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Sample records for acupuncture needle manipulation

  1. [Acupuncture therapy for regaining consciousness in terms of acupoint location, needle insertion and needle manipulation].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianggang; Gu, Wenlong; Ma, Fen; Du, Yuzheng; Zhao, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Acupuncture therapy for regaining consciousness activates soreness, numbness, distention, heaviness, radiating and moving, electric shock and ant climbing sensations at the specific acupoints in the stroke patients. Radiating and moving sensations are the summary of needling sensations such as soreness, numbness and twitching presenting during lifting and thrusting manipulation. These sensations are the essential factors of the therapeutic effect of regaining consciousness. Radiating sensation refers to the conduction along meridians and radiation of soreness and numbness. Moving sensation refers to the local muscular twitching at acupoints and the involuntary movement of limbs, joints and the distal. Acupuncture at the specific acupoints achieves radiating and moving sensations for promoting the circulation in meridians, regulating qi and mind and balancing yin and yang in stroke patients. This therapy was introduced in the paper in view of acupoint location, needle insertion and manipulation.

  2. Coarse needle surface potentiates analgesic effect elicited by acupuncture with twirling manipulation in rats with nociceptive pain.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunoh; Lee, Yangseok; Park, Hi-Joon; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2017-01-03

    Biomechanical phenomenon called "needle grasp" through the winding of connective tissue has been proposed as an action mechanism of acupuncture manipulation. The aim of the present study is to verify whether the needle grasp force affects the pain-relieving activity of acupuncture in the tail-flick latency (TFL) and the rat paw formalin tests. In order to make different roughness on the acupuncture needle surface, the needles with 0.2 mm-diameter were scratched using silicon carbide sandpapers with the grit numbers of 600 (mild coarse) and 200 (extra coarse). The surface roughness and rotation-induced torque of the scratched needles were then measured by atomic force microscope and Acusensor®, respectively. Rat abdominal wall tissues including insertion site of acupuncture needle were excised after 5 unidirectional rotations of the needles having various degrees of roughness, and the morphological changes of connective tissues were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) staining. Finally, the effects of coarse needle surface on anti-nociception induced by twirling manipulation were tested in rat TFL and formalin test. It was observed that the rougher the needle surface, the stronger the needle grasp force and thickness of subcutaneous connective tissue while rotating. TFL increased in proportion to surface roughness of the ground needles 10 min after acupuncture into the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) on rat's legs. In the rat formalin test, the rougher needle also significantly exerted the larger analgesic effect during both early and late phases compared to non-ground normal needle. Surface roughness of the acupuncture needle enhanced an anti-nociceptive activity of acupuncture therapy in rats, which partially supports the mechanical signaling theory through connective tissues in acupuncture manipulation.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle....

  8. [Inheritance and evolution of acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times].

    PubMed

    Yu, Daxiong; Ma, Ruijie; Fang, Jianqiao

    2015-05-01

    There are many eminent acupuncture masters in modern times in the regions of Zhejiang province, which has developed the acupuncture schools of numerous characteristics and induces the important impacts at home and abroad. Through the literature collection on the acupuncture schools in Zhejiang and the interviews to the parties involved, it has been discovered that the acupuncture manipulation techniques of acupuncture masters in modern times are specifically featured. Those techniques are developed on the basis of Neijing (Internal Classic), Jinzhenfu (Ode to Gold Needle) and Zhenjiu Dacheng (Great Compendium of Acupuncture and Moxibustion). No matter to obey the old maxim or study by himself, every master lays the emphasis on the research and interpretation of classical theories and integrates the traditional with the modern. In the paper, the acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times are stated from four aspects, named needling techniques in Internal Classic, feijingzouqi needling technique, penetrating needling technique and innovation of acupuncture manipulation.

  9. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongbae J; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2011-12-01

    Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation+rotation. In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation+rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted.

  10. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  11. [Quantitative research on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Grierson, Lawrence; Wu, Mary X; Breuer, Ronny; Carnahan, Heather

    2014-03-01

    To explore a method of quantitative evaluation on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation and further analyze behavior features of professional acupuncture manipulation. According to acupuncture basic manipulations, Scales for Operation Behavior of Acupuncture Basic Manipulation was made and Delphi method was adopted to test its validity. Two independent estimators utilized this scale to assess operation behavior of acupuncture manipulate among 12 acupuncturists and 12 acupuncture-novices and calculate interrater reliability, also the differences of total score of operation behavior in the two groups as well as single-step score, including sterilization, needle insertion, needle manipulation and needle withdrawal, were compared. The validity of this scale was satisfied. The inter-rater reliability was 0. 768. The total score of operation behavior in acupuncturist group was significantly higher than that in the acupuncture-novice group (13.80 +/- 1.05 vs 11.03 +/- 2.14, P < 0.01). The scores of needle insertion and needle manipulation in the acupuncturist group were significantly higher than those in the acupuncture-novice group (4.28 +/- 0.91 vs 2.54 +/- 1.51, P < 0.01; 2.56 +/- 0.65 vs 1.88 +/- 0.88, P < 0.05); however, the scores of sterilization and needle withdrawal in the acupuncturist group were not different from those in the acupuncture-novice group. This scale is suitable for quantitative evaluation on operation behavior of acupuncture manipulation. The behavior features of professional acupuncture manipulation are mainly presented with needle insertion and needle manipulation which has superior difficulty, high coordination and accuracy.

  12. [Standardizing the manipulation procedure of acupuncture-moxibustion, reinforcing the training of' clinical skill: learning experience of Acupuncture-moxibustion Clinical Skills Training: Chapter of Commonly Used Needling and Moxibustion Techniques].

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongfang; Yang, Chao; Tang, Jie; Qin, Qiuguo; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhao, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    The book Acupuncture-moxibustion Clinical Skills Training is one of "Twelfth Five-Year Plan" in novative teaching materials, which is published by People's Medical Publishing House. Through learning the first half of the book commonly used needling and moxibustion techniques, it is realized that the selection of book content is reasonable and much attention is paid to needling and moxibustion techniques; the chapter arrangement is well-organized, and the form is novel, which is concise and intuitive; for every technique, great attention is paid to standardize the manipulation procedure and clarify the technique key, simultaneously the safety of acupuncture and moxibustion is also emphasized. The characteristics of the book, including innovativeness, practicability, are highlighted, and it greatly helps to improve students' clinical skills and examination ability.

  13. Introducing a placebo needle into acupuncture research.

    PubMed

    Streitberger, K; Kleinhenz, J

    1998-08-01

    A problem acupuncture research has to face is the concept of a control group. If, in control groups, non-acupoint needling is done, physiological acupuncture effects are implied. Therefore the effects shown in this group are often close to those shown in the acupuncture group. In other trials, control groups have received obviously different treatments, such as transcutaneous electrical nervous stimulation or TENS-laser treatment; it is not clear if the effects of acupuncture are due only to the psychological effects of the treatment. We developed a placebo acupuncture needle, with which it should be possible to simulate an acupuncture procedure without penetrating the skin. In a cross-over experiment with 60 volunteers we tested whether needling with the placebo needle feels any different from real acupuncture. Of 60 volunteers, 54 felt a penetration with acupuncture (mean visual analogue scale [VAS] 13.4; SD 10.58) and 47 felt it with placebo (VAS 8.86; SD 10.55), 34 felt a dull pain sensation (DEQI) with acupuncture and 13 with placebo. None of the volunteers suspected that the needle may not have penetrated the skin. The placebo needle is sufficiently credible to be used in investigations of the effects of acupuncture.

  14. Acupuncture needles and the Seebeck effect: do temperature gradients produce electrostimulation?

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Kwok, G; Cosic, I

    1997-01-01

    Acupuncture may act through modifying bioelectric events and this may occur through different mechanisms including the application of external currents. According to the Seebeck effect which produces a potential difference when a temperature gradient is placed across a conductor, the physical properties of acupuncture needles may produce internal currents due to the temperature gradient across the needle when placed insitu. Such currents were detected when needles were differentially heated and these currents were found to be in the range capable of producing biological effects. The traditional design of acupuncture needles and traditional needle manipulations seem to maintain a temperature gradient across the needle and thus enhance the Seebeck effect.

  15. Examination of surface conditions and other physical properties of commonly used stainless steel acupuncture needles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi Min; Xu, Shanqing; Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2014-04-01

    The present work examined the surface conditions and various other physical properties of sterilised single-use stainless steel acupuncture needles from two of the most popular brands widely used in many countries. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken for 10 randomly chosen needles from each brand. Further SEM images were taken after each of these needles underwent a standard manipulation with an acupuncture needling practice gel. A comparison of forces and torques during the needling process was also carried out. The SEM images revealed significant surface irregularities and inconsistencies at the needle tips, especially for needles from one of the two brands. Metallic lumps and small, loosely attached pieces of material were observed on the surfaces of some needles. Some of the lumps and pieces of material seen on the needle surfaces disappeared after the acupuncture manipulation. If these needles had been used on patients, the metallic lumps and small pieces of material could have been deposited in human tissues, which could have caused adverse events such as dermatitis. Malformed needle tips might also cause other adverse effects including bleeding, haematoma/bruising, or strong pain during needling. An off-centre needle tip could result in the needle altering its direction during insertion and consequently failing to reach the intended acupuncture point or damaging adjacent tissues. These findings highlight the need for improved quality control of acupuncture needles, with a view to further enhancing the safety and comfort of acupuncture users.

  16. Evaluation of phantom-based education system for acupuncture manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Ye-Seul; Park, Hi-Joon; Lee, Hyejung; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-01-01

    Although acupuncture manipulation has been regarded as one of the important factors in clinical outcome, it has been difficult to train novice students to become skillful experts due to a lack of adequate educational program and tools. In the present study, we investigated whether newly developed phantom acupoint tools would be useful to practice-naïve acupuncture students for practicing the three different types of acupuncture manipulation to enhance their skills. We recruited 12 novice students and had them practice acupuncture manipulations on the phantom acupoint (5% agarose gel). We used the Acusensor 2 and compared their acupuncture manipulation techniques, for which the target criteria were depth and time factors, at acupoint LI11 in the human body before and after 10 training sessions. The outcomes were depth of needle insertion, depth error from target criterion, time of rotating, lifting, and thrusting, time error from target criteria and the time ratio. After 10 training sessions, the students showed significantly improved outcomes in depth of needle, depth error (rotation, reducing lifting/thrusting), thumb-forward time error, thumb-backward time error (rotation), and lifting time (reinforcing lifting/thrusting). The phantom acupoint tool could be useful in a phantom-based education program for acupuncture-manipulation training for students. For advanced education programs for acupuncture manipulation, we will need to collect additional information, such as patient responses, acupoint-specific anatomical characteristics, delicate tissue-like modeling, haptic and visual feedback, and data from an acupuncture practice simulator.

  17. Physical Properties Of Acupuncture Needles: Do Disposable Acupuncture Needles Break With Normal Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A manuscript submitted to the faculty of the Orofacial Pain Graduate...JOURNAL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ACUPUNCTURE NEEDLES: DO DISPOSABLE ACUPUNCTURE NEEDLES BREAK WITH NORMAL USE? James Kyle Vick DDS, Orofacial Pain...MS CAPT, DC, USN Orofacial Pain Department Head Naval Postgraduate Dental School vi    TABLE OF CONTENTS GUIDELINE I. TITLE PAGE

  18. Visualizing Motion Patterns in Acupuncture Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Seul; Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2016-07-16

    Acupuncture manipulation varies widely among practitioners in clinical settings, and it is difficult to teach novice students how to perform acupuncture manipulation techniques skillfully. The Acupuncture Manipulation Education System (AMES) is an open source software system designed to enhance acupuncture manipulation skills using visual feedback. Using a phantom acupoint and motion sensor, our method for acupuncture manipulation training provides visual feedback regarding the actual movement of the student's acupuncture manipulation in addition to the optimal or intended movement, regardless of whether the manipulation skill is lifting, thrusting, or rotating. Our results show that students could enhance their manipulation skills by training using this method. This video shows the process of manufacturing phantom acupoints and discusses several issues that may require the attention of individuals interested in creating phantom acupoints or operating this system.

  19. [Sheng's acupuncture manipulation at bone-nearby acupoints and the academic thoughts].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ji-li; Jin, Xiao-qing

    2014-11-01

    Sheng's acupuncture manipulation at bone-nearby acupoints is a set of needling manipulation of the chief physician of TCM, SHENG Xie-sun, summarized through his over 50 years clinical experiences and on the basis of Internal Classic. Regarding this manipulation, on the premise of acupoint selection based on syndrome differentiation, the acupoints close to bone are possibly selected and punctured, with the needle tip toward bone edge, and followed by the technique to achieve reducing purpose. Clinically, the significant immediate analgesia can be achieved in pain disorders such as headache and toothache. Professor Sheng thought, corresponding to the location of needle insertion and needling depth, the tissue layers of needle tip passing through should be considered specially. The site of needle insertion should be changeable so as to ensure the needle tip reaching the bone. This manipulation for analgesia provides a certain guide for acupuncture study, especially for the mechanism study on acupuncture analgesia.

  20. Evaluation of Phantom-Based Education System for Acupuncture Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Ye-Seul; Park, Hi-Joon; Lee, Hyejung; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture manipulation has been regarded as one of the important factors in clinical outcome, it has been difficult to train novice students to become skillful experts due to a lack of adequate educational program and tools. Objectives In the present study, we investigated whether newly developed phantom acupoint tools would be useful to practice-naïve acupuncture students for practicing the three different types of acupuncture manipulation to enhance their skills. Methods We recruited 12 novice students and had them practice acupuncture manipulations on the phantom acupoint (5% agarose gel). We used the Acusensor 2 and compared their acupuncture manipulation techniques, for which the target criteria were depth and time factors, at acupoint LI11 in the human body before and after 10 training sessions. The outcomes were depth of needle insertion, depth error from target criterion, time of rotating, lifting, and thrusting, time error from target criteria and the time ratio. Results After 10 training sessions, the students showed significantly improved outcomes in depth of needle, depth error (rotation, reducing lifting/thrusting), thumb-forward time error, thumb-backward time error (rotation), and lifting time (reinforcing lifting/thrusting). Conclusions The phantom acupoint tool could be useful in a phantom-based education program for acupuncture-manipulation training for students. For advanced education programs for acupuncture manipulation, we will need to collect additional information, such as patient responses, acupoint-specific anatomical characteristics, delicate tissue-like modeling, haptic and visual feedback, and data from an acupuncture practice simulator. PMID:25689598

  1. Anisotropic tissue motion induced by acupuncture needling along intermuscular connective tissue planes.

    PubMed

    Fox, James R; Gray, Weili; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2014-04-01

    Acupuncture needle manipulation causes mechanical deformation of connective tissue, which in turn results in mechanical stimulation of fibroblasts, with active changes in cell shape and autocrine purinergic signaling. We have previously shown using ultrasound elastography in humans that acupuncture needle manipulation causes measurable movement of tissue up to several centimeters away from the needle. The goal of this study was to quantify the spatial pattern of tissue displacement and deformation (shear strain) in response to acupuncture needling along an intermuscular connective tissue plane compared with needling over the belly of a muscle. Eleven (11) healthy human subjects underwent a single testing session during which robotic acupuncture needling was performed while recording tissue displacement using ultrasound. Outcome measures were axial and lateral tissue displacement as well as lateral shear strain calculated using ultrasound elastography postprocessing. Tissue displacement and strain extended further in the longitudinal direction when needling between muscles, and in the transverse direction when needling over the belly of a muscle. The anisotropic tissue motion observed in this study may influence the spatial distribution of local connective tissue cellular responses following acupuncture needle manipulation.

  2. [The essence of Professor Wu Lian-Zhong's acupuncture manipulation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Yi; Wu, Lian-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    The painless needle insertion technique, summarized by Professor WU Lian-zhong during his decades of acupuncture clinical practice is introduced in this article, which is characterized as soft, flexible, fast, plucking and activating antipathogenic qi. The Sancai (three layers) lifting and thrusting manipulation technique is adopted by Professor WU for getting the qi sensation. And features of 10 kinds of needling sensation such as soreness, numbness, heaviness, distension, pain, cold, hot, radiation, jumping and contracture are summarized. Finger force, amplitude, speed and time length are also taken as the basis of reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Moreover, examples are also given to explain the needling technique on some specific points which further embodies Professor WU's unique experiences and understandings on acupuncture.

  3. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Investigating the effects of three needling parameters (manipulation, retention time, and insertion site) on needling sensation and pain profiles: a study of eight deep needling interventions.

    PubMed

    Loyeung, Bertrand Y K; Cobbin, Deirdre M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In traditional Chinese acupuncture, needle sensation (deqi) is purported to contribute to a therapeutic outcome. While researchers have attempted to define deqi qualitatively, few have examined the effects of needling parameters on its intensity. Methods. 24 healthy subjects completed eight interventions scheduled at least one week apart, which involved manual acupuncture to LI4 or a designated nonacupoint (NAP) on the hand, with real or simulated manipulation each three minutes and needle retentions of one or 21 minutes. Intensities of needling sensation and pain were reported every three minutes and sensation qualities were reported post-intervention. Results. Immediately after needle insertion, similar levels of mean needle sensation and of pain were reported independent of intervention. At subsequent measurement times, only two interventions (one at LI4 and one at NAP) maintained statistically significantly elevated needle sensation and pain scores and reported higher numbers of needle sensation descriptors. For both, the needle was retained for 21 minutes and manipulated every three minutes. Neither intervention differed significantly in terms of levels of pain, and needle sensation or numbers and qualities of needle sensation described. Conclusion. In this group of healthy subjects, the initial needling for all eight interventions elicited similar levels of needle sensation and pain. These levels were only maintained if there was ongoing of needle manipulation and retention of the needle. By contrast, the strength of needle sensation or pain experienced was independent of insertion site.

  5. Investigating the Effects of Three Needling Parameters (Manipulation, Retention Time, and Insertion Site) on Needling Sensation and Pain Profiles: A Study of Eight Deep Needling Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Loyeung, Bertrand Y. K.; Cobbin, Deirdre M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In traditional Chinese acupuncture, needle sensation (deqi) is purported to contribute to a therapeutic outcome. While researchers have attempted to define deqi qualitatively, few have examined the effects of needling parameters on its intensity. Methods. 24 healthy subjects completed eight interventions scheduled at least one week apart, which involved manual acupuncture to LI4 or a designated nonacupoint (NAP) on the hand, with real or simulated manipulation each three minutes and needle retentions of one or 21 minutes. Intensities of needling sensation and pain were reported every three minutes and sensation qualities were reported post-intervention. Results. Immediately after needle insertion, similar levels of mean needle sensation and of pain were reported independent of intervention. At subsequent measurement times, only two interventions (one at LI4 and one at NAP) maintained statistically significantly elevated needle sensation and pain scores and reported higher numbers of needle sensation descriptors. For both, the needle was retained for 21 minutes and manipulated every three minutes. Neither intervention differed significantly in terms of levels of pain, and needle sensation or numbers and qualities of needle sensation described. Conclusion. In this group of healthy subjects, the initial needling for all eight interventions elicited similar levels of needle sensation and pain. These levels were only maintained if there was ongoing of needle manipulation and retention of the needle. By contrast, the strength of needle sensation or pain experienced was independent of insertion site. PMID:24159337

  6. [Review and reflection on 2010' Hwato Cup National University Students' Acupuncture Manipulation Skills Competition].

    PubMed

    Kuai, Le; Qu, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Hai-Meng; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Jian-Min; Shen, Xue-Yong

    2012-02-01

    The questionnaire and the result of 2010' Hwato Cup National University Students' Acupuncture Manipulation Skills Competition were analyzed in this paper. It was showed that the competition achieved the significant effects of enhancing acupuncture manipulation skills for the university students and promoting the standardization on teaching acupuncture manipulation skills. The teachers and students were not very satisfied with the current acupuncture manipulation skill education. In the competition, only the item of reciting the classics achieved more than 90 scores, which just displayed the memory ability. The results of the manipulation competition were generally not very high. It is suggested that concerning to teaching acupuncture and moxibustion in the future, the ratio of class time for improving the practice ability on the human body should be increased and the practice on some manipulation techniques such as inserting the needle by holding the needle tip with the pressing hand, reinforcing-reducing technique by twirling and rotating the needle and warming needle technique should be intensified. It is necessary to enhance the interpretation, emphasis and supplementation on the keys and details of some manipulations of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  7. [Doctor HUANG Shi-ping's acupuncture with golden needles].

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Fei; Ma, Zeng-Bin; Xin, Si-Yuan; Zhu, Jiang

    2013-08-01

    Taking Doctor HUANG Shi-ping as the representative, the school of Huang's golden needle is based on Chinese martial art. Golden needles are adopted as main tool. Attaching great importance on the combination of acupuncture and moxibustioin, it is also characterized with penetrating needling with long needles. Through the development of three generations, it once outshone other schools in the field of acupuncture, and became famous all over the world. It made great contribution to the development of the course of acupuncture. However, with the development of the history, the form of acupuncture education as well as apparatus were all undergone an unified reform. Therefore, Doctor HUANG Shi-ping's acupuncture school be lost gradually.

  8. Effect of Acupuncture Manipulations at LI4 or LI11 on Blood Flow and Skin Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihui; Ahn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture induces physiological changes, and patients have reported warm or cool sensations with "Burning Fire" (BF) or "Penetrating Cool" (PC) manipulations. This study aimed to evaluate whether these techniques had distinct effects on skin temperature and blood flow and to examine whether skin temperature correlated with blood flow. The participants were 25 healthy volunteers, each receiving acupuncture manipulations on points LI4 and LI11 bilaterally. Skin temperatures and blood flow were recorded continuously on both arms. The study found that acupuncture significantly increased skin temperature on the needling arm by 0.3514°C on average, but decreased it on the contralateral arm by 0.2201°C on average. Blood flow decreased significantly in both arms during needling (-3.4% and -5.97% for the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides, respectively), but the changes in skin temperature did not correlate with the changes in blood flow. Furthermore, these changes were not significantly different between acupuncture techniques and acupuncture points. In conclusion, acupuncture changes local skin temperature and blood flow independent of the manipulation technique. Moreover, blood flow may not be affected by the increased temperature on the needling arm. These results help to verify traditional Chinese medicine concepts and may help in establishing standards for acupuncture treatments.

  9. Evidence and expert opinions: Dry needling versus acupuncture (II) : The American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety (AAPAS) White Paper 2016.

    PubMed

    Fan, Arthur Yin; Xu, Jun; Li, Yong-Ming

    2017-02-01

    In the United States and other Western countries, dry needling has been a topic in academic and legal fields. This White Paper is to provide the authoritative information of dry needling versus acupuncture to academic scholars, healthcare professionals, administrators, policymakers, and the general public by providing the authoritative evidence and expertise regarding critical issues of dry needling and reaching a consensus. We conclude that Dr. Travell, Dr. Gunn, Dr. Baldry and others who have promoted dry needling by simply rebranding (1) acupuncture as dry needling and (2) acupuncture points as trigger points (dry needling points). Dry needling simply using English biomedical terms (especially using "fascia" hypothesis) in replace of their equivalent Chinese medical terms. Dry needling is an over-simplified version of acupuncture derived from traditional Chinese acupuncture except for emphasis on biomedical language when treating neuromuscularskeletal pain (dry needling promoters redefined it as "myofascial pain"). Trigger points belong to the category of Ashi acupuncture points in traditional Chinese acupuncture, and they are not a new discovery. By applying acupuncture points, dry needling is actually trigger point acupuncture, an invasive therapy (a surgical procedure) instead of manual therapy. Dr. Travell admitted to the general public that dry needling is acupuncture, and acupuncture professionals practice dry needling as acupuncture therapy and there are several criteria in acupuncture profession to locate trigger points as acupuncture points. Among acupuncture schools, dry needling practitioners emphasize acupuncture's local responses while other acupuncturists pay attention to the responses of both local, distal, and whole body responses. For patients' safety, dry needling practitioners should meet standards required for licensed acupuncturists and physicians.

  10. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  11. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment. PMID:27301303

  12. De qi: Chinese acupuncture patients' experiences and beliefs regarding acupuncture needling sensation--an exploratory survey.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jun J; Farrar, John T; Armstrong, Katrina; Donahue, Alethea; Ngo, Jessica; Bowman, Marjorie A

    2007-12-01

    While de qi, the acupuncture needling sensation, has been considered as an important component of acupuncture, little is known of the acupuncture patient's experience and beliefs about de qi in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to describe Chinese acupuncture patients' perceived sensations of, and beliefs about, acupuncture needling. We developed a questionnaire and conducted a survey study at two time periods among 200 subjects at six outpatient acupuncture clinics in Beijing, China. Respondents were 55% female and had a mean age of 41 years. The most common types of needling sensations reported by subjects were the terms 'distended' (94%), 'sore' (81%), 'electric' (81%) and 'numb' (78%). Eighty-nine percent of subjects reported that the needling sensation travelled away from the puncturing points or travelled among the needling points. Eighty-two percent of subjects believed that the needling sensation was very important for acupuncture treatment, and 68% further indicated that the stronger the needling sensation, the more effective the therapy. Eighty-one percent of subjects found the acupuncture process to be very comfortable and relaxing. Chinese acupuncture patients described the common characteristics of de qi and its migratory nature. The sensations were believed to be important in producing clinical efficacy by most patients. Measuring the sensations described as de qi in future prospective studies will help us understand the degree to which this phenomenon has an effect on the physiological outcome and clinical response to acupuncture. There appears to be a limit to the number of sensations that can be discriminated by each individual patient, and further development of the questionnaire is planned.

  13. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... but six to eight treatments are common. During acupuncture Acupuncture points are situated in all areas of ... no discomfort when the needles are removed. After acupuncture Some people feel relaxed and others feel energized ...

  14. Modifying Bodily Self-Awareness during Acupuncture Needle Stimulation Using the Rubber Hand Illusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Seon; Kim, Yun-Ji; Lee, Soon-Ho; Lee, Hyejung; Lee, In-Seon; Park, Hi-Joon; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2013-01-01

    Background. The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm that manipulates important aspects of body self-awareness. Objectives. We were interested in whether modifying bodily self-awareness by manipulation of body ownership and visual expectations using the RHI would change the subjective perception of pain as well as the autonomic response to acupuncture needle stimulation. Methods. Acupuncture needle stimulation was applied to the real hand during the RHI with (experiment 1) or without (experiment 2) visual expectation while measuring concurrent autonomic changes such as the skin conductance response (SCR). Subjective responses such as perception of the RHI and perceived pain were measured by questionnaires. Results. In experiment 1, the amplitude of the increase in SCR was visibly higher during the synchronous session compared with that of the asynchronous session. In experiment 2, the amplitude of the increase of SCR was lower for the synchronous session compared with that for the asynchronous session. Comparing these two experiments, the visual expectation of needle stimulation produced a greater autonomic response to acupuncture stimulation. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the sympathetic response to acupuncture needle stimulation is primarily influenced by visual expectation rather than by modifications of body ownership.

  15. Modifying Bodily Self-Awareness during Acupuncture Needle Stimulation Using the Rubber Hand Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dong-Seon; Kim, Yun-Ji; Lee, Soon-Ho; Lee, Hyejung; Lee, In-Seon; Park, Hi-Joon; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2013-01-01

    Background. The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm that manipulates important aspects of body self-awareness. Objectives. We were interested in whether modifying bodily self-awareness by manipulation of body ownership and visual expectations using the RHI would change the subjective perception of pain as well as the autonomic response to acupuncture needle stimulation. Methods. Acupuncture needle stimulation was applied to the real hand during the RHI with (experiment 1) or without (experiment 2) visual expectation while measuring concurrent autonomic changes such as the skin conductance response (SCR). Subjective responses such as perception of the RHI and perceived pain were measured by questionnaires. Results. In experiment 1, the amplitude of the increase in SCR was visibly higher during the synchronous session compared with that of the asynchronous session. In experiment 2, the amplitude of the increase of SCR was lower for the synchronous session compared with that for the asynchronous session. Comparing these two experiments, the visual expectation of needle stimulation produced a greater autonomic response to acupuncture stimulation. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the sympathetic response to acupuncture needle stimulation is primarily influenced by visual expectation rather than by modifications of body ownership. PMID:23690859

  16. [Clinical efficacy on xerosis conjunctivitis of liver and kidney yin deficiency treated with SHI's acupuncture manipulation].

    PubMed

    Ni, Weimin; Li, Jie; Ji, Qing; Song, Yi; Liu, Baojun; Wang, Guimao; Zhu, Jiong; Chen, Hanping

    2016-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of the patients of xerosis conjunctivitis with liver and kidney yin deficiency among the combined therapy of acupuncture and Shi's manipulation, common acupuncture and artificial tears therapy. One hundred and eight patients were randomized into an acupuncture group, a SHI's manipulation group and an artificial tears group, 36 cases in each group. A total of 15 cases dropped out before the end of the study, including 4 cases in the acupuncture group, 6 cases in the SHI's manipulation group, and 5 cases in the artificial tears group. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was applied to Jingming (BL 1) and Qiuhou (EX-HN 7) on the affected side, and the bilateral Sanyinjiao (SP 6) and Taixi (KI 3). The needles were retained for 20 min. In the SHI's manipulation group, on the basis of the treatment as the acupuncture group, Shuigou (GV26) was added and stimulated with SHI's acupuncture manipulation. In these two groups, acupuncture was given 3 times a week totally for 3 weeks. In the artificial tears group, sodium hyaluronate eye drops were used, 5 times a day, for 3 weeks totally. Separately, before treatment, at the moment after the 1st treatment and 3 weeks after treatment, the subjective symptom score, Schirmer I test, breakup time (BUT) of tear film were observed in each group. (1) Subjective symptom score: at the moment after the 1st treatment and 3 weeks after treatment, the scores in each group were all reduced significantly as compared with those before treatment (all P < 0.05). At the moment after the 1st treatment, the score in the SHI's manipulation group and the artificial tears group was reduced apparently as compared with that in the acupuncture group (both P < 0.05). In 3 weeks of treatment, the score in the SHI's manipulation group was reduced apparently as compared with the acupuncture group and the artificial tears group (both P < 0.05). (2) For Schirmer I test, at the moment of the 1st treatment, the result in the SHI

  17. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-feng; Deng, Shi-zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-hong

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3–4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. PMID:27651774

  18. Safety of different acupuncture manipulations for posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Shi-Zhe; He, Si; Huang, Ling-Hui; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture at Fengchi (GB20) in the posterior neck improves vertigo. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal epidural hematoma have been reported to occur after acupuncture in the posterior neck. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the safety of acupuncture at Fengchi. Laboratory tests and adverse event reports were used to evaluate the safety of different acupuncture manipulations for the treatment of posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo. A total of 136 patients were randomly assigned to four groups. Verum acupuncture was conducted with different needle insertion directions (contralateral paropia or prominentia laryngea) and different needle twisting frequencies (60 or 120 times/minute) at Fengchi and matching acupoints (for example, Zhongwan [CV12], Qihai [CV6], Zusanli [ST36], and Fenglong [ST40]). The patients received 14 treatments over 3-4 weeks. Routine blood analysis, hepatic and renal function tests, urine and feces tests and electrocardiography were performed before the first treatment session and after the final session. Adverse events were recorded after every session. Of the 136 patients, 120 completed the study. There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment test results in any of the groups. Only five patients suffered from minor adverse events (needling pain, slight hematoma and transient chest tightness). No serious adverse events were found. Our results indicate that a 14-session course of needling at Fengchi is relatively safe for treating posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo.

  19. The muscle twitch in myofascial pain relief: effects of acupuncture and other needling methods.

    PubMed

    Chu, J; Schwartz, I

    2002-01-01

    Proposed is that needling methods such as acupuncture, primarily effect pain relief in myofascial pain through a local mechanism, elicitation of muscle twitches. Occasionally, diagnostic needling procedures such as electromyography (EMG) can relieve such pain through insertional intramuscular movements of the needle electrode. This results in stimulation of the motor end-plate zones (MEPZs), eliciting muscle twitches. As needle elicitation of muscle twitches is a common diagnostic technique to identify myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), muscle twitches elicited at such points may be therapeutic, not just diagnostic. Occasionally evoked small local muscle twitches are observed in pain relieving methods using needle penetration or manipulation, such as classical or electrical acupuncture and intramuscular stimulation (IMS). Twitch elicitation has been observed to be essential to obtain myofascial pain relief associated with the needling methods of automated and electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ATOIMS and ETOIMS). These two methods facilitate the elicitation of larger force twitches by mechanical or electrical stimulation respectively at motor end-plate zones.

  20. Varying assay geometry to emulate connective tissue planes in an in vitro model of acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Julias, Margaret; Buettner, Helen M.; Shreiber, David I.

    2011-01-01

    During traditional acupuncture, fine needles are inserted subcutaneously and rotated, which causes loose fascial tissue to wind around the needle. This coupling is stronger at acupuncture points, which tend to fall above intermuscular fascial planes, than control points, which lay above skeletal muscle. These different anatomical constraints may affect the mechanical coupling. Fascia at acupuncture points is bounded on two sides by skeletal muscle, but at control points is essentially unbounded. These differences were approximated in simple in vitro models. To emulate the narrower boundary within the intermuscular plane, type 1 collagen was cast in circular gels of different radii. To model the channel-like nature of these planes, collagen was cast in elliptical gels with major and minor axes matching the large and small circular gels, respectively, and in planar gels constrained on two sides. Acupuncture needles were inserted into the gels and rotated via a computer-controlled motor while capturing the evolution of fiber alignment under cross-polarization. Small circular gels aligned faster, but failed earlier than large circular gels. Rotation in elliptical and planar gels generated more alignment-per-revolution than circular gels. Planar gels were particularly resistant to failure. Fiber alignment in circular gels was isotropic, but was stronger in the direction of the minor axis in elliptical and planar gels. In fibroblast-populated gels, cells followed the alignment of the collagen fibers, and also became denser in regions of stronger alignment. These results suggest that the anatomy at acupuncture points provides unique boundaries that accentuate the mechanical response to needle manipulation. PMID:21234998

  1. [Peripheral facial paralysis treated with the adapted acupuncture technique of heat-producing needling].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Weli, Qing-Lin

    2011-09-01

    To improve the manipulations of traditional heat-producing needling, and observe its therapeutic effect on peripheral facial paralysis. Acupuncture was adopted for all the 50 patients with peripheral facial paralysis. Acupoints such as Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6), Qianzheng (Extra), Fengchi(GB 20), Yifeng (TE 17) of the affected side, Hegu (LI 4) of the healthy side, Shousanli (LI 10), Zusanli (ST 36) and Taichong (LR 3) of both sides were adopted. And an adapted heat-producing needling was applied. With the left thumb of the doctor press at the point, the needle was rotated slowly with the right thumb moving forward and index finger moving backward to maintain the needling sensation. Then, heavier pressure was given with the left thumb, and a 9-time lifting and thrusting manipulation with small amplitude, low and even frequency by the right thumb and the index finger. Heavy pressure was maintained by the left thumb, and the needle was inserted by the right thumb and index finger to promote the needling sensation. Thus, the tip of the needle was always kept at the level where the needling sensation appeared. Therefore, a heat sensation can be felt by the patient under the needle or at the distal area. The treatment should be given once a day. And therapeutic effect was observed after 15 times continue treatment. All the 50 patients were cured without any sequela. Adapted heat-producing needling can promote the recovery of the function of facial muscle, and the effect of treatment of peripheral facial paralysis with the manipulation is confirmed.

  2. [Brief introduction of acupuncture needling and teaching keypoint].

    PubMed

    Hou, Shu-wei; Guo, Li; Kong, Su-ping

    2014-09-01

    We summarized our accumulated clinical and teaching experiences and explored the regularity of acupuncture needling and teaching. It is of great importance in pressing hand during inserting needle. Stroking and pressing are two crucial parts which deserve more attention, and seldom useage of pressing hand should be abolished. Operating hand needs practice before inserting needle, while it should fully relaxed during inserting. Blending "touching", "stretch" "gathering" "erupting" and "advancing" in single moment, applying appropriate dynamic mode of inserting needle such as "join 3 forces as one" "3 points in a line" expertly and naturally. In addition, enough attention should be paid on "altering direction" and "shifting point". Inserting deftly and powerfully, no/slight sensation, deqi when inserting needle are the highest reflection as an acupuncturist.

  3. [From manual workshop to international standard maker: exploration on production standard of acupuncture needle by Chengjiang acupuncture school].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Cao, Yang; Xia, Youbing

    2015-02-01

    ABSTRACT The exploration course on production standard of acupuncture needle by Chengjiang acupuncture school is reviewed in this paper. After new China was established, acupuncture needle standard was unified by Mr. CHENG Dan-an, which guided Suzhou Hua Erfang (predecessor of Suzhou Medical Supplies Factory) to make the quality standards and testing methods of acupuncture needle and improved the production process to make the modern acupuncture needle. Based on this, Suzhou Medical Supplies Factory followed the time development pace, ac tively introduced new technology, carried out technological innovation, and constantly improved the level of production technology, as a result, it gradually developed into one of the world's largest acupuncture needle production suppliers. Meanwhile, after establishing China's first national standard on acupuncture needle (GB 2024-1980), the Suzhou Medical Supplies Factory took the lead to draft "ISO) 17218:2014 the disposable use asepsis acupuncture needle", which was officially published as an international standard. The Suzhou Medical Supplies Factory developed from a manual workshop to an international standard maker.

  4. Evidence and expert opinions: Dry needling versus acupuncture (I) : The American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety (AAPAS) White Paper 2016.

    PubMed

    Fan, Arthur Yin; Xu, Jun; Li, Yong-Ming

    2017-01-01

    In the last twenty years, in the United States and other Western countries, dry needling (DN) became a hot and debatable topic, not only in academic but also in legal fields. This White Paper is to provide the authoritative information of DN versus acupuncture to academic scholars, healthcare professional administrators, lawmakers, and the general public through providing the authoritative evidence and experts' opinions regarding critical issues of DN versus acupuncture, and then reach consensus. DN is the use of dry needles alone, either solid filiform acupuncture needles or hollow-core hypodermic needles, to insert into the body for the treatment of muscle pain and related myofascial pain syndrome. DN is sometimes also known as intramuscular stimulati on, trigger points (TrP) acupuncture, TrP DN, myofascial TrP DN, or biomedical acupuncture. In Western countries, DN is a form of simplified acupuncture using biomedical language in treating myofascial pain, a contemporary development of a portion of Ashi point acupuncture from Chinese acupuncture. It seeks to redefine acupuncture by reframing its theoretical principles in a Western manner. DN-like needling with filiform needles have been widely used in Chinese acupuncture practice over the past 2,000 years, and with hypodermic needles has been used in China in acupuncture practice for at least 72 years. In Eastern countries, such as China, since late of 1800s or earlier, DN is a common name of acupuncture among acupuncturists and the general public, which has a broader scope of indications, not limited to treating the myofascial pain.

  5. [Debating some issues on the national standard Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, part 3: Auricular Acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-lan; Guo, Yi; Chen, Ze-lin; Li, Gui-hua

    2009-09-01

    The main difficulties and disputable problems on develping the national standard Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moribustion, Part 3: Auricular Acupuncture are debated in this paper from the three aspects of its meaning, scientific basis and key point. The difficult points mainly include manipulation standandization of auricular acupuncture, basis and science of the standards stipulated, selection of technical terms and definition, and why only the four kinds of manipulations are used for auricular acupuncture. Finally, the authors suggest that the Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Part 3: Auricular Acupuncture needs further to be studied and improved.

  6. Transcaval migration of an acupuncture needle from the abdominal cavity to the heart.

    PubMed

    Neely, David; Jeganathan, Reubendra; Campalani, Gianfranco

    2010-11-01

    We report the case of a patient who was noted to have inserted an acupuncture needle into his abdomen. The needle migrated to the heart and was removed from the right ventricle using cardiopulmonary bypass. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties

    PubMed Central

    In, Su-ll; Gwak, Young S.; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, SuChan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A.; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect. PMID:27713547

  8. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Su-Ll; Gwak, Young S.; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A.; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-10-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect.

  9. Hierarchical Micro/Nano-Porous Acupuncture Needles Offering Enhanced Therapeutic Properties.

    PubMed

    In, Su-Ll; Gwak, Young S; Kim, Hye Rim; Razzaq, Abdul; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Kim, Hee Young; Chang, SuChan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Grimes, Craig A; Yang, Chae Ha

    2016-10-07

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention has been widely used for treatment of many pathophysiological disorders. For achieving improved therapeutic effects, relatively thick acupuncture needles have been frequently used in clinical practice with, in turn, enhanced stimulation intensity. However due to the discomforting nature of the larger-diameter acupuncture needles there is considerable interest in developing advanced acupuncture therapeutical techniques that provide more comfort with improved efficacy. So motivated, we have developed a new class of acupuncture needles, porous acupuncture needles (PANs) with hierarchical micro/nano-scale conical pores upon the surface, fabricated via a simple and well known electrochemical process, with surface area approximately 20 times greater than conventional acupuncture needles. The performance of these high-surface-area PANs is evaluated by monitoring the electrophysiological and behavioral responses from the in vivo stimulation of Shenmen (HT7) points in Wistar rats, showing PANs to be more effective in controlling electrophysiological and behavioral responses than conventional acupuncture needles. Comparative analysis of cocaine induced locomotor activity using PANs and thick acupuncture needles shows enhanced performance of PANs with significantly less pain sensation. Our work offers a unique pathway for achieving a comfortable and improved acupuncture therapeutic effect.

  10. Treatment of fibromyalgia with formula acupuncture: investigation of needle placement, needle stimulation, and treatment frequency.

    PubMed

    Harris, Richard E; Tian, Xiaoming; Williams, David A; Tian, Thomas X; Cupps, Thomas R; Petzke, Frank; Groner, Kimberly H; Biswas, Pinaki; Gracely, Richard H; Clauw, Daniel J

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether typical acupuncture methods such as needle placement, needle stimulation, and treatment frequency were important factors in fibromyalgia symptom improvement. DESIGN/SETTINGS/SUBJECTS: A single-site, single-blind, randomized trial of 114 participants diagnosed with fibromyalgia for at least 1 year was performed. Participants were randomized to one of four treatment groups: (1) T/S needles placed in traditional sites with manual needle stimulation (n = 29): (2) T/0 traditional needle location without stimulation (n = 30); (3) N/S needles inserted in nontraditional locations that were not thought to be acupuncture sites, with stimulation (n = 28); and (4) N/0 nontraditional needle location without stimulation (n = 2 7). All groups received treatment once weekly, followed by twice weekly, and finally three times weekly, for a total of 18 treatments. Each increase in frequency was separated by a 2-week washout period. Pain was assessed by a numerical rating scale, fatigue by the Multi-dimensional Fatigue Inventory, and physical function by the Short Form-36. Overall pain improvement was noted with 25%-35% of subjects having a clinically significant decrease in pain; however this was not dependent upon "correct" needle stimulation (t = 1.03; p = 0.307) or location (t = 0.76; p = 0.450). An overall dose effect of treatment was observed, with three sessions weekly providing more analgesia than sessions once weekly (t = 2.10; p = 0.039). Among treatment responders, improvements in pain, fatigue, and physical function were highly codependent (all p < or = 0.002). Although needle insertion led to analgesia and improvement in other somatic symptoms, correct needle location and stimulation were not crucial.

  11. The Problem of Metal Needles in Acupuncture-fMRI Studies.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Florian; Nöth, Ulrike; Schockert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture is a therapy based on sensory stimulation of the human body by means of metal needles. The exact underlying mechanisms of acupuncture have not been clarified so far. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become an important tool in acupuncture research. Standard acupuncture needles, which are made of ferromagnetic steel, however, are problematic in acupuncture-fMRI studies for several reasons, such as attraction by the scanner's magnetic field, significant image distortions and signal-dropouts, when positioned close to the head or even heating due to absorption of radio frequency (RF). The aim of this study was to compare two novel types of acupuncture needles with a standard needle for their effect on MRI image quality. The standard needle severely reduced image quality, when located inside the RF coil. The nonferromagnetic metal needle may pose a risk due to RF heating, while the plastic needle has a significantly larger diameter. In conclusion, our recommendations are: (1) standard needles should not be used in MRI; (2) Nonferromagnetic metal needles seem to be the best choice for acupoints outside of the transmitter coil; and (3) only plastic needles are suited for points inside the coil. Laser acupuncture may be a safe alternative, too.

  12. [Observation on curative effect of thermal acupuncture needle muscular stimulation therapy for knee osteoarthritis patients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Chu; He, Shao-Feng; Wang, Ren-Can; Zhou, Yong-Mei

    2012-06-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of thermal acupuncture needle muscular stimulation for treatment of knee osteoarthritis patients. A total of 120 outpatients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly and equally divided into control and treatment groups. Patients of the treatment group were treated by inserting the acupuncture needles into the attached sites of the quadriceps femoris, musculus vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, etc. around the knee joint. The needles were manipulated repeately till "Deqi", followed by attaching a piece of ignited moxa-roll (about 2 cm length) to the needle handle. The treatment was conducted once a week, 4 weeks altogether. Patients of the control group were treated by oral administration of Celebrex (a specific inhibitor of COX-2, 200 mg/time, once daily, 4 weeks together). The therapeutic effect was evaluated by using visual analogue scale (VAS), Lequesne Index (Chinese Version) of osteoarthritis after 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months after the treatment. After 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months after the treatment, the effective rates were 78.3% (47/60) and 81.7% (49/60) in the control group, and 96.6% (58/60) and 96.6% (58/60) in the treatment group, respectively, being significantly higher in the treatment group (P<0.05). Both VAS scores and Lequesne Indexes in the treatment group, and VAS scores in the control group were decreased significantly after 4 weeks' treatment and 3 months' follow-up (P<0.05). The effects of the treatment group were considerably superior to those of the control group (P<0.05). Thermal needle muscular stimulation therapy is effective for relieving knee osteoarthritis patients' symptoms of pain, knee-joint stiffness, swelling, walking capability, etc.

  13. [Enlightenment and thinking on deqi (arrival of needling sensation) by abdominal acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Zhou

    2011-02-01

    Enlightened by clinical practice of new acupuncture techniques such as abdominal acupuncture, different recognitions on deqi (arrival of needling sensation), namely qi sensation under the tip of the needles and qi sensation at the affected region were analyzed in this article. The cause and effect relation of arrival of the qi sensation and effectiveness was unscrambled. Varying from the commonly accepted concept of qi sensation, a new concept of latent needling sensation which took the clinical effectiveness as the standard is proposed as a result to provide theoretical preparations for the clinical practice of painlessness acupuncture.

  14. Evaluation of heat transfer in acupuncture needles: convection and conduction approaches.

    PubMed

    Tzou, Chieh-Han John; Yang, Tzyy-Yih; Chung, Ya-Chien

    2015-04-01

    Originating in ancient China, acupuncture using needles has been developed for thousands of years and has received attention for its reported medical remedies, such as pain relief and chronic disease treatment. Heat transfer through the needles, which might have effects on the biomechanism of acupuncture, providing a stimulus and regulating homeostasis, has never been studied. This article analyzes the significance of heat transfer through needles via convection and conduction, approached by means of computational analysis. The needle is a cylindrical body, and an axis symmetrical steady-state heat-transfer model that viscosity and static pressure was not applied. This article evaluates heat transfer via acupuncture needles by using five metal materials: silver, copper, brass, iron, and stainless steel. A silver needle of the type extensively applied in acupuncture can dissipate more than seven times as much heat as a stainless steel needle of the same type. Heat transfer through such a needle is significant, compared to natural body-energy consumption over a range of ambient temperatures. The mechanism by which heat flows in or out of the body through the needles may be crucial in the remedial efficacy of acupuncture.

  15. Validity of the "streitberger" needle in a chinese population with acupuncture: a randomized, single-blinded, and crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chang-Cai; Wen, Xiu-Yun; Jiang, Li; Xie, Min-Jun; Fu, Wen Bin

    2013-01-01

    We studied the validity of a "Streitberger" needle as a valid approach in a Chinese population with experience of acupuncture. Volunteers were recruited from students of the School of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine. Sixty students receiving education in acupuncture theory and experience in practical acupuncture were tested in study determining whether needling with the placebo needle felt any different from conventional acupuncture. Outcomes included measures of penetration sensation, VAS ratings, and Deqi sensation questionnaire. As a result, needle penetration, VAS ratings for either needle and Deqi sensation were not significantly different between two kinds of needles. Our findings show that the use of "Streitberger" needle is credible in a Chinese population with acupuncture experience.

  16. Improvement of the Dynamic Responses of Heart Rate Variability Patterns after Needle and Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Patients with Burnout Syndrome: A Transcontinental Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cun-Zhi; Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2013-01-01

    We investigated manual needle and laser needle acupuncture as a complementary therapy for patients with burnout syndrome. Twenty patients with a mean age ± SD of 38.7 ± 8.4 years were assigned to two groups, each consisting of ten patients. One group was treated with manual needle acupuncture and the other with laser needle acupuncture. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), and a new score called dynamic acupuncture treatment score (DATS) served as evaluation parameters. The study documented significant effects on heart rate after needle acupuncture treatment and significant effects on HRV caused by both needle and laser needle acupuncture. Based on new neurovegetative acupuncture treatment evaluation scores, it can be stated that both noninvasive laser needle acupuncture and manual needle acupuncture have the potential to be a powerful approach for evidence-based complementary treatment of patients with burnout syndrome. Further transcontinental studies to verify or refute the preliminary findings are in progress. PMID:24302960

  17. Phantom acupuncture: dissociating somatosensory and cognitive/affective components of acupuncture stimulation with a novel form of placebo acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeungchan; Napadow, Vitaly; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Seunggi; Choi, Woojin; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Park, Kyungmo

    2014-01-01

    In a clinical setting, acupuncture treatment consists of multiple components including somatosensory stimulation, treatment context, and attention to needle-based procedures. In order to dissociate somatosensory versus contextual and attentional aspects of acupuncture, we devised a novel form of placebo acupuncture, a visual manipulation dubbed phantom acupuncture, which reproduces the acupuncture needling ritual without somatosensory tactile stimulation. Subjects (N = 20) received both real (REAL) and phantom (PHNT) acupuncture. Subjects were retrospectively classified into two groups based on PHNT credibility (PHNTc, who found phantom acupuncture credible; and PHNTnc, who did not). Autonomic and psychophysical responses were monitored. We found that PHNT can be delivered in a credible manner. Acupuncture needling, a complex, ritualistic somatosensory intervention, induces sympathetic activation (phasic skin conductance [SC] response), which may be specific to the somatosensory component of acupuncture. In contrast, contextual effects, such as needling credibility, are instead associated with a shift toward relative cardiovagal activation (decreased heart rate) during needling and sympathetic inhibition (decreased SC) and parasympathetic activation (decreased pupil size) following acupuncture needling. Visual stimulation characterizing the needling ritual is an important factor for phasic autonomic responses to acupuncture and may undelie the needling orienting response. Our study suggests that phantom acupuncture can be a viable sham control for acupuncture as it completely excludes the somatosensory component of real needling while maintaining the credibility of the acupuncture treatment context in many subjects.

  18. Biomedical engineering meets acupuncture--development of a miniaturized 48-channel skin impedance measurement system for needle and laser acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard; Wang, Lu

    2010-11-23

    Due to controversially discussed results in scientific literature concerning changes of electrical skin impedance before and during acupuncture a new measurement system has been developed. The prototype measures and analyzes the electrical skin impedance computer-based and simultaneously in 48 channels within a 2.5×3.5 cm matrix. Preliminary measurements in one person were performed using metal needle and violet laser (405 nm) acupuncture at the acupoint Kongzui (LU6). The new system is an improvement on devices previously developed by other researchers for this purpose. Skin impedance in the immediate surroundings of the acupoint was lowered reproducibly following needle stimulation and also violet laser stimulation. A new instrumentation for skin impedance measurements is presented. The following hypotheses suggested by our results will have to be tested in further studies: Needle acupuncture causes significant, specific local changes of electrical skin impedance parameters. Optical stimulation (violet laser) at an acupoint causes direct electrical biosignal changes.

  19. Ultrasound measurements of the distance between acupuncture needle tip at P6 and the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Streitberger, Konrad; Eichenberger, Urs; Schneider, Antonius; Witte, Steffen; Greher, Manfred

    2007-06-01

    Pericard 6 (P6) is one of the most frequently used acupuncture points, especially in preventing nausea and vomiting. At this point, the median nerve is located very superficially. To investigate the distance between the needle tip and the median nerve during acupuncture at P6, we conducted a prospective observational ultrasound (US) imaging study. We tested the hypothesis that de qi (a sensation that is typical of acupuncture needling) is evoked when the needle comes into contact with the epineural tissue and thereby prevents nerve penetration. The outpatient pain clinic of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Fifty (50) patients receiving acupuncture treatment including P6 bilaterally. Patients were examined at both forearms using US (a 10-MHz linear transducer) after insertion of the needle at P6. The distance between the needle tip and the median nerve, the number of nerve contacts and nerve penetrations, as well as the number of successfully elicited de qi sensations were recorded. Complete data could be obtained from 97 cases. The mean distance from the needle tip to the nerve was 1.8 mm (standard deviation 2.2; range 0-11.3). Nerve contacts were recorded in 52 cases, in 14 of which the nerve was penetrated by the needle. De qi was elicited in 85 cases. We found no association between the number of nerve contacts and de qi. The 1-week follow-up showed no complications or neurologic problems. This is the first investigation demonstrating the relationship between acupuncture needle placement and adjacent neural structures using US technology. The rate of median nerve penetrations by the acupuncture needle at P6 was surprisingly high, but these seemed to carry no risk of neurologic sequelae. De qi at P6 does not depend on median nerve contact, nor does it prevent median nerve penetration.

  20. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chu, Heng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority. PMID:23935678

  1. An acupuncture needle remaining in a lung for 17 years: case study and review.

    PubMed

    Lewek, Pawel; Lewek, Joanna; Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2012-09-01

    The case of a 67-year-old patient with an acupuncture needle remaining in his left lung is described. This foreign body was a remnant of a procedure performed by a doctor 17 years previously for osteoarthritic back pain. On the basis of this case, a review was performed of literature available in the PubMed database dealing with acupuncture needles remaining in a patient's body. A total of 25 articles were found. The articles describe needles found in the bladder, shoulder girdle, spinal cord, right ventricle, L5 nerve root, medulla oblongata, skin, carpal tunnel, nuchal and occipital area, calf and paraspinal muscle. Migration of needle fragments to the liver, pancreas, stomach, colon, breast, kidney, muscles, and spinal cord has been reported in the literature. In cases where patients were operated on, the needles were removed without subsequent complications and the patients recovered fully.

  2. [Clinical Trials for Observing the Influence of Acupuncture Needle-stimulation Induced Sharp Pain on Curative Effect in Primary Dysmenorrhea Patients].

    PubMed

    Ru, Shang-qing; Zhang, Peng; Li, Jing; Wang, Pei; Lin, Chi; Hu, Ni-juan; Hao, Jie; Hao, Mian-yi; Sun, Jon-jun; Wang, Ya-feng; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    To observe the influence of acupuncture needle stimulation-induced sharp pain on the curative effect of acupuncture therapy for primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients with cold damp stagnation syndrome (CDSS). A total of 87 PD patients with CDSS experiencing abdominal pain (> or =40 mm in visual analogue scale, VAS) were randomly asigned to deqi-expectation group and no-deqi-expectation group which were further divided into deqi-expectation + sharp pain (n = 31), deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain (n = 12), no-deqi-expectation + sharp pain (n = 17), no-deqi-expectation + no- sharp pain (n =27) groups. On the first day of abdominal pain attack, bilateral Sanyinjiao (SP 6) were punctured respectively with thicker needles with deeper insertion for deqi-expectation patients and thin filiform needles with shallow insertion for no-deqi-expectation patients. The needles were manipulated for 30 s with uniform reinforcing-reducing method for all the deqi-expectation patients, which was repeated once again every 10 min during 30 min of needle retention. The VAS was used to evaluate the patients' abdominal pain severity before treatment and 0, 10 min after acupuncture needle withdrawal. Following acupuncture stimulation of SP 6, the VAS scores of menstrual pain at both 0 min and 10 min after withdrawing acupuncture needles were significantly decreased in the deqi-expectation + sharp pain group, deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain group, no-deqi-expectation+sharp pain group and no-deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain group (P<0. 05), and that of 10 min post-needle withdrawal was markedly lower than that of 0 min in the deqi-expectation + sharp pain group ( P<0. 05). No significant differences were found in the VAS difference values at different time-points between deqi-expectation plus sharp pain and deqi- expectation + no-sharp pain groups, and between no-deqi-expectation + sharp pain and no-deqi-expectation + no-sharp pain groups (P>0.05). Acupuncture stimulation of SP 6 has an immediate

  3. Effect of needle puncture and electro-acupuncture on mucociliary clearance in anesthetized quails.

    PubMed

    Tai, Shusheng; Wang, Jiulin; Sun, Feng; Xutian, Stevenson; Wang, Tianshan; King, Malcolm

    2006-02-23

    Acupuncture therapy for obstructive respiratory diseases has been effectively used in clinical practice and the acupuncture points or acupoints of Zhongfu and Tiantu are commonly-used acupoints to treat patients with the diseases. Since the impaired mucociliary clearance is among the most important features of airway inflammation in most obstructive respiratory diseases, the effect of needle puncture and electro-acupuncture at the specific acupoints on tracheal mucociliary clearance was investigated in anesthetized quails. Mucociliary transport velocity on tracheal mucosa was measured through observing the optimal pathway, and fucose and protein contents in tracheal lavages were determined with biochemical methods. In the therapeutic group, needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to the acupoints was applied without or with constant current output in 2 mA and at frequency of 100 Hz for 60 minutes. In the sham group, electro-acupuncture stimulation to Liangmen was applied. Our present experiments demonstrated that the electro-acupuncture stimulation to Zhongfu and Tiantu significantly increased tracheal mucociliary transport velocity and decreased the content of protein in the tracheal lavage, compared with the control group. Moreover, either needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to Zhongfu and Tiantu significantly reverted the human neutrophil elastase-induced decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport velocity and human neutrophil elastase -induced increase in the contents of fucose and protein in the tracheal lavage, compared with the control group. These results suggest that either needle puncture or electro-acupuncture stimulation to the effective acupoints significantly improves both airway mucociliary clearance and the airway surface liquid and that the improvements maybe ascribed to both the special function of the points and the substantial stimulation of electricity.

  4. Needle acupuncture for osteoarthritis of the knee. A systematic review and updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Le; Zhang, Xian-Long; Gao, You-Shui; Jiang, Yao

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of treatment with acupuncture for knee osteoarthritis. We searched PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from July to October 2011 for randomized controlled trials that compared needle acupuncture with sham acupuncture, standard care, or waiting list control groups in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Of the 490 potentially relevant articles, 14 RCTs involving 3,835 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Two authors independently extracted outcome data on short-term and long-term pain and functional measures. Standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the mean differences in improvements from baseline and the associated standard deviations in patients assigned to acupuncture and those assigned to control groups according to measurement time points. Compared with sham acupuncture control treatment, acupuncture was significantly better at relieving pain (p=0.002) and restoring function (p=0.01) in the short-term period, and relieving pain (p=0.06) and restoring function (p=0.06) in the long-term. Compared with the standard care and waiting list control treatments, acupuncture was significantly better at relieving pain and restoring function. Acupuncture provided significantly better relief from knee osteoarthritis pain and a larger improvement in function than sham acupuncture, standard care treatment, or waiting for further treatment.

