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Sample records for acuros xb algorithm

  1. A phantom study on the behavior of Acuros XB algorithm in flattening filter free photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Pangam, Suresh; Srinivas, P; Athar Ali, Mirza; Priya, V Sujana; Komanduri, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    To study the behavior of Acuros XB algorithm for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in comparison with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) when applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms in conventional and RapidArc techniques. Acuros XB (Eclipse version 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, CA, USA) and AAA algorithms were used to calculate dose distributions for both 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies. RapidArc plans were created on Catphan phantom 504 and conventional plans on virtual homogeneous water phantom 30 × 30 × 30 cm(3), virtual heterogeneous phantom with various inserts and on solid water phantom with air cavity. Dose at various inserts with different densities were measured in both AAA and Acuros algorithms. The maximum % variation in dose was observed in (-944 HU) air insert and minimum in (85 HU) acrylic insert in both 6X FFF and 10X FFF photons. Less than 1% variation observed between -149 HU and 282 HU for both energies. At -40 HU and 765 HU Acuros behaved quite contrarily with 10X FFF. Maximum % variation in dose was observed in less HU values and minimum variation in higher HU values for both FFF energies. Global maximum dose observed at higher depths for Acuros for both energies compared with AAA. Increase in dose was observed with Acuros algorithm in almost all densities and decrease at few densities ranging from 282 to 643 HU values. Field size, depth, beam energy, and material density influenced the dose difference between two algorithms.

  2. A phantom study on the behavior of Acuros XB algorithm in flattening filter free photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Pangam, Suresh; Srinivas, P.; Athar Ali, Mirza; Priya, V. Sujana; Komanduri, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    To study the behavior of Acuros XB algorithm for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in comparison with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) when applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms in conventional and RapidArc techniques. Acuros XB (Eclipse version 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, CA, USA) and AAA algorithms were used to calculate dose distributions for both 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies. RapidArc plans were created on Catphan phantom 504 and conventional plans on virtual homogeneous water phantom 30 × 30 × 30 cm3, virtual heterogeneous phantom with various inserts and on solid water phantom with air cavity. Dose at various inserts with different densities were measured in both AAA and Acuros algorithms. The maximum % variation in dose was observed in (−944 HU) air insert and minimum in (85 HU) acrylic insert in both 6X FFF and 10X FFF photons. Less than 1% variation observed between −149 HU and 282 HU for both energies. At −40 HU and 765 HU Acuros behaved quite contrarily with 10X FFF. Maximum % variation in dose was observed in less HU values and minimum variation in higher HU values for both FFF energies. Global maximum dose observed at higher depths for Acuros for both energies compared with AAA. Increase in dose was observed with Acuros algorithm in almost all densities and decrease at few densities ranging from 282 to 643 HU values. Field size, depth, beam energy, and material density influenced the dose difference between two algorithms. PMID:26500400

  3. Dosimetric validation of the Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation algorithm: fundamental characterization in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca

    2011-05-01

    This corrigendum intends to clarify some important points that were not clearly or properly addressed in the original paper, and for which the authors apologize. The original description of the first Acuros algorithm is from the developers, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology by Vassiliev et al (2010) in the paper entitled 'Validation of a new grid-based Boltzmann equation solver for dose calculation in radiotherapy with photon beams'. The main equations describing the algorithm reported in our paper, implemented as the 'Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation Algorithm' in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system, were originally described (for the original Acuros algorithm) in the above mentioned paper by Vassiliev et al. The intention of our description in our paper was to give readers an overview of the algorithm, not pretending to have authorship of the algorithm itself (used as implemented in the planning system). Unfortunately our paper was not clear, particularly in not allocating full credit to the work published by Vassiliev et al on the original Acuros algorithm. Moreover, it is important to clarify that we have not adapted any existing algorithm, but have used the Acuros XB implementation in the Eclipse planning system from Varian. In particular, the original text of our paper should have been as follows: On page 1880 the sentence 'A prototype LBTE solver, called Attila (Wareing et al 2001), was also applied to external photon beam dose calculations (Gifford et al 2006, Vassiliev et al 2008, 2010). Acuros XB builds upon many of the methods in Attila, but represents a ground-up rewrite of the solver where the methods were adapted especially for external photon beam dose calculations' should be corrected to 'A prototype LBTE solver, called Attila (Wareing et al 2001), was also applied to external photon beam dose calculations (Gifford et al 2006, Vassiliev et al 2008). A new algorithm called Acuros, developed by the Transpire Inc. group, was

  4. Critical Appraisal of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Dose Calculation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical impact of the Acuros XB algorithm (implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment-planning system) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Methods and Materials: A CT dataset of 10 patients presenting with advanced NSCLC was selected and contoured for planning target volume, lungs, heart, and spinal cord. Plans were created for 6-MV and 15-MV beams using three-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity-modulated therapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc. Calculations were performed with Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm. To distinguish between differences coming from the different heterogeneity management and those coming from the algorithm and its implementation, all the plans were recalculated assigning Hounsfield Unit (HU) = 0 (Water) to the CT dataset. Results: Differences in dose distributions between the two algorithms calculated in Water were <0.5%. This suggests that the differences in the real CT dataset can be ascribed mainly to the different heterogeneity management, which is proven to be more accurate in the Acuros XB calculations. The planning target dose difference was stratified between the target in soft tissue, where the mean dose was found to be lower for Acuros XB, with a range of 0.4% {+-} 0.6% (intensity-modulated therapy, 6 MV) to 1.7% {+-} 0.2% (three-dimensional conformal therapy, 6 MV), and the target in lung tissue, where the mean dose was higher for 6 MV (from 0.2% {+-} 0.2% to 1.2% {+-} 0.5%) and lower for 15 MV (from 0.5% {+-} 0.5% to 2.0% {+-} 0.9%). Mean doses to organs at risk presented differences up to 3% of the mean structure dose in the worst case. No particular or systematic differences were found related to the various modalities. Calculation time ratios between calculation time for Acuros XB and the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm were 7 for three-dimensional conformal therapy, 5 for intensity-modulated therapy, and 0.2 for volumetric modulated arc therapy

  5. SU-E-T-317: Dosimetric Evaluation of Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation Algorithm in Head and Neck Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Faught, A; Wu, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Acuros XB photon dose calculation algorithm is a newly implemented calculation technique within the Eclipse treatment planning system using deterministic solutions to the linear Boltzmann transport equations. The goal of this study is to assess the clinical impact of dose differences arising from a retrospective comparison of calculations performed using the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB on patients. Methods: Ten head and neck patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were selected as a pilot study. Initial evaluation was based on the percentage of the planning target volume (PTV) covered by the prescription dose, minimum dose within the PTV, and dose differences in critical structures. For patients receiving boost plans, dosimetric evaluations were performed on the plan sum of the primary and boost plans. Results: Among the ten patients there were a total of 21 PTVs corresponding to primary and boost volumes. Using the same normalization within Eclipse, the average percentage of the PTVs receiving the prescription dose were 95.6% for AAA and Acuros XB. The average minimum doses within the PTVs, expressed as a percentage of the prescription to the volume, were 82.3% and 83.6% for AAA and Acuros XB respectively. Neither comparison showed differences with statistical significance when subjected to a paired t-test. Statistical significance was found in the average difference of the maximum dose for the mandible (242.5cGy, p=0.0005) and cord with a 5mm radial expansion (105.0cGy, p=0.0005) and in the median dose for the left parotid (25.0cGy, p=0.0423) and oral cavity (36.3cGy, p=0.002). Conclusion: The Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm did not exhibit significant differences in PTV coverage when compared to the AAA algorithm. Significant differences in critical structures are likely attributed to the structures proximity to high atomic number materials or air cavities, regions of known difficulty for the AAA

  6. Effect of Acuros XB algorithm on monitor units for stereotactic body radiotherapy planning of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rao F. Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Lau, Harold; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a curative regimen that uses hypofractionated radiation-absorbed dose to achieve a high degree of local control in early stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the presence of heterogeneities, the dose calculation for the lungs becomes challenging. We have evaluated the dosimetric effect of the recently introduced advanced dose-calculation algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), for SBRT of NSCLC. A total of 97 patients with early-stage lung cancer who underwent SBRT at our cancer center during last 4 years were included. Initial clinical plans were created in Aria Eclipse version 8.9 or prior, using 6 to 10 fields with 6-MV beams, and dose was calculated using the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) as implemented in Eclipse treatment planning system. The clinical plans were recalculated in Aria Eclipse 11.0.21 using both AAA and AXB algorithms. Both sets of plans were normalized to the same prescription point at the center of mass of the target. A secondary monitor unit (MU) calculation was performed using commercial program RadCalc for all of the fields. For the planning target volumes ranging from 19 to 375 cm{sup 3}, a comparison of MUs was performed for both set of algorithms on field and plan basis. In total, variation of MUs for 677 treatment fields was investigated in terms of equivalent depth and the equivalent square of the field. Overall, MUs required by AXB to deliver the prescribed dose are on an average 2% higher than AAA. Using a 2-tailed paired t-test, the MUs from the 2 algorithms were found to be significantly different (p < 0.001). The secondary independent MU calculator RadCalc underestimates the required MUs (on an average by 4% to 5%) in the lung relative to either of the 2 dose algorithms.

  7. Clinical implications of Eclipse analytical anisotropic algorithm and Acuros XB algorithm for the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risks (OARs) in 15 left lung cancer patients comparing analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) versus Acuros XB algorithm. Originally, all plans were created using AAA with a template of dose constraints and optimization parameters, and the patients were treated using intensity modulated radiotherapy. In addition, another set of plans was created by performing only dose calculations using Acuros algorithm without doing any reoptimization. Thereby, in both set of plans, the entire plan parameters, namely, beam angle, beam weight, number of beams, prescribed dose, normalization point, region of interest constraints, number of monitor units, and plan optimization were kept constant. The evaluated plan parameters were PTV coverage at dose at 95% volume (TV95) of PTV (D95), the dose at 5% of PTV (D5), maximum dose (Dmax), the mean dose (Dmean), the percent volume receiving 5 Gy (V5), 20 Gy (V20), 30 Gy (V30) of normal lung at risk (left lung- gross target volume [GTV], the dose at 33% volume (D33), at 67% volume (D67), and the Dmean (Gy) of the heart, the Dmax of the spinal cord. Furthermore, homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index were evaluated to check the quality of the plans. Significant statistical differences between the two algorithms, P < 0.05, were found in D95, Dmax, TV95, and HI of PTV. Furthermore, significant statistical differences were found in the dose parameters for the OARs, namely, V5, V20, and V30 of left lung-GTV, right lung (Dmean), D33, and Dmean of the heart, and Dmax of the spine, respectively. Although statistical differences do exist, the magnitude of the differences is too small to cause any clinically observable effect.

  8. SU-E-T-122: Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) Vs. Acuros XB (AXB) in Stereotactic Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mynampati, D; Scripes, P Godoy; Kuo, H; Yaparpalvi, R; Tome, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences between superposition beam model (AAA) and determinant photon transport solver (AXB) in lung SBRT and Cranial SRS dose computations. Methods: Ten Cranial SRS and ten Lung SBRT plans using Varian, AAA -11.0 were re-planned using Acuros -XB-11.0 with fixed MU. 6MV photon Beam model with HD120-MLC used for dose calculations. Four non-coplanar conformal arcs used to deliver 21Gy or 18Gy to SRS targets (0.4 to 6.2cc). 54Gy (3Fractions) or 50Gy (5Fractions) was planned for SBRT targets (7.3 to 13.9cc) using two VAMT non-coplanar arcs. Plan comparison parameters were dose to 1% PTV volume (D1), dose to 99% PTV volume( D99), Target mean (Dmean), Conformity index (ratio of prescription isodose volume to PTV), Homogeneity Index [ (D2%-D98%)/Dmean] and R50 (ratio of 50% of prescription isodose volume to PTV). OAR parameters were Brain volume receiving 12Gy dose (V12Gy) and maximum dose (D0.03) to Brainstem for SRS. For lung SBRT, maximum dose to Heart and Cord, Mean lung dose (MLD) and volume of lung receiving 20Gy (V20Gy) were computed. PTV parameters compared by percentage difference between AXB and AAA parameters. OAR parameters and HI compared by absolute difference between two calculations. For analysis, paired t-test performed over the parameters. Results: Compared to AAA, AXB SRS plans have on average 3.2% lower D99, 6.5% lower CI and 3cc less Brain-V12. However, AXB SBRT plans have higher D1, R50 and Dmean by 3.15%, 1.63% and 2.5%. For SRS and SBRT, AXB plans have average HI 2 % and 4.4% higher than AAA plans. In both techniques, all other parameters vary within 1% or 1Gy. In both sets only two parameters have P>0.05. Conclusion: Even though t-test results signify difference between AXB and AAA plans, dose differences in dose estimations by both algorithms are clinically insignificant.

  9. The accuracy of Acuros XB algorithm for radiation beams traversing a metallic hip implant - comparison with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko; Kapanen, Mika; Sipilä, Petri; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Pitkänen, Maunu

    2014-09-08

    In this study, the clinical benefit of the improved accuracy of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, implemented in a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS), Varian Eclipse, was demonstrated with beams traversing a high-Z material. This is also the first study assessing the accuracy of the AXB algorithm applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique compared to full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In the first phase the AXB algorithm was benchmarked against point dosimetry, film dosimetry, and full MC calculation in a water-filled anthropometric phantom with a unilateral hip implant. Also the validity of the full MC calculation used as reference method was demonstrated. The dose calculations were performed both in original computed tomography (CT) dataset, which included artifacts, and in corrected CT dataset, where constant Hounsfield unit (HU) value assignment for all the materials was made. In the second phase, a clinical treatment plan was prepared for a prostate cancer patient with a unilateral hip implant. The plan applied a hybrid VMAT technique that included partial arcs that avoided passing through the implant and static beams traversing the implant. Ultimately, the AXB-calculated dose distribution was compared to the recalculation by the full MC simulation to assess the accuracy of the AXB algorithm in clinical setting. A recalculation with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) was also performed to quantify the benefit of the improved dose calculation accuracy of type 'c' algorithm (AXB) over type 'b' algorithm (AAA). The agreement between the AXB algorithm and the full MC model was very good inside and in the vicinity of the implant and elsewhere, which verifies the accuracy of the AXB algorithm for patient plans with beams traversing through high-Z material, whereas the AAA produced larger discrepancies.

  10. SU-E-T-339: Dosimetric Verification of Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm On An Air Cavity for 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to verify the accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm on an air cavity for a single radiation field using 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. Methods: A rectangular slab phantom containing an air cavity was made for this study. The CT images of the phantom for dose calculation were scanned with and without film at measurement depths (4.5, 5.5, 6.5 and 7.5 cm). The central axis doses (CADs) and the off-axis doses (OADs) were measured by film and calculated with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and AXB for field sizes ranging from 2 Χ 2 to 5 Χ 5 cm{sup 2} of 6-MV FFF beams. Both algorithms were divided into AXB-w and AAA -w when included the film in phantom for dose calculation, and AXB-w/o and AAA-w/o in calculation without film. The calculated OADs for both algorithms were compared with the measured OADs and difference values were determined using root means squares error (RMSE) and gamma evaluation. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between the measured and calculated CAD for AXB-w was most agreement than others. Compared to the %Diff with and without film, the %Diffs with film were decreased than without within both algorithms. The %Diffs for both algorithms were reduced with increasing field size and increased relative to the depth increment. RMSEs of CAD for AXB-w were within 10.32% for both inner-profile and penumbra, while the corresponding values of AAA-w appeared to 96.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB within air cavity shows more accurate than with AAA compared to the measured dose. Furthermore, we found that the AXB-w was superior to AXB-w/o in this region when compared against the measurements.

  11. SU-E-T-313: The Accuracy of the Acuros XB Advanced Dose Calculation Algorithm for IMRT Dose Distributions in Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, F; Onizuka, R; Ohno, T; Tomiyama, Y; Hioki, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of the Acuros XB version 11 (AXB11) advanced dose calculation algorithm by comparing with Monte Caro (MC) calculations. The comparisons were performed with dose distributions for a virtual inhomogeneity phantom and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck. Methods: Recently, AXB based on Linear Boltzmann Transport Equation has been installed in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Oncology System, USA). The dose calculation accuracy of AXB11 was tested by the EGSnrc-MC calculations. In additions, AXB version 10 (AXB10) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) were also used. First the accuracy of an inhomogeneity correction for AXB and AAA algorithms was evaluated by comparing with MC-calculated dose distributions for a virtual inhomogeneity phantom that includes water, bone, air, adipose, muscle, and aluminum. Next the IMRT dose distributions for head and neck were compared with the AXB and AAA algorithms and MC by means of dose volume histograms and three dimensional gamma analysis for each structure (CTV, OAR, etc.). Results: For dose distributions with the virtual inhomogeneity phantom, AXB was in good agreement with those of MC, except the dose in air region. The dose in air region decreased in order of MCalgorithms, ie: 0.700 MeV for MC, 0.711 MeV for AXB11, and 1.011 MeV for AXB 10. Since the AAA algorithm is based on the dose kernel of water, the doses in regions for air, bone, and aluminum considerably became higher than those of AXB and MC. The pass rates of the gamma analysis for IMRT dose distributions in head and neck were similar to those of MC in order of AXB11

  12. Quantification of dose differences between two versions of Acuros XB algorithm compared to Monte Carlo simulations--the effect on clinical patient treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko Juhani; Kapanen, Mika

    2015-11-08

    A commercialized implementation of linear Boltzmann transport equation solver, the Acuros XB algorithm (AXB), represents a class of most advanced type 'c' photon radiotherapy dose calculation algorithms. The purpose of the study was to quantify the effects of the modifications implemented in the more recent version 11 of the AXB (AXB11) compared to the first commercial implementation, version 10 of the AXB (AXB10), in various anatomical regions in clinical treatment planning. Both versions of the AXB were part of Varian's Eclipse clinical treatment planning system and treatment plans for 10 patients were created using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). The plans were first created with the AXB10 and then recalculated with the AXB11 and full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Considering the full MC simulations as reference, a DVH analysis for gross tumor and planning target volumes (GTV and PTV) and organs at risk was performed, and also 3D gamma agreement index (GAI) values within a 15% isodose region and for the PTV were determined. Although differences up to 12% in DVH analysis were seen between the MC simulations and the AXB, based on the results of this study no general conclusion can be drawn that the modifications made in the AXB11 compared to the AXB10 would imply that the dose calculation accuracy of the AXB10 would be inferior to the AXB11 in the clinical patient treatment planning. The only clear improvement with the AXB11 over the AXB10 is the dose calculation accuracy in air cavities. In general, no large deviations are present in the DVH analysis results between the two versions of the algorithm, and the results of 3D gamma analysis do not favor one or the other. Thus it may be concluded that the results of the comprehensive studies assessing the accuracy of the AXB10 may be extended to the AXB11.

  13. SU-E-T-290: Dosimetric Accuracy of Acuros XB and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Small Lung Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Amy S; Yang, Y; Bush, K; Fahimian, B; Hsu, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of dose calculation for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of small lesions critically depends on the proper modeling of the lateral scatter in heterogeneous media. In recent years, grid-based Boltzman solvers such as Acuros XB (AXB) have been introduced for enhanced modeling of radiation transport in heterogeneous media. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric impact of dose calculation between AXB and convolution-superposition algorithms such as analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for small lesion sizes and different beam energies. Methods: Five lung SABR VMAT cases with GTV ranged from 0.8cm to 2.5cm in diameter were studied. For each case, doses were calculated by AAA, AXB (V11031) and Monte Carlo simulation (MC) with the same plan parameters for 10MV and 6MV. The dose calculation accuracy were evaluated by comparing DVHs and dose distributions with MC as the benchmark. The accuracy of calculated dose was also validated by EBT3 film measurement with a field size of 3cmx3cm in a thorax phantom. Results: For 10MV and GTV less than 1cm, dose calculated by AXB agrees well with MC compared to AAA. Dose difference calculated with AXB and AAA could be up to 30%. For GTV greater than 2cm, calculation results of AXB and AAA agree within 5% in GTV. For 6MV, the difference between calculated doses by AXB and AAA is less 10% for GTV less than 1cm. Based on film measurements, lung dose was overestimated 10% and 20% by AAA for 6MV and 10MV. Conclusion: Lateral scatter and transport is modeled more accurately by AXB than AAA in heterogeneous media, especially for small field size and high energy beams. The accuracy depends on the assigned material in calculation. If grid-based Boltzman solvers or MC are not available for calculation, lower energy beams should be used for treatment.

  14. SU-E-T-481: Dosimetric Comparison of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm with Commercial Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M; Tenn, S; Lee, C; Yang, Y; Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate performance of three commercially available treatment planning systems for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer using the following algorithms: Boltzmann transport equation based algorithm (AcurosXB AXB), convolution based algorithm Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA); and Monte Carlo based algorithm (XVMC). Methods: A total of 10 patients with early stage non-small cell peripheral lung cancer were included. The initial clinical plans were generated using the XVMC based treatment planning system with a prescription of 54Gy in 3 fractions following RTOG0613 protocol. The plans were recalculated with the same beam parameters and monitor units using AAA and AXB algorithms. A calculation grid size of 2mm was used for all algorithms. The dose distribution, conformity, and dosimetric parameters for the targets and organs at risk (OAR) are compared between the algorithms. Results: The average PTV volume was 19.6mL (range 4.2–47.2mL). The volume of PTV covered by the prescribed dose (PTV-V100) were 93.97±2.00%, 95.07±2.07% and 95.10±2.97% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms, respectively. There was no significant difference in high dose conformity index; however, XVMC predicted slightly higher values (p=0.04) for the ratio of 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%). The percentage volume of total lungs receiving dose >20Gy (LungV20Gy) were 4.03±2.26%, 3.86±2.22% and 3.85±2.21% for XVMC, AXB and AAA algorithms. Examination of dose volume histograms (DVH) revealed small differences in targets and OARs for most patients. However, the AAA algorithm was found to predict considerable higher PTV coverage compared with AXB and XVMC algorithms in two cases. The dose difference was found to be primarily located at the periphery region of the target. Conclusion: For clinical SBRT lung treatment planning, the dosimetric differences between three commercially available algorithms are generally small except at target periphery. XVMC

  15. Difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm, the dose-to-medium, and the dose-to-water reporting modes of the Acuros XB for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mampuya, Wambaka A; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Ishigaki, Takashi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithms (AAA) and the two dose reporting modes of the Acuros XB, namely, the dose to water (AXB_Dw) and dose to medium (AXB_Dm) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Thirty-eight plans were generated using the AXB_Dm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) and then recalculated with the AXB_Dw and AAA, using identical beam setup. A dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions was prescribed to the isocenter and the planning target volume (PTV) D95%. The isocenter was always inside the PTV. The following dose-volumetric parameters were evaluated; D2%, D50%, D95%, and D98% for the internal target volume (ITV) and the PTV. Two-tailed paired Student's t-tests determined the statistical significance. Although for most of the parameters evaluated, the mean differences observed between the AAA, AXB_Dm, and AXB_Dw were statistically significant (p < 0.05), absolute differences were rather small, in general less than 5% points. The maximum mean difference was observed in the ITV D50% between the AXB_Dm and the AAA and was 1.7% points under the isocenter prescription and 3.3% points under the D95 prescription. AXB_Dm produced higher values than AXB_Dw with differences ranging from 0.4 to 1.1% points under isocenter prescription and 0.0 to 0.7% points under the PTV D95% prescription. The differences observed under the PTV D95% prescription were larger compared to those observed for the isocenter prescription between AXB_Dm and AAA, AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw, and AXB_Dw and AAA. Although statistically significant, the mean differences between the three algorithms are within 3.3% points.

  16. Difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm, the dose-to-medium, and the dose-to-water reporting modes of the Acuros XB for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mampuya, Wambaka A; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Ishigaki, Takashi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithms (AAA) and the two dose reporting modes of the Acuros XB, namely, the dose to water (AXB-Dw) and dose to medium (AXB-Dm) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Thirty-eight plans were generated using the AXB-Dm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) and then recalculated with the AXB-Dw and AAA, using identical beam setup. A dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions was prescribed to the isocenter and the planning target volume (PTV) D95%. The isocenter was always inside the PTV. The following dose-volumetric parameters were evaluated; D2%, D50%, D95%, and D98% for the internal target volume (ITV) and the PTV. Two-tailed paired Student's t-tests determined the statistical significance. Although for most of the parameters evaluated, the mean differences observed between the AAA, AXB-Dmand AXB-Dw were statistically significant (p<0.05), absolute differences were rather small, in general less than 5% points. The maximum mean difference was observed in the ITV D50% between the AXB-Dm and the AAA and was 1.7% points under the isocenter prescription and 3.3% points under the D95 prescription. AXB-Dm produced higher values than AXB-Dw with differences ranging from 0.4 to 1.1% points under isocenter prescription and 0.0 to 0.7% points under the PTV D95% prescription. The differences observed under the PTV D95% prescription were larger compared to those observed for the isocenter prescription between AXB-Dm and AAA, AXB-Dm and AXB-Dw, and AXB-Dw and AAA. Although statistically significant, the mean differences between the three algorithms are within 3.3% points. PACS number(s): 87.55.x, 87.55.D-, 87.55.dk.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the

  18. SU-E-T-464: Implementation and Validation of 4D Acuros XB Dose Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S; Yuen, C; Huang, V; Milette, M; Teke, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this abstract we implement and validate a 4D VMAT Acuros XB dose calculation using Gafchromic film. Special attention is paid to the physical material assignment in the CT dataset and to reported dose to water and dose to medium. Methods: A QUASAR phantom with a 3 cm sinusoidal tumor motion and 5 second period was scanned using 4D computed tomography. A CT was also obtained of the static QUASAR phantom with the tumor at the central position. A VMAT plan was created on the average CT dataset and was delivered on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The trajectory log file from this treatment was acquired and used to create 10 VMAT subplans (one for each portion of the breathing cycle). Motion for each subplan was simulated by moving the beam isocentre in the superior/inferior direction in the Treatment Planning System on the static CT scan. The 10 plans were calculated (both dose to medium and dose to water) and summed for 1) the original HU values from the static CT scan and 2) the correct physical material assignment in the CT dataset. To acquire a breathing phase synchronized film measurements the trajectory log was used to create a VMAT delivery plan which includes dynamic couch motion using the Developer Mode. Three different treatment start phases were investigated (mid inhalation, full inhalation and full exhalation). Results: For each scenario the coronal dose distributions were measured using Gafchromic film and compared to the corresponding calculation with Film QA Pro Software using a Gamma test with a 3%/3mm distance to agreement criteria. Good agreement was found between calculation and measurement. No statistically significant difference in agreement was found between calculations to original HU values vs calculations to over-written (material-assigned) HU values. Conclusion: The investigated 4D dose calculation method agrees well with measurement.

  19. SU-E-T-199: Comparison Between Acuros XB and AAA in Homogeneous Phantoms for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J-Y; Huang, B-T; Zhang, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the differences among Acuros XB (AXB) with dose-to-water report mode (AXBw), AXB with dose-to-medium report mode (AXBm) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), in homogeneous phantoms and for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Methods: Nineteen clinically applied VMAT plans were transplanted to a Delta4 phantom and an I’mRT phantom to generate phantom plans, respectively. Each plan was calculated using AXBw, AXBm and AAA, respectively, utilizing the distributed calculation framework (DCF), and the calculation times were recorded. Each plan was delivered by the TrueBeam linear accelerator and measured using the Delta4 phantom and ionization chamber, respectively. The 3D gamma pass rates and point dose deviations were compared among AXBw, AXBm and AAA. Results: In terms of the gamma pass rates with both the criteria of 3 mm/3% (3 mm distance-to-agreement, 3% dose difference) and 2 mm/2%, AXBm demonstrated the significantly worst results, and no significant difference was found between AXBw and AAA. In terms of the point dose, AXBw was slightly closer to the measured dose compared with AAA, and AXBm demonstrated the maximum dose deviation from the measured dose. Moreover, AXB calculation consumed comparable time when the DCF was not busy, and consumed significantly less time when the DCF was busy. Conclusion: In the homogeneous phantoms and for the VMAT plans, AXBw has the best dose accuracy, and AAA is comparable to or slightly worse than AXBw, wheras AXBm has the worst dose accuracy. Furthermore, AXB has higher calculation efficiency than AAA.

  20. SU-E-T-137: Dosimetric Validation for Pinnacle, Acuros, AAA, and Brainlab Algorithms with Induced Inhomogenieties

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, P; Tambasco, M; LaFontaine, R; Burns, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric accuracy of the Eclipse 11.0 Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA), Pinnacle-3 9.2 Collapsed Cone Convolution, and the iPlan 4.1 Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) algorithms using measurement as the gold standard. Methods: Ion chamber and diode measurements were taken for 6, 10, and 18 MV beams in a phantom made up of slab densities corresponding to solid water, lung, and bone. The phantom was setup at source-to-surface distance of 100 cm, and the field sizes were 3.0 × 3.0, 5.0 × 5.0, and 10.0 × 10.0 cm2. Data from the planning systems were computed along the central axis of the beam. The measurements were taken using a pinpoint chamber and edge diode for interface regions. Results: The best agreement between data from the algorithms and our measurements occurs away from the slab interfaces. For the 6 MV beam, iPlan 4.1 MC software performs the best with 1.7% absolute average percent difference from measurement. For the 10 MV beam, iPlan 4.1 PB performs the best with 2.7% absolute average percent difference from measurement. For the 18 MV beam, Acuros performs the best with 2.0% absolute average percent difference from measurement. It is interesting to note that the steepest drop in dose occurred the at lung heterogeneity-solid water interface of the18 MV, 3.0 × 3.0 cm2 field size setup. In this situation, Acuros and AAA performed best with an average percent difference within −1.1% of measurement, followed by iPlan 4.1 MC, which was within 4.9%. Conclusion: This study shows that all of the algorithms perform reasonably well in computing dose in a heterogeneous slab phantom. Moreover, Acuros and AAA perform particularly well at the lung-solid water interfaces for higher energy beams and small field sizes.

  1. Experimental verification of the Acuros XB and AAA dose calculation adjacent to heterogeneous media for IMRT and RapidArc of nasopharygeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W. K.; Leung, Lucullus H. T.; So, Ronald W. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the doses calculated by the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) with experimentally measured data adjacent to and within heterogeneous medium using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and RapidArc{sup Registered-Sign} (RA) volumetric arc therapy plans for nasopharygeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Two-dimensional dose distribution immediately adjacent to both air and bone inserts of a rectangular tissue equivalent phantom irradiated using IMRT and RA plans for NPC cases were measured with GafChromic{sup Registered-Sign} EBT3 films. Doses near and within the nasopharygeal (NP) region of an anthropomorphic phantom containing heterogeneous medium were also measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and EBT3 films. The measured data were then compared with the data calculated by AAA and AXB. For AXB, dose calculations were performed using both dose-to-medium (AXB{sub Dm}) and dose-to-water (AXB{sub Dw}) options. Furthermore, target dose differences between AAA and AXB were analyzed for the corresponding real patients. The comparison of real patient plans was performed by stratifying the targets into components of different densities, including tissue, bone, and air. Results: For the verification of planar dose distribution adjacent to air and bone using the rectangular phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 98.7%, 99.5%, and 97.7% on the axial plane for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans, while they were 97.6%, 98.2%, and 97.7%, respectively, on the coronal plane. For the verification of planar dose distribution within the NP region of the anthropomorphic phantom, the percentages of pixels that passed the gamma analysis with the {+-} 3%/3mm criteria were 95.1%, 91.3%, and 99.0% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm}, and AXB{sub Dw}, respectively, averaged over all IMRT and RA plans. Within the NP region where

  2. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport method with Monte Carlo and model-based convolution methods in heterogeneous media

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tao; Mikell, Justin K.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mourtada, Firas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The deterministic Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm was recently implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The goal of this study was to compare AXB performance to Monte Carlo (MC) and two standard clinical convolution methods: the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the collapsed-cone convolution (CCC) method. Methods: Homogeneous water and multilayer slab virtual phantoms were used for this study. The multilayer slab phantom had three different materials, representing soft tissue, bone, and lung. Depth dose and lateral dose profiles from AXB v10 in Eclipse were compared to AAA v10 in Eclipse, CCC in Pinnacle3, and EGSnrc MC simulations for 6 and 18 MV photon beams with open fields for both phantoms. In order to further reveal the dosimetric differences between AXB and AAA or CCC, three-dimensional (3D) gamma index analyses were conducted in slab regions and subregions defined by AAPM Task Group 53. Results: The AXB calculations were found to be closer to MC than both AAA and CCC for all the investigated plans, especially in bone and lung regions. The average differences of depth dose profiles between MC and AXB, AAA, or CCC was within 1.1, 4.4, and 2.2%, respectively, for all fields and energies. More specifically, those differences in bone region were up to 1.1, 6.4, and 1.6%; in lung region were up to 0.9, 11.6, and 4.5% for AXB, AAA, and CCC, respectively. AXB was also found to have better dose predictions than AAA and CCC at the tissue interfaces where backscatter occurs. 3D gamma index analyses (percent of dose voxels passing a 2%∕2 mm criterion) showed that the dose differences between AAA and AXB are significant (under 60% passed) in the bone region for all field sizes of 6 MV and in the lung region for most of field sizes of both energies. The difference between AXB and CCC was generally small (over 90% passed) except in the lung region for 18 MV 10 × 10 cm2 fields (over 26% passed) and in the bone region for 5 × 5 and 10

  3. SU-E-T-800: Verification of Acurose XB Dose Calculation Algorithm at Air Cavity-Tissue Interface Using Film Measurement for Small Fields of 6-MV Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Suh, T; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm at air-tissue interface using inhomogeneous phantom for 6-MV flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom included air cavity was manufactured for verifying dose accuracy at the air-tissue interface. The phantom was composed with 1 and 3 cm thickness of air cavity. To evaluate the central axis doses (CAD) and dose profiles of the interface, the dose calculations were performed for 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} fields of 6 MV FFF beams with AAA and AXB in Eclipse treatment plainning system. Measurements in this region were performed with Gafchromic film. The root mean square errors (RMSE) were analyzed with calculated and measured dose profile. Dose profiles were divided into inner-dose profile (>80%) and penumbra (20% to 80%) region for evaluating RMSE. To quantify the distribution difference, gamma evaluation was used and determined the agreement with 3%/3mm criteria. Results: The percentage differences (%Diffs) between measured and calculated CAD in the interface, AXB shows more agreement than AAA. The %Diffs were increased with increasing the thickness of air cavity size and it is similar for both algorithms. In RMSEs of inner-profile, AXB was more accurate than AAA. The difference was up to 6 times due to overestimation by AAA. RMSEs of penumbra appeared to high difference for increasing the measurement depth. Gamma agreement also presented that the passing rates decreased in penumbra. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the dose calculation with AXB shows more accurate than with AAA for the air-tissue interface. The 2D dose distributions with AXB for both inner-profile and penumbra showed better agreement than with AAA relative to variation of the measurement depths and air cavity sizes.

