS) after the courses of acupuncture in groups A (P = 0.012) and B (P=0.001); there was no change in group C until after the course of acupuncture, when the improvement was significant (P = 0.001). Similarly significant changes were seen with the WOMAC pain and stiffness scores. These benefits were maintained during the one month after the course of acupuncture. Patients' rating of global assessment was higher than that of the acupuncturist. We conclude that manual and electroacupuncture causes a significant improvement in the symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee, either on its own or as an adjunct therapy, with no loss of benefit after one month.

  15. Randomized sham-controlled trial of acupuncture for postoperative pain control after stapled haemorrhoidopexy.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, M R; Aydemir-Dogruyol, K; Issel, R; Sauerland, S

    2012-08-01

    Haemorrhoidectomy usually causes moderate to strong postoperative pain. Chinese studies have found that acupuncture may have an analgesic effect in posthaemorrhoidectomy patients. This is the first Western study aiming assess the efficacy of acupuncture as an adjunct analgesic therapy after stapled haemorrhoidopexy. In a randomized controlled trial, 50 patients were allocated to three groups. Conventional drug therapy (oral diclofenac and metamizol, local lidocaine) served as baseline analgesia. In the control group (n = 17) only this regimen was used. In addition to baseline analgesia, 17 patients received verum acupuncture. Sham acupuncture was performed on 16 patients. Being the primary outcome measure, pain was measured twice daily using the numerical rating scale (NRS) and compared statistically by repeated-measures analysis of variance. The study was registered (DRKS00003116). Results  After verum acupuncture, pain intensity was not significantly lower when compared with conventional analgesia (primary hypothesis, P = 0.057), but was when compared to sham acupuncture (P = 0.007). In the afternoon of postoperative day 1, for example, NRS was 2.7 (SD 1.5) in the verum group, but 4.0 (1.0) in the sham group and 4.1 (1.9) under conventional analgesia. Furthermore, significantly fewer rescue analgesics were necessary if verum acupuncture was applied. Cardiovascular parameters were stable in all three groups, and no complications were recorded. In posthaemorrhoidectomy patients, acupuncture appears to be an effective adjunct to conventional analgesia. Further studies are necessary to confirm these observations and to refine the acupuncture technique. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Types of Control in Acupuncture Clinical Trials Might Affect the Conclusion of the Trials: A Review of Acupuncture on Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyong; Ning, Zhipeng; Lam, Wing Lok; Lam, Wai-Yee; Zhao, Ying Ke; Yeung, Jerry Wing Fai; Ng, Bacon Fung-Leung; Ziea, Eric Tat-Chi; Lao, Lixing

    2016-10-01

    Analgesic effects of acupuncture have been extensively studied in various clinical trials. However, the conclusion remains controversial, even among large scale randomized controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the association between the conclusion of the trials and the types of control used in those trials via systematic review. Published randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for pain were retrieved from electronic databases (Medline, AMED, Cochrane libraries, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Clinicaltrials.gov, and CAB Abstracts) using a prespecified search strategy. One hundred and thirty-nine studies leading to 166 pairs of acupuncture-control treatment effect comparisons (26 studies comprised of 53 intervention-control pairs) were analyzed based on the proportion of positive conclusions in different control designs. We found that treatment effects of acupuncture compared with nontreatment controls had the highest tendency to yield a positive conclusion (84.3%), compared with nonneedle-insertion controls (53.3%). Whereas with needle-insertion controls, the lowest tendency of positive conclusions was observed (37.8%). Consistently, in studies reporting successful blinding, a higher tendency of positive findings on the treatment effect of acupuncture was found in the noninsertion sham controls compared with that in the insertion sham controls. We conclude that the type of control is likely to affect the conclusion in acupuncture analgesic trials. Appropriate control should be chosen according to the aims of studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Children's specific fears.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, H; Vostanis, P; Dogra, N; Doos, L; Ford, T; Goodman, R

    2009-11-01

    Most children experience some degree of fear during their development. Specific fears are considered as an appropriate response provided that they are proportionate to the intensity of the perceived threat. Our aim is to present the prevalence of specific fears among children in the Great Britain, their socio-demographic correlates, in particular their association with ethnicity. Data on the child's experience of specific fears were obtained from parents of a national representative sample of 5- to 16-year-olds using the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Biographic, socio-demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the child and the family were included in the questionnaire. About one-third of children were assessed by their parents as having at least one of 12 specific fears. The most commonly reported fears were animals (11.6%), blood/injections (10.8%) and the dark (6.3%). Just less than 1% of all children were assessed according to International Classification of Diseases research diagnostic criteria as having a specific phobia. Biographic, socio-demographic and socioeconomic factors were independently associated with a greater likelihood of a child having particular fears. The most marked associations were fears of the dark, loud noises, imagined supernatural beings in younger children and fear of animals among girls and all non-white groups. Although fears are only labelled as phobias when they impair functioning and interfere with life, they can cause personal distress to children and also can interfere with their daily activities. Children's fears differ in nature across different ethnic groups. Culturally mediated beliefs, values and traditions may play a role in their expression.

  18. Acupuncture and women’s health: an overview of the role of acupuncture and its clinical management in women’s reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Suzanne; Smith, Caroline A; Possamai-Inesedy, Alphia; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture and other modalities of Chinese/East Asian medicine have been used to treat women’s health for many centuries. Gynecology specialties focus particularly on menstrual and reproductive disorders. Both the adoption of the use of acupuncture outside Asia, and the incorporation of scientific analysis in Asia have challenged biomedical conceptions of what can be achieved with this treatment method. The scale of research activity in relation to acupuncture and women’s health has increased over the last 20 years. Objective This review aims to explore the research evidence in relation to acupuncture use for women’s reproductive disorders, focusing on both clinical findings and experimental research on acupuncture’s mechanisms of action in relation to women’s health. Methods A narrative literature search was undertaken using searches of electronic databases and manual searches of journals and textbooks. The search included all literature published prior to June 2013. The literature was assessed as to the nature of the study it was reporting and findings synthesized into a commentary. Results For acupuncture’s mechanism of action the search resulted in 114 relevant documents; in relation to clinical reports on the use of acupuncture for women’s health 204 documents were found and assessed. Conclusion There is preliminary data indicating acupuncture may improve menstrual health and coping for women experiencing delays falling pregnant. There is experimental data showing that acupuncture can influence female reproductive functioning, although the actual mechanisms involved are not yet clarified. Further well-conducted clinical research would benefit our understanding of the usefulness of acupuncture to women’s health. PMID:24669195

  19. [A conceptual framework of the effectiveness of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chien-Ching; Wang, Chiu-Hua; Maa, Suh-Hwa

    2007-08-01

    The term, "Acupuncture," is used in its broadest senses to refer to needling, moxibustion, acupressure, laser acupuncture, electric acupuncture, and microsystem acupuncture, such as ear, face, hand and scalp acupuncture. Numerous surveys show that, of all the complementary medical systems, acupuncture enjoys the most credibility in the medical community. This article introduces a conceptual framework of the effectiveness of acupuncture from the perspective of responses to acupuncture shown in extensive, basic scientific evidence. The researchers hope, through this review of literature, to enable medical personnel to gain something of an understanding of acupuncture.

  20. A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients: descriptive analysis from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kit; Cheng, Mok-Chung Jennifer; Ge, Xiaoying; Berger, Ann; Xu, Dihua; Kato, Gregory J; Minniti, Caterina P

    2014-09-01

    This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. We identified 47 sickle cell disease patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January 2005 and September 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of sickle cell disease and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient vs. outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 y) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported >3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis. Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and 4 patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute vaso-occlusive crisis, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (P<0.0001). Excluding the 2 outliers, 75% of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared with prior session. To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture's efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for

  1. Acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes.

    PubMed

    Dodin, Sylvie; Blanchet, Claudine; Marc, Isabelle; Ernst, Edzard; Wu, Taixiang; Vaillancourt, Caroline; Paquette, Joalee; Maunsell, Elizabeth

    2013-07-30

    Hot flushes are the most common menopausal vasomotor symptom. Hormone therapy (HT) has frequently been recommended for relief of hot flushes, but concerns about the health risks of HT have encouraged women to seek alternative treatments. It has been suggested that acupuncture may reduce hot flush frequency and severity. To determine whether acupuncture is effective and safe for reducing hot flushes and improving the quality of life of menopausal women with vasomotor symptoms. We searched the following databases in January 2013: the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP database, Dissertation Abstracts International, Current Controlled Trials, Clinicaltrials.gov, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), BIOSIS, AMED, Acubriefs, and Acubase. Randomized controlled trials comparing any type of acupuncture to no treatment/control or other treatments for reducing menopausal hot flushes and improving the quality of life of symptomatic perimenopausal/postmenopausal women were eligible for inclusion. Sixteen studies, with 1155 women, were eligible for inclusion. Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality, and extracted data. We pooled data where appropriate and calculated mean differences (MDs) and standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated the overall quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Eight studies compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. No significant difference was found between the groups for hot flush frequency (MD -1.13 flushes per day, 95% CI -2.55 to 0.29, 8 RCTs, 414 women, I(2) = 70%, low-quality evidence

  2. Is acupuncture efficacious therapy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to assess the evidences from recent clinical studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease. Relevant literatures were searched from 13 databases under the condition "published between 2000 and 2012" with language restrictions. Eleven studies were indentified including 6 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 4 uncontrolled open label studies, and 1 crossover trial. The number of trials, and their total sample size were not enough to prove the favorable effects of acupuncture. Five studies failed to report proper diagnostic criteria for enrollment. Two of the 6 RCTs did not include the randomization methods and whether the assessors were blinded. Drop-outs were unreported or insufficiently reported in 2 trials. Three RCTs compared the effects of acupuncture with placebo acupuncture. Two of these trials failed to show superiority of acupuncture. One RCT showed beneficial effects of constitutional acupuncture, but not needle acupuncture. Three RCTs that assessed the effects of acupuncture adjunctive to conventional drugs reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. The placebo response to acupuncture was not excluded, because there was no control acupuncture group in these studies. Two uncontrolled studies showed significant positive effects of acupuncture, while other two uncontrolled trials failed. There were no recognized validated acupuncture treatment protocols and a lack of consensus on the location of acupoints. Safety and tolerability were reported only in 5 studies. No study evaluated the long-lasting effect of acupuncture following cessation of the treatment. To date, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating Parkinson's disease is not convincing. There are needs for further studies with improved methodological quality.

  3. [Interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture combined with occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment in stroke: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Pei, Jian; Cui, Xiao; Sun, Kexing; Ni, Huanhuan; Zhou, Cuixia; Wu, Ji; Huang, Mei; Ji, Li

    2015-10-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on upper limb motor impairment in stroke between the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture therapy and the traditional scalp acupuncture therapy. The randomized controlled trial and MINIMIZE layering randomization software were adopted. Seventy patients of upper limb with III to V grade in Brunnstrom scale after stroke were randomized into an interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group and a traditional scalp acupuncture group, 35 cases in each one. In the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group, the middle 2/5 of Dingnieqianxiexian (anterior oblique line of vertex-temporal), the middle 2/5 of Dingniehouxiexian (posterior oblique line of vertex-temporal) and Dingpangerxian (lateral line 2 of vertex) on the affected side were selected as the stimulation areas. Additionally, the rehabilitation training was applied during scalp acupuncture treatment. In the traditional scalp acupuncture group, the scalp stimulation areas were same as the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group. But the rehabilitation training was applied separately. The rehabilitation training was applied in the morning and the scalp acupuncture was done in the afternoon. The results in Fugl-Meyer for the upper limb motor function (U-FMA), the Wolf motor function measure scale (WM- FT) and the modified Barthel index in the two groups were compared between the two groups before treatment and in 1 and 2 months of treatment, respectively. After treatment, the U-FMA score, WMFT score and the score of the modified Barthel index were all apparently improved as compared with those before treatment (all P < 0.01). The improvement in the U-FMA score after treatment in the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture group was better than that in the traditional scalp acupuncture group (P < 0.05). For the patients of IV to V grade in Brunnstrom scale, WMFT score in 2 months of treatment and the score of Barthel index after treatment in the interactive dynamic scalp acupuncture

  4. Effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture versus Sham Acupuncture: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Luís; da Cruz, Lóris Aparecida Prado; Leopoldo, Vanessa Cristina; de Campos, Fabrício Ribeiro; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and synthesize the evidence from randomized clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of traditional Chinese acupuncture in relation to sham acupuncture for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women with breast cancer. Method: systematic review guided by the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Citations were searched in the following databases: MEDLINE via PubMed, Web of Science, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and LILACS. A combination of the following keywords was used: breast neoplasm, acupuncture, acupuncture therapy, acupuncture points, placebos, sham treatment, hot flashes, hot flushes, menopause, climacteric, and vasomotor symptoms. Results: a total of 272 studies were identified, five of which were selected and analyzed. Slight superiority of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture was observed; however, there were no strong statistical associations. Conclusions: the evidence gathered was not sufficient to affirm the effectiveness of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. PMID:27533271

  5. [Inheritance and evolution of acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times].

    PubMed

    Yu, Daxiong; Ma, Ruijie; Fang, Jianqiao

    2015-05-01

    There are many eminent acupuncture masters in modern times in the regions of Zhejiang province, which has developed the acupuncture schools of numerous characteristics and induces the important impacts at home and abroad. Through the literature collection on the acupuncture schools in Zhejiang and the interviews to the parties involved, it has been discovered that the acupuncture manipulation techniques of acupuncture masters in modern times are specifically featured. Those techniques are developed on the basis of Neijing (Internal Classic), Jinzhenfu (Ode to Gold Needle) and Zhenjiu Dacheng (Great Compendium of Acupuncture and Moxibustion). No matter to obey the old maxim or study by himself, every master lays the emphasis on the research and interpretation of classical theories and integrates the traditional with the modern. In the paper, the acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times are stated from four aspects, named needling techniques in Internal Classic, feijingzouqi needling technique, penetrating needling technique and innovation of acupuncture manipulation.

  6. Review of clinical applications of scalp acupuncture for paralysis: an excerpt from chinese scalp acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jason Jishun; Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-03-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years.

  7. Review of Clinical Applications of Scalp Acupuncture for Paralysis: An Excerpt From Chinese Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years. PMID:24278807

  8. Acupuncture for the treatment or management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Coeytaux, Remy R; Garland, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports the safety and efficacy of acupuncture compared with no treatment, but it is unclear what role the placebo effect plays in acupuncture's efficacy. In determining whether acupuncture is indicated for a given individual or patient population, clinicians should consider acupuncture's effectiveness compared with no acupuncture--as well as the effectiveness, safety, and cost of alternative types of treatment.

  9. [Status quo and progress of Chinese acupuncture in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yisheng

    2015-10-01

    The development of Chinese acupuncture in Algeria and realistic working status in recent years is in- troduced. From five aspects, including general condition of acupuncture in Algeria, clinical application and analysis, of acupuncture, promotion and publicity of acupuncture, existing problem and deficiency, and awards and honor, the status quo and progress of Chinese acupuncture in Algeria are discussed in detail.

  10. Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES)-a useful tool to practice and learn medical acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chi Fai David; Leung, Kwong Sak; Heng, Pheng Ann; Lim, Chi Eung Danforn; Wong, Felix Wu Shun

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) that will assist the learning and practice of medical acupuncture. This was the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System which incorporated eight functional modules. These modules were 1) Add Patient Record subsystem; 2) Diagnosis subsystem ; 3) Acupuncture Prescription subsystem ; 4) Needle Insertion Position Animation subsystem ; 5) Acupuncture Points Usage Statistic subsystem ; 6) History Query subsystem; 7) Acupuncture Points Query subsystem and 8) Diagnosis Remarks and Diagnosis Record Save subsystem. Two databases were built-Patient Record database and Diagnosis (Acupuncture) Knowledge database. All the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) knowledge and acupuncture treatment prescriptions were extracted from officially used TCM textbooks and received guidance and expert advice from two acupuncturists working in this project. A Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) was built, which after the input from users of any Chinese disease symptoms and signs, it can provide a list of related TCM syndrome diagnoses based on the patients' disease symptoms and signs, and at the same time it can offer advice of the appropriate Chinese acupuncture treatment to the users. CAES also provided text descriptions and acupuncture animations showing the acupoint locations and the direction and depth of the needle insertion technique. Therefore users can easily learn acupuncture and practice it. This new acupuncture expert system will hopefully provide an easy way for users to learn and practice Chinese Acupuncture and establish its usefulness after it was fully evaluated.

  11. Coping with Fear of Recurrence

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Fear of Recurrence Request Permissions Coping With Fear of Recurrence Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... affects your life. Tips for coping with the fear of recurrence Living with uncertainty is never easy. ...

  12. The balance effect of acupuncture therapy among stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Yang, Tsung-Hsien; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Li-Fong

    2014-08-01

    To analyze how acupuncture therapy affects balance in patients experiencing their first stroke and to identify the stroke group with greatest improvement in balance after acupuncture intervention. Retrospective case-control study. Ward of a medical university hospital. A total of 629 stroke patients were enrolled initially; 345 patients met the study criteria and 132 were analyzed (66 each in the study and control groups). The study group received physiotherapy combined with acupuncture and the control group received only physiotherapy. The Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patients (PASS) was used to evaluate balance. This balance scale system can be subdivided into static balance (PASS-MP, maintain posture) and dynamic balance (PASS-CP, change posture). This study revealed no statistically significant improvement of balance in the study group (t test). When patients with high Brunnstrom stage (Br stage) and low Br stage were analyzed separately, once again no statistical difference was detected between the study and control groups of those with high Br stage. However, among low-Br stage patients, the study group showed significant improvement in static balance (mean PASS-MP score±standard deviation: 4.7±3.7) compared with the control group (PASS-MP score: 2.8±2.7) (p<0.05). In first-ever stroke patients with a low Br stage, acupuncture therapy can improve static balance during rehabilitation. However, the effect on balance was limited among high-Br stage patients. This study provides information valuable to patients with hemiplegic stroke because it suggests that acupuncture can be used to improve balance. A prospective double-blind, randomized, controlled study design is recommended for future studies in patients with hemiplegic stroke.