  5. Development of Needle Insertion Manipulator for Central Venous Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Hashizume, Makoto; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure, which a doctor insert a catheter into the patient’s vein for transfusion. Since there are risks of bleeding from arterial puncture or pneumothorax from pleural puncture. Physicians are strictly required to make needle reach up into the vein and to stop the needle in the middle of vein. We proposed a robot system for assisting the venous puncture, which can relieve the difficulties in conventional procedure, and the risks of complication. This paper reports the design structuring and experimental results of needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relationship between insertion force and angle into the vein. The results indicated that the judgment of perforation using the reaction force is possible in case where the needling angle is from 10 to 20 degree. The experiment to evaluate accuracy of the robot also revealed that it has beyond 0.5 mm accuracy. We also evaluated the positioning accuracy in the ultrasound images. The results displays that the accuracy is beyond 1.0 mm and it has enough for venous puncture. We also carried out the venous puncture experiment to the phantom and confirm our manipulator realized to make needle reach up into the vein.

  6. [Teaching design of mastering scalp acupuncture fast].

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Niu, Wenmin

    2016-05-01

    Scalp acupuncture is a method of treating whole-body diseases. The author takes the easy positioning of scalp acupuncture as starting point, covers the positioning of scalp acupuncture and needle insertion points, acupuncture manipulation and the selection of acupoints, so as to introduce the design of teaching the international standardized scalp acupuncture with texts and illustrations. The positions of scalp acupuncture are 4 lines in frontal area, 5 lines in parietal area, 2 lines in temporal area and 3 lines in occipital area. The needle insertion angle is 30° to the skin. Acupoints can be selected crossly and correspondingly in clinic.

  7. [Principles and Methods for Formulating National Standards of "Regulations of Acupuncture-nee- dle Manipulating techniques"].

    PubMed

    Gang, Wei-juan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Fang; Dong, Guo-feng; Wu, Xiao-dong

    2015-08-01

    The national standard of "Regulations of Acupuncture-needle Manipulating Techniques" is one of the national Criteria of Acupuncturology for which a total of 22 items have been already established. In the process of formulation, a series of common and specific problems have been met. In the present paper, the authors expound these problems from 3 aspects, namely principles for formulation, methods for formulating criteria, and considerations about some problems. The formulating principles include selection and regulations of principles for technique classification and technique-related key factors. The main methods for formulating criteria are 1) taking the literature as the theoretical foundation, 2) taking the clinical practice as the supporting evidence, and 3) taking the expounded suggestions or conclusions through peer review.

  8. Diminished suture strength after robotic needle driver manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Daniel; Cerone, Jeffrey; Shie, Scott; Jetley, Ajay; Noe, Donald; Kovacik, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery has become a routine surgical option for the treatment of prostate cancer. Despite its technical advancements, the da Vinci(®) Surgical System still lacks haptic feedback to the surgeon, resulting in a maximally applied compressive force by the robotic needle driver during every grasping maneuver. Without this perceptional sense of touch and grip control, repetitive robotic needle driver manipulation may unknowingly lead to irreparable damage to fine sutures used during delicate anastomotic repairs. For robotic prostatectomy, any such loss of integrity can potentially lead to premature breakdown of the urethrovesical anastomosis and urine extravasation, especially important for a less-than-perfectly fashioned anastomotic repair. Although it has already been established that overhandling of sutures using handheld laparoscopic instruments can lead to reduced suture strength, it has not been established to what extent this may occur after robotic surgical procedures. We present analytical data and analyses concerning the failure strength of fine sutures commonly used for urethrovesical anastomotic repair during robotic prostatectomy, after repetitive robotic needle driver manipulation. When compared with noncompromised monofilament suture controls, the average maximal failure force after repetitive robotic manipulation was significantly reduced by 35% (p < 0.0001). Similarly, the average maximal failure force of braided sutures was significantly reduced after repetitive robotic manipulation by 3% (p = 0.009). This work demonstrates that significant reductions in monofilament and braided suture strength integrity can occur after customary repetitive manipulation by robotic needle drivers in an ex vivo model, with further research warranted in the in vivo setting.

  9. Biomedical engineering meets acupuncture - development of a miniaturized 48-channel skin impedance measurement system for needle and laser acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to controversially discussed results in scientific literature concerning changes of electrical skin impedance before and during acupuncture a new measurement system has been developed. Methods The prototype measures and analyzes the electrical skin impedance computer-based and simultaneously in 48 channels within a 2.5×3.5 cm matrix. Preliminary measurements in one person were performed using metal needle and violet laser (405 nm) acupuncture at the acupoint Kongzui (LU6). The new system is an improvement on devices previously developed by other researchers for this purpose. Results Skin impedance in the immediate surroundings of the acupoint was lowered reproducibly following needle stimulation and also violet laser stimulation. Conclusions A new instrumentation for skin impedance measurements is presented. The following hypotheses suggested by our results will have to be tested in further studies: Needle acupuncture causes significant, specific local changes of electrical skin impedance parameters. Optical stimulation (violet laser) at an acupoint causes direct electrical biosignal changes. PMID:21092296

  10. Early filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression: a meta-analysis of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiping; Chen, Jing; Chen, Junqi; Li, Xiaohui; Lai, Xueyan; Zhang, Shaoqun; Wang, Shengxu

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of filiform needle acupuncture for poststroke depression, and to compare acupuncture with the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant drugs. DATA RETRIEVAL: We retrieved data from the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979–2012), Wanfang (1980–2012), VIP (1989–2012), Chinese Biomedical Literature (1975–2012), PubMed (1966–2012), Ovid Lww (–2012), and Cochrane Library (–2012) Database using the internet. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials on filiform needle acupuncture versus antidepressant drugs for treatment of poststroke depression were included. Moreover, the included articles scored at least 4 points on the Jadad scale. Exclusion criteria: other acupuncture therapies as treatment group, not stroke-induced depression patients, score < 4 points, non-randomized controlled trials, or animal trials. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: These were the Hamilton Depression Scale scores, clinical effective rate, Self-Rating Depression Scale scores, Side Effect Rating Scale scores, and incidence of adverse reaction and events. RESULTS: A total of 17 randomized controlled clinical trials were included. Meta-analysis results displayed that after 4 weeks of treatment, clinical effective rate was better in patients treated with filiform needle acupuncture than those treated with simple antidepressant drugs [relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.21, P = 0.01]. At 6 weeks, clinical effective rate was similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. At 2 weeks after filiform needle acupuncture, Hamilton Depression Scale (17 items) scores were lower than in the antidepressant drug group (mean difference = −2.34, 95%CI: −3.46 to −1.22, P < 0.000,1). At 4 weeks, Hamilton Depression Scale (24 items) scores were similar between filiform needle acupuncture and antidepressant drug groups. Self-Rating Depression Scale scores were lower in filiform needle

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Needle Acupuncture for Treating Gynecologic and Obstetric Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Zapata, María José; Solà, Ivan; Stojanovic, Zoran; Uriona Tuma, Sonia Maria; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture is being used increasingly to treat gynecologic and obstetric disorders. Objective: The aim of this review was to determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating pelvic and low-back pain during pregnancy, pain during labor, primary dysmenorrhea, and menopausal symptoms. Design: This is an overview of systematic reviews (SRs) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Search strategy: A literature search was conducted, in July 2010, in MEDLINE,® the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CENTRAL, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Tripdatabase. Selection criteria: Published SRs and RCTs found during the literature search were included as well as RCTs that were published after completion of the literature search. Analysis: Data from SRs and RCTs that provided quantitative information were pooled. Results: Eight SRs and nine RCTs were included. One SR and 4 RCTs showed that acupuncture reduced pelvic and low-back pain, compared to physiotherapy or usual prenatal care. Results were contradictory when interventions were compared with sham acupuncture. With respect to reduction of pain during labor, two SRs showed no differences between acupuncture and sham acupuncture. None of the three SRs included on primary dysmenorrhea produced conclusive results. Two SRs of studies on menopausal symptoms showed no differences between acupuncture and sham acupuncture. A meta-analysis of three additional RCTs identified a favorable effect of acupuncture for reducing frequency and intensity of hot flashes. Adverse effects were mild and infrequent. Conclusions: Evidence for the efficacy of needle acupuncture for treating the disorders evaluated remains inconclusive. The intervention showed promising results for reducing pelvic and back pain during pregnancy and climacteric vasomotor symptoms, although well-designed studies are needed to make the results more precise and reliable. PMID:24761184

  12. [Research and thinking on needling sensation of acupoint Huantiao (GB 30)].

    PubMed

    Bai, Jiejing; Han, Junying; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xiuzhu; Wu, Jiulong; Zhang, Jian-bin

    2015-03-01

    Taken Huantiao (GB 30) as breakthrough point, acupuncture manipulations of generating various needling sensations by different physicians are sorted. Types of acupoint needling sensations and conducting directions after acupuncture and all kinds of factors that affect needling sensations are analyzed from new perspectives. It is considered that attention should be paid to acupoint location, postures of patients, manipulation methods, types of needling sensations, transmission lines and duration time of needling sensations, etc.

  13. Neural encoding of acupuncture needling sensations: evidence from a FMRI study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Chan, Suk-Tak; Fang, Jiliang; Nixon, Erika E; Liu, Jing; Kwong, Kenneth K; Rosen, Bruce R; Hui, Kathleen K S

    2013-01-01

    Deqi response, a psychophysical response characterized by a spectrum of different needling sensations, is essential for Chinese acupuncture clinical efficacy. Previous neuroimaging research works have investigated the neural correlates of an overall deqi response by summating the scores of different needling sensations. However, the roles of individual sensations in brain activity and how they interact with each other remain to be clarified. In this study, we applied fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of individual components of deqi during acupuncture on the right LV3 (Taichong) acupoint. We selected a subset of deqi responses, namely, pressure, heaviness, fullness, numbness, and tingling. Using the individual components of deqi of different subjects as covariates in the analysis of percentage change of bold signal, pressure was found to be a striking sensation, contributing to most of negative activation of a limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN). The similar or opposite neural activity in the heavily overlapping regions is found to be responding to different needling sensations, including bilateral LPNN, right orbitofrontal cortex, and bilateral posterior parietal cortex. These findings provide the neuroimaging evidence of how the individual needle sensations interact in the brain, showing that the modulatory effects of different needling sensations contribute to acupuncture modulations of LPNN network.

  14. Acupuncture needling sensation: the neural correlates of deqi using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Aziz U R; Green, Gary; Lythgoe, Mark F; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh

    2010-02-22

    The needling sensation of deqi is considered by most acupuncturists to be an important component of acupuncture, yet neuroimaging research that investigates this needle sensation has been limited. In this study we have investigated the effect of deqi and acute pain needling sensations upon brain fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. Seventeen right-handed participants who received acupuncture at the right LI-4 (Hegu) acupoint were imaged in a 3T MRI scanner. fMRI datasets were classified, on the basis of psychophysical participants' reports of needling scores, into those that were associated with predominantly deqi sensations versus those with predominantly acute pain sensations. Brain areas showing changes in BOLD signal increases (activations) and decreases (deactivations) were identified. Differences were demonstrated in the pattern of activations and deactivations between groupings of scans associated with deqi versus pain sensations. For the deqi grouping, significant deactivations occurred, whereas significant activations did not. In contrast, the predominantly acute pain grouping was associated with a mixture of activations and deactivations. For the comparison between the predominately deqi sensation grouping and the acute pain sensation grouping (deqi>pain contrast), only negative Z value voxels resulted (mainly from deactivations in the deqi grouping and activations in the pain grouping) in the limbic/sub-cortical structures and the cerebellum regions of interest. Our results show the importance of collecting and accounting for needle sensation data in neuroimaging studies of acupuncture. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neural Encoding of Acupuncture Needling Sensations: Evidence from a fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoling; Chan, Suk-Tak; Fang, Jiliang; Nixon, Erika E.; Liu, Jing; Kwong, Kenneth K.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Hui, Kathleen K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Deqi response, a psychophysical response characterized by a spectrum of different needling sensations, is essential for Chinese acupuncture clinical efficacy. Previous neuroimaging research works have investigated the neural correlates of an overall deqi response by summating the scores of different needling sensations. However, the roles of individual sensations in brain activity and how they interact with each other remain to be clarified. In this study, we applied fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of individual components of deqi during acupuncture on the right LV3 (Taichong) acupoint. We selected a subset of deqi responses, namely, pressure, heaviness, fullness, numbness, and tingling. Using the individual components of deqi of different subjects as covariates in the analysis of percentage change of bold signal, pressure was found to be a striking sensation, contributing to most of negative activation of a limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN). The similar or opposite neural activity in the heavily overlapping regions is found to be responding to different needling sensations, including bilateral LPNN, right orbitofrontal cortex, and bilateral posterior parietal cortex. These findings provide the neuroimaging evidence of how the individual needle sensations interact in the brain, showing that the modulatory effects of different needling sensations contribute to acupuncture modulations of LPNN network. PMID:24062782

  16. [Considerations about Acupuncture Treatment during Menstruation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    A dispute about whether women are suitable to receive acupuncture treatment in the period of menstruation has existed for many years. There are some reports about acupuncture treatment induced abnormal menstruation in women experiencing menstruation. However, according to long-term clinical practice and current development of acupuncture therapy, the authors of the present paper hold that there are no absolute contradictions for acupuncture treatment of women during menstruation. Additionally, acupuncture induced menstrual disorder has no enough data support of large size example clinical trials. The key points of acupuncture administration for women during menstruation are: (1) reasonable selection of acupoints prescriptions, and (2) appropriate acupuncture needle manipulations, particularly avoiding strong stimulation.

  17. On the Hazard Caused by the Heat of Acupuncture Needles in Warm Needling (溫針Wēn Zhēn)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Chieh; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Wen-Jiuan; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and convenience, acupuncture has become popular as a complementary therapy. In this Chinese medicine, doctors have to find the traditional meridian acupuncture points before puncturing the needles into them. Moxibustion (艾灸 Ài Jiǔ) is also an important part of the acupuncture remedy. Treatment by acupuncture can be classified roughly into two types – direct moxibustion and indirect moxibustion. Warm-needling acupuncture (溫針灸 Wēn Zhēn Jiǔ) is classified under the method of indirect moxibustion. In the present study, 10 standard stainless steel acupuncture needles with 10 pieces of cylinder-shaped moxa cone (艾柱 Ài Zhù) as the heat source of warm needles were used. In order to prevent the practitioners from getting burns, it is necessary to study the temperature changes in some designated parts of the needles. Two sizes, 0.6 g and 1.0 g, of moxa cones were used for comparison of the measured temperatures. The needles are typically divided into two parts – the handle part and the needle body. In our experiment, the temperatures of WNA at different parts of the needles were measured. The larger the size of moxa cone is, the longer is the burning time. Based on the observations we suggest that when 0.6 g moxa is used, the physicians should better pick out the needles around 9 min after ignition; however, while using the 1 g moxa, it might be safer to pick out the needles around 13 min after ignition. PMID:24716166

  18. Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture and myofascial trigger needling: The same stimulation points?

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot A; McDonough, Suzanne M; Baxter, George David

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture originates in China, and its effectiveness has been well documented in musculoskeletal pain disorders and other conditions. A widely accepted contemporary medical treatment option for myofascial pain is trigger point needling. Although there are many differences between Traditional Chinese Medicine acupuncture theory and the myofascial trigger point needling framework, it is argued that the stimulation sites for these two needling modalities are similar. In this paper we examined the correspondence between Traditional Chinese Medicine acupoints and myofascial trigger points. Based on this correspondence, we considered exploration of Ah-shi points from four aspects: pain recognition, distal Ah-shi points, Anti-Ah-shi points, and management approaches. The extent of correspondence is influenced by definitions of acupoints. Myofascial trigger points are significantly correlated to Traditional Chinese Medicine acupoints, including primary channel acupoints, extra acupoints, and Ah-shi points. Considering the correlation between MTrPs and acupoints and the rarely-studied research area of Ah-shi points, it may be reasonable to incorporate research findings of myofascial trigger points into further investigations into Ah-shi points. Correspondence between myofascial trigger points and acupoints enhances contemporary understanding of the mechanism of action of acupuncture, and may serve to facilitate increased integration of acupuncture into clinical management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acupuncture, connective tissue, and peripheral sensory modulation.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M

    2014-01-01

    Although considerable controversy surrounds the legitimacy of acupuncture as a treatment, a growing literature on the physiological effects of acupuncture needling in animals and humans is providing new insights into basic cellular mechanisms including connective tissue mechanotransduction and purinergic signaling. This review summarizes these findings and proposes a model combining connective tissue plasticity and peripheral sensory modulation in response to the sustained stretching of tissue that results from acupuncture needle manipulation.

  20. Preparation of Graphene-Modified Acupuncture Needle and Its Application in Detecting Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lina; Du, Danxin; Yang, Fan; Liang, Zhong; Ning, Yong; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-06-01

    We report a unique nanosensing platform by combining modern nanotechnology with traditional acupuncture needle to prepare graphene-modified acupuncture needle (G-AN), and using it for sensitive detection of neurotransmitters via electrochemistry. An electrochemical deposition method was employed to deposit Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip surface of the traditional acupuncture needle, while the other part of the needle was coated with insulation paste. Subsequently, the G-AN was obtained by cyclic voltammetry reduction of a graphene oxide solution on the surface of the AuNPs. To investigate the sensing property of the G-AN, pH dependence was measured by recording the open circuit potential in the various pH buffer solutions ranging from 2.0 to 10.0. What’s more, the G-AN was further used for detection of dopamine (DA) with a limit of detection of 0.24 μM. This novel G-AN exhibited a good sensitivity and selectivity, and could realize direct detection of DA in human serum.

  1. Preparation of Graphene-Modified Acupuncture Needle and Its Application in Detecting Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lina; Du, Danxin; Yang, Fan; Liang, Zhong; Ning, Yong; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique nanosensing platform by combining modern nanotechnology with traditional acupuncture needle to prepare graphene-modified acupuncture needle (G-AN), and using it for sensitive detection of neurotransmitters via electrochemistry. An electrochemical deposition method was employed to deposit Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip surface of the traditional acupuncture needle, while the other part of the needle was coated with insulation paste. Subsequently, the G-AN was obtained by cyclic voltammetry reduction of a graphene oxide solution on the surface of the AuNPs. To investigate the sensing property of the G-AN, pH dependence was measured by recording the open circuit potential in the various pH buffer solutions ranging from 2.0 to 10.0. What’s more, the G-AN was further used for detection of dopamine (DA) with a limit of detection of 0.24 μM. This novel G-AN exhibited a good sensitivity and selectivity, and could realize direct detection of DA in human serum. PMID:26112773

  2. Preparation of Graphene-Modified Acupuncture Needle and Its Application in Detecting Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lina; Du, Danxin; Yang, Fan; Liang, Zhong; Ning, Yong; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-06-26

    We report a unique nanosensing platform by combining modern nanotechnology with traditional acupuncture needle to prepare graphene-modified acupuncture needle (G-AN), and using it for sensitive detection of neurotransmitters via electrochemistry. An electrochemical deposition method was employed to deposit Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip surface of the traditional acupuncture needle, while the other part of the needle was coated with insulation paste. Subsequently, the G-AN was obtained by cyclic voltammetry reduction of a graphene oxide solution on the surface of the AuNPs. To investigate the sensing property of the G-AN, pH dependence was measured by recording the open circuit potential in the various pH buffer solutions ranging from 2.0 to 10.0. What's more, the G-AN was further used for detection of dopamine (DA) with a limit of detection of 0.24 μM. This novel G-AN exhibited a good sensitivity and selectivity, and could realize direct detection of DA in human serum.

  3. [Controlled observation of the efficacy between floating acupuncture at Tianying point and warm-needling therapy for supraspinous ligament injury].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Wei; Shao, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Ke-Ping; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2013-04-01

    To compare the efficacy difference in the treatment of supraspinous ligament injury between floating acupuncture at Tianying point and the conventional warm needling therapy. Ninety patients were randomized into a floating acupuncture group and a warm needling group, 45 cases in each one. In the floating acupuncture group, the floating needling technique was adopted at Tianying point. In the warm needling group, the conventional warm needling therapy was applied at Tianying point as the chief point in the prescription. The treatment was given 3 times a week and 6 treatments made one session. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was adopted for pain comparison before and after treatment of the patients in two groups and the efficacy in two groups were assessed. The curative and remarkably effective rate was 81.8% (36/44) in the floating acupuncture group and the total effective rate was 95.5% (42/44), which were superior to 44.2% (19/43) and 79.1% (34/43) in the warm needling group separately (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). VAS score was lower as compared with that before treatment of the patients in two groups (both P < 0.01) and the score in the floating acupuncture group was lower than that in the warm needling group after treatment (P < 0.01). Thirty-six cases were cured and remarkably effective in the floating acupuncture group after treatment, in which 28 cases were cured and remarkably effective in 3 treatments, accounting for 77.8 (28/36), which was apparently higher than 26.3 (5/19) in the warm-needling group (P < 0.01). The floating acupuncture at Tianying point achieves the quick and definite efficacy on supraspinous ligament injury and presents the apparent analgesic effect. The efficacy is superior to the conventional warm-needling therapy.

  4. Development of a needle insertion manipulator for central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yo; Hong, Jaesung; Hamano, Ryutaro; Okada, Kaoru; Fujie, Masakatsu G; Hashizume, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure in which a doctor inserts a catheter into a patient's vein for transfusions. Risks of this procedure include bleeding from the puncture of blood vessels and pneumothorax caused by pleural puncture. To avoid these and other risks, physicians are required to ensure that the needle is inserted securely and that it stops within the vein. We propose a robotic system for assisting venous puncture that is capable of alleviating the difficulties encountered during the conventional procedure, as well as minimizing the risks of complications. This paper describes the design and results of experiments conducted using a needle insertion manipulator. First, we investigated the relation between insertion force and angle into the vein to determine the appropriate insertion angle in relation to the blood vessel under physical conditions. The results indicated that the reaction force can be used to gauge whether the needle has been inserted into the vein in cases where the insertion angle is in the range 10-20°. Based on this result, we determined the mechanisms of the puncture device, which comprises a small, compact configuration. Experiments for accuracy validation were performed on a phantom. We evaluated the positioning accuracy using ultrasound images, and the results indicated an accuracy of 1.0 mm or better, which is considered feasible for venous puncture. In the phantom experiments, we confirmed that our manipulator was capable of placing the needle within the vein. The feasibility of this system was demonstrated in our experiments. Further studies, such as in vivo experiments, are required. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Reminiscences of microcirculatory studies on application of acupuncture needles to the rabbit in vivo.

    PubMed

    Asano, Makishige

    2006-01-01

    One of the favorites of traditional oriental medical treatments with Japanese people may be acupuncture for various intractable and/or chronic symptoms caused by external insults such as bruises and thermal injuries. The present paper was aimed to reminisce our previous two works using a rabbit ear chamber technique on effects of experimental acupuncture upon basic behaviors of cutaneous microcirculation and their pathophysiological changes induced by topical thermal stimulation in cutaneous microvascular system in vivo. Application of a single acupuncture needle (32-gauge, silver) to the back of rabbits, corresponding to Geshu (B17) in human beings, showed an increased microvascular blood flow in parallel with augmentation of vasomotion. Daily application of respective three larger (32-gauge, silver) and smaller (0.12 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, stainless steel) needles to fixed places of the back and ear lobe showed a notable acceleration of recovery from pathophysiological microcirculatory changes induced by the thermal stimulation such as hemorrhages and stases in accordance with restoration of vasomotion. Some implications of vasomotion in the curative effects of experimental acupuncture treatments were discussed from the microcirculatory point of view in conjunction with the clinical efficacy in human beings.

  6. Thermographical Measuring of the Skin Temperature Using Laser Needle Acupuncture in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Raith, Wolfgang; Litscher, Gerhard; Sapetschnig, Iris; Bauchinger, Sebastian; Ziehenberger, Evelyne; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2012-01-01

    In children, laser acupuncture is used more often than needle acupuncture in Western countries, due to their aversion to needles. When applying laser acupuncture to premature babies and neonates, firstly the degree of the thermal increase to the skin has to be evaluated so as to guarantee safe application. The patients were premature neonates before their discharge from hospital. The measurements were carried out by means of a polygraphy while they were asleep shortly. The large intestine 4 acupoint (LI4, Hegu) was stimulated by a microlaser needle (10 mW, 685 nm) twice (5 and 10 min). Local thermographic pictures were taken with a thermal camera (Flir i5, Flir Systems Inc., Portland, USA), and the warmest point was determined and subsequently compared. The study included 10 premature neonates (7 male, 3 female). The measurements were carried out on the 33rd day of life (weight 2030 g, gestational age 36 + 3 weeks of pregnancy). In comparison to the initial temperature (32.9°C), after 5 minutes of stimulation (33.9°C) (P = 0.025) and also after 10 minutes of stimulation (34.0°C) (P = 0.01), there was found to be a significant increase in the skin temperature. The singular maximum value of 37.9°C bears a potential danger; however, compared to the local temperatures reached in transcutaneous blood gas measurements it appears not to entail any risks. PMID:22666295

  7. Manual and Electrical Needle Stimulation in Acupuncture Research: Pitfalls and Challenges of Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schnyer, Rosa; MacPherson, Hugh; Davis, Robert; Harris, Richard E.; Napadow, Vitaly; Wayne, Peter M.; Milley, Ryan J.; Lao, Lixing; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the field of acupuncture research there is an implicit yet unexplored assumption that the evidence on manual and electrical stimulation techniques, derived from basic science studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, is generally interchangeable. Such interchangeability would justify a bidirectional approach to acupuncture research, where basic science studies and clinical trials each inform the other. This article examines the validity of this fundamental assumption by critically reviewing the literature and comparing manual to electrical acupuncture in basic science studies, clinical trials, and meta-analyses. The evidence from this study does not support the assumption that these techniques are interchangeable. This article also identifies endemic methodologic limitations that have impaired progress in the field. For example, basic science studies have not matched the frequency and duration of manual needle stimulation to the frequency and duration of electrical stimulation. Further, most clinical trials purporting to compare the two types of stimulation have instead tested electroacupuncture as an adjunct to manual acupuncture. The current findings reveal fundamental gaps in the understanding of the mechanisms and relative effectiveness of manual versus electrical acupuncture. Finally, future research directions are suggested to better differentiate electrical from manual simulation, and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25710206

  8. Noneffect of manual needle acupuncture on experimental pain parameters in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Micalos, Peter S; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of manual acupuncture on experimental pain parameters in healthy participants. The experimental design was a repeated-measures, three-group pre- and postprocedure. All subjects participated in a control, sham, and acupuncture procedure, separated by 1 week, in a counterbalanced sequence to forestall an order effect. Data were collected in a laboratory environment. The participants included 12 healthy young men (mean age 21.3 ± 2.6 years; height 183.8 ± 5 cm; weight 77.7 ± 9.5 kg). The control procedure comprised assessing the experimental pain parameters before and after a quiet rest for 20 minutes. The sham procedure was performed with the needle inserted bilaterally 1-1.5 cm outside each acupoint. The manual acupuncture procedure was performed at two bilateral acupoints of LI-4 (Large Intestine 4, Hegu) and ST-44 (Stomach 44, Nei Ting). Pain parameters assessed included the pain threshold, nociceptive reflex threshold, and nociceptive reflex amplitude. Repeated-measures analysis of variance between pre- and postcontrol, sham, and acupuncture procedures for pain threshold, nociceptive reflex threshold, and nociceptive reflex amplitude revealed no significant difference. Manual acupuncture at bilateral acupoints LI-4 and ST-44 did not show a change in pain threshold, nociceptive flexion reflex threshold, or the nociceptive reflex amplitude in healthy participants.

  9. [Effects of acupuncture with different filiform needles on tissues, cells and collagenous fiber of fascia in acupoint area of rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Bo; Hu, Tiehan; Chen, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To explore the effects of acupuncture with different filiform needles on structure of fascial connective tissues, cellular activity, arrangement and content of collagen fibers in acupoint area of rats. A total of 32 SD rats were randomly divided into a blank group, a thin needle group, a medium needle group and a thick needle group, 8 rats in each one. Except for the blank group, rats in the remaining groups were treated with horizontal acupuncture at "Zhongwan" (CV 12) towards Conception Vessel with different filiform needles, and twirling mild reinforcing-reducing method was applied, once a day. Rats in the blank group were treated with identical anesthesia, grasping and fixation. After 3-day intervention, the fascial connective tissue of acupoint area was collected. HE staining, immumohistochemical staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and MASSON staining were adopted to observe the morphology of fascial connective tissues, expression of PCNA in cells and arrangement and expression of collagenous fiber. After acupuncture in each group, the consistency of morphology of fascial connective tissues and arrangement of collagenous fiber were changed; the expression of PCNA protein in the fascial connective tissue in each group was significantly increased (P<0. 01, P<0. 05). The area distribution of collagenous fiber were changed, and that in the thin needle group was insignificantly increased compared with that in the blank group (P>0. 05), and that in the medium needle group and thick needle group were reduced compared with that in the blank group (both P<0. 05). Acupuncture with different filiform needles can change the local tissue morphology of acupoints, strengthen cell activity and adjust the exyression of collagenous fiber protein, which may be one of the cellular biomechanics principles of the acupuncture therapy's "regulating meridians" effects. However, the stimulation is produced by different fifiform needles, and the complex relationships

  10. The Impact of Placebo, Psychopathology, and Expectations on the Response to Acupuncture Needling in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wasan, Ajay Darsh; Kong, Jian; Pham, Loc-Duyen; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Edwards, Robert; Gollub, Randy L.

    2010-01-01

    Comorbid psychopathology is a variable not explored in the acupuncture RCTs that could explain whether subgroups of patients with chronic low back pain have differential responses to acupuncture or placebo treatments. This was a controlled, blinded, crossover trial of verum acupuncture and validated sham acupuncture in 40 CLBP patients, with a Low or High level of psychiatric comorbidity. They completed a 0–10 rating scale for pain at the beginning and end of each treatment session, and rated their expectations for change in pain. Verum acupuncture was performed at Large Intestine 4 on the dorsal right hand for 30 minutes by a licensed acupuncturist. Data analysis used percent improvement in pain as the primary outcome for each of the treatment sessions. Both groups (21 Low and 19 High) reported significant analgesia with verum acupuncture needling, mean 33%, p=.90 for difference between groups; and with placebo, 26%, p=.09. In both groups expectations were only a significant predictor of verum acupuncture response, p=.002, such that those with greater expectations had greater pain relief. Psychiatric comorbidity does not significantly impact acupuncture or placebo acupuncture analgesia in CLBP. It does not affect the positive impact of expectations on reported pain relief from real acupuncture. PMID:20075014

  11. [Effect of acupuncture needle-retention duration at Baihui (GV 20) and sishencong (EX-HN 1) on blood pressure in hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yong-Shu; Xing, Shu-Li

    2012-06-01

    To observe the effect of needle-retention duration at Baihui (GV 20) and Sishencong (EX-HN 1) on blood pressure in hypertension patients. Twenty-four patients with essential hypertension were randomly divided into acupuncture group and medication group. For patients of the acupuncture group, single-use sterilized filiform needles were inserted into Baihui (GV 20) and Sishencong (EX-HN 1) and manipulated for about 10 s till "Deqi", and retained for 8 h. Patients of the medication group were treated by oral administration of Nifedipine tablets(20 mg)in the morning. Blood pressure (right brachial artery) was detected 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after the treatment respectively. In comparison with pre-treatment, the systolic pressure levels at the time-points of 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after taking Nifedipine in the medication group, and the systolic pressure levels at the time-points of 2, 4 and 6 h after the treatment in the acupuncture group, and the diastolic pressure levels at the time-points of 2, 4, 6 and 8 h in both acupuncture and medication groups were decreased obviously (P<0.05, P<0.01). The effect of acupuncture group was significantly weaker than that of the medication group in lowering systolic pressure at the time-points of 0.5 and 8 h after the treatment (P<0.01). No significant differences were found between the acupuncture and medication groups in lowering systolic pressure at the time-points of 2, 4 and 6 h after the treatment, and in lowering diastolic pressure at the time-points of 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after the treatment (P>0.05). Acupuncture stimulation of Baihui (GV 20) and Sishencong (EX-HN 1) with sustained needle-retention works well in lowering blood pressure in hypertension patients, but is relatively slower and has a shorter period of time in lowering blood-pressure efficacy.

  12. German translation of the Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaire: use in an experimental acupuncture study.

    PubMed

    Pach, Daniel; Hohmann, Cynthia; Lüdtke, Rainer; Zimmermann-Viehoff, Frank; Witt, Claudia M; Thiele, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    To create a German version of the Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaire (SNSQ) in order to measure deqi (needling sensation) in subjects receiving different forms of acupuncture and to evaluate the translated questionnaire in an acupuncture study. A forward and backward translation procedure was applied to create a German version of the SNSQ. Discrepancies between translations were resolved by consensus. Healthy participants from an experimental acupuncture trial were asked to fill in the resulting questionnaire comprising of 17 items (none (0) to intense (3)) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain (0-100 mm) after receiving either sham or real acupuncture with or without stimulation. The questionnaire was validated using factor analysis and correlation analysis. Questionnaires from 63 subjects (mean 27.1 years; 69.8% female) were included in the analysis. Participants tended to score toward the low end of each of the 17 items (mean sum score (± SD): 8.9 ± 7.0). Four factors with eigenvalues > 1 were identified using exploratory factor analysis. Both of the original subscales, aching deqi (AD) and tingling deqi (TD), showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's α: AD: 0.71; TD: 0.78) and medium test-retest reliability (AD: r = 0.538, p = 0.002; TD: r = 0.603, p < 0.001). AD feeling (r = 0.574, p < 0.001) and TD feeling (r = 0.496, p < 0.001) correlated with the VAS for pain. Factor structure of the original questionnaire could not be reproduced with the German version of the SNSQ in an experimental setting. The questionnaire could not discriminate between pain and deqi. Further research is needed to create a German tool which is more suitable to measure deqi. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Mechanical signaling through connective tissue: a mechanism for the therapeutic effect of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Langevin, H M; Churchill, D L; Cipolla, M J

    2001-10-01

    The mechanism of action of acupuncture remains largely unknown. The reaction to acupuncture needling known as 'de qi', widely viewed as essential to the therapeutic effect of acupuncture, may be a key to understanding its mechanism of action. De qi includes a characteristic needling sensation, perceived by the patient, and 'needle grasp' perceived by the acupuncturist. During needle grasp, the acupuncturist feels pulling and increased resistance to further movement of the inserted needle. We hypothesize that 1) needle grasp is due to mechanical coupling between the needle and connective tissue with winding of tissue around the needle during needle rotation and 2) needle manipulation transmits a mechanical signal to connective tissue cells via mechanotransduction. Such a mechanism may explain local and remote, as well as long-term effects of acupuncture.

  14. Role of Acupoint Area Collagen Fibers in Anti-Inflammation of Acupuncture Lifting and Thrusting Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Cui, Guang-wei; Kuai, Le; Xu, Jian-min; Zhang, Ting-ting; Cheng, Huai-jin; Dong, Hong-sheng

    2017-01-01

    The role of the acupoint area collagen fibers in the efficacy of acupuncture lifting and thrusting (L&T) manipulation will be explored in this paper. 30 male NZW rabbits were randomly divided into 6 groups: sham operation group (Group N), model group (Group M), acupuncture without manipulation group (Group W), acupuncture L&T manipulation group (Group A), collagenase pretreatment group (Group JM), and collagenase pretreatment + acupuncture L&T manipulation group (Group JA). The bacterial endotoxin was used to generate the rabbit fever models. Acupuncture was applied at IL-11. The levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-4 and the rectal temperature were measured at 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h after modeling and the collagen fiber morphology at acupoint area was observed after 6 hours. Results. As compared with Group N, the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in Group M were significantly higher; the level of IL-4 was significantly lower (P < 0.05). As compared with Group M, IL-1β and TNF-α in Groups W and A were significantly lower and IL-4 was significantly higher (P < 0.05). As compared with Group W, IL-1β and TNF-α in Group A were lower and IL-4 was higher (P < 0.05). The collagen fiber in Group A was slightly rough, distorted, and fractured. As shown in studies, the endotoxin-induced inflammatory response can be significantly inhibited by acupuncture whose efficacy can also be significantly improved by the manipulations. Collagenase pretreatment may be the first receptor to the mechanical force of the L&T manipulation. PMID:28473863

  15. Southampton needle sensation questionnaire: development and validation of a measure to gauge acupuncture needle sensation.

    PubMed

    White, Peter; Bishop, Felicity; Hardy, Henry; Abdollahian, Sam; White, Adrian; Park, Jongbae; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Lewith, George T

    2008-05-01

    The specific sensations (deqi) generated during acupuncture are thought to be important for a positive clinical outcome, particularly when treating pain. It is important to be able to measure these sensations and discriminate between deqi and pain. A greater understanding of this will greatly aid researchers who wish to conduct mechanistic studies of acupuncture. Previous questionnaire designs failed to consider patient experience and, hence, may have been flawed. The aim of this study was to generate and validate a new sensation questionnaire, that was able to discriminate between pain and deqi, taking into account patient experience and expert opinions. The questionnaire was designed following qualitative interviews with patients, literature review, and consultation with experts. The questionnaire was piloted and then validated. It was successfully completed by 227 patients and analyzed using factor analysis and partial correlation. Patients were recruited via the physical therapy department at Southampton General Hospital and from private practice clinics in and around the Southampton area. The subjects were patients receiving acupuncture for any condition. Two (2) factors were clearly demonstrated: "Aching deqi" (7 items) which suggested deqi with pain and "Tingling deqi" (7 items) suggesting deqi only. One (1) item related solely to pain and 2 further items did not load into any factor. The final questionnaire is presented containing 17 items and is shown to be a valid, rigorous, soundly grounded, and patient-centered measure, capable of accurately recording deqi. We suggest that analysis should include a partial correlation of certain sensations against a pain visual analogue scale to ascertain how painful each sensation was, particularly if the questionnaire is to be used in a context in which pain and deqi need to be separated or their relationship clarified.

  16. Manipulation of Epileptiform Electrocorticograms (ECoGs) and Sleep in Rats and Mice by Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pei-Lu; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Wu, Yi-Jou; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2016-12-22

    Ancient Chinese literature has documented that acupuncture possesses efficient therapeutic effects on epilepsy and insomnia. There is, however, little research to reveal the possible mechanisms behind these effects. To investigate the effect of acupuncture on epilepsy and sleep, several issues need to be addressed. The first is to identify the acupoints, which correspond between humans, rats, and mice. Furthermore, the depth of insertion of the acupuncture needle, the degree of needle twist in manual needle acupuncture, and the stimulation parameters for electroacupuncture (EA) need to be determined. To evaluate the effects of acupuncture on epilepsy and sleep, a feasible model of epilepsy in rodents is required. We administer pilocarpine into the left central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to simulate focal temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in rats. Intraperitoneal (IP) injection of pilocarpine induces generalized epilepsy and status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Five IP injections of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) with a one-day interval between each injection successfully induces spontaneous generalized epilepsy in mice. Recordings of electrocorticograms (ECoGs), electromyograms (EMGs), brain temperature, and locomotor activity are used for sleep analysis in rats, while ECoGs, EMGs, and locomotor activity are employed for sleep analysis in mice. ECoG electrodes are implanted into the frontal, parietal, and contralateral occipital cortices, and a thermistor is implanted above the cerebral cortex by stereotactic surgery. EMG electrodes are implanted into the neck muscles, and an infrared detector determines locomotor activity. The criteria for categorizing vigilance stages, including wakefulness, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep are based on information from ECoGs, EMGs, brain temperature, and locomotor activity. Detailed classification criteria are stated in the text.

  17. The quantity-effect relationship and physiological mechanisms of different acupuncture manipulations on posterior circulation ischemia with vertigo: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shi-Zhe; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Ling-Hui; He, Si; Wen, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Tian, Guang; Wang, Tian; Wu, Fen-Fen; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2015-04-11

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that different needling manipulations may induce variable effects via diverse physiological mechanisms. A previous study indicated that needling at Fengchi (GB 20) improved cerebral blood flow in patients with vertigo induced by posterior circulation ischemia (PCI). In this study, we aim to explore the quantity-effect relationship and the physiological mechanisms underlying different acupuncture manipulations in PCI patients with vertigo. We propose a pragmatic randomized and controlled trial. All participants, outcome assessors, and statisticians will be blinded. A total of 144 eligible participants will be randomized into one of four treatment groups receiving acupuncture at Fengchi (GB 20) with different one-minute manipulation parameters. Group 1 will receive twirling at a frequency of 60 times per minute toward the contralateral outer canthus at a depth of 0.5 to 0.8 cun. Group 2 will receive twirling at a frequency of 60 times per minute toward the Adam's apple at a depth of 0.5 to 0.8 cun. Group 3 will receive twirling at a frequency of 120 times per minute toward the contralateral outer canthus at a depth of 0.5 to 0.8 cun. Group 4 will receive twirling at a frequency of120 times per minute toward the Adam's apple at a depth of 0.5 to 0.8 cun. Additional points will be added based on individualized pattern diagnoses. The participants will receive 14 acupuncture sessions over 3 to 4 weeks. The subjects will be assessed at two time points: baseline and post-treatment. The primary outcome measurements will include subjective measurements (Vertebrobasilar System Ischemic Neurological Impairment Scale, UCLA Dizziness Questionnaire, Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Psychological and Social Adaptation Scale) and objective measurements (Transcranial Doppler, carotid ultrasonography and changes in cerebral oxygenation) to reduce bias arising from the placebo effect. We will use metabolomics to investigate the mechanisms

  18. Acupuncture needling versus lidocaine injection of trigger points in myofascial pain syndrome in elderly patients--a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Ga, Hyuk; Choi, Ji-Ho; Park, Chang-Hae; Yoon, Hyun-Jung

    2007-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of acupuncture needling and 0.5% lidocaine injection of trigger points in myofascial pain syndrome of elderly patients. Thirty nine participants with myofascial pain syndrome of one or both upper trapezius muscles were randomised to treatment with either acupuncture needling (n=18) or 0.5% lidocaine injection (n=21) at all the trigger points on days 0, 7 and 14, in a single-blinded study. Pain scores, range of neck movement, pressure pain intensity and depression were measured up to four weeks from the first treatment. Local twitch responses were elicited at least once in 94.9% of all subjects. Both groups improved, but there was no significant difference in reduction of pain in the two groups at any time point up to one month. Overall, the range of cervical movement improved in both groups, apart from extension in the acupuncture needling group. Changes in depression showed only trends. There was no significant difference between acupuncture needling and 0.5% lidocaine injection of trigger points for treating myofascial pain syndrome in elderly patients.

  19. [Debating on the formulation of standardized manipulation of acupuncture and moxibustion, Part I: Moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Chu, Hao-Ran; Yang, Jun; Liu, Gang

    2010-06-01

    Main difficulties and solutions in working out the national standard Standardized Manipulation of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Part I: Moxibustion are explained in this paper so as to promote the implementation and application of this national standard, including the definition of moxibustion, selection of pertinent literature, expiration date of moxa stick, quantification of moxibustion amount and the problems needing attention.

  20. Brain areas involved in acupuncture needling sensation of de qi: a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Li, Gan-Long; Zhang, Gui-Feng; Huang, Yong; Wang, Shu-Xia; Lu, Na

    2012-12-01

    De qi is a sensory response elicited by acupuncture stimulation. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), de qi is essential for clinical efficacy. However, the understanding of the neurobiological basis of de qi is still limited. To investigate the relationship between brain activation and de qi by taking a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan while applying acupuncture at TE5. A total of 24 volunteers were randomly divided into 4 groups, and received verum or sham acupuncture at true acupuncture point TE5 or a nearby sham point according to grouping. All subjects then received a (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT scan. All six subjects in the verum acupuncture at true acupuncture point group experienced de qi sensation; in contrast, all six subjects in the sham acupuncture at the sham point group responded with nothing other than non-sensation. Compared to the scan results from subjects who experienced non-sensation, SPECT scans from subjects with de qi sensation demonstrated significant activated points mainly located in brodmann areas 6, 8, 19, 21, 28, 33, 35, 37, 47, the parahippocampal gyrus, lentiform nucleus, claustrum and red nucleus; deactivated points were seen in brodmann areas 9 and 25. Verum acupuncture at true acupuncture points is more likely to elicit de qi sensation. De qi sensations mainly resulted in brain area activations, but not deactivations. These brain areas are related to the curative effect of Te5. The acupuncture needle sensations of de qi and sharp pain are associated with different patterns of activations and deactivations in the brain.

  1. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This ... functions of the body. Research has shown that acupuncture reduces nausea and vomiting after surgery and chemotherapy. ...

  2. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Acupuncture Posted under Health Guides . Updated 25 June 2015. + ... stomach problems, menstrual cramps , and more. What is acupuncture? Acupuncture is a type of East Asian Medicine ...

  3. [The key of increasing the therapeutic effect of scalp acupuncture on hemiplegia due to stroke].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Mei

    2007-10-01

    Discuss the 5 aspects for increasing the therapeutic effect of scalp acupuncture for treatment of hemiplegia due to stroke. First is deqi (getting qi), which is an important factor for acupuncture effect, and the needling sensation of scalp acupuncture should be the feeling of sucking the needle as main; second is needling manipulation, which should be selected for getting proper needling sensation, conducting direction and intensity; third is effective stimulating amount, only stimulating intensity and amount match with response state in the body of the patient, can produce resonance of energy, and attain the best therapeutic effect; fourth is treatment opportunity: the increase of rehabilitation level for hemiplegia of stroke depends on early scalp acupuncture treatment; fifth is rehabilitation training: scalp acupuncture needs combination with rehabilitation training in scalp acupuncture treatment of hemiplegia of stroke to exert positive effects. Clinically, taking note of these five aspects, the therapeutic effects of scalp acupuncture on hemiplegia of stroke can be consolidated and increased.

  4. [Approach to teaching methods of the needling skill of filiform needle].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-Hong; Xu, Jian-Min; Wang, Yin-Ping; Li, Yi

    2008-08-01

    The present paper is armed at approach to a set of teaching method about the needling skill of filiform needle, so as to increase teaching quality. After review and analysis on present situation of teaching methods about the needling skill of filiform needle, it is raised that traditional teaching methods are unable to objectively and comprehensively reflect characteristics and requirement of manipulation, so try to adopt acupuncture manipulation detection instrument, on the basis of traditional teaching methods about the needling skill of filiform needle. And the parameters and figures of manipulation examine of real-time collection in 131 students and information of 120 copies of questionnaire are analyzed and summarized. It is indicated that combined teaching method of traditional model and the manipulation instrument is more reasonable, and basic manipulation training most he strengthened in manipulation skill training, particularly, pay attention to training of twirling manipulation.

  5. Effective Hotspot Arrays Based on Non-Close-Packed Gold Nanoshells in Microporous Polystyrene Film on Acupuncture Needles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jian; Chen, Yang; Guo, Mingde; Xie, Wei; Qian, Weiping

    2015-05-01

    To constructing effective hotspot arrays in SERS substrates, gold nanoshells (GNSs) were assembled layer by layer on acupuncture needles by covalent absorption of bifunctional chemicals; three dimensional structures of the GNSs were locked by polystyrene (PS) coating; effective hotspots were obtained by removing bifunctional chemicals on surface of the GNSs, and the spacing between GNSs was enlarged by corroding gold shell layers of the GNSs partly. The strongest SERS signal was obtained from the SERS-active substrate with two-layer GNSs. After effective hotspot arrays were constructed in the SERS-active substrate with two-layer GNSs, its enhancement factor was higher about two to three orders of magnitude than that of the monolayer of close-packed GNSs. The hotspot arrays integrated on acupuncture needles would be used to detect low concentration of biomolecules in vivo.

  6. [Professor XIE Qiang's unique acupuncture therapy in otorhinolaryngologic department].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Rong; Xie, Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Rui; Wang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The detailed operating methods and the clinical application of the unique acupuncture therapy established by professor XIE Qiang and applied specially in otorhinolaryngologic department are introduced, ie. acupuncture and moxibustion methods for regulating channels and contacting qi, transferring focus of excitation, needling movement and needling ying combined with minimally invasive needle scalpel. Meanwhile, the position of the experience acupoints named Kaiyin 1 (ease-up the voice 1) and Kaiyin 2 (ease-up the voice 2) and their manipulation are recommended, and the clinical application of these acupuncture methods and acupoints for inflammation and pain in otorhinolaryngologic department are explained.

  7. [Preliminary study on force feedback of acupuncture in virtual reality based on the visible human].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Wang, Hai-sheng; Min, You-jiang; Yan, Zhen-guo; Hong, Z Tan; Zhuang, Tian-ge

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of virtual reality technology in the 3-D visible human body and acupuncture research. Based on the 3-D visible human fused with the localization information and hierarchy of acupoints, the paper analyzes the force against the needle and haptic rendering during the needle manipulation according to the physical properties of different tissues. A haptic model is constructed to demonstrate the force behaviors during acupuncture, and the force will be produced and passed to the manipulator by a force feedback device. It enriches the contents of 3-D visible human project, provides a dynamic simulation instrument for acupuncture teaching, and supplies a platform for acupuncture research.

  8. Warm Needling Therapy and Acupuncture at Meridian-Sinew Sites Based on the Meridian-Sinew Theory: Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Nie, Wenbin; Sun, Yuxiu; Li, Sinuo; Yang, Su; Meng, Fanying; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Fang; Huang, Shixi

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of warm needling acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory in the treatment of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) after stroke. In total, 124 subjects were randomized into a treatment group and control group. In the treatment group, warm needling therapy and acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory were performed. In the control group, usual care therapy was applied. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, range of motion (ROM), and Barthel index (BI) were used to evaluate treatment effectiveness. At 2 weeks of treatment, the VAS score, ROM, and BI had obviously changed from baseline in the two groups (P < 0.01). The changes in the VAS score and ROM in the treatment group were significantly greater than those in the control group (P < 0.01). At the 3-month follow-up after treatment, the changes in the treatment group were significantly greater than those in the control group (P < 0.01). This study indicates that warm needling therapy with acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory is effective for HSP. PMID:26495023

  9. [Classification on academic systems of acupuncture in Keynotes of Acupuncture-Moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Bin; Dong, Qin

    2012-12-01

    The understanding and classification of academic systems of acupuncture-moxibustion of GAO Wu can be initially clarified through Keynotes of Acupuncture-Moxibustion. On the base of theoretical system of Neijing (Internal Classic) and Nanjing (Classic on Medical Problems), needling manipulations, treatment, meridians and acupoints were taken as the major knowledge models to construct the framework of the academic system by GAO Wu. The "nine needles" and "manipulations" were taken as the starting point of acupuncture. "Reducing and reinforcing methods" were held as the requirement for advanced skills of acupuncturists. Moreover, syndromes based on the theory of was 12 regular meridians was emphasized to combine the theory and clinical practice tightly. Therefore, it is concluded that GAO Wu's classification of acupuncture-moxibustion academic system enlightened and provided experiences for the modern acupuncture education and academic research.

  10. [Advances in the study on the role of connective tissue in the mechanical signal transduction of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xue-Quan; Yuan, Lin

    2009-04-01

    Non-specific connective tissue (fascia connective tissue) plays an important role in the mechanical signal transduction of acupuncture. Acupuncture needle manipulation-induced mechanical stress has a certain effect on the fibroblasts and cytoskeleton in the nonspecific connective tissue (including loose connective tissue and fat tissue) in morphology, histochemistry and biochemistry. For example, acupuncture-needle manipulation can make the fibroblast deformed, the cytoskeleton remodeled and result in the release of biochemical materials from the connective tissue. The present review summarizes new results of studies on the effect of acupuncture needle manipulation from cytobiology, imageology and physiology; and holds that making clear the transduction pathways of acupuncture mechanical stress signals in the connective tissue and its impact on the organism possesses an important significance in revealing the mechanism of acupuncture underlying clinical therapeutic effects.

  11. [Acupoint position and manipulation of needle knife treating shoulder bi syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Guo, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    With Jianyu (LI 15), Jianliao (TE 14) and Jianzhen (SI 9) for instance, the three acupoints used to treat shoulder bi syndrome by needle knife, and through traceability and researching constant structure, the acupoint position, insertion trace, manipulation and clinical significance of needle knife medicine were discussed. Accurate position is one of the characteristics of acupoints selection of needle knife medicine. As for the acupoints selection method, the mean of body surface localization is always used. The phanerous or palpable bone processes, muscles and tendons are taken as positioning marks; pressing areas where appear sour, numb, or distensible and other sensations is considered as the principle of press positioning. So acupoints position method is the combination of observation and palpation. Different insertion methods can effectively relieve the accretive bursae synovialis, tendon, joint capsule and the compressed nerve, so that shoulder bi syndrome is relieved.

  12. Manipulation of and sustained effects on the human brain induced by different modalities of acupuncture: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhenyu; Dong, Yuru; Dong, Yue; Xiang, Xiaohui; Bai, Lijun; Tian, Jie; Wu, Liuzhen; Han, Jisheng; Cui, Cailian

    2013-01-01

    The javascript:void(0)manipulation and sustained effects of acupuncture have been investigated in multiple studies, but several findings are inconsistent with one another. One possible explanation for these discrepancies is that different modalities of acupuncture were utilized in these studies. In the present study, we investigated both the manipulation and sustained effects of acupuncture in different modalities, including manual acupuncture (MA), electroacupuncture (EA) and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS). MA, EA, TEAS and sensory control stimulation were applied to 18 healthy subjects, and combined block-designed and resting-state fMRI scans were performed. In analyzing these data, the block-designed datasets were used to assess the manipulation effect by employing a modified general linear model. The data from the resting states, before and after stimulation, were used to explore the brain networks involved in the sustained effect. The results showed that the two 1-min stimulation periods produced similar activation patterns in the sensory control with positive activation in the sensorimotor areas and negative activation in the default mode areas. Although similar patterns could be detected in the first stimulation period in MA, EA and TEAS, no positive activation result was observed in the second stimulation period, and EA showed a more extensive deactivation compared to MA and TEAS. Additionally, all three of the modalities of acupuncture stimulation could increase the instinct brain network in rest. A more secure and spatially extended connectivity of the default mode network was observed following MA and EA, and TEAS specifically increased the functional connectivity in the sensorimotor network. The present study suggested that different brain mechanisms might be recruited in different acupuncture modalities. In addition, the findings from our work could provide methodological information for further research into the mechanism of

  13. [Professor GAO Yuchun's experience on "sequential acupuncture leads to smooth movement of qi"].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjun; Xing, Xiao; Cui, Linhua

    2016-01-01

    Professor GAO Yuchun is considered as the key successor of GAO's academic school of acupuncture and moxibustion in Yanzhao region. Professor GAO's clinical experience of, "sequential acupuncture" is introduced in details in this article. In Professor GAO's opinions, appropriate acupuncture sequence is the key to satisfactory clinical effects during treatment. Based on different acupoints, sequential acupuncture can achieve the aim of qi following needles and needles leading qi; based on different symptoms, sequential acupuncture can regulate qi movement; based on different body positions, sequential acupuncture can harmonize qi-blood and reinforcing deficiency and reducing excess. In all, according to the differences of disease condition and constitution, based on the accurate acupoint selection and appropriate manipulation, it is essential to capture the nature of diseases and make the order of acupuncture, which can achieve the aim of regulating qi movement and reinforcing deficiency and reducing excess.

  14. [On Ziwuliuzhu (midnight-noon ebb-flow) needling of acupuncture theory and rigidification process of acupuncture theory in the Jin and Yuan Dynasties].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Jian

    2015-04-01

    The Ziwuliuzhu (midnight-noon ebb-flow) needling of acupuncture theory was generally considered to be a representative perfect example of traditional acupuncture theory. It is created in the Jin and Yuan Dynasties, and has been being frequently cited thereafter. It is mainly derived from and inherits the theory of Wuxing (five-elements) doctrine of traditional Chinese culture in ancient China, for which the Wushu-points, five specific acupoints on the distal ends of the arm and leg, i. e., Jing (Well-points), Xing (Spring-point), Shu (stream-point), Jing (river-point) and He (sea-point) to match the Wuxing so as to calculate their open time according to the Heavenly Stems and Earthly Branches designating the years, months, days and hours in ancient China. Although it has been repeatedly copied in Chinese medical books, this theory was not really used by clinical acupuncturists in the Jin, Yuan and following dynasties. The present theory came up in the special time, primarily being derived from the combination of medical and Confucian theories in the Song Dynasty. Nowadays, we should thoroughly make known its connotations, and do not make heedless affirmation and clinical validation.

  15. [Impacts on analgesia and detumescence in ankle sprain treated with acupuncture at Xiaojie point combined with tendon-regulation manipulation].

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Bin; Bao, Guan-Ai; Quan, Ren-Fu

    2014-07-01

    To compare the efficacy difference of analgesia and detumescence on ankle sprain among acupuncture at Xiaojie point combined with tendon regulation manipulation, acupuncture at Xiaojie point and tendon regulation manipulation. Sixty cases of ankle sprain were randomized into a combined therapy group, a Xiaojie point group and a tendon-regulation manipulation group, 20 cases in each one. The combined therapy of acupuncture at Xiaojie point and tendon regulation manipulation, the acupuncture at Xiaojie point and the simple application of tendon-regulation manipulation were applied respectively in the three groups, once a day, 3 treatments were required. The symptom score such as pain, ecchymosis, swelling and motor dysfunction and the total score were observed before and after treatment in the three groups. The different values of pain and swelling scores were compared before and after treatment in the three groups. The efficacy was compared among the groups. The total effective rate was 100.0% (20/20) in each group. But the curative rate was 85.0% (17/20) in the combined group, 65.0% (13/20) in the Xiaojie point tion manipulation group. After treatment, the symptom scores of pain, ecchymosis, swelling and motor dysfunction and the total score were all improved as compared with those before treatment in the three groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The pain score in either the combined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was lower than that in the tendon-regulation manipulation group after treatment (0.20 -/+ 0.41, 0.15 +/- 0.37 vs 0.60 +/- 0.50, both P < 0.05). Swelling score in the Xiaojie point group was different significantly from that in the tendon-regulation manipulation 0.49 vs 06.4 vs. 20+0.41, P < 0.05). The different value of pain score in either the combined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was higher than that in the tendon-regulation manipulation group before group after treatment (0.65 bined therapy group or Xiaojie point group was higher than that in

  16. Manipulating and dispensing micro/nanoliter droplets by superhydrophobic needle nozzles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhichao; Ma, Jie; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-26

    There is rapidly increasing research interest focused on manipulating and dispensing tiny droplets in nanotechnology and biotechnology. A micro/nanostructured superhydrophobic nozzle surface is one promising candidate for the realization of tiny droplet manipulating applications. Here, we explore the feasibility of using superhydrophobicity for guided dispensing of tiny water droplets. A facile dip-coating method is developed to prepare superhydrophobic needle nozzles (SNNs) based on commercial needle nozzles with reduced inner diameter. The SNNs can manipulate tiny droplets of different volumes by only changing the inner diameter of the nozzle, rather than reducing the nozzle size as a whole. Different from the previous electric-field-directed process or pyroelectrodynamic-driven technique, quasi-stable water drops down to the picoliter scale can be produced by SNNs without employing any extra driving mechanisms. Due to their intrinsic superhydrophobic nature, the SNNs also possess the properties of reducing sample liquid retention, improving sample volume transfer accuracy, and saving expensive reagents. In addition, this kind of dip-coating method can also be applied to micropipet tips, inkjet or bio-printer heads, etc. As the issues of reducing drop size and increasing drop volume accuracy are quite important in the laboratory and industry, this facile but effective superhydrophobic nozzle-coating method for manipulating tiny droplets could be of great help to make breakthroughs in next-generation liquid transport and biometric and inkjet printing devices.