  4. XB-70A in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The XB-70 was the world's largest experimental aircraft. Capable of flight at speeds of three times the speed of sound (2,000 miles per hour) at altitudes of 70,000 feet, the XB-70 was used to collect in-flight information for use in the design of future supersonic aircraft, military and civilian. This 23-second video clip shows the XB-70A taxiing, taking off, and in flight.

  5. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  6. XB-70A_takeoff

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the 1960s, XB-70 was the world's largest experimental aircraft. Capable of flight at speeds of three times the speed of sound (2,000 miles per hour) at altitudes of 70,000 feet, the XB-70 wa...

  7. XB-70A_flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the 1960s, XB-70 was the world's largest experimental aircraft. Capable of flight at speeds of three times the speed of sound (2,000 miles per hour) at altitudes of 70,000 feet, the XB-70 wa...

  8. Comparison of selected dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for tissues with inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, Y. L.; Heng, S. P.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneity correction is recommended for accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning since human body are highly inhomogeneous with the presence of bones and air cavities. However, each dose calculation algorithm has its own limitations. This study is to assess the accuracy of five algorithms that are currently implemented for treatment planning, including pencil beam convolution (PBC), superposition (SP), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), Monte Carlo (MC) and Acuros XB (AXB). The calculated dose was compared with the measured dose using radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT2) in inhomogeneous phantoms. In addition, the dosimetric impact of different algorithms on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was studied for head and neck region. MC had the best agreement with the measured percentage depth dose (PDD) within the inhomogeneous region. This was followed by AXB, AAA, SP and PBC. For IMRT planning, MC algorithm is recommended for treatment planning in preference to PBC and SP. The MC and AXB algorithms were found to have better accuracy in terms of inhomogeneity correction and should be used for tumour volume within the proximity of inhomogeneous structures.

  9. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  10. XB-70A during startup and ramp taxi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The XB-70 was the world's largest experimental aircraft. Capable of flight at speeds of three times the speed of sound (2,000 miles per hour) at altitudes of 70,000 feet, the XB-70 was used to collect in-flight information for use in the design of future supersonic aircraft, military and civilian. This 35-second video shows the startup of the XB-70A airplane engines, the beginning of its taxi to the runway, and a turn on the ramp that shows the unique configuration of this aircraft.

  11. Evaluation of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yun I; Metwaly, Mohamed; Glegg, Martin; Baggarley, Shaun; Elliott, Alex

    2014-05-08

    Entrance and exit doses are commonly measured in in vivo dosimetry for comparison with expected values, usually generated by the treatment planning system (TPS), to verify accuracy of treatment delivery. This report aims to evaluate the accuracy of six TPS algorithms in computing entrance and exit doses for a 6 MV beam. The algorithms tested were: pencil beam convolution (Eclipse PBC), analytical anisotropic algorithm (Eclipse AAA), AcurosXB (Eclipse AXB), FFT convolution (XiO Convolution), multigrid superposition (XiO Superposition), and Monte Carlo photon (Monaco MC). Measurements with ionization chamber (IC) and diode detector in water phantoms were used as a reference. Comparisons were done in terms of central axis point dose, 1D relative profiles, and 2D absolute gamma analysis. Entrance doses computed by all TPS algorithms agreed to within 2% of the measured values. Exit doses computed by XiO Convolution, XiO Superposition, Eclipse AXB, and Monaco MC agreed with the IC measured doses to within 2%-3%. Meanwhile, Eclipse PBC and Eclipse AAA computed exit doses were higher than the IC measured doses by up to 5.3% and 4.8%, respectively. Both algorithms assume that full backscatter exists even at the exit level, leading to an overestimation of exit doses. Despite good agreements at the central axis for Eclipse AXB and Monaco MC, 1D relative comparisons showed profiles mismatched at depths beyond 11.5 cm. Overall, the 2D absolute gamma (3%/3 mm) pass rates were better for Monaco MC, while Eclipse AXB failed mostly at the outer 20% of the field area. The findings of this study serve as a useful baseline for the implementation of entrance and exit in vivo dosimetry in clinical departments utilizing any of these six common TPS algorithms for reference comparison.

  12. Percentage depth dose calculation accuracy of model based algorithms in high energy photon small fields through heterogeneous media and comparison with plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Alagar, Ananda Giri Babu; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu

    2016-01-08

    Small fields smaller than 4 × 4 cm2 are used in stereotactic and conformal treatments where heterogeneity is normally present. Since dose calculation accuracy in both small fields and heterogeneity often involves more discrepancy, algorithms used by treatment planning systems (TPS) should be evaluated for achieving better treatment results. This report aims at evaluating accuracy of four model-based algorithms, X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) from Monaco, Superposition (SP) from CMS-Xio, AcurosXB (AXB) and analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) from Eclipse are tested against the measurement. Measurements are done using Exradin W1 plastic scintillator in Solid Water phantom with heterogeneities like air, lung, bone, and aluminum, irradiated with 6 and 15 MV photons of square field size ranging from 1 to 4 cm2. Each heterogeneity is introduced individually at two different depths from depth-of-dose maximum (Dmax), one setup being nearer and another farther from the Dmax. The central axis percentage depth-dose (CADD) curve for each setup is measured separately and compared with the TPS algorithm calculated for the same setup. The percentage normalized root mean squared deviation (%NRMSD) is calculated, which represents the whole CADD curve's deviation against the measured. It is found that for air and lung heterogeneity, for both 6 and 15 MV, all algorithms show maximum deviation for field size 1 × 1 cm2 and gradually reduce when field size increases, except for AAA. For aluminum and bone, all algorithms' deviations are less for 15 MV irrespective of setup. In all heterogeneity setups, 1 × 1 cm2 field showed maximum deviation, except in 6MV bone setup. All algorithms in the study, irrespective of energy and field size, when any heterogeneity is nearer to Dmax, the dose deviation is higher compared to the same heterogeneity far from the Dmax. Also, all algorithms show maximum deviation in lower-density materials compared to high-density materials.

  13. Evaluation of an analytic linear Boltzmann transport equation solver for high-density inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, S. A. M.; Ansbacher, W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Acuros external beam (Acuros XB) is a novel dose calculation algorithm implemented through the ECLIPSE treatment planning system. The algorithm finds a deterministic solution to the linear Boltzmann transport equation, the same equation commonly solved stochastically by Monte Carlo methods. This work is an evaluation of Acuros XB, by comparison with Monte Carlo, for dose calculation applications involving high-density materials. Existing non-Monte Carlo clinical dose calculation algorithms, such as the analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA), do not accurately model dose perturbations due to increased electron scatter within high-density volumes. Methods: Acuros XB, AAA, and EGSnrc based Monte Carlo are used to calculate dose distributions from 18 MV and 6 MV photon beams delivered to a cubic water phantom containing a rectangular high density (4.0-8.0 g/cm{sup 3}) volume at its center. The algorithms are also used to recalculate a clinical prostate treatment plan involving a unilateral hip prosthesis, originally evaluated using AAA. These results are compared graphically and numerically using gamma-index analysis. Radio-chromic film measurements are presented to augment Monte Carlo and Acuros XB dose perturbation data. Results: Using a 2% and 1 mm gamma-analysis, between 91.3% and 96.8% of Acuros XB dose voxels containing greater than 50% the normalized dose were in agreement with Monte Carlo data for virtual phantoms involving 18 MV and 6 MV photons, stainless steel and titanium alloy implants and for on-axis and oblique field delivery. A similar gamma-analysis of AAA against Monte Carlo data showed between 80.8% and 87.3% agreement. Comparing Acuros XB and AAA evaluations of a clinical prostate patient plan involving a unilateral hip prosthesis, Acuros XB showed good overall agreement with Monte Carlo while AAA underestimated dose on the upstream medial surface of the prosthesis due to electron scatter from the high-density material. Film measurements

  14. A summary of XB-70 sonic boom signature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.; Keefer, Thomas N., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A compilation is provided of measured sonic boom signature data derived from 39 supersonic flights (43 passes) of the XB-70 airplane over the Mach number range of 1.11 to 2.92 and an altitude range of 30500 to 70300 ft. These tables represent a convenient hard copy version of available electronic files which include over 300 digitized sonic boom signatures with their corresponding spectra. Also included in the electronic files is information regarding ground track position, aircraft operating conditions, and surface and upper air weather observations for each of the 43 supersonic passes. In addition to the sonic boom signature data, a description is also provided of the XB-70 data base that was placed on electronic files along with a description of the method used to scan and digitize the analog/oscillograph sonic boom signature time histories. Such information is intended to enhance the value and utilization of the electronic files.

  15. Performance of dose calculation algorithms from three generations in lung SBRT: comparison with full Monte Carlo-based dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko J; Kapanen, Mika K; Hyödynmaa, Simo J; Wigren, Tuija K; Pitkänen, Maunu A

    2014-03-06

    The accuracy of dose calculation is a key challenge in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of the lung. We have benchmarked three photon beam dose calculation algorithms--pencil beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Acuros XB (AXB)--implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), Varian Eclipse. Dose distributions from full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were regarded as a reference. In the first stage, for four patients with central lung tumors, treatment plans using 3D conformal radiotherapy (CRT) technique applying 6 MV photon beams were made using the AXB algorithm, with planning criteria according to the Nordic SBRT study group. The plans were recalculated (with same number of monitor units (MUs) and identical field settings) using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc MC codes. The MC-calculated dose distributions were compared to corresponding AXB-calculated dose distributions to assess the accuracy of the AXB algorithm, to which then other TPS algorithms were compared. In the second stage, treatment plans were made for ten patients with 3D CRT technique using both the PBC algorithm and the AAA. The plans were recalculated (with same number of MUs and identical field settings) with the AXB algorithm, then compared to original plans. Throughout the study, the comparisons were made as a function of the size of the planning target volume (PTV), using various dose-volume histogram (DVH) and other parameters to quantitatively assess the plan quality. In the first stage also, 3D gamma analyses with threshold criteria 3%/3mm and 2%/2 mm were applied. The AXB-calculated dose distributions showed relatively high level of agreement in the light of 3D gamma analysis and DVH comparison against the full MC simulation, especially with large PTVs, but, with smaller PTVs, larger discrepancies were found. Gamma agreement index (GAI) values between 95.5% and 99.6% for all the plans with the threshold criteria 3%/3 mm were achieved, but 2%/2 mm

  16. XB130 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and involved in cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feiye; Zeng, Qinsong; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Hou, Jianing; Yu, Xinpei; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    XB130 is a cytosolic adaptor protein involved in various physiological processes and oncogenesis of certain malignancies, but its role in the development of prostate cancer remains unclear. In current study, we examined XB130 expression in prostate cancer tissues and found that XB130 expression was remarkably increased in prostate cancer tissues and significantly correlated with increased prostate specific antigen (PSA), free PSA (f-PSA), prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and T classification. Patients with highly expressed XB130 had significantly decreased survival, which suggested XB130 as a possible prognostic indicator for prostate cancer. In vitro experiments showed that reduced XB130 expression restrained tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, XB130 knockdown hindered transition of G1 to S phase in prostate cancer cell line DU145 and LNCap, which might contribute to the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Results from transwell assay demonstrated that downregulation of XB130 may attenuate invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer. Semiquantitative analysis of Western blot suggested that decreased XB130 expression was accompanied by diminished Akt signaling and EMT process. Thus, above observations suggest that XB130 may be a novel molecular marker and potent therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:27509056

  17. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  18. Delta-f particle-in-cell simulation of X-B mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Cary, J. R.; Barnes, D. C.; Carlsson, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low-noise, delta-f particle-in-cell algorithm has been implemented in VORPAL, a massive parallel, hybrid plasma modeling code (Chet Nieter and John. R. Cary, J. Comp. Physics 196, 448 (2004)). This computation method allows us to simulate the mode conversion between the extraordinary wave (X) and electron Bernstein wave (EBW) in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, it is found that a full X-B mode conversion can be obtained for optimized parameters as φ/φce<2 (φ is the driving frequency and φce is the electron cyclotron frequency). No 100% conversion is found for φ/φce moderately larger than 2. The simulation results agree with the predictions of Ram's theory (Ram & Schultz, Phys. Plasma 4084 (2000)). The agreement indicates that X-B mode conversion can be well described by the quadratic wave equation based on cold plasma approximation, and this is consistent with the phase-space picture of mode conversion. It is also shown that the conversion efficiency is significantly affected by the gradient of magnetic fields. When the amplitude of the incident X wave increases, it is shown that the nonlinear self-interaction of the electron converted EBW gives rise to the second harmonic generation at a pump power as low as three orders smaller than the electron thermal energy. If the fundamental EBW is sufficiently large, the non-propagating third and fourth harmonic modes are also generated. *The work was supported by DOE Contract No.DE-FG02-04ER54735.

  19. XB-70 aerodynamic, geometric, mass, and symmetric structural mode data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wykes, J. H.; Mori, A. S.

    1970-01-01

    XB-70-1 mass, structural, and aerodynamic data were updated to reflect as closely as possible the characteristics of the airplane at three specific flight conditions which were actually flown; a nominal Mach number of 0.90 at an altitude of 25,000 feet (two cases) and a nominal Mach number of 1.6 at an altitude of 40,000 feet (one case). In-flight response characteristics at a number of points on the vehicle were obtained by exciting a pair of shaker vanes on the nose of the airplane. Data were recorded with the basic stability augmentation system (SAS) operating both alone and together with the identical location of accelerometer and force (ILAF) structural mode control system. Detailed total vehicle weight, mass characteristics, structural frequencies, generalized masses, all aerodynamic data used in the present analyses, and a description of the actual mode shapes are tabulated and presented.

  20. XB130 translocation to microfilamentous structures mediates NNK-induced migration of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifei; Nadesalingam, Jeya; Moodley, Serisha; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-07-20

    Cigarette smoking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) is the most potent carcinogen among cigarette smoking components, and is known to enhance migration of cancer cells. However, the effect of NNK on normal human bronchial epithelial cells is not well studied. XB130 is a member of actin filament associated protein family and is involved in cell morphology changes, cytoskeletal rearrangement and outgrowth formation, as well as cell migration. We hypothesized that XB130 mediates NNK-induced migration of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Our results showed that, after NNK stimulation, XB130 was translocated to the cell periphery and enriched in cell motility-associated structures, such as lamellipodia, in normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells. Moreover, overexpression of XB130 significantly enhanced NNK-induced migration, which requires both the N- and C-termini of XB130. Overexpression of XB130 enhanced NNK-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and promoted matrix metalloproteinase-14 translocation to cell motility-associated cellular structures after NNK stimulation. XB130-mediated NNK-induced cell migration may contribute to airway epithelial repair; however, it may also be involved in cigarette smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

  1. Comparison of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters on plans for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy using an endorectal balloon for different dose-calculation algorithms and delivery-beam modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk; Chung, Jin-Beom; Eom, Keun-Yong; Song, Changhoon; Kim, In-Ah; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Cho, Woong

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters on treatment plans by using different dose-calculation algorithms and delivery-beam modes for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon. For 20 patients with prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans were generated by using a 10-MV photon beam with flattening filter (FF) and flattening-filter-free (FFF) modes. The total treatment dose prescribed was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose. The dose computation was initially performed using an anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and was then re-calculated using Acuros XB (AXB V. 11.0.34) with the same monitor units and multileaf collimator files. The dosimetric and the radiobiological parameters for the PTV and organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed from the dose-volume histogram. An obvious difference in dosimetric parameters between the AAA and the AXB plans was observed in the PTV and rectum. Doses to the PTV, excluding the maximum dose, were always higher in the AAA plans than in the AXB plans. However, doses to the other OARs were similar in both algorithm plans. In addition, no difference was observed in the dosimetric parameters for different delivery-beam modes when using the same algorithm to generate plans. As a result of the dosimetric parameters, the radiobiological parameters for the two algorithm plans presented an apparent difference in the PTV and the rectum. The average tumor control probability of the AAA plans was higher than that of the AXB plans. The average normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) to rectum was lower in the AXB plans than in the AAA plans. The AAA and the AXB plans yielded very similar NTCPs for the other OARs. In plans using the same algorithms, the NTCPs for delivery

  2. Kinetic simulations of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, A. V.; Du Toit, E. J.; Vann, R. G. L.; Köhn, A.; Holzhauer, E.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2015-12-10

    We have performed fully-kinetic simulations of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion in one and two dimensional setups using the PIC code EPOCH. We have recovered the linear dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves by employing relatively low amplitude incoming waves. The setups presented here can be used to study non-linear regimes of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion.

  3. Kinetic simulations of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A. V.; Du Toit, E. J.; Köhn, A.; Holzhauer, E.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed fully-kinetic simulations of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion in one and two dimensional setups using the PIC code EPOCH. We have recovered the linear dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves by employing relatively low amplitude incoming waves. The setups presented here can be used to study non-linear regimes of X-B and O-X-B mode conversion.

  4. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  5. Stimulus-dependent dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 scaffold proteins promotes airway epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Serisha; Derouet, Mathieu; Bai, Xiao Hui; Xu, Feng; Kapus, Andras; Yang, Burton B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    Repair of airway epithelium after injury requires migration of neighboring epithelial cells to injured areas. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating airway epithelial cell migration is not well defined. We have previously shown that XB130, a scaffold protein, is required for airway epithelial repair and regeneration in vivo, and interaction between XB130 and another scaffold protein, Tks5, regulates cell proliferation and survival in human bronchial epithelial cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of XB130 and Tks5 interaction in airway epithelial cell migration. Interestingly, we found that XB130 only promotes lateral cell migration, whereas, Tks5 promotes cell migration/invasion via proteolysis of extracellular matrix. Upon stimulation with EGF, PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate or a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, XB130 and Tks5 translocated to the cell membrane in a stimulus-dependent manner. The translocation and distribution of XB130 is similar to lamellipodial marker, WAVE2; whereas Tks5 is similar to podosome marker, N-WASP. Over-expression of XB130 or Tks5 alone enhances cell migration, whereas co-expression of both XB130 and Tks5 inhibits cell migration processes and signaling. Furthermore, XB130 interacts with Rac1 whereas Tks5 interacts with Cdc42 to promote Rho GTPase activity. Our results suggest that dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 may facilitate lateral cell migration via XB130/Rac1, and vertical cell migration via Tks5/Cdc42. These molecular mechanisms will help our understanding of airway epithelial repair and regeneration. PMID:27835612

  6. Dosimetric comparison of lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment plans using averaged computed tomography and end-exhalation computed tomography images: Evaluation of the effect of different dose-calculation algorithms and prescription methods.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Nakamura, Akira; Iizuka, Yusuke; Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to quantitatively evaluate differences in dose distributions calculated using various computed tomography (CT) datasets, dose-calculation algorithms, and prescription methods in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage lung cancer. Data on 29 patients with early-stage lung cancer treated with SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. Averaged CT (Ave-CT) and expiratory CT (Ex-CT) images were reconstructed for each patient using 4-dimensional CT data. Dose distributions were initially calculated using the Ave-CT images and recalculated (in the same monitor units [MUs]) by employing Ex-CT images with the same beam arrangements. The dose-volume parameters, including D95, D90, D50, and D2 of the planning target volume (PTV), were compared between the 2 image sets. To explore the influence of dose-calculation algorithms and prescription methods on the differences in dose distributions evident between Ave-CT and Ex-CT images, we calculated dose distributions using the following 3 different algorithms: x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC), Acuros XB (AXB), and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA). We also used 2 different dose-prescription methods; the isocenter prescription and the PTV periphery prescription methods. All differences in PTV dose-volume parameters calculated using Ave-CT and Ex-CT data were within 3 percentage points (%pts) employing the isocenter prescription method, and within 1.5%pts using the PTV periphery prescription method, irrespective of which of the 3 algorithms (XVMC, AXB, and AAA) was employed. The frequencies of dose-volume parameters differing by >1%pt when the XVMC and AXB were used were greater than those associated with the use of the AAA, regardless of the dose-prescription method employed. All differences in PTV dose-volume parameters calculated using Ave-CT and Ex-CT data on patients who underwent lung SBRT were within 3%pts, regardless of the dose-calculation algorithm or the dose

  7. X (3872 ) , Xb , and the χb 1(3 P ) state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the possible production and discovery channels in e+e- and p p machines of the Xb, the bottomonium counterpart of X (3872 ) and the putative isoscalar analogue of the charged bottomoniumlike states Zb discovered by Belle. We suggest that the Xb may be close in mass to the bottomonium state χb 1(3 P ), mixing with it and sharing its decay channels, just as X (3872 ) is likely a mixture of a D ¯D* molecule and χc 1(2 P ) . Consequently, the experiments which reported observing χb 1(3 P ) might have actually discovered the Xb, or a mixture of the two states.

  8. Column and Plate Compressive Strength of Extruded XB75S-T Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimerl, George J.; Roy, J. Albert

    1944-01-01

    Results are presented of tests to determine the column and plate compressive strength of extruded XB75S-T aluminum alloy, and comparative values are shown for 24S-T aluminum-alloy sheet. Stress-strain curves are also given,

  9. SU-E-T-795: Validations of Dose Calculation Accuracy of Acuros BV in High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a Shielded Cylinder Applicator Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Acuros BV has become available to perform accurate dose calculations in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with phantom heterogeneity considered by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, we performed validation studies regarding the dose calculation accuracy of Acuros BV in cases with a shielded cylinder applicator using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Fifteen cases were considered in our studies, covering five different diameters of the applicator and three different shielding degrees. For each case, a digital phantom was created in Varian BrachyVision with the cylinder applicator inserted in the middle of a large water phantom. A treatment plan with eight dwell positions was generated for these fifteen cases. Dose calculations were performed with Acuros BV. We then generated a voxelized phantom of the same geometry, and the materials were modeled according to the vendor’s specifications. MC dose calculations were then performed using our in-house developed fast MC dose engine for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC) on a GPU platform, which is able to simulate both photon transport and electron transport in a voxelized geometry. A phase-space file for the Ir-192 HDR source was used as a source model for MC simulations. Results: Satisfactory agreements between the dose distributions calculated by Acuros BV and those calculated by gBMC were observed in all cases. Quantitatively, we computed point-wise dose difference within the region that receives a dose higher than 10% of the reference dose, defined to be the dose at 5mm outward away from the applicator surface. The mean dose difference was ∼0.45%–0.51% and the 95-percentile maximum difference was ∼1.24%–1.47%. Conclusion: Acuros BV is able to accurately perform dose calculations in HDR brachytherapy with a shielded cylinder applicator.

  10. The effects of oblique incidences on the XB mode conversion in the electron cyclotron range of frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Gao, Zhe

    2017-02-01

    The linear conversion from a fast extraordinary mode to a Bernstein mode (XB) in the electron cyclotron range of frequency is revisited numerically by using a simplified kinetic model. The corresponding wave equations are solved as a standard two-point boundary value problem, where the self-consistent boundary conditions are applied and the scattering coefficients are calculated accordingly. The numerical calculation of the XB conversion efficiency is compared with the analytical formula for the normal incidence (along the direction perpendicular to the equilibrium magnetic field and parallel to the density gradient), where a reasonable agreement is found. The effects of incident angles represented by refractive indexes on the conversion efficiency are analyzed. It is shown that as the incident angle deviates from the normal incidence, the efficiency of XB conversion decreases significantly. The results also indicate that the power loss in the XB process can be ascribed to the reflected fast extraordinary mode and the reflected-converted ordinary mode. The symmetry of the conversion efficiency about the incident angle is discussed, and the rigid restriction on the scale length of the density variation for effective XB conversions can be possibly alleviated through altering the injection direction in realistic experiments.

  11. Rotation vibration energy level clustering in the XB1 ground electronic state of PH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Jensen, Per; Bunker, P. R.

    2006-10-01

    We use previously determined potential energy surfaces for the Renner-coupled XB1 and AA1 electronic states of the phosphino (PH 2) free radical in a calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of highly excited rotational and vibrational energy levels of the X˜ state. We show how spin-orbit coupling, the Renner effect, rotational excitation, and vibrational excitation affect the clustered energy level patterns that occur. We consider both 4-fold rotational energy level clustering caused by centrifugal distortion, and vibrational energy level pairing caused by local mode behaviour. We also calculate ab initio dipole moment surfaces for the X˜ and A˜ states, and the X˜-A˜ transition moment surface, in order to obtain spectral intensities.

  12. EXOSAT observations of a long X-ray burst from XB 1905 + 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, C.; Ilovaisky, S. A.

    1990-02-01

    During a 17-hour continuous Exosat observation of the faint X-ray source XB 1905 + 000 a single burst was detected which shows a long decay following a radius expansion-contraction phase near maximum bolometric flux. The best spectral fits for the persistent emission are found when a 10-percent contribution from a cool blackbody component is added to a hard spectrum represented by a power law. During the burst decay the blackbody burst emission evolves clearly into the small cool component seen in the persistent emission. From the relation between the observed color temperature and the bolometric flux, an allowed region in the M-R diagram is delimited for a neutron star with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere, and a distance of 8 + or - 1 kpc is derived for the source. This yields an absolute visual magnitude of + 4.8 for the optical counterpart.

  13. Summary of stability and control characteristics of the XB-70 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Yancey, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability and control characteristics of the XB-70 airplane were evaluated for Mach numbers up to 3.0 and altitudes up to 21,300 meters (70,000 feet). The airplane's inherent longitudinal characteristics proved to be generally satisfactory. In the lateral-directional modes, the airplane was characterized by light wheel forces, low static directional stability beyond approximately 2 deg of sideslip, adverse yaw response to aileron inputs throughout the entire Mach number range, and negative effective dihedral with wingtips full down. At subsonic Mach numbers, with the flight augmentation control system off, the light wheel forces and adverse yaw response to aileron inputs caused the pilots to minimize use of the ailerons. At supersonic Mach numbers, with the augmentation system off, the adverse yaw due to aileron and the negative effective dihedral were conducive to pilot-induced oscillations.

  14. Measured Sonic Boom Signatures Above and Below the XB-70 Airplane Flying at Mach 1.5 and 37,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Henderson, Herbert R.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2011-01-01

    During the 1966-67 Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) National Sonic Boom Evaluation Program, a series of in-flight flow-field measurements were made above and below the USAF XB-70 using an instrumented NASA F-104 aircraft with a specially designed nose probe. These were accomplished in the three XB-70 flights at about Mach 1.5 at about 37,000 ft. and gross weights of about 350,000 lbs. Six supersonic passes with the F-104 probe aircraft were made through the XB-70 shock flow-field; one above and five below the XB-70. Separation distances ranged from about 3000 ft. above and 7000 ft. to the side of the XB-70 and about 2000 ft. and 5000 ft. below the XB-70. Complex near-field "sawtooth-type" signatures were observed in all cases. At ground level, the XB-70 shock waves had not coalesced into the two-shock classical sonic boom N-wave signature, but contained three shocks. Included in this report is a description of the generating and probe airplanes, the in-flight and ground pressure measuring instrumentation, the flight test procedure and aircraft positioning, surface and upper air weather observations, and the six in-flight pressure signatures from the three flights.

  15. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin: examination of biochemical effects involved in the proliferation and differentiation of XB cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, J.C.; Poland, A.

    1984-10-01

    XB, a cell line derived form a mouse teratoma, differentiates into stratified squamous epithelium when incubated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). To examine the mediators of this response the effects produced by TCDD and those elicited by other compounds which stimulated epidermal proliferation and/or differentiation in mice were compared, XB/3T3 cultures keratinize when incubated with cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or TCDD , but not 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Incubation of XB cells with TCDD for 48 hours produces an increase in thymidine incorporation, a response which is neither as large nor as rapid as that produced by cholera toxin, TPA, or EGF. Although both cholera toxin and TCDD stimulate differentiation and thymidine incorporation in XB/3T3 cultures, cholera toxin increases cAMP 30-fold in these cells, while TCDD does not affect cAMP accumulation. Inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism, which block epidermal proliferative responses to TPA in vivo, do not prevent the differentiation of XB cells in response to TCDD. In XB/3T3 cultures, TPA stimulates arachidonic acid release at all times tested (1,6, and 24 hours) and increases the incorporation of /sup 32/P/sub i/ into total phospholipids and phosphatidyl-choline after 3 hours. In contrast, D affects neither arachidonic acid release nor the turnover of phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidylcholine at any of the times tested. Although biochemical effects which have been suggested as part of the mechanism of TCDD and produced by other epidermal proliferative compounds in XB cells were examined, no mediator of the TCDD-produced differentiation of XB/3T3 cultures was observed.

  16. Flight investigation of XB-70 structural response to oscillatory aerodynamic shaker excitation and correlation with analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, J. M.; Kordes, E. E.; Wykes, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The low frequency symmetric structural response and damping characteristics of the XB-70 airplane were measured at four flight conditions: heavyweight at a Mach number of 0.87 at an altitude of 7620 meters (25,000 feet); lightweight at a Mach number of 0.86 at an altitude of 7620 meters (25,000 feet); a Mach number of 1.59 at an altitude of 11,918 meters (39.100 feet); and a Mach number of 2.38 and an altitude of 18,898 meters (62,000 feet). The flight data are compared with the response calculated by using early XB-70 design data and with the response calculated with mass, structural, and aerodynamic data updated to reflect as closely as possible the airplane characteristics at three of the flight conditions actually flown.

  17. Simulated Altitude Performance of Combustor of Westinghouse 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, J. Howard; McCafferty, Richard J.

    1948-01-01

    A 19XB-1 combustor was operated under conditions simulating zero-ram operation of the 19XB-1 turbojet engine at various altitudes and engine speeds. The combustion efficiencies and the altitude operational limits were determined; data were also obtained on the character of the combustion, the pressure drop through the combustor, and the combustor-outlet temperature and velocity profiles. At altitudes about 10,000 feet below the operational limits, the flames were yellow and steady and the temperature rise through the combustor increased with fuel-air ratio throughout the range of fuel-air ratios investigated. At altitudes near the operational limits, the flames were blue and flickering and the combustor was sluggish in its response to changes in fuel flow. At these high altitudes, the temperature rise through the combustor increased very slowly as the fuel flow was increased and attained a maximum at a fuel-air ratio much leaner than the over-all stoichiometric; further increases in fuel flow resulted in decreased values of combustor temperature rise and increased resonance until a rich-limit blow-out occurred. The approximate operational ceiling of the engine as determined by the combustor, using AN-F-28, Amendment-3, fuel, was 30,400 feet at a simulated engine speed of 7500 rpm and increased as the engine speed was increased. At an engine speed of 16,000 rpm, the operational ceiling was approximately 48,000 feet. Throughout the range of simulated altitudes and engine speeds investigated, the combustion efficiency increased with increasing engine speed and with decreasing altitude. The combustion efficiency varied from over 99 percent at operating conditions simulating high engine speed and low altitude operation to less than 50 percent at conditions simulating operation at altitudes near the operational limits. The isothermal total pressure drop through the combustor was 1.82 times as great as the inlet dynamic pressure. As expected from theoretical

  18. Statistical survey of XB-70 airplane responses and control usage with an illustration of the application to handling qualities criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of occurrence of aircraft responses and control inputs during 27 flights of the XB-70 airplane were measured. Exceedance curves are presented for the airplane responses and control usage. A technique is presented which makes use of these exceedance curves to establish or verify handling qualities criteria. This technique can provide a means of incorporating current operational experience in handling qualities requirements for future aircraft.

  19. Tenascin-X: a novel extracellular matrix protein encoded by the human XB gene overlapping P450c21B

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A human gene termed XB overlaps the P450c21B gene encoding steroid 21- hydroxylase and encodes a protein that closely resembles extracellular matrix proteins. Sequencing of phage and cosmid clones and of cDNA fragments shows that the XB gene spans 65 kb of DNA, consisting of 39 exons that encode a 12-kb mRNA. The predicted protein of over 400 kD consists of five distinct domains: a signal peptide, a hydrophobic domain containing three heptad repeats, a series of 18.5 EGF-like repeats, 29 fibronectin type III repeats, and a carboxy-terminal fibrinogen-like domain. Because the structure of the protein encoded by the XB gene closely resembles tenascin, we term this protein tenascin-X (TN-X), and propose a simplified nomenclature system for the family of tenascins. RNase protection experiments show that the TN-X transcript is expressed ubiquitously in human fetal tissues, with the greatest expression in the fetal testis and in fetal skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. Two adrenal-specific transcripts, P450c21B (steroid 21- hydroxylase) and Y (an untranslated transcript) overlap the XB gene on the complementary strand of DNA, yielding a unique array of overlapping transcripts: a "polygene." In situ hybridization histochemistry experiments show that the TN-X transcript and the P450c21 and Y transcripts encoded on the complementary DNA strand are all expressed in the same cells of the human adrenal cortex. Genetic data suggest that TN-X may be essential for life. PMID:7686164

  20. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  1. Systematic investigation of the molecular behaviors of heterofullerenes C 48X 2 (X=B, N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufang; Xing, Yumei; Shang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Guichang; Cai, Zunsheng; Pan, Yinming; Zhao, Xuezhuang

    2003-02-01

    A systematic investigation on all possible substituted fullerene isomers of C 48B 2 and C 48N 2 has been performed using the semiempirical methods AM1 and MNDO. The equilibrium geometrical structures, heats of formation, strain, aromaticity, HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, ionization potentials, electronic affinities, the absolute hardness and electronegativity have been studied. The results indicate that the isomer-78, which corresponds to 1,4-substitution in the six-membered ring located on the equator, is the most stable isomer for both C 48B 2 and C 48N 2. The driving force governing the stabilities of the present studied C 48X 2 (X=B, N) isomers is the strain being inherent in the C 50 cage. The contribution of the conjugation effect to the stabilization is not able to compete with that of the strain. From an application of the HSAB principle, the absolute hardness of the more stable isomers of both C 48B 2 and C 48N 2 are larger than that of C 50, and the direction of electron flow for forming a complex among them may be C 48N 2→C 50→C 48B 2 according to the calculated absolute electronegativity. The more stable C 48X 2 isomers have larger ionization potentials and smaller electronic affinities compared with C 50, which suggests that it is more difficult to oxidize and reduce C 48X 2, i.e., the redox characteristics of C 50 can be weakened by doping. The vibrational spectra and electronic absorption spectra of these substituted fullerenes have been calculated, which could serve as a framework to interpret future experimental results. The computed nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) values also provide a basis for the possible characterization of these C 48X 2 isomers.