  13. A Real Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2007-01-01

    For years, mainstream thinking about math anxiety assumed that people fear math because they are bad at it. However, a growing body of research shows a much more complicated relationship between math ability and anxiety. It is true that people who fear math have a tendency to avoid math-related classes, which decreases their math competence.…

  14. A Real Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2007-01-01

    For years, mainstream thinking about math anxiety assumed that people fear math because they are bad at it. However, a growing body of research shows a much more complicated relationship between math ability and anxiety. It is true that people who fear math have a tendency to avoid math-related classes, which decreases their math competence.…

  15. Fear of Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Steve

    Fear of success in a group of high school students (N=127) was studied, with research findings supporting the following generalizations: (1) high school students with an intermediate level of self-esteem have greater fear of success than those with high and low levels of self-esteem; (2) high school students with BSRI (Bem Sex Role Inventory)…

  16. Faith and Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    People are living in times when fear often trumps all other emotions. The ability to increase trust between people by diminishing the fear they feel toward each other can be the key to a happy and successful life. Many of the controversies seen in schools over curriculum are really about protecting personal values. The irony in this is that people…

  17. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  18. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addiction treatments. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (n = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program.

  19. The Holistic Effects of Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Qian-Qian; Li, Fang; Fu, Qing-Nan; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), as a complex medical science which reflects philosophical principles and embodies large dialectical thought, is used to place the human body into a large system for observation. Acupuncture as a vital part of TCM, has been practiced to treat various diseases and symptoms. However, acupuncture is also facing severe challenges resulted from insufficient modern scientific research. Nowadays, the holistic effects of acupuncture can be researched by some modern approaches, such as the systems biology and fMRI technique. It is believed that having a better understand will greatly promote acupuncture research and be beneficial to scientization and modernization of acupuncture. PMID:24527051

  20. Acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine for survivors of torture and refugee trauma: a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Ellen Silver; Lama, Puja; Grodin, Michael A; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Crosby, Sondra S

    2012-06-01

    Refugees with trauma histories are a difficult medical population to treat. Acupuncture care has gained acceptance in many mainstream hospitals in the United States, but research on acupuncture and refugee populations is limited. Herein, we report our experiences with 50 refugees (total acupuncture treatments = 425) at a major tertiary teaching hospital. Patients often reported extreme trauma including physical torture, rape and witnessing the same in family members. Patients represented 13 different countries, with about half the patients being Somali. The primary complaint of all patients was pain (100%). Using the Wong-Baker Faces Pain scale, 56% patients reported pain decreases. Patient acceptance of acupuncture was high. We provide three case histories as illustrative examples. Further research is warranted.

  1. Acupuncture injection for field amplified sample stacking and glass microchip-based capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture sample injection is a simple method to deliver well-defined nanoliter-scale sample plugs in PDMS microfluidic channels. This acupuncture injection method in microchip CE has several advantages, including minimization of sample consumption, the capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into the same microchannel, and the capability of injecting sample plugs into any desired position of a microchannel. Herein, we demonstrate that the simple and cost-effective acupuncture sample injection method can be used for PDMS microchip-based field amplified sample stacking in the most simplified straight channel by applying a single potential. We achieved the increase in electropherogram signals for the case of sample stacking. Furthermore, we present that microchip CGE of ΦX174 DNA-HaeⅢ digest can be performed with the acupuncture injection method on a glass microchip while minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware.

  2. Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Hun; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk; Son, Dong Wuk; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun-Sung; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (≤1 week) after back surgery. Methods We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. Results Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.67 (−1.04 to −0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.23 (−0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). Conclusion Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required. PMID:24766648

  3. Traditional Chinese medicine (tongue acupuncture) in children with drooling problems.

    PubMed

    Wong, V; Sun, J G; Wong, W

    2001-07-01

    Tongue acupuncture is an innovative technique in traditional Chinese medicine. We have demonstrated that specific tongue acupoints are related to various functional domains. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of tongue acupuncture in children with neurologic disability who had severe drooling problems. We conducted an intent-to-treat study in a cohort of 10 children. A continuous course of tongue acupuncture was performed daily to five acupoints in the tongue for a total of 30 sessions. Standardized outcome measures of drooling were evaluated by a blinded assessor to study the efficacy at baseline and after a course of treatment. Statistically significant improvement was noted in the following outcome measures: (1) mean visual analog scale (VAS) decreased from 6.6 (pre-TAC) to 4.67 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002); (2) mean drooling quotient (DQ) decreased from 14.016% (pre-TAC) to 8.335% (post-TAC) (P = 0.0078); and (3) mean drooling score (DS) decreased from 7.4 (pre-TAC) to 4.4 (post-TAC) (P = 0.002). This study demonstrated the efficacy of tongue acupuncture as an adjunctive or alternative treatment for patients with drooling problems and can be integrated as part of the oromotor stimulation program, drooling program, and behavioral modification program before subjecting the patient to invasive surgical procedures on the salivary glands.

  4. Acupuncture in the management of acute dental pain.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Cássia Maria; Wada, Ronaldo Seichi; da Luz Rosário de Sousa, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Acute dental pain is the main reason for seeking dental services to provide urgent dental care; there is consensus about the use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture, to control dental pain in pre-dental care. This study aimed to evaluate the use of acupuncture in reducing the intensity of acute dental pain in pre-dental care in patients waiting for emergency dental care, and was conducted at the After-Hours Emergency Dental Clinic of Piracicaba Dental School, and at the Emergency Center Dental Specialties I in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. The sample consisted of 120 patients. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to measure pain intensity. All patients underwent one session of acupuncture; the points LI4, ST44 and CV23 were selected and were used alone or in combinations. Reduction in pain was observed in 120 patients (mean initial VAS=6.558±1.886, p<0; mean final VAS=0.962±2.163, p<0.00001). The results of this study indicate that acupuncture analgesia could be a technical adjunct to pain control in patients with acute dental pain, contributing to the restoration of health with social benefit.

  5. [Quality assurance in acupuncture therapy].

    PubMed

    Kubiena, G

    1996-04-01

    Quality assurance for acupuncture therapy requires a good basic and on-going training in both conventional western medicine as well as in the theory and practice of acupuncture, the ability to synthesize the patient's objective findings and subjective feelings, and honesty with the patient and towards oneself. Thus, based on the continuous critical evaluation of the objective and subjective parameters, the question of acupunture as the optimal form of therapy for this specific case is honestly answered and one has the courage to admit failures. With regard to the theory, surveys of the acupuncture literature show that a considerable improvement in quality and honesty is necessary. There is a lack of standardised experimental methods (e.g. 28 different placebos in 28 different studies!). Especially German acupuncture journals have a disturbed relation to failures. To hide or deny failures is of no benefit neither to acupuncture, science to the relationship between the physician and the patient since the practitioner must be able to rely on the information in the literature. Furthermore, one should be open minded to alternative methods even if this means to refer a patient to a colleague.

  6. Acupuncture treatment of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Syed Zahid Hussain; Zahid, Syeda Samina

    2010-01-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic, acute peripheral-nerve palsy involving the facial nerve which supplies all the muscles of facial expression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of electro-A=acupuncture on patients with facial palsy. This study was conducted on patients with facial palsy at a private clinic at Peshawar during 1999-2009, and 49 cases were included in the study. All those cases that were within first two weeks of illness or who had related history of stroke or they had upper motor neuron lesion were not included in the study. Electroacupuncture was used as the main therapeutic technique to treat these cases. Patients were subjected to acupuncture treatment at four major points on the face for 20-25 minutes everyday for 10 days. Specific points were used for nasolabial fold and watering of the eye. After rest for a week patients were again evaluated and another course of treatment comprising of 5-10 days was sufficient in most cases. Frequency of electro-acupuncture is kept at 60-80 cycles per minute. Total number of patients studied was 49 with duration of illness as early as 3 weeks to a year and above. Cases with duration of illness from 3 weeks onward showed rapid recovery of palsy symptoms with electro-acupuncture. All cases showed recovery. Palsy of the angle of the mouth did not recover completely. Electro-acupuncture is effective in treating facial palsy cases.

  7. The Biology of Fear

    PubMed Central

    Adolphs, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Each of us has felt afraid, and we can all recognize fear in many animal species. Yet there is no consensus in the scientific study of fear. Some argue that “fear” is a psychological construct rather than discoverable through scientific investigation. Others argue that the term “fear” cannot properly be applied to animals because we cannot know whether they feel afraid. Studies in rodents show that there are highly specific brain circuits for fear, whereas findings from human neuroimaging seem to make the opposite claim. Here I review the field and urge three approaches that could reconcile the debates. For one, we need a broadly comparative approach that would identify core components of fear conserved across phylogeny. This also pushes us towards the second point of emphasis: an ecological theory of fear that is essentially functional. Finally, we should aim even to incorporate the conscious experience of being afraid, reinvigorating the study of feelings across species. PMID:23347946

  8. Acupuncture for pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: a pilot study for an open parallel-arm randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Harriet; Howard, Katie; Brealey, Stephen; MacPherson, Hugh

    2009-10-24

    There is some evidence that acupuncture for pain and osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is more than a placebo, and short term clinical benefits have been observed when acupuncture is compared to usual care. However there is insufficient evidence on whether clinical benefits of acupuncture are sustained over the longer term. In this study our key objectives are to inform the design parameters for a fully powered pragmatic randomised controlled trial. These objectives include establishing potential recruitment rates, appropriate validated outcome measures, attendance levels for acupuncture treatment, loss to follow up and the sample size for a full scale trial. Potential participants aged over 50 with pain and osteoarthritis of the knee were identified from a GP database. Eligible patients were randomised to either 'acupuncture plus usual care' and 'usual care' alone, with allocation appropriately concealed. Acupuncture consisted of up to 10 sessions usually weekly. Outcome measures included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index with the sample size for a full scale trial determined from the variance. From the GP database of 15,927 patients, 335 potential trial participants were identified and invited to participate. After screening responses, 78 (23%) were identified as eligible and 30 patients who responded most promptly were randomised to 'acupuncture plus usual care' (15 patients) and 'usual care' alone (15 patients). Attendance for acupuncture appointments was high at 90% of the maximum. Although the trial was not powered to detect significant changes in outcome, the WOMAC pain index showed a statistically significant reduction at 3 months in the acupuncture group compared to usual care. This was not sustained at 12 months. The sample size for a fully powered two-arm trial was estimated to be 350. This pilot study provided the evidence that a fully powered study to explore the longer term impact of acupuncture would be worthwhile, and relevant

  9. Effect of acupuncture on Deqi traits and pain intensity in primary dysmenorrhea: analysis of data from a larger randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deqi is a central concept in traditional Chinese acupuncture. We performed a secondary analysis on data from a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) in order to assess the effect of acupuncture on deqi traits and pain intensity in primary dysmenorrhea. Methods A total of 60 primary dysmenorrhea patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. Acupuncture was given at SP6, GB39 or nonacupoint. Subjective pain was measured by a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after acupuncture. The Massachusetts General Hospital acupuncture sensation scales (MASS) with minor modification was used to rate deqi sensations during acupuncture. Results The results showed that VAS scores of pain after acupuncture were significantly decreased comparing to before acupuncture treatment in all three groups (P = 0.000). However, no significant differences were found among three groups at the beginning or end of acupuncture treatment (P = 0.928, P = 0.419). Conclusions There was no statistical difference among three groups in terms of intensity of deqi feeling. The types of sensation were similar across the groups with only minor differences among them. Trial registration Trial registration number: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN24863192. PMID:24555788

  10. Effect of acupuncture on Deqi traits and pain intensity in primary dysmenorrhea: analysis of data from a larger randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Lin-Peng; Wang, Jing; Han, Li-Li; Guan, Li-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng

    2014-02-21

    Deqi is a central concept in traditional Chinese acupuncture. We performed a secondary analysis on data from a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) in order to assess the effect of acupuncture on deqi traits and pain intensity in primary dysmenorrhea. A total of 60 primary dysmenorrhea patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. Acupuncture was given at SP6, GB39 or nonacupoint. Subjective pain was measured by a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after acupuncture. The Massachusetts General Hospital acupuncture sensation scales (MASS) with minor modification was used to rate deqi sensations during acupuncture. The results showed that VAS scores of pain after acupuncture were significantly decreased comparing to before acupuncture treatment in all three groups (P = 0.000). However, no significant differences were found among three groups at the beginning or end of acupuncture treatment (P = 0.928, P = 0.419). There was no statistical difference among three groups in terms of intensity of deqi feeling. The types of sensation were similar across the groups with only minor differences among them. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN24863192.

  11. Rehabilitation of stroke patients using Yamamoto New Scalp Acupuncture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Gabriella; Szigeti, Gyula P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether acupuncture, especially Yamamoto's New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA), is of value in additional to standard poststroke motor rehabilitation. A prospective, assessor-blinded randomized control trial was carried out in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit with day hospital service. After inclusion, patients were stratified into control group and acupuncture group, randomly. The Barthel Index, the Rivermead Scale Index, and the Visual Analogue Scale were used to follow the efficacy of treatment. In the acupuncture group, all the sensory, motor, and functional scores improved significantly during the examination period until 2 years after injury. The Barthel Index is increased from 4±2 to 95±4 in the acupuncture group. This index also increased in the control group (from 4±2 to 75±4), but the changes were significantly less than in the acupuncture group. A significant spontaneous recovery during the 2-year follow-up was found, but the YNSA treatment facilitated the functional recovery. Improved moving function and more flexible joints and ligaments were observed in comparison to the patients' condition prior to treatment. The data suggest that the YNSA is a useful method to treat stroke patients and enhance their quality of life.

  12. Evaluation of acupuncture in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: a double-blind pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cristian, Adrian; Katz, Meredith; Cutrone, Eileen; Walker, Ruth H

    2005-09-01

    As many as 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use some form of complementary medicine during the course of their illness, and many try acupuncture. One nonblinded study of the effects of acupuncture in PD suggested that it might be helpful for some aspects of PD. We performed a double-blind, randomized, pilot study comparing acupuncture to a control nonacupuncture procedure to determine the effects of acupuncture upon a variety of PD-associated symptoms. Fourteen patients with Stage II or III PD received acupuncture or a control nonacupuncture protocol. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using the Motor subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), and the Geriatric Depression Scale. There were no statistically significant changes for the outcomes measured. In the patients who received acupuncture, nonsignificant trends toward improvement were noted in the Activities of Daily Living score of the PDQ-39, the PDQ-39 Summary Index(c) 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Acupuncture treatment modulates the corticostriatal reward circuitry in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengjian; Wang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Jian; Chen, Jun; Liu, Xian; Nie, Guangning; Jorgenson, Kristen; Sohn, Ki Cheul; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming; Liu, Bo; Kong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder with a high prevalence and significant social and economic impacts. Nevertheless, the treatment of MDD is far from satisfactory. Acupuncture treatment has emerged as a promising method for treating MDD. However, the neural mechanism by which acupuncture reduces depressive symptoms is not fully understood. Studies have shown that the corticostriatal reward circuitry is associated with the pathophysiology of MDD; thus, we investigated the corticostriatal resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) before and after real and sham acupuncture treatments combined with the antidepressant fluoxetine. Forty-six female major depressive patients were assigned to either verum acupuncture plus fluoxetine (n = 22) or sham acupuncture plus fluoxetine (n = 24) treatment for 8 weeks, and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected before the first and after the last treatment sessions. The results showed that compared with sham acupuncture, the verum acupuncture group showed: (1) significantly increased rsFC between inferior ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, ventral rostral putamen and amygdala/parahippocampus, as well as dorsal caudate and middle temporal gyrus; (2) significantly decreased rsFC between right ventral rostral putamen and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and right dorsal caudate and bilateral cerebellar tonsil. The increased rsFC between the inferior ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, ventral rostral putamen and amygdala/parahippocampus were significantly positively associated with decreased clinical scores (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale scores) at the end of the eight-week treatment. Our findings suggest that acupuncture may achieve treatment effects by modulating the corticostriatal reward/motivation circuitry in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prospective Tests on Biological Models of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The biological effects of acupuncture include the regulation of a variety of neurohumoral factors and growth control factors. In science, models or hypotheses with confirmed predictions are considered more convincing than models solely based on retrospective explanations. Literature review showed that two biological models of acupuncture have been prospectively tested with independently confirmed predictions: The neurophysiology model on the long-term effects of acupuncture emphasizes the trophic and anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture. Its prediction on the peripheral effect of endorphin in acupuncture has been confirmed. The growth control model encompasses the neurophysiology model and suggests that a macroscopic growth control system originates from a network of organizers in embryogenesis. The activity of the growth control system is important in the formation, maintenance and regulation of all the physiological systems. Several phenomena of acupuncture such as the distribution of auricular acupuncture points, the long-term effects of acupuncture and the effect of multimodal non-specific stimulation at acupuncture points are consistent with the growth control model. The following predictions of the growth control model have been independently confirmed by research results in both acupuncture and conventional biomedical sciences: (i) Acupuncture has extensive growth control effects. (ii) Singular point and separatrix exist in morphogenesis. (iii) Organizers have high electric conductance, high current density and high density of gap junctions. (iv) A high density of gap junctions is distributed as separatrices or boundaries at body surface after early embryogenesis. (v) Many acupuncture points are located at transition points or boundaries between different body domains or muscles, coinciding with the connective tissue planes. (vi) Some morphogens and organizers continue to function after embryogenesis. Current acupuncture research suggests a convergence

  15. Acupuncture--a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Y M

    1992-03-01

    Acupuncture is a traditional form of Chinese medicine which has been in practice for over 3000 years. It was not accepted in the West mainly due to cultural barriers. However, research during the last decade has established the physiological basis of acupuncture. Although it is mainly used for chronic musculoskeletal pain in the West, it also has a place in the treatment of various non-painful disorders like bronchial asthma, alcohol and nicotine addiction and functional gastrointestinal disorders. Controlled trials published in the literature have many methodological flaws, and these can be rectified by standardisation of acupuncture technique. Since traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine differ in their concepts of anatomy, physiology and systems of diagnosis, it is not possible to reconcile them into a common language. However, it is possible for them to co-exist.