  17. Changes of Locoregional Skin Temperature in Neonates Undergoing Laser Needle Acupuncture at the Acupuncture Point Large Intestine 4

    PubMed Central

    Kurath-Koller, Stefan; Gross, Anna; Freidl, Thomas; Urlesberger, Berndt; Raith, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Laser acupuncture bears a potential risk for the skin surface, especially in neonates whose skin has histological and physiological peculiarities. We evaluated thermal changes of skin temperature in neonates during laser acupuncture by using a thermal camera (Flir i5, Flir Systems Inc., Portland, USA). Laserneedles (Laserneedle GmbH, Glienicke/Nordbahn, Germany) were fixed to the skin at Large Intestine 4 (LI 4, Hegu), bilaterally. Before application of laser acupuncture (685 nm, 15 mW, 500 μm), as well as after 1, 5, and 10 min, thermographic pictures of both hands were taken. The measuring was carried out on the 23rd day after birth (20 neonates, mean postmenstrual gestational age 38 + 2, mean weight 2604 g). Compared to the initial temperature of 34.2°C on the right hand, the skin temperature had increased to 35.3°C (P < 0.05) after 5 min and up to 36.1°C (P < 0.05) after 10 min of stimulation. Equally, on the left hand, an increase of the skin temperature from 34.5°C to 35.9°C (P < 0.05) and 35.9°C (P < 0.05) was measured. The highest measured skin temperature after 10 min of stimulation amounted to 38.7°C, without any clinically visible changes on the skin surface. PMID:25922612

  18. [Study on force feedback of acupuncture at Fengchi (GB 20)].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Fu-Bo; Guo, Hai-Dong; Shao, Shui-Jin; Miao, Peng; Zhang, Qi; Guo, Chun-Xia; Mou, Fang-Fang; Yan, Zhen-Guo

    2013-10-01

    Acupuncture manipulations on Fengchi (GB 20) of famous doctors were taken through force feedback device, then the data was input into a digitized virtual human. Virtual Fengchi (GB 20) acupuncture force feedback simulation system was built through the virtual reality technology to achieve one-to-one high simulative manipulation effect for acupuncture students. The interaction force of the needle body and human tissues was analyzed during the acupuncture process on the 3D digital human integrated with information of Fengchi (GB 20) according to the physical characteristics of the tissues under this point. The mechanical model which is used to imitate the stress received by the body of the needle was established, and transmitted truly to the operator by the force feedback device. Thus, Fengchi (GB 20) virtual acupuncture force feedback simulation was preliminary established, and the sense of touch could be reproduced lively on the visualized virtual acupuncture human. It is held that Fengchi (GB 20) acupuncture force feedback research is a preliminary exploration for virtual acupuncture that integrated with the information of visual, tactile and force feedback. And it also provided a dynamic one-to-one simulation approach for acupuncture teaching.

  19. Physical Therapy Treatment Of Chronic Neck Pain A Discussion And Case Study: Using Dry Needling And Battlefield Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Richard M; Chorba, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mechanical neck pain can have a complex clinical presentation and is often difficult to treat. This case study illustrates a successful physical therapy treatment approach using dry needling and auricular acupuncture techniques. A 51-year-old active-duty, male US Marine was treated by a physical therapist in a direct-access military clinic for chronic neck pain poorly responsive to previous physical therapy, pharmacologic, and surgical interventions. Needling techniques were combined with standard physical therapy interventions to address the comprehensive needs of the patient. Within five treatments, the patient reported reduced pain levels from 8-9/10 to 0-2/10, improved sleep quality, and increased function with daily activities. Over several months, the patient reduced multiple medication use by greater than 85%. The effects of treatment were lasting, and the patient accomplished a successful transition to an independent maintenance program. Needling techniques have the potential to expedite favorable physical therapy outcomes for active-duty service members suffering from chronic mechanical and degenerative neck pain. The dramatic improvements observed in this case warrant additional exploration of treatment efficacy and delineation of best practices in the delivery of these techniques. 2016.

  20. Deqi Is Double-Faced: The Acupuncture Practitioner's and the Subject's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang Shik; Chae, Younbyeong; Kang, O-Seok; Kim, Seung-Tae; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Park, Ji-Yeun; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background. While therapeutic acupuncture perception (deqi) has recently been investigated only for the subject's perception, classical acupuncture discussed acupuncture perception for both the practitioner and the subject. The aim of this study was to explore the practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perception during acupuncture. Methods. Explorative crossover study to quantitatively document acupuncture perception of both the practitioner and the subject. Eighty-one participants acted as a practitioner or a subject. The practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perceptions were collected using self-report type checklists. Acupuncture needles were inserted to LI4 or ST36, adopting a four-phase method: insertion into shallow, middle, and deep depths, followed by twirling manipulation. Pain, transmission, dullness, and soreness feelings of the subject and thick, tangled, solid, and empty feelings of the practitioner were analyzed for their correlation. Results. The practitioner's and the subject's perception showed a significant correlation. Acupuncture perception varied over four phases of needling, with a tendency to be rated higher when inserted deep. Perception for LI4 was generally higher than those for ST36. Conclusion. The practitioner's acupuncture perception was successfully documented and analyzed in relation to the subject's acupuncture perception and different needling conditions.

  1. Deqi Is Double-Faced: The Acupuncture Practitioner's and the Subject's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chang Shik; Chae, Younbyeong; Kang, O-Seok; Kim, Seung-Tae; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Park, Ji-Yeun; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background. While therapeutic acupuncture perception (deqi) has recently been investigated only for the subject's perception, classical acupuncture discussed acupuncture perception for both the practitioner and the subject. The aim of this study was to explore the practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perception during acupuncture. Methods. Explorative crossover study to quantitatively document acupuncture perception of both the practitioner and the subject. Eighty-one participants acted as a practitioner or a subject. The practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perceptions were collected using self-report type checklists. Acupuncture needles were inserted to LI4 or ST36, adopting a four-phase method: insertion into shallow, middle, and deep depths, followed by twirling manipulation. Pain, transmission, dullness, and soreness feelings of the subject and thick, tangled, solid, and empty feelings of the practitioner were analyzed for their correlation. Results. The practitioner's and the subject's perception showed a significant correlation. Acupuncture perception varied over four phases of needling, with a tendency to be rated higher when inserted deep. Perception for LI4 was generally higher than those for ST36. Conclusion. The practitioner's acupuncture perception was successfully documented and analyzed in relation to the subject's acupuncture perception and different needling conditions. PMID:26689128

  2. [Contribution of ZHAO ji-an, a modern famous doctor handed down from ancestors, to the acupuncture and moxibustion cause ].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shou-Mao

    2007-12-01

    ZHAO Jian was a modern famous doctor of Shanxi province, a family of TCM handed down from ancestors, with unique academic thought and manipulation of acupuncture and moxibustion, and made important contribution to the acup-moxibustion sciences, mainly including paying attention to medical ethics, noble character and high prestige, originating "the crimes of indiscriminately passing on acupuncture and moxibustion"; writing scholarly works, developing Chinese national culture; constantly creating needling instruments; paying attention to treating mind, regulating yin and yang, advocating treating both mind and form; promoting free circulation of qi to kill pain, combination of acupuncture with massage, originating "alternate application of mental needles and digital needling "; inheriting ancient medicine and ancient acupuncture and moxibustion methods, originating no-pain inserting needle method, and combination of acupuncture and moxibustion with massage.

  3. Immediate effects of scalp acupuncture with twirling reinforcing manipulation on hemiplegia following acute ischemic stroke: a hidden association study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao-zheng; Bao, Chun-ling; Dong, Gui-rong; Yang, Xu-ming

    2016-01-01

    Data mining has the potential to provide information for improving clinical acupuncture strategies by uncovering hidden rules between acupuncture manipulation and therapeutic effects in a data set. In this study, we performed acupuncture on 30 patients with hemiplegia due to acute ischemic stroke. All participants were pre-screened to ensure that they exhibited immediate responses to acupuncture. We used a twirling reinforcing acupuncture manipulation at the specific lines between the bilateral Baihui (GV20) and Taiyang (EX-HN5). We collected neurologic deficit score, simplified Fugl-Meyer assessment score, muscle strength of the proximal and distal hemiplegic limbs, ratio of the maximal H-reflex to the maximal M-wave (Hmax/Mmax), muscle tension at baseline and immediately after treatment, and the syndromes of traditional Chinese medicine at baseline. We then conducted data mining using an association algorithm and an artificial neural network backpropagation algorithm. We found that the twirling reinforcing manipulation had no obvious therapeutic difference in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes of “Deficiency and Excess”. The change in the muscle strength of the upper distal and lower proximal limbs was one of the main factors affecting the immediate change in Fugl-Meyer scores. Additionally, we found a positive correlation between the muscle tension change of the upper limb and Hmax/Mmax immediate change, and both positive and negative correlations existed between the muscle tension change of the lower limb and immediate Hmax/Mmax change. Additionally, when the difference value of muscle tension for the upper and lower limbs was > 0 or < 0, the difference value of Hmax/Mmax was correspondingly positive or negative, indicating the scalp acupuncture has a bidirectional effect on muscle tension in hemiplegic limbs. Therefore, acupuncture with twirling reinforcing manipulation has distinct effects on acute ischemic stroke patients with different symptoms or

  4. Immediate effects of scalp acupuncture with twirling reinforcing manipulation on hemiplegia following acute ischemic stroke: a hidden association study.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Zheng; Bao, Chun-Ling; Dong, Gui-Rong; Yang, Xu-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Data mining has the potential to provide information for improving clinical acupuncture strategies by uncovering hidden rules between acupuncture manipulation and therapeutic effects in a data set. In this study, we performed acupuncture on 30 patients with hemiplegia due to acute ischemic stroke. All participants were pre-screened to ensure that they exhibited immediate responses to acupuncture. We used a twirling reinforcing acupuncture manipulation at the specific lines between the bilateral Baihui (GV20) and Taiyang (EX-HN5). We collected neurologic deficit score, simplified Fugl-Meyer assessment score, muscle strength of the proximal and distal hemiplegic limbs, ratio of the maximal H-reflex to the maximal M-wave (Hmax/Mmax), muscle tension at baseline and immediately after treatment, and the syndromes of traditional Chinese medicine at baseline. We then conducted data mining using an association algorithm and an artificial neural network backpropagation algorithm. We found that the twirling reinforcing manipulation had no obvious therapeutic difference in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes of "Deficiency and Excess". The change in the muscle strength of the upper distal and lower proximal limbs was one of the main factors affecting the immediate change in Fugl-Meyer scores. Additionally, we found a positive correlation between the muscle tension change of the upper limb and Hmax/Mmax immediate change, and both positive and negative correlations existed between the muscle tension change of the lower limb and immediate Hmax/Mmax change. Additionally, when the difference value of muscle tension for the upper and lower limbs was > 0 or < 0, the difference value of Hmax/Mmax was correspondingly positive or negative, indicating the scalp acupuncture has a bidirectional effect on muscle tension in hemiplegic limbs. Therefore, acupuncture with twirling reinforcing manipulation has distinct effects on acute ischemic stroke patients with different symptoms or

  5. The accuracy and safety aspects of a novel robotic needle guide manipulator to perform transrectal prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Martijn G; Ansems, Janneke; Renema, W Klaas Jan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W J; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2010-09-01

    To introduce a new in-house developed pneumatically controlled magnetic field compatible manipulator as an aid to perform magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsies of the prostate. A pneumatic controlled manipulator with five degrees of freedom constructed of plastic to achieve magnetic field compatibility was developed to guide biopsies. A risk analysis, mechanical tests, and RF safety tests with respect to needle tip heating were performed to assure future patient safety and to meet standard safety requirements for the use in a medical environment. The accuracy of needle positioning with the needle guide manipulator to sample a predefined target was measured in agar phantoms on a 3 T whole body MR system. The in-plane error was used to evaluate the accuracy, which is defined as the orthogonal distance between target and biopsy needle. The time for each step in the biopsy procedure was recorded to evaluate the procedure time. The influence of the insertion angle with respect to the static field of the MR scanner on the needle artifact was investigated. The risk analyses met patient safety requirements. No RF induced local heating around the needle tip was observed. The average in-plane error in 19 measurements was 3.0 mm (range 0-5.6 mm). The average time needed for manipulation to place the needle guide in the desired position was 5 min (range 3-8 min). Total procedure time was 30 min. The needle artifact size increases with the insertion angle with respect to the static field of the MR scanner. The new MR compatible manipulator can be used safely for patient care. It showed a high accuracy and short total procedure time, demonstrating great potential to improve the transrectal prostate biopsy procedure.

  6. [Professor WU Xu's clinical experiences on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Liang; Lu, Bin; Sun, Jian-Hua; Ai, Bing-Wei; Bao, Chao; Wu, Wen-Zhong; Li, Jian-Bing; Liu, Lan-Ying; Wu, Wen-Yun; Pei, Li-Xia; Zhou, Jun-Ling; Li, Yan-Cai; Qin, Shan

    2014-03-01

    The clinical experiences and proven cases of distinguished doctor of TCM, professor WU Xu, on acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain is introduced. Professor WU's manipulation characteristics of acupuncture for acute upper abdominal pain, including acute cholecystitis, kidney stone, acute stomach pain, are one-hand shape but both hands in nature, moving like Tai Chi, force on the tip of needle, movement of qi mainly. The main technique posture is one-hand holding needle with middle finger for pressing, the needle is hold by thumb and index finger, and is assisted by middle finger. The special acupuncture experience of emergency is treatment according to syndrome differentiation, combination of acupuncture and moxibustion, selecting acupoint based on experience, blood-letting acupuncture therapy and so on.

  7. [Clinical study on the treatment of knee osteoarthritis by acupuncture plus manipulative regulation of knee muscle].

    PubMed

    Sun, Kui; Bao, Xue-Mei; Song, Yang-Chun; Liu, De-Chun

    2010-12-01

    To investigate and research the appraisal scores of the symptoms and physical signs index for the evaluation of the clinical efficacy of acupuncture and manipulative regulation of knee muscle balance for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, and provide clinical basis for the treatment. From January 2008 to December 2009, 121 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly divided into two groups. In the treatment group there were 63 cases of 83 knees including 16 males and 47 females, with an average age of (59.88 +/- 7.97) years; in the control group there were 58 cases of 73 knees including 13 males and 45 females, with an average age of (57.95 +/- 10.37) years. The patients in the treatment group were treated with acupuncture plus manipulative regulation of knee muscle balance, and the patients in the control group were treated with Diclofenac Sodium Sustained Release Tablets. The appraisal scores of the symptoms and physical signs index, numerical rating scale of pain, joint function, joint swelling were evaluated before and after the treatment, as well as 3 months after the treatment. All data were statistical analyzed by package SPSS 10.0. 1) In the treatment group, before and after treatment the appraisal scores of the symptoms and physical signs index were (39.81 +/- 3.92) and (9.69 +/- 8.08); numerical rating scale of pain were (7.61 +/- 0.97) and (2.17 +/- 2.09); joint function were (1.47 +/- 0.50) and (0.61 +/- 0.58); joint swelling were (1.23 +/- 0.79) and (0.42 +/- 0.52). As well in the control group, above data were (39.89 +/- 3.78), (13.62 +/- 7.83), (7.55 +/- 0.71), (3.34 +/- 2.32), (1.33 +/- 0.47), (0.93 +/- 0.67), an (0.97 +/- 0.88), (0.58 +/- 0.52) respectively. Both group had obvious differences in the appraisal scores of the symptoms and physical signs index, numerical rating scale of pain, joint function, joint swelling between after and before treatment. The comparison between the two groups suggested that after the treatments the treatment

  8. Role of collagen fibers in acupuncture analgesia therapy on rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojia; Ding, Guanghong; Huang, Hong; Lin, Jun; Yao, Wei; Zhan, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic technique, has been put into practice for more than 4000 years and widely used for pain management since 1958. However, what is the mechanism underlying the acupuncture for analgesia effects by stimulation of acupoints, what substances receive the original mechanical acupuncture signals from the acupoints, or what transforms these signals into effective biological signals are not well understood. In this work, the role of collagen fibers at acupoints during acupuncture analgesia on rats was investigated. When the structure of the collagen fibers at Zusanli (ST36) was destroyed by injection of type I collagenase, the needle force caused by the acupuncture declined and the analgesic effects of rotation or lift-thrusting manipulations was attenuated accompanying the restraint of the degranulation ratios of mast cells. We propose that collagen fibers play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia, and they participate in signal transmission and transform processes.

  9. [Zhu Lian's characteristics and experiences in clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Li fu; Pan, Xiaoria; Liu, Bing; Yue, Jin; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing the clinical characteristics and experiences of ZHU Lian, the renowned contemporary acupuncture master from the following three aspects: "characteristics of clinical manipulations and techniques", "thoughts on diagnosis and treatment" and "examples of clinical cases". The study has shown that ZHU Lian invented the slow insertion technique by rotating needle and the embedding needle technique, improved moxibustion technique with moxa roll and proposed the three keys on the treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion, as well as discovered new acupoints for treatment. The pioneering and distinguished achievements she con tributed play the great demonstrating and driving role in the development of clinical study and practice of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  10. [Li Wen-Rong's experience on acupuncture at painful locality taken as acupoint].

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Lin; Li, Jun

    2010-04-01

    Doctor Li Wen-Rong, who has been practicing acupuncture for five decades by combination of the meridian theory of TCM and related modern medical science, has still been active in acupuncture clinic, especially in acupuncture manipulation based on the method of acupuncture at painful locality taken as acupoint, Jiaji (EX-B 2) being selected as the main acupoints and Back-shu acupoints of the Bladder Meridian as adjuvant acupoints, except the acupoints on the limbs, and the selected acupoints being relatively concentrated and the needles being inserted in tender points for treatment of relevant nervous system diseases and complicated chronic cases, which has formed her own academic style. In this article, the authors introduce some of her medical records by using acupuncture manipulation based on the method of acupuncture at painful locality taken as acupoint for treatment of facial paralysis, renal colic and rheumatoid arthritis, and the main idea of this article is to summarize and analyze her academic thoughts.

  11. Needle Sensation and Personality Factors Influence Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncture for Treating Bell's Palsy: A Secondary Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen-Yan; Xu, Sha-Bei; Huang, Bo; Du, Peng; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Luo, Xiang; Huang, Guang-Ying; Xie, Min-Jie; Zhou, Zong-Kui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has not been solved what kind of needle sensation might influence outcomes of acupuncture treatment. Effects of personality factors on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture have not been investigated. This study aimed to find the effects of the traits of personality on the objective outcome when different acupuncture techniques were used in treating patients with Bell's palsy. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial of acupuncture for Bell's palsy. Patients were randomly assigned to the de qi and control groups, respectively. The primary outcome was facial nerve function at month 6. The intensity of each needle sensation was rated by a visual analog scale. Psychosocial factors were assessed by the pretreatment mediator questionnaire; 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) was used for assessing personality factors and digit cancellation test for assessing attention. Results: After 6 months, patients in the de qi group had better facial function (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.23–7.78). Path analysis showed that intensity of needle sensation of fullness had direct effect on House-Brackmann (HB) score at month 6. In de qi group, the low HB score on day 1 (OR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03–0.45) and the low Social Boldness score (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.41–0.97) in 16PF were associated with better facial function. In control group, low HB score on day 1 (OR: 0.25, 95% CI: 0.13–0.50), low Vigilance score (OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.50–0.88), and high Tension score (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.12–1.77) in 16PF were related to better facial function. Conclusions: The needle sensation of fullness could predict better facial function and personality traits might influence outcomes of acupuncture treatment. Both of them should be considered seriously in acupuncture treatment and research. PMID:27453226

  12. Manipulation Therapy Relieved Pain More Rapidly Than Acupuncture among Lateral Epicondylalgia (Tennis Elbow) Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial with 8-Week Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ko-Hung; Chang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Radial bone adjustment manipulation treatment may be effective to reduce pain rapidly in lateral epicondylalgia patients and the pathological tension in the biceps brachii muscle is highly concerned. To prove this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized controlled trial and included 35 patients with lateral epicondylalgia for more than 2 months. Either manipulation treatment (n = 16) or acupuncture (n = 19) was given to these patients for 2 weeks and all patients' symptoms were followed up for 8 weeks after treatment. Both groups demonstrated changes in pain VAS score, grip strength, and DASH questionnaire. Lateral epicondylalgia patients who received manipulation treatment felt pain relief sooner than those who had acupuncture treatments during the first few treatments. However, both acupuncture and manipulation are effective, while the difference has no significance at the 8-week follow-up. The trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81308551 on 5 February 2016. PMID:27143983

  13. [Acupuncture and stress].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cisong; Zhu Yihui; Wei, Qin; Kou, Jun; Wen, Peipei

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between acupuncture and stress is discussed from three aspects, including is it possible for acupuncture stimulation to be a stressor, whether acupuncture will start stress reaction, and whether acupuncture effects contain some stress factors. It is believed that correct acupuncture manipulation will not cause stress response, however, under some circumstances, such as inaccurate manipulation, improper treatment or patients who are very nervous but do not receive effective intervention, acupuncture is likely to cause stress response. Acupuncture-induced stress response is totally different from acupuncture anti-stress. The possible stress factors in acupuncture effect are explored, which can provide a new angle for the research on action mechanism of acupuncture. From the view of stress to review acupuncture treatment, there are three enlightenments: emphasizing on communication between doctors and patients, avoiding over-pursuit of deqi and focusing on analysis of the body constitution.

  14. [Discussion on different methods of painless needle insertion based on positions].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Xuemin

    2016-03-01

    Based on multiple painless needle insertion skills in clinic combined with own experience, the authors propose the opinion that different painless needle insertion methods need to be used according to the positions where acupoints are. The appropriate needle insertion mean must be selected in accord with the anatomical characteristic of acupoint position, namely, tapping insertion is applied in scalp part, skin-pinching up needle insertion is used in forehead and superficial nerve trunk, fingernail-pressure needle insertion in ocular region and positions where large blood vessels distribute, flying acupuncture insertion in face and finger tip, vibrating needle in occipitonuchal region, quivering insertion in abdomen, quick pricking by single hand in the four limbs and back, and chop acupuncture in palm and pelma. The insertion methods are systematically discussed in terms of preparation, acupoint position, manipulation and attention, etc, so that to provide the reference for painless needle insertion.

  15. [Academic characteristics of Huang's school of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Xia, Yong; Liu, Li-Gong

    2012-09-01

    Huang's school of acupuncture and moxibustion, whose representative figures are HUANG Hong-fang and HUANG Xian-ming, is one of the schools of acupuncture and moxibustion in Shanghai. The life stories of the representative figures of Huang's school of acupuncture and moxibustion and three academic viewpoints of Huang's school are briefly introduced in this article: (1) syndrome differentiation for seeking the pathogenic roots and developing treatment principle based on the roots; (2) focusing on spleen and stomach and putting stomach first in the treatment; (3) simple point selection with clear structures showing major and assistant points. Their characteristics of the needling techniques are summarized, involving needling manipulations, qi induction, reinforcing and reducing method, etc. so as to lay a foundation for further study and inheritance of the academic thought in Huang's school of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  16. Development of an MRI-compatible needle insertion manipulator for stereotactic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Masamune, K; Kobayashi, E; Masutani, Y; Suzuki, M; Dohi, T; Iseki, H; Takakura, K

    1995-01-01

    A variety of medical robots for stereotactic neurosurgery has been developed in recent years. Almost of all these robots use computed tomography (CT) to scan the brain of the patient before and during surgery. Currently, we are developing a needle insertion manipulator for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided neurosurgery. MRI techniques, including MRI angiography and functional MRI, are attractive for the development of interventional MRI therapies and operations. If a robot were available, these therapies would be minimally invasive, with more accurate guidance than is possible with current CT-guided systems. Actuation of a robot in an MRI environment is difficult because of the presence of strong magnetic fields. Therefore, the robot must be constructed of nonmagnetic materials. The system frame was manufactured using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and was actuated using ultrasonic motors. Accuracy-evaluation procedures and phantom tests have been performed. The total accuracy of the system was approximately 3.0 mm. No artifacts caused by the manipulator were observed in the images.

  17. [Study on the effect of cluster needling of scalp acupuncture on the plasticity protein MAP-2 in rats with focal cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-zeng; Ni, Jin-xia; Tang, Qiang; Dong, Gui-rong; Li, Hong-ying

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the material base and underlying mechanism of the effect of cluster needling of scalp acupuncture on the neuronal plasticity in rats with focal cerebral infarction. The model rats with acute cerebral infarction were made by blocking the middle cerebral artery with monofilament. One hundred and thirty two Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham-operation group (A), model group (B), point-to-point scalp acupuncture group (C) and cluster-needling of scalp acupunture group (D). Puncturing from "Baihui (GV 20)" to "Qubin (GB 7)" was used in group C. Cluster needling of scalp acupuncture was used in group D, in which needles were inserted forward and slantingly into "Baihui (GV 20)" and its left and right sides at 4 mm. In both groups, the treatment was carried out with rapid twirling reinforcing-reducing for 1 min then retaining needle for 30 min, once a day, 6 days in one course, for treating 4 courses. There was no treatment for group A and B. The change of neurological function was evaluated with Bederson score, while the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in the ischemic penumbra was examined with immunohistochemistry (streptavidin-peroxidase method). In comparison,with group B, the score of neurological function in group D decreased on 7th day (P<0.05), while the scors in group C and D also decreased on 14th and 28th days (both P<0.05). As compared with group C, the score of neurological function in group D obviously decreased on 28th days (P<0. 05). Comparing with group B, the expression of MAP-2 on the ischemic cortex was significantly increased in group D and C on 7th, 14th and 28th days (all P<0. 05), however, this expression in group D was higher than that in group C on 14th and 28th days (P<0. 05). Cluster needling of scalp acupuncture can improve the neurological function of rats with focal cerebral infarction, and increase the expression of MAP-2 in the ischemic penumbra.

  18. Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in “Overweight” Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Liu, Peng; Chen, Peng; Xie, Huisheng; Gold, Mark S.; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    This functional connectivity study depicts how acupoints ST 36 and SP 9 and their sham acupoints acutely act on blood glucose (GLU), core body temperature (CBT), hunger, and sensations pertaining to needling (De-qi) via the limbic system and dopamine (DA) to affect various brain areas in fasting, adult, and “overweight” Chinese males using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis utilized the amygdala (AMY) and hypothalamus (HYP) as regions of interest (ROIs) in the discrete cosine transform and seed correlation analysis methods. There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups. Correlation results showed that increased HYP-hippocampus FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT; increased HYP-putamen-insula FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU; and increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. Decreased HYP-thalamus FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was possibly associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. No correlation was found for min SHAM. This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals. PMID:25821486

  19. Effects of the lifting manipulation of scalp acupuncture for raising myodynamia of the affected limbs in hemiplegic patients due to cerebral thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yaoqi; Xu, Fu; Lin, Xiurong; Feng, Zhengen; Shi, Hongfei; Yu, Guoqiao; Hu, Lirong; Li, Xinwei; Jiang, Lingzhen

    2005-12-01

    To provide a new therapy with definite quality controllable therapeutic effects for functional restoration of the affected limbs in hemiplegic patients due to cerebral thrombosis. 180 patients with hemiplegia due to cerebral thrombosis were randomly divided into 2 groups: the treatment group (treated with scalp acupuncture by using the lifting manipulation) and the control group (treated with scalp acupuncture by using the twirling manipulation). Evaluations were given for the two groups based on the improvement of myodynamia and comprehensive functions after the treatment. Both groups showed increased myodynamia, but with different cured and much relieved rates (86.67% in the treatment group and 5% in the control group, P<0.01). Scalp acupuncture with the lifting manipulation can dramatically increase myodynamia of the affected limbs in hemiplegic patients due to cerebral thrombosis.

  20. [Professor GAO Yuchun's experience of acupuncture for headache].

    PubMed

    Cui, Linhua; Xing, Xiao; Xue, Weihua; Wang, Yanjun; Xu, Cejun; Xuc, Jun; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-12-01

    As one of the important founders of GAO's acupuncture academic school in YanZhao area, Professor GAO Yuchun 's experience of acupuncture for headache is summarized in this paper. In the opinion of Professor GAO, the treatment of headache should focus on eliminating evil and relieving pain, and the syndrome differentiation should be based on meridian differentiation, especially on three yang meridians of foot as well as liver meridian and kidney meridian. In the acupoint prescription, attention should be placed on strengthening the spleen and stomach. The midnight-midday ebb flow acupuncture is advocated. The combination between acupuncture order and movement of qi is emphasized. In the manipulation, the role of pressing hand, the stimulation during reinforcing and reducing methods, and needle-retention time are important. The breathing reinforcing and reducing method of acupuncture are also advocated.

  1. Inhibitory effects of acupuncture manipulation and focal electrical stimulation of the nucleus submedius on a viscerosomatic reflex in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, E; Kawakita, K

    1997-02-01

    To examine the participation of nucleus submedius (Sm) in the medial thalamus of pain inhibitory systems, we investigated the effects of acupuncture and focal electrical stimulation of the Sm and adjacent brain sites (0.3 ms, 50 Hz, 50-100 microA, 10 s) on the EMG activity of the external oblique muscle evoked by colorectal distension in urethane-anesthetized Wistar rats. The viscerosomatic reflex (VSR) activity was suppressed after the administration of morphine (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) and the effect was reversed by naloxone (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.). Transection of the spinal cord at the Th2 level also eliminated the VSR. Acupuncture manipulation applied to the cheek (manual rotation at 1 Hz) suppressed the VSR, and this inhibition was eliminated by microinjections of lidocaine into the bilateral Sm nuclei (0.5 microliter of 1.0% solution). Electrical stimulation in the ventral part but not the dorsal part of the Sm suppressed the VSR. The inhibition of the VSR induced by electrical stimulation of the Sm was not reversed by the administration of naloxone (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Electrical stimulation of the adjacent medial thalamic nuclei (mediodorsal nucleus (MD) or centromedial nucleus (CM)) and ventrobasal complex (VB) of the thalamus had very little effect on the VSR. These results suggests that the Sm is not only involved in the relay of nociceptive information to the cortex, but may also be involved in a non-opioid mediated pain inhibitory system and may participate, at least in part, in the suppressive effects of intense acupuncture manipulation on VSR activity.

  2. [Ye De-ming: a famous expert of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Wei

    2009-05-01

    Ye De-ming is a famous old doctor of Chinese medicine of the first occasion in Chengdu city, a chief physician, and a representative figure of special school of thought in acupuncture and moxibustion science, Ye's gold needle. He is called "Ye's gold needle". He has served clinic for many years, bringing benefit to the patients by unique acupuncture manipulation method, point prescription and paying attention to the congenital and acquired theories. He successively sets up the department of gold needle in two municipal hospitals, building the echelon of talented persons and forming an extensive department laying equal stress on the outpatient service and inpatient service. He gives a lecture in training class of gold needle, passing on experience, and he makes important contribution for development of acupuncture and moxibustion science.

  3. Activation of the hypothalamus characterizes the response to acupuncture stimulation in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Wenhua; Ruan, Xingzhong; Li, Ronghui; Lee, Tatia; Weng, Xuchu; Hu, Jun; Yang, Guodong

    2007-06-29

    Acupuncture stimulation elicited a composite of sensations termed deqi that is related to clinical efficacy. Neurobiological studies have identified the hypothalamus as an important component in mediating the deqi. Functional changes in hypothalamus persist after abstinence in addicts. We investigated the activation in the hypothalamus associated with acupuncture stimulation in healthy volunteers and heroin addicts by fMRI. Cortisol level and psychophysical responses, including the deqi sensation (an acupuncture effect of needle-manipulation), anxiety, and sharp pain, were also assessed. The activation of the hypothalamus was more robust in the addicts than that in the healthy subjects during acupuncture stimulation. The deqi scores of the heroin addicts were significantly higher than those of the healthy subjects during acupuncture treatment. An acupuncture sensation scale predicted the activation of the hypothalamus associated with the deqi sensation.

  4. Continuous separation of multiple size microparticles using alternating current dielectrophoresis in microfluidic device with acupuncture needle electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Ren, Yukun; Yan, Hui; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-03-01

    The need to continuously separate multiple microparticles is required for the recent development of lab-on-chip technology. Dielectrophoresis(DEP)-based separation device is extensively used in kinds of microfluidic applications. However, such conventional DEP-based device is relatively complicated and difficult for fabrication. A concise microfluidic device is presented for effective continuous separation of multiple size particle mixtures. A pair of acupuncture needle electrodes are creatively employed and embedded in a PDMS(poly-dimethylsiloxane) hurdle for generating non-uniform electric field thereby achieving a continuous DEP separation. The separation mechanism is that the incoming particle samples with different sizes experience different negative DEP(nDEP) forces and then they can be transported into different downstream outlets. The DEP characterizations of particles are calculated, and their trajectories are numerically predicted by considering the combined action of the incoming laminar flow and the nDEP force field for guiding the separation experiments. The device performance is verified by successfully separating a three-sized particle mixture, including polystyrene microspheres with diameters of 3 μm, 10 μm and 25 μm. The separation purity is below 70% when the flow rate ratio is less than 3.5 or more than 5.1, while the separation purity can be up to more than 90% when the flow rate ratio is between 3.5 and 5.1 and meanwhile ensure the voltage output falls in between 120 V and 150 V. Such simple DEP-based separation device has extensive applications in future microfluidic systems.

  5. [Impacts of numerology on acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wu, Changqiu; Wu, Xueyi

    2016-04-01

    Numerology has a long history in China and has the profound impacts on every academic field in TCM, with acupuncture involved. In this paper, the impacts on acupuncture were discussed in different aspects such as the numbers of meridians, the length of meridian, the time taboo of acupuncture, acupuncture manipulation and time acupuncture. It was found that numerology had laid the critical impact on acupuncture and had the profound imprint nowadays. It is of great significance to study the numerology theory in its impacts on acupuncture, in the exploration on the theories behind acupuncture as well as the comprehensive understanding of acupuncture.

  6. [Ideas of standardization evaluation on acupuncture skills: enlightened by quantitative appraisal of surgical skills in Europe and North America].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Mary X

    2011-12-01

    Acupuncture manipulation skills are the core of acupuncture therapy. Traditional acupuncture skills evaluation is based on experts' subjective assessment which is deficient in reliability and validity. Certain progresses on the quantitative research on acupuncture skills have been made in China, while there is still a long way to go before the formation of the consummate standardization evaluation system on acupuncture skills. Actually, quantitative appraisal on surgical skills has been developed for a long time in Europe and North America. Since acupuncture could be considered as a kind of skills of minimally invasive surgery because small wounds would be generated by needles, the theories and methods in surgical quantitative appraisal could be utilized. For instance, scales could be designed to evaluate the operation modes in acupuncture skills and precise instruments could be used in the measurement of acupuncture skills. Then standard databases on common acupuncture manipulations would be built. Moreover, in terms of the characteristics of acupuncture skills, high-fidelity simulators should be designed or standardized patients should be trained for the assessment of "Deqi" (arrival of qi)feelings. Thereby, an appropriate standardization evaluation system for acupuncture skills would be created gradually.

  7. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science Past Issues / ... percent of U.S. adults use acupuncture. What Is Acupuncture? Dr. Adeline Ge adjusts placement of acupuncture needles ...

  8. Visualized Characterization for Cerebral Response of Acupuncture Deqi: Paradox Underway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Xiao; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Xi; Chen, Jiao; Liu, Yan-Qin; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an oriental natural healing therapy with prolonged history has been extensively utilized in the management of great numbers of disorders. Deqi, a renowned acupuncture needling sensation, is profoundly regarded as the predictor and also the prerequisite of a preferable acupuncture treatment efficacy. Till now, there is still no consistency being reached towards the mechanism of acupuncture Deqi as a result of the discrepancy for publicly acknowledged evidence. Recent visualized research on Deqi using modern technologies has demonstrated possible central mechanism towards it. However, there is a conspicuous paradox underway in the research of cerebral response to acupuncture Deqi. This paper provided a view of up-to-date studies using visualized tools to characterize the brain response to acupuncture Deqi, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The paradox was extruded to highlight certain reasons from a TCM view. It is hypothesized that acupoints located at different dermal sites, state of participant, and needling manipulation can all contribute to the current paradox. Hence, further studies on acupuncture Deqi should pay more attention to the strategy of experiment design with generalized measurement, valid sham control methods, and more to subjects in diseased condition. PMID:23935686

  9. Visualized characterization for cerebral response of acupuncture deqi: paradox underway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Ming-Xiao; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Xi; Chen, Jiao; Liu, Yan-Qin; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an oriental natural healing therapy with prolonged history has been extensively utilized in the management of great numbers of disorders. Deqi, a renowned acupuncture needling sensation, is profoundly regarded as the predictor and also the prerequisite of a preferable acupuncture treatment efficacy. Till now, there is still no consistency being reached towards the mechanism of acupuncture Deqi as a result of the discrepancy for publicly acknowledged evidence. Recent visualized research on Deqi using modern technologies has demonstrated possible central mechanism towards it. However, there is a conspicuous paradox underway in the research of cerebral response to acupuncture Deqi. This paper provided a view of up-to-date studies using visualized tools to characterize the brain response to acupuncture Deqi, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The paradox was extruded to highlight certain reasons from a TCM view. It is hypothesized that acupoints located at different dermal sites, state of participant, and needling manipulation can all contribute to the current paradox. Hence, further studies on acupuncture Deqi should pay more attention to the strategy of experiment design with generalized measurement, valid sham control methods, and more to subjects in diseased condition.

  10. [Clinical research of knee joint motor impairment after fracture operation treated with relaxing needling manipulation combined with exercise therapy].

    PubMed

    Luo, Kaimin; Qi, Tianchen; Yang, Lin; Hou, Zhi

    2015-09-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy on the motor impairment of knee joint after tracture operation between the combined therapeutic method of relaxing needling manipulation and exercise therapy and the simple exercise therapy. Sixty-four patients after the operation for the fracture of femoral shaft were randomized into a relaxing needling combined with exercise therapy group (group A) and an exercise therapy group (group B), 32 cases in each one. In the group A, the relaxing needling manipulation was applied to the local painful area of knee or the stiff soft tissues. Additionally, the exercise therapy was used in combination. In the group B, the exercise therapy was applied simply. Hospital for special surgery (HSS) pain score, the range of movement (ROM) of knee joint and Lysholm score were compared before and 60 days after treatment in the patients of the two groups. The efficacy was compared between the two groups. After treatment, HSS pain score, ROM and Lysholm score were all improved in the two groups, presenting the significant differences as compared with those before treatment (all P<0. 05). The results in the group A were better than those in the group B (all P<0. 05). The total effective rate was 96. 9% (31/32) in the group A, which was better than 75. 0% (24/32) in the group B (P<0. 05). The combined therapeutic method of relaxing needling manipulation and exercise therapy achieves the significant efficacy on the motor impairment of knee joint after the operation for the fracture of femoral shaft, superior to the simple exercise therapy.

  11. [Needling technique of Professor Li Yan-Fang].

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of needling techniques of Professor LI Ya- fang is introduced in this article. Gentle and superficial insertion is adopted by Professor LI in clinic. Emphases are put on the qi regulation function, needling sensation to the affected region and insertion with both hands, especially the function of the left hand as pressing hand. The gentle and superficial insertion should be done as the follows: hold the needle with the right hand, press gently along the running course of meridians with the left hand to promote qi circulation, hard pressing should be applied at acupoints to disperse the local qi and blood, insert the needle gently and quickly into the subcutaneous region with the right hand, and stop the insertion when patient has the needling sensation. While the fast needling is characterized with shallow insertion and swift manipulation: the left hand of the manipulator should press first along the running course of the meridian, and fix the local skin, hold the needle with the right hand and insert the needle quickly into the acupoint. Withdrawal of the needle should be done immediately after the reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Professor LI is accomplished in qi regulation. It is held by him that regulating qi circulation is essence of acupuncture, letting the patient get the needling sensation is the most important task of needling. Lifting, thrusting and rotation manipulations should be applied to do reinforcing or reducing. The tissue around the tip of the needle should not be too contracted or too relaxed, and the resistance should not be too strong or too weak. The feeling of the insertion hand of the practitioner should not be too smooth or too hesitant. Needle should be inserted into the skin quickly at the moment of hard pressing by the left hand. And then, slow rotation and gentle lifting and thrusting can be applied to promote the needling sensation like electric current pass through and to reach the affected region along the

  12. Different patterns of blood flow response in the trapezius muscle following needle stimulation (acupuncture) between healthy subjects and patients with fibromyalgia and work-related trapezius myalgia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Margareta; Larsson, Britt; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Gerdle, Björn

    2005-10-01

    Needle stimulation (acupuncture) has recently been shown to increase blood flow in the tibialis anterior muscle and overlying skin in healthy subjects (HS) and patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of needle stimulation on local blood flow in the trapezius muscle and overlying skin in HS and two groups of patients suffering from chronic pain in the trapezius muscle, i.e., FM and work-related trapezius myalgia (TM) patients. Two modes of needling, deep muscle stimulation (Deep) and subcutaneous needle insertion (SC), were performed at the upper part of the shoulder and blood flow was monitored for 60 min post-stimulation. Blood flow changes were measured non-invasively by using a new application of photoplethysmography. Increased blood flow in the trapezius muscle and overlying skin was found in all three groups following both Deep and SC. In HS, Deep was superior to SC in increasing skin and muscle blood flow, whereas in FM, SC was as effective as, or even more effective, than Deep. In the severely affected TM patients, no differences were found between the stimuli, and generally, a lesser blood flow response to the stimuli was found. At Deep, the muscle blood flow increase was significantly larger in HS, compared to the two patient groups. Positive correlations were found between muscle blood flow at Deep and pressure pain threshold in the trapezius muscle, neck movement and pain experienced at the stimulation, and negative correlations were found with spontaneous pain-related variables, symptom duration and age, pointing to less favorable results with worsening of symptoms, and to the importance of nociceptor activation in blood flow increase. It was hypothesized that the different patterns of muscle blood flow response to the needling may mirror a state of increased sympathetic activity and a generalized hypersensitivity in the patients. The intensity of stimulation should be taken into consideration when

  13. Nausea control by needling at acupuncture point Neiguan (PC6) during an intraoral impression-taking procedure.

    PubMed

    Zotelli, Vera Lucia Rasera; Grillo, Cássia Maria; de Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture point PC6 (Neiguan) in controlling nausea during intraoral impression taking. This study was conducted in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. The sample consisted of 33 adult volunteers with nausea, who were randomly divided into control and study groups, and treated with nonpenetrating sham acupuncture and real acupuncture, respectively, at acupoint PC6. The two groups had two maxillary impressions taken, one prior to acupuncture and the other after acupuncture. The nausea assessment was made using the visual analog scale, Gagging Severity Index (GSI), and Gagging Prevention Index. Volunteers' expectation that nausea would be reduced through acupuncture was also assessed. For statistical analysis, we used the t test and the Spearman correlation (p < 0.05). When assessed by Gagging Severity Index/Gagging Prevention Index, nausea was reduced in the real acupuncture group (p < 0.01). In the visual analog scale assessment, similar reductions of nausea were noted in both groups (p > 0.05). No correlation existed between the expected and the actual reductions in nausea. Our results indicate that acupoint PC6 was effective for controlling nausea during the maxillary impression-taking procedure. Patients' expectation did not influence the results.

  14. Combination of acupuncture and spinal manipulative therapy: management of a 32-year-old patient with chronic tension-type headache and migraine

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsen, Bahia A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment using acupuncture and spinal manipulation for a patient with a chronic tension-type headache and episodic migraines. Clinical Features A 32-year-old woman presented with headaches of 5 months' duration. She had a history of episodic migraine that began in her teens and had been controlled with medication. She had stopped taking the prescription medications because of gastrointestinal symptoms. A neurologist diagnosed her with mixed headaches, some migrainous and some tension type. Her headaches were chronic, were daily, and fit the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria of a chronic tension-type headache superimposed with migraine. Intervention and Outcome After 5 treatments over a 2-week period (the first using acupuncture only, the next 3 using acupuncture and chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy), her headaches resolved. The patient had no recurrences of headaches in her 1-year follow-up. Conclusion The combination of acupuncture with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy was a reasonable alternative in treating this patient's chronic tension-type headaches superimposed with migraine. PMID:23449932

  15. [Progress of research on acupuncture at trigger point for myofascial pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao; Bu, He; Jia, Ji-rong; Zhang, Xue

    2012-06-01

    To review the literature of acupuncture at trigger point for myofascial pain syndrome from the main selected points (trigger point), the mechanism of Chinese medicine and modern research and its clinical application. The results show that acupuncture at trigger point has significant effect on the myofascial pain syndrome, which could be influenced by the type of needle, manipulation, insertion angle and depth of the needles. However, the involved studies at present are still far from enough and lack of systematic study with multivariate analysis, it is needed to be improved that some problems about the clinical diagnosis and basic research.

  16. Acupuncture and anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anna; Chan, Simon

    2006-06-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are increasingly practised in anaesthesia. This paper reviews the current evidence and applicability of acupuncture and related techniques for anaesthetic procedures and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Recent evidence suggests that manual acupuncture is effective for reducing preoperative anxiety and for postoperative pain relief. Current available data do not support the use of acupuncture as an adjunct to the general anaesthetic in the intraoperative setting. There are extensive and good quality data to support the use of P6 acupoint stimulation techniques for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting in combination with or as an alternative to conventional anti-emetics. The use of acupuncture for labour pain management appears promising but requires further research. Patient selection, acupoint selection, needling techniques, and mode of acupuncture need to be considered when applying acupuncture and related techniques in the perioperative setting. There are guidelines for the conduct and reporting of acupuncture research, and these should be followed to improve the quality of studies.

  17. Acupuncture in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Kapur, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Acupuncture is an ancient traditional Chinese medical therapy that is used widely around the world. When practiced by a certified provider, it is safe and often perceived as calming and relaxing for patients. Animal and human studies have found a physiological basis for acupuncture needling in that it affects the complex central and peripheral neuro-hormonal network. Although it is unclear whether acupuncture is beneficial over sham/placebo acupuncture, acupuncture care yields clinically relevant short- and long-term benefits for low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, chronic neck pain, and headache. The integration of acupuncture into a primary care setting also appears to be cost-effective. Furthermore, the practice of acupuncture in primary care involves rigorous training, financial discipline, and art of communication. When it is done correctly, acupuncture proves to be beneficial for both patients and providers. PMID:20189001

  18. Therapeutic effects of different durations of acupuncture on rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wen, Yan; Fan, Xiao-nong; Tian, Guang; Zhou, Xue-yi; Deng, Shi-zhe; Meng, Zhi-hong

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is regarded as an effective therapy for cerebral ischemia. Different acupuncture manipulations and durations may result in different therapeutic effects. In the present study, the Neiguan (PC6) acupoint of rats with occluded middle cerebral arteries was needled at a fixed frequency (3 Hz) with different durations, i.e., 5, 60 and 180 seconds under a twisting-rotating acupuncture method. Results showed that different durations of acupuncture had different therapeutic effects, with 60 seconds yielding a better therapeutic effect than the other two groups. This duration of treatment demonstrated rapid cerebral blood flow, encouraging recovery of neurological function, and small cerebral infarct volume. Experimental findings indicated that under 3 Hz frequency, the treatment of needling Neiguan for 60 seconds is effective for ischemic stroke. PMID:25788938

  19. [Effect of acupuncture therapy on appetite of obesity patients].

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Zi-Qian; Pan, Yu; Zheng, Jie; Tong, Juan

    2012-12-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture intervention on the appetite of obesity patients. A total of 118 obesity patients were randomized into acupuncture group (76 cases, treated by true acupuncture needles) and placebo group (42 cases, treated by placebo acupuncture needles) using single-blind method. All the patients of the two groups were ordered to control their diet during the treatment. The acupoints around the umbilicus [Zhongwan (CV 12), Zhongji (CV 3), Daheng (SP 15), Xiawan (CV 10), Shimen (CV 5) and Tianshu (ST 25), etc.] and Liangqiu (ST 34), Zusanli (ST 36), and Yin-lingquan (SP 9) were punctured with filiform needles which were manipulated with uniform reducing and reinforcing method for a while tijl "Deqi" and retained for 30 min. The treatment was conducted once every other day, 12 times altogether. Body mass index (BMI), and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of eating-desire and hunger feeling and prospective food consumption were measured before and after the treatment. The gastric fluid survival rate (GFSR) was evaluated by using ultrasound scanning. The BMI in the acupuncture group was obviously declined after the treatment in comparison with the placebo group (P < 0.01). Compared to the placebo group, the VAS scores of eating-desire, hunger feeling and prospective food consumption were significantly decreased in the acupuncture group ( P < 0.05), but there are no significant difference between two groups in the VAS score of gastric fullness feeling (P > 0.05). The GFSR was obviously increased in the acupuncture group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.05). Acupuncture therapy can significantly decrease BMI and delay the digesting time and control the appetite in obesity patients, which may contribute to its effect in body weight reduction.

  20. 'Big needles, small bodies'-the absence of acupuncture treatment for infants in contemporary Shanghai: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Skjeie, Holgeir; Brekke, Mette

    2015-11-09

    To explore contemporary practices and clinical recommendations regarding the use of acupuncture for infants by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners in Shanghai. A qualitative study consisting of four field visits between February 2014 and March 2015. Data was collected using participant observation, focus group interview, in-depth interview, textbook page analysis and informant validation. 14 Shanghainese professionals, including interpreters and TCM practitioners, of which seven were acupuncturists. The Longhua Hospital (paediatric, acupuncture and Tui na departments) in southern Shanghai and the campus of the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The Longhua Hospital outpatient acupuncture clinic receives 400 consultations on average per day. Children, including patients from the paediatric department, are referred to this clinic. During 3 days of participant observations at this department, we saw two children. No infants. During 3 days at the paediatric department and 1 day at the Tui na department we saw no referrals. Formal interviews and informal conversations with acupuncturists and other TCM professionals revealed that acupuncture was neither routinely practiced nor recommended for infants and small children. Acupuncture was considered potentially painful for this young patient population. Alternative treatment options such as herbal treatments or medical massage were widely available and preferred. Western medical diagnostics and treatment were also used, recommended, and trusted. Acupuncture for infants is not a preferred therapeutic method among TCM practitioners working in contemporary Shanghai. Acupuncture on broad indications in infants appears to be a Western practice with little basis in TCM modern-day practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. [ZHANG Tangfa's characteristics of acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-10-01

    Through collecting and sorting of works, literature and medical cases regarding professor ZHANG Tangfa, it is found that his acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation can be summarized as: tracing the source and paying attention to basic theory, especially the meridian theory and conception vessel and governor vessel; focusing on acupuncture manipulation and emphasizing acupuncture basic skills; highly valuing treating spirit, acquiring and maintaining needling sensation; underlining "three differentiations" that is consisted of syndrome differentiation, disease differentiation and meridian differentiation to guide the clinical prescriptions of acupoints; exploring and ingenious use of scalp acupuncture; being concerned on research of difficult and complicated diseases; advocating comparative studies to optimize the clinical treatment plan; proposing the combination of Chinese and western medicine, including diagnosis, treatment and basic theory, to improve the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture.

  2. [Deep acupuncture at Baliao points (eight sacral foramina) by Professor WANG Ling-Ling and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hai-Hong; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2014-03-01

    With deep acupuncture at Baliao points (eight sacral foramina) as the core, Professor WANG Ling-ling has treated diseases of urinary, digestive and reproductive systems with superior therapeutic effect. The key for efficacy of Baliao points is deep acupuncture. Only deeply insert into acupoints with long needles and directly stimulate at sacral nerves, could Baliao points play a superior role in treatment effect. Searching acupoints is the basis of deep acupuncture, and superficial anatomy should be combined to summarize the methods of searching Baliao points. The premise of deep acupuncture is needling manipulation. The angles of needles must be adjusted according to morphological features of posterior sacral foramina, or it is hard to practice deep acupuncture into Baliao points. The description of location and manipulation on Baliao points in ancient and modern literature was vague, which restricts clinical application of Baliao points. A lot of research on location, manipulation and clinical application of Baliao points has performed by Professor WANG Ling-ling, and its manipulation and clinical cases are introduced to make a positive effect on its application and popularization.

  3. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  4. [Acupuncture (dry needle) versus neural therapy (local anesthesia) in the treatment of benign back pain. Immediate and long-term results].

    PubMed

    Barbagli, P; Bollettin, R; Ceccherelli, F

    2003-08-01

    A retrospective study of benign low back pain, comparing the early and long-term results obtained by means of acupuncture and Huneke's neural-therapy is presented. Two groups, (dry needling group and neural-therapy group) consisting of 104 and 152 patients respectively, were compared for age, pain duration, treatment length, number of sessions and initial intensity of the pain. The age and pain duration resulted significantly higher in the neural-therapy group; the percentage of subjective improvement proved to be greater for neural-therapy, even if not in a statistically significant manner, both immediately after therapy (70.4% and 74.8%) and at all the time intervals studied (every 3 months until 4 years, when possible). Similar results have been obtained both in acute cases (pain duration shorter than 6 weeks) and in chronic ones (pain lasting at least 6 months). In conclusion, this study shows a slight, but not statistically significant, preference for neural-therapy, subjectively considered by the patient more effective than acupuncture in 49 out of 51 comparisons carried out.

  5. [Mr ZHENG Yugui's academic thoughts: in memory of the successor of Chengjiang acupuncture school in Shandong province].

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaobin; Du, Guangzhong; Tian, Daozheng

    2016-03-01

    Mr ZHENG Yugui, a distinguished acupuncturist in Qilu area, is one of the successors of Chengjiang acupuncture school in Shandong province. Through collecting the papers and works concerning Mr ZHENG, the academic thoughts are summarized, including careful and clear differentiation of syndrome, specific and precise selection of acupoints, reinforcing and reducing methods based on qi, and gentle and soft manipulation of needles. He has discovered new acupoints such as Fengyan point, etc. He also focuses on moxibustion and creates Taiyang moxibustion method. In addition, to develop acupuncture education, Mr ZHENG has played a deep and important role in spreading Chengjiang acupuncture school in Shandong province.

  6. Decreased peripheral and central responses to acupuncture stimulation following modification of body ownership.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, In-Seon; Jung, Won-Mo; Chang, Dong-Seon; Napadow, Vitaly; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Wallraven, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture stimulation increases local blood flow around the site of stimulation and induces signal changes in brain regions related to the body matrix. The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm that manipulates important aspects of bodily self-awareness. The present study aimed to investigate how modifications of body ownership using the RHI affect local blood flow and cerebral responses during acupuncture needle stimulation. During the RHI, acupuncture needle stimulation was applied to the real left hand while measuring blood microcirculation with a LASER Doppler imager (Experiment 1, N = 28) and concurrent brain signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Experiment 2, N = 17). When the body ownership of participants was altered by the RHI, acupuncture stimulation resulted in a significantly lower increase in local blood flow (Experiment 1), and significantly less brain activation was detected in the right insula (Experiment 2). This study found changes in both local blood flow and brain responses during acupuncture needle stimulation following modification of body ownership. These findings suggest that physiological responses during acupuncture stimulation can be influenced by the modification of body ownership.

  7. Decreased Peripheral and Central Responses to Acupuncture Stimulation following Modification of Body Ownership

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, In-Seon; Jung, Won-Mo; Chang, Dong-Seon; Napadow, Vitaly; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Wallraven, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture stimulation increases local blood flow around the site of stimulation and induces signal changes in brain regions related to the body matrix. The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm that manipulates important aspects of bodily self-awareness. The present study aimed to investigate how modifications of body ownership using the RHI affect local blood flow and cerebral responses during acupuncture needle stimulation. During the RHI, acupuncture needle stimulation was applied to the real left hand while measuring blood microcirculation with a LASER Doppler imager (Experiment 1, N = 28) and concurrent brain signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Experiment 2, N = 17). When the body ownership of participants was altered by the RHI, acupuncture stimulation resulted in a significantly lower increase in local blood flow (Experiment 1), and significantly less brain activation was detected in the right insula (Experiment 2). This study found changes in both local blood flow and brain responses during acupuncture needle stimulation following modification of body ownership. These findings suggest that physiological responses during acupuncture stimulation can be influenced by the modification of body ownership. PMID:25285620

  8. Direct electrical stimulation on the injured ulnar nerve using acupuncture needles combined with rehabilitation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery-A case report.

    PubMed

    Tang, You-Jen; Wu, Min Huan; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2016-02-01

    This study illustrates that direct electrical stimulation (ES) improve functional recovery and time of return to work evaluated by prognostic scoring system after ulnar nerve injury. The Rosén and Lundborg (R&L) protocol, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores, and electromyography were applied for measuring improvements after direct ES intervention. A 32-year-old male with deep cutting wound and total rupture of right proximal forearm ulnar nerve was treated using direct ES and daily rehabilitation activities. Direct ES, transmitted using 2 acupuncture needles inserted in the cubital tunnel, was applied along the site of the injured ulnar nerve. Other needles were placed according to muscle origins and insertions. All needles were connected to electrical stimulators. We executed these procedures once per week and conducted rehabilitating activities daily. The R&L protocol, DASH scores, and electromyography were used to measure the intervention outcomes. The total score in the R&L protocol was 0.703 of the initial state; the sensory domain contributed the least amount. Among the improved numerical factors, pain/discomfort domain was the first to reach a stable ameliorative state in the first month. The sensory and motor domains reached stable growth in fourth and third months, respectively. The patient returned to the previous job in third month; his time off work was 75 days. Directly applying ES to the proximal site of an injured nerve can augment nerve regeneration through three suspected mechanisms. Although direct ES on the injured nerve contributed to an effective recovery of this patient with minimal adverse effects, additional investigation of treatment protocols is warranted and the actual mechanism must be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome treated with floating-needle therapy combined with rehabilitation training: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhao-Hui; Zhuang, Li-Xing; Chen, Zhen-Hu; Lang, Jian-Ying; Li, Yan-Hui; Jiang, Gang-Hui; Xu, Zhan-Qiong; Liao, Mu-Xi

    2014-07-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy in the treatment of post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome between floating-needle therapy and conventional acupuncture on the basis of rehabilitation training. One hundred cases of post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome were randomized into a floating-needle group and an acupuncture group, 50 cases in each one. The passive and positive rehabilitation training was adopted in the two groups. Additionally, in the floating-needle group, the floating-needle therapy was used. The needle was inserted at the site 5 to 10 cm away from myofasical trigger point (MTrP), manipulated and scattered subcutaneously, for 2 min continuously. In the acupuncture group, the conventional acupuncture was applied at Jianqian (EX-UE), Jianyu (LI 15), Jianliao (TE 14), etc. The treatment was given once every two days, 3 times a week, and 14 days of treatment were required. The shoulder hand syndrome scale (SHSS), the short form McGill pain scale (SF-MPQ) and the modified Fugl-Meyer motor function scale (FMA) were used to evaluate the damage severity, pain and motor function of the upper limbs before and after treatment in the two groups. The clinical efficacy was compared between the two groups. SHSS score, SF-MPQ score and FMA score were improved significantly after treatment in the two groups (all P < 0.01), and the improvements in the floating-needle group were superior to those in the acupuncture group (all P < 0.05). The total effective rate was 94.0% (47/50) in the floating-needle group, which was better than 90.0% (45/50) in the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). The floating-needle therapy combined with rehabilitation training achieves a satisfactory efficacy on post-stroke shoulder-hand syndrome, which is better than the combined therapy of conventional acupuncture and rehabilitation training.