  2. Altitude-wind-tunnel investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 jet-propulsion engines III : performance and windmilling drag characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A; Dietz, Robert O JR

    1948-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the 19B-8 and 19XB-1 turbojet engines and the windmilling drag characteristics of the 19B-8 engine were determined in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The 19B engine is one of the earliest experimental Westinghouse axial-flow engines. The 19XB-1 engine is an experimental prototype of the Westinghouse 19XB series, having a rated thrust of 1400 pounds. Improvements in performance and operational characteristics have resulted in the 19XB-2B engine with a rated thrust of 1600 pounds. The investigations were conducted on the 19B-8 engine at simulated altitudes from 5000 to 25,000 feet with various free-stream ram-pressure ratios and on the 19XB-1 engine at simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet with approximately static free-stream conditions. Data for these two engines are presented to show the effect of altitude, free-stream ram-pressure ratio, and tail-pipe-nozzle area on engine performance.

  3. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines IV : analysis of compressor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Robert O; Kuenzig, John K

    1948-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to determine the performance and operational characteristics of the 19B-2, 19B-6, and 19XB-1 Turbojet Engines. One objective of the investigations was to determine the effect of altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-pipe-nozzle area on the performance characteristics of the six-stage and ten-stage axial-flow compressors of the 19B-8 and 19XB-1 engines, respectively. The data were obtained over a range of simulated altitudes and flight Mach numbers. At each simulated flight condition the engine was run over its full operable range of speeds. Performance characteristics of the 19B-8 and 19XB-1 compressors for the range of operation obtainable in the turbojet-engine installation are presented. Compressor characteristics are presented as functions of air flow corrected to sea-level conditions, compressor Mach number, and compressor load coefficient.

  4. Hyperactivation of the Human Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump PMCA h4xb by Mutation of Glu99 to Lys*

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Luciana R.; Adamo, Hugo P.

    2014-01-01

    The transport of calcium to the extracellular space carried out by plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps (PMCAs) is essential for maintaining low Ca2+ concentrations in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. The activity of PMCAs is controlled by autoinhibition. Autoinhibition is relieved by the binding of Ca2+-calmodulin to the calmodulin-binding autoinhibitory sequence, which in the human PMCA is located in the C-terminal segment and results in a PMCA of high maximal velocity of transport and high affinity for Ca2+. Autoinhibition involves the intramolecular interaction between the autoinhibitory domain and a not well defined region of the molecule near the catalytic site. Here we show that the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of the h4xb PMCA causes partial loss of autoinhibition by specifically increasing the Vmax. Mutation of residue Glu99 to Lys in the cytosolic portion of the M1 transmembrane helix at the other end of the molecule brought the Vmax of the h4xb PMCA to near that of the calmodulin-activated enzyme without increasing the apparent affinity for Ca2+. Altogether, the results suggest that the autoinhibitory interaction of the extreme C-terminal segment of the h4 PMCA is disturbed by changes of negatively charged residues of the N-terminal region. This would be consistent with a recently proposed model of an autoinhibited form of the plant ACA8 pump, although some differences are noted. PMID:24584935

  5. Direct X-B mode conversion for high-β national spherical torus experiment in nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Asgarian, M. E-mail: maa@msu.edu; Parvazian, A.; Abbasi, M.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-09-15

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can be effective for heating and driving currents in spherical tokamak plasmas. Power can be coupled to EBW via mode conversion of the extraordinary (X) mode wave. The most common and successful approach to study the conditions for optimized mode conversion to EBW was evaluated analytically and numerically using a cold plasma model and an approximate kinetic model. The major drawback in using radio frequency waves was the lack of continuous wave sources at very high frequencies (above the electron plasma frequency), which has been addressed. A future milestone is to approach high power regime, where the nonlinear effects become significant, exceeding the limits of validity for present linear theory. Therefore, one appropriate tool would be particle in cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC method retains most of the nonlinear physics without approximations. In this work, we study the direct X-B mode conversion process stages using PIC method for incident wave frequency f{sub 0} = 15 GHz, and maximum amplitude E{sub 0} = 10{sup 5 }V/m in the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX). The modelling shows a considerable reduction in X-B mode conversion efficiency, C{sub modelling} = 0.43, due to the presence of nonlinearities. Comparison of system properties to the linear state reveals predominant nonlinear effects; EBW wavelength and group velocity in comparison with linear regime exhibit an increment around ∼36% and 17%, respectively.

  6. An adequate interpretation of charge transport for a dilute La 1-xCe xB 6 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluchanko, N. E.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A.; Bogach, A. V.; Gon'kov, K. V.; Khayrullin, E. I.; Filipov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.

    2008-04-01

    Precision measurements of charge transport characteristics (resistivity and Seebeck coefficient) have been carried out on the high quality single crystals of the so-called dilute Kondo system La 1-xCe xB 6 ( x⩽0.1) in a wide temperature range 1.8-300 K. At low temperatures, it was shown that instead of Kondo-type logarithmic contribution to resistivity Δ ρ∼-ln T the magnetic component obeys the power law Δ ρ∼ T-a, which corresponds to the regime of weak localization of charge carriers with the critical exponent values a=0.47-0.49 for x⩽0.1. An asymptotic behavior of Seebeck coefficient S∼-ln T found for these dilute magnetic compounds at intermediate temperatures is compared with S( T) dependence observed for the dense system CeB 6. The data obtained for La 1-xCe xB 6 are analyzed in terms of Kondo-impurity model and alternative spin-polaron approach.

  7. Radar detection of near-Earth Asteroids 1915 Quetzalcoatl, 3199 Nefertiti, 3757 (1982 XB), and 4034 (1986 PA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Ostro, Steven J.; Campbell, Donald B.; Shapiro, Irwin I.; Chandler, John F.

    2004-11-01

    We describe Arecibo (2380 MHz, 12.6 cm) Doppler-only radar detections of near-Earth Asteroids 1915 Quetzalcoatl, 3199 Nefertiti, 3757 (1982 XB), and 4034 (1986 PA) obtained between 1981 and 1989. Estimates of the echo spectral bandwidths, radar cross-sections, and circular polarization ratios of these objects constrain their sizes, radar albedos, surface roughnesses, taxonomic classes, rotation periods, and pole directions. Our radar constraints on the diameters of Quetzalcoatl and Nefertiti are most consistent with sizes determined using thermal-radiometry and the Fast Rotation Model (FRM); this consistency may indicate that these asteroids have surfaces of high thermal inertia (i.e., little or no regolith). Constraints on Quetzalcoatl's radar albedo rule out a "metallic M" classification. The radar constraints for Nefertiti are inconsistent with a rotation pole published by Kaasalainen et al. (2004, Icarus 167, 178). Our estimates of 1982 XB's size are consistent with previously published estimates. The radar bandwidth of 1986 PA places an upper bound of about 24 h on its rotation period.

  8. HDDR processing of direct-reduced Nd 15Fe 77- xB 8Ga x powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, C.; Matzinger, M.; Steinhorst, M.; Fidler, J.; Harris, I. R.

    1997-05-01

    Direct-reduced (DR) Nd 15Fe 77B 8 and Nd 15Fe 77 - xB 8Ga x powders with x = 0.5, 1, 2 and 4, were treated by the HDDR process at various temperatures in order to optimise the processing parameters. The investigation of the magnetic properties was carried out on wax-bonded samples on a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and polymer-bonded magnets on a permeameter. The influence of Ga additions on the microstructure of direct-reduced NdFe B-type material was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the direct-reduced NdFeB powders containing Ga additions show significantly increased intrinsic coercivities of up to 895 kAm -1 compared to those of the ternary alloy or those of direct-reduced powders with Zr additions. The remanence appears to be, for Nd 15Fe 77 - xB 8Ga x, with x = 0.5, 1 and 2, relatively constant over a processing temperature range of ˜50°C; with remanence values of up to 720 mT. The maximum remanence values decrease with increasing Ga content. Under the conditions employed in these experiments, the HDDR treatment removes existing anisotropy in the as-received coarse grain material, thus leading to predominantly isotropic behaviour.

  9. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. Part 1; Operational Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to determine the operational characteristics of the Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-l jet-propulsion engines. The 19B engine is one af the earliest experimental Westinghouse axial flow engines. The 19XB-1 engine is an experimental prototype of the Westinghouse 15 series, having a rated thrust of 1400 pounds. Improvements in performance and operational characteristics have resulted in the 19XB-2B engine with a rated thrust of 1600 pounds. The operational characteristics were determined over a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet for the 19B engines and from 5000 to 35000 feet for the 19XB-l engine at airspeed from 20 to 380 miles per hour. The affects of altitude and airspeed on such operating characteristics as operating range, stability of combustion, starting, acceleration, and functioning of the fuel-control system are discussed. Damage to the engines that occurred during the investigation is also briefly discussed. The changes made in the combustion-chamber configuration to improve the operating we are described.

  10. On unusual temperature dependence of the upper critical field in YNi 2- xFe xB 2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumary, T. Geetha; Kalavathi, S.; Valsakumar, M. C.; Hariharan, Y.; Radhakrishnan, T. S.

    1997-02-01

    Measurement of upper critica field in YNi 2- xFe xB 2C is reported for x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15. An anomalous positive curvature is observed for a range of temperatures close to Tc, for all x. As x is increased, the temperature interval over which the curvature in Hc2( T) is positive, is reduced and the system shows a tendency to go to the usual behaviour exhibited by conventional low temperature superconductors. Most of the theories based on a Fermi liquid normal state seem to be inadequate to understand this anomalous behaviour. It is speculated that this anomalous behaviour of Hc2( T) signifies the presence of strong correlations in the pristine YNi 2B 2C and that strong correlation effects become less and less important upon substitution of Ni with Fe.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Associated Protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 Crosslinks Actin Filaments through Its Actin Binding and Multimerization Properties In Vitro and Enhances Endocytosis in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Akama, Takeshi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Ito, Koichi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins control actin filament networks and bundles and contribute to various cellular functions including regulation of cell migration, cell morphology, and endocytosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 has been reported to be localized to actin filaments (F-actin) and required for cell migration in thyroid carcinoma cells. Here, we show a role for PI3KAP/XB130 as an actin-crosslinking protein. First, we found that the carboxyl terminal region of PI3KAP/XB130 containing amino acid residues 830–840 was required and sufficient for localization to F-actin in NIH3T3 cells, and this region is directly bound to F-actin in vitro. Moreover, actin-crosslinking assay revealed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinked F-actin. In general, actin-crosslinking proteins often multimerize to assemble multiple actin-binding sites. We then investigated whether PI3KAP/XB130 could form a multimer. Blue native-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 was detected at 250–1200 kDa although the molecular mass was approximately 125 kDa, suggesting that PI3KAP/XB130 formed multimers. Furthermore, we found that the amino terminal 40 amino acids were required for this multimerization by co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293T cells. Deletion mutants of PI3KAP/XB130 lacking the actin-binding region or the multimerizing region did not crosslink actin filaments, indicating that actin binding and multimerization of PI3KAP/XB130 were necessary to crosslink F-actin. Finally, we examined roles of PI3KAP/XB130 on endocytosis, an actin-related biological process. Overexpression of PI3KAP/XB130 enhanced dextran uptake in HEK 293 cells. However, most of the cells transfected with the deletion mutant lacking the actin-binding region incorporated dextran to a similar extent as control cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinks F-actin through both its actin-binding region and multimerizing region and

  12. SU-E-T-802: Verification of Implanted Cardiac Pacemaker Doses in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy: Dose Prediction Accuracy and Reduction Effect of a Lead Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J; Chung, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify delivered doses on the implanted cardiac pacemaker, predicted doses with and without dose reduction method were verified using the MOSFET detectors in terms of beam delivery and dose calculation techniques in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: The pacemaker doses for a patient with a tongue cancer were predicted according to the beam delivery methods [step-and-shoot (SS) and sliding window (SW)], intensity levels for dose optimization, and dose calculation algorithms. Dosimetric effects on the pacemaker were calculated three dose engines: pencil-beam convolution (PBC), analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), and Acuros-XB. A lead shield of 2 mm thickness was designed for minimizing irradiated doses to the pacemaker. Dose variations affected by the heterogeneous material properties of the pacemaker and effectiveness of the lead shield were predicted by the Acuros-XB. Dose prediction accuracy and the feasibility of the dose reduction strategy were verified based on the measured skin doses right above the pacemaker using mosfet detectors during the radiation treatment. Results: The Acuros-XB showed underestimated skin doses and overestimated doses by the lead-shield effect, even though the lower dose disagreement was observed. It led to improved dose prediction with higher intensity level of dose optimization in IMRT. The dedicated tertiary lead sheet effectively achieved reduction of pacemaker dose up to 60%. Conclusion: The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, however, use of the lead sheet contributed to reduce scattered doses.Thin lead plate can be a useful tertiary shielder and it could not acuse malfunction or electrical damage of the implanted pacemaker in IMRT. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient with medical device to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  13. Influence of B content substituting for Al on the magnetic properties of Nd 60Fe 30Al 10- xB x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Nguyen; Luong, Nguyen Hoang; Huu, Cao Xuan; Phuc, Nguyen Xuan; Dan, Nguyen Huy

    2002-04-01

    The Nd 60Fe 30Al 10- xB x ( x=0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10) alloys were prepared by copper mold casting using arc-melting. Investigation shows that with increasing B content magnetization and remanence decrease while coercivity and Curie temperature increase. The hard magnetic properties are achieved not only in the amorphous state but also in partly crystallizing state.

  14. Strong electron-phonon coupling in Be{1-x}B{2}C{2}: ab initio studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, A. H.

    2008-07-01

    Several structures for off-stoichiometric beryllium diboride dicarbide Be{1-x}B2C2 have been designed, and their properties studied from first-principles density functional methods. Among the most stable phases examined, the layered hexagonal structures are shown to exhibit various features in the electronic properties and in the lattice dynamics reminiscent of the superconducting magnesium diboride and alkaline earth-intercalated graphites. For substoichiometric composition x˜ 1/3, the system is found metallic with a moderately strong electron-phonon coupling through a predominant contribution arising from high frequency streching modes modulating the σ-bonding of the B C network, and a weaker contribution at medium frequency range of the phonon spectra, arising from the intercalent motion coupled to the π-bonding states. Further, anharmonicities emerging from the proximity of the Fermi level to the σ-band edge, contributes to reduce the phonon softening hence stabilizing the structure. All these effects appear to combine favourably to produce a high temperature phonon-superconductivity.

  15. Microstructure and magnetic properties of Ce10+xFe84-xB6 nanocrystalline ribbons versus preparation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoras, M.; Lostun, M.; Stoian, G.; Herea, D. D.; Chiriac, H.; Lupu, N.

    2017-06-01

    Results on the magnetic and structural properties of Ce10+xFe78-xB6 (x = 0, 2, 4, 6) ribbons with good potential for the manufacturing of permanent magnets are presented. Ce-Fe-B based ribbons have been prepared by melt-spinning technique. The as-spun ribbons reveal either amorphous or nanocrystalline structure depending on the velocity of the wheel. In order to obtain ribbons with optimum nanocrystalline structure and magnetic properties, the as-spun ribbons with amorphous structure were annealed for different periods of time at temperatures ranging between 650 and 750 °C. It was found that the nanocrystalline ribbons obtained by optimal annealing of amorphous precursors presented better magnetic properties compared to the nanocrystalline ribbons obtained directly by rapid quenching from the melt. The best magnetic properties have been obtained for the amorphous Ce14Fe80B6 ribbons after annealing at 700 °C for 20 min. when the coercivity was about 6.08 kOe, remanence about 7.7 kG and energy product of 8.21 MGOe.

  16. Search for the Xb and other hidden-beauty states in the π+π- ϒ (1 S) channel at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.

    2015-01-01

    This Letter presents a search for a hidden-beauty counterpart of the X (3872) in the mass ranges of 10.05-10.31 GeV and 10.40-11.00 GeV, in the channel Xb →π+π- ϒ (1 S) (→μ+μ-), using 16.2 fb-1 of √{ s} = 8 TeVpp collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No evidence for new narrow states is found, and upper limits are set on the product of the Xb cross section and branching fraction, relative to those of the ϒ (2S), at the 95% confidence level using the CLS approach. These limits range from 0.8% to 4.0%, depending on mass. For masses above 10.1 GeV, the expected upper limits from this analysis are the most restrictive to date. Searches for production of the ϒ (13DJ), ϒ (10 860), and ϒ (11 020) states also reveal no significant signals.

  17. Excitation of ion Bernstein waves as the dominant parametric decay channel in direct X-B mode conversion for typical spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Mustafa; Sadeghi, Yahya; Sobhanian, Samad; Asgarian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-01

    The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is typically the only wave in the electron cyclotron (EC) range that can be applied in spherical tokamaks for heating and current drive (H&CD). Spherical tokamaks (STs) operate generally in high- β regimes, in which the usual EC ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) modes are cut off. As it was recently investigated the existence of EBWs at nonlinear regime thus the next step would be the probable nonlinear phenomena study which are predicted to be occurred within the high levels of injected power. In this regard, parametric instabilities are considered as the major channels for losses at the X-B conversion. Hence, we have to consider their effects at the UHR region which can reduce the X-B conversion efficiency. In the case of EBW heating (EBH) at high power density, the nonlinear effects can arise. Particularly at the UHR position, the group velocity is strongly reduced, which creates a high energy density and subsequently a high amplitude electric field. Therefore, a part of the input wave can decay into daughter waves via parametric instability (PI). Thus, via the present research, the excitations of ion Bernstein waves as the dominant decay channels are investigated and also an estimate for the threshold power in terms of experimental parameters related to the fundamental mode of instability is proposed.

  18. Algorithms and Algorithmic Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veselov, V. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    This paper is intended as an introduction to a number of problems connected with the description of algorithms and algorithmic languages, particularly the syntaxes and semantics of algorithmic languages. The terms "letter, word, alphabet" are defined and described. The concept of the algorithm is defined and the relation between the algorithm and…

  19. Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles V.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. In the investigation it was found that with flaps neutral satisfactory flight behavior at low speeds was obtainable with an increase in height of the vertical tail and with the inboard slats opened. In the flap-down slat-open condition the longitudinal stability was satisfactory, but it was impossible to obtain satisfactory lateral-flight characteristics even with the increase in height of the vertical tail because of the negative effective dihedral, low directional stability, and large-adverse yawing moments of the ailerons.

  20. Equivalent Longitudinal Area Distributions of the B-58 and XB-70-1 Airplanes for Use in Wave Drag and Sonic Boom Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Maglieri, Domenic J.; Driver, Cornelius; Bobbitt, Percy J.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed geometric description, in wave drag format, has been developed for the Convair B-58 and North American XB-70-1 delta wing airplanes. These descriptions have been placed on electronic files, the contents of which are described in this paper They are intended for use in wave drag and sonic boom calculations. Included in the electronic file and in the present paper are photographs and 3-view drawings of the two airplanes, tabulated geometric descriptions of each vehicle and its components, and comparisons of the electronic file outputs with existing data. The comparisons include a pictorial of the two airplanes based on the present geometric descriptions, and cross-sectional area distributions for both the normal Mach cuts and oblique Mach cuts above and below the vehicles. Good correlation exists between the area distributions generated in the late 1950s and 1960s and the present files. The availability of these electronic files facilitates further validation of sonic boom prediction codes through the use of two existing data bases on these airplanes, which were acquired in the 1960s and have not been fully exploited.

  1. A 2.15 hr ORBITAL PERIOD FOR THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY XB 1832-330 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6652

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M. C.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Elshamouty, K. G.; Edmonds, P. D. E-mail: heinke@ualberta.ca

    2012-03-10

    We present a candidate orbital period for the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) XB 1832-330 in the globular cluster NGC 6652 using a 6.5 hr Gemini South observation of the optical counterpart of the system. Light curves in g' and r' for two LMXBs in the cluster, sources A and B in previous literature, were extracted and analyzed for periodicity using the ISIS image subtraction package. A clear sinusoidal modulation is evident in both of A's curves, of amplitude {approx}0.11 mag in g' and {approx}0.065 mag in r', while B's curves exhibit rapid flickering, of amplitude {approx}1 mag in g' and {approx}0.5 mag in r'. A Lomb-Scargle test revealed a 2.15 hr periodic variation in the magnitude of A with a false alarm probability less than 10{sup -11}, and no significant periodicity in the light curve for B. Though it is possible that saturated stars in the vicinity of our sources partially contaminated our signal, the identification of A's binary period is nonetheless robust.

  2. Tests of a 1/7-Scale Semispan Model of the XB-35 Airplane in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Jerome; Kayten, Gerald G.; Cancro, Patrick A.

    1946-01-01

    A 1/7 scale semispan model of the XB-35 airplane was tested in the Langley 10 foot pressure tunnel, primarily for the purpose of investigating the effectiveness of a leading-edge slot for alleviation of stick-fixed longitudinal instability at high angles of attack caused by early tip stalling and a device for relief of stick-free instability caused by elevon up-floating tendencies at high angles of attack. Results indicated that the slot was not adequate to provide the desired improvement in stick-fixed stability. The tab-flipper device provided improvement in stick-free stability abd two of the linkage combinations tested gave satisfactory variations of control force with airspeed for all conditions except that in which the wing-tip "pitch-control" flap was fully deflected. However, the improvement in control force characteristics was accompanied by a detrimental effect on stick-fixed stability because of the pitching moments produced by the elevon tab deflection.

  3. Quantum mechanically guided design of Co43Fe20Ta(5.5)X(31.5) (X=B, Si, P, S) metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Hostert, C; Music, D; Bednarcik, J; Keckes, J; Schneider, J M

    2012-05-02

    A systematic ab initio molecular dynamics study was carried out to identify valence electron concentration and size induced changes on structure, elastic and magnetic properties for Co(43)Fe(20)Ta(5.5)X(31.5) (X=B, Si, P, S). Short range order, charge transfer and the bonding nature are analyzed by means of density of states, Bader decomposition and pair distribution function analysis. A clear trend of a decrease in density and bulk modulus as well as a weaker cohesion was observed as the valence electron concentration is increased by replacing B with Si and further with P and S. These changes may be understood based on increased interatomic distances, variations in coordination numbers and the electronic structure changes; as the valence electron concentration of X is increased the X bonding becomes more ionic, which disrupts the overall metallic interactions, leading to lower cohesion and stiffness. The highest magnetic moments for the transition metals are identified for X=S, despite the fact that the presence of X generally reduces the magnetic moment of Co. Furthermore, this study reveals an extended diagonal relationship between B and P within these amorphous alloys. Based on quantum mechanical data we identify composition induced changes in short range order, charge transfer and bonding nature and link them to density, elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between transition metal d band filling and s-d hybridization was identified to be a key materials design criterion.

  4. Investigation of Prolific Sheep from UK and Ireland for Evidence on Origin of the Mutations in BMP15 (FecXG, FecXB) and GDF9 (FecGH) in Belclare and Cambridge Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Michael P.; Hanrahan, James P.; Howard, Dawn J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns the likely origin of three mutations with large effects on ovulation rate identified in the Belclare and Cambridge sheep breeds; two in the BMP15 gene (FecXG and FecXB) and the third (FecGH) in GDF9. All three mutations segregate in Belclare sheep while one, FecXB, has not been found in the Cambridge. Both Belclare and Cambridge breeds are relatively recently developed composites that have common ancestry through the use of genetic material from the Finnish Landrace and Lleyn breeds. The development of both composites also involved major contributions from exceptionally prolific ewes screened from flocks in Ireland (Belclare) and Britain (Cambridge) during the 1960s. The objective of the current study was to establish the likely origin of the mutations (FecXG, FecXB and FecGH) through analysis of DNA from Finnish Landrace and Lleyn sheep, and Galway and Texel breeds which contributed to the development of the Belclare breed. Ewes with exceptionally high prolificacy (hyper-prolific ewes) in current flocks on Irish farms were identified to simulate the screening of ewes from Irish flocks in the 1960s. DNA was obtained from: prolific ewes in extant flocks of Lleyn sheep (n = 44) on the Lleyn peninsula in Wales; hyper-prolific ewes (n = 41); prolific Galway (n = 41) ewes; Finnish Landrace (n = 124) and Texel (n = 19) ewes. The FecXG mutation was identified in Lleyn but not in Finnish Landrace, Galway or Texel sheep; FecXB was only found among the hyper-prolific ewes. The FecGH mutation was identified in the sample of Lleyn sheep. It was concluded from these findings that the Lleyn breed was the most likely source of the FecXG and FecGH mutations in Belclare and Cambridge sheep and that the FecXB mutation came from the High Fertility line that was developed using prolific ewes selected from commercial flocks in Ireland in the 1960′s and subsequently used in the genesis of the Belclare. PMID:23301039

  5. SWIFT REVEALS A ∼5.7 DAY SUPER-ORBITAL PERIOD IN THE M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER X-RAY BINARY XB158

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.; Garcia, M. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2015-03-01

    The M31 globular cluster X-ray binary XB158 (a.k.a. Bo 158) exhibits intensity dips on a 2.78 hr period in some observations, but not others. The short period suggests a low mass ratio, and an asymmetric, precessing disk due to additional tidal torques from the donor star since the disk crosses the 3:1 resonance. Previous theoretical three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamical modeling suggested a super-orbital disk precession period 29 ± 1 times the orbital period, i.e., ∼81 ± 3 hr. We conducted a Swift monitoring campaign of 30 observations over ∼1 month in order to search for evidence of such a super-orbital period. Fitting the 0.3-10 keV Swift X-Ray Telescope luminosity light curve with a sinusoid yielded a period of 5.65 ± 0.05 days, and a >5σ improvement in χ{sup 2} over the best fit constant intensity model. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram revealed that periods of 5.4-5.8 days were detected at a >3σ level, with a peak at 5.6 days. We consider this strong evidence for a 5.65 day super-orbital period, ∼70% longer than the predicted period. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity varied by a factor of ∼5, consistent with variations seen in long-term monitoring from Chandra. We conclude that other X-ray binaries exhibiting similar long-term behavior are likely to also be X-ray binaries with low mass ratios and super-orbital periods.

  6. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 jet-propulsion engines V : combustion chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Bemrose

    1948-01-01

    Pressure losses through the combustion chamber and the combustion efficiency of the 19B-2 and 19B-8 jet-propulsion engines and the combustion efficiency of the 19XB-1 jet-propulsion engine are presented.Data were obtained from an investigation of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel over a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and tunnel Mach numbers from less than 0.100 to 0.455. The combustion-chamber pressure loss due to friction was higher for the 19B-2 combustion chamber than for the 19B-8. The 19B-2 combustion chamber had a screen of 40-percent open area interposed between the compressor outlet and the combustion-chamber inlet. The screen for the 19B-8 combustion chamber had a 60-percent open area, which except for a small difference in tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area represents the only point of difference between the standard 19B-2 and 19B-8 combustion chambers. The pressure loss due to heat addition to the flowing gases in the combustion chamber was approximately the same for the 19B-2 and 19B-8 configurations. Altitude and tunnel Mach number had no significant effect on the over-all total-pressure loss through the combustion chamber. A decrease in tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area (tail cone out) resulted in a decrease in combustion-chamber total-pressure loss at high engine speeds.

  7. The electronic structure, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides

    SciTech Connect

    He, TianWei; Jiang, YeHua E-mail: jfeng@seas.harvard.edu; Zhou, Rong; Feng, Jing E-mail: jfeng@seas.harvard.edu

    2015-08-21

    The mechanical properties, electronic structure and thermodynamic properties of the Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides were calculated by first-principles methods. The elastic constants show that these ternary borides are mechanically stable. Formation enthalpy of Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides are at the range of −118.09 kJ/mol to −40.14 kJ/mol. The electronic structures and chemical bonding characteristics are analyzed by the density of states. Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} has the largest shear and Young's modulus because of its strong chemical bonding, and the values are 204.3 GPa and 500.3 GPa, respectively. MoCo{sub 2}B{sub 4} shows the lowest degree of anisotropy due to the lack of strong direction in the bonding. The Debye temperature of MoFe{sub 2}B{sub 4} is the largest among the six phases, which means that MoFe{sub 2}B{sub 4} possesses the best thermal conductivity. Enthalpy shows an approximately linear function of the temperature above 300 K. The entropy of these compounds increase rapidly when the temperature is below 450 K. The Gibbs free energy decreases with the increase in temperature. MoCo{sub 2}B{sub 4} has the lowest Gibbs free energy, which indicates the strongest formation ability in Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides.

  8. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  9. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-70-1). 3: A comparison between characteristics predicted from wind-tunnel measurements and those measured in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.; Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Daugherty, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A program was undertaken by NASA to evaluate the accuracy of a method for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of large supersonic cruise airplanes. This program compared predicted and flight-measured lift, drag, angle of attack, and control surface deflection for the XB-70-1 airplane for 14 flight conditions with a Mach number range from 0.76 to 2.56. The predictions were derived from the wind-tunnel test data of a 0.03-scale model of the XB-70-1 airplane fabricated to represent the aeroelastically deformed shape at a 2.5 Mach number cruise condition. Corrections for shape variations at the other Mach numbers were included in the prediction. For most cases, differences between predicted and measured values were within the accuracy of the comparison. However, there were significant differences at transonic Mach numbers. At a Mach number of 1.06 differences were as large as 27 percent in the drag coefficients and 20 deg in the elevator deflections. A brief analysis indicated that a significant part of the difference between drag coefficients was due to the incorrect prediction of the control surface deflection required to trim the airplane.

  10. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 05: 10X-FFF VMAT for Lung SABR: an Investigation of Peripheral Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, J; Mestrovic, A

    2014-08-15

    Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams exhibit high dose rates, reduced head scatter, leaf transmission and leakage radiation. For VMAT lung SABR, treatment time can be significantly reduced using high dose rate FFF beams while maintaining plan quality and accuracy. Another possible advantage offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR is the reduction in peripheral dose. The focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the reduction of peripheral dose offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR. The peripheral doses delivered by VMAT Lung SABR treatments using FFF and flattened beams were investigated for the Varian Truebeam linac. This study was conducted in three stages, (1): ion chamber measurement of peripheral dose for various plans, (2): validation of AAA, Acuros XB and Monte Carlo for peripheral dose using measured data, and (3): using the validated Monte Carlo model to evaluate peripheral doses for 6 VMAT lung SABR treatments. Three energies, 6X, 10X, and 10X-FFF were used for all stages. Measured data indicates that 10X-FFF delivers the lowest peripheral dose of the three energies studied. AAA and Acuros XB dose calculation algorithms were identified as inadequate, and Monte Carlo was validated for accurate peripheral dose prediction. The Monte Carlo-calculated VMAT lung SABR plans show a significant reduction in peripheral dose for 10X-FFF plans compared to the standard 6X plans, while no significant reduction was showed when compared to 10X. This reduction combined with shorter treatment time makes 10X-FFF beams the optimal choice for superior VMAT lung SABR treatments.

  11. Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases for which all know classical algorithms require exponential time.

  12. Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Airplane with a Full-Span Leading-Edge Slat in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles V.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed; power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 airplane equipped with full-span leading-edge slats has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. In this investigation it was found that the-full-span leading-edge slat gave about the same maximum lift coefficient as was obtained with the outboard single slotted flap and inboard slat. The stability and control characteristics were greatly improved except near the stall where the characteristics with the full-span slat were considered unsatisfactory because of a loss of directional stability and a slight nosing-up tendency.

  13. Structural and optical properties of ZrB 2 and Hf xZr 1-xB 2 films grown by vicinal surface epitaxy on Si(1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucka, R.; An, Y.-J.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; D'Costa, V. R.; Tolle, J.; Menéndez, J.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2008-11-01

    ZrB2 and HfxZr1-xB2 films were grown on 4° miscut Si(1 1 1) substrates by chemical vapor deposition of gaseous Hf(BH4)4 and Zr(BH4)4. The films display superior structural and optical properties when compared with ZrB2 films grown on on-axis Si(1 1 1). The observed improvements include an optically featureless surface with rms roughness of ∼2.5-3.5 nm, a ∼50% reduction in the amount of residual strain, and a ∼50% lower resistivity. These properties should promote the use of diboride films as buffer layers for nitride semiconductor epitaxy on large-area Si substrates.

  14. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-701) 2: Extrapolation of wind-tunnel data to full-scale conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Mann, M. J.; Sorrells, R. B., III; Sawyer, W. C.; Fuller, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of calculations necessary to extrapolate performance data on an XB-70-1 wind tunnel model to full scale at Mach numbers from 0.76 to 2.53 are presented. The extrapolation was part of a joint program to evaluate performance prediction techniques for large flexible supersonic airplanes similar to a supersonic transport. The extrapolation procedure included: interpolation of the wind tunnel data at the specific conditions of the flight test points; determination of the drag increments to be applied to the wind tunnel data, such as spillage drag, boundary layer trip drag, and skin friction increments; and estimates of the drag items not represented on the wind tunnel model, such as bypass doors, roughness, protuberances, and leakage drag. In addition, estimates of the effects of flexibility of the airplane were determined.