  16. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its benefits in treating AF. We report a 57-year-old man who was admitted after having an allergic reaction to amiodarone administered to treat paroxysmal AF with fast ventricular response. Cardioversion with intravenous propafenone was uneventful. Before an attempt of electric cardioversion, he was treated with acupuncture as additional therapy to peroral propafenone. After acupuncture treatment consisting of 10 treatments during 30 days period, both immediate cardioversion to sinus rhythm and no paroxysmal AF during 30 days period were recorded. PMID:26593171

  17. [Relationship between early maladaptive schemas, attachment quality and fear of darkness].

    PubMed

    Kopcsó, Krisztina; Láng, András

    2014-12-07

    Although fear of darkness is most common in childhood, it is also a remarkable phenomenon in young adulthood. To examine the relationship between fear of darkness, early maladaptive schemas and attachment quality in young adults and assess fear related sex differences. A self-developed scale was used to measure fear of darkness' intensity and frequency. Young Schema Questionnaire - Short Form and two scales that measure attachment dimensions were also applied. 120 university students (68 women, 52 men) filled in the tests. Fear of darkness' frequency correlated with avoidant attachment, and intensity with independent and anxious attachment. Fear of darkness variables correlated with several early maladaptive schemas. Women reported more frequent and intensive fear of darkness than men. These results indicated that the elevated level of fear of darkness is related to specific cognitive style and attachment quality. This highlights the potential clinical relevance of fear of darkness.

  18. A clinical pilot study comparing traditional acupuncture to combined acupuncture for treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang-Beohm; Lee, Sang-Ju; Lee, Jang-Cheon; Fossion, Jean Pierre J; Sant'Ana, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Traditional acupuncture (TA) and ear acupuncture (EA) are used for treatment of headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain. The purpose of this study is to develop effective treatment using combined acupuncture (CA) which consists of TA and EA and to set clinical protocols for future trials. Participants were divided into TA (n = 15) control and CA (n = 34) experimental groups. Obligatory points among Korean Five Element Acupuncture and optional individual points along with symptom points were used in the TA group. The CA group was exposed to ear points of Fossion and TA. Acupuncture treatment consisted of six mandatory sessions per patient over 3 weeks and extended to 12 sessions. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. We compared TA to CA and researched their relevant publications. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p = 0.968) which showed pain-alleviating tendency. Pain alleviation was significantly different after the fifth and sixth sessions (p = 0.021, p = 0.025), with headache being the most significantly relieved (F = 4.399, p = 0.018) among the diseases. When assessing pain intensity, both the Headache Impact Test and the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale should be adopted for headache and the fractal electroencephalography method be used in pain diseases. In the future, studies should consist of TA, EA, and CA groups; each group having 20 patients. Treatment number should to be no less than 10 sessions. Korean Five Element Acupuncture should be a compulsory inclusion along with individual points being optional inclusion in TA. EA could be selected from Nogier, Fossion and so forth. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment, whether TA or CA, showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain, but no significant difference was seen between groups. Prospective, well-controlled, and relevant protocols using multimodal strategies to define the role of TA, EA, and CA are

  19. Assessing fears of preschool children with nighttime fears by a parent version of the fear survey schedule for preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Jonathan; Gothelf, Doron; Sadeh, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive fears are common in preschool children, validated assessment tools for this age are lacking. Our aim was to modify and provide preliminary evidence of the utility of a preschoolers' fear screening tool, a parent-reported Fear Survey Schedule for Preschool Children (FSS-PC). 109 Israeli preschool children (aged 4-6 years) with chronic night time fears (NF) and 30 healthy children (controls) participated. The FSS-PC analysis included: 1) internal reliability, 2) correlations between FSS-PC scores and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) measures, 3) differences between NF and a comparison sample of FSS-PC scores, and 4) FSS-PC sensitivity in detecting change in NF following an intervention for NF. There were low-to-medium positive correlations between the FSS-PC scores and several internalizing scales of the CBCL measures. FSS-PC scores in the NF group were significantly higher than the control children's score. FSS-PC scores had adequate internal reliability and were also sensitive for detecting significant changes in fear levels following behavioral interventions. Unique cultural and environmental circumstances and specific study group. This new version of the FSS-PC may provide clinicians with a novel and useful screening tool for early assessment of fear- and anxiety-related phenomena of preschool children.

  20. Acupuncture and chronic joint pain: an effective placebo?

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Several randomised trials suggest that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment in patients with painful chronic knee osteoarthritis or chronic low back pain. However, comparisons with sham acupuncture provide no evidence that acupuncture has a specific effect.

  1. Acupuncture treatment for duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Debreceni, L; Denes, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acupuncture therapy for duodenal ulcer was investigated in 21 male and female patients. The diagnosis and healing were verified by gastroscopy. It was found that the needle therapy for 3 weeks led to complete recovery in 76 percent of the patients. Diet, alcohol and cigarette abstinency were necessary for healing. Cuti-visceral reflex activation eliciting the improvement of the secretory and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract and effects in the CNS leading to analgesia and tranquilization may play a role in the mechanism of action. Our conclusion is that acupuncture can be satisfactory method to cure duodenal ulcer.

  2. Acupuncture: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman, Michele

    2014-01-01

    During the past 40 years, acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of oriental medicine, has become more and more popular, evolving into one of the most utilized forms of complementary integrative medicine interventions in the United States. In fact, more than 10 million acupuncture treatments are administered annually in the United States alone.1 Its rise in popularity, particularly in the West, can be attributed in part to its effectiveness for pain relief and in part to the fact that scientific studies have begun to prove its efficacy. PMID:25105069

  3. Physical Therapists' Views and Experiences of Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain and the Role of Acupuncture: Qualitative Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Bartlam, Bernadette; Bishop, Annette; Holden, Melanie A.; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low back pain is often accepted as a “normal” part of pregnancy. Despite research suggesting that quality of life for women who are pregnant is adversely affected, most are advised to self-manage. Although the use of acupuncture for the management of persistent nonspecific low back pain has been recommended in recent UK national guidelines, its use in the management of pregnancy-related low back pain remains limited. Objectives This study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of physical therapists involved in treating women who are pregnant and have low back pain with the objective of informing the pretrial training program for a pilot randomized trial (Evaluating Acupuncture and Standard care for pregnant womEn with Back pain [EASE Back]). Design A qualitative phenomenological method with purposive sampling was used in the study. Methods Three focus groups and 3 individual semistructured interviews were undertaken, and an iterative exploratory thematic analysis was performed. To ensure transparency of the research process and the decisions made, an audit trail was created. Results Twenty-one physical therapists participated, and emergent issues included: a lack of experience in treating pregnancy-related complaints, mixed messages from previous acupuncture education, a mistrust of the current evidence for acupuncture safety and effectiveness, and personal and professional fear of causing harm. Conclusions The findings suggest that UK physical therapists are reluctant to use acupuncture in the management of pregnancy-related low back pain. The explanations for these findings include perceived lack of knowledge and confidence, as well as a pervasive professional culture of caution, particularly fears of inducing early labor and of litigation. These findings have been key to informing the content of the training program for physical therapists delivering acupuncture within the pilot EASE Back trial. PMID:25929530

  4. Attachment Without Fear

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.

    2012-01-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, openness, and dependence interact with the caregiving elements of caring, empathy, and responsibility. PMID:22879835

  5. [Academic thinking on Cheng Dan-an's theory of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-jian

    2011-11-01

    Academic thinking on Cheng Dan-an's theory of acupuncture is analyzed. It is stated that Cheng's theory of acupuncture has put exceptional emphasis and efforts on inheriting the tradition and learning from the west by pursuing truth. He concisely reinterpretes the traditional theory of acupuncture and practically improves the acupuncture instruments according to clinical experiences. Meanwhile, he introduces the advanced achievements of anatomy and neurophysiology into acupuncture teaching and research, which plays an important role for modernization of acupuncture.

  6. [Do previous abortions cause fear of childbirth?].

    PubMed

    Breines Simonsen, Tone; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad; Vangen, Siri; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2013-03-19

    Abortion is a matter that concerns many women, and we have little knowledge about the effects of such experiences with regard to later pregnancies. The objective of the study was to investigate whether a previous history of abortion has an effect on later development of fear of childbirth, adjusted for the woman's mental health, parity, previous stillbirths and socio-demographic factors. The study included 2,753 pregnant women from Akershus University Hospital. Information was collected with the aid of questionnaires in the 18th and 32nd week of gestation, as well as retrievals from the hospital's system of birth records. Fear of childbirth was measured on the Wijma scale (W-DEQ). The prevalence of fear of childbirth (defined as W-DEQ ≥ 85) amounted to 11.7% among women who had undertaken two or more elective abortions and 7.8% among those who had no previous abortions. This trend was not statistically significant and disappeared completely in the adjusted analyses. Nor did we find any correlation between spontaneous abortions and fear of childbirth. The mental health of the woman was the one factor that was most strongly associated with fear of childbirth, an association that we have found also on a previous occasion in analyses of a smaller proportion of this cohort. We found no co-variance between previous abortion history and fear of childbirth.

  7. [Cranial acupuncture in the treatment of spasticity. Clinical results].

    PubMed

    Gomirato, G; Grimaldi, L; Perfetti, C; Roccia, L

    1976-06-09

    Hospitals in communist China perfected a new acupuncture technique about 3 yrs ago, whereby needles are placed in the scalp to stimulate the cortical centres below. This method is particularly indicated in subjects with neurological damage. Results observed in 45 subjects with cerebral vasculopathy at the neurological clinic of Pisa University and the reflexotherapy service of the University of Turin were encouraging and suggest that clinical experimentation should be attempted on a wider scale.

  8. Therapeutic effects of acupuncture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective study using (18)F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masami; Inubushi, Masayuki; Shiga, Tohru; Hirata, Kenji; Okamoto, Shozo; Kamibayashi, Tomohito; Tanimura, Kazuhide; Tamaki, Nagara

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether improvement of regional inflammatory findings in knee joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could be detected by positron-emission tomography (PET) using (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) after acupuncture treatments, as well as improvement of systemic inflammatory markers. Six RA patients (all female, 61 +/- 12 years old) received 10 acupuncture treatments in 2 months, to 11 traditional acupuncture points around a knee joint considered effective on RA. A visual analogue scale (VAS) for intensity of pain, knee joint range of motion (ROM), face scale for patient mood, and modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ) for disability of daily activities were assessed just before and after acupuncture. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) and the volume with SUV more than 1.0 [Volume(SUV > 1)] on FDG-PET images as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also measured before and after the treatments. VAS, ROM, face scale and MHAQ improved in all patients and significantly after acupuncture, but no significant change was detected in ESR, CRP, SUV(max), or Volume(SUV > 1). Acupuncture relieves symptom, remedies physical function, and improves quality of life in RA patients, but may have no or very limited anti-inflammatory effect systemically. The regional effects of acupuncture are unlikely to be induced through reduction of regional inflammation. We believe this clinical study is the first step for elucidating therapeutic mechanisms of acupuncture, which must be important for the rational use and further development of acupuncture.

  9. Nausea control by needling at acupuncture point Neiguan (PC6) during an intraoral impression-taking procedure.

    PubMed

    Zotelli, Vera Lucia Rasera; Grillo, Cássia Maria; de Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture point PC6 (Neiguan) in controlling nausea during intraoral impression taking. This study was conducted in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. The sample consisted of 33 adult volunteers with nausea, who were randomly divided into control and study groups, and treated with nonpenetrating sham acupuncture and real acupuncture, respectively, at acupoint PC6. The two groups had two maxillary impressions taken, one prior to acupuncture and the other after acupuncture. The nausea assessment was made using the visual analog scale, Gagging Severity Index (GSI), and Gagging Prevention Index. Volunteers' expectation that nausea would be reduced through acupuncture was also assessed. For statistical analysis, we used the t test and the Spearman correlation (p < 0.05). When assessed by Gagging Severity Index/Gagging Prevention Index, nausea was reduced in the real acupuncture group (p < 0.01). In the visual analog scale assessment, similar reductions of nausea were noted in both groups (p > 0.05). No correlation existed between the expected and the actual reductions in nausea. Our results indicate that acupoint PC6 was effective for controlling nausea during the maxillary impression-taking procedure. Patients' expectation did not influence the results.

  10. Acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cho, S-H; Hwang, E-W

    2010-04-01

    The effectiveness of acupuncture in primary dysmenorrhoea is not fully understood. To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for the symptomatic treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs investigating acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea up to July 2008 with no language restrictions. All RCTs that evaluated the effects of acupuncture compared with controls were included. Studies that assessed the effect of moxibustion or body acupressure were excluded. The study abstraction and quality assessment of all studies were undertaken following the detailed descriptions of these categories as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Twenty-seven RCTs were systematically reviewed. Only nine of the 27 trials clearly described their methods of randomisation and none of the trials stated the methods of allocation concealment. Compared with pharmacological treatment or herbal medicine, acupuncture was associated with a significant reduction in pain. Three studies reported reduced pain within groups from baseline; however, two RCTs did not find a significant difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture. The review found promising evidence in the form of RCTs for the use of acupuncture in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea compared with pharmacological treatment or herbal medicine. However, the results were limited by methodological flaws. The evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea is not convincing compared with sham acupuncture. Further rigorous nonpenetrating placebo-controlled RCTs are warranted.

  11. Is sham acupuncture as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture? It's too early to say.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Chu, Qin; Wang, Shu; Lai, Hilary; Xie, Bing-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical trials and experimental studies claim that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. However, these studies have no standard sham acupuncture control and many other factors can affect the clinical effect. These factors include needle retention time, treatment frequency, and the total number of treatments needed for satisfactory results, and all can change the clinical effect. The majority of existing acupuncture treatment studies do not consider these factors and lack standard dosage criteria. Therefore, it is still too early to conclude that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. This article investigates the factors that influence the curative effect of acupuncture as to help set a standard for acupuncture studies in the future.

  12. A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients: Descriptive analysis from a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kit; Cheng, M. Jennifer; Ge, Xiaoying; Berger, Ann; Xu, Dihua; Kato, Gregory J.; Minniti, Caterina P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. Methods We identified 47 sickle cell disease (SCD) patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January, 2005 and September, 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of SCD and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient versus outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. Results Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 years) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported more than 3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and four patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute VOC, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (p< 0.0001). Excluding the two outliers, 75% of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared to prior session. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture’s efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in

  13. Efficacies of Acupuncture and Anti-inflammatory Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammadjavad; Bazrafshan, Esmaeel; Momeninejad, Hadi; Jahani, Navid

    2015-10-01

    This study compared the efficacies of acupuncture and anti-inflammatory treatment in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fifty patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received night wrist splints as the standard conservative treatment for 1 month. The acupuncture group also received eight sessions of acupuncture therapy (twice a week for 4 weeks). The control group received 400 mg of ibuprofen three times a day for 10 days. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, the score on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire for Functional Status and Symptom Severity (BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT), and the electrodiagnostic findings were evaluated at baseline and 1 month after treatment. At the final follow up, significant improvements were found in both groups (p < 0.05). Statistically significant improvements were observed in the VAS score, the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, and the electrodiagnostic findings, but not in the distal motor latency (DML), in the acupuncture group (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that acupuncture affected the score on the global BCTQ FUNCT and SYMPT, the VAS score, and the electrodiagnostic findings, except the DML, more than ibuprofen did and that acupuncture might be an effective treatment for CTS.

  14. Evaluating validity of various acupuncture device types: a random sequence clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jungtae; Park, Jimin; Han, Gajin; Eun, Seulgi; Makary, Meena M; Park, Kyungmo; Lee, Junhee; Lee, Sanghoon

    2016-02-02

    Although various placebo acupuncture devices have been developed and used in acupuncture research, there is controversy concerning whether these devices really serve as appropriate placebos for control groups. The proposed study is a single-center prospective random sequence participant- and assessor-blinded trial with two parallel arms. A total of 76 participants will be randomly assigned to Group 1 or Group 2 in a 1:1 ratio. Group 1 will consist of Sham Streitberger's needle, Real Streitberger's needle, and Phantom acupuncture session. Group 2 will consist of Park Sham device with real needle, Park Sham device with sham needle, and no treatment session. Participants will have a total of three acupuncture sessions in a day. The primary endpoint is blinding test questionnaire 1. Secondary endpoints are the Bang's blinding index, the Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale index, and physiological data including heart rate, heart rate variability, and skin conductance response. This trial will evaluate the relevance of using placebo acupuncture devices as controls using a validation test procedure. Clinical Research Information Service: KCT0001347 .

  15. Randomized trial of trigger point acupuncture treatment for chronic shoulder pain: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Saito, Shingo; Sahara, Shunsaku; Naitoh, Yuki; Imai, Kenji; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    There is evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture treatment for chronic shoulder pain, but it remains unclear which acupuncture modes are most effective. We compared the effect of trigger point acupuncture (TrP), with that of sham (SH) acupuncture treatments, on pain and shoulder function in patients with chronic shoulder pain. The participants were 18 patients (15 women, 3 men; aged 42-65 years) with nonradiating shoulder pain for at least 6 months and normal neurological findings. The participants were randomized into two groups, each receiving five treatment sessions. The TrP group received treatment at trigger points for the muscle, while the other group received SH acupuncture treatment on the same muscle. Outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS) and shoulder function (Constant-Murley Score: CMS). After treatment, pain intensity between pretreatment and 5 weeks after TrP decreased significantly (p<0.001). Shoulder function also increased significantly between pretreatment and 5 weeks after TrP (p<0.001). A comparison using the area under the outcome curves demonstrated a significant difference between groups (p=0.024). Compared with SH acupuncture therapy, TrP therapy appears more effective for chronic shoulder pain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Efficacy of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yi, Jing-Hong; Cheng, Jin-Lian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the six-week influence of acupuncture on sleep quality and daytime functioning in primary insomnia. Methods. The study was a double-dummy, single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. A total of 180 patients with primary insomnia were randomly assigned to 3 groups: verum group underwent verum acupuncture plus placebo; estazolam group underwent estazolam plus sham acupuncture; sham group underwent sham acupuncture plus placebo. The outcome was measured by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). Results. The three groups showed significant improvement compared with the pretreatment baseline. Compared with the other two groups, the verum group reported improved sleep quality (SQ) and vitality (VT), decreased daytime dysfunction (DD) and sleepiness (ESS score). The differences were kept from the treatment period to the end of the trial. Discussion. Verum acupuncture appeared to be more effective in increasing sleep quality and daytime functioning than sham acupuncture and estazolam. Trial Registration. The trial is registeded with ClinicalTrials.gov ISRCTN12585433. PMID:24159338

  17. [Application of acupuncture anesthesia during craniocerebral operation in temporo-fronto-occipital region].