  10. Characterizing Acupuncture Stimuli Using Brain Imaging with fMRI - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenjing; Pach, Daniel; Napadow, Vitaly; Park, Kyungmo; Long, Xiangyu; Neumann, Jane; Maeda, Yumi; Nierhaus, Till; Liang, Fanrong; Witt, Claudia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of action underlying acupuncture, including acupuncture point specificity, are not well understood. In the previous decade, an increasing number of studies have applied fMRI to investigate brain response to acupuncture stimulation. Our aim was to provide a systematic overview of acupuncture fMRI research considering the following aspects: 1) differences between verum and sham acupuncture, 2) differences due to various methods of acupuncture manipulation, 3) differences between patients and healthy volunteers, 4) differences between different acupuncture points. Methodology/Principal Findings We systematically searched English, Chinese, Korean and Japanese databases for literature published from the earliest available up until September 2009, without any language restrictions. We included all studies using fMRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the human brain (at least one group that received needle-based acupuncture). 779 papers were identified, 149 met the inclusion criteria for the descriptive analysis, and 34 were eligible for the meta-analyses. From a descriptive perspective, multiple studies reported that acupuncture modulates activity within specific brain areas, including somatosensory cortices, limbic system, basal ganglia, brain stem, and cerebellum. Meta-analyses for verum acupuncture stimuli confirmed brain activity within many of the regions mentioned above. Differences between verum and sham acupuncture were noted in brain response in middle cingulate, while some heterogeneity was noted for other regions depending on how such meta-analyses were performed, such as sensorimotor cortices, limbic regions, and cerebellum. Conclusions Brain response to acupuncture stimuli encompasses a broad network of regions consistent with not just somatosensory, but also affective and cognitive processing. While the results were heterogeneous, from a descriptive perspective most studies suggest that acupuncture can modulate the

  11. [Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility by Tongyuan needling technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuemei; Meng, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ranran

    2015-03-01

    Professor LAI Xinsheng's treatment experience of infertility mainly by Tongyuan needling technique for both females and males is summarized. Tongyuan needling technique is a treatment method of leading qi to its primordial location mainly through viscera back-shu points that can dredge the governor vessel and tonify the spirit and conception vessel points in abdomen and abdominal front-mu points, and according to state of illness acupoints for opening the 4 gates or five shu points are combined; reinforcing and reducing manipulations of acupuncture are applied for reference. With the method of listing cases, professor LAI Xinsheng's Tongyuan needling technique is detailedly introduced in different aspects, such as the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome infertility and male infertility and improving the success rate of test-tube baby, and the manipulation of Tongyuan needling technique is summarized, indicating that Tongyuan needling technique is worth vigorously prompting in clinical treatment of infertility.

  12. More Than Needles: The Importance of Explanations and Self-Care Advice in Treating Primary Dysmenorrhea with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary dysmenorrhea is a common gynaecological condition. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncturists commonly treat primary dysmenorrhea and dispense specific self-care advice for this condition. The impact of self-care advice on primary dysmenorrhea is unknown. Methods. 19 TCM acupuncture practitioners from New Zealand or Australia and 12 New Zealand women who had recently undergone acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea as part of a randomised controlled trial participated in this qualitative, pragmatic study. Focus groups and semistructured interviews were used to collect data. These were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using thematic analysis. Results. The overarching theme was that an acupuncture treatment consisted of “more than needles” for both practitioners and participants. Practitioners and participants both discussed the partnership they engaged in during treatment, based on openness and trust. Women felt that the TCM self-care advice was related to positive outcomes for their dysmenorrhea and increased their feelings of control over their menstrual symptoms. Conclusions. Most of the women in this study found improved symptom control and reduced pain. A contributing factor for these improvements may be an increased internal health locus of control and an increase in self-efficacy resulting from the self-care advice given during the clinical trial. PMID:27242909

  13. Management of Dupuytren contracture with ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection and needle aponeurotomy coupled with osteopathic manipulative treatment.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Steven; Meng, Michael; Schulte, Adam; Trainor, Drew; Montenegro, Roberto; Aufiero, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    Dupuytren contracture is a debilitating disease that characteristically presents as a firm nodularity on the palmar surface of the hand with coalescing cords of soft tissue on the webs and digits. With few nonsurgical modalities providing clinical benefits, open surgical procedures are the standard of care for patients with this condition. However, recent studies have associated surgical intervention with many complications, necessitating further exploration of nonsurgical treatment options. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with decreased extension of the fourth and fifth digits on the upper extremities bilaterally; previous conservative treatment regimens had been unsuccessful. After a diagnostic ultrasound, the patient was diagnosed as having Dupuytren contracture and underwent 5 treatments consisting of ultrasound-guided dry-needle aponeurotomy, lidocaine injections, and osteopathic manipulative treatment. During the fifth treatment session, the patient experienced dramatic relief of her symptoms after a palpable release during the manual manipulation portion of her therapeutic regimen. At 2-week follow-up, the patient was symptom-free. Based on this desirable outcome, the authors suggest future research be directed at minimally invasive therapeutic options in the management of Dupuytren contracture.

  14. Auricular Acupuncture with Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a method which has been successfully used in various fields of medicine especially in the treatment of pain relief. The introduction of lasers especially low-level lasers into medicine brought besides the already existing stimulation with needles and electricity an additional technique to auricular acupuncture. This literature research looks at the historical background, the development and the anatomical and neurological aspects of auricular acupuncture in general and auricular laser acupuncture in detail. Preliminary scientific findings on auricular acupuncture with laser have been described in detail and discussed critically in this review article. The results of the studies have shown evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison of these studies was impossible due to their different study designs. The most important technical as well as study parameters were described in detail in order to give more sufficient evidence and to improve the quality of future studies. PMID:23935695

  15. [A conceptual framework of the effectiveness of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chien-Ching; Wang, Chiu-Hua; Maa, Suh-Hwa

    2007-08-01

    The term, "Acupuncture," is used in its broadest senses to refer to needling, moxibustion, acupressure, laser acupuncture, electric acupuncture, and microsystem acupuncture, such as ear, face, hand and scalp acupuncture. Numerous surveys show that, of all the complementary medical systems, acupuncture enjoys the most credibility in the medical community. This article introduces a conceptual framework of the effectiveness of acupuncture from the perspective of responses to acupuncture shown in extensive, basic scientific evidence. The researchers hope, through this review of literature, to enable medical personnel to gain something of an understanding of acupuncture.

  16. Minimal acupuncture is not a valid placebo control in randomised controlled trials of acupuncture: a physiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lund, Iréne; Näslund, Jan; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2009-01-30

    Placebo-control of acupuncture is used to evaluate and distinguish between the specific effects and the non-specific ones. During 'true' acupuncture treatment in general, the needles are inserted into acupoints and stimulated until deqi is evoked. In contrast, during placebo acupuncture, the needles are inserted into non-acupoints and/or superficially (so-called minimal acupuncture). A sham acupuncture needle with a blunt tip may be used in placebo acupuncture. Both minimal acupuncture and the placebo acupuncture with the sham acupuncture needle touching the skin would evoke activity in cutaneous afferent nerves. This afferent nerve activity has pronounced effects on the functional connectivity in the brain resulting in a 'limbic touch response'. Clinical studies showed that both acupuncture and minimal acupuncture procedures induced significant alleviation of migraine and that both procedures were equally effective. In other conditions such as low back pain and knee osteoarthritis, acupuncture was found to be more potent than minimal acupuncture and conventional non-acupuncture treatment. It is probable that the responses to 'true' acupuncture and minimal acupuncture are dependent on the aetiology of the pain. Furthermore, patients and healthy individuals may have different responses. In this paper, we argue that minimal acupuncture is not valid as an inert placebo-control despite its conceptual brilliance.

  17. Acupuncture for chronic low back pain in long-term follow-up: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mai; Yan, Shi; Yin, Xu; Li, Xiuyang; Gao, Shuguang; Han, Rui; Wei, Licheng; Luo, Wei; Lei, Guanghua

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the most common reasons that people seek medical treatment, and the consequent disability creates a great financial burden on individuals and society. The etiology of chronic low back pain is not clear, which means it is often refractory to treatment. Acupuncture has been reported to be effective in providing symptomatic relief of chronic low back pain. However, it is not known whether the effects of acupuncture are due to the needling itself or nonspecific effects arising from the manipulation. To determine the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy, a meta-analysis was performed to compare acupuncture with sham acupuncture and other treatments. Overall, 2678 patients were identified from thirteen randomized controlled trials. The meta-analysis was performed by a random model (Cohen's test), using the I-square test for heterogeneity and Begg's test to assess for publication bias. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by pain intensity, disability, spinal flexion, and quality of life. Compared with no treatment, acupuncture achieved better outcomes in terms of pain relief, disability recovery and better quality of life, but these effects were not observed when compared to sham acupuncture. Acupuncture achieved better outcomes when compared with other treatments. No publication bias was detected. Acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, but this effect is likely to be produced by the nonspecific effects of manipulation.

  18. Effect of Blinding With a New Pragmatic Placebo Needle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyan; Xu, Huanfang; Ma, Rui; Mo, Qian; Yan, Shiyan; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Placebo control is a useful method for determining the efficacy of a therapy. In acupuncture researches, the preferred method for placebo control is acupuncture using a placebo needle that has a blunt tip and achieves no skin penetration. We performed a crossover study to validate the blinding effect of a new type of placebo needle. Sixty volunteers were randomized to receive acupuncture using 2 types of needles with different sequences: sequence AB, involving first the pragmatic placebo needle and then the real needle, and sequence BA, in a reverse order. Placebo acupuncture was performed by administering the placebo needle through an adhesive pad without skin penetration on the acupoints LI4, RN12, BL25, and BL36. Real acupuncture was performed by needling through the pad and penetrating the skin to 15 mm using a real needle on the same acupoints. The acupuncture was administered every other day with 3 sessions for 1 type of needle. The primary outcome was the perception of needle penetration. Besides degree of acupuncture pain, type, and degree of needle sensation, needle acceptability and factors influencing the subject blinding effect were assessed. Needle penetration was felt by 100%, 90% (54/60), 88.3% (53/60), and 95% (57/60) of volunteers receiving placebo acupuncture and 98.3% (59/60), 96.7% (58/60), 95% (57/60), and 95% (57/60) of volunteers receiving real acupuncture on LI4, RN12, BL25, and BL36, respectively. Differences of the volunteers’ perception of needle penetration between the placebo needle and real needle were not significant for the 4 acupoints (all P > 0.05). Volunteers experienced fewer distension sensations (P = 0.01), a lower degree of needle sensation (P = 0.007), and less pain (P = 0.006) during placebo acupuncture than during real acupuncture. The placebo needle was more easily accepted than the real needle (OR = 1.63, 95% CI, 1.01–2.64). The influences of age, sex, educational level, acupuncture

  19. [Toll-like receptor 4 in regional acupoints and initiation of acupuncture signals].

    PubMed

    Cui, Rui; Xi, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    It has been well documented that acupuncture effect is produced through suitable manipulation stimulation of the inserted acupuncture needle, and subsequent activation of the body' s inherent nerve-endocrine-immune regulating network. As a physical stimulus, the acupuncture stimulation exerted onto the local acupoint needs being converted into biological signal first, further reaching favorable regulation in the body. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR 4), an important molecular pattern recognition receptor, can not only recognize the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns but also identify endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, leading to activation of innate immunity. What's more, TLR 4 has a close relationship with nervous and immune system of the body. In the present paper, the authors make a discussion on the correlation between TLR 4 and acupuncture intervention from 1) TLR 4 and acupuncture signal conversion, 2) TLR 4 and acupuncture clinical phenomenon, and 3) TLR 4 and related mechanisms of acupuncture intervention. Moreover, the authors also think that TLR 4 in the acupoint area may participate in the initiation process of acupuncture stimulation information.

  20. Acupuncture treatment for feline multifocal intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Keum Hwa; Hill, Sara A

    2009-08-01

    A 14-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat was admitted to the Veterinary Medical Center, University of Minnesota for evaluation of severe hind limb ataxia, atrophy and paresis. Diagnosis based on physical examination, neurological assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was multifocal intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) with dorsal disc protrusion throughout the thoracic and cranial lumbar spine. The Oriental Medicine (OM) diagnosis (pattern identification) was painful obstruction (Bi) syndrome caused by phlegm-heat accumulation with blood stagnation in the spine. High dose prednisolone therapy (1.25mg/kg PO, once daily) initially did not show any significant improvement in clinical signs. The cat was then treated with several modes of acupuncture treatment including dry needle acupuncture, electro-acupuncture and scalp acupuncture along with Tui-Na (hand manipulation in OM) and physical therapy. Significant improvements in mobility, proprioception and spinal posture were noticed and the cat was able to rise, walk and run 4 months after starting acupuncture treatments. This is the first case report of feline IVDD with multiple sites of disc compression which was successfully treated with several modes of acupuncture treatment.

  1. [Effects of heat and cool-producing needling manipulations on rectal temperature and serum endotoxin content in endotoxin-induced heat syndrome rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Yan; Yang, Jie; Feng, Yue; Yang, Shen-Qiao

    2012-08-01

    To observe the effect of traditional manipulations of "Shaoshanhuo" (heat-producing needling) and "Toutianliang"(cool-producing needling) on body temperature and serum endotoxin level in heat syndrome rabbits. Twenty-four Japanese rabbits were randomly divided into control, model, Shaoshanhuo and Toutianliang groups. Heat-syndrome model was established by subcutaneous injection of bacterium coli endotoxin solution (40 microg/mL, 2 mL/kg). Heat-producing and cool-producing needling was applied to bilateral "Quchi" (LI 11) for 5 min, respectively. Rectal temperature was detected by using a thermometer, and serum endotoxin content assayed by using Limulus Ameboyte Lysate kit (luminescence measuring). In comparison with the control group, both rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels were increased significantly in the model group (P < 0.01). While compared to the model group, the rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels were down-regulated considerably in both Shaoshanhuo and Toutianliang groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The effect of the Toutianliang group was obviously superior to that of the Shaoshanhuo group in reducing serum endotoxin content (P < 0.01). Both heat-producing needling and cool-producing needling can lower rectal temperature and serum endotoxin levels in heat-syndrome rabbits, and the effect of cool-producing needling is relatively better in reducing endotoxin content.

  2. [Mr. HU Yin-pei: a famous acupuncture specialist in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xue-Song; Wang, Fan

    2013-10-01

    Mr. HU Yin-pei, who is good at treating difficult and complicated syndromes of internal medicine, gynaecology and paediatrics with golden needles, is a famous acupuncture specialist of modern times in Beijing. He attaches great importance on integration of acupuncture and materia medica. It is held that acupuncture and herbal medicine can complement mutual promotion as the same function, mutual supplement as the different action, restrict each other as the opposite function and regulate different syndromes respectively so as to enhance the therapeutic effect and bring their own advantages into full play. He focuses on acupuncture manipulation, and puts forward four key points of accuracy, gentle and fast, stable as well as effective. It is held that the root cause of diseases should be given explored, differentiation of syndromes should be based on differentiation according to meridians, and diagnosis should be as accurate as possible. Selection of points is refined with key points, and the application is flexible with obvious therapeutic effects.

  3. Effect of acupuncture ‘dose’ on modulation of the default mode network of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yii-Jeng; Kung, Yen-Ying; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Niddam, David M; Chou, Chih-Che; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies show that brain activity, including the default mode network (DMN), can be modulated by acupuncture. Conventional means to enhance the neurophysiological ‘dose’ of acupuncture, including an increased number of needles and manual needle manipulation, are expected to enhance its physiological effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of both methods on brain activity. Methods 58 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into four groups that received single needle acupuncture (SNA, n=15) or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n=13) as active controls, or enhanced acupuncture by way of three needle acupuncture (TNA, n=17) or SNA plus manual stimulation (SNA+MS, n=13). Treatment-associated sensations were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Central responses were recorded before, during, and after treatment at LI4 on the left hand using resting state fMRI. Results TNA and SNA+MS induced DMN-insula activity and extensive DMN activity compared to SNA, despite comparable levels of de qi sensation. The TNA and SNA+MS groups exhibited a delayed and enhanced modulation of the DMN, which was not observed followed SNA and TENS. Furthermore, TNA increased precuneus activity and increased the DMN-related activity of the cuneus and left insula, while SNA+MS increased activity in the right insula. Conclusions The results showed that conventional methods to enhance the acupuncture dose induce different DMN modulatory effects. TNA induces the most extensive DMN modulation, compared with other methods. Conventional methods of enhancing the acupuncture dose could potentially be applied as a means of modulating brain activity. PMID:27841974

  4. Effect of acupuncture 'dose' on modulation of the default mode network of the brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yii-Jeng; Kung, Yen-Ying; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Niddam, David M; Chou, Chih-Che; Cheng, Chou-Ming; Yeh, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2016-12-01

    Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies show that brain activity, including the default mode network (DMN), can be modulated by acupuncture. Conventional means to enhance the neurophysiological 'dose' of acupuncture, including an increased number of needles and manual needle manipulation, are expected to enhance its physiological effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of both methods on brain activity. 58 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into four groups that received single needle acupuncture (SNA, n=15) or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, n=13) as active controls, or enhanced acupuncture by way of three needle acupuncture (TNA, n=17) or SNA plus manual stimulation (SNA+MS, n=13). Treatment-associated sensations were evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Central responses were recorded before, during, and after treatment at LI4 on the left hand using resting state fMRI. TNA and SNA+MS induced DMN-insula activity and extensive DMN activity compared to SNA, despite comparable levels of de qi sensation. The TNA and SNA+MS groups exhibited a delayed and enhanced modulation of the DMN, which was not observed followed SNA and TENS. Furthermore, TNA increased precuneus activity and increased the DMN-related activity of the cuneus and left insula, while SNA+MS increased activity in the right insula. The results showed that conventional methods to enhance the acupuncture dose induce different DMN modulatory effects. TNA induces the most extensive DMN modulation, compared with other methods. Conventional methods of enhancing the acupuncture dose could potentially be applied as a means of modulating brain activity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. A Correlation Study between Two Adjacent Same-Meridian Acupoints after Laser-Needle Acupuncture with Optical Coherence Tomography and Diffuse Reflectance Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuli; Wei, Huajiang; Ni, Yirong; Liu, Zhiming; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Zhou, Lianpeng

    2016-01-01

    This study is to investigate the correlations among Sanjian (LI3), Hegu (LI4), and Yangxi (LI5) acupoints and their corresponding nonacupoints on the Yangming Large Intestine Meridian of Hand before and after laser irradiation using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and diffuse reflectance spectra. The experiment was conducted on 10 healthy people. A 658 nm laser with 50 mW output power was used for irradiating LI4, LI5 acupoints and their corresponding nonacupoints. As to LI4 acupoint with laser irradiation for duration of 15 or 45 minutes, the OCT backscattered light intensities of LI4 and LI5 acupoints increased significantly, and the reflectance intensities (RIs) of the LI3, LI4, and LI5 acupoints decreased significantly. As to LI5 acupoint with laser irradiation for duration of 15 or 45 minutes, the changes of OCT backscattered light intensities of the corresponding irradiated acupoint and LI4 acupoint increased significantly, and the RIs decreased significantly. However, the OCT backscattered light intensities and RIs for their nonacupoints were almost not changed. The results show that an association exists between two adjacent same-meridian acupoints on the same meridian after laser-needle acupuncture to some extent. PMID:27990169

  6. Interaction of acupuncture treatment and manipulation laterality modulated by the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xuan; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zhenyu; Sun, Chuanzhu; Wang, Shan; Wang, Xiaocui; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Hongyan; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate selection of ipsilateral or contralateral electroacupuncture (corresponding to the pain site) plays an important role in reaching its better curative effect; however, the involving brain mechanism still remains unclear. Compared with the heat pain model generally established in previous study, capsaicin pain model induces reversible cutaneous allodynia and is proved to be better simulating aspects of clinical nociceptive and neuropathic pain. In the current study, 24 subjects were randomly divided into two groups with a 2 × 2 factorial design: laterality (ipsi- or contralateral side, inter-subject) × treatment with counter-balanced at an interval of one week (verum and placebo electroacupuncture, within-subject). We observed subjective pain intensity and brain activations changes induced by capsaicin allodynia pain stimuli before and after electroacupuncture treatment at acupoint LI4 for 30 min. Analysis of variance results indicated that ipsilateral electroacupuncture treatment produced significant pain relief and wide brain signal suppressions in pain-related brain areas compared with contralateral electroacupuncture. We also found that verum electroacupuncture at either ipsi- or contralateral side to the pain site exhibited comparable significant magnitudes of analgesic effect. By contrast, placebo electroacupuncture elicited significant pain reductions only on the ipsilateral rather than contralateral side. It was inferred that placebo analgesia maybe attenuated on the region of the body (opposite to pain site) where attention was less focused, suggesting that analgesic effect of placebo electroacupuncture mainly rely on the motivation of its spatial-specific placebo responses via attention mechanism. This inference can be further supported by the evidence that the significant interaction effect of manipulation laterality and treatment was exclusively located within the default mode network, including the bilateral superior parietal

  7. Interaction of acupuncture treatment and manipulation laterality modulated by the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xuan; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zhenyu; Bai, Lijun; Sun, Chuanzhu; Wang, Shan; Wang, Xiaocui; Chen, Zhen; Chen, Hongyan; Tian, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate selection of ipsilateral or contralateral electroacupuncture (corresponding to the pain site) plays an important role in reaching its better curative effect; however, the involving brain mechanism still remains unclear. Compared with the heat pain model generally established in previous study, capsaicin pain model induces reversible cutaneous allodynia and is proved to be better simulating aspects of clinical nociceptive and neuropathic pain. In the current study, 24 subjects were randomly divided into two groups with a 2 × 2 factorial design: laterality (ipsi- or contralateral side, inter-subject) × treatment with counter-balanced at an interval of one week (verum and placebo electroacupuncture, within-subject). We observed subjective pain intensity and brain activations changes induced by capsaicin allodynia pain stimuli before and after electroacupuncture treatment at acupoint LI4 for 30 min. Analysis of variance results indicated that ipsilateral electroacupuncture treatment produced significant pain relief and wide brain signal suppressions in pain-related brain areas compared with contralateral electroacupuncture. We also found that verum electroacupuncture at either ipsi- or contralateral side to the pain site exhibited comparable significant magnitudes of analgesic effect. By contrast, placebo electroacupuncture elicited significant pain reductions only on the ipsilateral rather than contralateral side. It was inferred that placebo analgesia maybe attenuated on the region of the body (opposite to pain site) where attention was less focused, suggesting that analgesic effect of placebo electroacupuncture mainly rely on the motivation of its spatial-specific placebo responses via attention mechanism. This inference can be further supported by the evidence that the significant interaction effect of manipulation laterality and treatment was exclusively located within the default mode network, including the bilateral superior parietal

  8. [Acupuncture: quo vadis?].

    PubMed

    Bäcker, M; Tao, I; Dobos, G J

    2006-03-10

    On the current discussion about efficacy and "point-specificity" of the needle therapy To improve the evidence base for acupuncture in pain treatment the German health insurance initiated the so called "Acupuncture randomised trials (ART)" and "German Acupuncture Trials" (GERAC) with a sample size of 300 (ART) and 1000 (GERAC) patients, providing a new dimension in acupuncture research. These studies have yielded data, which indicate that acupuncture is effective in the treatment of migraine, tension type headache, osteoarthritis of the knee and chronic low back pain. For the two latter indications acupuncture showed an even higher therapeutic response rate than conventional standard treatment. In migraine acupuncture showed an effect comparable to pharmacological treatment. The studies moreover indicate that the relevance of point-specific effects may have been overestimated concerning some indications. This article discusses the results of ART and GERAC, based on differentiating the mechanisms of action in acupuncture therapy. It is shown that the current data neither support the postulate of a "no-matter-where acupuncture" nor the irrefutability of the theorems of Chinese Medicine. Future studies will have to determine more precisely the mechanism by which the therapeutic effect of acupuncture is mediated. Furthermore, it will be necessary to find out more clearly in what diseases the location of needling represents the crucial part of the treatment and in what diseases rather different factors, like the intensity of stimulation or the doctor-patient interaction, are more relevant for the therapeutic effect. Research into acupuncture is still at the beginning. For this reason it should be avoided to draw premature and untenable conclusions from the current data.

  9. Acupuncture for substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Arthur

    2003-10-01

    Acupuncture, in the form of insertion of needles bilaterally in the outer ears, is widely used for the treatment of addiction in the US. However, support for this form of treatment from controlled studies has not been consistent. This article examines recent clinical trials of acupuncture for addiction treatment, with a goal of conveying to the reader some of the complex issues involved in conducting studies in this area. Acupuncture trials in addictions frequently have been conducted without preliminary dose-ranging studies to establish efficacious doses of the experimental treatment, use needle insertion controls of unknown degrees of activity, and present no rationale for the type or intensity of concurrently offered psychotherapy. At the present time, it is premature to put forth recommendations for or against acupuncture for the treatment of addiction based on evidence from extant studies.

  10. Analysis and Thoughts about the Negative Results of International Clinical Trials on Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hong; Hao, Yang; Han, Yan-jing; Wang, Xiao-hong; Li, Chen; Liu, Wan-ning

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture have proved the clinical benefits of acupuncture; however, there are some results that have shown negative results or placebo effects. The paper carried out an in-depth analysis on 33 RCTs in the 2011 SCI database, the quality of the reports was judged according to Jadad scores, and the “Necessary Information Included in Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA 2010)” was taken as the standard to analyze the rationality of the therapeutic principle. The difference between the methodology (Jadad) scores of the two types of research reports did not constitute statistical significance (P > 0.05). The studies with negative results or placebo effects showed the following deficiencies with respect to intervention details: (1) incompletely rational acupoint selection; (2) inconsistent ability of acupuncturists; (3) negligible needling response to needling; (4) acupuncture treatment frequency too low in most studies; and (5) irrational setting of placebo control. Thus, the primary basis for the negative results or placebo effects of international clinical trials on acupuncture is not in the quality of the methodology, but in noncompliance with the essential requirements proposed by acupuncture theory in terms of clinical manipulation details. PMID:26161126

  11. [An instant pain-relief effect of balance acupuncture for relieving sore throat in acute pharyngitis patients].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Hong; Xie, Ping-Chang; Qin, Xiao-Lan

    2012-08-01

    To observe the instant effect of "Balance Acupuncture" in relieving sore throat in patients with acute pharyngitis. A total of 74 acute pharyngitis patients with sore throat were randomly assigned to treatment group (Balance Acupuncture, n = 36) and placebo acupuncture group (sham acupoint, n = 38). Patients of the Balance Acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of bilateral "Yantong" (sore throat) point (the mid-point of the second metacarpal bone on the radial side) and those of the sham acupoint group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of the sham point (the site 1 cm lateral to the mid-point between the ulnar endpoint of the cubic transverse striation and that of the wrist-palm transverse striation). After insertion, the acupuncture needle was manipulated repeatedly till "Deqi" for patients of the treatment group but not manipulated for patients of the placebo acupuncture group, then removed immediately. The VAS (Visual Analogue Scores) were assessed 1 min after the treatment in addition to safety index records. Before the treatment, the VAS values of the treatment group and sham acupoint group were (5.25 +/- 1.51) points and (4.83 +/- 1.59) points, respectively, which had no significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). One minute after the treatment, VAS values of the treatment and sham acupoint groups were (2.11 +/- 1.88) points and (3.39 +/- 1.94) points, respectively, both decreasing significantly (P < 0.01). The effect of the former group was significantly superior to that of the sham acupoint group (P < 0.05). Both Balance Acupuncture and sham-acupoint acupuncture treatments can relieve sore throat in acute pharyngitis patients, and the therapeutic effect of Balance Acupuncture treatment is obviously better.

  12. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Germany to Joint Andrews Base and another pilot study examining acupuncture for phantom limb pain that yielded promising preliminary data. In 2006 a...persistent, multi-system symptoms of varying degrees and severities. This is reminiscent of “Gulf War Syndrome ” or “Chronic Multi-symptom Illness” defined...illness syndrome . Acupuncture is more than the act of needle insertion. It is embedded in a ritual that includes a narrative interaction and trusting

  13. Implementation of laser acupuncture with lifting-thrusting through the use of mechanically immobile components.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Yen, San-Fong; Chang, Shu-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Che-Chang; Wu, Chih-Er

    2015-10-01

    Lifting and thrusting constitute an important manipulation method in traditional Chinese acupuncture. Lifting and thrusting enables the implementation of various features, such as reinforcement and reduction, which enhance acupuncture effectiveness. Laser acupuncture stimulates acupoints through laser light, which is a noninvasive treatment, but can still achieve effects similar to those obtained from traditional acupuncture. Lifting and thrusting can be achieved by moving the laser focal point back and forth, thus concentrating the energy, as does the tip of the acupuncture needle when it is moved upward and downward in the acupoint. This article presents a novel optical design of a laser acupuncture device, in which a focus-tunable lens is used to move the position of the focused light in order to achieve the lifting and thrusting mechanism through programmable changes to the control current of the focus-tunable lens. The device employs an infrared laser with a wavelength of 808 nm and a maximum power of 150 mW. The focus-tunable lens used in this study had a diopter of -10 to +5. The results revealed that by controlling the lens diopter, the focused light can be moved from 4.5 to 9.5 cm. Therefore, the range of the lift and thrust for the laser acupuncture device was 5 cm. The area of the focal point was approximately 6×10(-3) mm2, which is comparable to that of the commonly used traditional acupuncture needle tip. Because the components are immobile, no additional space is required for the moving lens. Therefore, the size of the laser acupuncture head can be minimized, and the effectiveness of focus tuning can be improved.

  14. Review of clinical applications of scalp acupuncture for paralysis: an excerpt from chinese scalp acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jason Jishun; Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-03-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years.

  15. Review of Clinical Applications of Scalp Acupuncture for Paralysis: An Excerpt From Chinese Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years. PMID:24278807

  16. Acupuncture for melasma in women: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chai, Qianyun; Fei, Yutong; Cao, Huijuan; Wang, Congcong; Tian, Jinzhou; Liu, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    Melasma is a common facial skin disorder seen in women. Manual acupuncture (MA) is widely used alone or in combination with conventional treatments for melasma in China. To assess the effectiveness and safety of MA for melasma, and explore the range of treatments applied. Six databases were searched systematically for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on acupuncture for melasma in women up to November 2014. RevMan software was used for data analysis. The Cochrane tool of Risk of Bias was used to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. Eight RCTs involving 587 women were included. Seven studies used the encircling needling method, four studies used the quick needling method and four studies used intensive needle manipulations. Five studies provided individualised acupuncture treatments. Points used with highest frequency were SP6, ST36 and SP10. MA was compared with oral tranexamic acid, vitamin C and E, vitamin C and tamoxifen, topical 20% azelaic acid, hydroquinone, vitamin A and no treatment. Studies were too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. For global outcome measures, seven trials showed that MA groups were significantly better than the conventional treatments either with a better cure rate or with a better combined cure rate and markedly effective rate, and one trial did not (MA vs vitamin A). No acupuncture-related adverse events were reported. MA appeared to be beneficial and safe for women with melasma, but insufficient evidence was found to reach conclusions. The encircling needling method, the quick needling method, intensive needle manipulations and individualised points' selection were widely used. Well-designed trials are required. PROSPERO Systematic review registration: CRD42013006396. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. [Observation on the therapeutic effect of lumbar disc herniation treated with different acupuncture therapies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Ling

    2013-07-01

    To observe the differences in the clinical therapeutic effects on lumbar disc herniation among warm needling therapy, electroacupuncture therapy and common acupuncture therapy. One hundred and thirty-six cases of lumbar disc herniation were randomized into a warm needling group (46 cases), an electroacupuncture group (45 cases) and a common acupuncture group (45 cases). The points were the same in the three groups. The main points were Shiqizhui (EX-B 8), Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Huantiao (GB 30), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Jiaji (EX-B 2) (corresponding tender points). In the warm manipulation group, the warm and dredging manipulation was adopted. In the electroacupuncture group, G6805- II electric acupuncture apparatus was attached. In the common acupuncture group, only common needling therapy was applied without any specific manipulation supplemented. In all of the three groups, the treatment was given once every two days, 10 treatments made one session. After one session of treatment, the comprehensive assessment score of the chief symptoms and physical signs, VAS score and the clinical efficacy were compared among the three groups. The score of the chief symptoms and physical signs and VAS score after treatment were all reduced as compared with those before treatment in all of the three groups, indicating the statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). All of the three therapies could relieve the chief symptoms and physical signs of lumbar disc herniation. After treatment, the total effective rate was 89.1% (41/46) in the warm manipulation group, 88.9% (40/50) in the electroacupuncture group and 71.1% (32/45) in the common acupuncture group. The efficacies were not different apparently between the warm manipulation group and the electroacupuncture group (P > 0.05). The efficacies in the warm manipulation group and the electroacupuncture group were all superior to the common acupuncture group (P < 0.05). The efficacies of the warm and dredging manipulation and the

  18. [Acupuncture messenger--Pu Xiang-cheng].

    PubMed

    Du, Huai-bin; Liang, Fan-rong

    2011-06-01

    PU Xiang-cheng is the eminent acupuncture master in modern history of China. He studied diligently in early years and devoted his life to the cause of acupuncture practice and education in Chinese medicine. Combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine, coordination of acupuncture and moxibustion, unique application of acupoints, flexible combination of acupoints and focusing on needling techniques are the essence of his academic thoughts. The life of PU Xiang-cheng, the acupuncture master, and his major academic thoughts are described in this paper, so as to commemorate his contributions to acupuncture theory, practice and promotions.

  19. [ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a clinical observation].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Zhang, Xinghua; Sun, Runjie; Qin, Xiaoguang

    2016-04-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences between Zheng's gold hook, fishing acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Sixty patients of LDH were randomly allocated to a gold hook fishing acupuncture group and an EA group, 30 cases in each one. Lumbar Jiaji (EX-1 B 2), Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Shenshu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25), Guanyuanshu (BL 26) and ashi points were selected in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group; after the needles were inserted, the manipulation of gold hook fishing acupuncture was applied at tendon junction points and ashi points. The identical acupoints were selected in the EA group and patients were treated with EA. The treatment was both given once a day; ten days of treatment were taken as one session, and totally 3 sessions were given. The clinical effective rate, visual analogue scale (VAS), low back pain score and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used for efficacy evaluation. The effective rate was 93.3% (28/30) in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group, which was superior to 86.7% (26/30) in the EA group (P < 0.05). The VAS, low back pain score and ODI were both significantly improved after treatment (all P < 0.05), which were more significant in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group (all P < 0.05). ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture could effectively improve the symptoms and sings of LDH, reduce the disability index and improve the quality of life, which is superior to EA.

  20. The Observation of the Change of TCE Caused by Different Acupuncture Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Xinnong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the change of transcutaneous CO2 emission on meridian points or nonacupoints when the different needle sensations were gotten and study the associativity between Deqi acupuncture and periphery constitution energy metabolism effect. Method. 20 healthy volunteers were punctured on Neiguan (P6) in different ways including sham, shallow, Deqi acupuncture, and Deqi plus pressed P5, and measured TCE of different points before, during, and after acupuncture. Result. Needle sensations of sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture were less than those of Deqi acupuncture. TCE of meridian points increased significantly and showed the specificity of meridian/channels. Conclusion. Verum acupuncture could cause the stronger needling sensations including distention, aching, numbness, and tingling than sham and shallow acupuncture. The strength of needling sensation caused by Deqi acupuncture is moderate and brought the best curative effects in TCE measurement. Deqi acupuncture could improve the energy metabolism of the points on the corresponding meridian/channel. PMID:24069059

  1. The Observation of the Change of TCE Caused by Different Acupuncture Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Xinnong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the change of transcutaneous CO2 emission on meridian points or nonacupoints when the different needle sensations were gotten and study the associativity between Deqi acupuncture and periphery constitution energy metabolism effect. Method. 20 healthy volunteers were punctured on Neiguan (P6) in different ways including sham, shallow, Deqi acupuncture, and Deqi plus pressed P5, and measured TCE of different points before, during, and after acupuncture. Result. Needle sensations of sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture were less than those of Deqi acupuncture. TCE of meridian points increased significantly and showed the specificity of meridian/channels. Conclusion. Verum acupuncture could cause the stronger needling sensations including distention, aching, numbness, and tingling than sham and shallow acupuncture. The strength of needling sensation caused by Deqi acupuncture is moderate and brought the best curative effects in TCE measurement. Deqi acupuncture could improve the energy metabolism of the points on the corresponding meridian/channel.

  2. The effects of acupuncture on the brain networks for emotion and cognition: An observation of gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei Qiao; Claunch, Joshua; Kong, Jian; Nixon, Erika E.; Fang, Jiliang; Li, Ming; Vangel, Mark; Hui, Kathleen Kin-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture modulates brain activity at the limbic–paralimbic–neocortical network (LPNN) and the default mode network (DMN). Since these brain networks show gender differences when mediating emotional and cognitive tasks, we thus hypothesize that women and men may also respond differently to acupuncture procedure at these brain regions. In order to test this hypothesis, we retrieved the data of 38 subjects, 19 females and 19 males, who had brain fMRI during acupuncture from previous studies and reanalyzed them based on sex status. Deactivation at the LPNN/DMN during needle manipulation of acupuncture was more extensive in females than in males, particularly in the posterior cingulate (BA31), precuneus (BA7m) and angular gyrus (BA39). The functional correlations between the right BA31 and pregenual cingulate (BA32), hippocampus or contralateral BA31 were significantly stronger in females than in males. The angular gyrus (BA39) was functionally correlated with BA31 in females; in contrast, it was anticorrelated with BA31 in males. Soreness, a major component of the psychophysical responses to needle manipulation, deqi, was correlated in intensity with deactivation of the angular gyrus in females; no such relationships were observed in males. In contrast to lesser deactivation at the LPNN/DMN networks, needle manipulation during acupuncture induced greater activation at the secondary somatosensory cortex and stronger functional connectivity with the anterior-middle cingulate (BA32/24) in males than in females. Our study suggests that brains with sex dimorphism may process the acupuncture stimulation differently between women and men. PMID:20851113

  3. The effects of acupuncture on the brain networks for emotion and cognition: an observation of gender differences.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei Qiao; Claunch, Joshua; Kong, Jian; Nixon, Erika E; Fang, Jiliang; Li, Ming; Vangel, Mark; Hui, Kathleen Kin-Sang

    2010-11-29

    Acupuncture modulates brain activity at the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN) and the default mode network (DMN). Since these brain networks show gender differences when mediating emotional and cognitive tasks, we thus hypothesize that women and men may also respond differently to acupuncture procedure at these brain regions. In order to test this hypothesis, we retrieved the data of 38 subjects, 19 females and 19 males, who had brain fMRI during acupuncture from previous studies and reanalyzed them based on sex status. Deactivation at the LPNN/DMN during needle manipulation of acupuncture was more extensive in females than in males, particularly in the posterior cingulate (BA31), precuneus (BA7m) and angular gyrus (BA39). The functional correlations between the right BA31 and pregenual cingulate (BA32), hippocampus or contralateral BA31 were significantly stronger in females than in males. The angular gyrus (BA39) was functionally correlated with BA31 in females; in contrast, it was anticorrelated with BA31 in males. Soreness, a major component of the psychophysical responses to needle manipulation, deqi, was correlated in intensity with deactivation of the angular gyrus in females; no such relationships were observed in males. In contrast to lesser deactivation at the LPNN/DMN networks, needle manipulation during acupuncture induced greater activation at the secondary somatosensory cortex and stronger functional connectivity with the anterior-middle cingulate (BA32/24) in males than in females. Our study suggests that brains with sex dimorphism may process the acupuncture stimulation differently between women and men. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Effects of different manipulation methods of acupuncture at Zusanli (ST 36) on signal transduction pathway of STAT5 in human PBMC].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-bin; Yang, Xiao-hang

    2006-02-01

    To study on effects of different manipulation methods of acupuncture on the binding ability of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT5) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with DNA. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomly divided into 3 groups; reinforcing method group, reducing method group, normal control group, 10 cases in each group. The expression of STAT5 mRNA and the activation of STAT5 in the human PBMC were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). In the reinforcing method group, the basic transcription level of STATS mRNA in human PBMC and the binding ability of STAT5 with DNA significantly increased (P<0.01), but in the reducing method group, they did not significantly change as compared with those in the normal control group (P>0.05). Cytokines and JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway are in volved in immunoregulative actions of acupuncture of the reinforcing method, but the reasons of influencing the transcription level of STAT5 mRNA and the binding ability of STAT5 with DNA are unclear.

  5. Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES)-a useful tool to practice and learn medical acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chi Fai David; Leung, Kwong Sak; Heng, Pheng Ann; Lim, Chi Eung Danforn; Wong, Felix Wu Shun

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) that will assist the learning and practice of medical acupuncture. This was the development of a Chinese Acupuncture Expert System which incorporated eight functional modules. These modules were 1) Add Patient Record subsystem; 2) Diagnosis subsystem ; 3) Acupuncture Prescription subsystem ; 4) Needle Insertion Position Animation subsystem ; 5) Acupuncture Points Usage Statistic subsystem ; 6) History Query subsystem; 7) Acupuncture Points Query subsystem and 8) Diagnosis Remarks and Diagnosis Record Save subsystem. Two databases were built-Patient Record database and Diagnosis (Acupuncture) Knowledge database. All the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) knowledge and acupuncture treatment prescriptions were extracted from officially used TCM textbooks and received guidance and expert advice from two acupuncturists working in this project. A Chinese Acupuncture Expert System (CAES) was built, which after the input from users of any Chinese disease symptoms and signs, it can provide a list of related TCM syndrome diagnoses based on the patients' disease symptoms and signs, and at the same time it can offer advice of the appropriate Chinese acupuncture treatment to the users. CAES also provided text descriptions and acupuncture animations showing the acupoint locations and the direction and depth of the needle insertion technique. Therefore users can easily learn acupuncture and practice it. This new acupuncture expert system will hopefully provide an easy way for users to learn and practice Chinese Acupuncture and establish its usefulness after it was fully evaluated.

  6. Mobilization with movement, thoracic spine manipulation, and dry needling for the management of temporomandibular disorder: a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Cleland, Joshua A; Neto, Francisco; Hall, Toby; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this case series was to describe the outcomes of patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) treated with mobilization with movement (MWM) directed at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the cervical spine, thoracic manipulation, and trigger point (TrP) dry needling. Fifteen patients with TMD completed the Steigerwald/Maher TMD disability questionnaire, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and maximal mouth opening (MMO) at baseline. The VAS and MMO were also collected at 15 days posttreatment and at a 2-month follow-up, and the Steigerwald/Maher TMD disability questionnaire was completed at the 2-month follow-up. Repeated measure ANOVAs were used to determine the effects of the intervention on each outcome. Within-group effect sizes were calculated in order to assess clinical effectiveness. Fifteen patients participated in this case series. The ANOVA revealed significant decreases (all, p  <  0.01) VAS mean, VAS Worst, and VAS Best between baseline and final visit of 25.7 (95% CI; 17.7, 33.8); 33.2 (95% CI; 23.4, 43.0); 18.4 (12.1, 24.7); and 28.3 (95% CI; 18.8, 37.9); 36.1 (95% CI; 25.0, 47.3); 19.7 (95% CI; 12.8, 26.7) between baseline and the 2-month follow-up periods, respectively. Additionally, the ANOVA revealed significant increases (all, p  <  0.01) in MMO and disability following the physical therapy management strategy between baseline and final visit with a mean of 11.4 (95% CI, 6.9, 15.9) and 10.2 (95% CI, 5.2, 15.2) between baseline and the 2-month follow-up. Within-group effect sizes were large (d  >  1.0) for all outcomes at both follow-up periods. Patients with TMD treated with a multimodal treatment exhibited significant and clinical improvements in pain intensity, disability, and MMO.

  7. Deqi Induction by HT7 Acupuncture Alters Theta and Alpha Band Coherence in Human Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Go-Eun; Yun, Jong-Min; Yang, Seung-Bum; Kang, Yeonseok; Kang, Hyung-Won; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Junbeom; Kwon, O Sang; Park, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jae-Hyo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate the changes in phase synchronization in the theta and alpha bands before and during the performance of classical acupuncture on the Sinmun (HT7). The electroencephalogram (EEG) signals from nine healthy young subjects were recorded before and during acupuncture in the "closed-eye" state. The EEG signals were acquired from 19 surface scalp electrodes (FP1, FP2, F7, F3, Fz F4, F8, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, T5, P3, Pz, P4, T6, O1, and O2). Needles were inserted into the HT7 bilaterally and were then manipulated to induce deqi and retained for 15 minutes. Phase synchronization was measured by phase coherence. In the theta band, coherence significantly increased between the temporal (T5, T6) and occipital areas (O1, O2) during the acupuncture stimulation. In the alpha band, coherence significantly increased between the left temporal area (T5) and other areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital). Phase coherence in the theta and alpha bands tended to increase during the retention of the acupuncture needles after deqi. Therefore, it can be concluded that acupuncture stimulation with deqi is clinically effective via the central nervous system (CNS).

  8. Deqi Induction by HT7 Acupuncture Alters Theta and Alpha Band Coherence in Human Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate the changes in phase synchronization in the theta and alpha bands before and during the performance of classical acupuncture on the Sinmun (HT7). The electroencephalogram (EEG) signals from nine healthy young subjects were recorded before and during acupuncture in the “closed-eye” state. The EEG signals were acquired from 19 surface scalp electrodes (FP1, FP2, F7, F3, Fz F4, F8, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, T5, P3, Pz, P4, T6, O1, and O2). Needles were inserted into the HT7 bilaterally and were then manipulated to induce deqi and retained for 15 minutes. Phase synchronization was measured by phase coherence. In the theta band, coherence significantly increased between the temporal (T5, T6) and occipital areas (O1, O2) during the acupuncture stimulation. In the alpha band, coherence significantly increased between the left temporal area (T5) and other areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital). Phase coherence in the theta and alpha bands tended to increase during the retention of the acupuncture needles after deqi. Therefore, it can be concluded that acupuncture stimulation with deqi is clinically effective via the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:28484506

  9. [Deqi and application and manipulation of Deqi].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-qing

    2007-05-01

    Deqi is the key for therapeutic effect of acupuncture therapy. In the present paper, the significance of Deqi, and how to differentiate qi and how to induce Deqi are preliminarily studied. Deqi is concrete response of acupuncturist and the patient during acupuncture. Arrival of qi is like bobbing on water when the fish swallows the fishhook; no arrival of qi is like the deep valley with shallow sensation. For differentiation of qi, the vital-qi (essence derived from food), pathogenic factor, deficiency and excess, cold and heat need to be differentiated. For manipulation, the 14 methods of Yang Ji-zhou are used as guiding principle. In brief, massage along channel induces qi, on-the-point pressing promotes flow of qi, circling method regulates qi. And reinforcing and reducing by puncturing along and against the direction of channels respectively are explained, and how to induce Deqi is preliminarily expounded from methods of inserting the needle, manipulating the needle and withdrawing the needle.

  10. [Acupotomology: returning to the ancients and innovation of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Guo, Chang-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Acupotomology is a technique of percutaneous minimally invasive soft tissue releasing. It can be found in traditional acupuncture, but is deemphasized in modern times. Therefore, the development of acupotomology is held as restoring of ancient ways of acupuncture. Compared with traditional acupuncture, acupotomology makes modern interpretations on the theory of muscle regions, absorbs theories of anatomy and pathology as well as techniques of asepsis and anaesthesia. It improves traditional needling tool. Therefore, it is also held as an innovation of acupuncture. The development of acupotomology makes up for the deficiency of acupuncture study. It. will promote the differentiation and crossing of acupuncture discipline, and become a new trend of acupuncture.

  11. Does Deqi (needle sensation) exist?

    PubMed

    Park, Hijoon; Park, Jongbae; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Hyejung

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism, by which acupuncture works is not yet clear, therefore there is no unequivocal consensus about styles and sensations of needling. To enhance the scientific base of acupuncture, needling somehow should be objectified. The term Deqi is understood to represent all or at least the main form of phenomena to acupuncture stimulation. The characteristics of Deqi, however, have always been based on a translation of original Chinese description. Hoping to find a clue to develop sham (placebo) method for subject blinding, we investigated which sensations are frequently expected and experienced, and whether or not these expectations and experiences of sensations are similar in naive subjects. The acupuncture sensation scale developed by Vincent et al. (1989) was translated into Korean. Thirty-eight healthy acupuncture naïve female volunteers (mean age 29.1, range 25-39) were asked to complete the sensation scale of acupuncture according to what they expected needling to feel like before needling. Needling was done on left Hegu (LI4) point in the hand and consisted of insertion, stimulation for 30 seconds, and removal. Directly after needling, the subjects were asked to complete the same sensation scale according to what they experienced. The subjects expected to feel hurting, penetrating, sharp, tingling, pricking and stinging, and actually experienced aching, spreading, radiating, pricking and stinging more than 60% of the time. Comparison between expectation and experience, the subjects expected more penetrating, tingling, pricking and burning than they experienced, and on the contrary experienced more aching, pulling, heavy, dull, electric and throbbing than they expected. Traditionally described sensations of Deqi are something beyond just a general pain dimension in the Korean population. Further study involving acupuncture experienced subjects or subjects from other cultures need to confirm this finding. Moreover, sham acupuncture should be studied.

  12. Traditional Chinese acupuncture: a potentially useful antiemetic?

    PubMed Central

    Dundee, J W; Chestnutt, W N; Ghaly, R G; Lynas, A G

    1986-01-01

    Two consecutive studies were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as an antiemetic used in addition to premedication with opioids in patients undergoing minor gynaecological operations. In the first study 25 of the 50 patients underwent acupuncture immediately after premedication with 100 mg meptazinol, the rest receiving the drug alone, and in the second 75 patients were allocated randomly to one of three groups: a group receiving 10 mg nalbuphine and acupuncture, a group receiving premedication and dummy acupuncture, and a group receiving premedication alone. Manual needling for five minutes at the P6 acupuncture point (Neiguan) resulted in a significant reduction in perioperative nausea and vomiting in the 50 patients who underwent acupuncture compared with the 75 patients who received no acupuncture. These findings cannot be explained, but it is recommended that the use of acupuncture as an antiemetic should be explored further. PMID:3092933

  13. [Research and practice on basic skill training and technique improving of acupuncture and tuina major].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao-Lin; Gao, Xi-Yan; Ye, Xian-Feng; Hu, Bin; Zheng, Ming-Chang

    2014-01-01

    In order to summarize and perfect the basic skill practicing method in acupuncture teaching and form a characteristic teaching, the research on skill training and technique improving of acupuncture and tuina major was carried out. The undergraduate students in acupuncture and tuina major from College of Acupuncture-Moxibustion and Tuina were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. Students from both groups received the basic courses of acupuncture-moxibustion and tuina as requested in the syllabus and the special teaching was added to the experimental group, namely "three practice" (strength practice, coordination practice, targeted practice of acupuncture basic skills) and "three enlightenment" (technique enlightenment, mind and qi enlightenment, efficacy enlightenment). During and after the courses, the teaching effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of needling manipulation. The peacetime score in the experimental group was superior to that in the control group (38.03 +/- 1.14 vs 33.25 +/- 1.31, P < 0.05), the total score in the experimental group was superior to that in the control group (84.03 +/- 6.30 vs 78.05 +/- 6.55, P < 0.05). The special teaching method of "three practice" and "three enlightenment" can improve the effect of skill training teaching method. It highlights the unique feature of central plains by integrating the essence of Shaolin internal qigong and Chen-style Taiji, it can also provide new ideas for the practical teaching of TCM professional courses and the construction of characteristic professionals.

  14. Changes of Local Blood Flow in Response to Acupuncture Stimulation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Min, Seorim; Lee, Hyangsook; Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Park, Ji-Yeun; Song, Taek-Jin; Park, Hi-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic review aimed to summarize and evaluate the findings of studies investigating the local microcirculatory effects following acupuncture stimulation. Methods. MEDLINE, EMBASE, OASIS, and Cochrane library were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before January 30, 2015. Studies demonstrating any type of microcirculation response to manual acupuncture in healthy subjects and patients were included. The risk of bias and the reliability of the experimental conditions were evaluated to determine quality assessment. Results. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria; there was at least one acupuncture-induced change in a microcirculatory parameter. Of the seven studies in healthy subjects, four reported significant increases in blood flow following acupuncture compared with control, whereas one other study observed reductions in microcirculation immediately after acupuncture needling. The studies that assessed patients with either fibromyalgia or trapezius myalgia found significant increases in blood flow in the skin and muscle. Additionally, the degree and duration of increases in microcirculation varied depending on the condition of the subjects and the manipulation technique. Conclusions. The current evidence regarding the local effects of acupuncture in terms of blood flow remains insufficient for reliable conclusions due to few well-designed studies. Additional well-designed studies are needed to clarify these issues. PMID:27403201

  15. Methodological standards for experimental research on stroke using scalp acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guo-qing

    2009-01-01

    Scalp acupuncture (SA) is a modality based on different physiologic functions of different brain areas, using needles to stimulate different scalp zones so as to excite the reflex-related nervous tissue. The findings of several studies showed that the clinical effect of SA on stroke was significant, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. In this research, some new ways of thinking and new methodological standards on stroke experiment using SA are put forward. They are as follows: A, establishment of standard animal model of stroke; B, simulation of head acupoint line on animal model following traditional Chinese medicine localization; C, acupuncture manipulation and quantity of stimulus for SA in animal model; D, optimal curative opportunity and instant effect of SA therapy on stroke; E, mechanism study of SA on stroke. This research may provide methodological reference for future mechanism study on stroke experiment using SA.

  16. Downrange Acupuncture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Downrange Acupuncture Robert L. Koffman, MD, Capt, US Navy* ABSTRACT Robert L. Koffman, MD, Capt, US Navy, reports his experiences using acupuncture ...satisfaction that acupuncture provides in the broad range of military medicine and psychiatry. Key Words: Acupuncture , Auricular, Battlefield, Trauma, PTSD...Medical Institute (HMI; in Berkeley, CA) military acupuncture program, and, in December, deployed to Afghanistan. My official assignment took me to

  17. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Aziz U R; Johnson, Robyn L; Woods, William; Green, Gary G R; Lewith, George; Macpherson, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering) analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu) acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the SFG. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and SFG, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes toward an underlying mechanism of acupuncture.

  18. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Aziz U. R.; Johnson, Robyn L.; Woods, William; Green, Gary G. R.; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering) analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu) acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz), and gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the SFG. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and SFG, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes toward an underlying mechanism of acupuncture. PMID:23248594

  19. Acupuncture as a treatment modality for back problems.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, K

    1999-04-01

    Concepts of acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicine are presented for clarity and contrast to Western medical concepts. Various acupuncture techniques and methods are discussed including dry needling, electroacupuncture, acupuncture using hypodermic needles, and injecting various solutions into the acupuncture sites. Potential complications and precautions are also presented. A type of chronic back pain is discussed that is possibly associated with a radiculopathically induced, hypersensitivity myofascial syndrome that presents as a fibromyalgia-like syndrome. Effective acupuncture treatment for the described chronic fibromyalgia-like syndrome is discussed.

  20. ‘Big needles, small bodies’—the absence of acupuncture treatment for infants in contemporary Shanghai: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Skjeie, Holgeir; Brekke, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore contemporary practices and clinical recommendations regarding the use of acupuncture for infants by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners in Shanghai. Design A qualitative study consisting of four field visits between February 2014 and March 2015. Data was collected using participant observation, focus group interview, in-depth interview, textbook page analysis and informant validation. Participants 14 Shanghainese professionals, including interpreters and TCM practitioners, of which seven were acupuncturists. Setting The Longhua Hospital (paediatric, acupuncture and Tui na departments) in southern Shanghai and the campus of the Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Results The Longhua Hospital outpatient acupuncture clinic receives 400 consultations on average per day. Children, including patients from the paediatric department, are referred to this clinic. During 3 days of participant observations at this department, we saw two children. No infants. During 3 days at the paediatric department and 1 day at the Tui na department we saw no referrals. Formal interviews and informal conversations with acupuncturists and other TCM professionals revealed that acupuncture was neither routinely practiced nor recommended for infants and small children. Acupuncture was considered potentially painful for this young patient population. Alternative treatment options such as herbal treatments or medical massage were widely available and preferred. Western medical diagnostics and treatment were also used, recommended, and trusted. Conclusions Acupuncture for infants is not a preferred therapeutic method among TCM practitioners working in contemporary Shanghai. Acupuncture on broad indications in infants appears to be a Western practice with little basis in TCM modern-day practice. PMID:26553838

  1. [Manipulation methods of slow-rapid reinforcing-reducing method].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi-Xin; Ran, Peng-Fei; Lü, Xiao-Rui; Wang, Xue-Xia

    2008-06-01

    After consulting literature, following the original meaning of the paper about slow-rapid reinforcing-reducing method in Huangdi's Internal Classic, in combination with explanation of later ages, and comprehension and clinical experience of the authors, it is put forward that the slow-rapid reinforcing-reducing method in Huangdi's Internal Classic is not single manipulation method, but it is a guiding principle for reinforcing-reducing manipulation, it includes many manipulation methods and they were listed, and all of the reinforcing-reducing methods of later ages are developed from these. In the teaching material Acupuncture and Moxibustion Sciences they are included in single reinforcing-reducing method, reducing extension and intension of this definition. The relative description in the teaching material only is slow-rapid reinforcing-reducing method of narrow sense, but the manipulations can be divided into qi-carrying manipulating needle type and three-one pushing-pulling type.