  15. Scheduling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, William J.; Wood, David; Sorensen, Stephen E.

    1996-12-01

    This paper discusses automated scheduling as it applies to complex domains such as factories, transportation, and communications systems. The window-constrained-packing problem is introduced as an ideal model of the scheduling trade offs. Specific algorithms are compared in terms of simplicity, speed, and accuracy. In particular, dispatch, look-ahead, and genetic algorithms are statistically compared on randomly generated job sets. The conclusion is that dispatch methods are fast and fairly accurate; while modern algorithms, such as genetic and simulate annealing, have excessive run times, and are too complex to be practical.

  16. Haplotyping algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.; O`Connell, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Haplotyping is the logical process of inferring gene flow in a pedigree based on phenotyping results at a small number of genetic loci. This paper formalizes the haplotyping problem and suggests four algorithms for haplotype reconstruction. These algorithms range from exhaustive enumeration of all haplotype vectors to combinatorial optimization by simulated annealing. Application of the algorithms to published genetic analyses shows that manual haplotyping is often erroneous. Haplotyping is employed in screening pedigrees for phenotyping errors and in positional cloning of disease genes from conserved haplotypes in population isolates. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of dose calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems at hip prosthesis interfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulu, David; Alaei, Parham

    2017-03-20

    There are an increasing number of radiation therapy patients with hip prosthesis. The common method of minimizing treatment planning inaccuracies is to avoid radiation beams to transit through the prosthesis. However, the beams often exit through them, especially when the patient has a double-prosthesis. Modern treatment planning systems employ algorithms with improved dose calculation accuracies but even these algorithms may not predict the dose accurately at high atomic number interfaces. The current study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of three common dose calculation algorithms employed in two commercial treatment planning systems. A hip prosthesis was molded inside a cylindrical phantom and the dose at several points within the phantom at the interface with prosthesis was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured doses were then compared to the predicted ones by the planning systems. The results of the study indicate all three algorithms underestimate the dose at the prosthesis interface, albeit to varying degrees, and for both low- and high-energy x rays. The measured doses are higher than calculated ones by 5-22% for Pinnacle Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm, 2-23% for Eclipse Acuros XB, and 6-25% for Eclipse Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm. There are generally better agreements for AXB algorithm and the worst results are for the AAA.

  18. A theoretical investigation of mixing thermodynamics, age-hardening potential, and electronic structure of ternary M11–xM2xB2 alloys with AlB2 type structure

    PubMed Central

    Alling, B.; Högberg, H.; Armiento, R.; Rosen, J.; Hultman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal diborides are ceramic materials with potential applications as hard protective thin films and electrical contact materials. We investigate the possibility to obtain age hardening through isostructural clustering, including spinodal decomposition, or ordering-induced precipitation in ternary diboride alloys. By means of first-principles mixing thermodynamics calculations, 45 ternary M11–xM2xB2 alloys comprising MiB2 (Mi = Mg, Al, Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) with AlB2 type structure are studied. In particular Al1–xTixB2 is found to be of interest for coherent isostructural decomposition with a strong driving force for phase separation, while having almost concentration independent a and c lattice parameters. The results are explained by revealing the nature of the electronic structure in these alloys, and in particular, the origin of the pseudogap at EF in TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2. PMID:25970763

  19. Observation of e+e- → π+π-π(0)(χbJ) and Search for X(b) → ωϒ(1S) at sqrt[s] = 10.867 GeV.

    PubMed

    He, X H; Shen, C P; Yuan, C Z; Ban, Y; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bansal, V; Bhuyan, B; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Cervenkov, D; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Grzymkowska, O; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kim, D Y; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Thorne, F; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wehle, S; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2014-10-03

    The e(+)e(-) → π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(bJ) (J = 0,1,2) processes are studied using a 118 fb(-1) data sample acquired with the Belle detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.867 GeV. Unambiguous π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(bJ) (J = 1,2), ωχ(b1) signals are observed, and indication for ωχ(b2) is seen, both for the first time, and the corresponding cross section measurements are presented. No significant π(+)π(-)π(0)χ(b0) or ωχ(b0) signals are observed, and 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross sections for these two processes are obtained. In the π(+)π(-)π(0) invariant mass spectrum, significant non-ω signals are also observed. We search for the X(3872)-like state (named X(b)) decaying into ωϒ(1S); no significant signal is observed with a mass between 10.55 and 10.65 GeV/c(2).

  20. A theoretical investigation of mixing thermodynamics, age-hardening potential, and electronic structure of ternary M11-xM2xB2 alloys with AlB2 type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, B.; Högberg, H.; Armiento, R.; Rosen, J.; Hultman, L.

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal diborides are ceramic materials with potential applications as hard protective thin films and electrical contact materials. We investigate the possibility to obtain age hardening through isostructural clustering, including spinodal decomposition, or ordering-induced precipitation in ternary diboride alloys. By means of first-principles mixing thermodynamics calculations, 45 ternary M11-xM2xB2 alloys comprising MiB2 (Mi = Mg, Al, Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) with AlB2 type structure are studied. In particular Al1-xTixB2 is found to be of interest for coherent isostructural decomposition with a strong driving force for phase separation, while having almost concentration independent a and c lattice parameters. The results are explained by revealing the nature of the electronic structure in these alloys, and in particular, the origin of the pseudogap at EF in TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2.

  1. Algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Lomax, Harvard

    1987-01-01

    The past decade has seen considerable activity in algorithm development for the Navier-Stokes equations. This has resulted in a wide variety of useful new techniques. Some examples for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations are presented, divided into two parts. One is devoted to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the other to the compressible form.

  2. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure and properties of Mg3B36Si9C and related rare earth compounds RE3-xB36Si9C (RE=Y, Gd-Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thilo; Pediaditakis, Alexis; Sagawe, Vanessa; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis and characterisation of Mg3B36Si9C. Black single crystals of hexagonal shape were yielded from the elements at 1600 °C in h-BN crucibles welded in Ta ampoules. The crystal structure (space group R3barm, a=10.0793(13) Å, c=16.372(3) Å, 660 refl., 51 param., R1(F)=0.019; wR2(F2)=0.051) is characterized by a Kagome-net of B12 icosahedra, ethane like Si8-units and disordered SiC-dumbbells. Vibrational spectra show typical features of boron-rich borides and Zintl phases. Mg3B36Si9C is stable against HF/HNO3 and conc. NaOH. The micro-hardness is 17.0 GPa (Vickers) and 14.5 GPa (Knoop), respectively. According to simple electron counting rules Mg3B36Si9C is an electron precise compound. Band structure calculations reveal a band gap of 1.0 eV in agreement to the black colour. Interatomic distances obtained from the refinement of X-ray data are biased and falsified by the disorder of the SiC-dumbbell. The most evident structural parameters were obtained by relaxation calculation. Composition and carbon content were confirmed by WDX measurements. The small but significant carbon content is necessary by structural reasons and frequently caused by contaminations. The rare earth compounds RE3-xB36Si9C (RE=Y, Dy-Lu) are isotypic. Single crystals were grown from a silicon melt and their structures refined. The partial occupation of the RE-sites fits to the requirements of an electron-precise composition. According to the displacement parameters a relaxation should be applied to obtain correct structural parameters.

  4. Optimization of Couch Modeling in the Change of Dose Calculation Methods and Their Versions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Junichi; Nakata, Manabu; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Tsuruta, Yusuke; Yano, Shinsuke; Higashimura, Kyoji; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    In external radiotherapy, the X-ray beam passes through the treatment couch, leading to the dose reduction by the attenuation of the couch. As a method to compensate for the reduction, radiation treatment planning systems (RTPS) support virtual couch function, namely "couch modeling method". In the couch modeling method, the computed tomography (CT) numbers assigned to each structure should be optimized by comparing calculations to measurements for accurate dose calculation. Thus, re-optimization of CT numbers will be required when the dose calculation algorithm or their version changes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the calculation accuracy of the couch modeling method in different calculation algorithms and their versions. The optimal CT numbers were determined by minimizing the difference between measured transmission factors and calculated ones. When CT numbers optimized by Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) Ver. 8.6 were used, the maximum and the mean difference of transmission factor were 5.8% and 1.5%, respectively, for Acuros XB (AXB) Ver. 11.0. However, when CT numbers optimized by AXB Ver. 11.0 were used, they were 2.6% and 0.6%, respectively. The CT numbers for couch structures should be optimized when changing dose calculation algorithms and their versions. From the comparison of the measured transmission to calculation, it was found that the CT numbers had high accuracy.

  5. Algorithmic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, W.

    1990-12-13

    In this paper complex adaptive systems are defined by a self- referential loop in which objects encode functions that act back on these objects. A model for this loop is presented. It uses a simple recursive formal language, derived from the lambda-calculus, to provide a semantics that maps character strings into functions that manipulate symbols on strings. The interaction between two functions, or algorithms, is defined naturally within the language through function composition, and results in the production of a new function. An iterated map acting on sets of functions and a corresponding graph representation are defined. Their properties are useful to discuss the behavior of a fixed size ensemble of randomly interacting functions. This function gas'', or Turning gas'', is studied under various conditions, and evolves cooperative interaction patterns of considerable intricacy. These patterns adapt under the influence of perturbations consisting in the addition of new random functions to the system. Different organizations emerge depending on the availability of self-replicators.

  6. Algorithm Animation with Galant.

    PubMed

    Stallmann, Matthias F

    2017-01-01

    Although surveys suggest positive student attitudes toward the use of algorithm animations, it is not clear that they improve learning outcomes. The Graph Algorithm Animation Tool, or Galant, challenges and motivates students to engage more deeply with algorithm concepts, without distracting them with programming language details or GUIs. Even though Galant is specifically designed for graph algorithms, it has also been used to animate other algorithms, most notably sorting algorithms.

  7. A Review on the Use of Grid-Based Boltzmann Equation Solvers for Dose Calculation in External Photon Beam Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Monica W. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Leung, Lucullus H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic linear Boltzmann transport equation (D-LBTE) solvers have recently been developed, and one of the latest available software codes, Acuros XB, has been implemented in a commercial treatment planning system for radiotherapy photon beam dose calculation. One of the major limitations of most commercially available model-based algorithms for photon dose calculation is the ability to account for the effect of electron transport. This induces some errors in patient dose calculations, especially near heterogeneous interfaces between low and high density media such as tissue/lung interfaces. D-LBTE solvers have a high potential of producing accurate dose distributions in and near heterogeneous media in the human body. Extensive previous investigations have proved that D-LBTE solvers were able to produce comparable dose calculation accuracy as Monte Carlo methods with a reasonable speed good enough for clinical use. The current paper reviews the dosimetric evaluations of D-LBTE solvers for external beam photon radiotherapy. This content summarizes and discusses dosimetric validations for D-LBTE solvers in both homogeneous and heterogeneous media under different circumstances and also the clinical impact on various diseases due to the conversion of dose calculation from a conventional convolution/superposition algorithm to a recently released D-LBTE solver. PMID:24066294

  8. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  9. The BR eigenvalue algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, G.A.; Howell, G.W.; Watkins, D.S.

    1997-11-01

    The BR algorithm, a new method for calculating the eigenvalues of an upper Hessenberg matrix, is introduced. It is a bulge-chasing algorithm like the QR algorithm, but, unlike the QR algorithm, it is well adapted to computing the eigenvalues of the narrowband, nearly tridiagonal matrices generated by the look-ahead Lanczos process. This paper describes the BR algorithm and gives numerical evidence that it works well in conjunction with the Lanczos process. On the biggest problems run so far, the BR algorithm beats the QR algorithm by a factor of 30--60 in computing time and a factor of over 100 in matrix storage space.

  10. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  11. Uses of clinical algorithms.

    PubMed

    Margolis, C Z

    1983-02-04

    The clinical algorithm (flow chart) is a text format that is specially suited for representing a sequence of clinical decisions, for teaching clinical decision making, and for guiding patient care. A representative clinical algorithm is described in detail; five steps for writing an algorithm and seven steps for writing a set of algorithms are outlined. Five clinical education and patient care uses of algorithms are then discussed, including a map for teaching clinical decision making and protocol charts for guiding step-by-step care of specific problems. Clinical algorithms are compared as to their clinical usefulness with decision analysis. Three objections to clinical algorithms are answered, including the one that they restrict thinking. It is concluded that methods should be sought for writing clinical algorithms that represent expert consensus. A clinical algorithm could then be written for any area of medical decision making that can be standardized. Medical practice could then be taught more effectively, monitored accurately, and understood better.

  12. Software For Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    SPLICER computer program is genetic-algorithm software tool used to solve search and optimization problems. Provides underlying framework and structure for building genetic-algorithm application program. Written in Think C.

  13. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  14. Comparison of Dosimetric Performance among Commercial Quality Assurance Systems for Verifying Pretreatment Plans of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Flattening-Filter-Free Beams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of different commercial quality assurance (QA) systems for the pretreatment verification plan of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique using a flattening-filter-free beam. The verification for 20 pretreatment cancer patients (seven lung, six spine, and seven prostate cancers) were tested using three QA systems (EBT3 film, I’mRT MatriXX array, and MapCHECK). All the SBRT-VMAT plans were optimized in the Eclipse (version 11.0.34) treatment planning system (TPS) using the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm and were delivered to the Varian TrueBeam® accelerator equipped with a high-definition multileaf collimator. Gamma agreement evaluation was analyzed with the criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement (2%/2 mm) or 3%/3 mm. The highest passing rate (99.1% for 3%/3 mm) was observed on the MapCHECK system while the lowest passing rate was obtained on the film. The pretreatment verification results depend on the QA systems, treatment sites, and delivery beam energies. However, the delivery QA results for all QA systems based on the TPS calculation showed a good agreement of more than 90% for both the criteria. It is concluded that the three 2D QA systems have sufficient potential for pretreatment verification of the SBRT-VMAT plan. PMID:27709851

  15. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  16. Quantum algorithms: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computers are designed to outperform standard computers by running quantum algorithms. Areas in which quantum algorithms can be applied include cryptography, search and optimisation, simulation of quantum systems and solving large systems of linear equations. Here we briefly survey some known quantum algorithms, with an emphasis on a broad overview of their applications rather than their technical details. We include a discussion of recent developments and near-term applications of quantum algorithms.

  17. INSENS classification algorithm report

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.; Frerking, C.J.; Myers, D.W.

    1993-07-28

    This report describes a new algorithm developed for the Imigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in support of the INSENS project for classifying vehicles and pedestrians using seismic data. This algorithm is less sensitive to nuisance alarms due to environmental events than the previous algorithm. Furthermore, the algorithm is simple enough that it can be implemented in the 8-bit microprocessor used in the INSENS system.

  18. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  19. Remote sensing imagery classification using multi-objective gravitational search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aizhu; Sun, Genyun; Wang, Zhenjie

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous optimization of different validity measures can capture different data characteristics of remote sensing imagery (RSI) and thereby achieving high quality classification results. In this paper, two conflicting cluster validity indices, the Xie-Beni (XB) index and the fuzzy C-means (FCM) (Jm) measure, are integrated with a diversity-enhanced and memory-based multi-objective gravitational search algorithm (DMMOGSA) to present a novel multi-objective optimization based RSI classification method. In this method, the Gabor filter method is firstly implemented to extract texture features of RSI. Then, the texture features are syncretized with the spectral features to construct the spatial-spectral feature space/set of the RSI. Afterwards, cluster of the spectral-spatial feature set is carried out on the basis of the proposed method. To be specific, cluster centers are randomly generated initially. After that, the cluster centers are updated and optimized adaptively by employing the DMMOGSA. Accordingly, a set of non-dominated cluster centers are obtained. Therefore, numbers of image classification results of RSI are produced and users can pick up the most promising one according to their problem requirements. To quantitatively and qualitatively validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the proposed classification method was applied to classifier two aerial high-resolution remote sensing imageries. The obtained classification results are compared with that produced by two single cluster validity index based and two state-of-the-art multi-objective optimization algorithms based classification results. Comparison results show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate RSI classification.

  20. License plate detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, Michael; Klopovsky, Yuri; Silinskis, Normunds

    2013-12-01

    A novel algorithm for vehicle license plates localization is proposed. The algorithm is based on pixel intensity transition gradient analysis. Near to 2500 natural-scene gray-level vehicle images of different backgrounds and ambient illumination was tested. The best set of algorithm's parameters produces detection rate up to 0.94. Taking into account abnormal camera location during our tests and therefore geometrical distortion and troubles from trees this result could be considered as passable. Correlation between source data, such as license Plate dimensions and texture, cameras location and others, and parameters of algorithm were also defined.

  1. Distributed Minimum Hop Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    acknowledgement), node d starts iteration i+1, and otherwise the algorithm terminates. A detailed description of the algorithm is given in pidgin algol...precise behavior of the algorithm under these circumstances is described by the pidgin algol program in the appendix which is executed by each node. The...l) < N!(2) for each neighbor j, and thus by induction,J -1 N!(2-1) < n-i + (Z-1) + N!(Z-1), completing the proof. Algorithm Dl in Pidgin Algol It is

  2. Algorithm That Synthesizes Other Algorithms for Hashing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm that includes a collection of several subalgorithms has been devised as a means of synthesizing still other algorithms (which could include computer code) that utilize hashing to determine whether an element (typically, a number or other datum) is a member of a set (typically, a list of numbers). Each subalgorithm synthesizes an algorithm (e.g., a block of code) that maps a static set of key hashes to a somewhat linear monotonically increasing sequence of integers. The goal in formulating this mapping is to cause the length of the sequence thus generated to be as close as practicable to the original length of the set and thus to minimize gaps between the elements. The advantage of the approach embodied in this algorithm is that it completely avoids the traditional approach of hash-key look-ups that involve either secondary hash generation and look-up or further searching of a hash table for a desired key in the event of collisions. This algorithm guarantees that it will never be necessary to perform a search or to generate a secondary key in order to determine whether an element is a member of a set. This algorithm further guarantees that any algorithm that it synthesizes can be executed in constant time. To enforce these guarantees, the subalgorithms are formulated to employ a set of techniques, each of which works very effectively covering a certain class of hash-key values. These subalgorithms are of two types, summarized as follows: Given a list of numbers, try to find one or more solutions in which, if each number is shifted to the right by a constant number of bits and then masked with a rotating mask that isolates a set of bits, a unique number is thereby generated. In a variant of the foregoing procedure, omit the masking. Try various combinations of shifting, masking, and/or offsets until the solutions are found. From the set of solutions, select the one that provides the greatest compression for the representation and is executable in the

  3. Transitional Division Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Robert A.; Meyer, Ruth Ann

    1982-01-01

    A survey of general mathematics students whose teachers were taking an inservice workshop revealed that they had not yet mastered division. More direct introduction of the standard division algorithm is favored in elementary grades, with instruction of transitional processes curtailed. Weaknesses in transitional algorithms appear to outweigh…

  4. Ultrametric Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Glenn W.

    1979-01-01

    Johnson has shown that the single linkage and complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms induce a metric on the data known as the ultrametric. Johnson's proof is extended to four other common clustering algorithms. Two additional methods also produce hierarchical structures which can violate the ultrametric inequality. (Author/CTM)

  5. The Training Effectiveness Algorithm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Training Effectiveness Algorithm, a systematic procedure for identifying the cause of reported training problems which was developed for use in the U.S. Navy. A two-step review by subject matter experts is explained, and applications of the algorithm to other organizations and training systems are discussed. (Author/LRW)

  6. Totally parallel multilevel algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, Paul O.

    1988-01-01

    Four totally parallel algorithms for the solution of a sparse linear system have common characteristics which become quite apparent when they are implemented on a highly parallel hypercube such as the CM2. These four algorithms are Parallel Superconvergent Multigrid (PSMG) of Frederickson and McBryan, Robust Multigrid (RMG) of Hackbusch, the FFT based Spectral Algorithm, and Parallel Cyclic Reduction. In fact, all four can be formulated as particular cases of the same totally parallel multilevel algorithm, which are referred to as TPMA. In certain cases the spectral radius of TPMA is zero, and it is recognized to be a direct algorithm. In many other cases the spectral radius, although not zero, is small enough that a single iteration per timestep keeps the local error within the required tolerance.

  7. The Algorithm Selection Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Steve; Allen, John; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Work on NP-hard problems has shown that many instances of these theoretically computationally difficult problems are quite easy. The field has also shown that choosing the right algorithm for the problem can have a profound effect on the time needed to find a solution. However, to date there has been little work showing how to select the right algorithm for solving any particular problem. The paper refers to this as the algorithm selection problem. It describes some of the aspects that make this problem difficult, as well as proposes a technique for addressing it.

  8. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  9. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  10. OpenEIS Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-29

    The OpenEIS Algorithm package seeks to provide a low-risk path for building owners, service providers and managers to explore analytical methods for improving building control and operational efficiency. Users of this software can analyze building data, and learn how commercial implementations would provide long-term value. The code also serves as a reference implementation for developers who wish to adapt the algorithms for use in commercial tools or service offerings.

  11. Implementation of Parallel Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-30

    their socia ’ relations or to achieve some goals. For example, we define a pair-wise force law of i epulsion and attraction for a group of identical...quantization based compression schemes. Photo-refractive crystals, which provide high density recording in real time, are used as our holographic media . The...of Parallel Algorithms (J. Reif, ed.). Kluwer Academic Pu’ ishers, 1993. (4) "A Dynamic Separator Algorithm", D. Armon and J. Reif. To appear in

  12. The Superior Lambert Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    der, G.

    2011-09-01

    Lambert algorithms are used extensively for initial orbit determination, mission planning, space debris correlation, and missile targeting, just to name a few applications. Due to the significance of the Lambert problem in Astrodynamics, Gauss, Battin, Godal, Lancaster, Gooding, Sun and many others (References 1 to 15) have provided numerous formulations leading to various analytic solutions and iterative methods. Most Lambert algorithms and their computer programs can only work within one revolution, break down or converge slowly when the transfer angle is near zero or 180 degrees, and their multi-revolution limitations are either ignored or barely addressed. Despite claims of robustness, many Lambert algorithms fail without notice, and the users seldom have a clue why. The DerAstrodynamics lambert2 algorithm, which is based on the analytic solution formulated by Sun, works for any number of revolutions and converges rapidly at any transfer angle. It provides significant capability enhancements over every other Lambert algorithm in use today. These include improved speed, accuracy, robustness, and multirevolution capabilities as well as implementation simplicity. Additionally, the lambert2 algorithm provides a powerful tool for solving the angles-only problem without artificial singularities (pointed out by Gooding in Reference 16), which involves 3 lines of sight captured by optical sensors, or systems such as the Air Force Space Surveillance System (AFSSS). The analytic solution is derived from the extended Godal’s time equation by Sun, while the iterative method of solution is that of Laguerre, modified for robustness. The Keplerian solution of a Lambert algorithm can be extended to include the non-Keplerian terms of the Vinti algorithm via a simple targeting technique (References 17 to 19). Accurate analytic non-Keplerian trajectories can be predicted for satellites and ballistic missiles, while performing at least 100 times faster in speed than most

  13. Parallel Wolff Cluster Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Ko, S. H.; Coddington, P. D.

    The Wolff single-cluster algorithm is the most efficient method known for Monte Carlo simulation of many spin models. Due to the irregular size, shape and position of the Wolff clusters, this method does not easily lend itself to efficient parallel implementation, so that simulations using this method have thus far been confined to workstations and vector machines. Here we present two parallel implementations of this algorithm, and show that one gives fairly good performance on a MIMD parallel computer.

  14. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.

    1995-09-19

    This paper defines a class of evolutionary algorithms called evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) and analyzes their convergence properties. This class of algorithms is closely related to evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategie and real-coded genetic algorithms. EPSAs are self-adapting systems that modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The rule used to adapt the step size can be used to provide a stationary point convergence theory for EPSAs on any continuous function. This convergence theory is based on an extension of the convergence theory for generalized pattern search methods. An experimental analysis of the performance of EPSAs demonstrates that these algorithms can perform a level of global search that is comparable to that of canonical EAs. We also describe a stopping rule for EPSAs, which reliably terminated near stationary points in our experiments. This is the first stopping rule for any class of EAs that can terminate at a given distance from stationary points.

  15. Algorithms and Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dongarra, Jack

    1998-01-01

    This exploratory study initiated our inquiry into algorithms and applications that would benefit by latency tolerant approach to algorithm building, including the construction of new algorithms where appropriate. In a multithreaded execution, when a processor reaches a point where remote memory access is necessary, the request is sent out on the network and a context--switch occurs to a new thread of computation. This effectively masks a long and unpredictable latency due to remote loads, thereby providing tolerance to remote access latency. We began to develop standards to profile various algorithm and application parameters, such as the degree of parallelism, granularity, precision, instruction set mix, interprocessor communication, latency etc. These tools will continue to develop and evolve as the Information Power Grid environment matures. To provide a richer context for this research, the project also focused on issues of fault-tolerance and computation migration of numerical algorithms and software. During the initial phase we tried to increase our understanding of the bottlenecks in single processor performance. Our work began by developing an approach for the automatic generation and optimization of numerical software for processors with deep memory hierarchies and pipelined functional units. Based on the results we achieved in this study we are planning to study other architectures of interest, including development of cost models, and developing code generators appropriate to these architectures.

  16. Algorithmization in Learning and Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landa, L. N.

    An introduction to the theory of algorithms reviews the theoretical issues of teaching algorithms, the logical and psychological problems of devising algorithms of identification, and the selection of efficient algorithms; and then relates all of these to the classroom teaching process. It also descirbes some major research on the effectiveness of…

  17. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  18. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  19. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  20. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  1. Parallel Algorithms and Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, Robert W.

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation on parallel algorithms and patterns. A parallel algorithm is a well-defined, step-by-step computational procedure that emphasizes concurrency to solve a problem. Examples of problems include: Sorting, searching, optimization, matrix operations. A parallel pattern is a computational step in a sequence of independent, potentially concurrent operations that occurs in diverse scenarios with some frequency. Examples are: Reductions, prefix scans, ghost cell updates. We only touch on parallel patterns in this presentation. It really deserves its own detailed discussion which Gabe Rockefeller would like to develop.

  2. Improved Chaff Solution Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Programme de démonstration de technologies (PDT) sur l’intégration de capteurs et de systèmes d’armes embarqués (SISWS), un algorithme a été élaboré...technologies (PDT) sur l’intégration de capteurs et de systèmes d’armes embarqués (SISWS), un algorithme a été élaboré pour déterminer automatiquement...0Z4 2. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION (Overall security classification of the document including special warning terms if applicable .) UNCLASSIFIED

  3. Automatic design of decision-tree algorithms with evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Rodrigo C; Basgalupp, Márcio P; de Carvalho, André C P L F; Freitas, Alex A

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the empirical analysis of a hyper-heuristic evolutionary algorithm that is capable of automatically designing top-down decision-tree induction algorithms. Top-down decision-tree algorithms are of great importance, considering their ability to provide an intuitive and accurate knowledge representation for classification problems. The automatic design of these algorithms seems timely, given the large literature accumulated over more than 40 years of research in the manual design of decision-tree induction algorithms. The proposed hyper-heuristic evolutionary algorithm, HEAD-DT, is extensively tested using 20 public UCI datasets and 10 microarray gene expression datasets. The algorithms automatically designed by HEAD-DT are compared with traditional decision-tree induction algorithms, such as C4.5 and CART. Experimental results show that HEAD-DT is capable of generating algorithms which are significantly more accurate than C4.5 and CART.

  4. PSC algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the performance seeking control (PSC) algorithm and details of the important components of the algorithm are given. The onboard propulsion system models, the linear programming optimization, and engine control interface are described. The PSC algorithm receives input from various computers on the aircraft including the digital flight computer, digital engine control, and electronic inlet control. The PSC algorithm contains compact models of the propulsion system including the inlet, engine, and nozzle. The models compute propulsion system parameters, such as inlet drag and fan stall margin, which are not directly measurable in flight. The compact models also compute sensitivities of the propulsion system parameters to change in control variables. The engine model consists of a linear steady state variable model (SSVM) and a nonlinear model. The SSVM is updated with efficiency factors calculated in the engine model update logic, or Kalman filter. The efficiency factors are used to adjust the SSVM to match the actual engine. The propulsion system models are mathematically integrated to form an overall propulsion system model. The propulsion system model is then optimized using a linear programming optimization scheme. The goal of the optimization is determined from the selected PSC mode of operation. The resulting trims are used to compute a new operating point about which the optimization process is repeated. This process is continued until an overall (global) optimum is reached before applying the trims to the controllers.

  5. Comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Zamora, G.; Vahtel, M.; Soliz, P.; Barriga, S.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several research groups have developed automatic algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) in individuals with diabetes (DM), using digital retinal images. Studies have indicated that diabetics have 1.5 times the annual risk of developing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) as do people without DM. Moreover, DM patients have 1.8 times the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although numerous investigators are developing automatic DR detection algorithms, there have been few successful efforts to create an automatic algorithm that can detect other ocular diseases, such as POAG and AMD. Consequently, our aim in the current study was to develop a comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm that not only detects DR in retinal images, but also automatically identifies glaucoma suspects and AMD by integrating other personal medical information with the retinal features. The proposed system is fully automatic and provides the likelihood of each of the three eye disease. The system was evaluated in two datasets of 104 and 88 diabetic cases. For each eye, we used two non-mydriatic digital color fundus photographs (macula and optic disc centered) and, when available, information about age, duration of diabetes, cataracts, hypertension, gender, and laboratory data. Our results show that the combination of multimodal features can increase the AUC by up to 5%, 7%, and 8% in the detection of AMD, DR, and glaucoma respectively. Marked improvement was achieved when laboratory results were combined with retinal image features.

  6. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  7. The Xmath Integration Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringslid, Odd

    2009-01-01

    The projects Xmath (Bringslid and Canessa, 2002) and dMath (Bringslid, de la Villa and Rodriguez, 2007) were supported by the European Commission in the so called Minerva Action (Xmath) and The Leonardo da Vinci programme (dMath). The Xmath eBook (Bringslid, 2006) includes algorithms into a wide range of undergraduate mathematical issues embedded…

  8. Algorithm for reaction classification.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Hans; Eiblmaier, Josef; Grethe, Guenter; Löw, Peter; Matuszczyk, Heinz; Saller, Heinz

    2013-11-25

    Reaction classification has important applications, and many approaches to classification have been applied. Our own algorithm tests all maximum common substructures (MCS) between all reactant and product molecules in order to find an atom mapping containing the minimum chemical distance (MCD). Recent publications have concluded that new MCS algorithms need to be compared with existing methods in a reproducible environment, preferably on a generalized test set, yet the number of test sets available is small, and they are not truly representative of the range of reactions that occur in real reaction databases. We have designed a challenging test set of reactions and are making it publicly available and usable with InfoChem's software or other classification algorithms. We supply a representative set of example reactions, grouped into different levels of difficulty, from a large number of reaction databases that chemists actually encounter in practice, in order to demonstrate the basic requirements for a mapping algorithm to detect the reaction centers in a consistent way. We invite the scientific community to contribute to the future extension and improvement of this data set, to achieve the goal of a common standard.

  9. Robotic Follow Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The Robotic Follow Algorithm enables allows any robotic vehicle to follow a moving target while reactively choosing a route around nearby obstacles. The robotic follow behavior can be used with different camera systems and can be used with thermal or visual tracking as well as other tracking methods such as radio frequency tags.

  10. Fast autodidactic adaptive equalization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilal, Katia

    Autodidactic equalization by adaptive filtering is addressed in a mobile radio communication context. A general method, using an adaptive stochastic gradient Bussgang type algorithm, to deduce two low cost computation algorithms is given: one equivalent to the initial algorithm and the other having improved convergence properties thanks to a block criteria minimization. Two start algorithms are reworked: the Godard algorithm and the decision controlled algorithm. Using a normalization procedure, and block normalization, the performances are improved, and their common points are evaluated. These common points are used to propose an algorithm retaining the advantages of the two initial algorithms. This thus inherits the robustness of the Godard algorithm and the precision and phase correction of the decision control algorithm. The work is completed by a study of the stable states of Bussgang type algorithms and of the stability of the Godard algorithms, initial and normalized. The simulation of these algorithms, carried out in a mobile radio communications context, and under severe conditions on the propagation channel, gave a 75% reduction in the number of samples required for the processing in relation with the initial algorithms. The improvement of the residual error was of a much lower return. These performances are close to making possible the use of autodidactic equalization in the mobile radio system.

  11. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  12. Genetic Algorithms and Local Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Darrell

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this presentation is a tutorial level introduction to the principles of genetic search and models of simple genetic algorithms. The second half covers the combination of genetic algorithms with local search methods to produce hybrid genetic algorithms. Hybrid algorithms can be modeled within the existing theoretical framework developed for simple genetic algorithms. An application of a hybrid to geometric model matching is given. The hybrid algorithm yields results that improve on the current state-of-the-art for this problem.

  13. SU-E-J-58: Dosimetric Verification of Metal Artifact Effects: Comparison of Dose Distributions Affected by Patient Teeth and Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M; Kang, S; Lee, S; Suh, T; Lee, J; Park, J; Park, H; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Implant-supported dentures seem particularly appropriate for the predicament of becoming edentulous and cancer patients are no exceptions. As the number of people having dental implants increased in different ages, critical dosimetric verification of metal artifact effects are required for the more accurate head and neck radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical analysis of the metal(streak and dark) artifact, and to evaluate dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of patients with the patient teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. Methods: The phantom comprises cylinder which is shaped to simulate the anatomical structures of a human head and neck. Through applying various clinical cases, made phantom which is closely allied to human. Developed phantom can verify two classes: (i)closed mouth (ii)opened mouth. RapidArc plans of 4 cases were created in the Eclipse planning system. Total dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions is prescribed to the whole planning target volume (PTV) using 6MV photon beams. Acuros XB (AXB) advanced dose calculation algorithm, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and progressive resolution optimizer were used in dose optimization and calculation. Results: In closed and opened mouth phantom, because dark artifacts formed extensively around the metal implants, dose variation was relatively higher than that of streak artifacts. As the PTV was delineated on the dark regions or large streak artifact regions, maximum 7.8% dose error and average 3.2% difference was observed. The averaged minimum dose to the PTV predicted by AAA was about 5.6% higher and OARs doses are also 5.2% higher compared to AXB. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that AXB dose calculation involving high-density materials is more accurate than AAA calculation, and AXB was superior to AAA in dose predictions beyond dark artifact/air cavity portion when compared against the measurements.