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Jiang, C

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports 174 cases of brain operations in temporo-fronto-occipital region by using the regime of combined acupuncture and medication. The patients comprised of 122 males and 52 females. The acupoints consisted of ear needling and body needling. Adjuvant drugs used were half-dosage Innovar and 0.1% lidocaine for scalp infiltration. According to the documented two-grade scaling criteria, 97.1% patients belonged to grade I. No obvious discrepancy existed between ear needling group and body needling one. Three controlled groups are presented for comparison: 1) 0.1% lidocaine alone; 2) acupuncture plus normal saline; 3) acupuncture plus 0.1% lidocaine. The resultant P value was less than 0.005, with remarkable statistical significance. It is revealed that 0.1% lidocaine per se cannot achieve satisfactory analgesia, whereas the efficacy of acupuncture can be greatly enhanced by the combination of 0.1% lidocaine and acupuncture. This method is proved as an effectual means to offset the incomplete analgesia of acupuncture, especially for those requiring intraoperative demonstration of surgical effects, to avoid impairment to functional areas of cerebral cortex, which are undoubtedly superior to general anesthesia.

  18. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  19. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  20. [Effect of cervical paravertebral block combined with acupuncture intervention on cervicogenic headache].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Xuan; Fan, Ru-Jun; Song, Wen-Xue; Chen, Ping

    2013-10-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of cervical paravertebral block plus acupuncture treatment for cervicogenic headache. Sixty cases of cervicogenic headache were randomly and equally divided into cervical paravertebral block (control) group and acupuncture plus cervical paravertebral block (acupuncture) group. Paravertebral block was performed by injection of 5 mL of 0.3% lidocaine solution containing triamcinolone (10 mg) into the 2nd cervical paravertebral tissue from the cross point between the posterior border of the sternomastoid muscle and the angle of jaw, once every week for three weeks. Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to Baihui (GV 20), unilateral Fengchi (GB 20) and Jiaosun (SJ 20), once daily for 3 weeks. The patients' headache severity was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and their cervical vertebral activity assessed by range of motion (ROM) before and after the treatment. Compared with pre-treatment in the same one group, the scores of both VAS and ROM at time points of one, two and three weeks after the treatment were significantly decreased in the control and acupuncture groups (P < 0.05), suggesting a marked improvement of both headache and cervical motion after the treatment. Comparison between the two groups showed that the VAS and ROM scores of the acupuncture group were evidently lower than those of the control group at each time point after the treatment (P < 0.05), displaying a better therapeutic effect of acupuncture plus paravertebral block for cervicogenic headache. Acupuncture combined with cervical paravertebral block is effective in relieving cervicogenic headache and improving cervical vertebral activity in cervicogenic headache patients, and can strengthen the therapeutic effect of simple paravertebral block.

  1. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  2. Fears of a Heterogeneous, Nonpsychiatric Sample: A Factor Analytic Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Dwight R.; Berg, Alan J.

    Previous studies on common fears have been vague and have not met requirements for using factor analysis. To avoid some of these problems, a broader age range and a separate analysis of males and females were designed for a sample of 545 individuals, ages 15-89, who responded to 133 fear-scale items. "Death of a loved one" was the greatest fear…

  3. What do midwives fear?

    PubMed

    Dahlen, Hannah Grace; Caplice, Shea

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence that a significant number of women are fearful about birth but less is known about the fears of maternity health providers and how their fear may impact on the women they care for. The aim of this study was to determine the top fears midwives in Australia and New Zealand hold when it comes to caring for childbearing women. From 2009 to 2011, 17 workshops were held in Australia and New Zealand supporting over 700 midwives develop skills to keep birth normal. During the workshop midwives were asked to write their top fear on a piece of paper and return it to the presenters. Similar concepts were grouped together to form 8 major categories. In total 739 fears were reported and these were death of a baby (n=177), missing something that causes harm (n=176), obstetric emergencies (n=114), maternal death (n=83), being watched (n=68), being the cause of a negative birth experience (n=52), dealing with the unknown (n=36) and losing passion and confidence around normal birth (n=32). Student midwives were more concerned about knowing what to do, while homebirth midwives were mostly concerned with being blamed if something went wrong. There was consistency between the 17 groups of midwives regarding top fears held. Supporting midwives with workshops such as dealing with grief and loss and managing fear could help reduce their anxiety. Obstetric emergency skills workshops may help midwives feel more confident, especially those dealing with shoulder dystocia and PPH as they were most commonly recorded. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Accurate identification of fear facial expressions predicts prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Abigail A; Kozak, Megan N; Ambady, Nalini

    2007-05-01

    The fear facial expression is a distress cue that is associated with the provision of help and prosocial behavior. Prior psychiatric studies have found deficits in the recognition of this expression by individuals with antisocial tendencies. However, no prior study has shown accuracy for recognition of fear to predict actual prosocial or antisocial behavior in an experimental setting. In 3 studies, the authors tested the prediction that individuals who recognize fear more accurately will behave more prosocially. In Study 1, participants who identified fear more accurately also donated more money and time to a victim in a classic altruism paradigm. In Studies 2 and 3, participants' ability to identify the fear expression predicted prosocial behavior in a novel task designed to control for confounding variables. In Study 3, accuracy for recognizing fear proved a better predictor of prosocial behavior than gender, mood, or scores on an empathy scale.

  5. Accurate Identification of Fear Facial Expressions Predicts Prosocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Abigail A.; Kozak, Megan N.; Ambady, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    The fear facial expression is a distress cue that is associated with the provision of help and prosocial behavior. Prior psychiatric studies have found deficits in the recognition of this expression by individuals with antisocial tendencies. However, no prior study has shown accuracy for recognition of fear to predict actual prosocial or antisocial behavior in an experimental setting. In 3 studies, the authors tested the prediction that individuals who recognize fear more accurately will behave more prosocially. In Study 1, participants who identified fear more accurately also donated more money and time to a victim in a classic altruism paradigm. In Studies 2 and 3, participants’ ability to identify the fear expression predicted prosocial behavior in a novel task designed to control for confounding variables. In Study 3, accuracy for recognizing fear proved a better predictor of prosocial behavior than gender, mood, or scores on an empathy scale. PMID:17516803

  6. Fear of death in mid-old age.

    PubMed

    Cicirelli, Victor G

    2006-03-01

    A transition model hypothesizes that the discrepancy between desired and expected time left to live is greater for mid-old persons than young-old persons. This discrepancy arouses a greater fear of death, which is influenced by age, health, and purpose in life. With the use of the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale, 192 older adults (60 to 84 years of age) were assessed on these variables and death fear. In structural analyses, purpose in life and the difference between the desired and the expected time left to live had direct effects on fear of body loss, with indirect effects of health; the relative size of effects differed as expected for two age groups. These variables were not related to fear of the unknown. An awareness of approaching death appears to arouse a greater fear of physical loss, but not mental or spiritual loss, in mid-old persons than in young-old persons.

  7. [Professions and fear of death--are they correlated?].

    PubMed

    Zana, Ágnes; Konkolÿ Thege, Barna; Limpár, Imre; Henczi, Eszter; Golovics, Petra; Pilling, János; Hegedűs, Katalin

    2014-08-03

    There are relatively few data on the relationship between professions and fear of death. The aim of the authors was to examine the association between profession and fear of death. Physicians, medical students and other healthcare workers, priests, psychologists and non-healthcare workers (N = 1062) were asked about their attitude to death by means of the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale. Significant differences were found in the total and some factor scores among the study groups. Priests showed the lowest fear of death values. Scores on the Fear of the Dead Factor was the highest in psychologists and non-healthcare workers who had no contact with the dead and dying. Fear of death seems rather to be present in professions dealing less directly with the dead and dying.

  8. Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vixner, Linda; Schytt, Erica; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Waldenström, Ulla; Pettersson, Hans; Mårtensson, Lena B

    2014-06-09

    Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). Acupuncture does not reduce women's experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of acupuncture with electrical stimulation may be underestimated. These findings were

  9. Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. Methods A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. Results Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). Conclusions Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of

  10. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

  11. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor “fear of medical pain” significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality. PMID:26491370

  12. Acupuncture and gastric acid studies.

    PubMed

    Sodipo, J O; Falaiye, J M

    1979-01-01

    The effects of therapeutic acupuncture on gastric acid secretion on pain relief in chronic duodenal ulcer patients were studied. Ten adult Nigerian patients with clinical, endoscopic as well as radiological evidence of duodenal ulcer constituted the "Ulcer Group." Four other patients who gave history of dyspepsia formed the "Dyspeptic Group." Pentagastrin stimulation test was performed on all subjects pre- and post-acupuncture therapy. The classical Chinese acupuncture loci were employed. The mean Basal Acid Output (BAO) in the duodenal ulcer group was markedly reduced from 4.04 +/- 1.01 mMols/hour to 1.05 +/- 2.5 mMols/hour. The mean Maximal Acid Output (MAO) was lowered from 34.72 +/- 13.81 mMols/hour to 15.34 +/- 4.01 mMols/hour. The difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). It is more probable, therefore, that the relief of pain is attributable to the therapeutic inhibition of gastric hyperacidity in our patients. Thus, though pain relief has been previously demonstrated in response to acupuncture, the results of this investigation have gone further to show that acupunture achieves symptomatic relief through therapeutic gastric depression in duodenal ulcer patients.

  13. [Relationship between neuro-psychological factors and effect of acupuncture in treating Bell's palsy].

    PubMed

    Mei, Jun-Hua; Gao, Shan; Chen, Guo-Hua

    2010-10-01

    To study the influence of neuro-psychological factors on the effect of acupuncture in the treatment of Bell's palsy and the overall prognosis in patients. Fifty patients with Bell's palsy were randomized into the treatment group and the control group, and they were treated with manipulated and non-manipulated acupuncture, respectively. Scorings by subjective perceptive scale of acupuncture, Cartel personality test, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale were performed and the curative effect was assessed according House-Brackmann grading standards. The total effective rate of acupuncture was 78.0% (39/50), and that of manipulated acupuncture was better than that of non-manipulated acupuncture [89.2% (25/28) vs. 63.6% (14/22), P < 0.01]. Visual analogue scoring for perception of "Deqi", evaluated either by patients or by doctors, showed that the scores was higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.01). Cartel personality test (16PF) found that patients with personality factors of sociability, intellectuality, excitability, braveness, and independence were capable of getting "Deqi" more easily, there existed a significant correlation between personality factors and curative effect. By Hamilton Anxiety Scale scoring, 92.0% (46/50) of the patients were found being in an anxiety state, and the efficacy of treatment was negatively correlated with the degree of anxiety (r = -0.9491, P < 0.05). Neuro-psychological factors put great influence on the efficacy of treatment for Bell's palsy, multiple measures, such as drug-therapy, acupuncture, psychological intervention, rehabilitation therapy, etc., should be taken in combination for improving patients' prognosis.

  14. Acupuncture in Australian general practice: trends in reimbursed acupuncture services from 1995 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Jonathan Lee; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David William

    2013-03-01

    To ascertain the extent of and trends in the use of acupuncture in Australian general practice and the characteristics of patients receiving publicly subsidised acupuncture services from general practitioners (GPs). Secondary analysis of national patient Medicare data for claims by all non-specialist medical practitioners for Medicare Benefits Schedule items for an attendance where acupuncture was performed by a medical practitioner from 1995 to 2011. Use of acupuncture by GPs, patients' sex and age and the socioeconomic disadvantage index of GP's practice. There has been a 47.7% decline in the number of acupuncture claims by GPs per 100 000 population in the period from 1995 to 2011. Acupuncture claims were made by 3.4% of GPs in 2011. Women were almost twice as likely to receive acupuncture from a GP as men, and patients in urban areas were more than twice as likely to receive acupuncture from a GP as patients in rural areas. Acupuncture claims were highest in areas that were socioeconomically advantaged. Claims for reimbursement for acupuncture by GPs have declined significantly in Australian general practice even though the use of acupuncture by the Australian public has increased. This may be due to increased use of referrals or use of non-medical practitioners, barriers to acupuncture practice in general practice or non-specific factors affecting reimbursement for non-vocationally registered GPs.

  15. Investigation of the electrical impedance of acupuncture points and non-acupuncture points before and after acupuncture, using a four-electrode device.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, Ali; Zhu, Jiang; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Baghani, Sara; Ma, Liangxiao; Rezaei, Shima

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of acupuncture on skin electrical impedance of selected points, before and after acupuncture on one acupuncture point (PC6), using a four-electrode device. Six acupuncture and non-acupuncture points on both sides of the body were selected to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on electrical properties of these points. There were no results significant differences of electrical impedance before and after acupuncture in the selected points. According to our experimental set-up, acupuncture at one point without stimulation does not alter skin electrical impedance in healthy volunteers and there is no difference between acupuncture points and non-acupuncture points. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. [Current role of acupuncture in analgesic therapy].

    PubMed

    Zanini, F

    1983-04-21

    After a brief introduction dealing with the great development of acupuncture in management of various painful conditions in the West today, its increased importance, use and role in acute and chronic pain, benign and intractable pain, are discussed. Recent acquisitions about known and yet unknown neurophysiological parameters (evoked cns potentials, endorphines, action of acupuncture in "regulation" of many functions--so called homeostasis--milieu) in connection with good pain relief properties of acupuncture, are referred. The main methods of acupuncture in pain treatment (acupuncture as reflexotherapy--so called electroacupuncture and the very effective auriculotherapy, in comparison with traditional acupuncture as "regulating" method of homeostasis and others minor methods, with our casuistry and positive results in 724 cases of various pain conditions are stressed. Own conclusions about the positive results and the great significance of physician-patient relations in delicate field of pain therapy are referred.

  17. Visualizing Motion Patterns in Acupuncture Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Seul; Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2016-07-16

    Acupuncture manipulation varies widely among practitioners in clinical settings, and it is difficult to teach novice students how to perform acupuncture manipulation techniques skillfully. The Acupuncture Manipulation Education System (AMES) is an open source software system designed to enhance acupuncture manipulation skills using visual feedback. Using a phantom acupoint and motion sensor, our method for acupuncture manipulation training provides visual feedback regarding the actual movement of the student's acupuncture manipulation in addition to the optimal or intended movement, regardless of whether the manipulation skill is lifting, thrusting, or rotating. Our results show that students could enhance their manipulation skills by training using this method. This video shows the process of manufacturing phantom acupoints and discusses several issues that may require the attention of individuals interested in creating phantom acupoints or operating this system.

  18. Fear of clowns in hospitalized children: prospective experience.

    PubMed

    Meiri, Noam; Schnapp, Zeev; Ankri, Amichi; Nahmias, Itay; Raviv, Amnon; Sagi, Omer; Hamad Saied, Mohamad; Konopnicki, Muriel; Pillar, Giora

    2017-02-01

    Medical clowns (MC) have become an integral part of the pediatric staff of hospital wards. While several studies have demonstrated the huge benefits of MC, there are almost no data regarding fear of clowns, a known phenomenon that means an irrational fear of clowns. In the current study, we sought to examine the prevalence of fear of clowns in pediatrics wards, and to characterize the affected children. The clinical work of three certified MCs was prospectively assessed. Every child with fear of clowns was noted, data were retrieved from the medical records, and the parents/child completed a specific questionnaire with a research assistant. Fear of clowns was defined as crying, anxiety response or effort to avoid contact with the MCs in small children, while in older children, it was determined if the child either reported fear of MCs or made actions to avoid clowns' intervention. A total of 1160 children participated in the study. All were hospitalized in the department of pediatrics or the pediatric emergency medicine department at Carmel Medical Center, and were exposed to a MC intervention session. Of the 1160 children, 14 children experienced fear of clowns (1.2%). The average age of children who experienced fear of clowns was 3.5 years (range 1-15). Interestingly, most of the children demonstrating fear of clowns were girls (12 out of 14, 85.7%). We found no association between fear of clowns and specific diagnosis, fever, clinical appearance, religion, or ethnicity. The prevalence of fear of clowns in the general pediatric hospitalized population was 1.2%, with a significant predominance of girls (85.7%). Children who experienced significant fear of clowns also experienced significant fear of encountering or thinking about a MC visit. Fear of clowns can affect children at any age (range 1-15), any ethnicity, religion, or degree of illness. Further large scale studies are required to better understand this unique phenomenon of fear of clowns. What is Known

  19. Acupuncture, connective tissue, and peripheral sensory modulation.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M

    2014-01-01

    Although considerable controversy surrounds the legitimacy of acupuncture as a treatment, a growing literature on the physiological effects of acupuncture needling in animals and humans is providing new insights into basic cellular mechanisms including connective tissue mechanotransduction and purinergic signaling. This review summarizes these findings and proposes a model combining connective tissue plasticity and peripheral sensory modulation in response to the sustained stretching of tissue that results from acupuncture needle manipulation.