  2. Exploring the Patterns of Acupuncture on Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients Using Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; You, Youbo; Chen, Shangjie; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the different responses to acupuncture in MCI patients and age-matched healthy subjects reflected by the Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) indices. Methods The experiment was performed at the acupoint KI3 in 12 MCI patients and 12 healthy controls, respectively. A novel non-repeated event-related (NRER) fMRI design paradigm was applied to separately detect neural activities related to different stages of acupuncture (pre-acupuncture resting state, needling manipulation and post-acupuncture resting state). ReHo values were calculated for MCI patients and healthy controls in pre- and post-acupuncture resting state. Then, a two-way ANCOVA with repeated measures with post-hoc two sample t-tests was performed to explore the different responses to acupuncture in the two groups. Results The ANCOVA revealed a significant main effect of group, but no significant main effect of acupuncture and interactions between group and acupuncture. During the pre-acupuncture resting state, ReHo values increased in the precentral gyrus (PCG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and insula (INS) and decreased mainly in middle temporal gyrus (MTG), parahippocampal (PHIP) and cingulate cortex in MCI patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, we found that the regions including precuneus (PCUN), and cingulate cortex showed increased ReHo values for MCI patients following acupuncture. For healthy controls, the medial frontal gyrus, PCG, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and INS showed enhanced ReHo values following acupuncture. During the post-acupuncture resting state, MCI patients showed increased ReHo values mainly in the MTG, superior parietal lobule (SPL), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), supramarginal (SMG), and PCG, and decreased ReHo values mainly in the frontal regions, PHIP, and posterior cingulated cortex (PCC) compared to healthy controls. Conclusion Though we found some ReHo changes between MCI patients and healthy controls, the two-way ANCOVA results showed no

  3. [Blood perfusion in different facial acupoint areas and its changes after acupuncture stimulation of Hegu (LI 4) displayed by laser Doppler imager in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-You; Qu, Xiao-Xiao; Song, Xiao-Jing; Li, Shun-Yue; Ma, Hui-Min; Zhang, Dong

    2012-12-01

    To observe the blood perfusion levels in different facial acupoint regions and changes after acupuncture stimulation of Hegu (LI 4). Thirty healthy volunteer subjects were equally divided into control group and acupuncture group. Blood perfusion levels of different facial acupoint areas were detected using a Laser Doppler Imager. Acupuncture stimulation was applied to bilateral Hegu (LI 4) by using two filiform needles which were manipulated for a while till "Deqi", followed by keeping them in position for 30 min. The needles were then manipulated once again every 10 min. The blood perfusion levels of facial acupoint regions were from 0.73 to 1.17 PU in healthy volunteers, with relatively higher levels being in Juliao (ST 3), Kouheliao (LI 19), Sibai (ST 2) and Chengqi (ST 1) regions and relatively lower levels in Xiaguan (ST 7), Qianzheng (Ex-HN) and Sizhukong (TE 23) regions, but without significant difference between the isonym acupoint areas of the bilateral face in the control group. Following acupuncture stimulation of bilateral Hegu (LI 4), the blood perfusion volumes were remarkably increased in the acupoint regions on bilateral sides of the face (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Acupuncture of Hegu (LI 4) can effectively increase blood perfusion volume of the acupoint areas of the bilateral face in healthy volunteers.

  4. Neurobiology of Acupuncture: Toward CAM

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    It has long been accepted that acupuncture, puncturing and scraping needles at certain points on the body, can have analgesic and anesthetic effects, as well as therapeutic effects in the treatment of various diseases. This therapy, including acupuncture anesthesia, has drawn the attention of many investigators and become a research subject of international interest around the world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the nervous system, neurotransmitters, endogenous substances and Jingluo (meridians) may respond to needling stimulation and electrical acupuncture. An abundance of information has now accumulated concerning the neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture, in relation to both neural pathways and neurotransmitters/hormonal factors that mediate autonomic regulation, pain relief and other therapeutics. Early studies demonstrated that the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) are mediated by opioid peptides in the periaqueductal gray. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide plays an important role in mediating the cardiovascular responses to EA stimulation through the gracile nucleus-thalamic pathway. Other substances, including serotonin, catecholamines, inorganic chemicals and amino acids such as glutamate and α-aminobutyric acid (GABA), are proposed to mediate certain cardiovascular and analgesic effects of acupuncture, but at present their role is poorly understood. The increased interest in acupuncture health care has led to an ever-growing number of investigators pursuing research in the processes of the sense of needling touch, transduction of needling stimulation signals, stimulation parameters and placebos. In this Review, the evidence and understanding of the neurobiological processes of acupuncture research have been summarized with an emphasis on recent developments of nitric oxide mediating acupuncture signals through the dorsal medulla-thalamic pathways. PMID:15257325

  5. Acupuncture in modern society.

    PubMed

    Vanderploeg, Kristin; Yi, Xiaobin

    2009-03-01

    For at least 2,500 years, acupuncture has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. However, recently as more people in western countries are diagnosed with chronic disease poorly treated with modern medical therapies, many are turning to acupuncture and other forms of alternative medical treatments. Based on the theory of harmonious flowing qi being the basis of good health, acupuncture focuses on restoring qi by manipulation of the complementary and opposing elements of yin and yang. However, in the modern medical community we struggle to with the concept of qi, given a lack of anatomic and histological evidence supporting its existence. However, with the surge in public interest in acupuncture, the scientific community begun heavy investigation of acupuncture's efficacy, as well as the physiologic basis behind it. Thus far, evidence supports the use of acupuncture in post-operative nausea and vomiting, postoperative dental pain, chronic pain conditions such as lower back pain, and possibly also such psychologic conditions as addiction. It is possible that by affecting afferent nerve signaling, acupuncture may influence the release of endogenous opioids to promote pain relief. This effect may be augmented by release of ACTH and cortisol, as well as through down-regulation of signaling through pain fibers. When treating patients who may utilize alternative forms of medicine, it is important that medical practitioners be educated in regards to the basic fundamental beliefs behind acupuncture, as well as the scientific evidence supporting its use and revealing its efficacy. The purpose of this review is to give western trained physicians exposure to history, basic knowledge and its clinical applications of acupuncture to accommodate accelerating interests in acupuncture in modern society.

  6. Acupuncture and dry needling in the management of myofascial trigger point pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tough, Elizabeth A; White, Adrian R; Cummings, T Michael; Richards, Suzanne H; Campbell, John L

    2009-01-01

    Pain from myofascial trigger points is often treated by needling, with or without injection, although evidence is inconclusive on whether this is effective. We aimed to review the current evidence on needling without injection, by conducting a systematic literature review. We searched electronic databases to identify relevant randomised controlled trials, and included studies where at least one group were treated by needling directly into the myofascial trigger points, and where the control was either no treatment, or usual care; indirect local dry needling or some form of placebo intervention. We extracted data on pain, using VAS scores as the standard. Seven studies were included. One study concluded that direct dry needling was superior to no intervention. Two studies, comparing direct dry needling to needling elsewhere in the muscle, produced contradictory results. Four studies used a placebo control and were included in a meta-analysis. Combining these studies (n=134), needling was not found to be significantly superior to placebo (standardised mean difference, 14.9 [95%CI, -5.81 to 33.99]), however marked statistical heterogeneity was present (I(2)=88%). In conclusion, there is limited evidence deriving from one study that deep needling directly into myofascial trigger points has an overall treatment effect when compared with standardised care. Whilst the result of the meta-analysis of needling compared with placebo controls does not attain statistically significant, the overall direction could be compatible with a treatment effect of dry needling on myofascial trigger point pain. However, the limited sample size and poor quality of these studies highlights and supports the need for large scale, good quality placebo controlled trials in this area.

  7. [Effects of acupuncture of Jianjing (GB 21) on gallbladder volume and symptoms of cholecystitis patients].

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng-Yun; Li, Shuang-Cheng; Wang, Guo-Ming; Li, Li-Xia; Song, Yong-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture of Jianjing (GB 21) and non-acupoint on gallbladder volume and clinical symptoms of chronic cholecystitis patients. Sixty cases of chronic cholecystitis patients were equally randomized into Jianjing (GB 21) group and non-acupoint group. A filiform needle was inserted into Jianjing (GB 21) or non-acupoint (2 cun lateral to the mid-point between the spinous processes of the 6th and 7th cervical vertebrae) on the right side, manipulated for a while till "Deqi", and retained for 30 min. A color Doppler ultrasound scanner was used to detect the volume of the gallbladder before and 15 min after acupuncture stimulation and 30 min after withdrawal of the acupuncture needle. Changes of the patients symptoms of shoulder-back pain, stomachache, distension and nausea were evaluated according to the patients' complaints. After acupuncture intervention, the remission rates of shoulder-back pain and stomachache in non-acupoint and GB 21 groups were 56.67% and 90.00% respectively, while the effective rates of the patients' gastric distention and nausea in non-acupoint and GB 21 groups were 16.67% and 23.33%, respectively. The therapeutic effect of Jianjing (GB 21) was apparently superior to that of non-acupoint in pain relief (P < 0.05). Fifteen min following acupuncture stimulation and 30 min after withdrawal of the acupuncture needle, the gallbladder volume in cholecystitis patients with deflated gallbladder was increased apparently in GB 21 group (P < 0.01), and that in patients with expanded gallbladder was decreased significantly (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found among pre-, during and post-treatment in the non-acupoint group in the effects of acupuncture on regulation of the deflated and expanded gallbladder volume (P > 0.05). Acupuncture stimulation of Jianjing (GB 21) can effectively relieve shoulder-back pain and stomachache, and regulate the volume of the deflated and expanded gallbladder in cholecystitis patients

  8. Is sham acupuncture as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture? It's too early to say.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Chu, Qin; Wang, Shu; Lai, Hilary; Xie, Bing-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical trials and experimental studies claim that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. However, these studies have no standard sham acupuncture control and many other factors can affect the clinical effect. These factors include needle retention time, treatment frequency, and the total number of treatments needed for satisfactory results, and all can change the clinical effect. The majority of existing acupuncture treatment studies do not consider these factors and lack standard dosage criteria. Therefore, it is still too early to conclude that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. This article investigates the factors that influence the curative effect of acupuncture as to help set a standard for acupuncture studies in the future.

  9. Ultrasonography in Acupuncture-Uses in Education and Research.

    PubMed

    Leow, Mabel Qi He; Cui, Shu Li; Mohamed Shah, Mohammad Taufik Bin; Cao, Taige; Tay, Shian Chao; Tay, Peter Kay Chai; Ooi, Chin Chin

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to explore the potential use of ultrasound in locating the second posterior sacral foramen acupuncture point, quantifying depth of insertion and describing surrounding anatomical structures. We performed acupuncture needle insertion on a study team member. There were four steps in our experiment. First, the acupuncturist located the acupuncture point by palpation. Second, we used an ultrasound machine to visualize the structures surrounding the location of the acupuncture point and measure the depth required for needle insertion. Third, the acupuncturist inserted the acupuncture needle into the acupuncture point at an angle of 30°. Fourth, we performed another ultrasound scan to ensure that the needle was in the desired location. Results suggested that ultrasound could be used to locate the acupuncture point and estimate the depth of needle insertion. The needle was inserted to a depth of 4.0 cm to reach the surface of the sacral foramen. Based on Pythagoras theorem, taking a needle insertion angle of 30° and a needle insertion depth of 4.0 cm, the estimated perpendicular depth is 1.8 cm. An ultrasound scan corroborated the depth of 1.85 cm. The use of an ultrasound-guided technique for needle insertion in acupuncture practice could help standardize the treatment. Clinicians and students would be able to visualize and measure the depth of the sacral foramen acupuncture point, to guide the depth of needle insertion. This methodological guide could also be used to create a standard treatment protocol for research. A similar mathematical guide could also be created for other acupuncture points in future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Yes, there is deqi sensation in laser acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Deqi, a composite of unique sensations, is essential for clinical efficacy according to Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is described as a sensory perception of varying character and is mostly ascribed to metal needle acupuncture. However, it can also be elicited by different kinds of laser acupuncture stimulation. This short paper summarizes the current scientific status of deqi in laser stimulation. Different kinds of laser acupuncture are described in a comprehensive form, and the most interesting studies concerning deqi and laser acupuncture are presented.

  11. [Introduction on the schools of the scalp acupuncture for treatment of the stroke hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Qiao; Wang, Fun; Liu, Jian-Hao; Dong, Gui-Rong

    2010-09-01

    Three representative schools of scalp acupuncture for the stroke hemiplegia such as Jiao's scalp acupuncture, Yu's scalp acupuncture and temporal three-needle are introduced and analyzed. Since the schools of scalp acupuncture are numerous and the bases of selection acupoints are complicated, it demands to determine the optimal needling acupoints by means of scientific research. Therefore, the selection acupoints would be adhering to scientific principles. The theoretical basis needs to be explored and studied further.

  12. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J; Solomon, L M; Lichter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of acupuncture on histamine-induced itch and flare in healthy volunteers (n = 25) and compared it with the effect of a pseudo-acupuncture procedure and of no-intervention in a single-blind randomized cross-over study. A cumulative itch index is defined and was found to be smaller with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.02) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.005). The duration of itching was shorter with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p = 0.006) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.001). In addition, maximal flare area was decreased with acupuncture compared with pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.04) and with no intervention (p = 0.003). Acupuncture had little or no effect on the itch onset time or on the maximal itch intensity after intradermal injection of histamine. Measurements of itching correlated poorly with measurements of flare size in all three experimental groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective inhibitor of histamine-induced itch and flare. Moreover, acupuncture points displayed specificity in that needling near-by, non-acupuncture sites resulted in greater itching and larger flares.

  13. [Discussion on needling sensation, arrival of qi and needling response (Deqi)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Hong-Du

    2012-12-01

    The current appointed teaching material of Science of Acupuncture and Moxibustion holds that there is no difference among the needling sensation, arrival of qi and needling response. However, the author has a different understanding. Therefore, Neijing (Internal Classic), its annotation, exposition and understandings of ancient and modern famous experts are cited to analyze their meanings. And the result indicates that the needling sensation is subjective feelings and perceived responses of doctors and patients. Arrival of qi is the healing process of the organ through activating the anti-pathogenic qi to expel the pathogens. The needling response is the final aim of acupuncture therapy. Thus, the meaning of needling sensation, arrival of qi, and needling response are different. And an accurate understanding can better guide acupuncture treatment.

  14. Acupuncture and facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John B

    2005-01-01

    In traditional Oriental medicine, facial rejuvenation is achieved by inserting acupuncture needles at different points along designated channels to attain tonification or sedation effects. According to the author, treatment benefits include elimination of some wrinkles and decrease in length and depth of others, decrease of facial edema, decrease of acne, improvement of facial muscle tone, improved skin texture with tighter pores, and decrease of sagging around the eyes, cheeks, chin, and neck.

  15. Acupuncture benefits a pregnant patient who has Bell's palsy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hong; Wang, Wei; Huang, Guangying

    2010-09-01

    Here we report the complete recovery from Bell's palsy (BP) of a 27-year-old woman, 27 weeks pregnant, after 2 weeks of acupuncture treatment. BP in pregnancy is an acute idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis of unknown etiology. Treatment and management have not been well evaluated or documented in the literature. The patient was exposed to wind and cold weather before the rapid onset of BP on December 26, 2008. She was treated with acupuncture without co-intervention. During the first week, needles were gently manipulated at local and distal acupoints to induce the qi sensation, and direct moxibustion with moxa sticks was performed at two points, Yangbai (GB14) and Dicang (ST4). During the second week, needles were manipulated without inducing the qi sensation, and moxibustion was performed as previously explained. To document progress, the patient was videotaped before, during, and after each treatment. Outcome assessments included the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading system (HBS), the Nottingham facial nerve grading system, and the Facial Disability Indexes (FDIP). Prior to treatment, her HBS was II, Nottingham was 50.88%, and FDIP was 90. After 2 weeks, her symptoms had disappeared, her face was restored to normal, HBS was I, Nottingham was 96.46%, and FDIP was 100. These results suggest that acupuncture may be a safe, alternative treatment for BP in pregnancy.

  16. [Emergency treatment of epilepsy with Yamamoto New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA) and body acupunctureacupuncture in emergency medicine: a case report].

    PubMed

    Schockert, Thomas; Dittmar, Frank; Gleditsch, Jochen M

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, acupuncture is used in conflict areas and increasingly also as a supportive measure in emergency medicine. In this case, the treatment of epilepsy, masseter cramp, unconsciousness and respiratory arrest by means of YNSA and body acupuncture with only 3 acupuncture needles is described. The 3 points used were YNSA basal ganglia point, Renzhong and Qiangu. After application of the needles, the epileptic fit stopped, the unconscious patient opened his mouth and started breathing spontaneously. In this case, acupuncture simplified the emergency procedure as a supportive treatment method and provided the patient with fast and safe relief.

  17. Vibrio Vulnificus Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kotton, Yael; Soboh, Soboh; Bisharat, Naiel

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe life-threatening infection of the deep subcutaneous tissues and fascia. Infection with Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacillus found worldwide in warm coastal waters, can lead to severe complications, particularly among patients with chronic liver diseases. We herein present an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by V. vulnificus triggered by acupuncture needle insertion. The patient, who suffered from diabetes mellitus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and worked at a fish hatchery, denied any injury prior to acupuncture. This is the first ever reported case of V. vulnificus infection triggered by acupuncture needle insertion, clearly emphasizing the potential hazards of the prolonged survival of V. vulnificus on the skin. The potential infectious complications of acupuncture needle insertion are discussed. PMID:26500738

  18. [Discussion on WANG Guo-rui's acupuncture academy thought].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi-Yan; Wang, Xin; Gao, Ling; Chen, Xin-Wang

    2013-12-01

    Through study on Bianque Shenying Zhenjiu Yulong Jing (Bianque's Classic of Effective Acupuncture Prescriptions), acupuncture experiences and ideology of WANG Guo-rui, an acupuncture physician of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), is discussed in this article. Inherited and carried forward DOU's acupuncture theory, WANG Guo-rui encouraged to use experiential points and to expand extra points. Penetrating needling method was created, and the application of acupoints according to needling opportunities and seasonal factors were enriched by him. Great importance was also attached on treatment according to differentiation of syndromes, which including the simultaneous acupuncture and moxibustion, simultaneous reinforcing and reducing, reducing after reinforcing, reinforcing after reducing, predomination of reducing and predomination of reinforcing. The flexible treating methods are still extensively adopted in clinic nowadays. WANG Guo-rui is a master of clinical acupuncture who made great contribution to the development of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  19. [Research on needle-acupointomics].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-Hua; Wei, Lian-Hai; Guo, Yi

    2012-03-01

    The concept of needle-acupointomics should be clarified initially in order to discuss the relative researches. The comprehension can be deepened through the aspects of researching methods, content and goals. Proper researching model and analysis method should be selected so as to bring the advantages of the ancient acupuncture literatures, case records and clinical experiences of famous physicians into full play. Only in this way can the domestic needle acupointomics studies achieve a breakthrough.

  20. Is acupuncture efficacious therapy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to assess the evidences from recent clinical studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease. Relevant literatures were searched from 13 databases under the condition "published between 2000 and 2012" with language restrictions. Eleven studies were indentified including 6 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 4 uncontrolled open label studies, and 1 crossover trial. The number of trials, and their total sample size were not enough to prove the favorable effects of acupuncture. Five studies failed to report proper diagnostic criteria for enrollment. Two of the 6 RCTs did not include the randomization methods and whether the assessors were blinded. Drop-outs were unreported or insufficiently reported in 2 trials. Three RCTs compared the effects of acupuncture with placebo acupuncture. Two of these trials failed to show superiority of acupuncture. One RCT showed beneficial effects of constitutional acupuncture, but not needle acupuncture. Three RCTs that assessed the effects of acupuncture adjunctive to conventional drugs reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. The placebo response to acupuncture was not excluded, because there was no control acupuncture group in these studies. Two uncontrolled studies showed significant positive effects of acupuncture, while other two uncontrolled trials failed. There were no recognized validated acupuncture treatment protocols and a lack of consensus on the location of acupoints. Safety and tolerability were reported only in 5 studies. No study evaluated the long-lasting effect of acupuncture following cessation of the treatment. To date, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating Parkinson's disease is not convincing. There are needs for further studies with improved methodological quality.

  1. [Influence of acupuncture of Zusanli (ST 36) on connectivity of brain functional network in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Li, Nuo; Wang, Pang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-le; Che, Yan-qiu; Jia, Chen-hui; Guo, Yi; Chao, Wang

    2011-08-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture of Zusanli (ST 36) on electroencephalogram (EEG) so as to probe into its law in regulating the interconnectivity of brain functional network. A total of 9 healthy young volunteer students (6 male, 3 female) participated in the present study. They were asked to take a dorsal position on a test-bed. EEG signals were acquired from 22 surface scalp electrodes (Fp1, Fp2, F7, F3, F2, F4, F8, A1, T3, C3, C2, C4, T4, A2, T5, P3, P2, P4, T6, O2, O1 and O2) fixed on the subject's head. Acupuncture stimulation was applied to the right Zusanli (ST 36) by manipulating the filiform needle with uniform reducing-reinforcing method and at a frequency of about 50 cycles/min for 2 min. Then the stimulation was stopped for 10 min, and repeated once again (needle-twirling frequency: 150 and 200 cycles/min), 3 times altogether. The acquired EEG data were analyzed by using coherence estimation method, average path length, average clustering coefficient, and the average degree of the articulation points (nodes) for analyzing the synchronization of EEG signals before, during and after acupuncture. In comparison with pre-acupuncture, the coherence amplitude values of EEG-delta (1-4 Hz) and y (31-47 Hz) waves were increased significantly after acupuncture of ST 36. No significant changes were found in the amplitude values of EEG-theta (5-8 Hz), -alpha (9-13 Hz) and-beta (14-30 Hz) waves after acupuncture stimulation. During and after acupuncture, the synchronism values of EEG-delta waves of different leads and numbers of interconnectivity between every two brain functional regions in majority of the 9 volunteers were increased clearly. In all volunteers, the degree values of all nodes except A1 and A2, the average clustering coefficients along with the increase of the threshold (r), and the average path lengths of the brain functional network of EEG-delta waves during and after acupuncture were also increased evidently (the latter two items, P < 0

  2. [Efficacy observation of acupuncture method of tonifying-qi and dredging-meridian for blepharospasm].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Ren

    2014-01-01

    To compare differences of therapeutic effect between acupuncture method of tonifying-qi and dredging-meridian and conventional acupuncture method. Seventy cases of blepharospasm were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 35 cases in each one. Cuanzhu (BL 2), Yuwei (Extra) through Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Xinming 1 (Extra), Sibai (ST 2) and Yintang (GV 29) were selected as main acupoints. The acupuncture method of tonifying-qi and dredging-meridian was applied in the observation group, which was an acupuncture manipulation that could achieve strong needling sensation of qi arrival combined with electric-impulse stimulation. The conventional acupuncture method was applied in the control group. The treatment was given once every other day, 10 times as a session for continuous three sessions in both groups. The severity of blepharospasm was compared before and after treatment in two groups and clinical therapeutic effect was assessed. Follow-up visit was performed after half a year to observe the recurrence rate. The cured and markedly effective rate was 77.1% (27/35) in the observation group, which was superior to 51.4% (18/35) in the control group (P < 0.05). Among cured and markedly effective patients in both groups, the recurrence rate was 20.0% (4/20) in the observation group, which was inferior to 54.5% (6/11) in the control group (P < 0.05) in the follow-up visit. The acupuncture method of tonifying-qi and dredging-meridian could effectively improve severity of blepharospasm, which has superior short-term and long-term effects to conventional acupuncture method.

  3. The status and future of acupuncture mechanism research.

    PubMed

    Napadow, Vitaly; Ahn, Andrew; Longhurst, John; Lao, Lixing; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Harris, Richard; Langevin, Helene M

    2008-09-01

    On November 8-9, 2007, the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR) hosted an international conference to mark the tenth anniversary of the landmark NIH [National Institutes of Health] Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture. More than 300 acupuncture researchers, practitioners, students, funding agency personnel, and health policy analysts from 20 countries attended the SAR meeting held at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. This paper summarizes important invited lectures in the area of basic and translational acupuncture research. Specific areas include the scientific assessment of acupuncture points and meridians, the neural mechanisms of cardiovascular regulation by acupuncture, mechanisms for electroacupuncture applied to persistent inflammation and pain, basic and translational research on acupuncture in gynecologic applications, the application of functional neuroimaging to acupuncture research with specific application to carpal-tunnel syndrome and fibromyalgia, and the association of the connective tissue system to acupuncture research. In summary, mechanistic models for acupuncture effects that have been investigated experimentally have focused on the effects of acupuncture needle stimulation on the nervous system, muscles, and connective tissue. These mechanistic models are not mutually exclusive. Iterative testing, expanding, and perhaps merging of such models will potentially lead to an incremental understanding of the effects of manual and electrical stimulation of acupuncture needles that is solidly rooted in physiology.

  4. Battlefield Acupuncture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    employed such as electrical and laser devices. For example, the author successfully used the "Battlefield Acupuncture " concept with the Laser Report...ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION BY MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE (SEPT 2007) COPYRIGHT Battlefield Acupuncture Richard C. Niemtzow, MD, PHD, MPH COLONEL, USAF, MC...FS INTRODUCTION 1 Battlefield acupuncture was developed by the author in 200 1 in the course of researching a more efficient auriculotherapy

  5. [Mr. Wang Le-ting: a master of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xue-Song; Wang, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Mr. WANG Le-ting attaches great importance to accurate differentiation of syndromes, strict selection of acupoints, technique and direction of needle insertion, clear reinforcing and reducing methods after the appearance of needling sensations, proper opportunities of manipulations as well as needle withdrawal techniques, and reasonable application of acupuncture and moxibustion respectively. The above mentioned principles are known as his "5 agreements". He emphasizes that the selection of acupoints should be "in accordance with both the meridians and the accurate location of the points", and "needling sensation is necessary for each point". He holds that the back-shu points of the five-zang organs and Geshu (BL 17) can be adopted for patient with deficiency of qi, blood, yin and yang. In the aspect of acupoint theory, he insists the accurate location of Xuanzhong (GB 39). He also adjusts the locations of Huatuo Jiaji (EX-B 2) points, and finds the location of the new Dubi (ST 35). For easier applications, he divides the functions of acupoints into different schools of qi, blood, cold, heat, deficiency, excess, wind and dampness. And 41 combinations of acupoints are also invented as innovation. He is always strict to his students, instructing and influencing them by his own words and deeds. He is always conscientious and meticulous, which benefit immensely his followers, and remains a lot of precious experiences for the later generations.

  6. Specifying the nonspecific components of acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially nonspecific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred one patients who developed pain of ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0 to 10) after third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients' perception of the treatment (active or placebo) and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed before and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P=.240), but there was a large and significant nonspecific effect of placebo acupuncture (P<.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P<.001), indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings after both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%). This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions, nonspecific factors such as patients' perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment. To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice, it may therefore be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Acupuncture master Xu Yi-nian and his Practical Acupuncture in the Republic of China].

    PubMed

    Li, Nai-qi; Liu, Xiao-bin

    2014-09-01

    By collecting and studying Practical Acupuncture written by XU Yi-nian, Guangdong acupuncture master in the Republic of China, and using literature methodology, the life story of XU Yi-nian is textually researched and his acupuncture characteristics is analyzed. The results indicate that XU Yi-nian emphasizes on the utility of acupuncture manipulations and acupoint selection, the application of folk experiences in moxibustion and Sha disorders. He pays attention to the co-work of acupuncture and medicine and his work collects the therapeutic experiences of different schools and deserves to be further explored and validated.

  8. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  9. Acupuncture in ancient China: how important was it really?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Although acupuncture theory is a fundamental part of the Huangdi Neijing, the clinical application of the needle therapy in ancient China was always a limited one. From early times there have been warnings that acupuncture might do harm. In books like Zhang Zhongjing's Shanghanlun it plays only a marginal role. Among the 400 emperors in Chinese history, acupuncture was hardly ever applied. After Xu Dachun called acupuncture a "lost tradition" in 1757, the abolition of acupuncture and moxibustion from the Imperial Medical Academy in 1822 was a radical, but consequent act. When traditional Chinese medicine was revived after 1954, the "New Acupuncture" was completely different from what it had been in ancient China. The conclusion, however, is a positive one: The best time acupuncture ever had was not the Song dynasty or Yuan dynasty, but is now - and the future of acupuncture does not lie in old scripts, but in ourselves.

  10. Abdominal acupuncture reduces laser-evoked potentials in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, C; Liguori, S; Minciotti, I; Testani, E; Tozzi, A E; Liguori, A; Petti, F; Padua, L; Valeriani, M

    2015-09-01

    Acupuncture is known to reduce clinical pain, although the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on laser-evoked potential amplitudes and laser pain perception. In order to evaluate whether abdominal acupuncture is able to modify pain perception, 10 healthy subjects underwent a protocol in which laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and laser pain perception were collected before the test (baseline), during abdominal acupuncture, and 15 min after needle removal. The same subjects also underwent a similar protocol in which, however, sham acupuncture without any needle penetration was used. During real acupuncture, both N1 and N2/P2 amplitudes were reduced, as compared to baseline (p<0.01). The reduction lasted up to 15 min after needle removal. Furthermore, laser pain perception was reduced during real acupuncture, although the difference was marginally significant (p=0.06). Our results show that abdominal acupuncture reduces LEP amplitude in healthy subjects. Our results provide a theoretical background for the use of abdominal acupuncture as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of pain conditions. Future studies will have to be conducted in clinical painful syndromes, in order to confirm the analgesic effect of acupuncture in patients suffering from pain. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of de qi on the immediate analgesic effect of SP6 acupuncture in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea and cold and dampness stagnation: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min-Yi; Zhang, Peng; Li, Jing; Wang, Lin-Peng; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yan-Xia; She, Yan-Fen; Ma, Liang-Xiao; Wang, Pei; Hu, Ni-Juan; Lin, Chi; Hu, Shang-Qin; Wu, Gui-Wen; Wang, Ya-Feng; Sun, Jun-Jun; Jiang, Si-Zhu; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-07-11

    The aim of this multicentre randomised controlled trial was to investigate the contribution of de qi to the immediate analgesic effect of acupuncture in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea and the specific traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis cold and dampness stagnation. Eighty-eight patients with primary dysmenorrhoea and cold and dampness stagnation were randomly assigned to de qi (n=43) or no de qi (n=45) groups and underwent 30 min of SP6 acupuncture. The de qi group received deep needling at SP6 with manipulation using thick needles; the no de qi group received shallow needling with no manipulation using thin needles. In both groups the pain scores and actual de qi sensation were evaluated using a visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-P) and the acupuncture de qi clinical assessment scale (ADCAS), respectively. Both groups showed reductions in VAS-P, with no signficant differences between groups. ADCAS scores showed 43/43 and 25/45 patients in de qi and no de qi groups, respectively, actually experienced de qi sensation. Independent of original group allocation, VAS-P reductions associated with actual de qi (n=68) were greater than those without (28.4±18.19 mm vs 14.6±12.28 mm, p=0.008). This study showed no significant difference in VAS-P scores in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea and cold and dampness stagnation immediately after SP6 acupuncture designed to induce or avoid de qi sensation. Both treatments significantly reduced VAS-P relative to baseline. Irrespective of group allocation, patients experiencing actual de qi sensation demonstrated larger reductions in pain score relative to those without, suggesting greater analgesic effects. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR-TRC-13003086); Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Acupuncture and insomnia].

    PubMed

    Montakab, H

    1999-02-01

    40 patients with primary difficulties in either falling asleep or remaining asleep were diagnosed according to the traditional Chinese medicine, allocated to specific diagnostic subgroups and treated individually by a practitioner in his private practice. The patients were randomized into two groups, one receiving true acupuncture, the other needled at non-acupuncture points for 3-5 sessions at weekly intervals. The outcome of the therapy was assessed in several ways, first and foremost by an objective measurement of the sleep quality by polysomnography in a specialized sleep laboratory, performed once before and once after termination of the series of treatments. Additional qualitative results were obtained from several questionnaires. The objective measurement showed a statistically significant effect only in the patients who received the true acupuncture. The subjective, qualitative assessment was better in the proper treatment group than in the control group but was not calculated statistically for methodological reasons. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that true and individualized acupuncture indeed shows efficacy in primary sleep disorders. However, a direct influence by the therapist cannot be excluded.

  13. Significance of "Deqi" response in acupuncture treatment: myth or reality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Benharash, Peyman

    2014-08-01

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China for over 2000 years to treat a variety of diseases based on the "meridian theory," as described in the "Yellow Emperor's Classics of Internal Medicine." Deqi refers to the excitation of qi or vital energy inside meridians by acupuncture needle stimulation. Patients often experience multidimensional and intense needling sensations such as numbness, soreness, distention, heaviness, dull pain, and sharp pain during acupuncture stimulation. Deqi is considered as an important parameter in the process of achieving therapeutic effectiveness in acupuncture treatment. Understanding this phenomenon from neurophysiological aspects is important for clinical practice and enables practitioners to perform quantitative acupuncture evaluation to obtain a reliable prognosis of acupuncture treatment. This review paper describes our current knowledge and understanding of Deqi from a physiological aspect. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Hugh; Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R; Davis, Robert T; Harris, Richard E; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies.

  15. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Davis, Robert T.; Harris, Richard E.; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M.; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M.; Wayne, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies. PMID:26745452

  16. [Clinical observation of Erlong Xizhu acupuncture for retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaodong; Han, Douying

    2015-07-01

    To explore the clinical effect of Erlong Xizhu acupuncture for retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Sixty patients with retinitis pigmentosa were randomly divided into an Erlong Xizhu acupuncture group and a conventional acupuncture group, 30 cases in each one. In the conventional acupuncture group, Tongziliao (GB 1), Sizhukong (TE 23), Taiyang (EX-HN 5) were acupunctured as the main acupoints by uniform reinforcing-reducing manipulation; acupoints based on syndrome differentiation were coordinated by acupuncture manipulation of reinforcing deficiency and reducing excess. The treatment in the Erlong Xizhu acupuncture group was the same as that in the conventional group, except acupuncture manipulation at the main acupoints replaced by Erlong Xizhu acupuncture. In the two groups, treatment was given once a day, 10 days as one session and there were 2 days at the interval between sessions. The change of the vision and visual field and the efficacy were observed after 3 sessions in the two groups. The total effective rate on enhancing the vision of patients in the Erlong Xizhu acupuncture group was 93. 10% (54/58), which was superior to 81. 36% (48/59) in the conventional acupuncture group (P<0. 01). And the effective rate on improving the visual field was 91. 38% (53/58) in the Erlong Xizhu acupuncture group, which was better than 83. 05% (49/59) in the conventional acupuncture group (P<0. 01). On the comprehensive effect, the effective rate was 90. 00% (27/30) in the Erlong Xizhu acupuncture group, which was better than 63. 34% (19/30) in the conventional acupuncture group (P<0. 05). The clinical effect of Erlong Xizhu acupuncture is superior to that of conventional acupuncture for retinitis pigmentosa and it is worthy of promoting.

  17. [Academic origin of round magnetic needle and standardization operation].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan-Ting; Zhang, Tian-Sheng; Meng, Li-Qiang; Shi, Rui-Qi; Ji, Lai-Xi

    2014-07-01

    The origin and development of round magnetic needle was explored, and the structure of round magnetic needle was introduced in detail, including the handle, the body and the tip of the needle. The clinical opera tion of round magnetic needle were standardized from the aspects of the methods of holding needle, manipulation skill, tapping position, strength of manipulation, application scope and matters needing attention, which laid foundation for the popularization and application of round magnetic needle.

  18. Acupuncture treatment for duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Debreceni, L; Denes, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acupuncture therapy for duodenal ulcer was investigated in 21 male and female patients. The diagnosis and healing were verified by gastroscopy. It was found that the needle therapy for 3 weeks led to complete recovery in 76 percent of the patients. Diet, alcohol and cigarette abstinency were necessary for healing. Cuti-visceral reflex activation eliciting the improvement of the secretory and motor function of the gastrointestinal tract and effects in the CNS leading to analgesia and tranquilization may play a role in the mechanism of action. Our conclusion is that acupuncture can be satisfactory method to cure duodenal ulcer.

  19. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Zhou, Muke; He, Li; Zhou, Dong; Li, N

    2010-08-04

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We updated the searches of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (24 May 2010), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2010), AMED (January 1985 to May 2010), LILACS (from January 1982 to May 2010) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to May 2010) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture by needle insertion in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search, extracted data and assessed quality of each trial independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. The literature search and handsearching identified 49 potentially relevant articles. Of these, six RCTs were included involving 537 participants with Bell's palsy. Two more possible trials were identified in the update than the previous version of this systematic review, but both were excluded because they were not real RCTs. Of the six included trials, five used acupuncture while the other one used

  20. Electro-acupuncture treatment of acute stage peripheral facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, X L; Fang, Q P

    1989-03-01

    The treatment of 100 cases of acute stage peripheral facial paralysis with electro-acupuncture has indicated that, with the stimulation intensity and time interval strictly controlled, electro-acupuncture is effective. Suitable wave forms and electric intensity, as well as proper needling techniques and controlled duration of the stimulation according to experimental experience have yielded high therapeutic effects without aggravation of symptoms.

  1. Acupuncture for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai; Wu, Hong Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling; Xu, Li; Yang, Ming; Liu, Guan J

    2016-08-26

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death in the world and in China it has now become the main cause of death. It is also a main cause of adult disability and dependency. Acupuncture for stroke has been used in China for hundreds of years and is increasingly practiced in some Western countries. This is an update of the Cochrane review originally published in 2006 . To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy in people with subacute and chronic stroke. We intended to test the following hypotheses: 1) acupuncture can reduce the risk of death or dependency in people with subacute and chronic stroke at the end of treatment and at follow-up; 2) acupuncture can improve neurological deficit and quality of life after treatment and at the end of follow-up; 3) acupuncture can reduce the number of people requiring institutional care; and 4) acupuncture is not associated with any intolerable adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1966 to July 2015, Ovid), EMBASE (1980 to July 2015, Ovid), CINAHL (1982 to July 2015, EBSCO), and AMED (1985 to July 2015, Ovid). We also searched the following four Chinese medical databases: China Biological Medicine Database (July 2015); Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (July 2015); China National Infrastructure (July 2015), and Wan Fang database (July 2015). Truly randomised unconfounded clinical trials among people with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, in the subacute or chronic stage, comparing acupuncture involving needling with placebo acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or no acupuncture. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed quality, extracted and cross-checked the data. We included 31 trials with a total of 2257 participants in the subacute or chronic stages of stroke. The methodological quality of most of the included trials

  2. Neural Acupuncture Unit: A New Concept for Interpreting Effects and Mechanisms of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Wang, Xiao-Min; McAlonan, Grainne M.

    2012-01-01

    When an acupuncture needle is inserted into a designated point on the body and mechanical or electrical stimulation is delivered, various neural and neuroactive components are activated. The collection of the activated neural and neuroactive components distributed in the skin, muscle, and connective tissues surrounding the inserted needle is defined as a neural acupuncture unit (NAU). The traditionally defined acupoints represent an anatomical landmark system that indicates local sites where NAUs may contain relatively dense and concentrated neural and neuroactive components, upon which acupuncture stimulation would elicit a more efficient therapeutic response. The NAU-based local mechanisms of biochemical and biophysical reactions play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia. Different properties of NAUs are associated with different components of needling sensation. There exist several central pathways to convey NAU-induced acupuncture signals, Electroacupuncture (EA) frequency-specific neurochemical effects are related to different peripheral and central pathways transmitting afferent signals from different frequency of NAU stimulation. More widespread and intense neuroimaging responses of brain regions to acupuncture may be a consequence of more efficient NAU stimulation modes. The introduction of the conception of NAU provides a new theoretical approach to interpreting effects and mechanisms of acupuncture in modern biomedical knowledge framework. PMID:22474503

  3. Why acupuncture in pain treatment?

    PubMed

    Ondrejkovicova, Alena; Petrovics, Gabriel; Svitkova, Katarína; Bajtekova, Bibiana; Bangha, Ondrej

    2016-07-01

    Acupuncture is one of the branches of Chinese Traditional Medicine dating back almost 5 000 years. The expansion of China's trade and business relations with other Asian countries brought about the spreading of acupuncture in 7th Century. Nowadays, acupuncture is an interdisciplinary clinical field of Medicine dealing with treatment, diagnostics and prevention of mainly functional disorders, algic, allergic and addictive conditions of various etiology, localization and intensity. It draws from the millennia of experience of Oriental Medicine as well as contemporary knowledge of morphology, physiology and neurophysiology. The acupuncture method is based on influencing the body functions in a precise way by controlled irritation of particular active meridian points using special needles, heat (moxibustion), pressure (acupressure), underpressure (cupping), electricity (electroacupuncture), light (laser therapy), ultrasound (sonopuncture), static or pulsating electromagnetic field (magnetic therapy) and solutions (pharmacopuncture).The use of acupuncture as a method of pain relief in Modern Western Medicine is based on a wide range of clinical trials, and there is no doubt that it has significant effect in the treatment of acute and chronic pain classification. The introduction of gate-control theory and endogenous opioids facilitated the recognition of acupuncture in pain treatment.

  4. Acupuncture for Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xue; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiao T.; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Victor; Zimmerman-Bier, Barbie

    2012-01-01

    Background. There has been lack of reviews of evidence on efficacy, methodology, and/or safety of acupuncture in autism spectrum disorders. This paper examines the emerging evidence of the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of autistic children. Method. A literature review was completed via Medline and three Chinese search engines. A total of 31 studies were evaluated for acupuncture methodology, study design, treatment effects, and tolerability. Results. The acupoints used, the duration of needling, the frequency of treatment, the choice of stimulation, and the course of the treatment were highly variable amongst the studies. Behavioral and/or developmental improvements were reported in all acupuncture treatment studies. All studies reported general tolerability. Weakness of experimental designs was discussed. Conclusions. Vigorously controlled double-blinded clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in children with autism spectrum disorders. PMID:22203876

  5. Contra-lateral needling in the treatment of hemiplegia due to acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huanmin; Gao, Xia; Liang, Guixia; Ma, Ben-Xu

    2012-01-01

    Contra-lateral Needling, a traditional acupuncture technique, means contra-lateral acupuncture by inserting needles into acupoints on the relative healthy side of the body opposite to the injured side to treat diseases such as apoplexy with high efficacy. However, there are not many well-designed and controlled clinical evidences found in the literature. Therefore the present study was designed to assess its therapeutic responses in the treatment of hemiplegia due to acute ischemic stroke. A clinical study was conducted with randomly selected 106 patients who have acute ischemic stroke confirmed by MRI. The subjects were assigned into 3 groups: 45 in the contra-lateral needling group received acupuncture on the unaffected limbs; 45 in the conventional acupuncture group received acupuncture on the hemiplegic limbs; and 16 in the non-acupuncture group received the similar medical and nursing care as subjects in other two groups but no acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture was given daily for 45 minutes for 30 days. The clinical therapeutic responses rate, Neurological Deficits Score (NDS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and Fugl-Meger Assertion (FMA) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of 30 days treatment. The therapeutic response rate of the contra-lateral needling group was 46.67%, while 31.11% in the conventional acupuncture group, and 18.75% in the non-acupuncture group. The NDS of Contra-lateral needling group decreased more significantly than that of the conventional acupuncture group (p < 0.01). The study also found that the MBI and FMA of Contra-lateral needling group increased more significantly than those of the conventional acupuncture group (p < 0.01, respectively). Contra-lateral needling might be more effective than the conventional acupuncture in the treatment of hemiplegia due to acute ischemic stroke in terms of increasing the recovery of neurological functions, promoting ADL (activities for daily living) rehabilitation and the limbs motor function.

  6. NADA protocol: integrative acupuncture in addictions.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kenneth; Olshan-Perlmutter, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) acupuncture is a simple, standardized, 1- to 5-point auricular needling protocol that originated as a grass-roots response to the opiate epidemic of the 1970s. NADA acupuncture is increasingly recognized as a universally useful intervention in the treatment of addictions specifically and in behavior health more generally. It is recognized as a best practice in the treatment of substance use disorders. Integrative programs using the NADA protocol are likely to see improvements in engagement, retention, decreased drug cravings, anxiety, and less physical symptoms.

  7. The role of touch in acupuncture treatment.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Olausson, Håkan

    2017-02-01

    Acupuncture is a therapeutic treatment that is characterised by the insertion of a needle at a particular location on the body. Acupuncture stimulation includes sensory-discriminative and affective-social touch dimensions. In this review, we discuss the role of touch during acupuncture stimulation with an emphasis on the therapeutic, sensory-discriminative and affective-social aspects. In the discriminative dimension, de qi, which is associated with needling, includes a combination of various sensations, such as heaviness, numbness, soreness and distension. Achieving the appropriate de qi sensation appears to be fundamental to the therapeutic outcome following acupuncture treatment. In the affective dimension, the acupuncture procedure typically includes gentle manual touch stimulation, which induces feelings of calm and well-being, perhaps by activating C tactile fibres. Enhanced activity of C tactile afferents may induce a 'limbic touch' response, resulting in emotional and hormonal reactions. Because acupuncture is a 'therapist intensive' and complex intervention, it is necessary to understand the role of social touch between the practitioner and patient. Both sensory-discriminative and affective-social touch aspects play an important role in the therapeutic effect of acupuncture treatment in clinical practice.

  8. Acupuncture modulates facial warm sensory thresholds.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Zaidan, Shadya; Eliav, Eli

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effects of four- and six-point acupuncture on facial sensory detection thresholds to thermal and electrical stimuli. Ten healthy volunteers underwent four-point acupuncture at ST6 and LI4 bilaterally for 15 minutes. A further 10 subjects underwent six-point acupuncture by adding needling at ST2 bilaterally. Sensory testing to thermal and electrical stimuli applied to mental and infraorbital nerve dermatomes was performed at baseline, 10 minutes, 1 hour, and 1 day after needling. In the mental and infraorbital nerve dermatomes, six-point acupuncture significantly increased warm threshold by a peak mean of 1.1°C to 1.4°C (repeated measures ANOVA P = .001) and this effect was significant at all time points relative to baseline (P < .05). No significant effects were observed by the four-point acupuncture on warm thresholds, and neither four- nor six-point acupuncture significantly altered electrical detection thresholds. A dose effect, related to the number of points employed, may be present when employing acupuncture.

  9. [Relationship between regional mast cell activity and peripheral nerve discharges during manual acupuncture stimulation of "Zusanli" (ST 36)].

    PubMed

    Sa, Zhe-Yan; Huang, Meng; Zhang, Di; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2013-04-01

    To observe changes of discharges of the sciatic nerve branch and mast cell activities and collagen fibers in the acupoint area during manual acupuncture stimulation of "Zusanli"(ST 36), so as to reveal the relationship between peripheral nerve and mast cell activities. A total of 30 male SD rats were divided into normal, acupuncture control (an acupuncture neidle was inserted into ST 36 without manipulation), manual acupuncture (MA), disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, suppressing mast cell activity) plus acupuncture (MA + DSCG) and col lagenase (dissolving the collagen fibers) plus acupuncture (MA+ collagenase) groups (6 rats/group). After dissection of a branch of the sciatic nerve innervating ST 36 region in the left hind-limb under anesthesia, the ipsilateral ST 36 was stimulated by manipulating the acupuncture needle for 20 min. Discharges of the sciatic nerve branch were recorded by using a pair of metal electrodes and data acquisition system (Power Lab). Skin and muscle tissues of ST 36 area were sampled, sliced and stained with Toluidine Blue for detecting the number of degranulated mast cells. Compared with the control group, the mean power spectrum of d ischarges of the sciatic nerve and the mean rates of the degranulated mast cells in "Zusanli" (ST 36) area in the MA group were significantly increased (P<0.01). Whereas the mean power spectrum of discharges of the sciatic nerve and the mean degranulation rates of mast cells were considerably lower in the MA + DSCG group and MA+ collagenase group than in the MA group (P<0.01). No significant differences were found between the normal and control groups, and between the MA+NDSCG and MA+collagenase groups in the mean power density and degranulation rates of mast cells (P>0.05). Manual acupuncture stimulation of Zuai"ST 36 can significantly potentiate the discharge activity of the sciatic nerve and induce degranulation of mast cells at the same time, suggesting an involvement of mast cells in initiating acupuncture

  10. [Effects of electroacupuncture and simple acupuncture on changes of IL-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in peripheral blood and joint fluid in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ba-Si; Che, Jian-Li; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yin; Li, Jun; Yang, Hai-Zhou; Hu, Tian-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Jian; Yang, Man

    2010-10-01

    To explore the mechanism of electroacupuncture on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a randomized and controlled trial, sixty-three cases with RA were randomly divided into an electroacupuncture group (n = 32) and a simple acupuncture group (n = 31). Baihui (GV 20), Fengchi (GB 20), Quchi (LI 11), Waiguan (TE 5), Guanyuan (CV 4) and Zusanli (ST 36) were selected by coordination method combined whole and local acupoints. The electroacupuncture group was treated with electroacupuncture at the local acupoints near painful joints, continuous wave, retaining needle for 30 minutes, and then electroacupuncture at Back-shu acupoints, retaining needle for 15 minutes, and the simple acupuncture group was treated with the same acupoints selection and acupuncture manipulation without electroacupuncture apparatus. They were all treated once every other day for 20 days as one course. After 3 courses, changes of interleukins in peripheral blood and joint fluid of patients were observed. Both of electroacupuncture and simple acupuncture had significant effect on IL-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in peripheral blood and joint fluid of patients with RA ( P < 0.01, P < 0.05). But after electroacupuncture, the absolute value and improvement value of decreasing IL-1 in peripheral blood and joint fluid were super than those of simple acupuncture (all P < 0.05), and of IL-4 in joint fluid was super than that after simple acupuncture (P < 0.05), and of IL-6 and the absolute value of decreasing IL-10 were almost the same after both treatment (all P > 0.05), and after electroacupuncture, the improvement value of IL-10 in peripheral blood and joint fluid were super than those after simple acupuncture (both P < 0.05). Electroacupuncture can effectively decrease the proinflammatory cytokine of IL-1 and IL-6 and increase the inhibition cytokine of IL-4 and IL-10 and improve the internal environment of occurrence and progression of RA.

  11. “I Felt Like It Was God's Hands Putting the Needles In”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Acupuncture for Chronic Pain in a Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse, and Medically Underserved Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Buonora, Michele; Gabison, Jonathan; Jacobs, Emilie; Karasz, Alison; McKee, M. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To examine the experience of patients from a low-income, ethnically diverse medically underserved population receiving acupuncture for chronic pain. Design: Qualitative analysis using inductive thematic analysis of interviews with participants from an acupuncture trial. Settings/Location: Four community health centers in the Bronx, New York. Participants: Thirty-seven adults with chronic neck or back pain or osteoarthritis who participated in a previous acupuncture trial. Interventions: Up to 14 weekly acupuncture treatments. Outcome measures: Pain and quality of life were examined in the original trial; this study examines qualitative outcomes. Results: The themes grouped naturally into three domains of the acupuncture experience: the decision-making process, the treatment experience, and the effect of acupuncture on health. Regarding decision-making, important factors were a willingness to try something new even if you do not necessary “believe” in it or have specifically positive expectations; a sense that medications were not working for their pain, that they also caused significant adverse effects, and that natural strategies might be preferable; and a feeling of desperation. Cost and access were significant barriers to acupuncture treatment. Regarding the process of acupuncture, the open and personal communication with the acupuncturist was an important factor, as were the sense that the process of acupuncture related to a natural process of healing or correction within the body and that part of making acupuncture successful required being open to the power of the mind to generate a positive outcome. Regarding the effect of treatment, notable aspects were the deep sense of rest and relaxation participants reported during treatment as well as the benefit they experienced for conditions other than pain. Conclusions: The themes that emerged in this ethnically diverse, low-income population were very similar to those that have emerged

  12. "I Felt Like It Was God's Hands Putting the Needles In": A Qualitative Analysis of the Experience of Acupuncture for Chronic Pain in a Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse, and Medically Underserved Patient Population.

    PubMed

    Kligler, Benjamin; Buonora, Michele; Gabison, Jonathan; Jacobs, Emilie; Karasz, Alison; McKee, M Diane

    2015-11-01

    To examine the experience of patients from a low-income, ethnically diverse medically underserved population receiving acupuncture for chronic pain. Qualitative analysis using inductive thematic analysis of interviews with participants from an acupuncture trial. Four community health centers in the Bronx, New York. Thirty-seven adults with chronic neck or back pain or osteoarthritis who participated in a previous acupuncture trial. Up to 14 weekly acupuncture treatments. Pain and quality of life were examined in the original trial; this study examines qualitative outcomes. The themes grouped naturally into three domains of the acupuncture experience: the decision-making process, the treatment experience, and the effect of acupuncture on health. Regarding decision-making, important factors were a willingness to try something new even if you do not necessarily "believe" in it or have specifically positive expectations; a sense that medications were not working for their pain, that they also caused significant adverse effects, and that natural strategies might be preferable; and a feeling of desperation. Cost and access were significant barriers to acupuncture treatment. Regarding the process of acupuncture, the open and personal communication with the acupuncturist was an important factor, as were the sense that the process of acupuncture related to a natural process of healing or correction within the body and that part of making acupuncture successful required being open to the power of the mind to generate a positive outcome. Regarding the effect of treatment, notable aspects were the deep sense of rest and relaxation participants reported during treatment as well as the benefit they experienced for conditions other than pain. The themes that emerged in this ethnically diverse, low-income population were very similar to those that have emerged over the past decade of qualitative research on the acupuncture experience in other patient populations.

  13. The integrated response of the human cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems to acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 as evidenced by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kathleen K S; Liu, Jing; Marina, Ovidiu; Napadow, Vitaly; Haselgrove, Christian; Kwong, Kenneth K; Kennedy, David N; Makris, Nikos

    2005-09-01

    Clinical and experimental data indicate that most acupuncture clinical results are mediated by the central nervous system, but the specific effects of acupuncture on the human brain remain unclear. Even less is known about its effects on the cerebellum. This fMRI study demonstrated that manual acupuncture at ST 36 (Stomach 36, Zusanli), a main acupoint on the leg, modulated neural activity at multiple levels of the cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems. The pattern of hemodynamic response depended on the psychophysical response to needle manipulation. Acupuncture stimulation typically elicited a composite of sensations termed deqi that is related to clinical efficacy according to traditional Chinese medicine. The limbic and paralimbic structures of cortical and subcortical regions in the telencephalon, diencephalon, brainstem and cerebellum demonstrated a concerted attenuation of signal intensity when the subjects experienced deqi. When deqi was mixed with sharp pain, the hemodynamic response was mixed, showing a predominance of signal increases instead. Tactile stimulation as control also elicited a predominance of signal increase in a subset of these regions. The study provides preliminary evidence for an integrated response of the human cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems to acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 that correlates with the psychophysical response.

  14. Acupuncture for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junfei; Wang, Xuehui; Li, Xing; Zhao, Dejun; Xu, Jinquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been suggested to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in COPD. Therefore, this multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treating patients with COPD. Methods: This is a two-arm, parallel group, multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation, and participants, assessor, and analyst blinding. Seventy-two participants with COPD were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients received either real or sham needling at the same acupoints 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was dyspnea on exertion evaluated using the 6-minute walk test. In addition, health-related quality of life was also evaluated. Measurements were obtained at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results: Six-minute walking distance measurements and health-related quality of life were significantly better in the real acupuncture group than that in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion: The findings suggest that acupuncture can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce dyspnea in patients with COPD. PMID:27749542

  15. Yes, There Is Deqi Sensation in Laser Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Deqi, a composite of unique sensations, is essential for clinical efficacy according to Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is described as a sensory perception of varying character and is mostly ascribed to metal needle acupuncture. However, it can also be elicited by different kinds of laser acupuncture stimulation. This short paper summarizes the current scientific status of deqi in laser stimulation. Different kinds of laser acupuncture are described in a comprehensive form, and the most interesting studies concerning deqi and laser acupuncture are presented. PMID:23533464

  16. [Spirit, pivot and the way for holding pivot in acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Lian-shi

    2008-04-01

    To probe into the relation between spirit, pivot and the way for holding pivot. Find out the discussion about spirit, pivot and holding pivot in acupuncture from ancient books, including literature, history and philosophy, and analyze, check and compare with the theory of controlling spirit in acupuncture, and find out the internal relations. Controlling spirit is applied to hold pivot, the way for holding pivot includes finding fine evidence of diseases, holding chance for needling, seizing opportunity, using circumstances and considering the coming-and-going of evil, constitution of patients and reinforcing-reducing methods of acupuncture. The way of holding pivot generalizes the main thought of acupuncture treatment.

  17. Acupuncture for dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Armour, Mike; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Li, Xun; Lu, Zhi Yong; Song, Jing

    2016-04-18

    Primary dysmenorrhoea is the most common form of period pain and affects up to three-quarters of women at some stage of their reproductive life. Primary dysmenorrhoea is pain in the absence of any organic cause and is characterised by cramping pain in the lower abdomen, starting within the first eight to 72 hours of menstruation.This review examines the currently available evidence supporting the use of acupuncture (stimulation of points on the body using needles) and acupressure (stimulation of points on the body using pressure) to treat primary dysmenorrhoea. To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture and acupressure in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea when compared with a placebo, no treatment, or conventional medical treatment. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (to September 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Chinese databases including Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP database and registers of ongoing trials. We included all published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or placebo control, usual care, pharmacological treatment or no treatment. We included the following modes of treatment: acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, and acupressure. Participants were women of reproductive age with primary dysmenorrhoea during the majority of the menstrual cycles or for three consecutive menstrual cycles, and moderate to severe symptoms. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We pooled the data where appropriate. Our primary outcomes was pain. Secondary outcomes included menstrual symptoms, quality of life, and adverse

  18. [Effect of acupuncture on dysphagia of convalescent stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yue; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Wei

    2011-06-01

    To discuss the therapeutic effect on dysphagia of the convalescent stroke by combination of the body acupuncture, the scalp acupuncture and the electric acupuncture could be better than that by routine rehabilitation training. 148 patients with dysphagia of convalescent stroke were randomly assigned to the acupuncture group and rehabilitation group, 74 in each group. Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), Yifeng (SJ17), Lian-quan (RN23), Jinjin (EX-HN12), Yuye (EX-HN12) on the affected side were needled, and the scalp acupuncture was needled. The body acupuncture, the electric acupuncture, and the scalp acupuncture were applied in combination in the acupuncture group. The acupuncture was performed once a day, five times as one therapeutic course, 2 -4 courses totally. Rehabilitation training was performed by language therapists in the control group. The main outcomes were assessed with both intention-to-treat analysis and on-treatment/per-protocol analysis at the same time. The value of number needed to treat (NNT)/number needed to harm (NNH) and their 95% confidence intervals were also reported. The secondary outcomes were assessed by the end of the treatment. The recovery rate assessed by Watian swallowing ability, water drinking test in the acupuncture group were better than those of the control group by the end of the treatment and three months after treatment (P<0.05). There was no statistical significance in the pulmonary infection rate and the mortality or in the 6-month mortality after treatment by the end of the treatment between the two groups (P>0.05). The compliance was 100% in the two groups. No adverse reaction occurred in the acupuncture group. Acupuncture for dysphagia of convalescent stroke was better than routine rehabilitation training with safety and high tolerance.