  14. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Park, H; Lee, J; Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  15. A MEDLINE categorization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Darmoni, Stefan J; Névéol, Aurelie; Renard, Jean-Marie; Gehanno, Jean-Francois; Soualmia, Lina F; Dahamna, Badisse; Thirion, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    Background Categorization is designed to enhance resource description by organizing content description so as to enable the reader to grasp quickly and easily what are the main topics discussed in it. The objective of this work is to propose a categorization algorithm to classify a set of scientific articles indexed with the MeSH thesaurus, and in particular those of the MEDLINE bibliographic database. In a large bibliographic database such as MEDLINE, finding materials of particular interest to a specialty group, or relevant to a particular audience, can be difficult. The categorization refines the retrieval of indexed material. In the CISMeF terminology, metaterms can be considered as super-concepts. They were primarily conceived to improve recall in the CISMeF quality-controlled health gateway. Methods The MEDLINE categorization algorithm (MCA) is based on semantic links existing between MeSH terms and metaterms on the one hand and between MeSH subheadings and metaterms on the other hand. These links are used to automatically infer a list of metaterms from any MeSH term/subheading indexing. Medical librarians manually select the semantic links. Results The MEDLINE categorization algorithm lists the medical specialties relevant to a MEDLINE file by decreasing order of their importance. The MEDLINE categorization algorithm is available on a Web site. It can run on any MEDLINE file in a batch mode. As an example, the top 3 medical specialties for the set of 60 articles published in BioMed Central Medical Informatics & Decision Making, which are currently indexed in MEDLINE are: information science, organization and administration and medical informatics. Conclusion We have presented a MEDLINE categorization algorithm in order to classify the medical specialties addressed in any MEDLINE file in the form of a ranked list of relevant specialties. The categorization method introduced in this paper is based on the manual indexing of resources with MeSH (terms

  16. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  17. Algorithm Visualization System for Teaching Spatial Data Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikander, Jussi; Helminen, Juha; Korhonen, Ari

    2010-01-01

    TRAKLA2 is a web-based learning environment for data structures and algorithms. The system delivers automatically assessed algorithm simulation exercises that are solved using a graphical user interface. In this work, we introduce a novel learning environment for spatial data algorithms, SDA-TRAKLA2, which has been implemented on top of the…

  18. Algorithms, games, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Erick; Livnat, Adi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Vazirani, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    Even the most seasoned students of evolution, starting with Darwin himself, have occasionally expressed amazement that the mechanism of natural selection has produced the whole of Life as we see it around us. There is a computational way to articulate the same amazement: “What algorithm could possibly achieve all this in a mere three and a half billion years?” In this paper we propose an answer: We demonstrate that in the regime of weak selection, the standard equations of population genetics describing natural selection in the presence of sex become identical to those of a repeated game between genes played according to multiplicative weight updates (MWUA), an algorithm known in computer science to be surprisingly powerful and versatile. MWUA maximizes a tradeoff between cumulative performance and entropy, which suggests a new view on the maintenance of diversity in evolution. PMID:24979793

  19. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  20. Irregular Applications: Architectures & Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Feo, John T.; Villa, Oreste; Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone

    2012-02-06

    Irregular applications are characterized by irregular data structures, control and communication patterns. Novel irregular high performance applications which deal with large data sets and require have recently appeared. Unfortunately, current high performance systems and software infrastructures executes irregular algorithms poorly. Only coordinated efforts by end user, area specialists and computer scientists that consider both the architecture and the software stack may be able to provide solutions to the challenges of modern irregular applications.

  1. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  2. SPA: Solar Position Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim; Andreas, Afshin

    2015-04-01

    The Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) calculates the solar zenith and azimuth angles in the period from the year -2000 to 6000, with uncertainties of +/- 0.0003 degrees based on the date, time, and location on Earth. SPA is implemented in C; in addition to being available for download, an online calculator using this code is available at http://www.nrel.gov/midc/solpos/spa.html.

  3. Algorithmic Complexity. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    works, give an example, and discuss the inherent weaknesses and their causes. Electrical Network Analysis Knuth mentions the applicability of...of these 3 products of 2-coefficient 2 1 polynomials can be found by a repeated application of the 3 multiplication W Ascheme, only 3.3-9 scalar...see another application of this paradigm later. We now investigate the efficiency of the divide-and-conquer polynomial multiplication algorithm. Let M(n

  4. ARPANET Routing Algorithm Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    IMPROVEMENTS . .PFOnINI ORG. REPORT MUNDER -- ) _ .. .... 3940 7, AUT񓂏(c) .. .. .. CONTRACT Of GRANT NUMSlet e) SJ. M. /Mc~uillan E. C./Rosen I...8217), this problem may persist for a very long time, causing extremely bad performance throughout the whole network (for instance, if w’ reports that one of...algorithm may naturally tend to oscillate between bad routing paths and become itself a major contributor to network congestion. These examples show

  5. Signal Processing Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-13

    determining the solu- tion using the Moore - Penrose inverse . An expression for the mean square error is derived [8,9]. The expression indicates that...Proc. 10. "An Iterative Algorithm for Finding the Minimum Eigenvalue of a Class of Symmetric Matrices," D. Fuhrmann and B. Liu, submitted to 1984 IEEE...Int. Conf. Acous. Sp. 5V. Proc. 11. "Approximating the Eigenvectors of a Symmetric Toeplitz Matrix," by D. Fuhrmann and B. Liu, 1983 Allerton Conf. an

  6. SIMAS ADM XBT Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    XBT’s sound speed values instead of temperature values. Studies show that the sound speed at the surface in a specific location varies less than...be entered at the terminal in metric or English temperatures or sound speeds. The algorithm automatically determines which form each data point was... sound speeds. Leroy’s equation is used to derive sound speed from temperature or temperature from sound speed. The previous, current, and next months

  7. Adaptive continuous twisting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jaime A.; Negrete, Daniel Y.; Torres-González, Victor; Fridman, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive continuous twisting algorithm (ACTA) is presented. For double integrator, ACTA produces a continuous control signal ensuring finite time convergence of the states to zero. Moreover, the control signal generated by ACTA compensates the Lipschitz perturbation in finite time, i.e. its value converges to the opposite value of the perturbation. ACTA also keeps its convergence properties, even in the case that the upper bound of the derivative of the perturbation exists, but it is unknown.

  8. NOSS altimeter algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Forsythe, R. G.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A description of all algorithms required for altimeter processing is given. Each description includes title, description, inputs/outputs, general algebraic sequences and data volume. All required input/output data files are described and the computer resources required for the entire altimeter processing system were estimated. The majority of the data processing requirements for any radar altimeter of the Seasat-1 type are scoped. Additions and deletions could be made for the specific altimeter products required by other projects.

  9. Genetic Algorithm for Optimization: Preprocessor and Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam A.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) inspired by Darwin's theory of evolution and employed to solve optimization problems - unconstrained or constrained - uses an evolutionary process. A GA has several parameters such the population size, search space, crossover and mutation probabilities, and fitness criterion. These parameters are not universally known/determined a priori for all problems. Depending on the problem at hand, these parameters need to be decided such that the resulting GA performs the best. We present here a preprocessor that achieves just that, i.e., it determines, for a specified problem, the foregoing parameters so that the consequent GA is a best for the problem. We stress also the need for such a preprocessor both for quality (error) and for cost (complexity) to produce the solution. The preprocessor includes, as its first step, making use of all the information such as that of nature/character of the function/system, search space, physical/laboratory experimentation (if already done/available), and the physical environment. It also includes the information that can be generated through any means - deterministic/nondeterministic/graphics. Instead of attempting a solution of the problem straightway through a GA without having/using the information/knowledge of the character of the system, we would do consciously a much better job of producing a solution by using the information generated/created in the very first step of the preprocessor. We, therefore, unstintingly advocate the use of a preprocessor to solve a real-world optimization problem including NP-complete ones before using the statistically most appropriate GA. We also include such a GA for unconstrained function optimization problems.

  10. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  11. Algorithm for navigated ESS.

    PubMed

    Baudoin, T; Grgić, M V; Zadravec, D; Geber, G; Tomljenović, D; Kalogjera, L

    2013-12-01

    ENT navigation has given new opportunities in performing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (ESS) and improving surgical outcome of the patients` treatment. ESS assisted by a navigation system could be called Navigated Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (NESS). As it is generally accepted that the NESS should be performed only in cases of complex anatomy and pathology, it has not yet been established as a state-of-the-art procedure and thus not used on a daily basis. This paper presents an algorithm for use of a navigation system for basic ESS in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The algorithm includes five units that should be highlighted using a navigation system. They are as follows: 1) nasal vestibule unit, 2) OMC unit, 3) anterior ethmoid unit, 4) posterior ethmoid unit, and 5) sphenoid unit. Each unit has a shape of a triangular pyramid and consists of at least four reference points or landmarks. As many landmarks as possible should be marked when determining one of the five units. Navigated orientation in each unit should always precede any surgical intervention. The algorithm should improve the learning curve of trainees and enable surgeons to use the navigation system routinely and systematically.

  12. Large scale tracking algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  13. RADFLO physics and algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Symbalisty, E.M.D.; Zinn, J.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the history, physics, and algorithms of the computer code RADFLO and its extension HYCHEM. RADFLO is a one-dimensional, radiation-transport hydrodynamics code that is used to compute early-time fireball behavior for low-altitude nuclear bursts. The primary use of the code is the prediction of optical signals produced by nuclear explosions. It has also been used to predict thermal and hydrodynamic effects that are used for vulnerability and lethality applications. Another closely related code, HYCHEM, is an extension of RADFLO which includes the effects of nonequilibrium chemistry. Some examples of numerical results will be shown, along with scaling expressions derived from those results. We describe new computations of the structures and luminosities of steady-state shock waves and radiative thermal waves, which have been extended to cover a range of ambient air densities for high-altitude applications. We also describe recent modifications of the codes to use a one-dimensional analog of the CAVEAT fluid-dynamics algorithm in place of the former standard Richtmyer-von Neumann algorithm.

  14. Algorithm for Constructing Contour Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1984-01-01

    General computer algorithm developed for construction of contour plots. algorithm accepts as input data values at set of points irregularly distributed over plane. Algorithm based on interpolation scheme: points in plane connected by straight-line segments to form set of triangles. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  15. Two Meanings of Algorithmic Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Stephen B.

    1984-01-01

    Two mathematical topics are interpreted from the viewpoints of traditional (performing algorithms) and contemporary (creating algorithms and thinking in terms of them for solving problems and developing theory) algorithmic mathematics. The two topics are Horner's method for evaluating polynomials and Gauss's method for solving systems of linear…

  16. Greedy algorithms in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, P. M.; Dobrin, R.

    1999-08-01

    We discuss search, minimal path and minimal spanning tree algorithms and their applications to disordered systems. Greedy algorithms solve these problems exactly, and are related to extremal dynamics in physics. Minimal cost path (Dijkstra) and minimal cost spanning tree (Prim) algorithms provide extremal dynamics for a polymer in a random medium (the KPZ universality class) and invasion percolation (without trapping) respectively.

  17. Grammar Rules as Computer Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd

    1992-01-01

    One college writing teacher engaged his class in the revision of a computer program to check grammar, focusing on improvement of the algorithms for identifying inappropriate uses of the passive voice. Process and problems of constructing new algorithms, effects on student writing, and other algorithm applications are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Verifying a Computer Algorithm Mathematically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Alton T.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an example of mathematics from an algorithmic point of view, with emphasis on the design and verification of this algorithm. The program involves finding roots for algebraic equations using the half-interval search algorithm. The program listing is included. (JN)

  19. Selfish Gene Algorithm Vs Genetic Algorithm: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, Norharyati Md; Khalid, Noor Elaiza Abdul; Hashim, Rathiah; Noor, Noorhayati Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Evolutionary algorithm is one of the algorithms inspired by the nature. Within little more than a decade hundreds of papers have reported successful applications of EAs. In this paper, the Selfish Gene Algorithms (SFGA), as one of the latest evolutionary algorithms (EAs) inspired from the Selfish Gene Theory which is an interpretation of Darwinian Theory ideas from the biologist Richards Dawkins on 1989. In this paper, following a brief introduction to the Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA), the chronology of its evolution is presented. It is the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the concepts of Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA) as well as its opportunities and challenges. Accordingly, the history, step involves in the algorithm are discussed and its different applications together with an analysis of these applications are evaluated.

  20. Join-Graph Propagation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Mateescu, Robert; Kask, Kalev; Gogate, Vibhav; Dechter, Rina

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates parameterized approximate message-passing schemes that are based on bounded inference and are inspired by Pearl's belief propagation algorithm (BP). We start with the bounded inference mini-clustering algorithm and then move to the iterative scheme called Iterative Join-Graph Propagation (IJGP), that combines both iteration and bounded inference. Algorithm IJGP belongs to the class of Generalized Belief Propagation algorithms, a framework that allowed connections with approximate algorithms from statistical physics and is shown empirically to surpass the performance of mini-clustering and belief propagation, as well as a number of other state-of-the-art algorithms on several classes of networks. We also provide insight into the accuracy of iterative BP and IJGP by relating these algorithms to well known classes of constraint propagation schemes. PMID:20740057

  1. Parallel algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.

    1996-06-01

    Rapid changes in parallel computing technology are causing significant changes in the strategies being used for parallel algorithm development. One approach is simply to write computer code in a standard language like FORTRAN 77 or with the expectation that the compiler will produce executable code that will run in parallel. The alternatives are: (1) to build explicit message passing directly into the source code; or (2) to write source code without explicit reference to message passing or parallelism, but use a general communications library to provide efficient parallel execution. Application of these strategies is illustrated with examples of codes currently under development.

  2. Algorithm performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard N.; Greci, Anthony M.; Bradley, Philip A.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, the performance of adaptive antenna systems is measured using automated antenna array pattern measuring equipment. This measurement equipment produces a plot of the receive gain of the antenna array as a function of angle. However, communications system users more readily accept and understand bit error rate (BER) as a performance measure. The work reported on here was conducted to characterize adaptive antenna receiver performance in terms of overall communications system performance using BER as a performance measure. The adaptive antenna system selected for this work featured a linear array, least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithm and a high speed phase shift keyed (PSK) communications modem.

  3. Online Planning Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg R.; Chien, Steve A.

    2010-01-01

    AVA v2 software selects goals for execution from a set of goals that oversubscribe shared resources. The term goal refers to a science or engineering request to execute a possibly complex command sequence, such as image targets or ground-station downlinks. Developed as an extension to the Virtual Machine Language (VML) execution system, the software enables onboard and remote goal triggering through the use of an embedded, dynamic goal set that can oversubscribe resources. From the set of conflicting goals, a subset must be chosen that maximizes a given quality metric, which in this case is strict priority selection. A goal can never be pre-empted by a lower priority goal, and high-level goals can be added, removed, or updated at any time, and the "best" goals will be selected for execution. The software addresses the issue of re-planning that must be performed in a short time frame by the embedded system where computational resources are constrained. In particular, the algorithm addresses problems with well-defined goal requests without temporal flexibility that oversubscribes available resources. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. Thereby enabling shorter response times and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  4. Contour Error Map Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    2005-01-01

    The contour error map (CEM) algorithm and the software that implements the algorithm are means of quantifying correlations between sets of time-varying data that are binarized and registered on spatial grids. The present version of the software is intended for use in evaluating numerical weather forecasts against observational sea-breeze data. In cases in which observational data come from off-grid stations, it is necessary to preprocess the observational data to transform them into gridded data. First, the wind direction is gridded and binarized so that D(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on forecast data and d(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on gridded observational data. Here, i and j are spatial indices representing 1.25-km intervals along the west-to-east and south-to-north directions, respectively; and n is a time index representing 5-minute intervals. A binary value of D or d = 0 corresponds to an offshore wind, whereas a value of D or d = 1 corresponds to an onshore wind. CEM includes two notable subalgorithms: One identifies and verifies sea-breeze boundaries; the other, which can be invoked optionally, performs an image-erosion function for the purpose of attempting to eliminate river-breeze contributions in the wind fields.

  5. Online Pairwise Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yiming; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2016-04-01

    Pairwise learning usually refers to a learning task that involves a loss function depending on pairs of examples, among which the most notable ones are bipartite ranking, metric learning, and AUC maximization. In this letter we study an online algorithm for pairwise learning with a least-square loss function in an unconstrained setting of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) that we refer to as the Online Pairwise lEaRning Algorithm (OPERA). In contrast to existing works (Kar, Sriperumbudur, Jain, & Karnick, 2013 ; Wang, Khardon, Pechyony, & Jones, 2012 ), which require that the iterates are restricted to a bounded domain or the loss function is strongly convex, OPERA is associated with a non-strongly convex objective function and learns the target function in an unconstrained RKHS. Specifically, we establish a general theorem that guarantees the almost sure convergence for the last iterate of OPERA without any assumptions on the underlying distribution. Explicit convergence rates are derived under the condition of polynomially decaying step sizes. We also establish an interesting property for a family of widely used kernels in the setting of pairwise learning and illustrate the convergence results using such kernels. Our methodology mainly depends on the characterization of RKHSs using its associated integral operators and probability inequalities for random variables with values in a Hilbert space.

  6. STAR Algorithm Integration Team - Facilitating operational algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikles, V. J.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Research and Applications (STAR) provides technical support of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) algorithm development and integration tasks. Utilizing data from the S-NPP satellite, JPSS generates over thirty Environmental Data Records (EDRs) and Intermediate Products (IPs) spanning atmospheric, ocean, cryosphere, and land weather disciplines. The Algorithm Integration Team (AIT) brings technical expertise and support to product algorithms, specifically in testing and validating science algorithms in a pre-operational environment. The AIT verifies that new and updated algorithms function in the development environment, enforces established software development standards, and ensures that delivered packages are functional and complete. AIT facilitates the development of new JPSS-1 algorithms by implementing a review approach based on the Enterprise Product Lifecycle (EPL) process. Building on relationships established during the S-NPP algorithm development process and coordinating directly with science algorithm developers, the AIT has implemented structured reviews with self-contained document suites. The process has supported algorithm improvements for products such as ozone, active fire, vegetation index, and temperature and moisture profiles.

  7. Algorithm aversion: people erroneously avoid algorithms after seeing them err.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Berkeley J; Simmons, Joseph P; Massey, Cade

    2015-02-01

    Research shows that evidence-based algorithms more accurately predict the future than do human forecasters. Yet when forecasters are deciding whether to use a human forecaster or a statistical algorithm, they often choose the human forecaster. This phenomenon, which we call algorithm aversion, is costly, and it is important to understand its causes. We show that people are especially averse to algorithmic forecasters after seeing them perform, even when they see them outperform a human forecaster. This is because people more quickly lose confidence in algorithmic than human forecasters after seeing them make the same mistake. In 5 studies, participants either saw an algorithm make forecasts, a human make forecasts, both, or neither. They then decided whether to tie their incentives to the future predictions of the algorithm or the human. Participants who saw the algorithm perform were less confident in it, and less likely to choose it over an inferior human forecaster. This was true even among those who saw the algorithm outperform the human.

  8. Optimal planning strategy among various arc arrangements for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, In Ah; Eom, Keun Yong; Song, Changhoon; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the optimal strategy among various arc arrangements in prostate plans of stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (SBRT-VMAT). Patients and methods To investigate how arc arrangements affect dosimetric and biological metrics, SBRT-VMAT plans for eighteen patients were generated with arrangements of single-full arc (1FA), single-partial arc (1PA), double-full arc (2FA), and double-partial arc (2PA). All plans were calculated by the Acuros XB calculation algorithm. Dosimetric and radiobiological metrics for target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated from dosevolume histograms. Results All plans were highly conformal (CI<1.05, CN=0.91) and homogeneous (HI=0.09-0.12) for target volumes. For OARs, there was no difference in the bladder dose, while there was a significant difference in the rectum and both femoral head doses. Plans using 1PA and 2PA showed a strong reduction to the mean rectum dose compared to plans using 1FA and 2FA. Contrastively, the D2% and mean dose in both femoral heads were always lower in plans using 1FA and 2FA. The average tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability were comparable in plans using all arc arrangements. Conclusions The use of 1PA had a more effective delivery time and produced equivalent target coverage with better rectal sparing, although all plans using four arc arrangements showed generally similar for dosimetric and biological metrics. However, the D2% and mean dose in femoral heads increased slightly and remained within the tolerance. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of 1PA is an attractive choice for delivering prostate SBRT-VMAT. PMID:28265240

  9. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  10. Fighting Censorship with Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, Mohammad

    In countries such as China or Iran where Internet censorship is prevalent, users usually rely on proxies or anonymizers to freely access the web. The obvious difficulty with this approach is that once the address of a proxy or an anonymizer is announced for use to the public, the authorities can easily filter all traffic to that address. This poses a challenge as to how proxy addresses can be announced to users without leaking too much information to the censorship authorities. In this paper, we formulate this question as an interesting algorithmic problem. We study this problem in a static and a dynamic model, and give almost tight bounds on the number of proxy servers required to give access to n people k of whom are adversaries. We will also discuss how trust networks can be used in this context.

  11. Efficient Kriging Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess

    2011-01-01

    More efficient versions of an interpolation method, called kriging, have been introduced in order to reduce its traditionally high computational cost. Written in C++, these approaches were tested on both synthetic and real data. Kriging is a best unbiased linear estimator and suitable for interpolation of scattered data points. Kriging has long been used in the geostatistic and mining communities, but is now being researched for use in the image fusion of remotely sensed data. This allows a combination of data from various locations to be used to fill in any missing data from any single location. To arrive at the faster algorithms, sparse SYMMLQ iterative solver, covariance tapering, Fast Multipole Methods (FMM), and nearest neighbor searching techniques were used. These implementations were used when the coefficient matrix in the linear system is symmetric, but not necessarily positive-definite.

  12. One improved LSB steganography algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bing; Zhang, Zhi-hong

    2013-03-01

    It is easy to be detected by X2 and RS steganalysis with high accuracy that using LSB algorithm to hide information in digital image. We started by selecting information embedded location and modifying the information embedded method, combined with sub-affine transformation and matrix coding method, improved the LSB algorithm and a new LSB algorithm was proposed. Experimental results show that the improved one can resist the X2 and RS steganalysis effectively.

  13. Algorithm Diversity for Resilent Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-27

    4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Algorithm Diversity for Resilent Systems N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 141512208 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...changes to a prograrn’s state during execution. Specifically, the project aims to develop techniques to introduce algorithm -level diversity, in contrast...to existing work on execution-level diversity. Algorithm -level diversity can introduce larger differences between variants than execution-level

  14. 77 FR 70147 - Fish and Wildlife Service 0648-XB088

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... equestrian leaseholds; and commercial and institutional leaseholds. Up to 180 acres of development in Zones 1... limited amount of future development. Ongoing operations and maintenance are divided into the following... Species from ongoing operation and maintenance of most University facilities and future development....

  15. Messy genetic algorithms: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Kargupta, H.

    1996-09-01

    Messy genetic algorithms define a rare class of algorithms that realize the need for detecting appropriate relations among members of the search domain in optimization. This paper reviews earlier works in messy genetic algorithms and describes some recent developments. It also describes the gene expression messy GA (GEMGA)--an {Omicron}({Lambda}{sup {kappa}}({ell}{sup 2} + {kappa})) sample complexity algorithm for the class of order-{kappa} delineable problems (problems that can be solved by considering no higher than order-{kappa} relations) of size {ell} and alphabet size {Lambda}. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the scalability of the GEMGA.

  16. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  17. Quantum algorithm for data fitting.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Nathan; Braun, Daniel; Lloyd, Seth

    2012-08-03

    We provide a new quantum algorithm that efficiently determines the quality of a least-squares fit over an exponentially large data set by building upon an algorithm for solving systems of linear equations efficiently [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)]. In many cases, our algorithm can also efficiently find a concise function that approximates the data to be fitted and bound the approximation error. In cases where the input data are pure quantum states, the algorithm can be used to provide an efficient parametric estimation of the quantum state and therefore can be applied as an alternative to full quantum-state tomography given a fault tolerant quantum computer.

  18. Preconditioned quantum linear system algorithm.

    PubMed

    Clader, B D; Jacobs, B C; Sprouse, C R

    2013-06-21

    We describe a quantum algorithm that generalizes the quantum linear system algorithm [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)] to arbitrary problem specifications. We develop a state preparation routine that can initialize generic states, show how simple ancilla measurements can be used to calculate many quantities of interest, and integrate a quantum-compatible preconditioner that greatly expands the number of problems that can achieve exponential speedup over classical linear systems solvers. To demonstrate the algorithm's applicability, we show how it can be used to compute the electromagnetic scattering cross section of an arbitrary target exponentially faster than the best classical algorithm.

  19. NOSS Altimeter Detailed Algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The details of the algorithms and data sets required for satellite radar altimeter data processing are documented in a form suitable for (1) development of the benchmark software and (2) coding the operational software. The algorithms reported in detail are those established for altimeter processing. The algorithms which required some additional development before documenting for production were only scoped. The algorithms are divided into two levels of processing. The first level converts the data to engineering units and applies corrections for instrument variations. The second level provides geophysical measurements derived from altimeter parameters for oceanographic users.

  20. Research on Routing Selection Algorithm Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guohong; Zhang, Baojian; Li, Xueyong; Lv, Jinna

    The hereditary algorithm is a kind of random searching and method of optimizing based on living beings natural selection and hereditary mechanism. In recent years, because of the potentiality in solving complicate problems and the successful application in the fields of industrial project, hereditary algorithm has been widely concerned by the domestic and international scholar. Routing Selection communication has been defined a standard communication model of IP version 6.This paper proposes a service model of Routing Selection communication, and designs and implements a new Routing Selection algorithm based on genetic algorithm.The experimental simulation results show that this algorithm can get more resolution at less time and more balanced network load, which enhances search ratio and the availability of network resource, and improves the quality of service.

  1. Using DFX for Algorithm Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.I.; Funkhouser, D.R.; Young, C.J.

    1998-10-20

    Evaluating whether or not a new seismic processing algorithm can improve the performance of the operational system can be problematic: it maybe difficult to isolate the comparable piece of the operational system it maybe necessary to duplicate ancillary timctions; and comparing results to the tuned, full-featured operational system maybe an unsat- isfactory basis on which to draw conclusions. Algorithm development and evaluation in an environment that more closely resembles the operational system can be achieved by integrating the algorithm with the custom user library of the Detection and Feature Extraction (DFX) code, developed by Science Applications kternational Corporation. This integration gives the seismic researcher access to all of the functionality of DFX, such as database access, waveform quality control, and station-specific tuning, and provides a more meaningfid basis for evaluation. The goal of this effort is to make the DFX environment more accessible to seismic researchers for algorithm evalua- tion. Typically, anew algorithm will be developed as a C-language progmm with an ASCII test parameter file. The integration process should allow the researcher to focus on the new algorithm developmen~ with minimum attention to integration issues. Customizing DFX, however, requires soflsvare engineering expertise, knowledge of the Scheme and C programming languages, and familiarity with the DFX source code. We use a C-language spatial coherence processing algorithm with a parameter and recipe file to develop a general process for integrating and evaluating a new algorithm in the DFX environment. To aid in configuring and managing the DFX environment, we develop a simple parameter management tool. We also identifi and examine capabilities that could simplify the process further, thus reducing the barriers facing researchers in using DFX..These capabilities include additional parameter manage- ment features, a Scheme-language template for algorithm testing, a

  2. Modular algorithm concept evaluation tool (MACET) sensor fusion algorithm testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John S.; Williams, Bradford D.; Talele, Sunjay E.; Amphay, Sengvieng A.

    1995-07-01

    Target acquisition in a high clutter environment in all-weather at any time of day represents a much needed capability for the air-to-surface strike mission. A considerable amount of the research at the Armament Directorate at Wright Laboratory, Advanced Guidance Division WL/MNG, has been devoted to exploring various seeker technologies, including multi-spectral sensor fusion, that may yield a cost efficient system with these capabilities. Critical elements of any such seekers are the autonomous target acquisition and tracking algorithms. These algorithms allow the weapon system to operate independently and accurately in realistic battlefield scenarios. In order to assess the performance of the multi-spectral sensor fusion algorithms being produced as part of the seeker technology development programs, the Munition Processing Technology Branch of WL/MN is developing an algorithm testbed. This testbed consists of the Irma signature prediction model, data analysis workstations, such as the TABILS Analysis and Management System (TAMS), and the Modular Algorithm Concept Evaluation Tool (MACET) algorithm workstation. All three of these components are being enhanced to accommodate multi-spectral sensor fusion systems. MACET is being developed to provide a graphical interface driven simulation by which to quickly configure algorithm components and conduct performance evaluations. MACET is being developed incrementally with each release providing an additional channel of operation. To date MACET 1.0, a passive IR algorithm environment, has been delivered. The second release, MACET 1.1 is presented in this paper using the MMW/IR data from the Advanced Autonomous Dual Mode Seeker (AADMS) captive flight demonstration. Once completed, the delivered software from past algorithm development efforts will be converted to the MACET library format, thereby providing an on-line database of the algorithm research conducted to date.

  3. Algorithms on ensemble quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Boykin, P Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh

    2010-06-01

    In ensemble (or bulk) quantum computation, all computations are performed on an ensemble of computers rather than on a single computer. Measurements of qubits in an individual computer cannot be performed; instead, only expectation values (over the complete ensemble of computers) can be measured. As a result of this limitation on the model of computation, many algorithms cannot be processed directly on such computers, and must be modified, as the common strategy of delaying the measurements usually does not resolve this ensemble-measurement problem. Here we present several new strategies for resolving this problem. Based on these strategies we provide new versions of some of the most important quantum algorithms, versions that are suitable for implementing on ensemble quantum computers, e.g., on liquid NMR quantum computers. These algorithms are Shor's factorization algorithm, Grover's search algorithm (with several marked items), and an algorithm for quantum fault-tolerant computation. The first two algorithms are simply modified using a randomizing and a sorting strategies. For the last algorithm, we develop a classical-quantum hybrid strategy for removing measurements. We use it to present a novel quantum fault-tolerant scheme. More explicitly, we present schemes for fault-tolerant measurement-free implementation of Toffoli and σ(z)(¼) as these operations cannot be implemented "bitwise", and their standard fault-tolerant implementations require measurement.

  4. Search for New Quantum Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Topological computing for beginners, (slide presentation), Lecture Notes for Chapter 9 - Physics 219 - Quantum Computation. (http...14 II.A.8. A QHS algorithm for Feynman integrals ......................................................18 II.A.9. Non-abelian QHS algorithms -- A...idea is that NOT all environmentally entangling transformations are equally likely. In particular, for spatially separated physical quantum

  5. Algorithm Calculates Cumulative Poisson Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowerman, Paul N.; Nolty, Robert C.; Scheuer, Ernest M.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithm calculates accurate values of cumulative Poisson distribution under conditions where other algorithms fail because numbers are so small (underflow) or so large (overflow) that computer cannot process them. Factors inserted temporarily to prevent underflow and overflow. Implemented in CUMPOIS computer program described in "Cumulative Poisson Distribution Program" (NPO-17714).

  6. FORTRAN Algorithm for Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Hull, David R.

    1987-01-01

    FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image-processing analysis and enhancement functions developed. Algorithm developed specifically to process images of developmental heat-engine materials obtained with sophisticated nondestructive evaluation instruments. Applications of program include scientific, industrial, and biomedical imaging for studies of flaws in materials, analyses of steel and ores, and pathology.

  7. Testing an earthquake prediction algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kossobokov, V.G.; Healy, J.H.; Dewey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    A test to evaluate earthquake prediction algorithms is being applied to a Russian algorithm known as M8. The M8 algorithm makes intermediate term predictions for earthquakes to occur in a large circle, based on integral counts of transient seismicity in the circle. In a retroactive prediction for the period January 1, 1985 to July 1, 1991 the algorithm as configured for the forward test would have predicted eight of ten strong earthquakes in the test area. A null hypothesis, based on random assignment of predictions, predicts eight earthquakes in 2.87% of the trials. The forward test began July 1, 1991 and will run through December 31, 1997. As of July 1, 1995, the algorithm had forward predicted five out of nine earthquakes in the test area, which success ratio would have been achieved in 53% of random trials with the null hypothesis.

  8. Algorithm for Autonomous Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Because of their small size, high maneuverability, and easy deployment, micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) are used for a wide variety of both civilian and military missions. One of their current drawbacks is the vast array of sensors (such as GPS, altimeter, radar, and the like) required to make a landing. Due to the MAV s small payload size, this is a major concern. Replacing the imaging sensors with a single monocular camera is sufficient to land a MAV. By applying optical flow algorithms to images obtained from the camera, time-to-collision can be measured. This is a measurement of position and velocity (but not of absolute distance), and can avoid obstacles as well as facilitate a landing on a flat surface given a set of initial conditions. The key to this approach is to calculate time-to-collision based on some image on the ground. By holding the angular velocity constant, horizontal speed decreases linearly with the height, resulting in a smooth landing. Mathematical proofs show that even with actuator saturation or modeling/ measurement uncertainties, MAVs can land safely. Landings of this nature may have a higher velocity than is desirable, but this can be compensated for by a cushioning or dampening system, or by using a system of legs to grab onto a surface. Such a monocular camera system can increase vehicle payload size (or correspondingly reduce vehicle size), increase speed of descent, and guarantee a safe landing by directly correlating speed to height from the ground.

  9. Algorithmic advances in stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.P.

    1993-07-01

    Practical planning problems with deterministic forecasts of inherently uncertain parameters often yield unsatisfactory solutions. Stochastic programming formulations allow uncertain parameters to be modeled as random variables with known distributions, but the size of the resulting mathematical programs can be formidable. Decomposition-based algorithms take advantage of special structure and provide an attractive approach to such problems. We consider two classes of decomposition-based stochastic programming algorithms. The first type of algorithm addresses problems with a ``manageable`` number of scenarios. The second class incorporates Monte Carlo sampling within a decomposition algorithm. We develop and empirically study an enhanced Benders decomposition algorithm for solving multistage stochastic linear programs within a prespecified tolerance. The enhancements include warm start basis selection, preliminary cut generation, the multicut procedure, and decision tree traversing strategies. Computational results are presented for a collection of ``real-world`` multistage stochastic hydroelectric scheduling problems. Recently, there has been an increased focus on decomposition-based algorithms that use sampling within the optimization framework. These approaches hold much promise for solving stochastic programs with many scenarios. A critical component of such algorithms is a stopping criterion to ensure the quality of the solution. With this as motivation, we develop a stopping rule theory for algorithms in which bounds on the optimal objective function value are estimated by sampling. Rules are provided for selecting sample sizes and terminating the algorithm under which asymptotic validity of confidence interval statements for the quality of the proposed solution can be verified. Issues associated with the application of this theory to two sampling-based algorithms are considered, and preliminary empirical coverage results are presented.