  20. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  1. Acupuncture in Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eleanor

    2016-06-08

    This article describes the use of acupuncture in the management of knee pain in Osgood-Schlatter disease. Manual and electroacupuncture were used. The patient responded well to acupuncture and found it effective in relieving his knee pain. Acupuncture should be considered in Osgood-Schlatter disease, both to manage the pain and to limit the need to take oral analgaesics for a prolonged period. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. [Impacts on neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients of chronic stable angina pectoris treated with acupuncture at Neiguan (PC 6)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Momg; Chen, Hui; Lu, Shengfeng; Wang, Jianfei; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Bingmei

    2015-05-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy on chronic stable angina pectoris treated with acupuncture at Neiguan (PC 6) and explore the impacts of acupuncture on peripheral blood neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in the patients of stable angina pectoris. Thirty patients of chronic stable angina pectoris met the inclusive criteria were randomized into an acupuncture group (15 cases) and a medication group (15 cases), and a healthy control group (15 cases of the same ages) was set up separately. In the acupuncture group, at the same time of the basic medication, acupuncture was applied to bilateral Neiguan (PC 6), once every two days, 3 days a week, totally for 4 weeks. In the medication group, the basic medication was applied, without acupuncture intervention. In the healthy control group, no any intervention was applied. The attack frequency of angina pectoris, dose of nitrogly-cerin, the evaluation of visual analogue scale (VAS), Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ), the six-minute walking test (6MWT), the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS) were observed before and after treatment in the subjects. Additionally, the peripheral blood cells were detected to analyze specifically the changes in NLR before and after treatment and observe the relationship between NLR and clinical efficacy. Compared with the medication group, the attack frequency of angina pectoris was reduced within 30 days (P<0.01); the dose of nitroglycerin was reduced (P<0.01); VAS was reduced (P<0.01) and SAQ was increased (P<0.05) in the acupuncture group. The differences in 6 MWT, SAS and SDS were not significant between the two groups after treatment (all P>0.05). Additionally, compared with the medication group, in 30 days of acupuncture, NLR was reduced apparently in the acupuncture group (P<0.05). Acupuncture relieves the clinical symptoms of chronic stable angina pectoris, but has not apparent effects on motor ability and psychological health. Corresponding to

  3. Light enhances learned fear

    PubMed Central

    Warthen, Daniel M.; Wiltgen, Brian J.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn, remember, and respond to emotional events is a powerful survival strategy. However, dysregulated behavioral and physiological responses to these memories are maladaptive. To fully understand learned fear and the pathologies that arise during response malfunction we must reveal the environmental variables that influence learned fear responses. Light, a ubiquitous environmental feature, modulates cognition and anxiety. We hypothesized that light modulates responses to learned fear. Using tone-cued fear conditioning, we found that light enhances behavioral responses to learned fear in C57BL/6J mice. Mice in light freeze more in response to a conditioned cue than mice in darkness. The absence of significant freezing during a 2-wk habituation period and during intertrial intervals indicated that light specifically modulates freezing to the learned acoustic cue rather than the context of the experimental chamber. Repeating our assay in two photoreceptor mutant models, Pde6brd1/rd1 and Opn4−/− mice, revealed that light-dependent enhancement of conditioned fear is driven primarily by the rods and/or cones. By repeating our protocol with an altered lighting regimen, we found that lighting conditions acutely modulate responses when altered between conditioning and testing. This is manifested either as an enhancement of freezing when light is added during testing or as a depression of freezing when light is removed during testing. Acute enhancement, but not depression, requires both rod/cone- and melanopsin-dependent photoreception. Our results demonstrate a modulation by light of behavioral responses to learned fear. PMID:21808002

  4. Light enhances learned fear.

    PubMed

    Warthen, Daniel M; Wiltgen, Brian J; Provencio, Ignacio

    2011-08-16

    The ability to learn, remember, and respond to emotional events is a powerful survival strategy. However, dysregulated behavioral and physiological responses to these memories are maladaptive. To fully understand learned fear and the pathologies that arise during response malfunction we must reveal the environmental variables that influence learned fear responses. Light, a ubiquitous environmental feature, modulates cognition and anxiety. We hypothesized that light modulates responses to learned fear. Using tone-cued fear conditioning, we found that light enhances behavioral responses to learned fear in C57BL/6J mice. Mice in light freeze more in response to a conditioned cue than mice in darkness. The absence of significant freezing during a 2-wk habituation period and during intertrial intervals indicated that light specifically modulates freezing to the learned acoustic cue rather than the context of the experimental chamber. Repeating our assay in two photoreceptor mutant models, Pde6b(rd1/rd1) and Opn4(-/-) mice, revealed that light-dependent enhancement of conditioned fear is driven primarily by the rods and/or cones. By repeating our protocol with an altered lighting regimen, we found that lighting conditions acutely modulate responses when altered between conditioning and testing. This is manifested either as an enhancement of freezing when light is added during testing or as a depression of freezing when light is removed during testing. Acute enhancement, but not depression, requires both rod/cone- and melanopsin-dependent photoreception. Our results demonstrate a modulation by light of behavioral responses to learned fear.

  5. SELF-CONSTRUAL AND THE FEAR OF DEATH.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2015-10-01

    Orehek, Sasota, Kruglanski, Dechesne, and Ridgeway (2014 ) reported that priming students with self-construals (reading paragraphs focusing on the self vs others) increased their general fear of death. The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale measures the fear of death of the self separately from the fear of death of others, and so it was predicted that priming students with self-construals would affect only the fear of death of self. Using a sample of 64 female and 27 male undergraduate students (M age = 20.5 yr., SD = 1.6), an attempt was made to replicate Orehek's finding, having the students read the same paragraphs used by Orehek, et al. prior to completing the fear of death scale. Scores on the Collett-Lester scale for the fears of death of self, dying of self, death of others, and dying of others were not affected by self-construal priming, thereby not replicating the effect of self-construing on the fear of death nor the present hypothesis.

  6. Acupuncture for the management of primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Helms, J M

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of acupuncture in managing the pain of primary dysmenorrhea was investigated in a randomized and controlled prospective clinical study. Forty-three women were followed for one year in one of four groups: the Real Acupuncture group was given appropriate acupuncture and the Placebo Acupuncture group was given random point acupuncture on a weekly basis for three menstrual cycles; the Standard Control group was followed without medical or acupuncture intervention; the Visitation Control group had monthly nonacupuncture visits with the project physician for three cycles. In the Real Acupuncture group, 10 of 11 (90.9%) women showed improvement; in the Placebo Acupuncture group, 4 of 11 (36.4%); in the Standard Control group, 2 of 11 (18.2%); and in the Visitation Control group 1 of 10 (10%). There was a 41% reduction of analgesic medication used by the women in the Real Acupuncture group after their treatment series, and no change or increased use of medication seen in the other groups.

  7. Acupuncture therapy on apoplectic aphasia rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youzhi; Xue, Steve An; Zuo, Zhengyun

    2012-09-01

    Acupuncture has often been used for aphasia rehabilitation in China. The purpose of this paper was to: 1) provide a historic overview of acupuncture for aphasia due to stroke; 2) summarize the commonly used acupuncture approaches; and 3) objectively comment on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the rehabilitation of this type of disorder. The Elsevier database and a Chinese database (CNKI) were searched through December, 2010 with the key words "aphasia, acupuncture" in English and Chinese, respectively. Case reports, uncontrolled clinical observations and controlled clinical trials were all included if acupuncture was the sole treatment or the main component of complex intervention for the rehabilitation of aphasia caused by cerebrovascular disease. More than 100 relevant articles were found. After analyzing these articles, we found that acupuncture for apoplectic aphasia most often included tongue, scalp, body and combination acupuncture. Tongue bleeding, deep insertion and strong stimulation were adopted by many practitioners. The ten most frequently used acupoints (or areas) were Lianquan (RN 23), Jinjin (EX-HN 12), Yuye (EX-HN 13), Tongli (HT 5), Fengchi (GB 20), Neiguan (PC 6), Baihui (DU 20), No. 1, 2 and 3 language sections, Sanyinjiao (SP 6) and Yamen (DU 15). Controlled clinical studies and a systematic literature review demonstrate that acupuncture has therapeutic effects on aphasia after stroke.

  8. Bilateral pneumothoraces secondary to acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Theresa M; Roy, Neil K; Zlupko, George R

    2011-09-01

    Acupuncture is becoming increasingly popular in the United States for a wide variety of uses, ranging from the treatment of chronic back pain to aiding in addiction therapy. As this form of complementary and alternative medicine becomes more prevalent in certain areas of the country, it is of paramount importance that the emergency physician be familiar with its methods and potential complications. In general, acupuncture is perceived as fairly safe. However, it is not without risks or side effects. In this case report, we discuss the history, methods, and common complications of acupuncture in the context of a patient who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with bilateral pneumothoraces secondary to acupuncture therapy.

  9. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  10. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  11. Acupuncture-related modulation of pain-associated brain networks during electrical pain stimulation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Theysohn, Nina; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gizewski, Elke R; Wen, Ming; Rampp, Thomas; Gasser, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav J; Forsting, Michael; Musial, Frauke

    2014-12-01

    Findings of existing functional MRI (fMRI) studies on the neural mechanisms that mediate effects of acupuncture analgesia are inconsistent. This study analyzes the effects of manual acupuncture on pain ratings and brain activation in response to experimental, electrical pain stimuli. Fourteen healthy volunteers were examined by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. The intensity of pain stimuli was adjusted to individual pain ratings on a numeric rating scale. Baseline fMRI was performed during electrical pain stimulation in a blocked design. For the second session, manual acupuncture with repeated stimulation was performed on contralateral acupoints-large intestine 4, liver 3, and stomach 36-before imaging. After imaging, subjective pain ratings and ratings of the de qi sensation were assessed. Compared with baseline, volunteers showed modulated brain activity under pain conditions in the cingulate gyrus, insula, primary somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal areas after the acupuncture session. In accordance with the literature, anterior insular and prefrontal activity seemed to be correlated with acupuncture treatment. This study supports the existence of analgesic acupuncture effects that outlast the needling period. Pain-associated brain areas were modulated in direct response to a preceding acupuncture treatment.

  12. A pilot study on using acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to treat chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Itoh, Satoko; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    The present study tests whether a combined treatment of acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is more effective than acupuncture or TENS alone for treating chronic low back pain (LBP). Thirty-two patients with chronic LBP were randomly allocated to four groups. The acupuncture group (ACP) received only acupuncture treatment at selected acupoints for low back pain; the TENS group (TENS) received only TENS treatment at pain areas; the acupuncture and TENS group (A&T) received both acupuncture and TENS treatments; the control group (CT) received topical poultice (only when necessary). Each group received specific weekly treatment five times during the study. Outcome measures were pain intensity in terms of visual analogue scale (VAS) and QOL of low back in terms of Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ). The ACP, TENS and A&T groups all reported lower VAS and RDQ scores. Significant reduction in pain intensity (P<0.008) and significant improvement in QOL (P<0.008) were shown in the A&T group. Combined acupuncture and TENS treatment is effective in pain relief and QOL of low back improvement for the sampled patients suffering from chronic LBP.

  13. Short-Term Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Lower Back Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Young; Ku, Boncho; Kim, Jaeuk U; Lee, Yu Jung; Kang, Jae Hui; Heo, Hyun; Choi, Hyo-Joon; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This trial was performed to investigate the efficacy of laser acupuncture for the alleviation of lower back pain. Methods. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group (n = 28) or the sham laser acupuncture group (n = 28). Participants in both groups received three treatment sessions over the course of one week. Thirteen acupuncture points were selected. The visual analogue scale for pain, pressure pain threshold, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Euro-Quality-of-Life Five Dimensions questionnaire (Korean version) were used to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture treatment on lower back pain. Results. There were no significant differences in any outcome between the two groups, although the participants in both groups showed a significant improvement in each assessed parameter relative to the baseline values. Conclusion. Although there was no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups, the results suggest that laser acupuncture can provide effective pain alleviation and can be considered an option for relief from lower back pain. Further studies using long-term intervention, a larger sample size, and rigorous methodology are required to clarify the effect of laser acupuncture on lower back pain.

  14. Cultural Effects on the Expression of Some Fears by Chinese and British Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Louise T.

    2004-01-01

    To compare the culturally acquired aspects of fears in two different cultures, the author gave an augmented version of the I. M. Marks and A. M. Mathews Fear Scale (1979) to 50 female students in China and 49 female students in England. When the rank ordering of the fears measured in both groups was compared, the author found a high positive…

  15. [Acupuncture master Xu Yi-nian and his Practical Acupuncture in the Republic of China].

    PubMed

    Li, Nai-qi; Liu, Xiao-bin

    2014-09-01

    By collecting and studying Practical Acupuncture written by XU Yi-nian, Guangdong acupuncture master in the Republic of China, and using literature methodology, the life story of XU Yi-nian is textually researched and his acupuncture characteristics is analyzed. The results indicate that XU Yi-nian emphasizes on the utility of acupuncture manipulations and acupoint selection, the application of folk experiences in moxibustion and Sha disorders. He pays attention to the co-work of acupuncture and medicine and his work collects the therapeutic experiences of different schools and deserves to be further explored and validated.

  16. Minimal acupuncture is not a valid placebo control in randomised controlled trials of acupuncture: a physiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lund, Iréne; Näslund, Jan; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2009-01-30

    Placebo-control of acupuncture is used to evaluate and distinguish between the specific effects and the non-specific ones. During 'true' acupuncture treatment in general, the needles are inserted into acupoints and stimulated until deqi is evoked. In contrast, during placebo acupuncture, the needles are inserted into non-acupoints and/or superficially (so-called minimal acupuncture). A sham acupuncture needle with a blunt tip may be used in placebo acupuncture. Both minimal acupuncture and the placebo acupuncture with the sham acupuncture needle touching the skin would evoke activity in cutaneous afferent nerves. This afferent nerve activity has pronounced effects on the functional connectivity in the brain resulting in a 'limbic touch response'. Clinical studies showed that both acupuncture and minimal acupuncture procedures induced significant alleviation of migraine and that both procedures were equally effective. In other conditions such as low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, acupuncture was found to be more potent than minimal acupuncture and conventional non-acupuncture treatment. It is probable that the responses to 'true' acupuncture and minimal acupuncture are dependent on the aetiology of the pain. Furthermore, patients and healthy individuals may have different responses. In this paper, we argue that minimal acupuncture is not valid as an inert placebo-control despite its conceptual brilliance.

  17. Serotonergic Modulation of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    Conditioned fear plays a key role in anxiety disorders as well as depression and other neuropsychiatric conditions. Understanding how neuromodulators drive the associated learning and memory processes, including memory consolidation, retrieval/expression, and extinction (recall), is essential in the understanding of (individual differences in vulnerability to) these disorders and their treatment. The human and rodent studies I review here together reveal, amongst others, that acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment facilitates fear conditioning, reduces contextual fear, and increases cued fear, chronic SSRI treatment reduces both contextual and cued fear, 5-HT1A receptors inhibit the acquisition and expression of contextual fear, 5-HT2A receptors facilitates the consolidation of cued and contextual fear, inactivation of 5-HT2C receptors facilitate the retrieval of cued fear memory, the 5-HT3 receptor mediates contextual fear, genetically induced increases in serotonin levels are associated with increased fear conditioning, impaired cued fear extinction, or impaired extinction recall, and that genetically induced 5-HT depletion increases fear conditioning and contextual fear. Several explanations are presented to reconcile seemingly paradoxical relationships between serotonin levels and conditioned fear. PMID:24278743

  18. Attitude toward death: does it influence dental fear?

    PubMed

    Fábián, Gábor; Müller, Orsolya; Kovács, Szilvia; Nguyen, Minh Tú; Fábián, Tibor Károly; Csermely, Péter; Fejérdy, Pál

    2007-10-01

    The possible influence of fear of death and attitude toward death were studied related to dental anxiety in Hungarian elementary and secondary school subjects (n = 277; 114 males, 163 females; age between 8 and 18 years). Dental fear and anxiety scores were DAS: 10.8 +/- 3.6; DFS: 40.6 +/- 15.6; STAI-S: 38.0 +/- 11.0; STAI-T: 40.3 +/- 10.0. Lester's Attitude Toward Death Scale scores were 6.3 +/- 1.3. Girls scored higher on DAS, STAI-S, and STAI-T scales (P < or = 0.05). Age influenced STAI-S, STAI-T, and Lester's Scale scores (P < or = 0.05). Lester's Scale scores influenced the expectations of the subjects about the dental fear of their surrounding people (parents, brother, sister, friends) (P < or = 0.05). A percentage of 7.22 of the subjects indicated a rather strong connection between dental fear and fear of death. These subjects had significantly higher dental fear and anxiety scores as compared to others (P < or = 0.01). Death-related content was found in 4.3% of drawings and in 10.5% of free associations (couplings) related to teeth (in 12.6% either in drawings or in couplings). The appearance of death-related content was higher with higher age, and higher expected dental fear of surrounding people (P < or = 0.01). Our data indicate a detectable influence of fear of death on dental fear, especially in subjects with higher dental fear scores.

  19. [Supplementing the international acupuncture and moxibustion in bilingual teaching of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Science].

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaiyu; Ma, Qiaolin; Ren, Shan; Liu, Fang

    2016-04-01

    Bilingual teaching is a innovative method of higher education of China to gear the need of the world. Acupuncture and Moxibustion, a higher international TCM course, has been the model of bilingual teaching in many colleges and universities of TCM successively. To meet the aim and original intention of bilingual education in China, we have supplemented international acupuncture and moxibustion in teaching program for many years. The related contents about acupuncture and moxibustion of World Health Organization (WHO) and International Standardization Organization(ISO) have been added into the chapters of introduction, meridians and acupoints, the technology of acupuncture and moxibustion, the therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion. Teaching international acupuncture and moxibustion not only enlarges the international perspective of students, but also makes them more interested in learning Acupuncture and Moxibustion with a bigger sense of mission.

  20. Emetophobia: A fear of vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Abhijeet D.; Gawande, Sushil; Tadke, Rahul; Kirpekar, Vivek C.; Bhave, Sudhir H.

    2013-01-01

    Emetophobia is an intense, irrational fear of vomiting including fear of feeling nausea, seeing or hearing another person vomit, or seeing vomitus itself. It may occur at any age and we need to understand its symptomatology. We report a case of emetophobic child whose fear of vomiting started after an attack of acute appendicitis. In the initial stage, fear was limited to vomiting, later it became generalized to a fear of seeing the vomitus, worries that parents may suffer vomiting, fear of vomiting in public places followed by avoiding social activities. Patient improved on short course of anti-anxiety drugs and Graded Exposure Therapy. PMID:24459314

  1. Fear of Crime in the United States: A Multivariate Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemente, Frank; Kleiman, Michael B.