  19. [Brief on the standardization of the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonghui

    2015-07-01

    To discuss the standardization of the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation. Based on the relevant discussion on 'way to holding needle' recorded in Lingshu (Miraculous Pivot) and in association with the clinical acupuncture practice, it was required to standardize the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation in reference to Lingshu (Miraculous Pivot). The standard standing posture of the practitioner is the precondition of acupuncture operation; the standard holding needle with the puncture hand is the key to the exercise of acupuncture technique and the regular standing orientation is the need of acupuncture operation. The three aspects are complemented each other, which is the coordinative procedure in acupuncture operation and enable the practitioner's high concentration with the body, qi and mind involved.

  20. The Biological Safety of Stainless Steel Needles Used in Warm-needling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sabina; Lee, Seunghun; Yi, Seung-Ho; Son, Yang-Sun; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Young-Kon

    2010-06-01

    Warm-needling (also called thermo-acupuncture) is a combination of acupuncture and moxibustion. Due to the intense heat involved, there have been concerns over the biological safety of the acuneedles used in the treatment. This paper reports two phases of a safety test. For a preliminary test, we compared the temperature change patterns of stainless steel (SS304) needles and traditional gold alloy needles, which have been increasingly replaced by the former. To verify the effects of the presence of coating materials, the main test involved three different kinds of SS304: silicone-coated, salicylic acid-coated and non-coated needles. Each group of needles was tested for pH level, heavy metals and UV absorbance spectrum along with biological tests on the cytotoxicity and hemolysis of the needle. All the tests on the extractants from the needles were negative. In the biological tests, each test result showed a significant difference from the positive control samples, while no significant difference was observed compared with the negative control samples. In the hemolysis tests, all samples satisfied the Korean Government Standards. All the results suggest that SS304 needles are biologically safe to be used in warm-needling, though they can be improved to perform as well as the gold alloy needles in terms of temperature fluctuations.

  1. [Quality control of the research on mechanisms of acupuncture therapy by using PET-CT imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mai-lan; Lan, Lei; Zeng, Fang; Li, Xue-zhi; Liu, Xu-guang; Liang, Fan-rong

    2010-02-01

    Combining the functional metabolic imaging and anatomical imaging, PET-CT stands for the highest level of current nuclear medical imaging techniques, and has been applying increasingly in acupuncture studies. However, owning to complexity of the brain function and sensitivity of brain metabolism, the lower reproducibility of cerebral function imaging even may reverse many results. This has been provoked more and more attention by researchers. Its main cause is intimately related to poor experimental methodology. For this reason, the present paper raises the quality control of the research on mechanisms of acupuncture in the process of application of PET-CT techniques from (1) the included standards of participants, (2) the preparation of participants during the scanning process of PET-CT, (3) the setting of the scanning parameters, (4) the used machine and the imaging reagent, (5) the analysis of dada, (6) the standardization of acupuncture manipulation, and (7) the designs of the acupuncture operation, needling opportunity and scanning opportunity, hoping to offer some beneficial information for the coming researches.

  2. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    PubMed

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se.

  3. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  4. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2013-05-31

    the standard therapy group; treatment reduced pain by 3 points (95% CI -3.9 to -2.1), an absolute reduction of 30% (21% to 39%). Two people treated with acupuncture reported adverse events; there were none in the control group (RR 3.57; 95% CI 0.18 to 71.21). Global well-being, sleep, fatigue and stiffness were not reported. Physical function data were not usable.Low quality evidence from one study (38 participants) showed a short-term benefit of acupuncture over antidepressants in pain relief: mean pain was 29 points (0 to 100 point scale) in the antidepressant group; acupuncture reduced pain by 17 points (95% CI -24.1 to -10.5). Other outcomes or adverse events were not reported.Moderate-quality evidence from one study (41 participants) indicated that deep needling with or without deqi did not differ in pain, fatigue, function or adverse events. Other outcomes were not reported.Four studies reported no differences between acupuncture and control or other treatments described at six to seven months follow-up.No serious adverse events were reported, but there were insufficient adverse events to be certain of the risks. There is low to moderate-level evidence that compared with no treatment and standard therapy, acupuncture improves pain and stiffness in people with fibromyalgia. There is moderate-level evidence that the effect of acupuncture does not differ from sham acupuncture in reducing pain or fatigue, or improving sleep or global well-being. EA is probably better than MA for pain and stiffness reduction and improvement of global well-being, sleep and fatigue. The effect lasts up to one month, but is not maintained at six months follow-up. MA probably does not improve pain or physical functioning. Acupuncture appears safe. People with fibromyalgia may consider using EA alone or with exercise and medication. The small sample size, scarcity of studies for each comparison, lack of an ideal sham acupuncture weaken the level of evidence and its clinical implications

  5. Ten Years Evidence-based High-Tech Acupuncture--A Short Review of Peripherally Measured Effects.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2009-06-01

    Since 1997, the Research Unit of Biomedical Engineering in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine of Graz Medical University has been dealing with the demystification of acupuncture and examining, using non-invasive methods, how different stimulation modalities (manual needle acupuncture, laserneedle acupuncture and electro acupuncture) affect peripheral and central functions. Laser is also an important instrument for acupuncture. One only needs to mention the treatment of children or of patients with needle phobia. The laserneedle acupuncture, which was examined scientifically for the first time in Graz, represents a new painless acupuncture method for which up to ten laserneedles are glued to the skin, but not stuck into it. This first part of the short review article summarizes some of the peripherally measured effects of acupuncture obtained at the Medical University of Graz within the last 10 years.

  6. Can Acupuncture Treatment Be Double-Blinded? An Evaluation of Double-Blind Acupuncture Treatment of Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Takayama, Miho; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Kawase, Akiko; Schuster, Lars; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Blinding protects against bias but the success of blinding is seldom assessed and reported in clinical trials including studies of acupuncture where blinding represents a major challenge. Recently, needles with the potential for double-blinding were developed, so we tested if acupuncture can be double-blinded in a randomized study of sixty-seven patients with acute pain ≥ 3 (0-10 scale following third molar removal) who received active acupuncture with a penetrating needle or placebo acupuncture with a non-penetrating needle. To test if acupuncture was administered double-blind, patients and acupuncturists were asked about perceived treatment allocation at the end of the study. To test if there were clues which led to identification of the treatment, deep dull pain associated with needle application and rotation (termed “de qi” in East Asian medicine), and patients’ pain levels were assessed. Perceived treatment allocation depended on actual group allocation (p < 0.015) for both patients and acupuncturists, indicating that the needles were not successful in double-blinding. Up to 68% of patients and 83% of acupuncturists correctly identified the treatment, but for patients the distribution was not far from 50/50. Also, there was a significant interaction between actual or perceived treatment and the experience of de qi (p = 0.027), suggesting that the experience of de qi and possible non-verbal clues contributed to correct identification of the treatment. Yet, of the patients who perceived the treatment as active or placebo, 50% and 23%, respectively, reported de qi. Patients’ acute pain levels did not influence the perceived treatment. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment was not fully double-blinded which is similar to observations in pharmacological studies. Still, the non-penetrating needle is the only needle that allows some degree of practitioner blinding. The study raises questions about alternatives to double-blind randomized clinical trials in

  7. Acupuncture (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in study design and size. Studies using strict scientific methods are needed to prove how acupuncture affects pain. ... CAM Therapies It is important that the same scientific methods used to test conventional therapies are used to ...

  8. Dry needling - peripheral and central considerations.

    PubMed

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Dry needling is a common treatment technique in orthopedic manual physical therapy. Although various dry needling approaches exist, the more common and best supported approach targets myofascial trigger points. This article aims to place trigger point dry needling within the context of pain sciences. From a pain science perspective, trigger points are constant sources of peripheral nociceptive input leading to peripheral and central sensitization. Dry needling cannot only reverse some aspects of central sensitization, it reduces local and referred pain, improves range of motion and muscle activation pattern, and alters the chemical environment of trigger points. Trigger point dry needling should be based on a thorough understanding of the scientific background of trigger points, the differences and similarities between active and latent trigger points, motor adaptation, and central sensitize application. Several outcome studies are included, as well as comments on dry needling and acupuncture.

  9. Dry needling — peripheral and central considerations

    PubMed Central

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Dry needling is a common treatment technique in orthopedic manual physical therapy. Although various dry needling approaches exist, the more common and best supported approach targets myofascial trigger points. This article aims to place trigger point dry needling within the context of pain sciences. From a pain science perspective, trigger points are constant sources of peripheral nociceptive input leading to peripheral and central sensitization. Dry needling cannot only reverse some aspects of central sensitization, it reduces local and referred pain, improves range of motion and muscle activation pattern, and alters the chemical environment of trigger points. Trigger point dry needling should be based on a thorough understanding of the scientific background of trigger points, the differences and similarities between active and latent trigger points, motor adaptation, and central sensitize application. Several outcome studies are included, as well as comments on dry needling and acupuncture. PMID:23115475

  10. Treating primary dysmenorrhoea with acupuncture: a narrative review of the relationship between acupuncture 'dose' and menstrual pain outcomes.

    PubMed

    Armour, Mike; Smith, Caroline A

    2016-12-01

    A number of randomised controlled trials have been performed to determine the effectiveness or efficacy of acupuncture in primary dysmenorrhoea. The objective of this review was to explore the relationship between the 'dose' of the acupuncture intervention and menstrual pain outcomes. Eight databases were systematically searched for trials examining penetrating body acupuncture for primary dysmenorrhoea published in English up to September 2015. Dose components for each trial were extracted, assessed by the two authors and categorised by neurophysiological dose (number of needles, retention time and mode of stimulation), cumulative dose (total number and frequency of treatments), needle location and treatment timing. Eleven trials were included. Components of acupuncture dose were well reported across all trials. The relationship between needle location and menstrual pain demonstrated conflicting results. Treatment before the menses appeared to produce greater reductions in pain than treatment starting at the onset of menses. A single needle during menses may provide greater pain reduction compared to multiple needles. Conversely, multiple needles before menses were superior to a single needle. Electroacupuncture may provide more rapid pain reduction compared to manual acupuncture but may not have a significantly different effect on overall menstrual pain. There appear to be relationships between treatment timing and mode of needle stimulation, and menstrual pain outcomes. Needle location, number of needles used and frequency of treatment show clear dose-response relationships with menstrual pain outcomes. Current research is insufficient to make definitive clinical recommendations regarding optimum dose parameters for treating primary dysmenorrhoea. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Deare, John C; Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie CL; Liu, Jian Ping; Shang, Jingsheng; Scott, Sean W; Littlejohn, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    ), adjunct acupuncture therapy reduced pain at one month after treatment: mean pain was 8 points on a 0 to 10 point scale in the standard therapy group; treatment reduced pain by 3 points (95% CI −3.9 to −2.1), an absolute reduction of 30% (21% to 39%). Two people treated with acupuncture reported adverse events; there were none in the control group (RR 3.57; 95% CI 0.18 to 71.21). Global well-being, sleep, fatigue and stiffness were not reported. Physical function data were not usable. Low quality evidence from one study (38 participants) showed a short-term benefit of acupuncture over antidepressants in pain relief: mean pain was 29 points (0 to 100 point scale) in the antidepressant group; acupuncture reduced pain by 17 points (95% CI −24.1 to −10.5). Other outcomes or adverse events were not reported. Moderate-quality evidence from one study (41 participants) indicated that deep needling with or without deqi did not differ in pain, fatigue, function or adverse events. Other outcomes were not reported. Four studies reported no differences between acupuncture and control or other treatments described at six to seven months follow-up. No serious adverse events were reported, but there were insufficient adverse events to be certain of the risks. Authors’ conclusions There is low tomoderate-level evidence that compared with no treatment and standard therapy, acupuncture improves pain and stiffness in people with fibromyalgia. There is moderate-level evidence that the effect of acupuncture does not differ from sham acupuncture in reducing pain or fatigue, or improving sleep or global well-being. EA is probably better than MA for pain and stiffness reduction and improvement of global well-being, sleep and fatigue. The effect lasts up to one month, but is not maintained at six months follow-up. MA probably does not improve pain or physical functioning. Acupuncture appears safe. People with fibromyalgia may consider using EA alone or with exercise and medication. The

  12. Objectifying Specific and Nonspecific Effects of Acupuncture: A Double-Blinded Randomised Trial in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Karner, Max; Brazkiewicz, Frank; Remppis, Andrew; Fischer, Joachim; Gerlach, Oliver; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Subramanian, Shanmuga Velayutham; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Acupuncture was recently shown to be effective in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, controversy persists whether the observed effects are specific to acupuncture or merely nonspecific consequences of needling. Therefore, the objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of different acupuncture treatment modalities. Materials and Methods. We compared between three different forms of acupuncture in a prospective randomised trial with a novel double-blinded study design. One-hundred and sixteen patients aged from 35 to 82 with osteoarthritis of the knee were enrolled in three study centres. Interventions were individualised classical/ modern semistandardised acupuncture and non-specific needling. Blinded outcome assessment comprised knee flexibility and changes in pain according to the WOMAC score. Results and Discussion. Improvement in knee flexibility was significantly higher after classical Chinese acupuncture (10.3 degrees; 95% CI 8.9 to 11.7) as compared to modern acupuncture (4.7 degrees; 3.6 to 5.8). All methods achieved pain relief, with a patient response rate of 48 percent for non-specific needling, 64 percent for modern acupuncture, and 73 percent for classical acupuncture. Conclusion. This trial establishes a novel study design enabling double blinding in acupuncture studies. The data suggest a specific effect of acupuncture in knee mobility and both non-specific and specific effects of needling in pain relief. PMID:23365608

  13. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the De qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:23055010

  14. Acupuncture in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the de qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes, such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs, and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain, and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe, but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture, implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases.

  15. From Peripheral to Central: The Role of ERK Signaling Pathway in Acupuncture Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Park, Jongbae J.; Jeon, Songhee; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Lee, Hyangsook; Chae, Younbyoung; Maixner, William; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence of the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture, its mechanism remains largely unclear. We assume that molecular signaling around the acupuncture needled area is essential for initiating the effect of acupuncture. To determine possible bio-candidates involved in the mechanisms of acupuncture and investigate the role of such bio-candidates in the analgesic effects of acupuncture, we conducted 2 stepwise experiments. First, a genome-wide microarray of the isolated skin layer at the GB34-equivalent acupoint of C57BL/6 mice 1 hour after acupuncture found that a total of 236 genes had changed and that extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) activation was the most prominent bio-candidate. Second, in mouse pain models using formalin and complete Freund adjuvant, we found that acupuncture attenuated the nociceptive behavior and the mechanical allodynia; these effects were blocked when ERK cascade was interrupted by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126 (.8 μg/μL). Based on these results, we suggest that ERK phosphorylation following acupuncture needling is a biochemical hallmark initiating the effect of acupuncture including analgesia. Perspective This article presents the novel evidence of the local molecular signaling in acupuncture analgesia by demonstrating that ERK activation in the skin layer contributes to the analgesic effect of acupuncture in a mouse pain model. This work improves our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia. PMID:24524846

  16. [Treatment of knee joint pain with superficial needling].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang-yang; Liao, Jing-ping

    2005-04-01

    To compare therapeutic effects of superficial needling and body acupuncture on knee joint pain. Ninety-six cases of knee joint pain were randomly divided into a treatment group of 48 cases treated with superficial needling, and a control group of 48 cases treated with body acupuncture. The cured rate was 66.7% in the treatment group and 39.6% in the control group with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). The total effective rate was 100.0% in both the two groups. The needed therapeutic times of superficial needling was significantly less than that of the body acupuncture (P< 0.05). Superficial needling has a good therapeutic effect on knee joint pain with a shorter therapeutic course.

  17. Efficacy of femtosecond lasers for application of acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Mika; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Hatano, Naoya; Sugano, Aki; Ito, Akihiko; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2016-12-10

    Acupuncture treatment utilizes the stimulation of metal acupuncture needles that are manually inserted into a living body. In the last decades, laser light has been used as an alternative to needles to stimulate acupuncture points. We previously reported suppression of myostatin (Mstn) gene expression in skeletal muscle by means of femtosecond laser (FL) irradiation, after electroacupuncture, in which acupuncture needles are stimulated with a low-frequency microcurrent. The purpose of the study here was to investigate the efficacy of FL irradiation in mouse skeletal muscle with regard to protein synthesis. After irradiation of the hindlimbs, we first analyzed Mstn gene expression and Mstn protein level in the skeletal muscle. We then evaluated phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). The results showed that FL irradiation significantly reduced the amount of Mstn protein and enhanced the phosphorylation of p70S6K in of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. We suggest that FL irradiation activated the protein synthetic pathway in the skeletal muscle. In conclusion, we determined that FL irradiation can serve as an alternative for acupuncture needles and has the potential of being a new non-invasive acupuncture treatment of skeletal muscle.

  18. Discitis in an adult following acupuncture treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter SY; Hsu, William

    2004-01-01

    Recent papers, including a review conducted by van Tulder et al., have suggested that there is paucity of information as to the efficacy of acupuncture treatment. However, there has been a significant increase in the use of acupuncture therapy for treatment of various ailments, including lower back pain. Chiropractors, along with other health care professionals, are using acupuncture as an adjunct to their main therapeutic intervention as demonstrated by a recent survey by the Canadian Chiropractic Protective Association (CCPA). However, like many other interventions, including NSAIDs and spinal manipulations, signs of side effects should be monitored when acupuncture treatments are considered. Recent papers have noted such complications as pneumothorax and hepatitis following acupuncture treatments. A case is presented in which a patient, who received previous acupuncture treatments, presented to a chiropractic clinic complaining of low back and leg pain. Early recognition of potential complications after acupuncture treatment may minimize significant impairments and disability. PMID:17549224

  19. [Effect of acupuncture on the activity of gastrointestinal electricity].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Li, Jia; Liang, Feng-Xia; Jin, Hong-Yun; Wang, Hua

    2011-05-01

    Based on the summarization of literatures on regulation of gastrointestinal electricity with acupuncture, the regulation effect of acupuncture, its influencing factors and its mechanism were analyzed in this article. It is found that the regulation effect can be influenced by many factors such as different acupuncture techniques, frequency, point selection, manipulations and the physical condition of the object. The effect of acupuncture appears great variety, which manifests as reinforced, inhibited or a kind of two-way regulation. And it is also held that the effect of acupuncture relies on the integrity of the nerve system. Nuclei, neurotransmitters, body fluid and gastrointestinal hormone also take part in the acupuncture effect. Therefore, studies on mechanism of acupuncture effect on gastrointestinal electricity should be strengthened in the future.

  20. Discitis in an adult following acupuncture treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter S Y; Hsu, William

    2004-06-01

    Recent papers, including a review conducted by van Tulder et al., have suggested that there is paucity of information as to the efficacy of acupuncture treatment. However, there has been a significant increase in the use of acupuncture therapy for treatment of various ailments, including lower back pain. Chiropractors, along with other health care professionals, are using acupuncture as an adjunct to their main therapeutic intervention as demonstrated by a recent survey by the Canadian Chiropractic Protective Association (CCPA). However, like many other interventions, including NSAIDs and spinal manipulations, signs of side effects should be monitored when acupuncture treatments are considered. Recent papers have noted such complications as pneumothorax and hepatitis following acupuncture treatments. A case is presented in which a patient, who received previous acupuncture treatments, presented to a chiropractic clinic complaining of low back and leg pain. Early recognition of potential complications after acupuncture treatment may minimize significant impairments and disability.

  1. [On connotation of Jin's three-needle technique].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Liu, Long-Lin; Shen, Xiu-Jin; Chen, Fei; Wu, Yun-Cai

    2014-07-01

    Jin's three-needle technique is named after Professor JIN Rui. The connotation of Jin's three-needle technique is summarized by his followers through long-term teaching and clinical practice. His principle and method of point combination are based on syndrome differentiation of acupuncture. And his unique needling technique and treating principle of mental tranquilization also play an important role in his clinical practice.

  2. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P < 0.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P < 0.001) indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  3. Acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Witt, C; Brinkhaus, B; Jena, S; Linde, K; Streng, A; Wagenpfeil, S; Hummelsberger, J; Walther, H U; Melchart, D; Willich, S N

    Acupuncture is widely used by patients with chronic pain although there is little evidence of its effectiveness. We investigated the efficacy of acupuncture compared with minimal acupuncture and with no acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients with chronic osteoarthritis of the knee (Kellgren grade < or =2) were randomly assigned to acupuncture (n=150), minimal acupuncture (superficial needling at non-acupuncture points; n=76), or a waiting list control (n=74). Specialised physicians, in 28 outpatient centres, administered acupuncture and minimal acupuncture in 12 sessions over 8 weeks. Patients completed standard questionnaires at baseline and after 8 weeks, 26 weeks, and 52 weeks. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index at the end of week 8 (adjusted for baseline score). All main analyses were by intention to treat. 294 patients were enrolled from March 6, 2002, to January 17, 2003; eight patients were lost to follow-up after randomisation, but were included in the final analysis. The mean baseline-adjusted WOMAC index at week 8 was 26.9 (SE 1.4) in the acupuncture group, 35.8 (1.9) in the minimal acupuncture group, and 49.6 (2.0) in the waiting list group (treatment difference acupuncture vs minimal acupuncture -8.8, [95% CI -13.5 to -4.2], p=0.0002; acupuncture vs waiting list -22.7 [-27.5 to -17.9], p<0.0001). After 52 weeks the difference between the acupuncture and minimal acupuncture groups was no longer significant (p=0.08). After 8 weeks of treatment, pain and joint function are improved more with acupuncture than with minimal acupuncture or no acupuncture in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, this benefit decreases over time.

  4. [Comments on "Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a randomized clinical trial" from Journal of the American Medical Association].

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxiao; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Hui; Wu, Qiaofeng; Zeng, Fang; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-03-01

    The development of TCM acupuncture represents a internationalized and modern trend. A recent study with the title of "Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a randomized clinical trial" published in Journal of the American Medical Association on October 1st, 2014, which raised doubts on acupuncture efficacy as well as traditional manipulation and acupoint theory, makes some negative impact and challenges on the development of acupuncture. From the view of future development of acupuncture, the potential influence of this research on acupuncture development is proposed, and by combining acupuncture theory, some discussions and doubts on the research design and outcome explanations are made. Additionally, enlightenments of this research on further clinical research are summarized.

  5. Interactive simulation of needle insertion models.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Simon P; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2005-07-01

    A novel interactive virtual needle insertion simulation is presented. The simulation models are based on measured planar tissue deformations and needle insertion forces. Since the force-displacement relationship is only of interest along the needle shaft, a condensation technique is shown to reduce the computational complexity of linear simulation models significantly. As the needle penetrates or is withdrawn from the tissue model, the boundary conditions that determine the tissue and needle motion change. Boundary condition and local material coordinate changes are facilitated by fast low-rank matrix updates. A large-strain elastic needle model is coupled to the tissue models to account for needle deflection and bending during simulated insertion. A haptic environment, based on these novel interactive simulation techniques, allows users to manipulate a three-degree-of-freedom virtual needle as it penetrates virtual tissue models, while experiencing steering torques and lateral needle forces through a planar haptic interface.

  6. [Contributions of professor Yang Chang-sen to modern acupuncture-moxibustion theory].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Bin

    2010-12-01

    Professor YANG Chang-sen, devoted himself entirely to the clinical practice, education and research of modern acupuncture-moxibustion for over 50 years, has made great contribution to the construction and development of the theoretical system of the science. His main achievements includes constructing and perfecting acupuncture-moxibustion module in differentiation of syndromes, editing textbooks such as Zhenjiuxue Jiangyi (Teaching Materials of Acupuncture-Moxibustion) and Zhenjiu Zhi-liaoxue (Acupuncture Therapeutics) from innovational viewpoints, explaining the reducing and reinforcing manipulations of acupuncture therapy systematically and historically, exploring means of high-level personnel cultivation and insisting to carry out acupuncture-moxibustion academic research in clinical practice.

  7. Contralateral needling at unblocked collaterals for hemiplegia following acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huanmin; Li, Xugang; Gao, Xia; Ma, Benxu

    2013-01-01

    Hemiplegia caused by stroke indicates dysfunction of the network between the brain and limbs, namely collateral shock in the brain. Contralateral needling is the insertion of needles into acupoints on the relative healthy side of the body to treat diseases such as apoplexy. However, there is little well-designed and controlled clinical evidence for this practice. This study investigated whether contralateral needling could treat hemiplegia after acute ischemic stroke in 106 randomly selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. These patients were randomly assigned to three groups: 45 in the contralateral needling group, receiving acupuncture on the unaffected limbs; 45 in the tional acupuncture group, receiving acupuncture on the hemiplegic limbs; and 16 in the control group, receiving routine treatments without acupuncture. Acupuncture at acupoints Chize (LU5) in the upper limb and Jianliao (TE14) in the lower limb was performed for 45 minutes daily for 30 consecutive days. The therapeutic effective rate, Neurological Deficit Score, Modified Barthel Index and Fugl-Meyer Assessment were evaluated. The therapeutic effective rate of contralateral needling was higher than that of conventional acupuncture (46.67% vs. 31.11%, P < 0.05). The neurological deficit score of contralateral needling was significantly decreased compared with conventional acupuncture (P < 0.01). The Modified Barthel Index and Fugl-Meyer Assessment score of contralateral needling increased more significantly than those of conventional acupuncture (both P < 0.01). The present findings suggest that contralateral needling unblocks collaterals and might be more effective than conventional acupuncture in the treatment of hemiplegia following acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25206612

  8. [Lifting-thrusting and rotating manipulations: a comparison on energy input].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Through the energy input model of lifting-thrusting and rotating manipulations, using the theory of energy density, energy flux density and sound intensity level in physics, the average energy flux intensity and frequency distributions of average poynting's vector were calculated respectively within the range of infrasound. According to the distribution table, it was discovered that both of the energy flux density and sound intensity level during the process of acupuncture were high. And it was concluded that the essence of meridians was probably fascial tissues which were rich in elastic fibers and collagenous fibers. The heat-producing needling with reinforcing effect (setting the moutain on fire) which focused on forceful thrusting was held to be the result of the action of same position solitary wave. And the coolness-producing needling with reducing effect (thorough heavenly cool) emphasized on the manipulation of forceful lifting was considered as the action of opposite position solitary wave. The energy input of lifting-thrusting manipulation is comparatively larger than the rotating method, however without significant difference. The speed of manipulations applied is regarded to have greater impact on energy transmission. And the energy produced by rotating manipulation can be better transmitted through meridians.

  9. [Analysis on academic frame of A-B classic of acupuncture and moxibustion by Huang Fumi].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    The acupuncture-moxibustion academic frame system was firstly and systematically established in A-B Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion authored by HUANG Fu-mi, which explained the knowledge and logical relationship among different parts of acupuncture-moxibustion. The academic frame consisted of acupuncture-moxibustion basis and clinical application. In the basic theory, zang-fu, qi-blood, meridians, acupoint, pulse diagnosis, acupuncture manipulation, etiology and pathogenesis, etc. were included; in the clinical application, various kinds of clinical diseases and their acupuncture treatment were included. The academic frame established by A-B Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion is broader than the modern academic frame of acupuncture-moxibustion, in which the attribution and location of four-seas theory has certain differences from modern acupuncture-moxibustion theory.

  10. Real world research: a complementary method to establish the effectiveness of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Xu, Hao; Liu, Baoyan

    2015-05-22

    Acupuncture has been widely used in the management of a variety of diseases for thousands of years, and many relevant randomized controlled trials have been published. In recent years, many randomized controlled trials have provided controversial or less-than-convincing evidence that supports the efficacy of acupuncture. The clinical effectiveness of acupuncture in Western countries remains controversial. Acupuncture is a complex intervention involving needling components, specific non-needling components, and generic components. Common problems that have contributed to the equivocal findings in acupuncture randomized controlled trials were imperfections regarding acupuncture treatment and inappropriate placebo/sham controls. In addition, some inherent limitations were also present in the design and implementation of current acupuncture randomized controlled trials such as weak external validity. The current designs of randomized controlled trials of acupuncture need to be further developed. In contrast to examining efficacy and adverse reaction in a "sterilized" environment in a narrowly defined population, real world research assesses the effectiveness and safety of an intervention in a much wider population in real world practice. For this reason, real world research might be a feasible and meaningful method for acupuncture assessment. Randomized controlled trials are important in verifying the efficacy of acupuncture treatment, but the authors believe that real world research, if designed and conducted appropriately, can complement randomized controlled trials to establish the effectiveness of acupuncture. Furthermore, the integrative model that can incorporate randomized controlled trial and real world research which can complement each other and potentially provide more objective and persuasive evidence.

  11. Acupuncture and addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Moner, S E

    1996-01-01

    Acupuncture has been advocated as a safe effective treatment for addictive diseases. This review highlights clinical trials using acupuncture in drug treatment. Clinical trials selected were those conducted for efficacy of acupuncture treatment with opiate, alcohol, cocaine and nicotine dependence.

  12. Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Margareta; Lundeberg, Thomas; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Gerdle, Björn

    2003-09-01

    In 14 healthy female subjects, the effects of needle stimulation (acupuncture) on skin and muscle blood flow were investigated using a non-invasive custom-designed probe and photoplethysmography (PPG). In randomised order, 2-7 days apart, three modes of needle stimulation were performed on the anterior aspect of the tibia: superficial insertion (SF), insertion into the anterior tibial muscle (Mu), and insertion into the muscle including manipulation of the needle in order to elicit a distinct sensation of distension, heaviness or numbness (DeQi). Before intervention, the subjects rested for 30 min. After the intervention, the needle was left in situ for 20 min. Blood flow recordings were performed intermittently from 10 min prior to the intervention to the end of the trial. In a fourth session, serving as control, corresponding measurements were performed without any needle stimulation. Area under curve was calculated for 5-min periods prior to and after stimulation, respectively, and for the remaining 15-min period after stimulation. Compared to the control situation, muscle blood flow increased following both Mu and DeQi for 20 min, with the latter being more pronounced for the initial 5 min. Skin blood flow increased for 5 min following DeQi. However, no increase was found following SF. The DeQi stimulation was preceded by higher visual analogue scale ratings of anxiety prior to stimulation, which might have influenced skin blood flow to some extent. The results indicate that the intensity of the needling is of importance, the DeQi stimulation resulting in the most pronounced increase in both skin and muscle blood flow.

  13. Standardizing therapeutic parameters of acupuncture for pain suppression in rats: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sujung; Lim, Hyungtaeck; Choe, Ilwhan; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2014-01-15

    Despite acupuncture's wide and successful use, it is still considered as lacking scientifically rigorous evidence, especially with respect to its effectiveness. To address this problem, it is necessary to re-examine the practice of acupuncture using scientific methodology. The standardization of acupuncture practices may offer a solution. As a preliminary step towards the standardization of acupuncture stimulation in animal experiments, this study attempted to clarify the various therapeutic parameters that contribute to acupuncture's efficacy. This study identified specific acupoints, temporal point of needling, rotation of the needle, duration of acupuncture, and diameter of the needle as the parameters, through formalin test. In this test, acupuncture was performed on either the ST36 or LR2 point immediately after pain induction and 5 minutes after pain induction. The formalin test yielded no significant suppression of pain in the case of ST36 and LR2 acupuncture stimulation immediately following pain induction. When acupuncture was applied 5 minutes after pain induction, however, the ST36 stimulation resulted in a significant decrease in pain, while the LR2 stimulation produced no change. The duration of acupuncture, but not the diameter of the needle, was also significant. As for the rotation of the needle, there was no significant difference in the pain reduction achieved in the rotation and non-rotation groups. We determined that specific acupoint, temporal point of needling, and duration of treatment are important factors in the inhibition of pain. These finding strongly suggest that in animal experiments, the application of a set of appropriate therapeutic parameters can significantly influence the outcome.

  14. The Timing of Acupuncture Stimulation Does Not Influence Anesthetic Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory; Sengupta, Papiya; Lenhardt, Rainer; Liem, Edwin; Doufas, Anthony G.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Akça, Ozan

    2005-01-01

    Studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective when induced before induction of general anesthesia than afterwards. We tested the hypothesis that electro-acupuncture initiated 30 minutes before induction reduces anesthetic requirement more than acupuncture initiated after induction. Seven volunteers were each anesthetized with desflurane on 3 study days. Needles were inserted percutaneously at 4 acupuncture points thought to produce analgesia in the upper abdominal area and provide generalized sedative and analgesic effects: Zusanli (St36), Sanyinjiao (Sp6), Liangqiu (St34), and Hegu (LI4). Needles were stimulated at 2-Hz and 10-Hz, with frequencies alternating at two-second intervals. On Preinduction day, electro-acupuncture was started 30 minutes before induction of anesthesia and maintained throughout the study. On At-induction day, needles were positioned before induction of anesthesia, but electro-acupuncture stimulation was not initiated until after induction. On Control day, electrodes were positioned near the acupoints, but needles were not inserted. Noxious electrical stimulation was administered via 25-G needles on the upper abdomen (70 mA, 100 Hz, 10 seconds). Desflurane concentration was increased 0.5% when movement occurred and decreased 0.5% when it did not. These up-and-down sequences continued until volunteers crossed from movement to no-movement 4 times. The P50 of logistic regression identified desflurane requirement. Desflurane requirement was similar on the Control (5.2±0.6%, mean±SD), Preinduction (5.0±0.8%), and At-induction (4.7±0.3%, P=0.125) days. This type of acupuncture is thus unlikely to facilitate general anesthesia or decrease the need for anesthetic drugs. PMID:15673863

  15. [Professor Wu Bing-huang's experiences in acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-e; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Chuan-jiang

    2008-03-01

    Professor WU Bing-huang's unique experiences in acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis are introduced. He excellently uses anatomical and pathological knowledge of facial nerves, selecting acupoints according to nervous distribution, selecting needling methods according to the nervous trend, selecting acupuncture stimulation amount according to pathological changes and judging prognosis according to affected position.

  16. [Clinical study on acupuncture intervention time for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Te-li; Cao, Lian-ying; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yan; Wu, Qing-hong; Yao, Mei-jin; Gu, Lu-yan

    2009-05-01

    To observe effects of intervention time of local acupuncture at the affected side on the facial nerve injury and the therapeutic effect at acute stage of peripheral facial paralysis. Two hundred and seventy-nine cases within 3 days of attack were randomly divided into 4 groups, group A (n=74), group B (n=70), group C (n=74) and control group (n=61). The 4 groups were treated with Prednisone on the third day after attack, and acupuncture was added in the group A, B and C, with Fengchi (GB 20), Yangbai (GB 14), Taiyang (EX-HN 5), Sibai (ST 2), Yingxiang (LI 20), etc. on the affected side and bilateral Hegu (LI 4) selected, and with superficial insertion method used for acupoints on the ear-face parts without manipulating the needles, and electroacupuncture was added from the fifth session of the treatment, and uniform reinforcing-reducing method was used for the distal acupoints selected. The needles were retained for 20 min and the treatment was given for 25 sessions, once other day. The therapeutic effects, the mean therapeutic courses for the cured patients and changes of electroneurography (ENoG) were compared among the groups. The clinical total effective rate was 98.6%, 95.7%, 94.6% and 72.1% in the group A, B, C and the control group, respectively, with a significant difference (P < 0.05), and the therapeutic course for the cured patients increased in the order of the group A, B, C and the control group; and there was no significant difference among the 4 groups in changes of ENoG at the third day and the fourteenth day (both P > 0.05). Acute stage is the best opportunity for acupuncture treatment of peripheral facial paralysis, and the earlier the intervention time, the better the therapeutic effect and the shorter the therapeutic course.

  17. Acupuncture Safety in Patients Receiving Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Michael; Nachat, Arian; Schwartz, Jonathan; Casella-Gordon, Vicki; Cook, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Theoretically, acupuncture in anticoagulated patients could increase bleeding risk. However, precise estimates of bleeding complication rates from acupuncture in anticoagulated patients have not been systematically examined. Objective: To critically evaluate evidence for safety of acupuncture in anticoagulated patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Google Scholar. Results: Of 39 potentially relevant citations, 11 met inclusion criteria: 2 randomized trials, 4 case series, and 5 case reports. Seven provided reporting quality sufficient to assess acupuncture safety in 384 anticoagulated patients (3974 treatments). Minor-moderate bleeding related to acupuncture in an anticoagulated patient occurred in one case: a large hip hematoma, managed with vitamin K reversal and warfarin discontinuation following reevaluation of its medical justification. Blood-spot bleeding, typical for any needling/injection and controlled with pressure/cotton, occurred in 51 (14.6%) of 350 treatments among a case series of 229 patients. Bleeding deemed unrelated to acupuncture during anticoagulation, and more likely resulting from inappropriately deep needling damaging tissue or from complex anticoagulation regimens, occurred in 5 patients. No bleeding was reported in 2 studies (74 anticoagulated patients): 1 case report and 1 randomized trial prospectively monitoring acupuncture-associated bleeding as an explicit end point. Altogether, 1 moderate bleeding event occurred in 3974 treatments (0.003%). Conclusion: Acupuncture appears to be safe in anticoagulated patients, assuming appropriate needling location and depth. The observed 0.003% complication rate is lower than the previously reported 12.3% following hip/knee replacement in a randomized trial of 27,360 anticoagulated patients, and 6% following acupuncture in a prospective study of 229,230 all-type patients. Prospective trials would help confirm our findings. PMID:25432001

  18. Comparison of the effectiveness between manual acupuncture and electro-acupuncture on patients with tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Paul; Leung, Mason C P

    2002-01-01

    This is a single-blinded randomized controlled trial to compare the relative effectiveness between manual acupuncture (MA) and electro-acupuncture (EA) on the patients with chronic tennis elbow. Twenty patients recruited in the study were first introduced into control group for 2 weeks waiting period. Then, they were randomly assigned into either MA or EA group for acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture points of GB34 and ST38 were used in both treatment groups. In the MA group, the needle was retained for 20 minutes after the Deqi sensation obtained. In the EA group, electrical stimulation with 4 pulses/second frequency was applied and treatment lasted for 20 minutes. After 6 treatments within 2 weeks duration, significant differences were observed between groups favoring the electro-acupuncture in relation to pain relief (Pain visual analogue scale) and pain free hand grip strength (PFG). This study showed that electro-acupuncture is superior to manual acupuncture in treating patients with tennis elbow.

  19. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Rana S; McCrory, Paul; Pirotta, Marie; Relf, Ian; Forbes, Andrew; Crossley, Kay M; Williamson, Elizabeth; Kyriakides, Mary; Novy, Kitty; Metcalf, Ben R; Harris, Anthony; Reddy, Prasuna; Conaghan, Philip G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-10-01

    There is debate about benefits of acupuncture for knee pain. To determine the efficacy of laser and needle acupuncture for chronic knee pain. Zelen-design clinical trial (randomization occurred before informed consent), in Victoria, Australia (February 2010-December 2012). Community volunteers (282 patients aged ≥50 years with chronic knee pain) were treated by family physician acupuncturists. No acupuncture (control group, n = 71) and needle (n = 70), laser (n = 71), and sham laser (n = 70) acupuncture. Treatments were delivered for 12 weeks. Participants and acupuncturists were blinded to laser and sham laser acupuncture. Control participants were unaware of the trial. Primary outcomes were average knee pain (numeric rating scale, 0 [no pain] to 10 [worst pain possible]; minimal clinically important difference [MCID], 1.8 units) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, 0 [no difficulty] to 68 [extreme difficulty]; MCID, 6 units) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included other pain and function measures, quality of life, global change, and 1-year follow-up. Analyses were by intention-to-treat using multiple imputation for missing outcome data. At 12 weeks and 1 year, 26 (9%) and 50 (18%) participants were lost to follow-up, respectively. Analyses showed neither needle nor laser acupuncture significantly improved pain (mean difference; -0.4 units; 95% CI, -1.2 to 0.4, and -0.1; 95% CI, -0.9 to 0.7, respectively) or function (-1.7; 95% CI, -6.1 to 2.6, and 0.5; 95% CI, -3.4 to 4.4, respectively) compared with sham at 12 weeks. Compared with control, needle and laser acupuncture resulted in modest improvements in pain (-1.1; 95% CI, -1.8 to -0.4, and -0.8; 95% CI, -1.5 to -0.1, respectively) at 12 weeks, but not at 1 year. Needle acupuncture resulted in modest improvement in function compared with control at 12 weeks (-3.9; 95% CI, -7.7 to -0.2) but was not significantly different from sham (-1.7; 95% CI

  20. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Manyong; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective. PMID:26539231

  1. [Research progress of acupuncture for cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury in recent 10 years].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Sun, Hua

    2015-07-01

    By searching relevant data from the PubMed database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database and Wanfang database, a comprehensive analysis and review regarding acupuncture for cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury (CIRI) in recent 10 years were performed. The results showed that acupuncture could inhibit the inflammatory reaction, reduce oxidative stress injury, restrain brain edema formation, inhibit apoptosis, promote neural and vascular regeneration, etc. Acupuncture methods used included electroacupuncture, scalp acupuncture, eye acupuncture and "consciousness-restoring resuscitation needling", etc. The existing problem was that the intervention action of acupuncture was mainly focused on inhibiting inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress injury, and the study on apoptosis and neural and vascular regeneration was needed. It is suggested that from the aspect of multiple target points, the intervention mechanism of acupuncture for CIRI should be systemically studied in the future, which could provide new idea for clinical diagnosis and treatment on ischemic cerebrovascular diseases.

  2. Acupuncture for chronic pain: individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Maschino, Alexandra C.; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh; Victor, Norbert; Foster, Nadine E.; Sherman, Karen J.; Witt, Claudia M.; Linde, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for four chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain where allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible trials, with a total of 17,922 patients analyzed. Results In the primary analysis including all eligible trials, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no acupuncture control for each pain condition (all p<0.001). After exclusion of an outlying set of trials that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores 0.23 (95% C.I. 0.13, 0.33), 0.16 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.25) and 0.15 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.24) standard deviations lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% C.I. 0.51, 0.58), 0.57 (95% C.I. 0.50, 0.64) and 0.42 (95% C.I. 0.37, 0.46). These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias. Conclusions Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. PMID:22965186

  3. ["Sham Needle"--Design and Application of A Double-blind Placebo Needle Assembly].

    PubMed

    Yan, Liu; Ma, Li-hong

    2016-02-01

    The blind study design, particularly the double-blind study design is a very important method for diminishing placebo effect and reducing bias in clinical medical trial. Enlightened by Streitberger's and Park's sham needle design, the authors of the present paper introduce a newly designed sham needle device (Yan's sham-needle) for controlled double-blind trials of acupuncture. This sham needle device consists of needle, tube and base. The bottom of the tube is completely sealed and it can never arouse any invasive stimulation on the subject's skin when the sham needle is downward pressed on the body surface. Meanwhile, this sham device is filled with sponge which is able to simulate soft tissues of the acupoint area. By combining words suggestions or hints before trials and the same shape as verum device, this sham-needle device reduces the risk of blind-breaking and makes it possible to conduct controlled double-blind trials. Primary practice showed that this device may provide a new and practical tool for researching the placebo effect of acupuncture therapy.

  4. Acupuncture as an Adjunct Therapy for Osteoarthritis in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Magden, Elizabeth R; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Buchl, Stephanie J; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient practice that is currently used to treat disorders ranging from osteoarthritis to cardiomyopathy. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin, sterile needles into defined acupuncture points that stimulate physiologic processes through neural signaling. Numerous scientific studies have proven the benefits of acupuncture, and given this scientific support, we hypothesized that acupuncture could benefit the nonhuman primates at our facility. As our chimpanzee colony ages, we are observing an increase in osteoarthritis and have focused our initial acupuncture treatments on this condition. We successfully trained 3 chimpanzees, by using positive-reinforcement training techniques, to voluntarily participate in acupuncture treatments for stifle osteoarthritis. We used 3 acupuncture points that correlate with alleviation of stifle pain and inflammation in humans. A mobility scoring system was used to assess improvements in mobility as a function of the acupuncture treatments. The 2 chimpanzees with the most severe osteoarthritis showed significant improvement in mobility after acupuncture treatments. Acupuncture therapy not only resulted in improved mobility, but the training sessions also served as enrichment for the animals, as demonstrated by their voluntary participation in the training and treatment sessions. Acupuncture is an innovative treatment technique that our data show to be safe, inexpensive, and, most importantly, effective for chimpanzees. PMID:23849446

  5. Acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for osteoarthritis in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Magden, Elizabeth R; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Buchl, Stephanie J; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2013-07-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient practice that is currently used to treat disorders ranging from osteoarthritis to cardiomyopathy. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin, sterile needles into defined acupuncture points that stimulate physiologic processes through neural signaling. Numerous scientific studies have proven the benefits of acupuncture, and given this scientific support, we hypothesized that acupuncture could benefit the nonhuman primates at our facility. As our chimpanzee colony ages, we are observing an increase in osteoarthritis and have focused our initial acupuncture treatments on this condition. We successfully trained 3 chimpanzees, by using positive-reinforcement training techniques, to voluntarily participate in acupuncture treatments for stifle osteoarthritis. We used 3 acupuncture points that correlate with alleviation of stifle pain and inflammation in humans. A mobility scoring system was used to assess improvements in mobility as a function of the acupuncture treatments. The 2 chimpanzees with the most severe osteoarthritis showed significant improvement in mobility after acupuncture treatments. Acupuncture therapy not only resulted in improved mobility, but the training sessions also served as enrichment for the animals, as demonstrated by their voluntary participation in the training and treatment sessions. Acupuncture is an innovative treatment technique that our data show to be safe, inexpensive, and, most importantly, effective for chimpanzees.

  6. Traditional Acupuncture Triggers a Local Increase in Adenosine in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Takahiro; Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Fang; Fujita, Takumi; Ren, Zeguang; Goldman, Nanna; Zhao, Yuanli; Markman, John D.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is a form of Eastern medicine that has been practiced for centuries. Despite its long history and worldwide application, the biological mechanisms of acupuncture in relieving pain have been poorly defined. Recent studies in mice, however, demonstrate that acupuncture triggers increases in interstitial adenosine, which reduces the severity of chronic pain through adenosine A1 receptors, suggesting that adenosine-mediated antinociception contributes to the clinical benefits of acupuncture. We asked here whether acupuncture in human subjects is also linked to a local increase in interstitial adenosine concentration. We collected microdialysis samples of interstitial fluid before, during, and after delivering 30 minutes of conventional acupuncture in the Zusanli point in human subjects. The interstitial adenosine concentration increased significantly during acupuncture and remained elevated for 30 minutes after the acupuncture. Acupuncture-mediated adenosine release was not observed if acupuncture was not delivered in the Zusanli point or if the acupuncture needle was inserted, but not rotated. This study strengthens the role of adenosine in acupuncture-mediated antinociception by directly providing such evidence in humans. PMID:23182227

  7. Does Needle Rotation Improve Lesion Targeting?

    PubMed Central

    Badaan, Shadi; Petrisor, Doru; Kim, Chunwoo; Mozer, Pierre; Mazilu, Dumitru; Gruionu, Lucian; Patriciu, Alex; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Background Image-guided robots are manipulators that operate based on medical images. Perhaps the most common class of image-guided robots are robots for needle interventions. Typically, these robots actively position and/or orient a needle guide, but needle insertion is still done by the physician. While this arrangement may have safety advantages and keep the physician in control of needle insertion, actuated needle drivers can incorporate other useful features. Methods We first present a new needle driver that can actively insert and rotate a needle. With this device we investigate the use of needle rotation in controlled in-vitro experiments performed with a specially developed revolving needle driver. Results These experiments show that needle rotation can improve targeting and may reduce errors by as much as 70%. Conclusion The new needle driver provides a unique kinematic architecture that enables insertion with a compact mechanism. Perhaps the most interesting conclusion of the study is that lesions of soft tissue organs may not be perfectly targeted with a needle without using special techniques, either manually or with a robotic device. The results of this study show that needle rotation may be an effective method of reducing targeting errors. PMID:21360796

  8. Does needle rotation improve lesion targeting?

    PubMed

    Badaan, Shadi; Petrisor, Doru; Kim, Chunwoo; Mozer, Pierre; Mazilu, Dumitru; Gruionu, Lucian; Patriciu, Alex; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-06-01

    Image-guided robots are manipulators that operate based on medical images. Perhaps the most common class of image-guided robots are robots for needle interventions. Typically, these robots actively position and/or orient a needle guide, but needle insertion is still done by the physician. While this arrangement may have safety advantages and keep the physician in control of needle insertion, actuated needle drivers can incorporate other useful features. We first present a new needle driver that can actively insert and rotate a needle. With this device we investigate the use of needle rotation in controlled in-vitro experiments performed with a specially developed revolving needle driver. These experiments show that needle rotation can improve targeting and may reduce errors by as much as 70%. The new needle driver provides a unique kinematic architecture that enables insertion with a compact mechanism. Perhaps the most interesting conclusion of the study is that lesions of soft tissue organs may not be perfectly targeted with a needle without using special techniques, either manually or with a robotic device. The results of this study show that needle rotation may be an effective method of reducing targeting errors. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Deqi Sensation and Acupuncture Effect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing-Yue; Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), deqi experienced by patients is often described as suan (aching or soreness), ma (numbness or tingling), zhang (fullness, distention, or pressure), and zhong (heaviness) and is felt by the acupuncturists (needle grasping) as tense, tight, and full. It is believed that deqi may be an important variable in the studies of the mechanism and efficacy of acupuncture treatment. In recent years, great efforts have been made to understand deqi, which include a couple of questionnaires to qualify and quantify deqi sensations, neuroimaging studies of deqi and acupuncture, physiological mechanisms of deqi, and the relation between deqi and clinical efficacy. However, many problems need to be resolved, and more researches are required to be made in the future. PMID:23864884

  11. Characterization of deqi sensation and acupuncture effect.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing-Yue; Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), deqi experienced by patients is often described as suan (aching or soreness), ma (numbness or tingling), zhang (fullness, distention, or pressure), and zhong (heaviness) and is felt by the acupuncturists (needle grasping) as tense, tight, and full. It is believed that deqi may be an important variable in the studies of the mechanism and efficacy of acupuncture treatment. In recent years, great efforts have been made to understand deqi, which include a couple of questionnaires to qualify and quantify deqi sensations, neuroimaging studies of deqi and acupuncture, physiological mechanisms of deqi, and the relation between deqi and clinical efficacy. However, many problems need to be resolved, and more researches are required to be made in the future.

  12. Is Acupuncture Efficacious for Treating Phonotraumatic Vocal Pathologies? A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Edwin M L; Chan, Karen M K; Kwong, Elaine; Li, Nicole Y K; Ma, Estella P M; Tse, Fred W; Lin, Zhixiu; Verdolini Abbott, Katherine; Tsang, Raymond

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions. A total of 123 dysphonic individuals with benign vocal pathologies were recruited. They were given either genuine acupuncture (n = 40), sham acupuncture (n = 44), or no treatment (n = 39) for 6 weeks (two 30-minute sessions/wk). The genuine acupuncture group received needles puncturing nine voice-related acupoints for 30 minutes, two times a week for 6 weeks, whereas the sham acupuncture group received blunted needles stimulating the skin surface of the nine acupoints for the same frequency and duration. The no-treatment group did not receive any intervention but attended just the assessment sessions. One-hundred seventeen subjects completed the study (genuine acupuncture = 40; sham acupuncture = 43; and no treatment = 34), but only 84 of them had a complete set of vocal functions and quality of life measures (genuine acupuncture = 29; sham acupuncture = 33; and no-treatment = 22) and 42 of them with a complete set of endoscopic data (genuine acupuncture = 16; sham acupuncture = 15; and no treatment = 11). Significant improvement in vocal function, as indicated by the maximum fundamental frequency produced, and also perceived quality of life, were found in both the genuine and sham acupuncture groups, but not in the no-treatment group. Structural (morphological) improvements were, however, only noticed in the genuine acupuncture group, which demonstrated a significant reduction in the size of the vocal fold lesions. The findings showed that acupuncture of voice-related acupoints could bring about improvement in vocal function and healing of vocal fold lesions. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effects of oculo-acupuncture therapy on colonic serotonin reuptake transporter expression in rats with irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Song, Shi-yi; Wang, Yan-jie; Wang, De-shan; Chai, Ji-yan

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effect of oculo-acupuncture therapy (OAT) on the alteration of colonic serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) expression in rats with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) so as to explore its underlying mechanism in relieving IBS. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomized into control, IBS model and OAT groups (n = 10/group). IBS model was established by repeated stress stimulation [water-intake inhibition (24 h), warm box keeping (40 degrees C,5 min), electric shock stimulation (30 V, 120 s), forced cool water swimming (14 t, 5 min), 24 h fasting, and tail clamping (180 s)] for 18 days. Oculo-acupuncture stimulation was given to "Xiajiao" (Lower Energizer), "Dachang" (Large Intestine), "Gan" (Liver) and "Pi" (Spleen) areas for 20 min by using filiform acupuncture needles (manipulated 1 min once every 10 min). The treatment was conducted once every 12 h for 7 days. Colonic SERT mRNA and protein expression levels were examined by RT-PCR and Western Blot. In comparison with the control group, the expression levels of both colonic SERT mRNA and protein in the model group were down-regulated remarkably (P < 0.05). Compared with the model group, the expression levels of SERT gene and protein in the OAT group were increased remarkably (P < 0.05). OAT can increase colonic SERT protein and gene expression in IBS rats, which may play a role in relieving IBS in OAT clinic.

  14. Polar acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Apps, John

    2004-09-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are common in people who undertake adventure travel to the Antarctic, and in those who support them, because of the hard physical demands and lack of rest. This paper describes the successful use of acupuncture as first line treatment for ten patients in these circumstances, and comments on its advantages, particularly in its capacity to reduce the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  15. Investigation of electrical responses to acupuncture stimulation: the effect of electrical grounding and insulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Heum; Ryu, Yeon-Hang; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-03-01

    Acupuncture in Oriental medicine has been widely used as a core therapeutic method due to its minimal side-effects and therapeutic efficacy. However, the electrical response to acupuncture stimulation (ERAS) has not been clearly studied under acupuncture conditions that might affect the efficacy of acupuncture therapy. In this study, the ERAS was objectively investigated by measuring meridian electric potentials (MEPs) when the electrical grounding conditions of the operator and subject were varied, and when the insulation conditions of acupuncture needle were varied. MEPs between Sang-geoheo (ST37) and Ha-geoheo (ST39) of the Stomach Meridian (ST) were measured by stimulating Jok-samni (ST36) with an acupuncture needle. For non-insulated acupuncture stimulation (NIAS), the average MEP peak was 148.6 +/- 20.6 when neither the operator nor the subject were electrically grounded, 23.1 +/- 8.8 when the subject only was electrically grounded, 348 +/- 76.8 when the operator only was electrically grounded, and 19.9 +/- 4.7 when both the operator and the subject were electrically grounded. The MEPs presented various magnitudes and patterns depending on the electrical grounding conditions. The MEP pattern was very similar to that of the charge and discharge of a capacitor. For insulated acupuncture stimulation (IAS), the average MEP peak was 20 +/- 4 in all electrical grounding conditions, which is not a significant electric response for acupuncture stimulation. In terms of electricity, this study verified that acupuncture therapy might be affected by acupuncture conditions such as (1) the electrical grounding condition of the operator and the subject and (2) the insulation condition of the acupuncture needle.

  16. Effect of "Deqi" during the Study of Needling "Wang's Jiaji" Acupoints Treating Spasticity after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanqin; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Cunzhi; Shi, Guangxia; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Chengmei; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Guiling; Zhao, Yin; Sun, Jingqing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Linpeng

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce spasticity and prevent the onset of spasticity after stroke. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of "Deqi" during needling "Wang's Jiaji" acupoints treating spasticity in the early stage of stroke. Methods. This study is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. 238 patients with stroke (<21 days) participated and were randomly allocated to the verum-acupuncture (n = 121) group or sham-acupuncture group (n = 117). The verum-acupuncture group received verum acupuncture required to produce the sense of "Deqi" while the sham-acupuncture group received sham acupuncture without "Deqi." Patients in both groups followed the same 30 min acupuncture regimen 5 times per week for a period of 4 weeks. Scales of MAS, FMA, ADL, MBI, NIHSS, SS-QOL, and MRS were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. Results. Significant differences were observed between two groups. The MRS rating composition has the statistical difference after 4 weeks (P = 0.017). The score of MAS, FMA, Barthel, and SSQOL in verum-acupuncture group has increased significantly compared with the sham-acupuncture group after 12 weeks. There was 14% reduction of higher muscle tension in the verum-acupuncture group. Conclusion. Acupuncture "Wang's Jiaji" points with sensation of "Deqi" in the early stage may reduce the occurrence and decrease the severity of spasticity after stroke.

  17. Paradoxes in Acupuncture Research: Strategies for Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M.; Wayne, Peter M.; MacPherson, Hugh; Schnyer, Rosa; Milley, Ryan M.; Napadow, Vitaly; Lao, Lixing; Park, Jongbae; Harris, Richard E.; Cohen, Misha; Sherman, Karen J.; Haramati, Aviad; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In November 2007, the Society for Acupuncture Research (SAR) held an international symposium to mark the 10th anniversary of the 1997 NIH Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture. The symposium presentations revealed the considerable maturation of the field of acupuncture research, yet two provocative paradoxes emerged. First, a number of well-designed clinical trials have reported that true acupuncture is superior to usual care, but does not significantly outperform sham acupuncture, findings apparently at odds with traditional theories regarding acupuncture point specificity. Second, although many studies using animal and human experimental models have reported physiological effects that vary as a function of needling parameters (e.g., mode of stimulation) the extent to which these parameters influence therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials is unclear. This White Paper, collaboratively written by the SAR Board of Directors, identifies gaps in knowledge underlying the paradoxes and proposes strategies for their resolution through translational research. We recommend that acupuncture treatments should be studied (1) “top down” as multi-component “whole-system” interventions and (2) “bottom up” as mechanistic studies that focus on understanding how individual treatment components interact and translate into clinical and physiological outcomes. Such a strategy, incorporating considerations of efficacy, effectiveness and qualitative measures, will strengthen the evidence base for such complex interventions as acupuncture. PMID:20976074

  18. Acupuncture-brain interactions as hypothesized by mood scale recordings.

    PubMed

    Acker, Helmut; Schmidt-Rathjens, Claudia; Acker, Till; Fandrey, Joachim; Ehleben, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Mood expressions encompassing positive scales like "activity, elation, contemplation, calmness" and negative scales like "anger, excitement, depression, fatigue" were applied for introducing a new tool to assess the effects of acupuncture on brain structures. Traditional acupuncture points defined in the literature for their effects on task negative and task positive brain structures were applied to chronic disease patients supposed to have dominant negative mood scales. Burn-out syndrome (n=10) and female chronic pain patients (n=22) showed a significant improvement on positive mood scales and a decline in negative mood scales after 10 acupuncture sessions. We observed a direct effect of acupuncture on brain structures in 5 burn-out syndrome patients showing an immediate, fast suppression of unusual slow high amplitude EEG waves in response to acupuncture needle rotation. These EEG waves described here for the first time in awake patients disappeared after 10 sessions but gradually returned after 1-1.5 years without acupuncture. This was accompanied with deterioration of positive mood scales and a return to negative mood scales. Both male (n=16) and female chronic pain patients reported a significant decrease of pain intensity after 10 sessions. Female patients only, however, showed a linear correlation between initial pain intensity and pain relief as well as a linear correlation between changes in pain intensity and mood scales accompanied by a drop of their heart rate during the acupuncture sessions. We hypothesized that mood scale recordings are a sensitive and specific new tool to reveal individual acupuncture-brain interaction.