  10. Scheduling with genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennel, Theron R.; Underbrink, A. J., Jr.; Williams, George P. W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In many domains, scheduling a sequence of jobs is an important function contributing to the overall efficiency of the operation. At Boeing, we develop schedules for many different domains, including assembly of military and commercial aircraft, weapons systems, and space vehicles. Boeing is under contract to develop scheduling systems for the Space Station Payload Planning System (PPS) and Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC). These applications require that we respect certain sequencing restrictions among the jobs to be scheduled while at the same time assigning resources to the jobs. We call this general problem scheduling and resource allocation. Genetic algorithms (GA's) offer a search method that uses a population of solutions and benefits from intrinsic parallelism to search the problem space rapidly, producing near-optimal solutions. Good intermediate solutions are probabalistically recombined to produce better offspring (based upon some application specific measure of solution fitness, e.g., minimum flowtime, or schedule completeness). Also, at any point in the search, any intermediate solution can be accepted as a final solution; allowing the search to proceed longer usually produces a better solution while terminating the search at virtually any time may yield an acceptable solution. Many processes are constrained by restrictions of sequence among the individual jobs. For a specific job, other jobs must be completed beforehand. While there are obviously many other constraints on processes, it is these on which we focussed for this research: how to allocate crews to jobs while satisfying job precedence requirements and personnel, and tooling and fixture (or, more generally, resource) requirements.

  11. Portable Health Algorithms Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Wong, Edmond; Fulton, Christopher E.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Maul, William A.

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses the Portable Health Algorithms Test (PHALT) System, which has been designed as a means for evolving the maturity and credibility of algorithms developed to assess the health of aerospace systems. Comprising an integrated hardware-software environment, the PHALT system allows systems health management algorithms to be developed in a graphical programming environment, to be tested and refined using system simulation or test data playback, and to be evaluated in a real-time hardware-in-the-loop mode with a live test article. The integrated hardware and software development environment provides a seamless transition from algorithm development to real-time implementation. The portability of the hardware makes it quick and easy to transport between test facilities. This hard ware/software architecture is flexible enough to support a variety of diagnostic applications and test hardware, and the GUI-based rapid prototyping capability is sufficient to support development execution, and testing of custom diagnostic algorithms. The PHALT operating system supports execution of diagnostic algorithms under real-time constraints. PHALT can perform real-time capture and playback of test rig data with the ability to augment/ modify the data stream (e.g. inject simulated faults). It performs algorithm testing using a variety of data input sources, including real-time data acquisition, test data playback, and system simulations, and also provides system feedback to evaluate closed-loop diagnostic response and mitigation control.

  12. A universal symmetry detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Research on symmetry detection focuses on identifying and detecting new types of symmetry. The paper presents an algorithm that is capable of detecting any type of permutation-based symmetry, including many types for which there are no existing algorithms. General symmetry detection is library-based, but symmetries that can be parameterized, (i.e. total, partial, rotational, and dihedral symmetry), can be detected without using libraries. In many cases it is faster than existing techniques. Furthermore, it is simpler than most existing techniques, and can easily be incorporated into existing software. The algorithm can also be used with virtually any type of matrix-based symmetry, including conjugate symmetry.

  13. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  14. Routing Algorithm Exploits Spatial Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Jennings, Esther

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed routing algorithm for broadcasting in an ad hoc wireless communication network takes account of, and exploits, the spatial relationships among the locations of nodes, in addition to transmission power levels and distances between the nodes. In contrast, most prior algorithms for discovering routes through ad hoc networks rely heavily on transmission power levels and utilize limited graph-topology techniques that do not involve consideration of the aforesaid spatial relationships. The present algorithm extracts the relevant spatial-relationship information by use of a construct denoted the relative-neighborhood graph (RNG).

  15. Belief network algorithms: A study of performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jitnah, N.

    1996-12-31

    This abstract gives an overview of the work. We present a survey of Belief Network algorithms and propose a domain characterization system to be used as a basis for algorithm comparison and for predicting algorithm performance.

  16. Do You Understand Your Algorithms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickreign, Jamar; Rogers, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses relationships between the development of an understanding of algorithms and algebraic thinking. It also provides some sample activities for middle school teachers of mathematics to help promote students' algebraic thinking. (Contains 11 figures.)

  17. Fibonacci Numbers and Computer Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, John; Geist, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The Fibonacci Sequence describes a vast array of phenomena from nature. Computer scientists have discovered and used many algorithms which can be classified as applications of Fibonacci's sequence. In this article, several of these applications are considered. (PK)

  18. APL simulation of Grover's algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    2012-02-01

    Grover's algorithm is a fast quantum search algorithm. Classically, to solve the search problem for a search space of size N we need approximately N operations. Grover's algorithm offers a quadratic speedup. Since present quantum computers are not robust enough for code writing and execution, to experiment with Grover's algorithm, we will simulate it using the APL programming language. The APL programming language is especially suited for this task. For example, to compute Walsh-Hadamard transformation matrix for N quantum states via a tensor product of N Hadamard matrices we need to iterate N-1 times only one line of the code. Initial study indicates the quantum mechanical amplitude of the solution is almost independent of the search space size and rapidly reaches 0.999 values with slight variations at higher decimal places.

  19. What is a Systolic Algorithm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sailesh K.; Kollath, T.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper, we show that every systolic array executes a Regular Iterative Algorithm with a strongly separating hyperplane and conversely, that every such algorithm can be implemented on a systolic array. This characterization provides us with an unified framework for describing the contributions of other authors. It also exposes the relevance of many fundamental concepts that were introduced in the sixties by Hennie, Waite and Karp, Miller and Winograd, to the present day concern of systolic array

  20. Programming the gradient projection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargrove, A.

    1983-01-01

    The gradient projection method of numerical optimization which is applied to problems having linear constraints but nonlinear objective functions is described and analyzed. The algorithm is found to be efficient and thorough for small systems, but requires the addition of auxiliary methods and programming for large scale systems with severe nonlinearities. In order to verify the theoretical results a digital computer is used to simulate the algorithm.

  1. Genetic algorithms as discovery programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, M.R.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical counterparts to natural selection and gene recombination. As such, they have provided one of the few significant breakthroughs in machine learning. Used with appropriate reward functions and apportionment of credit, they have been successfully applied to gas pipeline operation, x-ray registration and mathematical optimization problems. This paper discusses the basics of genetic algorithms, describes a few successes, and reports on current progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in applications to set covering and simulated robots.

  2. Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-16

    ktdud* Sccumy Oass/Kjoon) Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lanzano, Paolo 13 «. TYPE OF REPORT Final 13b...spectral density. 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 13 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED D SAME AS RPT n OTIC USERS 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Research Laboratory ’^^ SSZ ’.Washington. DC 20375-5000 NRLrMemorandum Report-6138 Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems p. LANZANO Space

  3. Label Ranking Algorithms: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vembu, Shankar; Gärtner, Thomas

    Label ranking is a complex prediction task where the goal is to map instances to a total order over a finite set of predefined labels. An interesting aspect of this problem is that it subsumes several supervised learning problems, such as multiclass prediction, multilabel classification, and hierarchical classification. Unsurprisingly, there exists a plethora of label ranking algorithms in the literature due, in part, to this versatile nature of the problem. In this paper, we survey these algorithms.

  4. A retrodictive stochastic simulation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, T.G. Drummond, P.D.; Drummond, A.J.

    2010-05-20

    In this paper we describe a simple method for inferring the initial states of systems evolving stochastically according to master equations, given knowledge of the final states. This is achieved through the use of a retrodictive stochastic simulation algorithm which complements the usual predictive stochastic simulation approach. We demonstrate the utility of this new algorithm by applying it to example problems, including the derivation of likely ancestral states of a gene sequence given a Markovian model of genetic mutation.

  5. Tactical Synthesis Of Efficient Global Search Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedunuri, Srinivas; Smith, Douglas R.; Cook, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm synthesis transforms a formal specification into an efficient algorithm to solve a problem. Algorithm synthesis in Specware combines the formal specification of a problem with a high-level algorithm strategy. To derive an efficient algorithm, a developer must define operators that refine the algorithm by combining the generic operators in the algorithm with the details of the problem specification. This derivation requires skill and a deep understanding of the problem and the algorithmic strategy. In this paper we introduce two tactics to ease this process. The tactics serve a similar purpose to tactics used for determining indefinite integrals in calculus, that is suggesting possible ways to attack the problem.

  6. Rotational Invariant Dimensionality Reduction Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jian; Shen, Linlin; Zhang, David

    2016-06-30

    A common intrinsic limitation of the traditional subspace learning methods is the sensitivity to the outliers and the image variations of the object since they use the L₂ norm as the metric. In this paper, a series of methods based on the L₂,₁-norm are proposed for linear dimensionality reduction. Since the L₂,₁-norm based objective function is robust to the image variations, the proposed algorithms can perform robust image feature extraction for classification. We use different ideas to design different algorithms and obtain a unified rotational invariant (RI) dimensionality reduction framework, which extends the well-known graph embedding algorithm framework to a more generalized form. We provide the comprehensive analyses to show the essential properties of the proposed algorithm framework. This paper indicates that the optimization problems have global optimal solutions when all the orthogonal projections of the data space are computed and used. Experimental results on popular image datasets indicate that the proposed RI dimensionality reduction algorithms can obtain competitive performance compared with the previous L₂ norm based subspace learning algorithms.

  7. Multimodal Estimation of Distribution Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Chen, Wei-Neng; Li, Yun; Chen, C L Philip; Xu, Xiang-Min; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-15

    Taking the advantage of estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) in preserving high diversity, this paper proposes a multimodal EDA. Integrated with clustering strategies for crowding and speciation, two versions of this algorithm are developed, which operate at the niche level. Then these two algorithms are equipped with three distinctive techniques: 1) a dynamic cluster sizing strategy; 2) an alternative utilization of Gaussian and Cauchy distributions to generate offspring; and 3) an adaptive local search. The dynamic cluster sizing affords a potential balance between exploration and exploitation and reduces the sensitivity to the cluster size in the niching methods. Taking advantages of Gaussian and Cauchy distributions, we generate the offspring at the niche level through alternatively using these two distributions. Such utilization can also potentially offer a balance between exploration and exploitation. Further, solution accuracy is enhanced through a new local search scheme probabilistically conducted around seeds of niches with probabilities determined self-adaptively according to fitness values of these seeds. Extensive experiments conducted on 20 benchmark multimodal problems confirm that both algorithms can achieve competitive performance compared with several state-of-the-art multimodal algorithms, which is supported by nonparametric tests. Especially, the proposed algorithms are very promising for complex problems with many local optima.

  8. Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew; Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a variation of a simulated-annealing optimization algorithm that uses a recursive-branching structure to parallelize the search of a parameter space for the globally optimal solution to an objective. The algorithm has been demonstrated to be more effective at searching a parameter space than traditional simulated-annealing methods for a particular problem of interest, and it can readily be applied to a wide variety of optimization problems, including those with a parameter space having both discrete-value parameters (combinatorial) and continuous-variable parameters. It can take the place of a conventional simulated- annealing, Monte-Carlo, or random- walk algorithm. In a conventional simulated-annealing (SA) algorithm, a starting configuration is randomly selected within the parameter space. The algorithm randomly selects another configuration from the parameter space and evaluates the objective function for that configuration. If the objective function value is better than the previous value, the new configuration is adopted as the new point of interest in the parameter space. If the objective function value is worse than the previous value, the new configuration may be adopted, with a probability determined by a temperature parameter, used in analogy to annealing in metals. As the optimization continues, the region of the parameter space from which new configurations can be selected shrinks, and in conjunction with lowering the annealing temperature (and thus lowering the probability for adopting configurations in parameter space with worse objective functions), the algorithm can converge on the globally optimal configuration. The Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing (RBSA) algorithm shares some features with the SA algorithm, notably including the basic principles that a starting configuration is randomly selected from within the parameter space, the algorithm tests other configurations with the goal of finding the globally optimal

  9. A replica exchange Monte Carlo algorithm for protein folding in the HP model

    PubMed Central

    Thachuk, Chris; Shmygelska, Alena; Hoos, Holger H

    2007-01-01

    Background The ab initio protein folding problem consists of predicting protein tertiary structure from a given amino acid sequence by minimizing an energy function; it is one of the most important and challenging problems in biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics. The ab initio protein folding problem is computationally challenging and has been shown to be NP MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaat0uy0HwzTfgDPnwy1egaryqtHrhAL1wy0L2yHvdaiqaacqWFneVtcqqGqbauaaa@3961@-hard even when conformations are restricted to a lattice. In this work, we implement and evaluate the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) method, which has already been applied very successfully to more complex protein models and other optimization problems with complex energy landscapes, in combination with the highly effective pull move neighbourhood in two widely studied Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice models. Results We demonstrate that REMC is highly effective for solving instances of the square (2D) and cubic (3D) HP protein folding problem. When using the pull move neighbourhood, REMC outperforms current state-of-the-art algorithms for most benchmark instances. Additionally, we show that this new algorithm provides a larger ensemble of ground-state structures than the existing state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, it scales well with sequence length, and it finds significantly better conformations on long biological sequences and sequences with a provably unique ground-state structure, which is believed to be a characteristic of real proteins. We also present evidence that our REMC algorithm can fold sequences which exhibit significant interaction between termini in the hydrophobic core relatively easily. Conclusion We demonstrate that REMC utilizing the pull move neighbourhood

  10. Mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, John H.; Chay, Seung C.; Downs, Mary M.

    1988-01-01

    Most state of the art expert system environments contain a single and often ad hoc strategy for approximate reasoning. Some environments provide facilities to program the approximate reasoning algorithms. However, the next generation of expert systems should have an environment which contain a choice of several mathematical algorithms for approximate reasoning. To meet the need for validatable and verifiable coding, the expert system environment must no longer depend upon ad hoc reasoning techniques but instead must include mathematically rigorous techniques for approximate reasoning. Popular approximate reasoning techniques are reviewed, including: certainty factors, belief measures, Bayesian probabilities, fuzzy logic, and Shafer-Dempster techniques for reasoning. A group of mathematically rigorous algorithms for approximate reasoning are focused on that could form the basis of a next generation expert system environment. These algorithms are based upon the axioms of set theory and probability theory. To separate these algorithms for approximate reasoning various conditions of mutual exclusivity and independence are imposed upon the assertions. Approximate reasoning algorithms presented include: reasoning with statistically independent assertions, reasoning with mutually exclusive assertions, reasoning with assertions that exhibit minimum overlay within the state space, reasoning with assertions that exhibit maximum overlay within the state space (i.e. fuzzy logic), pessimistic reasoning (i.e. worst case analysis), optimistic reasoning (i.e. best case analysis), and reasoning with assertions with absolutely no knowledge of the possible dependency among the assertions. A robust environment for expert system construction should include the two modes of inference: modus ponens and modus tollens. Modus ponens inference is based upon reasoning towards the conclusion in a statement of logical implication, whereas modus tollens inference is based upon reasoning away

  11. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log-polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  12. Lead-free piezoelectric ceramics based on (0.97 - x)K0.48Na0.52NbO3-0.03Bi0.5(Na0.7K0.2Li0.1)0.5ZrO3-xB0.5Na0.5TiO3 ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojing; Wu, Jiagang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Binyu; Zhu, Jianguo; Xiao, Dingquan; Wang, Xiangjian; Lou, Xiaojie; Liang, Wenfeng

    2013-09-01

    In this work, the ternary system of potassium-sodium niobate has been designed to enhance the piezoelectric properties without sacrificing the Curie temperature greatly, and (0.97 - x)K0.48Na0.52NbO3-0.03Bi0.5(Na0.7K0.2Li0.1)0.5ZrO3-xB0.5Na0.5TiO3 ceramics have been prepared by the conventional solid-state method. The effect of B0.5Na0.5TiO3 content on the microstructure and electrical properties of the ceramics is studied. The phase diagram shows a phase boundary of the rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase coexistence in the composition range of 0.5% < x < 1.5%, and then an enhanced dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric behavior is obtained at such a phase boundary zone. The ceramic with x = 0.01 has an optimum electrical behavior of d33 ˜ 285 pC/N, kp ˜ 0.40, ɛr ˜ 1235, tan δ ˜ 0.031, Pr ˜ 14.9 μC/cm2, and Ec ˜ 15.2 kV/cm, together with a high Curie temperature of ˜347 °C. The large d33 in such a ternary system is due to a composition-induced R-T phase transition and a higher ɛrPr, and the thermal stability performance is strongly dependent on the phase structure. As a result, the design of the ternary system is an effective way to enhance the piezoelectric properties of potassium-sodium niobate materials.

  13. Conflict-Aware Scheduling Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Borden, Chester

    2006-01-01

    conflict-aware scheduling algorithm is being developed to help automate the allocation of NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas and equipment that are used to communicate with interplanetary scientific spacecraft. The current approach for scheduling DSN ground resources seeks to provide an equitable distribution of tracking services among the multiple scientific missions and is very labor intensive. Due to the large (and increasing) number of mission requests for DSN services, combined with technical and geometric constraints, the DSN is highly oversubscribed. To help automate the process, and reduce the DSN and spaceflight project labor effort required for initiating, maintaining, and negotiating schedules, a new scheduling algorithm is being developed. The scheduling algorithm generates a "conflict-aware" schedule, where all requests are scheduled based on a dynamic priority scheme. The conflict-aware scheduling algorithm allocates all requests for DSN tracking services while identifying and maintaining the conflicts to facilitate collaboration and negotiation between spaceflight missions. These contrast with traditional "conflict-free" scheduling algorithms that assign tracks that are not in conflict and mark the remainder as unscheduled. In the case where full schedule automation is desired (based on mission/event priorities, fairness, allocation rules, geometric constraints, and ground system capabilities/ constraints), a conflict-free schedule can easily be created from the conflict-aware schedule by removing lower priority items that are in conflict.

  14. Fourier Lucas-Kanade algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Simon; Navarathna, Rajitha; Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Sridharan, Sridha

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for both gradient descent image and object alignment in the Fourier domain. Our method centers upon the classical Lucas & Kanade (LK) algorithm where we represent the source and template/model in the complex 2D Fourier domain rather than in the spatial 2D domain. We refer to our approach as the Fourier LK (FLK) algorithm. The FLK formulation is advantageous when one preprocesses the source image and template/model with a bank of filters (e.g., oriented edges, Gabor, etc.) as 1) it can handle substantial illumination variations, 2) the inefficient preprocessing filter bank step can be subsumed within the FLK algorithm as a sparse diagonal weighting matrix, 3) unlike traditional LK, the computational cost is invariant to the number of filters and as a result is far more efficient, and 4) this approach can be extended to the Inverse Compositional (IC) form of the LK algorithm where nearly all steps (including Fourier transform and filter bank preprocessing) can be precomputed, leading to an extremely efficient and robust approach to gradient descent image matching. Further, these computational savings translate to nonrigid object alignment tasks that are considered extensions of the LK algorithm, such as those found in Active Appearance Models (AAMs).

  15. Algorithms for automated DNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, Douglas; Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Kittleson, Joshua T.; DeLoache, Will; Batten, Christopher; Anderson, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Generating a defined set of genetic constructs within a large combinatorial space provides a powerful method for engineering novel biological functions. However, the process of assembling more than a few specific DNA sequences can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Even if a correct theoretical construction scheme is developed manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and formal approaches are needed for exploring these vast design spaces. By automating the design of DNA fabrication schemes using computational algorithms, we can eliminate human error while reducing redundant operations, thus minimizing the time and cost required for conducting biological engineering experiments. Here, we provide algorithms that optimize the simultaneous assembly of a collection of related DNA sequences. We compare our algorithms to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with random search approaches on two real-world datasets show that our algorithms can also quickly find lower-cost solutions for large datasets. PMID:20335162

  16. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  17. Metal detector depth estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Jay; McMichael, Ian

    2009-05-01

    This paper looks at depth estimation techniques using electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors. Four algorithms are considered. The first utilizes a vertical gradient sensor configuration. The second is a dual frequency approach. The third makes use of dipole and quadrapole receiver configurations. The fourth looks at coils of different sizes. Each algorithm is described along with its associated sensor. Two figures of merit ultimately define algorithm/sensor performance. The first is the depth of penetration obtainable. (That is, the maximum detection depth obtainable.) This describes the performance of the method to achieve detection of deep targets. The second is the achievable statistical depth resolution. This resolution describes the precision with which depth can be estimated. In this paper depth of penetration and statistical depth resolution are qualitatively determined for each sensor/algorithm. A scientific method is used to make these assessments. A field test was conducted using 2 lanes with emplaced UXO. The first lane contains 155 shells at increasing depths from 0" to 48". The second is more realistic containing objects of varying size. The first lane is used for algorithm training purposes, while the second is used for testing. The metal detectors used in this study are the: Geonics EM61, Geophex GEM5, Minelab STMR II, and the Vallon VMV16.

  18. POSE Algorithms for Automated Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Howard, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    POSE (relative position and attitude) can be computed in many different ways. Given a sensor that measures bearing to a finite number of spots corresponding to known features (such as a target) of a spacecraft, a number of different algorithms can be used to compute the POSE. NASA has sponsored the development of a flash LIDAR proximity sensor called the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) for use by the Orion capsule in future docking missions. This sensor generates data that can be used by a variety of algorithms to compute POSE solutions inside of 15 meters, including at the critical docking range of approximately 1-2 meters. Previously NASA participated in a DARPA program called Orbital Express that achieved the first automated docking for the American space program. During this mission a large set of high quality mated sensor data was obtained at what is essentially the docking distance. This data set is perhaps the most accurate truth data in existence for docking proximity sensors in orbit. In this paper, the flight data from Orbital Express is used to test POSE algorithms at 1.22 meters range. Two different POSE algorithms are tested for two different Fields-of-View (FOVs) and two different pixel noise levels. The results of the analysis are used to predict future performance of the POSE algorithms with VNS data.

  19. Parallel job-scheduling algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, we consider solving job scheduling problems on the CREW PRAM model. We show how to adapt Cole's pipeline merge technique to yield several efficient parallel algorithms for a number of job scheduling problems and one optimal parallel algorithm for the following job scheduling problem: Given a set of n jobs defined by release times, deadlines and processing times, find a schedule that minimizes the maximum lateness of the jobs and allows preemption when the jobs are scheduled to run on one machine. In addition, we present the first NC algorithm for the following job scheduling problem: Given a set of n jobs defined by release times, deadlines and unit processing times, determine if there is a schedule of jobs on one machine, and calculate the schedule if it exists. We identify the notion of a canonical schedule, which is the type of schedule our algorithm computes if there is a schedule. Our algorithm runs in O((log n){sup 2}) time and uses O(n{sup 2}k{sup 2}) processors, where k is the minimum number of distinct offsets of release times or deadlines.

  20. Using Alternative Multiplication Algorithms to "Offload" Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jazby, Dan; Pearn, Cath

    2015-01-01

    When viewed through a lens of embedded cognition, algorithms may enable aspects of the cognitive work of multi-digit multiplication to be "offloaded" to the environmental structure created by an algorithm. This study analyses four multiplication algorithms by viewing different algorithms as enabling cognitive work to be distributed…

  1. Seamless Merging of Hypertext and Algorithm Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karavirta, Ville

    2009-01-01

    Online learning material that students use by themselves is one of the typical usages of algorithm animation (AA). Thus, the integration of algorithm animations into hypertext is seen as an important topic today to promote the usage of algorithm animation in teaching. This article presents an algorithm animation viewer implemented purely using…

  2. Synthesis of Greedy Algorithms Using Dominance Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedunuri, Srinivas; Smith, Douglas R.; Cook, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Greedy algorithms exploit problem structure and constraints to achieve linear-time performance. Yet there is still no completely satisfactory way of constructing greedy algorithms. For example, the Greedy Algorithm of Edmonds depends upon translating a problem into an algebraic structure called a matroid, but the existence of such a translation can be as hard to determine as the existence of a greedy algorithm itself. An alternative characterization of greedy algorithms is in terms of dominance relations, a well-known algorithmic technique used to prune search spaces. We demonstrate a process by which dominance relations can be methodically derived for a number of greedy algorithms, including activity selection, and prefix-free codes. By incorporating our approach into an existing framework for algorithm synthesis, we demonstrate that it could be the basis for an effective engineering method for greedy algorithms. We also compare our approach with other characterizations of greedy algorithms.

  3. Next Generation Suspension Dynamics Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Higdon, Jonathon; Chen, Steven

    2014-12-01

    This research project has the objective to extend the range of application, improve the efficiency and conduct simulations with the Fast Lubrication Dynamics (FLD) algorithm for concentrated particle suspensions in a Newtonian fluid solvent. The research involves a combination of mathematical development, new computational algorithms, and application to processing flows of relevance in materials processing. The mathematical developments clarify the underlying theory, facilitate verification against classic monographs in the field and provide the framework for a novel parallel implementation optimized for an OpenMP shared memory environment. The project considered application to consolidation flows of major interest in high throughput materials processing and identified hitherto unforeseen challenges in the use of FLD in these applications. Extensions to the algorithm have been developed to improve its accuracy in these applications.

  4. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 ~ 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  5. Learning with the ratchet algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Hush, D. R.; Scovel, James C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a randomized algorithm called Ratchet that asymptotically minimizes (with probability 1) functions that satisfy a positive-linear-dependent (PLD) property. We establish the PLD property and a corresponding realization of Ratchet for a generalized loss criterion for both linear machines and linear classifiers. We describe several learning criteria that can be obtained as special cases of this generalized loss criterion, e.g. classification error, classification loss and weighted classification error. We also establish the PLD property and a corresponding realization of Ratchet for the Neyman-Pearson criterion for linear classifiers. Finally we show how, for linear classifiers, the Ratchet algorithm can be derived as a modification of the Pocket algorithm.

  6. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M.

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  7. SU-F-BRD-15: The Impact of Dose Calculation Algorithm and Hounsfield Units Conversion Tables On Plan Dosimetry for Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, L; Yorke, E; Lim, S; Mechalakos, J; Rimner, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dosimetric differences in IMRT lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans calculated with Varian AAA and Acuros (AXB) and with vendor-supplied (V) versus in-house (IH) measured Hounsfield units (HU) to mass and HU to electron density conversion tables. Methods: In-house conversion tables were measured using Gammex 472 density-plug phantom. IMRT plans (6 MV, Varian TrueBeam, 6–9 coplanar fields) meeting departmental coverage and normal tissue constraints were retrospectively generated for 10 lung SBRT cases using Eclipse Vn 10.0.28 AAA with in-house tables (AAA/IH). Using these monitor units and MLC sequences, plans were recalculated with AAA and vendor tables (AAA/V) and with AXB with both tables (AXB/IH and AXB/V). Ratios to corresponding AAA/IH values were calculated for PTV D95, D01, D99, mean-dose, total and ipsilateral lung V20 and chestwall V30. Statistical significance of differences was judged by Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (p<0.05). Results: For HU<−400 the vendor HU-mass density table was notably below the IH table. PTV D95 ratios to AAA/IH, averaged over all patients, are 0.963±0.073 (p=0.508), 0.914±0.126 (p=0.011), and 0.998±0.001 (p=0.005) for AXB/IH, AXB/V and AAA/V respectively. Total lung V20 ratios are 1.006±0.046 (p=0.386), 0.975±0.080 (p=0.514) and 0.998±0.002 (p=0.007); ipsilateral lung V20 ratios are 1.008±0.041(p=0.284), 0.977±0.076 (p=0.443), and 0.998±0.018 (p=0.005) for AXB/IH, AXB/V and AAA/V respectively. In 7 cases, ratios to AAA/IH were within ± 5% for all indices studied. For 3 cases characterized by very low lung density and small PTV (19.99±8.09 c.c.), PTV D95 ratio for AXB/V ranged from 67.4% to 85.9%, AXB/IH D95 ratio ranged from 81.6% to 93.4%; there were large differences in other studied indices. Conclusion: For AXB users, careful attention to HU conversion tables is important, as they can significantly impact AXB (but not AAA) lung SBRT plans. Algorithm selection is also important for

  8. Two Algorithms for Processing Electronic Nose Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca; Linnell, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Two algorithms for processing the digitized readings of electronic noses, and computer programs to implement the algorithms, have been devised in a continuing effort to increase the utility of electronic noses as means of identifying airborne compounds and measuring their concentrations. One algorithm identifies the two vapors in a two-vapor mixture and estimates the concentration of each vapor (in principle, this algorithm could be extended to more than two vapors). The other algorithm identifies a single vapor and estimates its concentration.

  9. Parallel algorithms for unconstrained optimizations by multisplitting

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qing

    1994-12-31

    In this paper a new parallel iterative algorithm for unconstrained optimization using the idea of multisplitting is proposed. This algorithm uses the existing sequential algorithms without any parallelization. Some convergence and numerical results for this algorithm are presented. The experiments are performed on an Intel iPSC/860 Hyper Cube with 64 nodes. It is interesting that the sequential implementation on one node shows that if the problem is split properly, the algorithm converges much faster than one without splitting.

  10. Adaptive-feedback control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Debin

    2006-06-01

    This paper is motivated by giving the detailed proofs and some interesting remarks on the results the author obtained in a series of papers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 214101 (2004); Phys. Rev. E 71, 037203 (2005); 69, 067201 (2004)], where an adaptive-feedback algorithm was proposed to effectively stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems. This note proves in detail the strictness of this algorithm from the viewpoint of mathematics, and gives some interesting remarks for its potential applications to chaos control & synchronization. In addition, a significant comment on synchronization-based parameter estimation is given, which shows some techniques proposed in literature less strict and ineffective in some cases.

  11. ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT FOR SPATIAL OPERATORS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claire, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    An approach is given that develops spatial operators about the basic geometric elements common to spatial data structures. In this fashion, a single set of spatial operators may be accessed by any system that reduces its operands to such basic generic representations. Algorithms based on this premise have been formulated to perform operations such as separation, overlap, and intersection. Moreover, this generic approach is well suited for algorithms that exploit concurrent properties of spatial operators. The results may provide a framework for a geometry engine to support fundamental manipulations within a geographic information system.

  12. Deceptiveness and genetic algorithm dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liepins, G.E. ); Vose, M.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We address deceptiveness, one of at least four reasons genetic algorithms can fail to converge to function optima. We construct fully deceptive functions and other functions of intermediate deceptiveness. For the fully deceptive functions of our construction, we generate linear transformations that induce changes of representation to render the functions fully easy. We further model genetic algorithm selection recombination as the interleaving of linear and quadratic operators. Spectral analysis of the underlying matrices allows us to draw preliminary conclusions about fixed points and their stability. We also obtain an explicit formula relating the nonuniform Walsh transform to the dynamics of genetic search. 21 refs.

  13. An algorithm for haplotype analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shili; Speed, T.P.

    1997-12-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for haplotype analysis based on a Monte Carlo method. Haplotype configurations are generated according to the distribution of joint haplotypes of individuals in a pedigree given their phenotype data, via a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The haplotype configuration which maximizes this conditional probability distribution can thus be estimated. In addition, the set of haplotype configurations with relatively high probabilities can also be estimated as possible alternatives to the most probable one. This flexibility enables geneticists to choose the haplotype configurations which are most reasonable to them, allowing them to include their knowledge of the data under analysis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A generalized memory test algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A general algorithm for testing digital computer memory is presented. The test checks that (1) every bit can be cleared and set in each memory work, and (2) bits are not erroneously cleared and/or set elsewhere in memory at the same time. The algorithm can be applied to any size memory block and any size memory word. It is concise and efficient, requiring the very few cycles through memory. For example, a test of 16-bit-word-size memory requries only 384 cycles through memory. Approximately 15 seconds were required to test a 32K block of such memory, using a microcomputer having a cycle time of 133 nanoseconds.

  15. Gossip algorithms in quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Gossip algorithms is a common term to describe protocols for unreliable information dissemination in natural networks, which are not optimally designed for efficient communication between network entities. We consider application of gossip algorithms to quantum networks and show that any quantum network can be updated to optimal configuration with local operations and classical communication. This allows to speed-up - in the best case exponentially - the quantum information dissemination. Irrespective of the initial configuration of the quantum network, the update requiters at most polynomial number of local operations and classical communication.

  16. Cognitive Algorithms for Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-18

    63] L. I. Perlovsky and R. Kozma. Eds. Neurodynamics of Higher-Level Cognition and Consciousness. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 2007. [64...AFRL-RY-HS-TR-2011-0013 ________________________________________________________________________ Cognitive Algorithms for Signal Processing...in more details in [46]. ..................................... 16  1 Abstract Processes in the mind: perception, cognition

  17. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  18. Adaptive protection algorithm and system

    DOEpatents

    Hedrick, Paul [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M [Mars, PA

    2009-04-28

    An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

  19. Genetic Algorithms: A gentle introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, K.D.

    1994-12-31

    Information is presented on genetic algorithms in outline form. The following topics are discussed: how are new samples generated, a genotypic viewpoint, a phenotypic viewpoint, an optimization viewpoint, an intuitive view, parameter optimization problems, evolving production rates, genetic programming, GAs and NNs, formal analysis, Lemmas and theorems, discrete Walsh transforms, deceptive problems, Markov chain analysis, and PAC learning analysis.

  20. Aerocapture Guidance Algorithm Comparison Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Stephane; Perot, Etienne; Graves, Claude; Masciarelli, James P.; Queen, Eric

    2002-01-01

    The aerocapture is a promising technique for the future human interplanetary missions. The Mars Sample Return was initially based on an insertion by aerocapture. A CNES orbiter Mars Premier was developed to demonstrate this concept. Mainly due to budget constraints, the aerocapture was cancelled for the French orbiter. A lot of studies were achieved during the three last years to develop and test different guidance algorithms (APC, EC, TPC, NPC). This work was shared between CNES and NASA, with a fruitful joint working group. To finish this study an evaluation campaign has been performed to test the different algorithms. The objective was to assess the robustness, accuracy, capability to limit the load, and the complexity of each algorithm. A simulation campaign has been specified and performed by CNES, with a similar activity on the NASA side to confirm the CNES results. This evaluation has demonstrated that the numerical guidance principal is not competitive compared to the analytical concepts. All the other algorithms are well adapted to guaranty the success of the aerocapture. The TPC appears to be the more robust, the APC the more accurate, and the EC appears to be a good compromise.