    1977-01-01

    Multivariate Nominal Scale Analysis (MNA) was used to assess the independent ability of each variable to predict respondents who indicated a fear of crime (42 percent) and those who did not (58 percent). (Author/AM)

  2. Acupuncture for tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2009-01-21

    Acupuncture is often used for tension-type headache prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on 'Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis') represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than 'sham' (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency; outcome of primary interest), headache days, pain intensity and analgesic use. Eleven trials with 2317 participants (median 62, range 10 to 1265) met the inclusion criteria. Two large trials compared acupuncture to treatment of acute headaches or routine care only. Both found statistically significant and clinically relevant short-term (up to 3 months) benefits of acupuncture over control for response, number of headache days and pain intensity. Long-term effects (beyond 3 months) were not investigated. Six trials compared acupuncture with a sham acupuncture intervention, and five of the six

  3. Acupuncture for tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for tension-type headache prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on ‘Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis’) represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than ‘sham’ (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Search strategy The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. Selection criteria We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency; outcome of primary interest), headache days, pain intensity and analgesic use. Main results Eleven trials with 2317 participants (median 62, range 10 to 1265) met the inclusion criteria. Two large trials compared acupuncture to treatment of acute headaches or routine care only. Both found statistically significant and clinically relevant short-term (up to 3 months) benefits of acupuncture over control for response, number of headache days and pain intensity. Long-term effects (beyond 3 months) were not

  4. Attitudes Toward Acupuncture Among Pain Fellowship Directors.

    PubMed

    Mann, Britton; Burch, Elizabeth; Shakeshaft, Charol

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate attitudes toward acupuncture among pain medicine fellowship directors. Additional goals were to assess the availability of acupuncture at academic medical centers and ascertain the inclusion of this modality in fellowship curricula. Electronic and paper surveys were distributed to the 97 American College of Graduate Medical Education pain medicine fellowship directors during January and February, 2014. Directors were queried about their referral patterns to acupuncture, as well as their perceptions of the utility of acupuncture for common pain conditions. They were asked about the availability of acupuncture at their institution, and whether acupuncture was included in the fellowship curriculum. Sixty-seven percent of fellowship directors (65/97) completed the questionnaire. A majority of directors (83%) reported acupuncture is available to patients at their institution, and reported that acupuncture is a modality that they discuss with patients when creating a treatment plan for chronic pain (72%). The majority of programs include acupuncture as part of didactic (63%) and clinical (52%) education. Time constraints, lack of qualified teaching personnel, and cost to patients were cited as barriers to inclusion. The majority of fellowship directors considered acupuncture a safe and worthwhile option for common pain conditions. Results from this survey indicate that acupuncture is widely available to patients at academic medical centers, integrated into many pain fellowship curricula, and considered a useful modality by physician leaders in the field of pain medicine. This sentiment, paired with the flexibility of national guidelines for pain fellowship curricula, suggests a trend toward greater inclusion of this modality in academic medicine. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Standardized set-point acupuncture for migraines.

    PubMed

    Plank, Sharon; Goodard, Janet Lee; Pasierb, Lisa; Simunich, Thomas Jason; Croner, Jeanette Renee

    2013-01-01

    Migraine headaches are common, debilitating, underdiagnosed, and undertreated, and medications are not always effective. Research has shown that acupuncture may be an effective and safe adjuvant or alternative migraine treatment. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether a standardized set of acupuncture points, when used to deliver treatment over a predefined period of time, could reduce the frequency and intensity of migraines. This is a prospective interventional study using set point acupuncture for migraines. The study took place at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center in Johnstown, PA, USA. Participants were 59 individuals with a diagnosis of migraine. Acupuncture was administered 2 ×/wk for 4 wks, followed by 1 ×/wk for 4 more wks, using one set of acupoints. Participants collected daily headache diaries and migraine quality-of-life measurements on a personal digital assistant for 12 wks before starting the acupuncture intervention. Participants continued to record the frequency and intensity of their migraines during the intervention and for an additional 12 wks beyond the intervention. The Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) were completed 4 × during the study: 12 wks prior to the start of the intervention, immediately prior to the first acupuncture treatment, at the end of treatment, and 12 wks after the end of treatment. When preintervention measurements were compared to postintervention measurements, migraine frequency and pain intensity showed a significant decrease (α = 0.05) after acupuncture intervention. Results had not returned to the preintervention baseline even 12 wks after the last acupuncture session. Acupuncture significantly influenced migraine frequency and intensity in the study's participants when preintervention measurements were compared to postintervention measurements. These results indicate that not only did acupuncture decrease both the

  6. Describing Acupuncture: A New Challenge for Technical Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanikas, Marianthe

    1997-01-01

    Considers acupuncture as an increasingly popular alternative medical therapy, but difficult to describe in technical communication. Notes that traditional Chinese medical explanations of acupuncture are unscientific, and that scientific explanations of acupuncture are inconclusive. Finds that technical communicators must translate acupuncture for…

  7. Describing Acupuncture: A New Challenge for Technical Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanikas, Marianthe

    1997-01-01

    Considers acupuncture as an increasingly popular alternative medical therapy, but difficult to describe in technical communication. Notes that traditional Chinese medical explanations of acupuncture are unscientific, and that scientific explanations of acupuncture are inconclusive. Finds that technical communicators must translate acupuncture for…

  8. The effect of acupuncture on stroke recovery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in China. Current treatments for stroke are limited and achieve no optimal effect. Acupuncture is widely used in the treatment of stroke and in improving the quality of life for patients in China. In most previous clinical studies, the effects of acupuncture have been diverse, and few well-designed randomized controlled trials have been conducted to investigate the long-term effect of acupuncture on acute stroke recovery. Method Three hundred and twenty eight subjects with acute cerebral apoplexy will be recruited. The patients will be randomized into two different groups: the intervention group will receive acupuncture treatment together with Western standard treatment for 2 weeks plus the secondary prevention treatment for 22 weeks; the control group will receive only the Western standard treatment for 2 weeks and the secondary prevention treatment for 22 weeks. The primary outcome measures are Barthel Index and the Stroke-Specific Quality Of Life. The secondary outcome measures are the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and Modified Rankin Scale. All assessments will be conducted at the baseline and at weeks 4, 12 and 24 of follow-up. Discussion This study will evaluate the effects of acupuncture on the long-term recovery of acute stroke and on improving the quality of life of the patients. The results of this study will help establish optimal integrated therapeutic strategies for patients with stroke. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29932220 PMID:23145765

  9. Efficacy of acupuncture versus local methylprednisolone acetate injection in De Quervain's tenosynovitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammadjavad; Ashraf, Alireza; Fakheri, Maryamsadat; Nasiri, Aref

    2014-06-01

    There is no consensus on the management of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, but local corticosteroid injection is considered the mainstay of treatment. However, some patients are reluctant to take steroid injections. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of acupuncture versus corticosteroid injection for the treatment of this disease. Thirty patients were consequently treated in two groups. The acupuncture group received five acupuncture sessions of 30 minutes duration on classic points of LI-5, LU-7, and LU-9 and on ahshi points. The injection group received one methylprednisolone acetate injection in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist. The degree of disability and pain was evaluated by using the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Q-DASH) scale and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at baseline and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks after the start of treatment. The baseline means of the Q-DASH and the VAS scores were 62.8 and 6.9, respectively. At the last follow-up, the mean Q-DASH scores were 9.8 versus 6.2 in the acupuncture and injection groups, respectively, and the mean VAS scores were 2 versus 1.2. We demonstrated short-term improvement of pain and function in both groups. Although the success rate was somewhat higher with corticosteroid injection, acupuncture can be considered as an alternative option for treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. [Fear of death among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Edo-Gual, Montserrat; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Aradilla-Herrero, Amor

    2011-01-01

    To assess, using a sample of nursing students, the fear of their own death and that of others and its relationship with several sociodemographic variables: gender, age, academic year, geographical origin, marital status and previous experiences with death. An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study including 243 nursing students who completed a questionnaire containing the sociodemographic variables and the Spanish version of the Collet-Lester's Fear of Death Scale (CLFDS). Means and standard deviations, Student t test, ANOVA and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, were calculated in the statistical analysis. A negative correlation was obtained between the CLFDS and age. Women scored higher on the four subscales of the CLFDS. Religious belief and practice were negatively correlated with fear of own death. Previous experiences with death are negatively correlated with three subscales of the CLFDS. Single nursing students scored higher on two subscales of the CLFDS. Statistical significance with the academic year was observed in the subscale of fear of others' death. To plan the training of nursing students based on specific competences on caring at the end of life, it is very important to understand the students' attitudes toward death. It is also important to understand the related variables, as well as the elements that trigger more fear or anxiety in the students, which can affect the quality of care they provide in their future professional practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Prednisolone and acupuncture in Bell's palsy: study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are a variety of treatment options for Bell's palsy. Evidence from randomized controlled trials indicates corticosteroids can be used as a proven therapy for Bell's palsy. Acupuncture is one of the most commonly used methods to treat Bell's palsy in China. Recent studies suggest that staging treatment is more suitable for Bell's palsy, according to different path-stages of this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of prednisolone and staging acupuncture in the recovery of the affected facial nerve, and to verify whether prednisolone in combination with staging acupuncture is more effective than prednisolone alone for Bell's palsy in a large number of patients. Methods/Design In this article, we report the design and protocol of a large sample multi-center randomized controlled trial to treat Bell's palsy with prednisolone and/or acupuncture. In total, 1200 patients aged 18 to 75 years within 72 h of onset of acute, unilateral, peripheral facial palsy will be assessed. There are six treatment groups, with four treated according to different path-stages and two not. These patients are randomly assigned to be in one of the following six treatment groups, i.e. 1) placebo prednisolone group, 2) prednisolone group, 3) placebo prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 4) prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 5) placebo prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group, 6) prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group. The primary outcome is the time to complete recovery of facial function, assessed by Sunnybrook system and House-Brackmann scale. The secondary outcomes include the incidence of ipsilateral pain in the early stage of palsy (and the duration of this pain), the proportion of patients with severe pain, the occurrence of synkinesis, facial spasm or contracture, and the severity of residual facial symptoms during the study period. Discussion The result of this trial will assess the efficacy of using

  12. [Acupotomology: returning to the ancients and innovation of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Guo, Chang-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Acupotomology is a technique of percutaneous minimally invasive soft tissue releasing. It can be found in traditional acupuncture, but is deemphasized in modern times. Therefore, the development of acupotomology is held as restoring of ancient ways of acupuncture. Compared with traditional acupuncture, acupotomology makes modern interpretations on the theory of muscle regions, absorbs theories of anatomy and pathology as well as techniques of asepsis and anaesthesia. It improves traditional needling tool. Therefore, it is also held as an innovation of acupuncture. The development of acupotomology makes up for the deficiency of acupuncture study. It. will promote the differentiation and crossing of acupuncture discipline, and become a new trend of acupuncture.

  13. Microwave propagation on acupuncture channels.

    PubMed

    Krevsky, Michael A; Zinina, Ekaterina S; Koshurinov, Yuri; Ovechkin, Aleck M; Tkachenko, Yuri A; Han, Wantaek; Lee, Sang-Min; Yoon, Gilwon

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative studies on functional state of acupuncture points and meridians have been done mostly by electrical measurement that requires the contact of the electrode on skin and is subject to pressure, humidity, etc. In this study, a new modality of using microwave was investigated. Microwave energy in the frequency range of 250 approximately 550MHz was irradiated on an acupuncture point. Transmitted microwave energy along the meridian was measured at the next acupuncture point of the same meridian. Diabetic and cancer patients were compared with healthy persons. Normal group consisted of 50 healthy persons. Diabetic group included 50 diabetic patients. Breast cancer group had also 50 patients. All 12 meridians on both right and left hands and feet were measured. For the diabetic group, the microwave energy propagation in this frequency range was 1.417 dB lower along Lung channel and 1.601 dB higher along Spleen channel compared with the normal group regardless of sex and diabetic types. For cancer patients, the propagation was 1.620 dB lower along Liver channel and 1.245 dB higher along Kidney channel compared with the normal group. Microwave energy proved to be a potential diagnostic method.

  14. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  15. Acupuncture for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junfei; Wang, Xuehui; Li, Xing; Zhao, Dejun; Xu, Jinquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been suggested to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in COPD. Therefore, this multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treating patients with COPD. Methods: This is a two-arm, parallel group, multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation, and participants, assessor, and analyst blinding. Seventy-two participants with COPD were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients received either real or sham needling at the same acupoints 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was dyspnea on exertion evaluated using the 6-minute walk test. In addition, health-related quality of life was also evaluated. Measurements were obtained at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results: Six-minute walking distance measurements and health-related quality of life were significantly better in the real acupuncture group than that in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion: The findings suggest that acupuncture can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce dyspnea in patients with COPD. PMID:27749542

  16. [Importance of cultural transmission in acupuncture translation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Ying; Wu, Jiang-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Xin

    2010-11-01

    The loss of cultural information transmission, inaccurate of translation or misunderstanding of the whole sentence in acupuncture translation are illustrated in this article. It suggests that these mistakes should be paid attention to and avoided; simultaneously, the solutions are stated so as to insure the accurate transmission of acupuncture.

  17. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, T; Bondesson, L; Thomas, M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch was studied in 10 healthy volunteers. Itching was induced by intradermal injections of histamine on the upper arm. 'Placebo-acupuncture', acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz or 80 Hz were applied over the injection site, proximal to the injection site (in the same dermatome) or extrasegmentally (ipsilateral to the injected arm) for a period of 5 min following induction of itch. In addition, the effect of a 5 min period and a 20 min period of stimulation of the skin area prior to the induction of itch were studied. The same periods of stimulation were also applied to extrasegmental points prior to the induction of itch on the arm. Acupuncture and 2 Hz and 80 Hz electro-acupuncture significantly reduced subjective itch intensity when applied intrasegmentally. No significant effects were obtained when stimulation was applied extrasegmentally. The results suggest that acupuncture or electro-acupuncture could be tried in clinical conditions associated with pruritus.

  18. Psychological Covariates of Longitudinal Changes in Back-related Disability in Patients Undergoing Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Lucy; Prescott, Philip; Cooper, Cyrus; Little, Paul; Lewith, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify psychological covariates of longitudinal changes in back-related disability in patients undergoing acupuncture. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal postal questionnaire study was conducted with data collection at baseline (pretreatment), 2 weeks, 3, and 6 months later. A total of 485 patients were recruited from 83 acupuncturists before commencing acupuncture for back pain. Questionnaires measured variables from 4 theories (fear-avoidance model, common-sense model, expectancy theory, social-cognitive theory), clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, and disability. Longitudinal multilevel models were constructed with disability over time as the outcome. Results: Within individuals, reductions in disability (compared with the person’s individual mean) were associated with reductions in: fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity (β=0.11, P<0.01) and work (β=0.03, P<0.05), catastrophizing (β=0.28, P<0.05), consequences (β=0.28, P<0.01), concerns (β=0.17, P<0.05), emotions (β=0.16, P<0.05), and pain identity (β=0.43, P<0.01). Within-person reductions in disability were associated with increases in: personal control (β=−0.17, P<0.01), comprehension (β=−0.11, P<0.05) and self-efficacy for coping (β=−0.04, P<0.01). Between individuals, people who were less disabled had weaker fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity (β=0.12, P<0.01), had more self-efficacy for coping (β=−0.07, P<0.01), perceived less severe consequences of back pain (β=0.87, P<0.01), had more positive outcome expectancies (β=−0.30, P<0.05), and appraised acupuncture appointments as less convenient (β=0.92, P<0.05). Discussion: Illness perceptions and, to a lesser extent, self-efficacy and expectancies can usefully supplement variables from the fear-avoidance model in theorizing pain-related disability. Positive changes in patients’ beliefs about back pain might underpin the large nonspecific effects of acupuncture seen in trials and

  19. Psychological covariates of longitudinal changes in back-related disability in patients undergoing acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Yardley, Lucy; Prescott, Philip; Cooper, Cyrus; Little, Paul; Lewith, George T

    2015-03-01

    To identify psychological covariates of longitudinal changes in back-related disability in patients undergoing acupuncture. A longitudinal postal questionnaire study was conducted with data collection at baseline (pretreatment), 2 weeks, 3, and 6 months later. A total of 485 patients were recruited from 83 acupuncturists before commencing acupuncture for back pain. Questionnaires measured variables from 4 theories (fear-avoidance model, common-sense model, expectancy theory, social-cognitive theory), clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, and disability. Longitudinal multilevel models were constructed with disability over time as the outcome. Within individuals, reductions in disability (compared with the person's individual mean) were associated with reductions in: fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity (β=0.11, P<0.01) and work (β=0.03, P<0.05), catastrophizing (β=0.28, P<0.05), consequences (β=0.28, P<0.01), concerns (β=0.17, P<0.05), emotions (β=0.16, P<0.05), and pain identity (β=0.43, P<0.01). Within-person reductions in disability were associated with increases in: personal control (β=-0.17, P<0.01), comprehension (β=-0.11, P<0.05) and self-efficacy for coping (β=-0.04, P<0.01). Between individuals, people who were less disabled had weaker fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity (β=0.12, P<0.01), had more self-efficacy for coping (β=-0.07, P<0.01), perceived less severe consequences of back pain (β=0.87, P<0.01), had more positive outcome expectancies (β=-0.30, P<0.05), and appraised acupuncture appointments as less convenient (β=0.92, P<0.05). Illness perceptions and, to a lesser extent, self-efficacy and expectancies can usefully supplement variables from the fear-avoidance model in theorizing pain-related disability. Positive changes in patients' beliefs about back pain might underpin the large nonspecific effects of acupuncture seen in trials and could be targeted clinically.