  19. Acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture in radiotherapy-induced nausea--a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Enblom, A; Johnsson, A; Hammar, M; Onelöv, E; Steineck, G; Börjeson, S

    2012-05-01

    It is not known if verum (real) acupuncture is effective for nausea and vomiting (emesis) during radiotherapy. We randomly treated 215 blinded cancer patients with verum: penetrating 'deqi' creating acupuncture (n = 109) or non-penetrating sham needles (n = 106) two to three times per week. The patients documented emesis daily during the radiotherapy period. Primary end point was the number of patients with at least one episode of nausea. In the verum and the sham acupuncture group, 70% and 62% experienced nausea at least once during the radiotherapy period (relative risk 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) for a mean number of 10.1 and 8.7 days. Twenty five percent and 28% vomited, and 42% and 37% used antiemetic drugs at least once, respectively. Ninety-five percent in the verum acupuncture group and 96% in the sham acupuncture group believed that the treatment had been effective against nausea. In both groups, 67% experienced positive effects on relaxation, mood, sleep or pain reduction and 89% wished to receive the treatment again. Acupuncture creating deqi is not more effective than sham in radiotherapy-induced nausea, but in this study, nearly all patients in both groups experienced that the treatment was effective for nausea.

  20. Acupuncture for Menopausal Hot Flashes: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Ee, Carolyn; Xue, Charlie; Chondros, Patty; Myers, Stephen P; French, Simon D; Teede, Helena; Pirotta, Marie

    2016-02-02

    Hot flashes (HFs) affect up to 75% of menopausal women and pose a considerable health and financial burden. Evidence of acupuncture efficacy as an HF treatment is conflicting. To assess the efficacy of Chinese medicine acupuncture against sham acupuncture for menopausal HFs. Stratified, blind (participants, outcome assessors, and investigators, but not treating acupuncturists), parallel, randomized, sham-controlled trial with equal allocation. (Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12611000393954). Community in Australia. Women older than 40 years in the late menopausal transition or postmenopause with at least 7 moderate HFs daily, meeting criteria for Chinese medicine diagnosis of kidney yin deficiency. 10 treatments over 8 weeks of either standardized Chinese medicine needle acupuncture designed to treat kidney yin deficiency or noninsertive sham acupuncture. The primary outcome was HF score at the end of treatment. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, anxiety, depression, and adverse events. Participants were assessed at 4 weeks, the end of treatment, and then 3 and 6 months after the end of treatment. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted with linear mixed-effects models. 327 women were randomly assigned to acupuncture (n = 163) or sham acupuncture (n = 164). At the end of treatment, 16% of participants in the acupuncture group and 13% in the sham group were lost to follow-up. Mean HF scores at the end of treatment were 15.36 in the acupuncture group and 15.04 in the sham group (mean difference, 0.33 [95% CI, -1.87 to 2.52]; P = 0.77). No serious adverse events were reported. Participants were predominantly Caucasian and did not have breast cancer or surgical menopause. Chinese medicine acupuncture was not superior to noninsertive sham acupuncture for women with moderately severe menopausal HFs. National Health and Medical Research Council.

  1. Acupuncture-Related Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Robert T.; Simeon, Erika; Moren, Alexis; Rowell, Susan; Watters, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture-related pneumothorax (PTX) is a poorly reported complication of thoracic needling. Recent Chinese literature reviews cited PTXs as the most common adverse outcome. Because of delayed presentation, this complication is thought to be underrecognized by acupuncturists and is largely addressed by hospital and emergency room personnel. The goal of this case study was to demonstrate common risk factors for a PTX, the mechanisms for its development, and protocols to use if one is suspected. Case: A 43-year-old, athletic female with chronic neck pain that was poorly managed with oral medications sought an alternative intervention for pain control. Her treatment plan consisted of weekly acupuncture sessions in the prone and supine positions targeting points along the Bladder, Gall Bladder, and Small Intestine meridians, as well as the right scapular Ah Shi point. She also received infrared lamp therapy. The aim of this approach was to help the patient achieve subjective pain reduction and increased range of motion. Results: One hour after her third treatment session, this patient experienced pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. She was transported to a local Level-1 trauma center by emergency medical services and was diagnosed with a right-sided PTX. Conclusions: The acupoints addressed, a practitioner's knowledge of variations in anatomy, and a patient's body habitus and medical history are risk factors for PTX development. A patient's initial presentation does not predict future outcome. A benign presentation can evolve into a potentially life-threatening cardiovascular collapse. When PTX is suspected, discussing it with the patient and facilitating appropriate evaluation and intervention by a tertiary-care facility is warranted. PMID:25184016

  2. Effect and Safety of Deep Needling and Shallow Needling for Functional Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiani; Liu, Baoyan; Li, Ning; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Liping; Cai, Yuying; Ye, Yongming; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yang; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aupuncture is widely used for functional constipation. Effect of acupuncture might be related to the depth of needling; however, the evidence is limited. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation, and to assess if the deep needling and shallow needling are superior to lactulose. We conducted a prospective, superiority-design, 5-center, 3-arm randomized controlled trial. A total of 475 patients with functional constipation were randomized to the deep needling group (237), shallow needling group (119), and lactulose-controlled group (119) in a ratio of 2:1:1. Sessions lasted 30 minutes each time and took place 5 times a week for 4 weeks in 2 acupuncture groups. Participants in the lactulose group took lactulose orally for 16 continuous weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline of mean weekly spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) during week 1 to 4 (changes from the baselines of the weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in follow-up period were also assessed simultaneously). Secondary outcomes were the weekly SBMs of each assessing week, the mean score change from the baseline of constipation-related symptoms over week 1 to 4, and the time to the first SBM. Emergency drug usage and adverse effects were monitored throughout the study. SBMs and constipation-related symptoms were all improved in the 3 groups compared with baseline at each time frame (P < 0.01, all). The changes in the mean weekly SBMs over week 1 to 4 were 2 (1.75) in the deep needling group, 2 (1.75) in the shallow needling group, and 2 (2) in the lactulose group (P > 0.05, both compared with the lactulose group). The changes of mean weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in the follow-up period were 2 (2), 2 (2.5) in the deep needling group, 2 (3), 1.5 (2.5) in the shallow needling group, and 1 (2), 1 (2) in the lactulose group (P < 0.05, all compared with the lactulose group). No significant difference

  3. Effect of acupuncture on bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, D Y; Lee, S P

    1976-11-01

    1. Needle acupuncture was performed at three sites in twenty patients in a clinical attack of bronchial asthma. 2. In all patients the symptoms of bronchoconstriction improved during the attacks when the correct site was stimulated, and in five patients wheezing was abolished. 3. Stimulation at the correct site produced a significant increase in the mean FEV1-0 (58%) and FVC (29%) but not in maximal mid-expiratory flow rate (MMFR; 76%), when compared with the findings before acupuncture, along with a significant fall in the Pa,CO2 and an insignificant fall in Pa,O2. A mild tachycardia was also observed. 4. After acupuncture a greater improvement in FEV1-0, FVC and MMFR was produced by inhalation of isoprenaline. 5. No significant changes in FEV1-0, FVC, MMFR, pulse rate or arterial blood gas tensions occurred after acupuncture at control sites. 6. In four of the patients during clinical remission acupuncture was performed before and after histamine aerosol challenge, but there was no effect on either the severity or the duration of the histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. 7. It is concluded that acupunture probably reduced the reflex component of the bronchoconstriction, but failed to influence direct smooth muscle constriction caused by histamine.

  4. Standardizing therapeutic parameters of acupuncture for pain suppression in rats: preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite acupuncture’s wide and successful use, it is still considered as lacking scientifically rigorous evidence, especially with respect to its effectiveness. To address this problem, it is necessary to re-examine the practice of acupuncture using scientific methodology. The standardization of acupuncture practices may offer a solution. As a preliminary step towards the standardization of acupuncture stimulation in animal experiments, this study attempted to clarify the various therapeutic parameters that contribute to acupuncture’s efficacy. Methods This study identified specific acupoints, temporal point of needling, rotation of the needle, duration of acupuncture, and diameter of the needle as the parameters, through formalin test. In this test, acupuncture was performed on either the ST36 or LR2 point immediately after pain induction and 5 minutes after pain induction. Results The formalin test yielded no significant suppression of pain in the case of ST36 and LR2 acupuncture stimulation immediately following pain induction. When acupuncture was applied 5 minutes after pain induction, however, the ST36 stimulation resulted in a significant decrease in pain, while the LR2 stimulation produced no change. The duration of acupuncture, but not the diameter of the needle, was also significant. As for the rotation of the needle, there was no significant difference in the pain reduction achieved in the rotation and non-rotation groups. Conclusions We determined that specific acupoint, temporal point of needling, and duration of treatment are important factors in the inhibition of pain. These finding strongly suggest that in animal experiments, the application of a set of appropriate therapeutic parameters can significantly influence the outcome. PMID:24422783

  5. Electrical needle therapy of uremic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Duo, L J

    1987-01-01

    Six patients with intractable uremic pruritus were treated with a modified acupuncture technique, the electrical needle stimulation (ENS). Results were followed with a pruritic score scale based on severity, frequency and distribution of itching, together with sleeping hours and waking up at night. The results were encouraging: pruritus was drastically improved during or after ENS in several patients. A control treatment with superficial electrical stimulation was ineffective.

  6. Registration Quality Assessment of Acupuncture Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Jianjun; Tian, Jinhui; Yang, Kehu

    2013-01-01

    Background Registration can help with transparency of acupuncture clinical trials (ACTs) by making protocol information and results available to the public. Recently, the number of registered ACTs has increased greatly, but only a few researchers have focused on the quality of ACTs registration. This review provides the first assessment of the registration quality of ACTs and the baseline information for future development. Methods All records of ACTs registered in the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) were collected. Data was extracted and input to Excel spreadsheets. The current 20 items of the WHO Trial Registration Data Set (TRDS) and the special prepared items for acupuncture intervention details were used to assess the registration quality of ACTs. Results A total of 740 records, found in 11 registries, were examined. The number of registered ACTs increased rapidly and involved a number of different diseases. The completeness of 20 items was not too poor due to 16 of them had a higher reported percentage (>85%). The completeness of the 20 items was different among registries. For example, the average registration percentage of 20 items in Clinicaltrials.gov, ChiCTR, ISRCTN and ANZCTR were 89.6%, 92.2%, 82.4% and 91.6% respectively. Detailed information regarding acupuncture intervention was seriously insufficient. Among the 740 registration records, 89.2% lacked information on the style of acupuncture, 80.8% did not contain details regarding the needles used, 53.5% lacked information on the treatment regimen and 76.2% did not give details of other interventions administered with acupuncture. Conclusions The overall registration quality of ACTs is not high enough due to the serious lack of information on the specifics of acupuncture intervention. It is vital that a number of special items be set regarding acupuncture in order to develop a suitable system for the registration of ACTs. PMID:23555686

  7. [Main influencing factors of functional magnetic resonance imaging for acupuncture mechanism research].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Ping; Wu, Wen; Zhang, Shan-Shan

    2013-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in the research of acupuncture mechanism in recent years. This article analyzes the effect of four main influencing factors, i.e., research subject, selection of acupoints, manipulation of acupuncture and evaluation of Deqi, and examples are given to explain research application of these four aspects. Based on those mentioned above, the authors presumed that removing ex terior and interior factors of research subject, optimizing compatibility of acupoints and manipulations of acupuncture and making use of correct evaluation scale of Deqi can improve the scientificity and objectivity of fMRI for evaluation of acupuncture mechanism research.

  8. A longitudinal study of the reliability of acupuncture deqi sensations in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Rosa B; Camhi, Stephanie; Hashmi, Javeria A; Vangel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deqi is one of the core concepts in acupuncture theory and encompasses a range of sensations. In this study, we used the MGH Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) to measure and assess the reliability of the sensations evoked by acupuncture needle stimulation in a longitudinal clinical trial on knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the clinical outcome. Thirty OA patients were randomized into one of three groups (high dose, low dose, and sham acupuncture) for 4 weeks. We found that, compared with sham acupuncture, real acupuncture (combining high and low doses) produced significant improvement in knee pain (P = .025) and function in sport (P = .049). Intraclass correlation analysis showed that patients reliably rated 11 of the 12 acupuncture sensations listed on the MASS and that heaviness was rated most consistently. Overall perceived sensation (MASS Index) (P = .014), ratings of soreness (P = .002), and aching (P = .002) differed significantly across acupuncture groups. Compared to sham acupuncture, real acupuncture reliably evoked stronger deqi sensations and led to better clinical outcomes when measured in a chronic pain population. Our findings highlight the MASS as a useful tool for measuring deqi in acupuncture research.

  9. A Longitudinal Study of the Reliability of Acupuncture Deqi Sensations in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Rosa B.; Camhi, Stephanie; Hashmi, Javeria A.; Vangel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D.; Edwards, Robert R.; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Deqi is one of the core concepts in acupuncture theory and encompasses a range of sensations. In this study, we used the MGH Acupuncture Sensation Scale (MASS) to measure and assess the reliability of the sensations evoked by acupuncture needle stimulation in a longitudinal clinical trial on knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the clinical outcome. Thirty OA patients were randomized into one of three groups (high dose, low dose, and sham acupuncture) for 4 weeks. We found that, compared with sham acupuncture, real acupuncture (combining high and low doses) produced significant improvement in knee pain (P = .025) and function in sport (P = .049). Intraclass correlation analysis showed that patients reliably rated 11 of the 12 acupuncture sensations listed on the MASS and that heaviness was rated most consistently. Overall perceived sensation (MASS Index) (P = .014), ratings of soreness (P = .002), and aching (P = .002) differed significantly across acupuncture groups. Compared to sham acupuncture, real acupuncture reliably evoked stronger deqi sensations and led to better clinical outcomes when measured in a chronic pain population. Our findings highlight the MASS as a useful tool for measuring deqi in acupuncture research. PMID:23935656

  10. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Oculomotor Paralysis: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jia-Qi; Li, Wei; Yang, Qi; Li, Bao-lin; Meng, Qing-Gang; Liu, Yu-fu

    2016-01-01

    This study consisted of a single centre randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group (n = 20) with 27 affected eyes and a sham group (n = 20) with 23 affected eyes. Participants in the acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment once daily, three times weekly for four weeks. Participants assigned to the control group received sham acupuncture, the same protocol as that used for the acupuncture group but without insertion of needles into the skin. The primary outcome measure was the cervical range of motion (CROM) score. Secondary outcome measures were the palpebral fissure size, response rate, and adverse events. All 40 participants completed the study. In the comparison of acupuncture and sham acupuncture, a significant difference was observed between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in CROM score (21.37 ± 15.16 and 32.21 ± 19.54, resp.) (P < 0.05) and palpebral fissure size (7.19 ± 2.94 and 5.41 ± 2.45, resp.) (P < 0.05). Response rate was also significantly different in the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). No adverse events were reported in both groups in this study. In summary, it was demonstrated that acupuncture had a feasibility positive effect on oculomotor paralysis. PMID:27313646

  11. The use of laser acupuncture for the treatment of neurogenic pruritus in a child--a case history.

    PubMed

    Stellon, Anthony

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the successful treatment using laser acupuncture of a six year old girl with neurogenic pruritus of the abdomen. It is the first case report of neurogenic pruritus treated by laser acupuncture. The main advantage of using low energy laser, as opposed to acupuncture needles, to stimulate points, is that low energy laser causes little or no sensation, which is particularly useful when treating children.

  12. [Chengjiang school descendant Mr. Huang Zong-Xu's academic characteristics of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhu, An-Ning; Meng, Xian-Jun; Qian, Lin-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    HUANG Zong-xu, who studied from Mr. Cheng Dan-an, the founder of Chengjiang acupuncture school, is a famous acupuncturist of Fujian Province. Through collecting and sorting of Mr. Huang's theses and medical records, his academic characteristics of acupuncture and moxibustion were summarized as follows. Paying attention to meridians and collaterals and treatment based on syndrome differentiation; valuing the needling sensation as well as being good at reinforcing and reducing methods; thinking highly of taking care of spleen and stomach, ombination of needles and herbal medicine to treat difficult miscellaneous diseases; being adept in externd therapy and penetration needling and diet prescriptions, as well as attaching importance on health preserving.

  13. The effect of acupuncture on leukocyte levels in peripheral blood is modified by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Vilchis, José Federico; Barrera-Escorcia, Eduardo; Fregoso-Padilla, Martha

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that acupuncture can modify circulating levels of subpopulations of leukocytes. There have been few investigations on the effect of acupuncture on prostaglandins metabolism. Aspirin is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of prostaglandins and to produce several pharmacological effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether prior administration of aspirin could modify the action of acupuncture on levels of circulating leukocytes. Fourteen healthy males (age: 19-23 years) were recruited from a university student population. This study was a placebo-controlled, prospective, cross-over design. Subjects were randomly assigned into A or B groups. Group A received aspirin 500 mg and group B placebo, after 1 week of a washout period, group A received placebo and group B aspirin. Subjects were given acupuncture with manual needling in GV14 (Dazhui) acupoint 2 hr after receiving medication. The needle was stimulated for 10 sec and was kept in place for 5 min. Leukocytes and their subpopulations were quantified in blood samples taken immediately before and 2 hr after acupuncture treatment. In each subject pre-acupuncture values were compared to those post-acupuncture. The results showed that acupuncture significantly increased overall leukocytes (p=0.006) and neutrophils (p<0.001). Aspirin partially inhibited these effects. The data suggest that the effect of acupuncture on leukocytes may be related to levels of prostaglandins.

  14. Adverse Events of Acupuncture: A Systematic Review of Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shifen; Wang, Lizhen; Cooper, Emily; Zhang, Ming; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping, important in traditional Eastern medicine, are increasingly used in the West. Their widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review, a sequel to one our team published 10 years ago, is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported for acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping between 2000 and 2011. Relevant English-language reports in six databases were identified and assessed by two reviewers. During this 12-year period, 117 reports of 308 AEs from 25 countries and regions were associated with acupuncture (294 cases), moxibustion (4 cases), or cupping (10 cases). Country of occurrence, patient's sex and age, and outcome were extracted. Infections, mycobacterial, staphylococcal, and others, were the main complication of acupuncture. In the previous review, we found the main source of infection to be hepatitis, caused by reusable needles. In this review, we found the majority of infections to be bacterial, caused by skin contact at acupoint sites; we found no cases of hepatitis. Although the route of infection had changed, infections were still the major complication of acupuncture. Clearly, guidelines such as Clean Needle Technique must be followed in order to minimize acupuncture AEs. PMID:23573135

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: is acupuncture a therapeutic possibility?

    PubMed

    Scardina, G A; Ruggieri, A; Provenzano, F; Messina, P

    2010-07-10

    Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic pathology of unknown ethiopathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether acupuncture can produce a reduction of the burning sensation by influencing the oral microcirculation. Thirty patients (10 male and 20 female; mean age +/- SD = 65.4 +/- 2.17) and 30 healthy subjects (10 male and 20 female; mean age +/- SD = 62.06 +/- 6.72) were recruited for the study. The patients were treated with acupunctural techniques based on traditional Chinese medicine. Microcirculation was observed in vivo using videocapillaroscopy at three different times: t(0)) in the absence of acupuncture; t(1)) 1 minute after the insertion of the needles; and t(2)) 5 minutes after the insertion of the needles and following their stimulation. The capillaroscopic observation revealed a significant increase of the capillary tortuousness and density, a reduction of the arborescence and a reduction of burning sensation in such patients. The study shows that acupuncture influences oral microcirculation, resulting in a significant variation of the vascular pattern to which is associated a significant reduction of the burning sensation after three weeks of therapy. Such reduction of the burning sensation has been permanent for the 18 months following the acupuncture therapy. Acupuncture appears a valid therapeutic choice in the management of such patients.

  16. Hypno-analgesia and acupuncture analgesia: a neurophysiological reality?

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Brown, M; Stern, J; Sletten, I; Ulett, G

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hypnosis, acupuncture and analgesic drugs on the subjective experience of pain and on objective neurophysiological parameters were investigated. Pain was produced by brief electric stimuli on the wrist. Pain challengers were: hypnosis (induced by two different video tapes), acupuncture (at specific and unspecific loci, with and without electrical stimulation of the needles), morphine and ketamine. Evaluation of clinical parameters included the subjective experience of pain intensity, blood pressure, puls, temperature, psychosomatic symptoms and side effects. Neurophysiological parameters consisted of the quantitatively analyzed EEG and somatosensory evlked potential (SEP). Pain was significantly reduced by hypnosis, morphine and ketamine, but not during the control seesion. Of the four acupuncture techniques, only electro-acupuncture at specific loci significantly decreased pain. The EEG changes during hypnosis were dependent on the wording of the suggestion and were characterized by an increase of slow and a decrease of fast waves. Acupuncture induced just the opposite changes, which were most significant when needles were inserted at traditional specific sites and stimulated electrically. The evoked potential findings suggested that ketamine attenuates pain in the thalamo-cortical pathways, while hypnosis, acupuncture and morphine induce analgesia at the later CNS stage of stimulus processing. Finally some clinical-neurophysiological correlations were explored.

  17. Acupuncture in posttonsillectomy pain : A prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dingemann, J; Plewig, B; Baumann, I; Plinkert, P K; Sertel, S

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative swallowing pain is one of the most unpleasant after-effects of tonsillectomy. During recent years, the demand for alternatives to drug-based pain therapy has continued to grow, although the topic has received little research attention until now. A total of 46 patients were randomized into verum acupuncture, control acupuncture, and drug-based treatment groups. All patients received nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs (NSAIDs). One hour after drug intake, the verum group also received acupuncture according to classical acupuncture rules (S34, S44 and PC5). The control group had acupuncture needles placed at nonspecific acupuncture points in the midaxillary line. Acupuncture was performed by a blinded acupuncturist, who had learnt exclusively these techniques in the run up to the study. Patients were asked to evaluate their pain before, and at intervals of 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h after drug intake/acupuncture treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). The analgesic effect of acupuncture was significant up to 3 hours in the verum group (p < 0.05). The analgesic effect in the control acupuncture group was significant for up to 1 h after acupuncture (p < 0.05). With reference to the time point before acupuncture, the differences between both acupuncture groups and the drug group were significant (p < 0.01) over the whole time. Acupuncture is an effective complement to NSAIDs in the treatment of posttonsillectomy pain. Particularly patients with allergies, drug intolerance, or reduced response to the commonly administered drugs may benefit from acupuncture.

  18. [Acupuncture in posttonsillectomy pain : A prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial. German version].

    PubMed

    Dingemann, J; Plewig, B; Baumann, I; Plinkert, P K; Sertel, S

    2017-08-01

    Postoperative swallowing pain is one of the most unpleasant after-effects of tonsillectomy. During recent years, the demand for alternatives to drug-based pain therapy has continued to grow, although the topic has received little research attention until now. A total of 46 patients were randomized into verum acupuncture, control acupuncture, and drug-based treatment groups. All patients received nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs (NSAIDs). One hour after drug intake, the verum group also received acupuncture according to classical acupuncture rules (S34, S44 and PC5). The control group had acupuncture needles placed at nonspecific acupuncture points in the midaxillary line. Acupuncture was performed by a blinded acupuncturist, who had learnt exclusively these techniques in the run up to the study. Patients were asked to evaluate their pain before, and at intervals of 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h after drug intake/acupuncture treatment using a visual analog scale (VAS). The analgesic effect of acupuncture was significant up to 3 hours in the verum group (p < 0.05). The analgesic effect in the control acupuncture group was significant for up to 1 h after acupuncture (p < 0.05). With reference to the time point before acupuncture, the differences between both acupuncture groups and the drug group were significant (p < 0.01) over the whole time. Acupuncture is an effective complement to NSAIDs in the treatment of posttonsillectomy pain. Particularly patients with allergies, drug intolerance, or reduced response to the commonly administered drugs may benefit from acupuncture.

  19. [Comparison between western trigger point of acupuncture and traditional acupoints].

    PubMed

    Peng, Zeng-fu

    2008-05-01

    Trigger point theory as the soul of western acupuncture is very similar to acupoint theory of traditional acupuncture and moxibustion science. After comparison, it is found that over 92% of trigger points (235/255) is corresponding to acupoints in anatomy, and the local pain treated by 79.5% acupoints are similar to corresponding myofascial trigger point. Both of them can induce similar linear propagation of needling response, with complete uniform or basically complete uniform of 76%, and a part uniform of 14%; next, both of them can treat symptoms of internal organs such as diarrhea, constipation, dysmenorrhea, etc. Therefore, they are very similar in anatomic location, clinical indications, and the linear propagation of needling response induced by acupuncture, etc.

  20. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazunori; Minakawa, Yoichi; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2011-06-22

    While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  1. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain. PMID:21696603

  2. Design and study of deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Haitao; Wang, Qingguo; Xing, Qian; Li, Fangzheng; Cheng, Dongan

    2002-04-01

    The laser acupuncture stimulation has been applied extensively to replace the acupuncture needles. But the laser is transmitted to the acupoint through the skin, so the curative effect of the laser irradiation on an acupoint from cuticle is limited. We have developed the deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam. The laser beam (such as He-Ne, LD, etc.) is turned into the modulated waveform. The modulated laser beam can simulate the customary acupuncture way such as twirling and rotating, etc. The laser beam is split into 3-8 beams by the means of optical shunt. After that they enter into laser acupuncture pins separately through the optical fiber joiners. The laser beam and pins can give simultaneously the stimulation in the depths of 3-8 acupoints. It has been proved by the clinical practice that the deep laser acupuncture has the notable efficiency for the apoplexy and sequelae of apoplexy, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

  3. Acupuncture outcomes, expectations, patient-provider relationship, and the placebo effect: implications for health promotion.

    PubMed

    So, Dominicus W

    2002-10-01

    To explore whether treatment outcomes are associated with a patient's degree of general hopefulness, expectations regarding treatment, attributions of health status, beliefs about mind-body dualism, and patient-provider relationship factors, I studied acupuncture patients' goal attainment. Sixty-two acupuncture patients were interviewed before and after acupuncture regarding goal attainment, mind-body beliefs, hopefulness, and attributions of health status. Demographics, acupuncture treatment, and health care usage information was also collected. Acupuncturists provided 3 months of treatment. Patients reported treatment goal attainment from acupuncture. Their perceived outcomes were not associated with previous treatment, patient demographics, or the expected and actual numbers of needle insertion. Successful outcomes were related positively to number of different CAM treatments used in the past year but negatively to patients' expectations and the "Powerful Others" health locus of control dimension. Perceived acupuncture outcomes seem not to be related to placebo effects and patient expectations, but rather to client-practitioner relationship factors.

  4. The use of acupuncture in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fung Kei

    2016-12-29

    Parkinson's disease, a progressive neuro-degeneration of multiple systems damaging motor and non-motor functions, affects individual and societal dimensions negatively. In addition to standard treatments, complementary and alternative medicine has been adopted, in which acupuncture, a traditional Chinese medical practice by needle penetration at specific stimulation points (acupoints) along the body, indicates positive outcomes in this illness. Apart from offering an overview of using acupuncture in Parkinson's disease, this literature review analyses the effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's-induced physical symptoms and mental problems such as slow movements, stiffness, constipation, and sleep disorders. In light of the 35 reviewed research projects in mainland China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the United States of America, this study reveals the optimization of this approach through combined therapy and its preventive contribution using acupuncture alone. It also suggests research and practical implications that hint at enhancements in medical applications.

  5. Acupuncture: In Depth

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information on traditional Chinese medicine . What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Results from ... in some degree of pain relief. What the Science Says About Safety and Side Effects of Acupuncture ...

  6. [Clinical observation of post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia treated with relaxing needling technique combined with wheat-grain moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuejiao; Ma, Tieming; Bian, Di; Tian, Hui

    2015-05-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical efficacy on post-stroke upper limb spasmodio hemiplegia among the combined therapy of relaxing needling (Huici) technique combined with wheat-grain moxibustion, simple relaxing needling and conventional acupuncture. Ninety patients were-randomized into a group with the combined therapy of relaxing needling technique combined with wheat-grain moxibustion (a combined therapy group), a simple relaxing needling group and a conventional acupuncture group, 30 cases in each group. In the combined therapy group, the relaxing needling technique was used in combination with wheat-grain moxibustion. The relaxing needling technique was applied to Jianyu (LI 15), Quchi (LI 11), Shousanli (LI 10), etc. The wheat-grain moxibustion was applied to Qihai (CV 6), Guanyuan (CV 4), Mingmen (GV 4), etc. In thel simple relaxing needling group, the relaxing needling technique was used simply. In the conventional acupuncture group, the conventional lifting, thrusting and rotating technique with filiform needle was adopted at the same acupoints as the simple relaxing needling group. The treatment was given once every day; 6 treatments made one session. Totally 4 sessions were required, with 1 day at intervals. The modified Ashworth scale (MAS), Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and Barthel index (BD were adopted to assess the upper limb muscle tension, motor functioni and daily life activity. After treatment, MAS score was all reduced as compared with that before treatment in each group, and FMA score and BI score were increased as compared with those before treatment (all P<0.01). MAS score in the combined therapy group was lower than that in either the simple relaxing needling group or the conventional acupuncture group (both P<0.01), and the score in the simple relaxing needling group was lower than that in the conventional acupuncture group (P<0.05). FMA score and BI score in the combined therapy group were higher than those in the simple relaxing

  7. [Clinical efficacy observation of acupuncture at suliao (GV 25) on improving regain of consciousness from coma in severe craniocerebral injury].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai-Sheng; Song, Jian-Hua; Huang, Tiao-Hua; Huang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Lu-Chang; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Chuan

    2014-06-01

    To compare the clinical therapeutic effects differences between acupuncture at Suliao (GV 25) and Shuigou (GV 26) on promoting regain of consciousness from coma in severe craniocerebral injury. Based on regular emergency treatments of neurosurgery, eighty-two cases of craniocerebral injury who were under stable condition were randomly divided into an observation group (42 cases) and a control group (40 cases). Suliao (GV 25) was selected as main aupoint, while Laogong (PC 8) and Yongquan (KI 1), etc. were selected as adjuvant acupoints and Neiguan (PC 6), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Yifeng (TE 17) and Wangu (GB 12), etc. were selected as matching acupoints in the observation group where a strong needle manipulation was applied to improve the regain of consciousness. The main acupoint of Shuigou (GV 26) along with identical adjuvant acupoints and matching acupoints in the observation group were selected in the control group with identical strong needle manipulation. The treatment was given once a day in both groups, five times per week and ten times were considered as one session. The immediate clinical symptoms after acupuncture at Suliao (GV 25) and Shuigou (GV 26) were observed as well as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) before the treatment, after 45 days and 90 days of treatment to assess the resuscitation time and rate. Also the clinical efficacy was compared between both groups. The occurrence rate of sneezing reflex was 85.7% (36/42) in the observation group, which was higher than 25.0% (10/40) in the control group (P < 0.01). The average resuscitation time was (64.6 +/- 19.4) days in the observation group, which was obviously shorter than (73.8 +/- 14. 6) days in the control group (P < 0.05). The resuscitation rate was 88.1% (37/42) in the observation group, which was similar to 75.0% (30/40) in the control group (P > 0.05). Compared before the treatment, GCS were both improved after the treatment in two groups (both P < 0.01). The 90-day GCS was 9.52 +/- 2.32 in the

  8. From peripheral to central: the role of ERK signaling pathway in acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Park, Jongbae J; Jeon, Songhee; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Lee, Hyangsook; Chae, Younbyoung; Maixner, William; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-05-01

    Despite accumulating evidence of the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture, its mechanism remains largely unclear. We assume that molecular signaling around the acupuncture needled area is essential for initiating the effect of acupuncture. To determine possible bio-candidates involved in the mechanisms of acupuncture and investigate the role of such bio-candidates in the analgesic effects of acupuncture, we conducted 2 stepwise experiments. First, a genome-wide microarray of the isolated skin layer at the GB34-equivalent acupoint of C57BL/6 mice 1 hour after acupuncture found that a total of 236 genes had changed and that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was the most prominent bio-candidate. Second, in mouse pain models using formalin and complete Freund adjuvant, we found that acupuncture attenuated the nociceptive behavior and the mechanical allodynia; these effects were blocked when ERK cascade was interrupted by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126 (.8 μg/μL). Based on these results, we suggest that ERK phosphorylation following acupuncture needling is a biochemical hallmark initiating the effect of acupuncture including analgesia. This article presents the novel evidence of the local molecular signaling in acupuncture analgesia by demonstrating that ERK activation in the skin layer contributes to the analgesic effect of acupuncture in a mouse pain model. This work improves our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Randomized Clinical Trial of Acupuncture for Myofascial Pain of the Jaw Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yoshi F.; Younger, Jarred; Goddard, Greg; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating symptoms associated with myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Methods Twenty-eight subjects over the age of 18 and diagnosed with chronic myofascial pain of the jaw muscles were randomized to receive real (n = 16) or sham (n = 12) acupuncture. Prior to treatment, each subject clenched his or her teeth for 2 minutes. Acupuncture or sham acupuncture was then administered at the Hegu large intestine 4 (LI4) acupoint for 15 minutes. Real acupuncture was given by penetrating the needle through a sticky foam pad at the acupoint. Sham acupuncture was conducted by pricking the skin, without penetration, with a shortened, blunted acupuncture needle through a foam pad placed away from the acupoint. General head and neck pain ratings were obtained before and after treatment on a numerical rating scale. A mechanical pain stimulus on the masseter muscle was given before and after treatment and rated on a visual analog scale to measure pain tolerance level. Paired t tests were performed to detect significant changes in pain levels. Results Subjects receiving real acupuncture experienced a significant reduction in jaw pain (P = .04), jaw/face tightness (P = .04), and neck pain (P = .04), and a significant increase in pain tolerance of the masseter muscle (P = .001). Subjects were not able to determine whether they received real or sham acupuncture (P = .69). No significant pain reductions were observed in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion A single acupuncture session using one acupoint at Hegu large intestine 4 significantly reduced most myofascial pain endpoints when compared to sham acupuncture. PMID:19888488

  10. Acupuncture and NATO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    MILITARY ACUPUNCTURE OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES Acupuncture and NATO Jean-Louis Belard, MD, Ret French Army Col,1 and Arnyce R. Pock, MD, Col, USAF...describes an opportunity by which acupuncture could be utilized as part of the initial military medical response to a cataclysmic disaster. Key Words... Acupuncture , NATO INTRODUCTION The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)was established in April 1949 as an intergovern- mental alliance aimed

  11. Battlefield Acupuncture: Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ACUPUNCTURE UPDATE 3 4C FIG. 3. Near-infrared spectroscopic measurements during electrical stimulation of battlefield acupuncture points in a 35-year-old fe...However, we have demonstrated for the first time that electric stimulation of the Battlefield Acupuncture points using an electric current, (1 mA), a...Battlefield Acupuncture points leads to dis- tinctive, reproducible changes in brain function. Perhaps comparatively small electric currents lead to similar

  12. Response to acupuncture treatment in horses with chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Babak; Lee, Dongbin; May, Kevin; Dong, Fanglong

    2017-08-01

    There is a need for evidence-based scientific research to address the question of the effectiveness of acupuncture in improving clinical signs of laminitis in horses. The objective of this study was to compare lameness levels before and after 2 acupuncture treatments in horses with chronic laminitis. Twelve adult horses with chronic laminitis received 2 acupuncture treatments 1 week apart. The points were treated using dry needling, hemo-acupuncture, and aqua-acupuncture. Lameness level was objectively evaluated using an inertial sensor-based lameness evaluation system (Lameness Locator), as well as routine examinations following American Association of Equine Practitioners scoring before the first and 1 week after the second acupuncture treatment. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test and P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Both the Lameness Locator (P = 0.0269) and routine lameness examination (P = 0.0039) showed a significant reduction in lameness severity. Our results support using acupuncture, along with other treatment options, in treating chronic equine laminitis.

  13. Discrimination accuracy between real and sham press needles in the hands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungha; Lee, Sanghun; Choi, Sunmi; Park, Jeonghwan; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the blinding effectiveness of a modified blunt sham press needle on the basis of the ability of subjects to discriminate between real and sham acupuncture needles compared with their discrimination ability based on pure guessing, and to define differences between senses (touch and vision) in the rates of correctly identified needles. Sixty-three healthy students and staff members were recruited through convenience sampling. First, real or sham acupuncture was randomly administered to the left LI4 point while subjects could not observe the needle tip. A real or sham needle tip was then shown to the subjects. Finally, a random combination of real or sham acupuncture needles were randomly administered to the left and right LI4 points, this time with the subjects observing the procedure. In all conditions the subjects gave their judgement as Yes or No in response to questions asking them to identify the needle type. The proportion of correct judgements (P(C)) was computed for the last part of the trial in left and right LI4 points, and the rates of correctly identified needles for each trial were obtained. The subjects' accuracy of discrimination between the real and sham acupuncture needles in left and right LI4 points was not significantly different from that based on pure guess (P(C)=0.50 (chance level)), which indicates complete inability to discriminate between needles. The rates of correctly identified needles using touch, vision and a combination of both senses were not significantly different (p=0.807). The findings from this study show that this sham acupuncture device successfully blinded subjects to real and sham press needles, suggesting that it is effective for subject blinding in studies on acupuncture using press needles, and facilitating evaluation of the effects of acupuncture in placebo-controlled trials using a rigorous scientific research methodology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  14. Evaluating validity of various acupuncture device types: a random sequence clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jungtae; Park, Jimin; Han, Gajin; Eun, Seulgi; Makary, Meena M; Park, Kyungmo; Lee, Junhee; Lee, Sanghoon

    2016-02-02

    Although various placebo acupuncture devices have been developed and used in acupuncture research, there is controversy concerning whether these devices really serve as appropriate placebos for control groups. The proposed study is a single-center prospective random sequence participant- and assessor-blinded trial with two parallel arms. A total of 76 participants will be randomly assigned to Group 1 or Group 2 in a 1:1 ratio. Group 1 will consist of Sham Streitberger's needle, Real Streitberger's needle, and Phantom acupuncture session. Group 2 will consist of Park Sham device with real needle, Park Sham device with sham needle, and no treatment session. Participants will have a total of three acupuncture sessions in a day. The primary endpoint is blinding test questionnaire 1. Secondary endpoints are the Bang's blinding index, the Massachusetts General Hospital Acupuncture Sensation Scale index, and physiological data including heart rate, heart rate variability, and skin conductance response. This trial will evaluate the relevance of using placebo acupuncture devices as controls using a validation test procedure. Clinical Research Information Service: KCT0001347 .

  15. [Application of acupuncture anesthesia during craniocerebral operation in temporo-fronto-occipital region].

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Jiang, C

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports 174 cases of brain operations in temporo-fronto-occipital region by using the regime of combined acupuncture and medication. The patients comprised of 122 males and 52 females. The acupoints consisted of ear needling and body needling. Adjuvant drugs used were half-dosage Innovar and 0.1% lidocaine for scalp infiltration. According to the documented two-grade scaling criteria, 97.1% patients belonged to grade I. No obvious discrepancy existed between ear needling group and body needling one. Three controlled groups are presented for comparison: 1) 0.1% lidocaine alone; 2) acupuncture plus normal saline; 3) acupuncture plus 0.1% lidocaine. The resultant P value was less than 0.005, with remarkable statistical significance. It is revealed that 0.1% lidocaine per se cannot achieve satisfactory analgesia, whereas the efficacy of acupuncture can be greatly enhanced by the combination of 0.1% lidocaine and acupuncture. This method is proved as an effectual means to offset the incomplete analgesia of acupuncture, especially for those requiring intraoperative demonstration of surgical effects, to avoid impairment to functional areas of cerebral cortex, which are undoubtedly superior to general anesthesia.

  16. Acupuncture and Equine Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    le Jeune, Sarah; Henneman, Kimberly; May, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most common veterinary integrative medicine modalities. Acupuncture can greatly contribute to a rehabilitation protocol by promoting analgesia, tissue healing, and muscle strength. Acupuncture is safe, has minimal detrimental side effects, and is well tolerated by most horses.

  17. [Design and establishment of modern literature database about acupuncture Deqi].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng-rong; Qian, Gui-feng; Pan, Qiu-yin; Wang, Yang; Xin, Si-yuan; Li, Jing; Hao, Jie; Hu, Ni-juan; Zhu, Jiang; Ma, Liang-xiao

    2015-02-01

    A search on acupuncture Deqi was conducted using four Chinese-language biomedical databases (CNKI, Wan-Fang, VIP and CBM) and PubMed database and using keywords "Deqi" or "needle sensation" "needling feeling" "needle feel" "obtaining qi", etc. Then, a "Modern Literature Database for Acupuncture Deqi" was established by employing Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition, introducing the contents, data types, information structure and logic constraint of the system table fields. From this Database, detailed inquiries about general information of clinical trials, acupuncturists' experience, ancient medical works, comprehensive literature, etc. can be obtained. The present databank lays a foundation for subsequent evaluation of literature quality about Deqi and data mining of undetected Deqi knowledge.

  18. INTEGRATING ACUPUNCTURE WITH EXERCISE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, LX; Mao, JJ; Fernandes, S; Galantino, ML; Guo, W; LaRiccia, P; Teal, V; Bowman, MA; Schumacher, HR; Farrar, JT

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee OA is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus non-penetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African-American) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and X-ray confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6–12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the Traditional Chinese “Bi” syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Results Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and non-penetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in WOMAC response rate (p=0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Conclusion Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than non-puncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit. PMID:23965480

  19. Integrating acupuncture with exercise-based physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan X; Mao, Jun J; Fernandes, Shawn; Galantino, Mary Lou; Guo, Wensheng; Lariccia, Patrick; Teal, Valerie L; Bowman, Marjorie A; Schumacher, H Ralph; Farrar, John T

    2013-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus nonpenetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African Americans) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and x-ray-confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6 to 12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the traditional Chinese "Bi" syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin-puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score at 12 weeks. Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and nonpenetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index response rate (P = 0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than nonpuncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit.

  20. [Analysis and strategy report on overseas large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Hui; Su, Yang-Shuai; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Shi, Hong; Chen, Shu-Li; Zhang, Lu; Jin, Zhi-Gao

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, studies of large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture were carried out in overseas. The literatures were conducted in Cochrane Library and overseas journals about systematic review of clinical effectiveness of acupuncture. The Cochrane Library contained a series of systematic reviews for the treatment of 67 kinds of diseases by acupuncture in 2009. Preliminary evaluations of clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on 37 kinds of disease were conducted. The results indicated that acupuncture therapy was effective for 7 kinds of disease, such as idiopathic headache, neck disorders, glaucoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting, primary dysmenorrhoea with TENS and knee osteoarthritis with TENS. However, these studies still need improved research designs and sufficient research evidence. The results also indicated that acupuncture was indecisive for the other 30 kinds of disease because of insufficient evidence. Through analysis, results of most systematic reviews indicated that there were no significant difference between therapeutic effects of acupuncture treatment and pseudo-acupuncture treatment. Effect of acupuncture treatment was equivalent to therapeutic effect of placebo. The likely reasons may be that some important clinical factors are disregarded in these researches, such as selection of acupoints, treatment with syndrome differentiation, the angel and depth of needle insertion, the proper time for treatment and so on. Therefore, the large-scale systematic evaluation on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture was criticized by acupuncturists. Thus, the pressing problem is to establish a rational evaluation system of clinical acupuncture. The suggestions are strengthening the research on diagnosis and treatment standard, strengthening the quality control of clinical acupuncture and establishing sound acupuncture control group and placebo acupuncture group. The basic researches on the

  1. The integration of acupuncture within medicine in the UK--the British Medical Acupuncture Society's 25th anniversary.

    PubMed

    Baldry, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Acupuncture was first used in China, probable about 2000 years ago. When acupuncture first arrived in the West in the 17th century, the principles which the Chinese had used to explain its actions were at variance with current scientific knowledge of the body's structure and function. This led to the rejection of acupuncture by the medical profession in the UK, although individual practitioners adopted it with enthusiasm, usually needling the point of maximal tenderness to treat musculoskeletal pain. Acupuncture was more generally accepted in France and Germany, where the pioneering British physician Felix Mann encountered it in the 1950s. He then taught acupuncture to other medical practitioners and organised regular meetings in London, from which the British Medical Acupuncture Society, BMAS, emerged in 1980. The tradition of biannual scientific meetings has continued since then. The Society has many connections with prominent acupuncturists internationally and is a founder member of the International Council of Medical Acupuncture and Related Techniques (ICMART), and has hosted two world congresses. The Society was involved in standardisation of the meridian nomenclature published in 1990. The Society's scientific journal, Acupuncture in Medicine, was founded in 1981 and has gained international recognition, being indexed on several databases. The Society has established regular teaching courses at different levels, which lead to professional qualifications of Certificate and Diploma. The membership is now open to different health professionals, has grown steadily and now stands at nearly 2500. The Society is administered from offices in Cheshire and London. Many individual members have contributed to the Society's characteristic Western 'medical' approach to acupuncture in which needling is seen as a form of neuromuscular stimulation that owes little to traditional meridians or points. The Society has shown a particular interest in acupuncture for myofascial

  2. More than DeQi: Spatial Patterns of Acupuncture-Induced Bodily Sensations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Mo; Shim, Woosun; Lee, Taehyung; Park, Hi-Joon; Ryu, Yeonhee; Beissner, Florian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture uses needles to stimulate certain parts of the body, inducing a specific sensation, termed DeQi, which regard as essential for acupuncture's therapeutic effect. Here, we used the newly developed tool, bodily sensation mapping, to investigate the spatial configuration of acupuncture-induced sensations throughout the body. Twenty-five participants randomly received acupuncture stimulation or tactile stimulation using a von Frey filament at four different acupoints (HT7, PC6, ST36, and SP10) on the left side of the body. Subjects evaluated the characteristics of DeQi sensations and marked the areas of induced sensations on a body outline. We compared the psychophysical responses of DeQi sensations and visualized the spatial patterns of these sensations using statistical parametric mapping. We found greater intensity of DeQi sensations following acupuncture stimulation compared with tactile stimulation, with relatively small differences among the four acupoints. The sensation maps exhibited similar spatial patterns for acupuncture and tactile stimulation in the areas close to the stimulated sites. However, acupuncture was associated with additional sensations in areas remote from the stimulated sites. This study demonstrates that acupuncture stimulation produces greater DeQi sensations than tactile stimulation and results in the spreading of sensations to areas remote from the stimulus sites. Investigating the spatial patterns of acupuncture-induced sensations may be crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture. PMID:27807402

  3. More than DeQi: Spatial Patterns of Acupuncture-Induced Bodily Sensations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won-Mo; Shim, Woosun; Lee, Taehyung; Park, Hi-Joon; Ryu, Yeonhee; Beissner, Florian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture uses needles to stimulate certain parts of the body, inducing a specific sensation, termed DeQi, which regard as essential for acupuncture's therapeutic effect. Here, we used the newly developed tool, bodily sensation mapping, to investigate the spatial configuration of acupuncture-induced sensations throughout the body. Twenty-five participants randomly received acupuncture stimulation or tactile stimulation using a von Frey filament at four different acupoints (HT7, PC6, ST36, and SP10) on the left side of the body. Subjects evaluated the characteristics of DeQi sensations and marked the areas of induced sensations on a body outline. We compared the psychophysical responses of DeQi sensations and visualized the spatial patterns of these sensations using statistical parametric mapping. We found greater intensity of DeQi sensations following acupuncture stimulation compared with tactile stimulation, with relatively small differences among the four acupoints. The sensation maps exhibited similar spatial patterns for acupuncture and tactile stimulation in the areas close to the stimulated sites. However, acupuncture was associated with additional sensations in areas remote from the stimulated sites. This study demonstrates that acupuncture stimulation produces greater DeQi sensations than tactile stimulation and results in the spreading of sensations to areas remote from the stimulus sites. Investigating the spatial patterns of acupuncture-induced sensations may be crucial for understanding the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture.

  4. [A brief talk on the embodiment of Three-Layer thought in the science of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qing-Song; Wang, Qing-Qi

    2014-07-01

    Three-Layer thought is an important proposition in Chinese traditional philosophy. This thought embodies the Chinese people's cosmology and methodology and exerts a far-reaching influence on various aspects of Chinese culture. The embodiment of Three-Layer thought in the theory and practice of acupuncture and moxibustion from naming of acupoints, principles of treatment, needling instruments, prescription of acupoints as well as needling techniques is elaborated and briefly analyzed. Thus it illustrates the comprehensive application of Three-Layer thought in acupuncture and moxibustion through the history and the significance of Chinese traditional philosophy in the science of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  5. [Summarization and analysis on the acupuncture-related articles published in science citation index (SCI) periodicals in 2005].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Yue; Wu, Li-Ping; Guo, Yi

    2007-04-01

    To retrieve, summarize and analyze journals and articles related to acupuncture published in SCI periodicals in 2005, so as to understand the international dynamics about acupuncture researches. The articles about treatment and mechanisms of acupuncture published in SCI periodicals in 2005 were found out and searched for by acupuncture information retrieval online and databank. Most of the 72 SCI periodicals retrieved are from the west, with 147 articles of acupuncture published, and Lancet has the highest impact factors of 23. 407. The kinds of the journals and articles publishing acupuncture researches are increasing, with varied types, rich and varied contents, and increasing the design level. However, the results of the studies are vastly different due to differences of experimental methods, objects and acupuncture manipulations. Therefore, standardization of acupuncture studies is extremely urgent.

  6. Magnetic needles and superparamagnetic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, H C; Sergatskov, D A; Lovato, Debbie; Adolphi, Natalie L; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles can be attached in great numbers to pathogenic cells using specific antibodies so that the magnetically-labeled cells themselves become superparamagnets. The cells can then be manipulated and drawn out of biological fluids, as in a biopsy, very selectively using a magnetic needle. We examine the origins and uncertainties in the forces exerted on magnetic nanoparticles by static magnetic fields, leading to a model for trajectories and collection times of dilute superparamagnetic cells in biological fluids. We discuss the design and application of such magnetic needles and the theory of collection times. We compare the mathematical model to measurements in a variety of media including blood. PMID:17664592

  7. Effect of “Deqi” during the Study of Needling “Wang's Jiaji” Acupoints Treating Spasticity after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanqin; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Cunzhi; Shi, Guangxia; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Chengmei; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Guiling; Zhao, Yin; Sun, Jingqing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Linpeng

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce spasticity and prevent the onset of spasticity after stroke. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of “Deqi” during needling “Wang's Jiaji” acupoints treating spasticity in the early stage of stroke. Methods. This study is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. 238 patients with stroke (<21 days) participated and were randomly allocated to the verum-acupuncture (n = 121) group or sham-acupuncture group (n = 117). The verum-acupuncture group received verum acupuncture required to produce the sense of “Deqi” while the sham-acupuncture group received sham acupuncture without “Deqi.” Patients in both groups followed the same 30 min acupuncture regimen 5 times per week for a period of 4 weeks. Scales of MAS, FMA, ADL, MBI, NIHSS, SS-QOL, and MRS were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, and 12 weeks after intervention. Results. Significant differences were observed between two groups. The MRS rating composition has the statistical difference after 4 weeks (P = 0.017). The score of MAS, FMA, Barthel, and SSQOL in verum-acupuncture group has increased significantly compared with the sham-acupuncture group after 12 weeks. There was 14% reduction of higher muscle tension in the verum-acupuncture group. Conclusion. Acupuncture “Wang's Jiaji” points with sensation of “Deqi” in the early stage may reduce the occurrence and decrease the severity of spasticity after stroke. PMID:25477996

  8. Acupuncture in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    So, Emily Wing Sze; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu

    2010-07-01

    Acupuncture is increasingly being used in reproductive medicine. This review summarizes the evidence of acupuncture in pain relief for oocyte retrieval, improving pregnancy outcomes of in vitro fertilization treatment, management of ovulation disorders, male subfertility, primary dysmenorrhea, endometriosis and menopausal symptoms. However, most of the studies are nonrandomized uncontrolled trials, case reports or case series. For randomized controlled trials, the sample size is underpowered and blinding of assessors is lacking. Different acupuncture protocols and controls are used. These heterogeneities make it difficult to compare studies and draw any firm conclusions. Further studies should also evaluate the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture and investigate the underlying mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  9. [Acupuncture therapy for the improvement of sleep quality of outpatients receiving methadone maintenance treatment: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Liu, Xue-bing; Zhang, Yao

    2012-08-01

    To study the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for the improvement of sleep quality of outpatients receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Using randomized double-blinded controlled design, seventy-five MMT outpatients with low sleep quality [score of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) > or = 8], were randomly assigned to the acupuncture group (38 cases) and the sham-acupuncture group (37 cases). All patients maintained previous MMT. Acupuncture was applied to Baihui (GV20), Shenmen (bilateral, TF4), Shenting (GV24), Sanyinjiao (bilateral, SP6), and Sishencong (EX-HN1) in the acupuncture group. The same procedures were performed in the sham-acupuncture group, but not to the acupoints (5 mm lateral to the acupoints selected in the acupuncture group) with shallow needling technique. The treatment was performed 5 times each week for 8 successive weeks. The PSQI was assessed before treatment, at the end of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th week of the treatment. The detection ratio of low sleep quality and the incidence of adverse acupuncture reactions were compared between the two groups at the end of the 8th week. The overall PSQI score was obviously higher in the acupuncture group than in the sham-acupuncture group with statistical difference (P < 0.01). The detection ratio of low sleep quality at the end of the 8th week was lower in the acupuncture group (60.53%, 23/38 cases) than in the sham-acupuncture group (83.78%, 31/37 cases) with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The rate of adverse acupuncture reaction was 5.26% (2/38 cases) in the acupuncture group and 2.70% (1/37 cases) in the sham-acupuncture group respectively, showing no statistical difference (P > 0.05). Acupuncture therapy could effectively and safely improve the sleep quality of outpatients receiving MMT.

  10. Local Changes in Microcirculation and the Analgesic Effects of Acupuncture: A Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Min, Seorim; Lee, Hyangsook; Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Ji-Yeun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyejung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Although the local response induced by acupuncture manipulation has been considered to be among the important factors that induce the effects of acupuncture, this connection has not yet been properly studied with standardized tools. The aims of this study are to examine the local changes in microcirculation that occur at different manipulation intensities and explore any associations of these changes with the analgesic effects of acupuncture. Participants/Interventions Twelve healthy volunteers received three acupuncture interventions (insertion only, a single manipulation, and repeated manipulations) at the right LI4 (Hegu or Hapgok) in random order. Outcome measures Skin blood perfusion was measured in a 100-mm2 area ellipse centered on LI4 by using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) before, during, and after acupuncture stimulation. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured at ipsilateral areas, including acupoints ST25 (abdomen), LI5 (hand), LI10 (arm), and SP9 (leg). Results Repeated acupuncture manipulations enhanced microcirculatory perfusion compared with the insertion-only (p<0.01) and the single-manipulation (p<0.05) conditions. The repeated acupuncture manipulations significantly decreased the pressure pain at ST25 compared with the other groups (each p<0.05). Of note, Spearman correlation analysis revealed significant correlation between changes of local perfusion and PPTs (r=0.393; p=0.018). Conclusions These results suggested that repeated manipulation induced higher local microcirculatory changes that were correlated with the analgesic effects at the relevant sites. The findings suggest that a proper dose of acupuncture stimulation might be essential to elicit the acupuncture effects. PMID:25354241

  11. Acupuncture and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2010-10-28

    Acupuncture is probably the most popular alternative therapy practiced in the United States, Europe and many Asian countries. It has been applied clinically for more than 5 thousand years according to the ancient oriental medical theory. A great deal of acupuncture research has been achieved, with particular efforts toward understanding the pain control effects. In addition to the analgesic effect of acupuncture, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can control autonomic nerve system functions such as blood pressure regulation, sphincter Oddi relaxation, and immune modulation. Although only a limited number of controlled studies have assessed the efficacy of acupuncture, increasing clinical evidences support that EA treatment is effective for various immunological diseases including allergic disorders, infections, autoimmune diseases and immunodifficiency-syndromes. This review will address the mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various immune responses and the relationship between acupuncture mediated immune regulation and neurological involvement.

  12. [For an updated acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Faust, S

    1998-09-01

    The author proposes an acupuncture which is characterized by its complete break with the ancient chinese physiopathology and its concepts of "acupuncture points" (in the old sense of the term) of "meridians", "energies", "ying-yang" etc.. This process of renewal of the practice and the theory has been coined "contemporary acupuncture". Its originality stands out in comparison with most teachings of acupuncture which have remained faithful to traditional acupuncture. Contemporary acupuncture creates bridges between acupunture and classical medicine. It offers simple therapeutic gestures to general practitioners. Acupuncture acts, from a clinical point of view, particularly through the following forms of action: a) a relaxing action on striated muscle; b) an anti-inflammatory action on the ligaments; c) an antidepressant and anxiolytic action.

  13. Acupuncture and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Ma, Sheng-Xing; Feng, Lili

    2005-07-01

    Acupuncture as a complex therapeutic system has been used to treat a variety of diseases and pathological conditions. Although the exact mechanism(s) of acupuncture remains unknown, some evidence suggests a mechanism initially involving signal transduction through connective tissue, with secondary involvement of other systems including the nervous system. Acupuncture has become increasingly popular in the Western countries as a therapy for pain and several chronic disorders difficult to manage with conventional treatments. Acupuncture and acupuncture-like somatic nerve stimulation have been used in different kidney diseases and several complications related to them. The effect of acupuncture techniques in some kidney diseases is reviewed on the basis of clinical reports as well as mechanisms that may possibly explain the beneficial effects mediated by acupressure/acupuncture. The potential effect of acupressure techniques in renal inflammation and whether these effects could be mediated through the newly identified cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway are discussed.

  14. A new diode laser acupuncture therapy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    Since the first laser-needles acupuncture apparatus was introduced in therapy, this kind of apparatus has been well used in laser biomedicine as its non-invasive, pain- free, non-bacterium, and safetool. The laser acupuncture apparatus in this paper is based on single-chip microcomputer and associated by semiconductor laser technology. The function like traditional moxibustion including reinforcing and reducing is implemented by applying chaos method to control the duty cycle of moxibustion signal, and the traditional lifting and thrusting of acupuncture is implemented by changing power output of the diode laser. The radiator element of diode laser is made and the drive circuit is designed. And chaos mathematic model is used to produce deterministic class stochastic signal to avoid the body adaptability. This function covers the shortages of continuous irradiation or that of simple disciplinary stimulate signal, which is controlled by some simple electronic circuit and become easily adjusted by human body. The realization of reinforcing and reducing of moxibustion is technological innovation in traditional acupuncture coming true in engineering.