  1. Algorithms, complexity, and the sciences

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Algorithms, perhaps together with Moore’s law, compose the engine of the information technology revolution, whereas complexity—the antithesis of algorithms—is one of the deepest realms of mathematical investigation. After introducing the basic concepts of algorithms and complexity, and the fundamental complexity classes P (polynomial time) and NP (nondeterministic polynomial time, or search problems), we discuss briefly the P vs. NP problem. We then focus on certain classes between P and NP which capture important phenomena in the social and life sciences, namely the Nash equlibrium and other equilibria in economics and game theory, and certain processes in population genetics and evolution. Finally, an algorithm known as multiplicative weights update (MWU) provides an algorithmic interpretation of the evolution of allele frequencies in a population under sex and weak selection. All three of these equivalences are rife with domain-specific implications: The concept of Nash equilibrium may be less universal—and therefore less compelling—than has been presumed; selection on gene interactions may entail the maintenance of genetic variation for longer periods than selection on single alleles predicts; whereas MWU can be shown to maximize, for each gene, a convex combination of the gene’s cumulative fitness in the population and the entropy of the allele distribution, an insight that may be pertinent to the maintenance of variation in evolution. PMID:25349382

  2. The minimal time detection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sungwan

    1995-01-01

    An aerospace vehicle may operate throughout a wide range of flight environmental conditions that affect its dynamic characteristics. Even when the control design incorporates a degree of robustness, system parameters may drift enough to cause its performance to degrade below an acceptable level. The object of this paper is to develop a change detection algorithm so that we can build a highly adaptive control system applicable to aircraft systems. The idea is to detect system changes with minimal time delay. The algorithm developed is called Minimal Time-Change Detection Algorithm (MT-CDA) which detects the instant of change as quickly as possible with false-alarm probability below a certain specified level. Simulation results for the aircraft lateral motion with a known or unknown change in control gain matrices, in the presence of doublet input, indicate that the algorithm works fairly well as theory indicates though there is a difficulty in deciding the exact amount of change in some situations. One of MT-CDA distinguishing properties is that detection delay of MT-CDA is superior to that of Whiteness Test.

  3. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Christian; Verbeke, Jerome; Vogt, Ramona; Roundrup, Jorgen

    2016-05-31

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a code that simulated the decay of a fissionable nucleus at specified excitation energy. In its present form, FREYA models spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV. It includes the possibility of neutron emission from the nuclear prior to its fussion (nth chance fission).

  4. Associative Algorithms for Computational Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varshney, Lav R.; Wang, Jun; Varshney, Kush R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational creativity, the generation of new, unimagined ideas or artifacts by a machine that are deemed creative by people, can be applied in the culinary domain to create novel and flavorful dishes. In fact, we have done so successfully using a combinatorial algorithm for recipe generation combined with statistical models for recipe ranking…

  5. Key Concepts in Informatics: Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szlávi, Péter; Zsakó, László

    2014-01-01

    "The system of key concepts contains the most important key concepts related to the development tasks of knowledge areas and their vertical hierarchy as well as the links of basic key concepts of different knowledge areas." (Vass 2011) One of the most important of these concepts is the algorithm. In everyday life, when learning or…

  6. Algorithm Visualization in Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Törley, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the history of algorithm visualization (AV), highlighting teaching-methodology aspects. A combined, two-group pedagogical experiment will be presented as well, which measured the efficiency and the impact on the abstract thinking of AV. According to the results, students, who learned with AV, performed better in the experiment.

  7. Understanding Algorithms in Different Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernoch, Mária; Biró, Piroska; Abari, Kálmán; Máth, János

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the Testing Algorithmic and Application Skills project we tested first year students of Informatics at the beginning of their tertiary education. We were focusing on the students' level of understanding in different programming environments. In the present paper we provide the results from the University of Debrecen, the…

  8. Listless zerotree image compression algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jing; Wang, Ke

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, an improved zerotree structure and a new coding procedure are adopted, which improve the reconstructed image qualities. Moreover, the lists in SPIHT are replaced by flag maps, and lifting scheme is adopted to realize wavelet transform, which lowers the memory requirements and speeds up the coding process. Experimental results show that the algorithm is more effective and efficient compared with SPIHT.

  9. An Algorithm for Suffix Stripping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The automatic removal of suffixes from words in English is of particular interest in the field of information retrieval. This work was originally published in Program in 1980 and is republished as part of a series of articles commemorating the 40th anniversary of the journal. Design/methodology/approach: An algorithm for suffix stripping…

  10. Threshold extended ID3 algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. B. Rajesh; Ramesh, C. Phani; Madhusudhan, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Information exchange over insecure networks needs to provide authentication and confidentiality to the database in significant problem in datamining. In this paper we propose a novel authenticated multiparty ID3 Algorithm used to construct multiparty secret sharing decision tree for implementation in medical transactions.

  11. Multilevel algorithms for nonlinear optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia; Dennis, J. E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) gives rise to nonlinear optimization problems characterized by a large number of constraints that naturally occur in blocks. We propose a class of multilevel optimization methods motivated by the structure and number of constraints and by the expense of the derivative computations for MDO. The algorithms are an extension to the nonlinear programming problem of the successful class of local Brown-Brent algorithms for nonlinear equations. Our extensions allow the user to partition constraints into arbitrary blocks to fit the application, and they separately process each block and the objective function, restricted to certain subspaces. The methods use trust regions as a globalization strategy, and they have been shown to be globally convergent under reasonable assumptions. The multilevel algorithms can be applied to all classes of MDO formulations. Multilevel algorithms for solving nonlinear systems of equations are a special case of the multilevel optimization methods. In this case, they can be viewed as a trust-region globalization of the Brown-Brent class.

  12. Linear Bregman algorithm implemented in parallel GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengyan; Ke, Jue; Sui, Dong; Wei, Ping

    2015-08-01

    At present, most compressed sensing (CS) algorithms have poor converging speed, thus are difficult to run on PC. To deal with this issue, we use a parallel GPU, to implement a broadly used compressed sensing algorithm, the Linear Bregman algorithm. Linear iterative Bregman algorithm is a reconstruction algorithm proposed by Osher and Cai. Compared with other CS reconstruction algorithms, the linear Bregman algorithm only involves the vector and matrix multiplication and thresholding operation, and is simpler and more efficient for programming. We use C as a development language and adopt CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) as parallel computing architectures. In this paper, we compared the parallel Bregman algorithm with traditional CPU realized Bregaman algorithm. In addition, we also compared the parallel Bregman algorithm with other CS reconstruction algorithms, such as OMP and TwIST algorithms. Compared with these two algorithms, the result of this paper shows that, the parallel Bregman algorithm needs shorter time, and thus is more convenient for real-time object reconstruction, which is important to people's fast growing demand to information technology.

  13. Algorithms, modelling and VO₂ kinetics.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Carlo; Carlo, Capelli; Cautero, Michela; Michela, Cautero; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Silvia, Pogliaghi

    2011-03-01

    This article summarises the pros and cons of different algorithms developed for estimating breath-by-breath (B-by-B) alveolar O(2) transfer (VO 2A) in humans. VO 2A is the difference between O(2) uptake at the mouth and changes in alveolar O(2) stores (∆ VO(2s)), which for any given breath, are equal to the alveolar volume change at constant FAO2/FAiO2 ∆VAi plus the O(2) alveolar fraction change at constant volume [V Ai-1(F Ai - F Ai-1) O2, where V (Ai-1) is the alveolar volume at the beginning of a breath. Therefore, VO 2A can be determined B-by-B provided that V (Ai-1) is: (a) set equal to the subject's functional residual capacity (algorithm of Auchincloss, A) or to zero; (b) measured (optoelectronic plethysmography, OEP); (c) selected according to a procedure that minimises B-by-B variability (algorithm of Busso and Robbins, BR). Alternatively, the respiratory cycle can be redefined as the time between equal FO(2) in two subsequent breaths (algorithm of Grønlund, G), making any assumption of V (Ai-1) unnecessary. All the above methods allow an unbiased estimate of VO2 at steady state, albeit with different precision. Yet the algorithms "per se" affect the parameters describing the B-by-B kinetics during exercise transitions. Among these approaches, BR and G, by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements, reduce the number of exercise repetitions necessary to study VO2 kinetics, compared to A approach. OEP and G (though technically challenging and conceptually still debated), thanks to their ability to track ∆VO(2s) changes during the early phase of exercise transitions, appear rather promising for investigating B-by-B gas exchange.

  14. Birkhoffian symplectic algorithms derived from Hamiltonian symplectic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-Lei, Kong; Hui-Bin, Wu; Feng-Xiang, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of structure preserving algorithms for Birkhoffian systems, based on existing symplectic schemes for the Hamiltonian equations. The key of the method is to seek an invertible transformation which drives the Birkhoffian equations reduce to the Hamiltonian equations. When there exists such a transformation, applying the corresponding inverse map to symplectic discretization of the Hamiltonian equations, then resulting difference schemes are verified to be Birkhoffian symplectic for the original Birkhoffian equations. To illustrate the operation process of the method, we construct several desirable algorithms for the linear damped oscillator and the single pendulum with linear dissipation respectively. All of them exhibit excellent numerical behavior, especially in preserving conserved quantities. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272050), the Excellent Young Teachers Program of North China University of Technology (Grant No. XN132), and the Construction Plan for Innovative Research Team of North China University of Technology (Grant No. XN129).

  15. Space complexity of estimation of distribution algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong; Culberson, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the space complexity of the Estimation of Distribution Algorithms (EDAs), a class of sampling-based variants of the genetic algorithm. By analyzing the nature of EDAs, we identify criteria that characterize the space complexity of two typical implementation schemes of EDAs, the factorized distribution algorithm and Bayesian network-based algorithms. Using random additive functions as the prototype, we prove that the space complexity of the factorized distribution algorithm and Bayesian network-based algorithms is exponential in the problem size even if the optimization problem has a very sparse interaction structure.

  16. Higher-order force gradient symplectic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Siu A.; Kidwell, Donald W.

    2000-12-01

    We show that a recently discovered fourth order symplectic algorithm, which requires one evaluation of force gradient in addition to three evaluations of the force, when iterated to higher order, yielded algorithms that are far superior to similarly iterated higher order algorithms based on the standard Forest-Ruth algorithm. We gauge the accuracy of each algorithm by comparing the step-size independent error functions associated with energy conservation and the rotation of the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector when solving a highly eccentric Kepler problem. For orders 6, 8, 10, and 12, the new algorithms are approximately a factor of 103, 104, 104, and 105 better.

  17. Why is Boris Algorithm So Good?

    SciTech Connect

    et al, Hong Qin

    2013-03-03

    Due to its excellent long term accuracy, the Boris algorithm is the de facto standard for advancing a charged particle. Despite its popularity, up to now there has been no convincing explanation why the Boris algorithm has this advantageous feature. In this letter, we provide an answer to this question. We show that the Boris algorithm conserves phase space volume, even though it is not symplectic. The global bound on energy error typically associated with symplectic algorithms still holds for the Boris algorithm, making it an effective algorithm for the multi-scale dynamics of plasmas.

  18. Treatment algorithms in refractory partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Barbara C

    2009-09-01

    An algorithm is a "step-by-step procedure for solving a problem or accomplishing some end....in a finite number of steps." (Merriam-Webster, 2009). Medical algorithms are decision trees to help with diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. For the treatment of epilepsy there is no generally accepted treatment algorithm, as individual epilepsy centers follow different diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. This article presents two algorithms to guide decisions in the treatment of refractory partial epilepsy. The treatment algorithm describes a stepwise diagnostic and therapeutic approach to intractable medial temporal and neocortical epilepsy. The surgical algorithm guides decisions in the surgical treatment of neocortical epilepsy.

  19. Algorithmic methods in diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre

    Recent diffraction imaging techniques use properties of coherent sources (most notably x-rays and electrons) to transfer a portion of the imaging task to computer algorithms. "Diffraction microscopy" is a method which consists in reconstructing the image of a specimen from its diffraction pattern. Because only the amplitude of a wavefield incident on a detector is measured, reconstruction of the image entails to recovering the lost phases. This extension of the 'phase problem" commonly met in crystallography is solved only if additional information is available. The main topic of this thesis is the development of algorithmic techniques in diffraction microscopy. In addition to introducing new methods, it is meant to be a review of the algorithmic aspects of the field of diffractive imaging. An overview of the scattering approximations used in the interpretation of diffraction datasets is first given, as well as a numerical propagation tool useful in conditions where known approximations fail. Concepts central to diffraction microscopy---such as oversampling---are then introduced and other similar imaging techniques described. A complete description of iterative reconstruction algorithms follows, with a special emphasis on the difference map, the algorithm used in this thesis. The formalism, based on constraint sets and projection onto these sets, is then defined and explained. Simple projections commonly used in diffraction imaging are then described. The various ways experimental realities can affect reconstruction methods will then be enumerated. Among the diverse sources of algorithmic difficulties, one finds that noise, missing data and partial coherence are typically the most important. Other related difficulties discussed are the detrimental effects of crystalline domains in a specimen, and the convergence problems occurring when the support of a complex-valued specimen is not well known. The last part of this thesis presents reconstruction results; an

  20. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  1. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  2. Algorithms for intravenous insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Susan S; Clement, Stephen

    2008-08-01

    This review aims to classify algorithms for intravenous insulin infusion according to design. Essential input data include the current blood glucose (BG(current)), the previous blood glucose (BG(previous)), the test time of BG(current) (test time(current)), the test time of BG(previous) (test time(previous)), and the previous insulin infusion rate (IR(previous)). Output data consist of the next insulin infusion rate (IR(next)) and next test time. The classification differentiates between "IR" and "MR" algorithm types, both defined as a rule for assigning an insulin infusion rate (IR), having a glycemic target. Both types are capable of assigning the IR for the next iteration of the algorithm (IR(next)) as an increasing function of BG(current), IR(previous), and rate-of-change of BG with respect to time, each treated as an independent variable. Algorithms of the IR type directly seek to define IR(next) as an incremental adjustment to IR(previous). At test time(current), under an IR algorithm the differences in values of IR(next) that might be assigned depending upon the value of BG(current) are not necessarily continuously dependent upon, proportionate to, or commensurate with either the IR(previous) or the rate-of-change of BG. Algorithms of the MR type create a family of IR functions of BG differing according to maintenance rate (MR), each being an iso-MR curve. The change of IR(next) with respect to BG(current) is a strictly increasing function of MR. At test time(current), algorithms of the MR type use IR(previous) and the rate-of-change of BG to define the MR, multiplier, or column assignment, which will be used for patient assignment to the right iso-MR curve and as precedent for IR(next). Bolus insulin therapy is especially effective when used in proportion to carbohydrate load to cover anticipated incremental transitory enteral or parenteral carbohydrate exposure. Specific distinguishing algorithm design features and choice of parameters may be important to

  3. MUSIC algorithms for rebar detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Leone, Giovanni; Dell'Aversano, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) algorithm is employed to detect and localize an unknown number of scattering objects which are small in size as compared to the wavelength. The ensemble of objects to be detected consists of both strong and weak scatterers. This represents a scattering environment challenging for detection purposes as strong scatterers tend to mask the weak ones. Consequently, the detection of more weakly scattering objects is not always guaranteed and can be completely impaired when the noise corrupting data is of a relatively high level. To overcome this drawback, here a new technique is proposed, starting from the idea of applying a two-stage MUSIC algorithm. In the first stage strong scatterers are detected. Then, information concerning their number and location is employed in the second stage focusing only on the weak scatterers. The role of an adequate scattering model is emphasized to improve drastically detection performance in realistic scenarios.

  4. Innovations in Lattice QCD Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today.

  5. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  6. Introductory Students, Conceptual Understanding, and Algorithmic Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushkin, David B.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the distinction between conceptual and algorithmic learning and the clarification of what is meant by a second-tier student. Explores why novice learners in chemistry and physics are able to apply algorithms without significant conceptual understanding. (DDR)

  7. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  8. Teaching Multiplication Algorithms from Other Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Cheng-Yao

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a number of multiplication algorithms from different cultures around the world: Hindu, Egyptian, Russian, Japanese, and Chinese. Students can learn these algorithms and better understand the operation and properties of multiplication.

  9. Algorithms Could Automate Cancer Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baky, A. A.; Winkler, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Five new algorithms are a complete statistical procedure for quantifying cell abnormalities from digitized images. Procedure could be basis for automated detection and diagnosis of cancer. Objective of procedure is to assign each cell an atypia status index (ASI), which quantifies level of abnormality. It is possible that ASI values will be accurate and economical enough to allow diagnoses to be made quickly and accurately by computer processing of laboratory specimens extracted from patients.

  10. Algorithms for Automated DNA Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    polyketide synthase gene cluster. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 101, 15573–15578. 16. Shetty,R.P., Endy,D. and Knight,T.F. Jr (2008) Engineering BioBrick vectors...correct theoretical construction scheme is de- veloped manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and...to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with

  11. Algorithmic deformation of matrix factorisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carqueville, Nils; Dowdy, Laura; Recknagel, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Branes and defects in topological Landau-Ginzburg models are described by matrix factorisations. We revisit the problem of deforming them and discuss various deformation methods as well as their relations. We have implemented these algorithms and apply them to several examples. Apart from explicit results in concrete cases, this leads to a novel way to generate new matrix factorisations via nilpotent substitutions, and to criteria whether boundary obstructions can be lifted by bulk deformations.

  12. Consensus Algorithms Over Fading Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    studying the effect of fading and collisions on the performance of wireless consensus gossiping and in comparing its cost (measured in terms of number of...not assumed to be symmetric under A2. III. RELATED WORK There has been a resurgence of interest in characterizing consen- sus and gossip algorithms...tree, and then distribute the consensus value, with a finite number of exchanges. The price paid is clearly that of finding the appropriate routing

  13. Numerical Algorithms and Parallel Tasking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    34 Principal Investigator, Virginia Klema, Research Staff, George Cybenko and Elizabeth Ducot . During the period, May 15, 1983 through May 14, 1984...Virginia Klema and Elizabeth Ducot have been supported for four months, and George Cybenko has been supported for one month. During this time system...algorithms or applications is the responsibility of the user. Virginia Klema and Elizabeth Ducot presented a description of the concurrent computing

  14. Network Games and Approximation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-03

    I also spend time during the last three years writing a textbook on Algorithm Design (with Jon Kleinberg) that had now been adopted by a number of...Minimum-Size Bounded-Capacity Cut (MSBCC) problem, in which we are given a graph with an identified source and seek to find a cut minimizing the number ...Distributed Computing (Special Issue PODC 05) Volume 19, Number 4, 2007, 255-266. http://www.springerlink.com/content/x 148746507861 np7/ ?p

  15. QCCM Center for Quantum Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-17

    and A. Ekert and C. Macchiavello and M. Mosca quant-ph/0609160v1 Phase map decompositions for unitaries Niel de Beaudrap, Vincent Danos, Elham...Quantum Algorithms and Complexity M. Mosca Proceedings of NATO ASI Quantum Computation and Information 2005, Chania, Crete, Greece, IOS Press (2006), in...press Quantum Cellular Automata and Single Spin Measurement C. Perez, D. Cheung, M. Mosca , P. Cappellaro, D. Cory Proceedings of Asian Conference on

  16. Parallel Algorithms for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    8217 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. TITLE (aid Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED PARALLEL ALGORITHMS FOR IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNICAL 6. PERFORMING O4G. REPORT NUMBER TR-1180...Continue on reverse side it neceesary aid Identlfy by block number) Image processing; image analysis ; parallel processing; cellular computers. 20... IMAGE ANALYSIS TECHNICAL 6. PERFORMING ONG. REPORT NUMBER TR-1180 - 7. AUTHOR(&) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Azriel Rosenfeld AFOSR-77-3271 9

  17. Halftoning and Image Processing Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    screening techniques with the quality advantages of error diffusion in the half toning of color maps, and on color image enhancement for halftone ...image quality. Our goals in this research were to advance the understanding in image science for our new halftone algorithm and to contribute to...image retrieval and noise theory for such imagery. In the field of color halftone printing, research was conducted on deriving a theoretical model of our

  18. Principles for Developing Algorithmic Instruction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    information-processing theories to test their applicability with instruction directed by learning algorithms. A version of a logical, or familiar, and a...intent of our research was to borrow~ from information-processing theory factors which are known to affect learning in a predictable manner and to apply... learning studies where processing theories are tested by minute performance or latency differences. -~ It is not surprising that differences are seldom found

  19. Global Positioning System Navigation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Historical Remarks on Navigation In Greek mythology , Odysseus sailed safely by the Sirens only to encounter the monsters Scylla and Charybdis...TNED 000 00 1(.7 BIBLIOGRAPHY 1. Pinsent, John. Greek Mythology . Paul Hamlyn, London, 1969. 2. Kline, Morris. Mathematical Thought from Ancient to...Algorithms 20. ABS AACT (Continue an reverse sid* If necessary and identify by block nttrnber) The Global Positioning System (CPS) will be a constellation of

  20. Efficient GPS Position Determination Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Dilution of Precision ( GDOP ) conditions. The novel differential GPS algorithm for a network of users that has been developed in this research uses a...performance is achieved, even under high Geometric Dilution of Precision ( GDOP ) conditions. The second part of this research investigates a...respect to the receiver produces high Geometric Dilution of Precision ( GDOP ), which can adversely affect GPS position solutions [1]. Four

  1. Algorithms for optimal redundancy allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenkieboom, J.; Youngblood, R.

    1993-01-01

    Heuristic and exact methods for solving the redundancy allocation problem are compared to an approach based on genetic algorithms. The various methods are applied to the bridge problem, which has been used as a benchmark in earlier work on optimization methods. Comparisons are presented in terms of the best configuration found by each method, and the computation effort which was necessary in order to find it.

  2. An algorithm for segmenting range imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments of the FY96 Cross Cutting and Advanced Technology (CC&AT) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The project focused on developing algorithms for segmenting range images. The image segmentation algorithm developed during the project is described here. In addition to segmenting range images, the algorithm can fuse multiple range images thereby providing true 3D scene models. The algorithm has been incorporated into the Rapid World Modelling System at Sandia National Laboratory.

  3. Algorithms and Requirements for Measuring Network Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guojun

    2002-12-08

    This report unveils new algorithms for actively measuring (not estimating) available bandwidths with very low intrusion, computing cross traffic, thus estimating the physical bandwidth, provides mathematical proof that the algorithms are accurate, and addresses conditions, requirements, and limitations for new and existing algorithms for measuring network bandwidths. The paper also discusses a number of important terminologies and issues for network bandwidth measurement, and introduces a fundamental parameter -Maximum Burst Size that is critical for implementing algorithms based on multiple packets.

  4. Efficient Algorithm for Rectangular Spiral Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Breckenridge, William

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm generates grid coordinates for a computationally efficient spiral search pattern covering an uncertain rectangular area spanned by a coordinate grid. The algorithm does not require that the grid be fixed; the algorithm can search indefinitely, expanding the grid and spiral, as needed, until the target of the search is found. The algorithm also does not require memory of coordinates of previous points on the spiral to generate the current point on the spiral.

  5. The Cartan algorithm in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, D. D.; Coley, A. A.; Forget, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce an algorithm to determine the equivalence of five dimensional spacetimes, which generalizes the Karlhede algorithm for four dimensional general relativity. As an alternative to the Petrov type classification, we employ the alignment classification to algebraically classify the Weyl tensor. To illustrate the algorithm, we discuss three examples: the singly rotating Myers-Perry solution, the Kerr (Anti-) de Sitter solution, and the rotating black ring solution. We briefly discuss some applications of the Cartan algorithm in five dimensions.

  6. Improved LMS algorithm for adaptive beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godara, Lal C.

    1990-01-01

    Two adaptive algorithms which make use of all the available samples to estimate the required gradient are proposed and studied. The first algorithm is referred to as the recursive LMS (least mean squares) and is applicable to a general array. The second algorithm is referred to as the improved LMS algorithm and exploits the Toeplitz structure of the ACM (array correlation matrix); it can be used only for an equispaced linear array.

  7. Storage capacity of the Tilinglike Learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, Arnaud; Gordon, Mirta B.

    2001-02-01

    The storage capacity of an incremental learning algorithm for the parity machine, the Tilinglike Learning Algorithm, is analytically determined in the limit of a large number of hidden perceptrons. Different learning rules for the simple perceptron are investigated. The usual Gardner-Derrida rule leads to a storage capacity close to the upper bound, which is independent of the learning algorithm considered.

  8. A Robustly Stabilizing Model Predictive Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackmece, A. Behcet; Carson, John M., III

    2007-01-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) algorithm that differs from prior MPC algorithms has been developed for controlling an uncertain nonlinear system. This algorithm guarantees the resolvability of an associated finite-horizon optimal-control problem in a receding-horizon implementation.

  9. Active Processor Scheduling Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    xiii Active Processor Scheduling Using Evolutionary Algorithms I. Introduction A distributed system offers the ability to run applications across...calculations are made. This model is sometimes referred to as a form of the island model of evolutionary computation because each population is evolved... Evolutionary Algorithms for Solving Multi-Objective Problems. Genetic Algorithms and Evolutionary Computation , New York: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002

  10. Learning Intelligent Genetic Algorithms Using Japanese Nonograms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jinn-Tsong; Chou, Ping-Yi; Fang, Jia-Cen

    2012-01-01

    An intelligent genetic algorithm (IGA) is proposed to solve Japanese nonograms and is used as a method in a university course to learn evolutionary algorithms. The IGA combines the global exploration capabilities of a canonical genetic algorithm (CGA) with effective condensed encoding, improved fitness function, and modified crossover and…

  11. Predicting Protein Structure Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    By " Predicting rotein Structure D istribticfiar.. ................ Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms ,Avaiu " ’ •"... Dist THESIS I IGeorge H...iiLite-d Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/ GCS /ENG/94D-03 Predicting Protein Structure Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms ...1-1 1.2 Genetic Algorithms ......... ............................ 1-3 1.3 The Protein Folding Problem

  12. In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this document is to provide a detailed description of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) algorithm, which is part of the Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness In-Trail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) application. To this end, the document presents a high level description of the ITP Algorithm and a prototype implementation of this algorithm in the programming language C.

  13. An algorithm on distributed mining association rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan

    2005-12-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet/Intranet, distributed databases have become a broadly used environment in various areas. It is a critical task to mine association rules in distributed databases. The algorithms of distributed mining association rules can be divided into two classes. One is a DD algorithm, and another is a CD algorithm. A DD algorithm focuses on data partition optimization so as to enhance the efficiency. A CD algorithm, on the other hand, considers a setting where the data is arbitrarily partitioned horizontally among the parties to begin with, and focuses on parallelizing the communication. A DD algorithm is not always applicable, however, at the time the data is generated, it is often already partitioned. In many cases, it cannot be gathered and repartitioned for reasons of security and secrecy, cost transmission, or sheer efficiency. A CD algorithm may be a more appealing solution for systems which are naturally distributed over large expenses, such as stock exchange and credit card systems. An FDM algorithm provides enhancement to CD algorithm. However, CD and FDM algorithms are both based on net-structure and executing in non-shareable resources. In practical applications, however, distributed databases often are star-structured. This paper proposes an algorithm based on star-structure networks, which are more practical in application, have lower maintenance costs and which are more practical in the construction of the networks. In addition, the algorithm provides high efficiency in communication and good extension in parallel computation.

  14. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  15. Optimisation of nonlinear motion cueing algorithm based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Rahim Zadeh, Delpak; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Motion cueing algorithms (MCAs) are playing a significant role in driving simulators, aiming to deliver the most accurate human sensation to the simulator drivers compared with a real vehicle driver, without exceeding the physical limitations of the simulator. This paper provides the optimisation design of an MCA for a vehicle simulator, in order to find the most suitable washout algorithm parameters, while respecting all motion platform physical limitations, and minimising human perception error between real and simulator driver. One of the main limitations of the classical washout filters is that it is attuned by the worst-case scenario tuning method. This is based on trial and error, and is effected by driving and programmers experience, making this the most significant obstacle to full motion platform utilisation. This leads to inflexibility of the structure, production of false cues and makes the resulting simulator fail to suit all circumstances. In addition, the classical method does not take minimisation of human perception error and physical constraints into account. Production of motion cues and the impact of different parameters of classical washout filters on motion cues remain inaccessible for designers for this reason. The aim of this paper is to provide an optimisation method for tuning the MCA parameters, based on nonlinear filtering and genetic algorithms. This is done by taking vestibular sensation error into account between real and simulated cases, as well as main dynamic limitations, tilt coordination and correlation coefficient. Three additional compensatory linear blocks are integrated into the MCA, to be tuned in order to modify the performance of the filters successfully. The proposed optimised MCA is implemented in MATLAB/Simulink software packages. The results generated using the proposed method show increased performance in terms of human sensation, reference shape tracking and exploiting the platform more efficiently without reaching

  16. A model-based 3D patient-specific pre-treatment QA method for VMAT using the EPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCowan, P. M.; Asuni, G.; van Beek, T.; van Uytven, E.; Kujanpaa, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2017-02-01

    This study reports the development and validation of a model-based, 3D patient dose reconstruction method for pre-treatment quality assurance using EPID images. The method is also investigated for sensitivity to potential MLC delivery errors. Each cine-mode EPID image acquired during plan delivery was processed using a previously developed back-projection dose reconstruction model providing a 3D dose estimate on the CT simulation data. Validation was carried out using 24 SBRT-VMAT patient plans by comparing: (1) ion chamber point dose measurements in a solid water phantom, (2) the treatment planning system (TPS) predicted 3D dose to the EPID reconstructed 3D dose in a solid water phantom, and (3) the TPS predicted 3D dose to the EPID and our forward predicted reconstructed 3D dose in the patient (CT data). AAA and AcurosXB were used for TPS predictions. Dose distributions were compared using 3%/3 mm (95% tolerance) and 2%/2 mm (90% tolerance) γ-tests in the planning target volume (PTV) and 20% dose volumes. The average percentage point dose differences between the ion chamber and the EPID, AcurosXB, and AAA were 0.73  ±  1.25%, 0.38  ±  0.96% and 1.06  ±  1.34% respectively. For the patient (CT) dose comparisons, seven (3%/3 mm) and nine (2%/2 mm) plans failed the EPID versus AAA. All plans passed the EPID versus Acuros XB and the EPID versus forward model γ-comparisons. Four types of MLC sensitive errors (opening, shifting, stuck, and retracting), of varying magnitude (0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mm), were introduced into six different SBRT-VMAT plans. γ-comparisons of the erroneous EPID dose and original predicted dose were carried out using the same criteria as above. For all plans, the sensitivity testing using a 3%/3 mm γ-test in the PTV successfully determined MLC errors on the order of 1.0 mm, except for the single leaf retraction-type error. A 2%/2 mm criteria produced similar results with two more additional detected

  17. A model-based 3D patient-specific pre-treatment QA method for VMAT using the EPID.

    PubMed

    McCowan, P M; Asuni, G; van Beek, T; van Uytven, E; Kujanpaa, K; McCurdy, B M C

    2017-02-21

    This study reports the development and validation of a model-based, 3D patient dose reconstruction method for pre-treatment quality assurance using EPID images. The method is also investigated for sensitivity to potential MLC delivery errors. Each cine-mode EPID image acquired during plan delivery was processed using a previously developed back-projection dose reconstruction model providing a 3D dose estimate on the CT simulation data. Validation was carried out using 24 SBRT-VMAT patient plans by comparing: (1) ion chamber point dose measurements in a solid water phantom, (2) the treatment planning system (TPS) predicted 3D dose to the EPID reconstructed 3D dose in a solid water phantom, and (3) the TPS predicted 3D dose to the EPID and our forward predicted reconstructed 3D dose in the patient (CT data). AAA and AcurosXB were used for TPS predictions. Dose distributions were compared using 3%/3 mm (95% tolerance) and 2%/2 mm (90% tolerance) γ-tests in the planning target volume (PTV) and 20% dose volumes. The average percentage point dose differences between the ion chamber and the EPID, AcurosXB, and AAA were 0.73  ±  1.25%, 0.38  ±  0.96% and 1.06  ±  1.34% respectively. For the patient (CT) dose comparisons, seven (3%/3 mm) and nine (2%/2 mm) plans failed the EPID versus AAA. All plans passed the EPID versus Acuros XB and the EPID versus forward model γ-comparisons. Four types of MLC sensitive errors (opening, shifting, stuck, and retracting), of varying magnitude (0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mm), were introduced into six different SBRT-VMAT plans. γ-comparisons of the erroneous EPID dose and original predicted dose were carried out using the same criteria as above. For all plans, the sensitivity testing using a 3%/3 mm γ-test in the PTV successfully determined MLC errors on the order of 1.0 mm, except for the single leaf retraction-type error. A 2%/2 mm criteria produced similar results with two more additional detected

  18. Empirical Studies of the Value of Algorithm Animation in Algorithm Understanding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    A series of studies is presented using algorithm animation to teach computer algorithms . These studies are organized into three components: eliciting...lecture with experimenter-preprepared data sets. This work has implications for the design and use of animated algorithms in teaching computer algorithms and

  19. Problem solving with genetic algorithms and Splicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayer, Steven E.; Wang, Lui

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem-solving methods) loosely based on the processes of population genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Genetic algorithms have proven useful in domains where other optimization techniques perform poorly. The main purpose of the paper is to discuss a NASA-sponsored software development project to develop a general-purpose tool for using genetic algorithms. The tool, called Splicer, can be used to solve a wide variety of optimization problems and is currently available from NASA and COSMIC. This discussion is preceded by an introduction to basic genetic algorithm concepts and a discussion of genetic algorithm applications.