  20. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for dizziness and vertigo in emergency department: a pilot cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Wen; Lee, Tsung-Chieh; Hsu, Po-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yun; Chang, Shun-Chang; Chiang, John Y; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2015-06-09

    Dizziness and vertigo account for roughly 4% of chief symptoms in the emergency department (ED). Pharmacological therapy is often applied for these symptoms, such as vestibular suppressants, anti-emetics and benzodiazepines. However, every medication is accompanied with unavoidable side-effects. There are several research articles providing evidence of acupuncture treating dizziness and vertigo but few studies of acupuncture as an emergent intervention in ED. We performed a pilot cohort study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in treating patients with dizziness and vertigo in ED. A total of 60 participants, recruited in ED, were divided into acupuncture and control group. Life-threatening conditions or central nervous system disorders were excluded to ensure participants' safety. The clinical effect of treating dizziness and vertigo was evaluated by performing statistical analyses on data collected from questionnaires of Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of dizziness and vertigo, and heart rate variability (HRV). The variation of VAS demonstrated a significant decrease (p-value: 0.001 and p-value: 0.037) between two groups after two different durations: 30 mins and 7 days. The variation of DHI showed no significant difference after 7 days. HRV revealed a significant increase in high frequency (HF) in the acupuncture group. No adverse event was reported in this study. Acupuncture demonstrates a significant immediate effect in reducing discomforts and VAS of both dizziness and vertigo. This study provides clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture to treat dizziness and vertigo in the emergency department. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02358239 . Registered 5 February 2015.

  1. Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc M; Smit, De Villiers; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Ben-Meir, Michael; Taylor, David McD; Parker, Shefton J; Xue, Chalie C; Cameron, Peter A

    2017-06-19

    This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.

  2. Effect of acupuncture ‘dose’ on modulation of the default mode network of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yii-Jeng; Kung, Yen-Ying; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Niddam, David M; Chou, Chih-Che; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies show that brain activity, including the default mode network (DMN), can be modulated by acupuncture. Conventional means to enhance the neurophysiological ‘dose’ of acupuncture, including an increased number of needles and manual needle manipulation, are expected to enhance its physiological effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of both methods on brain activity. Methods 58 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into four groups that received single needle acupuncture (SNA, n=15) or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n=13) as active controls, or enhanced acupuncture by way of three needle acupuncture (TNA, n=17) or SNA plus manual stimulation (SNA+MS, n=13). Treatment-associated sensations were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Central responses were recorded before, during, and after treatment at LI4 on the left hand using resting state fMRI. Results TNA and SNA+MS induced DMN-insula activity and extensive DMN activity compared to SNA, despite comparable levels of de qi sensation. The TNA and SNA+MS groups exhibited a delayed and enhanced modulation of the DMN, which was not observed followed SNA and TENS. Furthermore, TNA increased precuneus activity and increased the DMN-related activity of the cuneus and left insula, while SNA+MS increased activity in the right insula. Conclusions The results showed that conventional methods to enhance the acupuncture dose induce different DMN modulatory effects. TNA induces the most extensive DMN modulation, compared with other methods. Conventional methods of enhancing the acupuncture dose could potentially be applied as a means of modulating brain activity. PMID:27841974

  3. Treatment of Lymphedema with Saam Acupuncture in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young Ju; Kwon, Hyo Jung; Park, Young Sun; Kwon, Oh Chang; Shin, Im Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphedema is a troublesome complication affecting quality of life (QoL) in many women after breast-cancer treatment. Recent studies have suggested that acupuncture can reduce symptoms of lymphedema in breast-cancer survivors. Objectives: This was a pilot study. It was designed to assess the feasibility and the safety of acupuncture with the Saam acupuncture method for treating lymphedema in Korean patients after surgical therapy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, single-arm, observational pilot study using before and after measurements. The study was conducted at the East-West Medical Center at the Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, in Daegu, Korea. The subjects were 9 patients with breast cancer who presented with lymphedema of the upper limb ipsilateral to surgery. Saam acupuncture was administered 3 times per week for 6 consecutive weeks, for 30±5 minutes at each session.The primary outcome measure was severity of lymphedema as assessed by stages of lymphedema, a visual analogue scale (VAS), and by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. The secondary outcome measure was QoL, which was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire using the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Results: Acupuncture reduced severity of lymphedema significantly, as assessed by the VAS (P<0.001) as well as by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. Four weeks after the final treatment, symptoms were not aggravated. SF-36 scores remained significant for health status at the end of treatment. Conclusions: The Saam acupuncture method appeared to provide reduction of lymphedema among women after they had undergone surgery for breast cancer. A randomized, controlled prospective study with a larger sample size is required to clarify the role of acupuncture for managing lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26155321

  4. Acupuncture for the sequelae of Bell's palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyo-Jung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Yong-Suk; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Kim, Jong-In

    2015-06-03

    Incomplete recovery from facial palsy results in social and physical disabilities, and the medical options for the sequelae of Bell's palsy are limited. Acupuncture is widely used for Bell's palsy patients in East Asia, but its efficacy is unclear. We performed a randomized controlled trial including participants with the sequelae of Bell's palsy with the following two parallel arms: an acupuncture group (n = 26) and a waiting list group (n = 13). The acupuncture group received acupuncture treatments for 8 weeks, whereas the waiting list group did not receive acupuncture treatments during the 8-week period after randomization. The primary outcome measure was change in the Facial Disability Index (FDI) social and well-being subscale at week 8. We also analyzed changes in the FDI physical function subscale, the House-Brackmann score, the Sunnybrook Facial Nerve Grading system, lip mobility and stiffness at 5 and 8 weeks after randomization. An intention-to-treat analysis was applied. The acupuncture group exhibited greater improvements in the FDI social score (mean difference, 23.54; 95% confidence interval, 12.99 to 34.08) and better results on the FDI physical function subscale (mean difference, 21.54; 95% confidence interval, 7.62 to 35.46), Sunnybrook Facial Nerve Grading score (mean difference, 14.77; 95% confidence interval, 5.05 to 24.49), and stiffness scale (mean difference, -1.58; 95% confidence interval,-2.26 to -0.89) compared with the waiting list group after 8 weeks. No severe adverse event occurred in either group. Compared with the waiting list group, acupuncture had better therapeutic effects on the social and physical aspects of sequelae of Bell's palsy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN43104115.

  5. [Observation on clinical therapeutic effect of acupuncture on upper limb spasticity in the patient of poststroke].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Mao; Feng, Chong-Lian; Pi, Zhou-Kai; Fan, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Hui-Qiong; Zhang, Jie

    2008-04-01

    To observe therapeutic effect of acupuncture at acupoints selected according to rehabilitation medical theory on upper limb spasticity in the patient of poststroke. Sixty cases were randomly divided into an acupuncture group and an electro-stimulation group, 30 cases in each group. The acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture at the contralateral scalp motor region of the affected limb, Jiquan (HT 1), Chize (LU 5), Daling (PC 7) on the flexor side and Jianyu (LI 15), Tianjing (TE 10), Yangchi (TE 4) on the extensor muscle side of the affected limb; the electro-stimulation group were treated by electric stimulation. The two groups also were treated with necessary medical treatment and anti-spasm rehabilitation motor training. The course was 3 weeks. Modified Ashworth Scale for muscle spasm (MAS), modified Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) for upper limb motor function, and Modified Barthel Index (MBI) for ability of daily living were used for assessment of the therapeutic effect. After treatment, the spasm was significantly alleviated, the motor function of the upper limb and daily living ability were significantly increased (P<0.01) in the two groups; after treatment, BMI scores in the acupuncture group was very significantly superior to that in the electro-stimulation group. The total effective rate was 93.3% in the acupuncture group and 86.7% in the electro-stimulation group, with no significant difference between the two groups. Proper acupuncture is an effective method for upper limb spasm in the patient of poststroke, and the therapeutic effect is better for mild-moderate spasm of the upper limb.

  6. Effect of acupuncture 'dose' on modulation of the default mode network of the brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yii-Jeng; Kung, Yen-Ying; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Niddam, David M; Chou, Chih-Che; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2016-12-01

    Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies show that brain activity, including the default mode network (DMN), can be modulated by acupuncture. Conventional means to enhance the neurophysiological 'dose' of acupuncture, including an increased number of needles and manual needle manipulation, are expected to enhance its physiological effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of both methods on brain activity. 58 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into four groups that received single needle acupuncture (SNA, n=15) or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n=13) as active controls, or enhanced acupuncture by way of three needle acupuncture (TNA, n=17) or SNA plus manual stimulation (SNA+MS, n=13). Treatment-associated sensations were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Central responses were recorded before, during, and after treatment at LI4 on the left hand using resting state fMRI. TNA and SNA+MS induced DMN-insula activity and extensive DMN activity compared to SNA, despite comparable levels of de qi sensation. The TNA and SNA+MS groups exhibited a delayed and enhanced modulation of the DMN, which was not observed followed SNA and TENS. Furthermore, TNA increased precuneus activity and increased the DMN-related activity of the cuneus and left insula, while SNA+MS increased activity in the right insula. The results showed that conventional methods to enhance the acupuncture dose induce different DMN modulatory effects. TNA induces the most extensive DMN modulation, compared with other methods. Conventional methods of enhancing the acupuncture dose could potentially be applied as a means of modulating brain activity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Immediate effects of acupuncture on gait patterns in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tung-wu; Wei, I-pin; Liu, Yen-hung; Hsu, Wei-chun; Wang, Ting-ming; Chang, Chu-fen; Lin, Jaung-geng

    2010-01-20

    Acupuncture has been shown to be effective in pain relief and anesthesia, and has been suggested for treating various kinds of functional disabilities in traditional Chinese medicine, including knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of acupuncture on gait patterns in patients with knee OA. Twenty patients with bilateral medial knee OA were assigned evenly and randomly to a sham group and an experimental group. During the experiment, the experimental group underwent a 30-minute formula electro-acupuncture treatment while the sham group received a sham treatment. Before and after treatment, each subject was evaluated for their knee pain using visual analog scales (VAS) and then their performance of level walking using gait analysis. For all the obtained variables, the independent t-test was used for between-group comparisons, while paired t-test was used to investigate the before and after changes. All the measured data before acupuncture treatment between the groups were not significantly different. The VAS scores were decreased significantly after acupuncture in both groups, and the mean change of the VAS values of the experiment group was 2 times greater than that of the sham group. After formula acupuncture stimulation, while no significant changes were found in all the gait variables in the sham group, the experimental group had significant increases in the gait speed, step length, as well as in several components of the joint angles and moments. The results of the study suggest that significantly improved gait performance in the experimental group may be associated with pain relief after treatment, but the relatively small decrease of pain in the sham group was not enough to induce significant improvements in gait patterns. Gait analysis combined with the VAS can be useful for the evaluation of the effect of acupuncture treatment for patients with neuromusculoskeletal diseases and movement disorder.

  8. Pain Reduction After Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Geriatric Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Helianthi, Dwi R; Simadibrata, Christina; Srilestari, Adiningsih; Wahyudi, Edy R; Hidayat, Rudy

    2016-04-01

    to compare the effectiveness of active laser acupuncture with placebo on reducing pain intensity and improving functional outcome in geriatric patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). a double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in geriatrics with knee OA at Medical Acupuncture Outpatient Clinic, Integrated Geriatric Outpatient Clinic, Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, during May to October 2015. Sixty two patients with knee OA were randomly assigned into two groups: active laser acupuncture group or placebo laser acupuncture group. Interventions were carried out using a gallium aluminum arsenide laser device at the ST35 Dubi, ST36 Zusanli, SP9 Yinlingquan, GB34 Yanglingquan and EX - LE - 4 Neixiyan acupuncture points on the affected knee for ten sessions of treatment, i.e. twice a week. Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and Lequesne index at baseline, after four sessions, after nine sessions and at 2 weeks after the treatment had been stopped. the VAS scores were significantly improved in the active laser acupuncture group compared to the placebo group. The evaluation of VAS scores was carried out after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 0.39; p<0.001), after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 37.48; p<0.001) and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 39.15; p<0.001). The evaluation also showed significant improvement of Lequesne index after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 4.68; p<0.001), after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 5.90; p<0.001) and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 6.48; p<0.001). active laser acupuncture is effective in reducing pain.

  9. Manifestations, acquisition and diagnostic categories of dental fear in a self-referred population.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Birn, H

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify how manifestations and acquisition relate to diagnostic categories of dental fear in a population of self-referred dental fear patients, since diagnostic criteria specifically related to dental fear have not been validated. DSM III-R diagnostic criteria for phobias were used to compare with four existing dental fear diagnostic categories, referred to as the Seattle system. Subjects were 208 persons with dental fear who were telephone interviewed, of whom a subsample of 155 responded to a mailed Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a modified FSS-II Geer Fear Scale (GFS). Personal interviews and a Dental Beliefs Scale of perceived trust and social interaction with dentists were also used to evaluate a subsample of 80 patients selected by sex and high dental fear. Results showed that the majority of the 80 patients (66%), suffered from social embarrassment about their dental fear problem and their inability to do something about it. The largest cause of their fear (84%) was reported to be traumatic dental experiences, especially in childhood (70%). A minority of patients (16%) could not isolate traumatic experiences and had a history of general fearfulness or anxiety. Analysis of GFS data for the 155 subjects showed that fear of snakes and injuries were highest among women; heights and injections among men. Fear of blood was rarely reported. Spearman correlations between GFS individual items and DAS scores indicated functional independence between dental fear and common fears such as blood, injections and enclosures in most cases. Only in specific types of dental fear did these results support Rachman and Lopatka's contention that fears are thought to summate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  11. Comparison of acupuncture to injection for myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Gazi, Miriam C B; Issy, Adriana M; Avila, Ilíada P; Sakata, Rioko K

    2011-01-01

    Many treatments have been proposed for myofascial pain syndrome. The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of acupuncture to trigger point injection combined with cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate and sodium dipyrone. A randomized study was performed in 30 patients divided into 2 groups: G1 received trigger point injection with 0.25% bupivacaine twice weekly, and both cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate 10 mg/day and sodium dipyrone 500 mg every 8 hours; G2 received classical and trigger point acupuncture twice weekly. All patients were instructed in physical exercise. The following parameters were evaluated: pain intensity rated on a numerical scale, number of trigger points, and quality of life before and 4 weeks after treatment. The pain scores and the number of trigger points reduced significantly in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. Significant improvement in the quality of life scores was observed for some of the functional domains in the 2 groups, whereas there was no improvement of the general health status domain in either group or of the emotional domain in G1. Acupuncture, when compared with trigger point injection, combined with cyclobenzaprine chlorhydrate and sodium dipyrone provided similar pain relief and improvement in quality of life measures at 4 weeks.  © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  12. Acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun; Peng, Weina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate commonly encountered in older men. BPH has been treated with acupuncture inside and outside China, but its effects are uncertain. This review aims to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for BPH. Methods and analysis Seven databases will be searched from their inception: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and Wanfang Database. Randomised controlled clinical trials using acupuncture to treat BPH will be included. Outcome measures included urological symptom scores, urodynamic measures and quality-of-life scales. Adverse events will be assessed and reported for safety evaluation. Study selection and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. Quality assessment (assessment of risk of bias) and data synthesis will be implemented using Review Manager (RevMan) software (V.5.2.3). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not necessary because this systematic review will not include specific patient data. Updates will be conducted if there is enough new evidence that may cause any change in review conclusions. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42014013645. PMID:25838507

  13. A preliminary investigation of the relationship of dental fear to other specific fears, general fearfulness, disgust sensitivity and harm sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Jason M

    2008-04-01

    People with dental fear often suffer from other psychological disorders, as well as from a number of other specific fears. Fear of going to the dentist may be associated not only with general fearfulness, but also with underlying personality dispositions. This exploratory study, therefore, investigated the associations between dental fear and 67 other specific fears, general fearfulness, disgust sensitivity and harm sensitivity. Participants were 88 Australian adults who were administered the Fear Survey Schedule III (FSS-III), the Harm Sensitivity Index and the Disgust Sensitivity Index. Principle axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to examine how dental fear related to other specific fears as measured with the FSS-III. Dental fear was significantly correlated with most of the other specific fears, with factor analysis indicating that it tended to load more with fears related to lack of control rather than with what have often been classed as 'medical' fears. Significant associations were found between dental fear and the personality dispositions of general fearfulness, harm sensitivity and disgust sensitivity, although these associations were not linear. Findings reveal extensive co-occurrence of other specific fears with dental fear, while the associations of dental fear with personality traits suggest enduring aspects to dental fear which may translate into difficulties in fear alleviation. Dental fear was more related to a diverse range of fears relating to a loss of control than to medical-specific fears.

  14. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science Past Issues / ... percent of U.S. adults use acupuncture. What Is Acupuncture? Dr. Adeline Ge adjusts placement of acupuncture needles ...

  15. The Cape Fear Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrath, Richard C.

    In spring 1992, Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) completed its long-range strategic plan. The consultant who helped guide the institution through the process presented the plan to the Board of Trustees with 60 recommendations for implementation. The Chairman of the Board established task forces to study the recommendations for each major…

  16. Developing a research strategy for acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lewith, George T; White, Peter J; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2006-09-01

    This strategic overview revisits some of the basic assumptions that relate to the clinical evaluation of acupuncture. We look at the evidence available to estimate both the specific and nonspecific effect size of acupuncture (efficacy and effectiveness) and consider the placebo within acupuncture trials, as well as the value of both placebo controlled trials and pragmatic acupuncture studies. We argue for an augmented, mixed methodology that integrates basic mechanism studies, including modern imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance, quantitative and qualitative research, as well as safety and health economic data to obtain a more rigorous understanding of acupuncture. We hope that by taking a broad, patient-centered, and rigorous approach we may arrive at a realistic and thoughtful evaluation of its relative value in comparison to placebo treatment, conventional medicine, and its potential for integration into conventional clinical care.

  17. [Medical indications for acupuncture: Systematic review].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ortego, Juan; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Carrion, Carme

    2016-09-16

    Acupuncture is a medical procedure with a very wide range of indications according to the WHO. However the indications require robust scientific evidence to support them. We have conducted a systematic review (2010-2015) in order to define in which pathologies acupuncture can be an effective strategy, STRICTA criteria that aim to set up acupuncture clinical trials standard criteria were defined in 2010. Only systematic reviews and meta-analyses of good or very good methodological quality according to SIGN criteria were selected. Its main objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in the management of any disease. Most of the final 31 selected reviews focus on chronic pain-related diseases, mainly in the disciplines of Neurology, Orthopaedics and Rheumatology. Current evidence supports the use of acupuncture in the treatment of headaches, migraines, back pain, cervical pain and osteoarthritis. The remaining pathologies still require further good quality studies.