  15. Is there any energy transfer during acupuncture?

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Yong-Heum; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Jeong, Dong-Myong; Kim, Mo Kyung; Eo, Yoon-Gi; Ko, Su-Bok

    2005-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy is based on the principle of restoring equilibrium of the body's energy state by regulating the flow of Qi in the corresponding meridians and acupoints. The purpose of this study was to determine whether bio-energy transfer occurs during acupuncture of the meridians. We treated 20 normal healthy subjects with acupuncture and measured changes in the direct current (DC) potential between the stomach meridian points ST-39 and ST-37 in response to invasive insertion of a needle at ST-36. Using a crossover study design, the practitioner performed the procedure on each subject once with bare (uncovered) hands (ABH) and once wearing surgical gloves (ASH) to shield the electric energy transfer. ABH produced a response pattern to each stimulation, whereas ASH produced a response pattern only to the first step. ABH elicited a significantly higher response potential than did ASH (p < 0.001). These results suggest that there may be bio-energy (Qi) transfer during acupuncture along the meridians. This transferred bio-energy (Qi) seems to act as an electromotive force, which is purported to remove the stagnation or blockage of energy and restore an equilibrium state.

  16. Multivariate Granger Causality Analysis of Acupuncture Effects in Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lijun; Xu, Maosheng; Wang, Fang; Yin, Liang; Peng, Xuming; Chen, Xinghua; Shi, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from clinical reports has indicated that acupuncture has a promising effect on mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, it is still unknown that by what way acupuncture can modulate brain networks involving the MCI. In the current study, multivariate Granger causality analysis (mGCA) was adopted to compare the interregional effective connectivity of brain networks by varying needling depths (deep acupuncture, DA; superficial acupuncture, SA) and at different cognitive states, which were the MCI and healthy control (HC). Results from DA at KI3 in MCI showed that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus emerged as central hubs and had significant causal influences with each other, but significant in HC for DA. Moreover, only several brain regions had remarkable causal interactions following SA in MCI and even few brain regions following SA in HC. Our results indicated that acupuncture at KI3 at different cognitive states and with varying needling depths may induce distinct reorganizations of effective connectivities of brain networks, and DA at KI3 in MCI can induce the strongest and more extensive effective connectivities related to the therapeutic effect of acupuncture in MCI. The study demonstrated the relatively functional specificity of acupuncture at KI3 in MCI, and needling depths play an important role in acupuncture treatments. PMID:24023568

  17. Remote Effect of Lower Limb Acupuncture on Latent Myofascial Trigger Point of Upper Trapezius Muscle: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai-Hua; Hsiao, Kuang-Yu; Lin, Chu-Hsu; Chang, Wen-Ming; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Hsieh, Wei-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To demonstrate the use of acupuncture in the lower limbs to treat myofascial pain of the upper trapezius muscles via a remote effect. Methods. Five adults with latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) of bilateral upper trapezius muscles received acupuncture at Weizhong (UB40) and Yanglingquan (GB34) points in the lower limbs. Modified acupuncture was applied at these points on a randomly selected ipsilateral lower limb (experimental side) versus sham needling on the contralateral lower limb (control side) in each subject. Each subject received two treatments within a one-week interval. To evaluate the remote effect of acupuncture, the range of motion (ROM) upon bending the contralateral side of the cervical spine was assessed before and after each treatment. Results. There was significant improvement in cervical ROM after the second treatment (P = 0.03) in the experimental group, and the increased ROM on the modified acupuncture side was greater compared to the sham needling side (P = 0.036). Conclusions. A remote effect of acupuncture was demonstrated in this pilot study. Using modified acupuncture needling at remote acupuncture points in the ipsilateral lower limb, our treatments released tightness due to latent MTrPs of the upper trapezius muscle. PMID:23710218

  18. [A case of transverse myelopathy caused by acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yamane, K; Ezima, M; Sugishita, Y; Nozaki, H

    1991-07-01

    A 54-year-old man received insertion of an acupuncture needle into the region extending from the posterior neck to the back on two occasions for the treatment of shoulder stiffness. Two weeks after the second acupuncture, he developed fever, dysarthria and mictionary disturbance, finally reaching the condition of tetraplegia. He was immediately admitted to an emergency room in our hospital, and was diagnosed as sepsis with DIC, ARDS, heart failure, renal failure, liver failure, and myelitis. After one month, he recovered with transverse myelopathy as a residual deficit. Neurological findings showed transverse myelopathy below the level of Th2 at that time. Cervical CT revealed an irregular low density at the periphery of the cervical vertebra from the C2 to C4 level. Cervical MRI revealed an irregular swelling of his spinal cord from the C2 to C7 level. We explained the mechanism of transverse myelopathy in this case as follows. After the acupuncture, he suffered a focal infection of the region of needle insertion, and then the infection expanded to the cervical vertebra, thus causing osteomyelitis, sepsis, and finally cervical myelitis. Direct injury of the spinal cord and nerve roots as a complication of acupuncture was previously reported, but indirect injury of the spinal cord due to myelitis had not been reported except our present case. Careful attentions should be paid to the complications of acupuncture.

  19. Acupuncture Deqi Intensity and Propagated Sensation along Channels May, Respectively, Differ due to Different Body Positions of Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Zhu; Yang, Yun-Kuan; Yang, Ming-Xiao; Feng, Shu-Wei; Hu, Xiao-Juan; Luo, Xiao; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an essential component of complementary and alternative medicine is gradually recognized and accepted by the mainstream of contemporary medicine. For obtaining preferable clinical effectiveness, Deqi is commonly regarded as efficacy predictor and parameter which is necessary to be achieved. Influential factors for acupuncture efficacy, like Deqi sensation as well as propagated sensation along channels (PSCs), enjoyed a long history in acupuncture basic research. Concerning this study, taking into account different positions on acupuncture Deqi sensation and PSCs, we would like to attest whether different body positions for subjects during needling procedure yield differed acupuncture Deqi sensation, particularly in terms of intensity, and PSCs. Methods. We used self-controlled method and selected 30 healthy subjects to perform needle insertion at Futu point (ST32) bilaterally. Then they were instructed to record the value of intensity of acupuncture sensation and the length and width of PSCs after removing the needle. Results. In regard to intensity of Deqi, kneeling seat position is stronger than supine position, accounting for 90% of the total number of subjects. In length of PSCs, kneeling seat position is greater than supine position, accounting for 56.7%. In width of PSCs, kneeling seat position is greater than supine position, accounting for 66.7%. Conclusion. Our findings show that needle inserting at Futu point (ST32) in kneeling seat position achieve better needle sensation and provide reference for clinical. PMID:24250720

  20. Acupuncture Deqi Intensity and Propagated Sensation along Channels May, Respectively, Differ due to Different Body Positions of Subjects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Zhu; Yang, Yun-Kuan; Yang, Jie; Yang, Ming-Xiao; Feng, Shu-Wei; Hu, Xiao-Juan; Luo, Xiao; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an essential component of complementary and alternative medicine is gradually recognized and accepted by the mainstream of contemporary medicine. For obtaining preferable clinical effectiveness, Deqi is commonly regarded as efficacy predictor and parameter which is necessary to be achieved. Influential factors for acupuncture efficacy, like Deqi sensation as well as propagated sensation along channels (PSCs), enjoyed a long history in acupuncture basic research. Concerning this study, taking into account different positions on acupuncture Deqi sensation and PSCs, we would like to attest whether different body positions for subjects during needling procedure yield differed acupuncture Deqi sensation, particularly in terms of intensity, and PSCs. Methods. We used self-controlled method and selected 30 healthy subjects to perform needle insertion at Futu point (ST32) bilaterally. Then they were instructed to record the value of intensity of acupuncture sensation and the length and width of PSCs after removing the needle. Results. In regard to intensity of Deqi, kneeling seat position is stronger than supine position, accounting for 90% of the total number of subjects. In length of PSCs, kneeling seat position is greater than supine position, accounting for 56.7%. In width of PSCs, kneeling seat position is greater than supine position, accounting for 66.7%. Conclusion. Our findings show that needle inserting at Futu point (ST32) in kneeling seat position achieve better needle sensation and provide reference for clinical.

  1. Acupuncture therapy to the head and face to treat post-trauma paralysis of peripheral fascial nerve dextra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihardja, H.; Meuratana, PA; Ibrahim, A.

    2017-08-01

    Damage to the facial nerve due to trauma from traffic accidents is the second most common cause of paralysis of the facial nerve. The treatments include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy. Acupuncture is a method of treatment that applies evidence-based medical principles and uses anatomy, physiology, and pathology to place needles atcertain acupuncture points. This paper describes a 26-year-old female patient with right-side facial palsy following a traffic accident who had animproved Brackmann’s score after 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture points were chosen based on Liu Yan’sbrain-clearing needling technique. Acupuncture can shorten healing time and improve the effect of treatment for facial-nerve paralysis.

  2. Differential cerebral response to somatosensory stimulation of an acupuncture point vs. two non-acupuncture points measured with EEG and fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Nierhaus, Till; Pach, Daniel; Huang, Wenjing; Long, Xiangyu; Napadow, Vitaly; Roll, Stephanie; Liang, Fanrong; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Witt, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can be regarded as a complex somatosensory stimulation. Here, we evaluate whether the point locations chosen for a somatosensory stimulation with acupuncture needles differently change the brain activity in healthy volunteers. We used EEG, event-related fMRI, and resting-state functional connectivity fMRI to assess neural responses to standardized needle stimulation of the acupuncture point ST36 (lower leg) and two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome). Cerebral responses were expected to differ for stimulation in two different dermatomes (CP2 different from ST36 and CP1), or stimulation at the acupuncture point vs. the control points. For EEG, mu rhythm power increased for ST36 compared to CP1 or CP2, but not when comparing the two control points. The fMRI analysis found more pronounced insula and S2 (secondary somatosensory cortex) activation, as well as precuneus deactivation during ST36 stimulation. The S2 seed-based functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity to right precuneus for both comparisons, ST36 vs. CP1 and ST36 vs. CP2, however in different regions. Our results suggest that stimulation at acupuncture points may modulate somatosensory and saliency processing regions more readily than stimulation at non-acupuncture point locations. Also, our findings suggest potential modulation of pain perception due to acupuncture stimulation. PMID:25741269

  3. Differential cerebral response to somatosensory stimulation of an acupuncture point vs. two non-acupuncture points measured with EEG and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Nierhaus, Till; Pach, Daniel; Huang, Wenjing; Long, Xiangyu; Napadow, Vitaly; Roll, Stephanie; Liang, Fanrong; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Witt, Claudia M

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can be regarded as a complex somatosensory stimulation. Here, we evaluate whether the point locations chosen for a somatosensory stimulation with acupuncture needles differently change the brain activity in healthy volunteers. We used EEG, event-related fMRI, and resting-state functional connectivity fMRI to assess neural responses to standardized needle stimulation of the acupuncture point ST36 (lower leg) and two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome). Cerebral responses were expected to differ for stimulation in two different dermatomes (CP2 different from ST36 and CP1), or stimulation at the acupuncture point vs. the control points. For EEG, mu rhythm power increased for ST36 compared to CP1 or CP2, but not when comparing the two control points. The fMRI analysis found more pronounced insula and S2 (secondary somatosensory cortex) activation, as well as precuneus deactivation during ST36 stimulation. The S2 seed-based functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity to right precuneus for both comparisons, ST36 vs. CP1 and ST36 vs. CP2, however in different regions. Our results suggest that stimulation at acupuncture points may modulate somatosensory and saliency processing regions more readily than stimulation at non-acupuncture point locations. Also, our findings suggest potential modulation of pain perception due to acupuncture stimulation.

  4. [Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) for central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Xin; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Nong; Zhang, Chun-Hong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2014-07-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) on central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke, and explore dose-effect relationship among different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) as well as its optimal treatment plan. According to different acupuncture stimulation intensities which were based on treatment time and needle insertion direction, fifty patients were randomly divided into a Hegu 1 group, a Hegu 2 group, a Hegu 3 group, a Hegu 4 group and a control group, ten cases in each one. Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) combined with facial paralysis acupoints, including Yingxiang (LI 20), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6) and Quanliao (SI 18), were applied in Hegu 1 to 4 groups; meanwhile acupuncture at stroke acupoints, including Neiguan (PC 6), Shuigou (GV 26) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), and medication treatment were adopted. Except acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4), the treatment of the control group was identical as Hegu groups. The treatment duration lasted for 14 days. The House-Brackmann facial never grading systems (H-B), Toronto facial grading system (TFGS), degrees of facial never paralysis (DFNP), facial disability index (FDI) and clinical efficacy were compared among groups. (1) Compared before the treatment, H-B, TFGS, DFNP and physical function score in FDI were all improved significantly in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups (all P < 0.05), but social function score in FDI was not obviously improved (all P > 0.05); all the scores in the control group were not evidently changed (all P > 0.05). (2) Compared with the control group, differences of H-B before and after treatment in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups, differences of TFGS in the Hegu 2 group and differences of DFNP in the Hegu 1 and Hegu 2 group were significantly improved (all P < 0.05). The differences of any scale among Hegu 1 to 4 groups were not significant (all P > 0.05), in which the most evident change was found in Hegu 2 group. (3) The total

  5. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  6. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2010-01-20

    Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most likely to have physiological activity), reduced heterogeneity and resulted in pooled short

  7. Heat transfer involved in a warm (moxa-heated) needle treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Vincent C; Sheu, Tony W H

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to reveal the temperature distributions in tissues around the GB38 acupoint during the warm (moxa-heated) needle treatment (WNT). The proposed WNT model involves a needle, needle handle and the calf section around the GB38 acupoint. For validating the numerical results, measurement using the calibrated infrared (IR) camera was also conducted. Our aim was to calculate the skin surface temperature and the temperatures under warm needle at different depths beneath the skin. From the temperature profile along the centerline of the acupuncture needle, the temperature is seen to decrease rapidly from the burning moxa section (200 degrees C) to the skin surface (36 degrees C). The temperature near the needle (36 degrees C) is only 1 degrees C higher than those predicted at other places (approximately 35 degrees C). This phenomenon explains why this treatment practice is called the warm needle rather than the hot needle treatment.

  8. Wound healing effect of acupuncture for treating phonotraumatic vocal pathologies: Cytokine study

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Edwin ML; Chan, Karen MK; Li, Nicole YK; Tsang, Raymond; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Kwong, Elaine; Ma, Estella PM; Tse, Fred W; Lin, ZX

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture is a less invasive procedure when compared with surgical treatment for benign vocal pathologies caused by vocal overuse. This study aimed to determine the wound healing effect of acupuncture in treating phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions. Study Design and Methods The study used a two-way mixed-model between- and within-subjects, prospective randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded, group design. Seventeen dysphonic individuals with vocal nodules were recruited from a university clinic in Hong Kong. Each participant was randomly assigned to receive one session of either genuine or sham acupuncture. The genuine acupuncture group (N=9) received needles puncturing nine voice-related acupoints for 30 minutes; while the sham acupuncture group (N=8) received blunted needles stimulating the skin surface of the nine acupoints for the same frequency and duration. Laryngeal secretions were suctioned from the surface of the vocal folds immediately before, immediately after, and 24 hours after the acupuncture. The protein concentration levels of wound-healing related cytokines (interlukin IL-1 and IL-10) in these secretion samples were measured. Results Following acupuncture, a significant increased in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was found in the genuine acupuncture group (N=9) but not in the sham acupuncture group (N=8). Conclusions The findings showed that acupuncture of voice-related acupoints facilitated an anti-inflammatory process in phonotraumatic vocal pathologies. This could be considered as supporting evidence to consider acupuncture as a less invasive alternative option, when compared to surgery, for treating phonotraumatic vocal pathologies. PMID:26227080

  9. 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation for laser acupuncture and optimization of illumination parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Fulin; Li, Ting; Pan, Boan; Wang, Pengbo

    2017-02-01

    Laser acupuncture is an effective photochemical and nonthermal stimulation of traditional acupuncture points with lowintensity laser irradiation, which is advantageous in painless, sterile, and safe compared to traditional acupuncture. Laser diode (LD) provides single wavelength and relatively-higher power light for phototherapy. The quantitative effect of illumination parameters of LD in use of laser acupuncture is crucial for practical operation of laser acupuncture. However, this issue is not fully demonstrated, especially since experimental methodologies with animals or human are pretty hard to address to this issue. For example, in order to protect viability of cells and tissue, and get better therapeutic effect, it's necessary to control the output power varied at 5mW 10mW range, while the optimized power is still not clear. This study aimed to quantitatively optimize the laser output power, wavelength, and irradiation direction with highly realistic modeling of light transport in acupunctured tissue. A Monte Carlo Simulation software for 3D vowelized media and the highest-precision human anatomical model Visible Chinese Human (VCH) were employed. Our 3D simulation results showed that longer wavelength/higher illumination power, larger absorption in laser acupuncture; the vertical direction emission of the acupuncture laser results in higher amount of light absorption in both the acupunctured voxel of tissue and muscle layer. Our 3D light distribution of laser acupuncture within VCH tissue model is potential to be used in optimization and real time guidance in clinical manipulation of laser acupuncture.

  10. Needle Phobia.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lynda S

    2016-01-01

    Venipuncture is generally associated with some degree of pain, discomfort, and/or apprehension. Yet most patients accept it with tolerance, even nonchalance. A few, not only pediatric patients, exhibit a higher degree of anxiety and face the procedure with tears, tension, and a variety of bargaining techniques (ie, stick on the count of 3; use only this vein). But for 1 group of people, venipuncture is associated with such fear that avoidance of the procedure is practiced. The end results are detrimental to the patient and may have an impact on society as well. These are patients the American Psychiatric Association classifies as needle phobic. What can a nurse with no training in psychiatry do to assist these patients? To form an appropriate professional response, it's beneficial for practitioners to recognize the different pathways that lead to needle phobia and the issues related to the disorder.

  11. Is acupuncture effective in the treatment of pain in endometriosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Iréne; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometriosis is a multifactorial, estrogen-dependent, inflammatory gynecological condition – often with long-lasting visceral pelvic pain of different origin, and infertility among women. Current management options for patients’ are often inadequate, with side effects for many for whom acupuncture techniques could be an alternative. Earlier studies have discussed the efficacy of acupuncture, but not its methodological aspects. Objectives To summarize the documented clinical effects of acupuncture on rated visceral pelvic endometriosis-related pain, and associated variables among individuals, within and between studied groups, and to discuss the methodological treatment aspects. Methods Published full text clinical studies, case reports, and observational studies with abstracts written in English were searched by using the keywords “Acupuncture and Endometriosis” in databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL. The reporting guidelines, Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture was used for the methodological report. Results Three studies were found including 99 women, 13–40 years old, with diagnosed endometriosis. The studies were different in research design, needle stimulation techniques, and evaluation instruments. Methodological similarities were seven to12 needle insertions per subject/session, and 15–25 minutes of needle retention time. The needles were placed in lower back/pelvic-abdominal area, in the shank, feet, and hands. Treatment numbers varied from nine to 16 and patients received one to two treatments per week. Similarity in reported treatment effects in the quoted studies, irrespective of research design or treatment technique, was reported decrease of rated pain intensity. Discussion Meta-analysis is the standard procedure for the evaluation of evidence of treatment effects, ie, on a group level, usually without analysis of the individual responses even with obvious spread in the

  12. Acupuncture in De Quervain's disease: a treatment proposal.

    PubMed

    da Silva, João Bosco Guerreiro; Batigália, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    De Quervain's disease is a painful stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the hand affecting the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis, caused mainly by overuse. Conventional treatments include rest, immobilisation, oral anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injection and even surgery, but none of these is established as clearly effective. Acupuncture is rarely mentioned and the points suggested are rather general-regional, tender and ah shi points. Tendinopathy is almost always associated with problems in the relevant muscles and this paper calls attention to the correct identification and needling of the affected muscles, in order to increase the specificity of acupuncture treatment.

  13. Coupling IR Thermography and BIA to analyse body reaction after one acupuncture session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquemal, M.

    2013-04-01

    Coupling both thermography and bio-Impedance, some biophysical acupuncture mechanisms are statically studied on a small population of 18 subjects. Results show that a possible way of understanding acupuncture, in an electrical way, should be to consider ionic flux redistribution between vascular and extra cell compartments. This is a two steps mechanism. The first one is starting with needles insertion and the second one is lasting with more intensity after removing them from skin.

  14. [Treatment of otorhinolaryngologic diseases of deficient heat type with Professor XIE Qiang's Tihu Guanding needling method].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Xie, Qiange; Huang, Bing-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Professor XIE Qiang's Tihu Guanding needling method, a kind of acupuncture method which takes acupoints of the Conception Vessel as the primary and acupoints of the Governor Vessel as the secondary. Acupoints Lianquan (CV 23), Tiantu (CV 22), Qihai (CV 6), Zhongwan (CV 12), Baihui (GV 20) and Dazhui (GV 14) are adopted as the basic ones. Other points can be added according to various symptoms, for instance, Yingxiang (LI 20) and Yintang (GV 29) for rhinopathy, Tinggong (SI 19) and Yifeng (TE 17) for otopathy, Yan'an (Professor XIE's experience) and Shanglianquan (EX-HN 21) for pharyngopathy and Kaiyin 1 (Professor XIE's experience) and Kaiyin 2 (Professor XIE's experience) for laryngopathy. During the needle retention, rotation manipulation should be done every 5 min at Lianquan (CV 23). And the patient should be told to put the tip of one's tongue at the the palate as well as to do deep breathing to communicate the Conception Vessel and the Governor Vessel. Moxibustion is adopted at Yongquan (KI 1) to induce the up floating fire to mingmen (where the primary yang is stored). The therapeutic effect on treatment of persistent otorhinolaryngologic diseases with the above mentioned method is approve to be good.

  15. [Treatment of autism with scalp acupunctur].

    PubMed

    Li, Nuo; Jin, Bing-Xu; Li, Jie-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Huan

    2011-08-01

    To verify the efficacy on autism treated with scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice in children. Seventy cases of child autism were divided into an observation group (30 cases) and a control group (40 cases). In observation group, the cases were treated with scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice, in combination with music therapy and structure education method. Scalp acupuncture was applied to intelligent nine needles (frontal five needles, Sishencong (EX-HN 1)), affection area, heart and liver area, once a day, at the interval once every one week. Totally, 60 treatments made one session. In control group, music therapy and structure education method were applied simply. Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, Childhood Autism Behavior Scale (CARS), Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) and Gesell Developmental Scale (social adaptive behaviors and language development) were adopted to assess the scores before treatment and after 1 session of treatment. After treatment, the scores in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, CARS and ABC were lower apparently in observation group as compared with those before treatment (all P < 0.01), and the scores in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale and ABC were lower than those in control group (both P < 0.01). In observation group, the scores of social adaptive behavior scale and language development scale were improved obviously after treatment (both P < 0.01), which were all higher than those in control group (both P < 0.01). In observation, between the group aged from 4 to 6 years and the group aged from 2 to 3 years, the value differences in Clancy Autism Behavior Scale, ABC and social adaptive development scale did not present statistical significance in group comparison before and after treatment (all P > 0.05). Scalp acupuncture for regaining the consciousness and opening the orifice can significantly improve the efficacy on autism, effectively relieve child autism symptoms and

  16. Effects of acupuncture for initiation of labor: a double-blind randomized sham-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ajori, Ladan; Nazari, Leila; Eliaspour, Dariush

    2013-05-01

    This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate whether use of acupuncture could initiate labor at term and thus reduce post-term induction. Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 80 women at 38 weeks of gestation or greater were randomized to acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. Acupuncture points LI4, SP6 and BL67 were needled bilaterally. The primary outcome was initiation of labor. The time from acupuncture to delivery, mode of delivery, fetal and maternal outcome and Apgar scores were recorded. The trial is registered at irct.ir, number IRCT201111218151N1. Eighty women were randomized and 75 women completed the study procedure. Age, BMI, parity and gestational age were similar in both groups. Spontaneous labor was initiated in 94.7 % of acupuncture group and 89.2 % of sham acupuncture group (p = 0.430). There were no statistically significant difference between groups for time from enrollment to delivery (p = 0.06). According to this study, it seems that acupuncture was not effective in labor initiation compared to sham acupuncture.

  17. Laser therapy on points of acupuncture: Are there benefits in dentistry?

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Renata Ferreira; da Silva, Camila Vieira; Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown the use of laser therapy at points of acupuncture as an alternative to metal needles. The scientific literature in the area of laser acupuncture is rather large; however, the actual mechanisms and effects have not yet been proven in detail. Therefore, the current manuscript reviews the existing literature regarding the effects of laser acupuncture in Dentistry, seeking treatment modalities in which this technique is used and which are able to generate positive clinical results. Thus, the literature survey was conducted in electronic databases--Medline/Pubmed, VHL and Science Direct--using the uniterms "alternative medicine", "low-power laser and acupuncture", "laser acupuncture and dentistry" and "laser therapy and acupuncture". Retrospective and prospective clinical studies were considered. According to the findings of the literature, laser therapy at points of acupuncture was effective for the treatment of various orofacial problems encountered in dentistry, but there are still many differences among the parameters used for irradiation and there is a lack of important information reported by the studies, such as the wavelength, dose, power density, irradiation time and frequency, points of acupuncture selected for irradiation and therapy outcomes. Although these results indicate the potential benefit of the use of laser therapy at points of acupuncture on Dentistry, further double-blinded, controlled clinical trials should be carried out in order to standardize protocols for clinical application.

  18. Acupuncture and Immune Function in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Liong, Men Long; Yuen, Kah Hay; Krieger, John N

    2014-01-01

    Objective The immune system has been implicated as one mechanism underlying the benefits of acupuncture therapy. Evidence suggests that acupuncture can ameliorate symptoms of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), but the association between clinical response and the immune system has not been investigated. Design/Setting We investigated 12 CP/CPPS patients participating in a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing acupuncture versus sham acupuncture for effects on cellular immunity. Blood samples were taken before the first needling and after the last of 20 treatment sessions (week 10). Patients also completed questionnaires examining their CP/CPPS symptoms and mood status at the baseline and end of study visits. Results At the end of study 8 of 12 participants (67%) were classified as treatment responders, 4 participants each from the acupuncture and sham groups. The acupuncture group averaged a 5% increase in natural killer cell levels compared to corresponding sham (-13%; p=0.03). Similarly, patients randomized to acupuncture reported a reduction in other white blood cell parameters examined, supporting the possibility that immunity might be important in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS. Conclusions The specific effect of acupuncture on CP/CPPS remains unclear. Further research is warranted to examine the mechanisms by which acupuncture therapy may improve clinical symptoms in patients with CP/CPPS. PMID:25453515

  19. The analgesic effect of acupuncture in chronic tennis elbow pain.

    PubMed

    Molsberger, A; Hille, E

    1994-12-01

    The immediate analgesic effect of a single non-segmental acupuncture stimulation treatment on chronic tennis elbow pain was studied in a placebo-controlled single-blind trial completed by 48 patients. Before and after treatment, all patients were examined physically by an unbiased independent examiner. Eleven-point box scales were used [13] for pain measurement. Patients in the verum group were treated at non-segmental distal points (homolateral leg) for elbow pain following Chinese acupuncture rules, whereas patients in the placebo group were treated with placebo acupuncture avoiding penetration of the skin with an acupuncture needle. Overall reduction in the pain score was 55.8% (S = 2.95) in the verum group and 15% (S = 2.77) in the placebo group. After one treatment 19 out of 24 patients in the verum group (79.2%) reported pain relief of at least 50% (placebo group: six patients out of 24). The average duration of analgesia after one treatment was 20.2 h in the verum group (S = 21.54) and 1.4 h (S = 3.50) in the placebo group. The results are statistically significant (P < 0.01); they show that non-segmental verum acupuncture has an intrinsic analgesic effect in the clinical treatment of tennis elbow pain which exceeds that of placebo acupuncture.

  20. Cortical Activation Patterns of Bodily Attention triggered by Acupuncture Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, In-Seon; Wallraven, Christian; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-01-01

    We investigated commonalities and differences in brain responses to enhanced bodily attention around acupuncture points with and without stimulation. Fourteen participants received acupuncture needles at both PC6 and HT7 acupoints in the left hand. To enhance bodily attention to acupoints, participants responded to the locations of stimulations in a two-alternative forced choice task. Two fMRI scans were taken in a block design: session 1 labeled with manual stimulation (genuine stimulation) and session 2 labeled with electro-acupuncture (pseudo-stimulation). To compare cortical activation patterns, data were analyzed using the Freesurfer software package. Both genuine-and pseudo-stimulation resulted in brain activations in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, superior parietal cortex, and brain deactivation in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and the parahippocampus. Genuine acupuncture stimulation exhibited greater brain activation in the posterior insula, posterior operculum and the caudal part of the anterior cingulate cortex, compared with pseudo-stimulation. We demonstrated that enhanced bodily attention triggered by genuine acupuncture stimulation can activate the salience network and deactivate the default mode network regardless of the type of stimulation. The component of enhanced attention to a certain part of the body is significant in the brain response to acupuncture stimulation. PMID:26211895

  1. Orthogonal design to sift the optimal parameter of Neiguan acupuncture for cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanan; Yang, Sha; Fan, Xiaonong; Wang, Shu; He, Nina; Li, Lingxin; Luo, Ding; Shi, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    The individual difference and non-repeatability in acupuncture have not only restricted the development of acupuncture, but have also affected the specificity of acupoints. The present study used instruments to control needle depth, lifting and thrusting frequency, and the duration of acupuncture. Effects of the quantified acupuncture were observed at Neiguan (PC6) with different stimulation parameters. A frequency of 1, 2, or 3 Hz and duration of 5, 60, or 180 seconds were used to observe cerebral blood flow and ratio of infarct volume recovery. Results showed that stimulation at Neiguan with a frequency of 1 Hz and long duration of 180 seconds or 2/3 Hz and long duration of 5/60 seconds significantly increased cerebral blood flow and decreased the ratio of infarct volume. Interactions between frequency and duration play a critical role in quantified acupuncture therapy. PMID:25206575

  2. Electro-acupuncture at different acupoints modulating the relative specific brain functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiliang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yin; Liu, Hesheng; Hong, Yang; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Kehua; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Song, Ming; Liu, Baoyan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-11-01

    Objective: The specific brain effects of acupoint are important scientific concern in acupuncture. However, previous acupuncture fMRI studies focused on acupoints in muscle layer on the limb. Therefore, researches on acupoints within connective tissue at trunk are warranted. Material and Methods: Brain effects of acupuncture on abdomen at acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zhongwan (CV12) were tested using fMRI on 21 healthy volunteers. The data acquisition was performed at resting state, during needle retention, electroacupuncture (EA) and post-EA resting state. Needling sensations were rated after every electroacupuncture (EA) procedure. The needling sensations and the brain functional activity and connectivity were compared between CV4 and CV12 using SPSS, SPM2 and the local and remote connectivity maps. Results and conclusion: EA at CV4 and CV12 induced apparent deactivation effects in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network. The default mode of the brain was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The functional brain network was significantly changed post EA. However, the minor differences existed between these two acupoints. The results demonstrated similarity between functional brain network mode of acupuncture modulation and functional circuits of emotional and cognitive regulation. Acupuncture may produce analgesia, anti-anxiety and anti-depression via the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN).

  3. [Effect of "Jin three-needle therapy" on cognitive function and activity of daily living in patients of hemiplegia after stroke: a multi-central randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi-fen; Zhuang, Li-xing; Jia, Chao; Chen, Xing-hua; Wu, Si-ping; Jiang, Gui-mei; Zhu, Bo-chang; Xu, Di-jing; Pan, Chao-an

    2009-09-01

    To provide reliable evidence of "J in three-needle therapy" for treatment of stroke. Multi-central randomized controlled trials were adopted, 180 hemiplegia patients of ischemic stroke were randomly divided into a fin three-needle group (90 cases) and a routine acupuncture group (90 cases). Two groups were both treated with basic neurology therapies, and J in three-needle group was treated with J in three-needle therapy, three acupoints of tempora, hand and foot etc. were selected; the routine acupuncture group was treated with traditional acupuncture, Quchi (LI 11), Huantiao (GB 30), Futu (ST 32) etc. were selected. Both groups were treated with acupuncture for 5 weeks. The cognitive function score of functional comprehensive assessment scale (FCA), the scores of mini-mental state examination scale (MMSE) and modified Barthel index (BI) were compared before and after treatment between two groups. Results After treatment, the scores of FCA, MMSE and BI in both groups were significantly improved compared to those before treatment (P < 0.01, P < 0.05); the improvement of FCA score, MMSE score and BI score in the J in three-needle group were superior to those of the routine acupuncture group after treatment (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The total effective rate of 85.4% in the J in three-needle group was superior to tohat of 70.0% in the routine acupuncture group (P < 0.05). J in three-needle acupuncture treatment can obviously improve the cognitive function and activity ability of daily life of hemiplegia patients after stroke, and the therapeutic effect of J in three-needle therapy is superior to that of traditional acupuncture treatment.

  4. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  5. Hemopericardium Following Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Heon; Lee, Yong Jik; Hong, Jung Seok; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Eun Seog

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture-related hemopericardium is a rare but potentially fatal complication. We describe a hemopericardium that occurred shortly after acupuncture in a 55-year-old woman. A chest CT scan and echocardiography revealed a hemopericardium, and pericardiocentesis was then immediately and successfully performed. Subsequently, her clinical course improved. This case increases the attention of emergency physicians for acupuncture-related complications, especially hemopericardium, and the necessity of rapid diagnosis and management. PMID:21155058

  6. [Newly devised subcutaneous needle electrodes for EMG recording].

    PubMed

    Okabe, Y; Koibuchi, H; Ai, M; Hibi, H; Haketa, T

    1991-09-01

    Subcutaneous needle electrodes made of stainless steel were newly devised for ease of handling and perfect insulation. This needle (phi 0.20 mm) is used for acupuncture. The electrodes had the capability to record the EMG activity easily from a certain muscle. Then, the EMG activities of the masseter muscle were recorded with both these needle electrodes and surface electrodes and the results were compared. 1. Insertion of the electrodes into the subcutaneous tissue was easily performed because of the application of the acupuncture needle and their lightness of 0.2g was effective in fixing the electrodes on the skin without causing any tension. 2. After the insertion of the needle electrodes, the impedance showed below 5 kohm immediately, and the EMG recordings during biting could be simply achieved with great stability. 3. The action potential from the needle electrodes was less than that from the surface ones. The former reacted more sensitively to the change in the distance between the electrodes, compared with the latter.

  7. [Transition of the blind acupuncture and massage industry and its impacts in Japan].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    After being introduced to Japan, the Chinese acupuncture and massage therapy has changed a lot, in which the influence aroused by the blind practitioners cannot be ignored. Through analyzing the development and the transition of the blind acupuncture and massage industry in Japan, it is found that the tube needle technique, changeable acupoints concept, technical deviation and the importance on acupoints rather than meridians are still existed commonly today, which are introduced by the blind acupuncture and massage practitioners, the special group in Japan. In the process of development, the interaction with the governmental strategy has played the essential role in the consolidation of the above features.

  8. Laser diode fiber optic apparatus for acupuncture treatment by the Oriental method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Phung, Huu A.; Bui, Huy; Hoang, Cao D.; Vu, Duc T.; Tran, Minh T.; Nguyen, Minh H.

    1998-08-01

    The laser acupuncture equipment using laser diodes of 850, 1300 nm and optical fibers as light needles is presented. The double-frequency modulation of laser beam gives the high efficiency treatment of the low-power laser therapy by the oriental acupuncture method. The laser spot from optical fiber of 50 microns is suitable for the irradiation into special points on body or auricular by the acupuncture treatment schema. The laser intensity in pulse regime of 5 - 40 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 5 - 15 minutes are optimum for treatment of neurosis symptoms and pain-relieving.

  9. [Analysis on acupuncture related articles published in periodicals in science citation index (SCI) in 2008].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; He, Wen-Ju; Guo, Yi

    2010-09-01

    Acupuncture related articles published in periodicals in Science Citation Index (SCI) in 2008 were summarized and analyzed. About 583 articles were collected using "acupuncture" and "in 2008" as keywords in the Web of Science data base by information retrieval. These papers were summarized and analyzed from various aspects of country, language, subject category, literature type, publication sources, impact factor, research method, acupoints, disease category and needling methods by using Excel software combined with manual sorting of the literature, the aim is to provide a reference for domestic acupuncture research.

  10. [Analysis of LIU Zhang-jie's acupuncture academic thoughts: an outstanding follower of Chengjiang acupuncture school].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Xia, You-Bing; Meng, Xian-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Shu

    2012-10-01

    Mr. LIU Zhang-jie, one of the disciples of CHENG Dan-an who is considered as the initiator of the Chengjiang acupuncture school, is a famous acupuncturist in Fujian Province. With the collection and arrangement of Mr. LIU's literatures, medical records, books and interview of his student. ZHANG Yong-shu, Mr. LIU's academic characteristics are analyzed and summarized in this paper, mainly including being focused on finger power and manipulating without pain; being good at direct moxibustion to elevate yang-qi and drive out evil spirits; highlighting meridian syndrome differentiation and combined use of the four diagnostic methods; each disease has its own pathogeny, eliminating pathogen is the key; valuing the curative effect with flexible apply of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. In a word, Mr. LIU, who inherited the school's scholarism and developed it into next level, is one of Chengjiang acupuncture school's representative figures.

  11. History of acupuncture research.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yi; Xing, Jing-jing; Li, Juan; Zeng, Bai-Yun; Liang, Fan-rong

    2013-01-01

    The acupuncture has been practiced in China for more than 3000 years and was spread to Europe and American from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The history of acupuncture research was initiated in the eighteenth century and developed rapidly since then. In the past, physicians tried hard to apply acupuncture into clinical practice, while scientists were focused on the possible characteristics of acupoints and meridians. In the modern time, scientists have strived hard to evaluate the real effectiveness of acupuncture and the underlying physiological and biological mechanisms of acupuncture. Reviewing research history from past to present, we are delighted to witness this wonderful development. Accumulated evidences that acupuncture is beneficial in various conditions significantly enhanced our understanding the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment. However, there is still no conclusive evidence in acupuncture clinical studies. The clinical research still needs great improving, while the basic research results need to be appropriately transformed into clinical outcomes. Based on current achievements, we believe that although the challenges and difficulties exist, a more collaborative, innovative, and integrated approach will help us to achieve further progress in future acupuncture research.

  12. Effects of acupuncture on quality of life and pain in patients with osteoporosis-a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Joerg; Korallus, Christoph; Bethge, Matthias; Karst, Matthias; Schmalhofer, Marie-Lena; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Fink, Matthias Georg

    2016-12-01

    In this sham-controlled study, 53 patients received 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 5 weeks to investigate the effects of acupuncture on the pain and quality of life of patients with osteoporosis. The results showed significant favorable effects of verum acupuncture on quality of life. Both interventions showed sustained and clinically relevant effects on pain. Standard analgesic treatment is associated with adverse events in patients with osteoporosis, especially elderly and/or comorbid patients. As acupuncture has gained widespread acceptance as a complementary treatment modality with few side effects, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on the pain and quality of life of patients with osteoporosis. In total, 53 patients with vertebral compression fractures, osteoporosis-associated spinal deformities, and resultant pain were randomly allocated to the verum acupuncture with deep needling of specific points following the principles of traditional Chinese medicine (n = 29) or control acupuncture group with superficial needling of non-acupuncture points (n = 24). All patients received 10 sessions of standardized verum or control acupuncture treatment over 5 weeks. Pain (VAS score 1-100) and quality of life (QUALEFFO-41) were measured at the start of treatment (T0), before each acupuncture session (T1), and at 1 (T2) and 3 months (T3) post-treatment. Both acupuncture treatments significantly reduced activity-related pain and pain at rest over time. The verum acupuncture group experienced a significantly greater reduction in mean pain intensity at rest than the control group. In the control group, quality of life improved only temporarily post-treatment (T2) and slightly declined at the end of the follow-up period (T3). In contrast, patients in the verum acupuncture group experienced continuous and significant improvements in quality of life up to 3 months after treatment (T3). Both types of acupuncture were equally

  13. [Clinical observation on fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina for knee osteoarthritistis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang-Lai; Yao, Jun-Han; Guo, Jun-Xiong

    2013-08-01

    To explore a better therapy for knee osteoarthritis. One hundred cases were randomly divided into a comprehensive group and an acupuncture group, 50 cases in each one. The comprehensive treatment of fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina on local area of affected knee was applied in the comprehensive group. The Ashi points were mainly selected in the fire needles at bones therapy, once every other day. The cupping and Tuina therapy was adopted once a day. The conventional acupuncture was applied in the acupuncture group, in which Dubi (ST 35), Neixiyan (EX-LE 4), Xuehai (SP 10), Liangqiu (ST 34) and so on were selected, once a day. Ten days of treatment were taken as a treatment course in both two groups, and totally 1 to 2 courses was required. The pain score of joint before and after the treatment was observed and efficacy was assessed in two groups. Compared before the treatment, the pain score of joint after the treatment was obviously improved in two groups (both P<0.05), and the score in the comprehensive group was lower than that in the acupuncture group (P<0.05). The clinical cured rate was 38.0% (19/50), which was superior to 20.0% (10/50) in the acupuncture group. The comprehensive treatment of fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina, considered as a better therapy for knee osteoarthritis, could improve joint pain, swelling and action function, which is superior to the conventional acupuncture.

  14. Are reviews based on sham acupuncture procedures in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) valid?

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, Thomas; Lund, Iréne

    2007-09-01

    In recent reviews regarding the efficacy of acupuncture in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) it has been concluded that acupuncture has no specific effect since the control procedure (superficial needling and/or needling away from 'specific' points) had similar effects. These conclusions may be questioned since superficial needling and/or needling away from specific trigger points is not inert. Also, manual acupuncture or mild electroacupuncture (EA) may not be sufficient to activate the endogenous pain inhibiting system. Patients with FMS suffer from allodynia, fatigue and muscle ache, which is partly explained by peripheral and central sensitisation. Sensitisation results in augmented and altered stimulus responses whereby light stimulation of the skin has as strong an effect as regular needling on the pain inhibitory system in FMS. Central sensitisation in FMS is also associated with expanded receptive fields of central neurons resulting in a larger topographic distribution of the pain. This would suggest that control procedures using needling away from the 'specific site' might have as strong an effect as needling within the most painful area. Also, repeated nociceptive input from muscles (as obtained by de qi) results in expansion of receptive fields which in turn may result in activation of descending pain inhibition outside the stimulated myotome. Sensitisation to pain, such as in FMS, may also be related to abnormalities in descending efferent pathways. As there is likely to be an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems in FMS, stronger stimulation may therefore be needed to activate the descending pain inhibitory system. In studies using mild manual acupuncture or weak EA stimulation optimal pain inhibition may therefore not have been obtained. When conducting studies on acupuncture, the clinical condition or syndrome needs to be taken into account and the control procedure designed accordingly.

  15. [ZHU Lian's New Acupuncture Academic System and acupuncture science initialization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-11-01

    Acupuncture scientization was a consensus of most of acupuncture scholars who had long-term perspectives in the 20th century, among them Ms. ZHULian was the important one. Ms. ZHU Lian built a systemic new acupuncture" academic structure in practice and theory aspects. At the same time, as the main architect of Institute of Acupuncture-moxibustion of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ms. ZHU Lian was the first one who began to carry out the acupuncture clinical trail and laboratory experiment in modern way, which meant "acupuncture therapy" was transformed into "acupuncture science" by Ms. ZHULian's endeavor.

  16. [Early Western observations of moxibustion and acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Michel, W

    1993-01-01

    Earlier research has maintained that the earliest passage of written information about acupuncture and moxibustion to Western Europe took place around the middle of the 17th century. But an investigation into the letters, 'historias', dictionaries, grammars, etc. of the Jesuit mission in Japan, which started in 1549, shows that the missionaries there already enjoyed a considerable knowledge of both methods of treatment. These sources also reveal indications of the use of needles and moxa on horses as well as the use of 'hammer-needles', a Japanese invention which was later described in detail by Willem ten Rhijne and Engelbert Kaempfer. Furthermore some central Sinojapanese terms of anatomy, physiology and pulse diagnosis in the light of their European interpretations, and a hitherto unknown outline of Japanese medicine found in an early French book on Chinese sphygmology are presented.

  17. [Observation on the long-term efficacy of knee osteoarthritis treated with warm needling and rehabilitation training].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Kan, Jun-Wei; Zheng, Xu; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ji

    2013-03-01

    To observe the long-term efficacy and safety of warm needling therapy combined with rehabilitation training in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) for the patients living in simple room after earthquake. Eighty-eight cases of KOA were randomized into a warm needling group and an acupuncture group, 44 cases in each one. In the warm needling group, the warm needling therapy was applied at Neixiyan (EX LE 4) and Dubi (ST 35), in combination with rehabilitation training. In the acupuncture group, the same rehabilitation training was received, and the same acupoints were selected as the warm needling group, but only stimulated with acupuncture without moxibustion applied. The clinical efficacy was observed after 20 treatments and in 1-2 months of follow-up. The total effective rate was 100.0% (41/41) in the warm needling group, which was apparently superior to 85.4% (35/41) in the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). The symptom integral, pain and knee joint function score were all improved significantly after 20 treatments in both groups (all P < 0.05). The improvements in symptoms and pain in the warm needling group were superior apparently to the acupuncture group (all P < 0.05). The efficacy remained well within 2 months follow-up (all P < 0.05). But the difference in knee joint function score was not statistically significant between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The combined therapy of warm needling and rehabilitation training achieves the superior efficacy and good safety in the treatment of KOA as compared with the combined therapy of simple acupuncture and rehabilitation training for the patients living in simple room after earthquake.

  18. [Research thoughts and methodology on efficacy specificity of needling and moxibustion methods based upon data mining].

    PubMed

    Jia, Chun-sheng; Li, Xiao-feng; Wang, Jian-ling; Xu, Jing

    2011-02-01

    The method for needling and moxibustion is an indispensable component of acupuncturology. In clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion, efficacy specificity of different needling and moxibustion methods for different clinical conditions or different phases of a disease exists objectively, which is in a close relation with the results of clinical interventions. Starting with the correlation between the efficacy specificity of different needling and moxibustion methods and different clinical conditions or syndromes, the authors of the present paper put forward to collect abundant literature on needling and moxibustion methods, extract and analyze standard formats of information, establish literature database on needling and moxibustion methods and then design literature data application platform. On the basis of those mentioned above, a data mining model of needling and moxibustion methods will be established for revealing the potential knowledge and regularities about application of needling and moxibustion methods from the related abundant fuzzy and incomplete literature data according to data analysis and designed research program on efficacy specificity.

  19. [Efficacy observation on wrist-ankle needle for primary dysmenorrhea in undergraduates].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bin; Zhao, Shu; Sun, Na; Li, Xue-Qing; Ma, Shu-Xiang; Li, Qi; Cui, Jian-Mei

    2013-11-01

    To compare efficacy difference among wrist-ankle needle, body-acupuncture and ibuprofen in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Ninety-five cases were randomly divided into a wrist-ankle needle group (32 cases), a body-acupuncture group (31 cases) and an ibuprofen group (32 cases). Acupunc- , ture at Lower 1 and Lower 2 area was applied in the wrist-ankle needle group. Acupuncture at Guanyuan (CV 4) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) were applied in the body-acupuncture group. Ibuprofen sustained-release capsules were given for oral administration in the ibuprofen group. The treatment began 3 days before menses, once a day, until pain was relieved. One menstrual cycle was taken as a treatment course, continuously for 3 courses and efficacy were observed in three groups. The symptom score of dysmenorrhea and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to assess pain severity before and after treatment. 1The efficacy differences in three groups were statistically significant (P<0.01), in which the total effective rate was 90. 0% (27/30) in the wrist-ankle needle group, 73.4% (22/30) in the body-acupuncture group and 46. 7% (14/30) in the ibuprofen group. 2 After the treatment, symptom score of dysmenorrhea and VAS were all obviously lower than that before the treatment in three groups (all P<0.01). Compared with ibuprofen group (7.12+/-2.70), after the treatment symptom score of dysmenorrhea in the wrist-ankle needle group (4.00+/-3.40) and body-acupuncture group (5. 53+/-2. 80) was obviously decreased (P<0.01, P<0.05), and VAS in the wrist-ankle needle group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). Compared with body-acupuncture group (5. 53+/-2.80), symptom score of dysmenorrhea in the wrist-ankle needle group (4.00+/- 3. 40) was obviously decreased (P<0. 05). The wrist-ankle needle has better effect than body acupuncture and ibuprofen on the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea, which could significantly improve dysmenorrhea symptoms.

  20. Acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow): study protocol for a randomized, practitioner-assessor blinded, controlled pilot clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylitis is the most frequent cause of pain around the elbow joint. It causes pain in the region of the elbow joint and results in dysfunction of the elbow and deterioration of the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of ipsilateral acupuncture, contralateral acupuncture and sham acupuncture on lateral epicondylitis. Methods/design Forty-five subjects with lateral epicondylitis will be randomized into three groups: the ipsilateral acupuncture group, contralateral acupuncture group and the sham acupuncture group. The inclusion criteria will be as follows: (1) age between 19 and 65 years with pain due to one-sided lateral epicondylitis that persisted for at least four weeks, (2) with tenderness on pressure limited to regions around the elbow joint, (3) complaining of pain during resistive extension of the middle finger or the wrist, (4) with average pain of NRS 4 or higher during the last one week at a screening visit and (5) voluntarily agree to this study and sign a written consent. Acupuncture treatment will be given 10 times in total for 4 weeks to all groups. Follow up observations will be conducted after the completion of the treatment, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after the random assignment. Ipsilateral acupuncture group and contralateral acupuncture group will receive acupuncture on LI4, TE5, LI10, LI11, LU5, LI12 and two Ashi points. The sham acupuncture group will receive treatment on acupuncture points not related to the lateral epicondylitis using a non-invasive method. The needles will be maintained for 20 minutes. The primary outcome will be differences in the visual analogue scale (VAS) for elbow pain between the groups. The secondary outcome will be differences in patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE), pain-free/maximum grip strength (Dynamometer), pressure pain threshold, clinically relevant improvement, patient global assessment, and the EQ-5D. The data will be analyzed with the paired t

  1. [Effect of Acupuncture plus Different Frequency Shock-wave Interventions on Pain Reactions and Motor Function in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-wei; Zheng, Shi-jiang; Zhang, Jing-chun; Huang, Jian-jun; Liu, Xiao-gang

    2015-08-01

    To observe the clinical effect of acupuncture plus shock-wave (SW) intervention for osteoarthritis (WA), so as to explore its practicability in clinical practice. A total of 120 cases of knee OA patients were randomly divided into 4 groups, namely acupuncture (acupunct) + LFSW, acupunct + MFSW, acupunct + HFSW and routine acupunct groups, with 30 cases in each group. Xuehai (SP 10) , Liangqiu (ST 34), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Xiyan (ST 35) and Ashi-point were punctured with filiform needles which were manipulated with uniform reinforcing-reducing techniques for 15-20 min, once every other day for 7 times. In addition, these acupoints were also respectively stimulated with shock waves(10 Hz, 14 Hz and 18 Hz, pressure: 1-4 bar) delivered from a DolorClastEMS therapeutic apparatus for 600 times in 3 acupunct+ SW groups. The patients' pain response changes of the knee-joint were assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) and the motility was evaluated by using a 0-3 grade scale. RESULTS After 7 times of treatment, the patients' VAS scores and motility scores were significantly decreased in the acupunct+ LFSW, acupunct+ MFSW, acupunct+ HFSW and routine acupunct groups compared with their own basic values before treatment (P < 0.01), and the therapeutic effect of the acupunct+ MFSW group was significantly superior to those of the other 3 groups in reducing both VAS and motility scores (P < 0.05). Correspondingly, the Deqi sensation score of the acupunct+ MFSW group was markedly higher than those of the other 3 groups (P < 0.05). Shock wave acu-puncture treatment is effective in relieving OA patients' knee-joint pain and functional activity, and the therapeutic effect of acu- punct + 14 Hz-SW is better, which is closely with Deqi-sensation.

  2. [Remarks on the relationship between deqi and effect of acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ni-Juan; Lin, Chi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Hong-Wen; Qi, Dan-Dan; Hao, Jie; Xin, Si-Yuan; Liu, Yu-Qi; Li, Chun-Hua; Wang, Pei; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Acupuncturists have always paid high attention to deqi (needling sensation) in clinical. However, relationship between deqi and curative effect has not been elucidated yet. In order to have a further understanding on effect of deqi on clinical effect, through study on literature associated with deqi since the establishment of People's Republic of China in 1949, it is held that various factors can influence therapeutic effect of acupuncture treatment, including whether needling sensation appears or not, the speed of deqi, the intensity of deqi, different types of sensations as well as propagated sensation along meridians (PSM). Joint launched multidisciplinary researches should be carried out to reveal the influence principle of deqi on acupuncture effect, and to lay foundations for the further studies on mechanism of deqi.

  3. Psychophysical outcomes from a randomized pilot study of manual, electro, and sham acupuncture treatment on experimentally induced thermal pain.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jian; Fufa, Duretti T; Gerber, Andrew J; Rosman, Ilana S; Vangel, Mark G; Gracely, Richard H; Gollub, Randy L

    2005-01-01

    In this pilot study comparing the analgesic effects of three acupuncture modes--manual, electro, and placebo (with Streitberger placebo needles)--in a cohort of healthy subjects, we found that verum acupuncture treatment, but not placebo, lowered pain ratings in response to calibrated noxious thermal stimuli. This finding was mainly the result of highly significant analgesia in 5 of the 11 subjects who completed the 5-session study. Of the 5 responders, 2 responded only to electroacupuncture and 3 only to manual acupuncture, suggesting that acupuncture's analgesic effects on experimental pain may be dependent on both subject and mode. We developed a simple quantitative assessment tool, the Subjective Acupuncture Sensation Scale (SASS), comprised of 9 descriptors and an anxiety measure to study the relationship between the deqi sensation induced by acupuncture and the putative therapeutic effects of acupuncture. The SASS results confirm that the deqi sensation is complex, with all subjects rating multiple descriptors during each mode. We found significant correlations of analgesia with SASS ratings of numbness and soreness, but not with ratings of stabbing, throbbing, tingling, burning, heaviness, fullness, or aching. This suggests that attributes of the deqi sensation may be useful clinical indicators of effective treatment. The results of this study indicate the existence of both individual subject and acupuncture mode variability in the analgesic effects of acupuncture. This suggests that switching acupuncture mode may be a treatment option for unresponsive patients.

  4. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Wei; Li, Ming-Chieh; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Kang, Shih-Ching; Liu, Erh-Hao; Lee, Ko-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI) needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI) lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p < 0.05), and the effect persisted for at least 6 h in most patients. Sustained maximal inspiration lung volumes and sleep quality did not show improvement through every acupuncture intervention, and they could not respond accurately to pain relief via acupuncture. The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  5. Caffeine at Moderate Doses Can Inhibit Acupuncture-Induced Analgesia in a Mouse Model of Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Moré, Ari O; Cidral-Filho, Francisco J; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Martins, Daniel F; Nascimento, Francisney P; Li, Shin Min; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-09-01

    The use of acupuncture in the treatment of pain conditions has been extensively investigated. However, the influence of dietary ingredients on acupuncture-induced analgesia (AA) remains unexplored. Recently, the role of adenosine receptors in AA has been shown, and caffeine, one of the world's most commonly consumed dietary ingredients, is an antagonist of these receptors. In this study, the postincisional pain model was used to investigate caffeine's influence on AA. Mice submitted to plantar incision surgery were treated with acupuncture needling after administration of acute or chronic caffeine. Acupuncture needling was performed using two different types of stimuli, manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture bilaterally in the acupoint SP6. We found that acute preadministration of caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) completely reversed AA in both types of acupuncture. In the chronic preadministration, we used two doses that mimicked the average daily caffeine consumption in Western countries and China. Interestingly, the Western dose of caffeine (70 mg/kg/day) administered during 8 days in the drinking water reversed AA and the Chinese dose (4 mg/kg/day) administered during the same period did not. These results indicate that the use of caffeine can inhibit the analgesic effect of different forms of acupuncture. In addition, our findings suggest that doses of caffeine relevant to dietary human intake levels could be a confounding factor in the context of acupuncture research.

  6. Proposed catalog of the neuroanatomy and the stratified anatomy for the 361 acupuncture points of 14 channels.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Will

    2013-10-01

    In spite of the extensive research on acupuncture mechanisms, no comprehensive and systematic peer-reviewed reference list of the stratified anatomical and the neuroanatomical features of all 361 acupuncture points exists. This study creates a reference list of the neuroanatomy and the stratified anatomy for each of the 361 acupuncture points on the 14 classical channels and for 34 extra points. Each acupuncture point was individually assessed to relate the point's location to anatomical and neuroanatomical features. The design of the catalogue is intended to be useful for any style of acupuncture or Oriental medicine treatment modality. The stratified anatomy was divided into shallow, intermediate and deep insertion. A separate stratified anatomy was presented for different needle angles and directions. The following are identified for each point: additional specifications for point location, the stratified anatomy, motor innervation, cutaneous nerve and sensory innervation, dermatomes, Langer's lines, and somatotopic organization in the primary sensory and motor cortices. Acupuncture points for each muscle, dermatome and myotome are also reported. This reference list can aid clinicians, practitioners and researchers in furthering the understanding and accurate practice of acupuncture. Additional research on the anatomical variability around acupuncture points, the frequency of needle contact with an anatomical structure in a clinical setting, and conformational imaging should be done to verify this catalogue. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Caffeine at Moderate Doses Can Inhibit Acupuncture-Induced Analgesia in a Mouse Model of Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moré, Ari O.; Cidral-Filho, Francisco J.; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Martins, Daniel F.; Nascimento, Francisney P.; Li, Shin Min

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of acupuncture in the treatment of pain conditions has been extensively investigated. However, the influence of dietary ingredients on acupuncture-induced analgesia (AA) remains unexplored. Recently, the role of adenosine receptors in AA has been shown, and caffeine, one of the world's most commonly consumed dietary ingredients, is an antagonist of these receptors. In this study, the postincisional pain model was used to investigate caffeine's influence on AA. Method Mice submitted to plantar incision surgery were treated with acupuncture needling after administration of acute or chronic caffeine. Acupuncture needling was performed using two different types of stimuli, manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture bilaterally in the acupoint SP6. Results We found that acute preadministration of caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) completely reversed AA in both types of acupuncture. In the chronic preadministration, we used two doses that mimicked the average daily caffeine consumption in Western countries and China. Interestingly, the Western dose of caffeine (70 mg/kg/day) administered during 8 days in the drinking water reversed AA and the Chinese dose (4 mg/kg/day) administered during the same period did not. Conclusions These results indicate that the use of caffeine can inhibit the analgesic effect of different forms of acupuncture. In addition, our findings suggest that doses of caffeine relevant to dietary human intake levels could be a confounding factor in the context of acupuncture research. PMID:24761281

  8. [Cranial acupuncture in the treatment of spasticity. Clinical results].

    PubMed

    Gomirato, G; Grimaldi, L; Perfetti, C; Roccia, L

    1976-06-09

    Hospitals in communist China perfected a new acupuncture technique about 3 yrs ago, whereby needles are placed in the scalp to stimulate the cortical centres below. This method is particularly indicated in subjects with neurological damage. Results observed in 45 subjects with cerebral vasculopathy at the neurological clinic of Pisa University and the reflexotherapy service of the University of Turin were encouraging and suggest that clin