  18. Acupuncture improves cognitive function: A systematic review☆

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Yip, Ka Keung; Lam, Chung Tsung; Lam, Ka Shun; Lau, Wai; Yu, Wing Lam; Leung, Amethyst King Man; So, Kwok-fai

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acupuncture has been used as a treatment for cognitive impairment. OBJECTIVE: This review assesses clinical evidence for or against acupuncture as a treatment for cognitive impairment. This review also discusses the proposed mechanism(s) that could link acupuncture to improved cognitive function. METHODS: We searched the literature using PolyUone search from its inception to January 2013, with full text available and language limited to English. Levels of evidence were examined using Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine–Levels of Evidence (March, 2009). RESULTS: Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria: 3 human studies and 9 animal studies. Levels of evidence ranged from level 1b to level 5. CONCLUSION: Most animal studies demonstrated a positive effect of acupuncture on cognitive impairment. However, the results of human studies were inconsistent. Further high-quality human studies with greater statistical power are needed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture and an optimal protocol. PMID:25206464

  19. [Overview of acupuncture development in Ontario Canada].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Bin-jiang

    2012-04-01

    The history of acupuncture in Ontario, Canada was traced, and the current status as welI as the prospection were introduced in this paper. Statistics showed that the history of acupuncture in Ontario started in the 1880s, and it was only popular in China Town and Chinese community. In the 1970s, it gradually merged into the mainstream of the society, and entered into a growing period. With the tide of Chinese immigration in the 1980s and 1990s, acupuncture matured rapidly. In 2006, the "Traditional Chinese Medicine Act" was passed in Ontario, it was considered as a milestone in the history of acupuncture. At present, just like the other 23 health care professions, acupuncture has already be included into the legislation system, and become a component of Ontario's health care system. At the same time, the law and regulation may also promote the establishment of "pure Chinese Medicine" in Ontario.

  20. Acupuncture for Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xue; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiao T.; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Victor; Zimmerman-Bier, Barbie

    2012-01-01

    Background. There has been lack of reviews of evidence on efficacy, methodology, and/or safety of acupuncture in autism spectrum disorders. This paper examines the emerging evidence of the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of autistic children. Method. A literature review was completed via Medline and three Chinese search engines. A total of 31 studies were evaluated for acupuncture methodology, study design, treatment effects, and tolerability. Results. The acupoints used, the duration of needling, the frequency of treatment, the choice of stimulation, and the course of the treatment were highly variable amongst the studies. Behavioral and/or developmental improvements were reported in all acupuncture treatment studies. All studies reported general tolerability. Weakness of experimental designs was discussed. Conclusions. Vigorously controlled double-blinded clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in children with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:22203876

  1. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Opiate Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chan, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is an accepted treatment worldwide for various clinical conditions, and the effects of acupuncture on opiate addiction have been investigated in many clinical trials. The present review systematically analyzed data from randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English since 1970. We found that the majority agreed on the efficacy of acupuncture as a strategy for the treatment of opiate addiction. However, some of the methods in several included trials have been criticized for their poor quality. This review summarizes the quality of the study design, the types of acupuncture applied, the commonly selected acupoints or sites of the body, the effectiveness of the treatment, and the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of acupuncture in these trials. PMID:22474521

  2. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture.

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, Freek J; van den Berg-de Lange, Ineke; Huygen, Frank J P M; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of beta-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 are discussed. PMID:12775355

  3. Neuroimmunomodulatory effects of acupuncture in mice.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, T; Eriksson, S V; Theodorsson, E

    1991-07-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of acupuncture on the immunological response. The induction of anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) plaque-forming cells (PFC) was used as a measurement of the immune response to treatment. In normal non-immunized mice, enhancement of PFC was seen after a single acupuncture treatment when spleen cells from stimulated mice were cultured with SRBC in vitro. After 3 acupuncture treatments, spleen cells from mice did not show PFC enhancement after treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody and complement, nor after the removal of non-adherent cells. Serum obtained from mice 1 h after acupuncture stimulation enhanced the PFC of normal spleen cells in vitro, but the enhancement was abolished by the addition of propranolol. These results suggest that acupuncture, by activation of the autonomic nervous system, modulates the immune response.

  4. Acupuncture in the treatment of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Lee, W C; Chen, M T; Huang, J K; Chung, C; Chang, L S

    1992-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was performed to compare the effect of acupuncture and intramuscular Avafortan injection in the treatment of renal colic. Our results showed that acupuncture is as effective in relieving renal colic as Avafortan but it had a more rapid analgesic onset (3.14 +/- 2.88 minutes versus 15.44 +/- 7.55 minutes, p less than 0.05). Of the patients in the Avafortan group 7 (43.8%) had side effects, including skin rash in 3, tachycardia in 2, drowsiness in 1 and facial flush in 1. No side effects were noted in the acupuncture group. During 2 hours of observation acupuncture and Avafortan seemed to be ineffective in promoting stone passage. However, patients receiving Avafortan treatment were more likely to have paralytic ileus. In summary, acupuncture can be a good alternative for the treatment of renal colic.

  5. Randomized clinical trial of facial acupuncture with or without body acupuncture for treatment of melasma.

    PubMed

    Rerksuppaphol, Lakkana; Charoenpong, Theekapun; Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture treatments in treating facial melasma, contrasting treatments involving facial acupuncture with facial/body acupuncture. Women suffering with melasma were randomly assigned into: 1) facial acupuncture (n = 20); or 2) facial/body acupuncture (n = 21). Each group was given 2 sessions per week for 8 weeks. Melasma area and darkness of its pigmentation were assessed using digital images. 95.2% and 90% of participants in facial/body and facial acupuncture, respectively, had decreased melasma areas, with a mean reduction area being 2.6 cm(2) (95%CI 1.6-3.6 cm(2)) and 2.4 cm(2) (95%CI 1.6-3.3 cm(2)), respectively. 66.7% (facial/body acupuncture) and 80.0% (facial acupuncture) of participants had lighter melasma pigmentation compared to their baselines (p-value = 0.482). Facial acupuncture, with or without body acupuncture, was shown to be effective in decreasing the size of melasma areas. This study is registered with the Thai Clinical Trial Registry (TCTR20140903004). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acupuncture as analgesia for low back pain, ankle sprain and migraine in emergency departments: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc; Parker, Shefton; Taylor, David; Smit, De Villiers; Ben-Meir, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Xue, Charlie

    2011-11-15

    Pain is the most common reason that patients present to an emergency department (ED) and is often inadequately managed. Evidence suggests that acupuncture is effective for pain relief, yet it is rarely practiced in the ED. The current study aims to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for providing effective analgesia to patients presenting with acute low back pain, migraine and ankle sprain at the EDs of four hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The study is a multi-site, randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial of acupuncture analgesia in patients who present to an ED with low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. Patients will be block randomized to receive either acupuncture alone, acupuncture as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone. Acupuncture will be applied according to Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Pain after one hour, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes measures include the following instruments; the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire, 24-hour Migraine Quality of Life questionnaire and Patient's Global Assessment of Ankle Injury Scale. These measures will be recorded at baseline, 1 hour after intervention, each hour until discharge and 48±12 hours of ED discharge. Data will also be collected on the safety and acceptability of acupuncture and health resource utilization. The results of this study will determine if acupuncture, alone or as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy provides effective, safe and acceptable pain relief for patients presenting to EDs with acute back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. The results will also identify the impact that acupuncture treatment may have upon health resource utilisation in the ED setting. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12609000989246.

  7. Fear of Reinjury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Meierbachtol, Adam; George, Steven Z.; Chmielewski, Terese L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: A sports injury has both physical and psychological consequences for the athlete. A common postinjury psychological response is elevated fear of reinjury. Objective: To provide an overview of the implications of fear of reinjury on the rehabilitation of athletes, including clinical methods to measure fear of reinjury; the impact of fear of reinjury on rehabilitation outcomes, including physical impairments, function, and return to sports rate; and potential interventions to address fear of reinjury during rehabilitation. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for articles published in the past 16 years (1990-2016) relating to fear of reinjury in athletes. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were searched for additionally relevant articles. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can negatively affect the recovery of physical impairments, reduce self-report function, and prevent a successful return to sport. Athletes with high fear of reinjury might benefit from a psychologically informed practice approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The application of psychologically informed practice would be to measure fear of reinjury in the injured athletes and provide interventions to reduce fear of reinjury to optimize rehabilitation outcomes. Conclusion: Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. Incorporating principles of psychologically informed practice into sports injury rehabilitation could improve rehabilitation outcomes for athletes with high fear of reinjury. PMID:27590793

  8. Fear of Reinjury in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Meierbachtol, Adam; George, Steven Z; Chmielewski, Terese L

    A sports injury has both physical and psychological consequences for the athlete. A common postinjury psychological response is elevated fear of reinjury. To provide an overview of the implications of fear of reinjury on the rehabilitation of athletes, including clinical methods to measure fear of reinjury; the impact of fear of reinjury on rehabilitation outcomes, including physical impairments, function, and return to sports rate; and potential interventions to address fear of reinjury during rehabilitation. PubMed was searched for articles published in the past 16 years (1990-2016) relating to fear of reinjury in athletes. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were searched for additionally relevant articles. Clinical review. Level 3. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can negatively affect the recovery of physical impairments, reduce self-report function, and prevent a successful return to sport. Athletes with high fear of reinjury might benefit from a psychologically informed practice approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The application of psychologically informed practice would be to measure fear of reinjury in the injured athletes and provide interventions to reduce fear of reinjury to optimize rehabilitation outcomes. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. Incorporating principles of psychologically informed practice into sports injury rehabilitation could improve rehabilitation outcomes for athletes with high fear of reinjury.

  9. Patients’ preconceptions of acupuncture: a qualitative study exploring the decisions patients make when seeking acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Like any other form of healthcare, acupuncture takes place in a particular context which can enhance or diminish treatment outcomes (i.e. can produce contextual effects). Patients’ expectations of acupuncture might be an important component of contextual effects, but we know relatively little about the origins and nature of patients’ expectations or wider preconceptions about acupuncture. Our aim was to identify the processes the underpin patients’ decisions to try acupuncture and thus begin to tease out the origins and nature of patients’ preconceptions. Methods One-off semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive, varied sample of 35 adults who had tried acupuncture for various conditions. Interviews explored people’s experiences of acupuncture treatment and techniques from framework and inductive thematic analysis were used to relate the data to the research question. Results We identified four distinct processes within participants’ accounts of deciding to try acupuncture: establishing a need for treatment, establishing a need for a new treatment, deciding to try acupuncture, and finding an acupuncturist. Family, friends and health care professionals played a role in these processes, providing support, advice, and increasing people’s general familiarity with acupuncture. When they came to their first acupuncture appointment, participants had hopes, concerns, and occasionally concrete expectations as to the nature of acupuncture treatment and its likely effects. Conclusions Existing theories of how context influences health outcomes could be expanded to better reflect the psychological components identified here, such as hope, desire, optimism and open-mindedness. Future research on the context of acupuncture should consider these elements of the pre-treatment context in addition to more established components such as expectations. There appears to be a need for accessible (i.e. well-disseminated), credible, and

  10. [Observation on Therapeutic Effects of Acupuncture Combined with Cutaneous Electrical Stimulation for Dysphagia in Patients with Cerebral 1nfarction].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-na; Wang, Zai-ling; Ning, Li-na; Yang, Hui; Xiong, Jie

    2015-06-01

    To observe the clinical effect of acupuncture combined with neck-skin electrical stimulation (NSES) on dysphagia in patients with cerebral infarction (CI). A total of 120 CI patients with dysphagia were randomly divided into acupuncture group, NSES group and acupuncture + NSES group (combined treatment group, n = 40 in each group). Acupuncture stimulation of Fengchi (GB20), Yifeng (TE 17), etc., and blood-letting of Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13) were administrated. NSES was applied to the bilateral sites of the neck-median line. The treatment was given once daily for two weeks. The swallow function and swallow dysfunction degree of the dysphasia patients were evaluated by water swallow test and food-intake scale, respectively. After one week's and two weeks' treatment, the water swallow score and swallow dysfunction score were significantly improved in the acupuncture, NSES and combined treatment groups (P<0. 01), and the difference values between pre- and post-treatment of the water swallow score and swallow ability score in the combined treatment group were obviously higher than those of the acupuncture and NSES groups (P<0. 01, P<0. 05). No significant differences were found between the acupuncture and NSES groups in both the water swallow score and swallow ability score after one and two weeks' treatment (P>0. 05). Of the three 40 cases in the acupuncture, NSES and combined treatment groups, 16, 18 and 27 were basically cured, 2, 3 and 5 experienced marked improvement, 15, 13 and 7 were improved, and 7, 6 and 1 failed in the treatment, with the effective rates being 82.5%, 85.0% and 97. 5%, respectively. The therapeutic effect of the combined treatment group was apparently superior to that of the simple acupuncture and simple NSES groups (P<0. 01). Acupuncture and NSES intervention is effective in improving dysphasia in CI patients and the effect of combined treatment of acupuncture and NSES is obviously better than that of the simple acupuncture and

  11. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the De qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:23055010

  12. Acupuncture in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the de qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes, such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs, and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain, and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe, but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture, implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases.

  13. Fear of future terrorism: Associated psychiatric burden.

    PubMed

    Abiola, T; Udofia, O; Sheikh, T L; Yusuf, D A

    2017-02-04

    The mental health burden from fear of future terrorism has not been given much research attention compared to the immediate mental distress such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Such neglected ongoing mental health morbidity associated with threats of terrorism had been described as pre-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS). The study highlighted this phenomenon (PTSS) in Nigeria by examining the catastrophic burden of the fear of future terrorism and associated psychiatric burden among adult population in Kaduna city. Participants were students and staff of Kaduna State University (KASU), Kaduna Polytechnic, and students awaiting admission into Kaduna State University. They responded to the following instruments after obtaining their informed consents: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Terrorism Catastrophising Scale (TCS), and the depression and Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) portion of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The TCS showed that 78.8% of the participants had from moderate to severe clinical distress on fear of terrorism. The TCS has a Cronbach's alpha of 0.721 and also had significant moderate correlation with depression (r=0.278; p<0.01) and GAD (r=0.201; p<0.01) scales of MINI. The study illustrated that the mental health burden from the fear of terrorism was high and this was relatively related to depression and GAD. This highlighted the need for ongoing monitoring and called for their effective prevention from the identified underlying cognitive mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Fear of suffocation alters respiration during obstructed breathing.

    PubMed

    Pappens, Meike; Smets, Elyn; Van Den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to investigate whether fear of suffocation predicts healthy persons' respiratory and affective responses to obstructed breathing as evoked by inspiratory resistive loads. Participants (N = 27 women, ages between 18 and 21 years) completed the Fear of Suffocation scale and underwent 16 trials in which an inspiratory resistive load of 15 cmH(2)O/l/s (small) or 40 cmH(2)O/l/s (large) was added to the breathing circuit for 40 s. Fear of suffocation was associated with higher arousal ratings for both loads. Loaded breathing was associated with a decrease in minute ventilation, but progressively less so for participants scoring higher on fear of suffocation when breathing against the large load. The present findings document a potentially panicogenic mechanism that may maintain and worsen respiratory discomfort in persons with fear of suffocation. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  15. Efficacy of acupuncture for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomised sham acupuncture-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Ding, Yulong; Wu, Jiani; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Likun; Liu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) is a major public health problem and the primary reason why older adults seek lumbar spine surgery. Acupuncture may be effective for DLSS, but the evidence supporting this possibility is still limited. Methods and analysis A total of 80 participants with DLSS will be randomly allocated to either an acupuncture group or a sham acupuncture (SA) group at a ratio of 1:1. 24 treatments will be provided over 8 weeks. The primary outcome is the score change of the Modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) responses from baseline to week 8. The secondary outcomes include the assessment of lower back pain and leg pain using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the change in the number of steps per month, and the assessment of the specific quality of life using the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire (SSSQ). We will follow-up with the participants until week 32. All of the participants who received allocation will be included in the statistical analysis. Ethics/dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Research Ethical Committee of Guang'anmen Hospital (Permission number: 2015EC114) and Fengtai Hospital of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine (Permission number: 16KE0409). The full data set will be made available when this trial is completed and published. Applications for the release of data should be made to ZL (principal investigator). Trial registration number NCT02644746. PMID:27852717

  16. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which "pain experience" and "pain behavior" become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related-injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury-related fear avoidance in athletes and could be used to identify potential psychological barriers to rehabilitation.

  17. Predictors of fear of death and self-mortality: an Atlantic Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Power, Trinda L; Smith, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    This research was undertaken to explore gender, religiosity, perceived time-left-to-live and the interactions between these variables as predictors of fear of death in 144 Atlantic Canadian students using the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale (MFODS). Predictions about cause, age, marital status, and place of death were also derived from the Do-It-Yourself-Death-Certificate and compared with actuarial data to determine accuracy. Results showed significant gender effects on 2 MFODS subscales, such that women demonstrated greater fear for significant others and fear of the dead. More religious participants expressed greater fear of the dead, fear of being destroyed, and fear of conscious death, whereas participants with lower religious conviction were more fearful of the unknown. In addition, significant interactions between the predictors on various subscales of the MFODS were observed. Finally, both men and women made inaccurate death-related predictions when compared to actuarial data but predicted differential causes of death.

  18. The American Response to Fear of Crime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    20 Reducing Citizens’ Fear of Crime ................................................................ 23 C onclusions...8217 fear of crime was justified. Finally some suggestions were presented to reduce citizens’ fear of crime. Who Fears Crime Skogan (1987) examined the...residents fear of crime were reduced . Belyea and Zingraff (1988) found rural residents had a significantly lower fear of crime than urban residents

  19. The sum of all fears: conceptual challenges with measuring fear of cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel S J; Smith, Allan Ben; Fardell, Joanna E

    2016-01-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is increasingly recognised as a major concer