  20. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  1. Towards General Algorithms for Grammatical Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alexander

    Many algorithms for grammatical inference can be viewed as instances of a more general algorithm which maintains a set of primitive elements, which distributionally define sets of strings, and a set of features or tests that constrain various inference rules. Using this general framework, which we cast as a process of logical inference, we re-analyse Angluin's famous lstar algorithm and several recent algorithms for the inference of context-free grammars and multiple context-free grammars. Finally, to illustrate the advantages of this approach, we extend it to the inference of functional transductions from positive data only, and we present a new algorithm for the inference of finite state transducers.

  2. An Optimal Class Association Rule Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Claude, Turiho; Sheng, Yang; Chuang, Li; Kaia, Xie

    Classification and association rule mining algorithms are two important aspects of data mining. Class association rule mining algorithm is a promising approach for it involves the use of association rule mining algorithm to discover classification rules. This paper introduces an optimal class association rule mining algorithm known as OCARA. It uses optimal association rule mining algorithm and the rule set is sorted by priority of rules resulting into a more accurate classifier. It outperforms the C4.5, CBA, RMR on UCI eight data sets, which is proved by experimental results.

  3. Efficient demultiplexing algorithm for noncontiguous carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thanawala, A. A.; Kwatra, S. C.; Jamali, M. M.; Budinger, J.

    1992-01-01

    A channel separation algorithm for the frequency division multiple access/time division multiplexing (FDMA/TDM) scheme is presented. It is shown that implementation using this algorithm can be more effective than the fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm when only a small number of carriers need to be selected from many, such as satellite Earth terminals. The algorithm is based on polyphase filtering followed by application of a generalized Walsh-Hadamard transform (GWHT). Comparison of the transform technique used in this algorithm with discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and FFT is given. Estimates of the computational rates and power requirements to implement this system are also given.

  4. The global Minmax k-means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Bai, Yanping

    2016-01-01

    The global k-means algorithm is an incremental approach to clustering that dynamically adds one cluster center at a time through a deterministic global search procedure from suitable initial positions, and employs k-means to minimize the sum of the intra-cluster variances. However the global k-means algorithm sometimes results singleton clusters and the initial positions sometimes are bad, after a bad initialization, poor local optimal can be easily obtained by k-means algorithm. In this paper, we modified the global k-means algorithm to eliminate the singleton clusters at first, and then we apply MinMax k-means clustering error method to global k-means algorithm to overcome the effect of bad initialization, proposed the global Minmax k-means algorithm. The proposed clustering method is tested on some popular data sets and compared to the k-means algorithm, the global k-means algorithm and the MinMax k-means algorithm. The experiment results show our proposed algorithm outperforms other algorithms mentioned in the paper.

  5. Algorithms versus architectures for computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithms employed are computationally intensive and, as a result, increased performance (both algorithmic and architectural) is required to improve accuracy and to treat larger molecular systems. Several benchmark quantum chemistry codes are examined on a variety of architectures. While these codes are only a small portion of a typical quantum chemistry library, they illustrate many of the computationally intensive kernels and data manipulation requirements of some applications. Furthermore, understanding the performance of the existing algorithm on present and proposed supercomputers serves as a guide for future programs and algorithm development. The algorithms investigated are: (1) a sparse symmetric matrix vector product; (2) a four index integral transformation; and (3) the calculation of diatomic two electron Slater integrals. The vectorization strategies are examined for these algorithms for both the Cyber 205 and Cray XMP. In addition, multiprocessor implementations of the algorithms are looked at on the Cray XMP and on the MIT static data flow machine proposed by DENNIS.

  6. A hybrid algorithm with GA and DAEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, HongJie; Deng, HaoJiang; Wang, XueWei

    2013-03-01

    Although the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm has been widely used for finding maximum likelihood estimation of parameters in probabilistic models, it has the problem of trapping by local maxima. To overcome this problem, the deterministic annealing EM (DAEM) algorithm was once proposed and had achieved better performance than EM algorithm, but it is not very effective at avoiding local maxima. In this paper, a solution is proposed by integrating GA and DAEM into one procedure to further improve the solution quality. The population based search of genetic algorithm will produce different solutions and thus can increase the search space of DAEM. Therefore, the proposed algorithm will reach better solution than just using DAEM. The algorithm retains the property of DAEM and gets the better solution by genetic operation. Experiment results on Gaussian mixture model parameter estimation demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can achieve better performance.

  7. MM Algorithms for Some Discrete Multivariate Distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-09-01

    The MM (minorization-maximization) principle is a versatile tool for constructing optimization algorithms. Every EM algorithm is an MM algorithm but not vice versa. This article derives MM algorithms for maximum likelihood estimation with discrete multivariate distributions such as the Dirichlet-multinomial and Connor-Mosimann distributions, the Neerchal-Morel distribution, the negative-multinomial distribution, certain distributions on partitions, and zero-truncated and zero-inflated distributions. These MM algorithms increase the likelihood at each iteration and reliably converge to the maximum from well-chosen initial values. Because they involve no matrix inversion, the algorithms are especially pertinent to high-dimensional problems. To illustrate the performance of the MM algorithms, we compare them to Newton's method on data used to classify handwritten digits.

  8. Optimal Multistage Algorithm for Adjoint Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Aupy, Guillaume; Herrmann, Julien; Hovland, Paul; Robert, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We reexamine the work of Stumm and Walther on multistage algorithms for adjoint computation. We provide an optimal algorithm for this problem when there are two levels of checkpoints, in memory and on disk. Previously, optimal algorithms for adjoint computations were known only for a single level of checkpoints with no writing and reading costs; a well-known example is the binomial checkpointing algorithm of Griewank and Walther. Stumm and Walther extended that binomial checkpointing algorithm to the case of two levels of checkpoints, but they did not provide any optimality results. We bridge the gap by designing the first optimal algorithm in this context. We experimentally compare our optimal algorithm with that of Stumm and Walther to assess the difference in performance.

  9. A compilation of jet finding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Meier, K.

    1992-12-31

    Technical descriptions of jet finding algorithms currently in use in p{anti p} collider experiments (CDF, UA1, UA2), e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments and Monte-Carlo event generators (LUND programs, ISAJET) have been collected. For the hadron collider experiments, the clustering methods fall into two categories: cone algorithms and nearest-neighbor algorithms. In addition, UA2 has employed a combination of both methods for some analysis. While there are clearly differences between the cone and nearest-neighbor algorithms, the authors have found that there are also differences among the cone algorithms in the details of how the centroid of a cone cluster is located and how the E{sub T} and P{sub T} of the jet are defined. The most commonly used jet algorithm in electron-positron experiments is the JADE-type cluster algorithm. Five various incarnations of this approach have been described.

  10. Smell Detection Agent Based Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod Chandra, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel nature-inspired optimization algorithm has been employed and the trained behaviour of dogs in detecting smell trails is adapted into computational agents for problem solving. The algorithm involves creation of a surface with smell trails and subsequent iteration of the agents in resolving a path. This algorithm can be applied in different computational constraints that incorporate path-based problems. Implementation of the algorithm can be treated as a shortest path problem for a variety of datasets. The simulated agents have been used to evolve the shortest path between two nodes in a graph. This algorithm is useful to solve NP-hard problems that are related to path discovery. This algorithm is also useful to solve many practical optimization problems. The extensive derivation of the algorithm can be enabled to solve shortest path problems.

  11. ALFA: Automated Line Fitting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2015-12-01

    ALFA fits emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. It uses a catalog of lines which may be present to construct synthetic spectra, the parameters of which are then optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. Data cubes in FITS format can be analysed using multiple processors, and an analysis of tens of thousands of deep spectra obtained with instruments such as MUSE will take a few hours.

  12. Algorithms for skiascopy measurement automatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomins, Sergejs; Trukša, Renārs; KrūmiĆa, Gunta

    2014-10-01

    Automatic dynamic infrared retinoscope was developed, which allows to run procedure at a much higher rate. Our system uses a USB image sensor with up to 180 Hz refresh rate equipped with a long focus objective and 850 nm infrared light emitting diode as light source. Two servo motors driven by microprocessor control the rotation of semitransparent mirror and motion of retinoscope chassis. Image of eye pupil reflex is captured via software and analyzed along the horizontal plane. Algorithm for automatic accommodative state analysis is developed based on the intensity changes of the fundus reflex.

  13. Wire Detection Algorithms for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Camps, Octavia I.

    2002-01-01

    In this research we addressed the problem of obstacle detection for low altitude rotorcraft flight. In particular, the problem of detecting thin wires in the presence of image clutter and noise was studied. Wires present a serious hazard to rotorcrafts. Since they are very thin, their detection early enough so that the pilot has enough time to take evasive action is difficult, as their images can be less than one or two pixels wide. Two approaches were explored for this purpose. The first approach involved a technique for sub-pixel edge detection and subsequent post processing, in order to reduce the false alarms. After reviewing the line detection literature, an algorithm for sub-pixel edge detection proposed by Steger was identified as having good potential to solve the considered task. The algorithm was tested using a set of images synthetically generated by combining real outdoor images with computer generated wire images. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated both, at the pixel and the wire levels. It was observed that the algorithm performs well, provided that the wires are not too thin (or distant) and that some post processing is performed to remove false alarms due to clutter. The second approach involved the use of an example-based learning scheme namely, Support Vector Machines. The purpose of this approach was to explore the feasibility of an example-based learning based approach for the task of detecting wires from their images. Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have emerged as a promising pattern classification tool and have been used in various applications. It was found that this approach is not suitable for very thin wires and of course, not suitable at all for sub-pixel thick wires. High dimensionality of the data as such does not present a major problem for SVMs. However it is desirable to have a large number of training examples especially for high dimensional data. The main difficulty in using SVMs (or any other example-based learning

  14. Sensor network algorithms and applications.

    PubMed

    Trigoni, Niki; Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

    2012-01-13

    A sensor network is a collection of nodes with processing, communication and sensing capabilities deployed in an area of interest to perform a monitoring task. There has now been about a decade of very active research in the area of sensor networks, with significant accomplishments made in terms of both designing novel algorithms and building exciting new sensing applications. This Theme Issue provides a broad sampling of the central challenges and the contributions that have been made towards addressing these challenges in the field, and illustrates the pervasive and central role of sensor networks in monitoring human activities and the environment.

  15. Cluster Algorithm Special Purpose Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapov, A. L.; Shchur, L. N.; Andreichenko, V. B.; Dotsenko, Vl. S.

    We describe a Special Purpose Processor, realizing the Wolff algorithm in hardware, which is fast enough to study the critical behaviour of 2D Ising-like systems containing more than one million spins. The processor has been checked to produce correct results for a pure Ising model and for Ising model with random bonds. Its data also agree with the Nishimori exact results for spin glass. Only minor changes of the SPP design are necessary to increase the dimensionality and to take into account more complex systems such as Potts models.

  16. The Complexity of Parallel Algorithms,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Much of this work was done in collaboration with my advisor, Ernst Mayr . He was also supported in part by ONR contract N00014-85-C-0731. F ’. Table...Helinbold and Mayr in their algorithn to compute an optimal two processor schedule [HM2]. One of the promising developments in parallel algorithms is that...lei can be solved by it fast parallel algorithmmmi if the nmlmmmibers are smiall. llehmibold and Mayr JIlM I] have slhowm that. if Ole job timies are

  17. An efficient parallel termination detection algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A. H.; Crivelli, S.; Jessup, E. R.

    2004-05-27

    Information local to any one processor is insufficient to monitor the overall progress of most distributed computations. Typically, a second distributed computation for detecting termination of the main computation is necessary. In order to be a useful computational tool, the termination detection routine must operate concurrently with the main computation, adding minimal overhead, and it must promptly and correctly detect termination when it occurs. In this paper, we present a new algorithm for detecting the termination of a parallel computation on distributed-memory MIMD computers that satisfies all of those criteria. A variety of termination detection algorithms have been devised. Of these, the algorithm presented by Sinha, Kale, and Ramkumar (henceforth, the SKR algorithm) is unique in its ability to adapt to the load conditions of the system on which it runs, thereby minimizing the impact of termination detection on performance. Because their algorithm also detects termination quickly, we consider it to be the most efficient practical algorithm presently available. The termination detection algorithm presented here was developed for use in the PMESC programming library for distributed-memory MIMD computers. Like the SKR algorithm, our algorithm adapts to system loads and imposes little overhead. Also like the SKR algorithm, ours is tree-based, and it does not depend on any assumptions about the physical interconnection topology of the processors or the specifics of the distributed computation. In addition, our algorithm is easier to implement and requires only half as many tree traverses as does the SKR algorithm. This paper is organized as follows. In section 2, we define our computational model. In section 3, we review the SKR algorithm. We introduce our new algorithm in section 4, and prove its correctness in section 5. We discuss its efficiency and present experimental results in section 6.

  18. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  19. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  20. Filter selection using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Devesh

    1996-03-01

    Convolution operators act as matched filters for certain types of variations found in images and have been extensively used in the analysis of images. However, filtering through a bank of N filters generates N filtered images, consequently increasing the amount of data considerably. Moreover, not all these filters have the same discriminatory capabilities for the individual images, thus making the task of any classifier difficult. In this paper, we use genetic algorithms to select a subset of relevant filters. Genetic algorithms represent a class of adaptive search techniques where the processes are similar to natural selection of biological evolution. The steady state model (GENITOR) has been used in this paper. The reduction of filters improves the performance of the classifier (which in this paper is the multi-layer perceptron neural network) and furthermore reduces the computational requirement. In this study we use the Laws filters which were proposed for the analysis of texture images. Our aim is to recognize the different textures on the images using the reduced filter set.

  1. Enhanced algorithms for stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, A.S.

    1993-09-01

    In this dissertation, we present some of the recent advances made in solving two-stage stochastic linear programming problems of large size and complexity. Decomposition and sampling are two fundamental components of techniques to solve stochastic optimization problems. We describe improvements to the current techniques in both these areas. We studied different ways of using importance sampling techniques in the context of Stochastic programming, by varying the choice of approximation functions used in this method. We have concluded that approximating the recourse function by a computationally inexpensive piecewise-linear function is highly efficient. This reduced the problem from finding the mean of a computationally expensive functions to finding that of a computationally inexpensive function. Then we implemented various variance reduction techniques to estimate the mean of a piecewise-linear function. This method achieved similar variance reductions in orders of magnitude less time than, when we directly applied variance-reduction techniques directly on the given problem. In solving a stochastic linear program, the expected value problem is usually solved before a stochastic solution and also to speed-up the algorithm by making use of the information obtained from the solution of the expected value problem. We have devised a new decomposition scheme to improve the convergence of this algorithm.

  2. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-06-27

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects, and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions, and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well-known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms.

  3. Effects of visualization on algorithm comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, Matthew

    Computer science students are expected to learn and apply a variety of core algorithms which are an essential part of the field. Any one of these algorithms by itself is not necessarily extremely complex, but remembering the large variety of algorithms and the differences between them is challenging. To address this challenge, we present a novel algorithm visualization tool designed to enhance students understanding of Dijkstra's algorithm by allowing them to discover the rules of the algorithm for themselves. It is hoped that a deeper understanding of the algorithm will help students correctly select, adapt and apply the appropriate algorithm when presented with a problem to solve, and that what is learned here will be applicable to the design of other visualization tools designed to teach different algorithms. Our visualization tool is currently in the prototype stage, and this thesis will discuss the pedagogical approach that informs its design, as well as the results of some initial usability testing. Finally, to clarify the direction for further development of the tool, four different variations of the prototype were implemented, and the instructional effectiveness of each was assessed by having a small sample participants use the different versions of the prototype and then take a quiz to assess their comprehension of the algorithm.

  4. The performance of the progressive resolution optimizer (PRO) for RapidArc planning in targets with low-density media.

    PubMed

    Kan, Monica W K; Leung, Lucullus H T; Yu, Peter K N

    2013-11-04

    A new version of progressive resolution optimizer (PRO) with an option of air cavity correction has been implemented for RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RA). The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of this new PRO with the use of air cavity correction option (PRO10_air) against the one without the use of the air cavity correction option (PRO10_no-air) for RapidArc planning in targets with low-density media of different sizes and complexities. The performance of PRO10_no-air and PRO10_air was initially compared using single-arc plans created for four different simple heterogeneous phantoms with virtual targets and organs at risk. Multiple-arc planning of 12 real patients having nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC) and ten patients having non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were then performed using the above two options for further comparison. Dose calculations were performed using both the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm with the dose to medium option and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). The effect of using intermediate dose option after the first optimization cycle in PRO10_air and PRO10_no-air was also investigated and compared. Plans were evaluated and compared using target dose coverage, critical organ sparing, conformity index, and dose homogeneity index. For NSCLC cases or cases for which large volumes of low-density media were present in or adjacent to the target volume, the use of the air cavity correction option in PRO10 was shown to be beneficial. For NPC cases or cases for which small volumes of both low- and high-density media existed in the target volume, the use of air cavity correction in PRO10 did not improve the plan quality. Based on the AXB dose calculation results, the use of PRO10_air could produce up to 18% less coverage to the bony structures of the planning target volumes for NPC cases. When the intermediate dose option in PRO10 was used, there was negligible difference observed in plan quality between

  5. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  6. A Probabilistic Cell Tracking Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, Reinhold; Mayer, Dieter; Leiding, Tina; Lexer, Annemarie; Umdasch, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    The research described below was carried out during the EU-Project Lolight - development of a low cost, novel and accurate lightning mapping and thunderstorm (supercell) tracking system. The Project aims to develop a small-scale tracking method to determine and nowcast characteristic trajectories and velocities of convective cells and cell complexes. The results of the algorithm will provide a higher accuracy than current locating systems distributed on a coarse scale. Input data for the developed algorithm are two temporally separated lightning density fields. Additionally a Monte Carlo method minimizing a cost function is utilizied which leads to a probabilistic forecast for the movement of thunderstorm cells. In the first step the correlation coefficients between the first and the second density field are computed. Hence, the first field is shifted by all shifting vectors which are physically allowed. The maximum length of each vector is determined by the maximum possible speed of thunderstorm cells and the difference in time for both density fields. To eliminate ambiguities in determination of directions and velocities, the so called Random Walker of the Monte Carlo process is used. Using this method a grid point is selected at random. Moreover, one vector out of all predefined shifting vectors is suggested - also at random but with a probability that is related to the correlation coefficient. If this exchange of shifting vectors reduces the cost function, the new direction and velocity are accepted. Otherwise it is discarded. This process is repeated until the change of cost functions falls below a defined threshold. The Monte Carlo run gives information about the percentage of accepted shifting vectors for all grid points. In the course of the forecast, amplifications of cell density are permitted. For this purpose, intensity changes between the investigated areas of both density fields are taken into account. Knowing the direction and speed of thunderstorm

  7. Visualizing output for a data learning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Daniel; Graham, James; Ternovskiy, Igor

    2016-05-01

    This paper details the process we went through to visualize the output for our data learning algorithm. We have been developing a hierarchical self-structuring learning algorithm based around the general principles of the LaRue model. One example of a proposed application of this algorithm would be traffic analysis, chosen because it is conceptually easy to follow and there is a significant amount of already existing data and related research material with which to work with. While we choose the tracking of vehicles for our initial approach, it is by no means the only target of our algorithm. Flexibility is the end goal, however, we still need somewhere to start. To that end, this paper details our creation of the visualization GUI for our algorithm, the features we included and the initial results we obtained from our algorithm running a few of the traffic based scenarios we designed.

  8. Runtime support for parallelizing data mining algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ruoming; Agrawal, Gagan

    2002-03-01

    With recent technological advances, shared memory parallel machines have become more scalable, and offer large main memories and high bus bandwidths. They are emerging as good platforms for data warehousing and data mining. In this paper, we focus on shared memory parallelization of data mining algorithms. We have developed a series of techniques for parallelization of data mining algorithms, including full replication, full locking, fixed locking, optimized full locking, and cache-sensitive locking. Unlike previous work on shared memory parallelization of specific data mining algorithms, all of our techniques apply to a large number of common data mining algorithms. In addition, we propose a reduction-object based interface for specifying a data mining algorithm. We show how our runtime system can apply any of the technique we have developed starting from a common specification of the algorithm.

  9. A boundary finding algorithm and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, J. N.; Wintz, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    An algorithm for locating gray level and/or texture edges in digitized pictures is presented. The algorithm is based on the concept of hypothesis testing. The digitized picture is first subdivided into subsets of picture elements, e.g., 2 x 2 arrays. The algorithm then compares the first- and second-order statistics of adjacent subsets; adjacent subsets having similar first- and/or second-order statistics are merged into blobs. By continuing this process, the entire picture is segmented into blobs such that the picture elements within each blob have similar characteristics. The boundaries between the blobs comprise the boundaries. The algorithm always generates closed boundaries. The algorithm was developed for multispectral imagery of the earth's surface. Application of this algorithm to various image processing techniques such as efficient coding, information extraction (terrain classification), and pattern recognition (feature selection) are included.

  10. ENAS-RIF algorithm for image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Zhen-wen; Shen, Tian-shuang; Chen, Bo

    2012-11-01

    mage of objects is inevitably encountered by space-based working in the atmospheric turbulence environment, such as those used in astronomy, remote sensing and so on. The observed images are seriously blurred. The restoration is required for reconstruction turbulence degraded images. In order to enhance the performance of image restoration, a novel enhanced nonnegativity and support constants recursive inverse filtering(ENAS-RIF) algorithm was presented, which was based on the reliable support region and enhanced cost function. Firstly, the Curvelet denoising algorithm was used to weaken image noise. Secondly, the reliable object support region estimation was used to accelerate the algorithm convergence. Then, the average gray was set as the gray of image background pixel. Finally, an object construction limit and the logarithm function were add to enhance algorithm stability. The experimental results prove that the convergence speed of the novel ENAS-RIF algorithm is faster than that of NAS-RIF algorithm and it is better in image restoration.

  11. Tilted cone beam VCT reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2005-04-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for volumetric CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms have been proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone beam related artifacts. In this paper, we present a closed form cone beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed to compensate for errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the case in which the cone beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. Because of the rebinning process, the amount of iso-center adjustment depends not only on the projection angle and tilt angle, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. The proposed algorithm has been tested extensively on both 16 and 64 slice VCT with phantoms and clinical data. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by the experiments.

  12. An Algorithmic Framework for Multiobjective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, T.; Elamvazuthi, I.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku; Vasant, P.

    2013-01-01

    Multiobjective (MO) optimization is an emerging field which is increasingly being encountered in many fields globally. Various metaheuristic techniques such as differential evolution (DE), genetic algorithm (GA), gravitational search algorithm (GSA), and particle swarm optimization (PSO) have been used in conjunction with scalarization techniques such as weighted sum approach and the normal-boundary intersection (NBI) method to solve MO problems. Nevertheless, many challenges still arise especially when dealing with problems with multiple objectives (especially in cases more than two). In addition, problems with extensive computational overhead emerge when dealing with hybrid algorithms. This paper discusses these issues by proposing an alternative framework that utilizes algorithmic concepts related to the problem structure for generating efficient and effective algorithms. This paper proposes a framework to generate new high-performance algorithms with minimal computational overhead for MO optimization. PMID:24470795

  13. Adaptive link selection algorithms for distributed estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songcen; de Lamare, Rodrigo C.; Poor, H. Vincent

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents adaptive link selection algorithms for distributed estimation and considers their application to wireless sensor networks and smart grids. In particular, exhaustive search-based least mean squares (LMS) / recursive least squares (RLS) link selection algorithms and sparsity-inspired LMS / RLS link selection algorithms that can exploit the topology of networks with poor-quality links are considered. The proposed link selection algorithms are then analyzed in terms of their stability, steady-state, and tracking performance and computational complexity. In comparison with the existing centralized or distributed estimation strategies, the key features of the proposed algorithms are as follows: (1) more accurate estimates and faster convergence speed can be obtained and (2) the network is equipped with the ability of link selection that can circumvent link failures and improve the estimation performance. The performance of the proposed algorithms for distributed estimation is illustrated via simulations in applications of wireless sensor networks and smart grids.

  14. Anaphora Resolution Algorithm for Sanskrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralayankar, Pravin; Devi, Sobha Lalitha

    This paper presents an algorithm, which identifies different types of pronominal and its antecedents in Sanskrit, an Indo-European language. The computational grammar implemented here uses very familiar concepts such as clause, subject, object etc., which are identified with the help of morphological information and concepts such as precede and follow. It is well known that natural languages contain anaphoric expressions, gaps and elliptical constructions of various kinds and that understanding of natural languages involves assignment of interpretations to these elements. Therefore, it is only to be expected that natural language understanding systems must have the necessary mechanism to resolve the same. The method we adopt here for resolving the anaphors is by exploiting the morphological richness of the language. The system is giving encouraging results when tested with a small corpus.

  15. Improved Heat-Stress Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Fehn, Steven

    2007-01-01

    NASA Dryden presents an improved and automated site-specific algorithm for heat-stress approximation using standard atmospheric measurements routinely obtained from the Edwards Air Force Base weather detachment. Heat stress, which is the net heat load a worker may be exposed to, is officially measured using a thermal-environment monitoring system to calculate the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). This instrument uses three independent thermometers to measure wet-bulb, dry-bulb, and the black-globe temperatures. By using these improvements, a more realistic WBGT estimation value can now be produced. This is extremely useful for researchers and other employees who are working on outdoor projects that are distant from the areas that the Web system monitors. Most importantly, the improved WBGT estimations will make outdoor work sites safer by reducing the likelihood of heat stress.

  16. Algorithmic synthesis using Python compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszewski, Radoslaw; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Linczuk, Maciej

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a python to VHDL compiler. The compiler interprets an algorithmic description of a desired behavior written in Python and translate it to VHDL. FPGA combines many benefits of both software and ASIC implementations. Like software, the programmed circuit is flexible, and can be reconfigured over the lifetime of the system. FPGAs have the potential to achieve far greater performance than software as a result of bypassing the fetch-decode-execute operations of traditional processors, and possibly exploiting a greater level of parallelism. This can be achieved by using many computational resources at the same time. Creating parallel programs implemented in FPGAs in pure HDL is difficult and time consuming. Using higher level of abstraction and High-Level Synthesis compiler implementation time can be reduced. The compiler has been implemented using the Python language. This article describes design, implementation and results of created tools.

  17. LDRD Report: Scheduling Irregular Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Boman, Erik G.

    2014-10-01

    This LDRD project was a campus exec fellowship to fund (in part) Donald Nguyen’s PhD research at UT-Austin. His work has focused on parallel programming models, and scheduling irregular algorithms on shared-memory systems using the Galois framework. Galois provides a simple but powerful way for users and applications to automatically obtain good parallel performance using certain supported data containers. The naïve user can write serial code, while advanced users can optimize performance by advanced features, such as specifying the scheduling policy. Galois was used to parallelize two sparse matrix reordering schemes: RCM and Sloan. Such reordering is important in high-performance computing to obtain better data locality and thus reduce run times.

  18. Online Planning Algorithms for POMDPs

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stéphane; Pineau, Joelle; Paquet, Sébastien; Chaib-draa, Brahim

    2009-01-01

    Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs) provide a rich framework for sequential decision-making under uncertainty in stochastic domains. However, solving a POMDP is often intractable except for small problems due to their complexity. Here, we focus on online approaches that alleviate the computational complexity by computing good local policies at each decision step during the execution. Online algorithms generally consist of a lookahead search to find the best action to execute at each time step in an environment. Our objectives here are to survey the various existing online POMDP methods, analyze their properties and discuss their advantages and disadvantages; and to thoroughly evaluate these online approaches in different environments under various metrics (return, error bound reduction, lower bound improvement). Our experimental results indicate that state-of-the-art online heuristic search methods can handle large POMDP domains efficiently. PMID:19777080

  19. Energy functions for regularization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delingette, H.; Hebert, M.; Ikeuchi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regularization techniques are widely used for inverse problem solving in computer vision such as surface reconstruction, edge detection, or optical flow estimation. Energy functions used for regularization algorithms measure how smooth a curve or surface is, and to render acceptable solutions these energies must verify certain properties such as invariance with Euclidean transformations or invariance with parameterization. The notion of smoothness energy is extended here to the notion of a differential stabilizer, and it is shown that to void the systematic underestimation of undercurvature for planar curve fitting, it is necessary that circles be the curves of maximum smoothness. A set of stabilizers is proposed that meet this condition as well as invariance with rotation and parameterization.

  20. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-09

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients.

  1. Novel MRC algorithms using GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kokoro; Taniguchi, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Tadao; Kadota, Kazuya

    2012-06-01

    GPGPU (General Purpose Graphic Processor Unit) has been attracting many engineers and scientists who develop their own software for massive numerical computation. With hundreds of core-processors and tens of thousands of threads operating concurrently, GPGPU programs can run significantly fast if their software architecture is well optimized. The basic program model used in GPGPU is SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data stream), and one must adapt his programming model to SIMD. However, conditional branching is fundamentally not allowed in SIMD and this limitation is quite challenging to apply GPGPU to photomask related software such as MDP or MRC. In this paper unique methods are proposed to utilize GPU for MRC operation. We explain novel algorithms of mask layout verification by GPGPU.

  2. Algorithms for tensor network renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenbly, G.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss in detail algorithms for implementing tensor network renormalization (TNR) for the study of classical statistical and quantum many-body systems. First, we recall established techniques for how the partition function of a 2 D classical many-body system or the Euclidean path integral of a 1 D quantum system can be represented as a network of tensors, before describing how TNR can be implemented to efficiently contract the network via a sequence of coarse-graining transformations. The efficacy of the TNR approach is then benchmarked for the 2 D classical statistical and 1 D quantum Ising models; in particular the ability of TNR to maintain a high level of accuracy over sustained coarse-graining transformations, even at a critical point, is demonstrated.

  3. Innovative algorithm for cast detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Francesca; Schettini, Raimondo; Gallina, Paolo

    2001-12-01

    The paper describes a method for detecting a color cast (i.e. a superimposed dominant color) in a digital image without any a priori knowledge of its semantic content. The color gamut of the image is first mapped in the CIELab color space. The color distribution of the whole image and of the so-called Near Neutral Objects (NNO) is then investigated using statistical tools then, to determine the presence of a cast. The boundaries of the near neutral objects in the color space are set adaptively by the algorithm on the basis of a preliminary analysis of the image color gamut. The method we propose has been tuned and successfully tested on a large data set of images, downloaded from personal web-pages or acquired using various digital and traditional cameras.

  4. Evolving evolutionary algorithms using linear genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Mihai

    2005-01-01

    A new model for evolving Evolutionary Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The model is based on the Linear Genetic Programming (LGP) technique. Every LGP chromosome encodes an EA which is used for solving a particular problem. Several Evolutionary Algorithms for function optimization, the Traveling Salesman Problem and the Quadratic Assignment Problem are evolved by using the considered model. Numerical experiments show that the evolved Evolutionary Algorithms perform similarly and sometimes even better than standard approaches for several well-known benchmarking problems.

  5. Robustness of Tree Extraction Algorithms from LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, M.; Strimbu, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Forest inventory faces a new era as unmanned aerial systems (UAS) increased the precision of measurements, while reduced field effort and price of data acquisition. A large number of algorithms were developed to identify various forest attributes from UAS data. The objective of the present research is to assess the robustness of two types of tree identification algorithms when UAS data are combined with digital elevation models (DEM). The algorithms use as input photogrammetric point cloud, which are subsequent rasterized. The first type of algorithms associate tree crown with an inversed watershed (subsequently referred as watershed based), while the second type is based on simultaneous representation of tree crown as an individual entity, and its relation with neighboring crowns (subsequently referred as simultaneous representation). A DJI equipped with a SONY a5100 was used to acquire images over an area from center Louisiana. The images were processed with Pix4D, and a photogrammetric point cloud with 50 points / m2 was attained. DEM was obtained from a flight executed in 2013, which also supplied a LIDAR point cloud with 30 points/m2. The algorithms were tested on two plantations with different species and crown class complexities: one homogeneous (i.e., a mature loblolly pine plantation), and one heterogeneous (i.e., an unmanaged uneven-aged stand with mixed species pine -hardwoods). Tree identification on photogrammetric point cloud reveled that simultaneous representation algorithm outperforms watershed algorithm, irrespective stand complexity. Watershed algorithm exhibits robustness to parameters, but the results were worse than majority sets of parameters needed by the simultaneous representation algorithm. The simultaneous representation algorithm is a better alternative to watershed algorithm even when parameters are not accurately estimated. Similar results were obtained when the two algorithms were run on the LIDAR point cloud.

  6. MRCK_3D contact detonation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Munjiza, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Combined Finite-Discrete Element Methods (FEM-DEM) and Discrete Element Methods (DEM) simulations involving contact of a large number of separate bod ies need an efficient, robust and flexible contact detection algorithm. In this work the MRCK-3D search algorithm is outlined and its main CPU perfonnances are evaluated. One of the most important aspects of this newly developed search algorithm is that it is applicable to systems consisting of many bodies of different shapes and sizes.

  7. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  8. A Traffic Motion Object Extraction Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaofei

    2015-12-01

    A motion object extraction algorithm based on the active contour model is proposed. Firstly, moving areas involving shadows are segmented with the classical background difference algorithm. Secondly, performing shadow detection and coarse removal, then a grid method is used to extract initial contours. Finally, the active contour model approach is adopted to compute the contour of the real object by iteratively tuning the parameter of the model. Experiments show the algorithm can remove the shadow and keep the integrity of a moving object.

  9. Dynamic Shortest Path Algorithms for Hypergraphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    geometric hypergraphs and the Enron email data set. The latter illustrates the application of the proposed algorithms in social networks for identifying...analyze the time complexity of the proposed algorithms and perform simulation experiments for both random geometric hypergraphs and the Enron email data...geometric hypergraph model and a real data set of a social network ( Enron email data set), we study the average performance of these two algorithms in

  10. Algorithm for Compressing Time-Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, S. Edward, III; Darlington, Edward Hugo

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm based on Chebyshev polynomials effects lossy compression of time-series data or other one-dimensional data streams (e.g., spectral data) that are arranged in blocks for sequential transmission. The algorithm was developed for use in transmitting data from spacecraft scientific instruments to Earth stations. In spite of its lossy nature, the algorithm preserves the information needed for scientific analysis. The algorithm is computationally simple, yet compresses data streams by factors much greater than two. The algorithm is not restricted to spacecraft or scientific uses: it is applicable to time-series data in general. The algorithm can also be applied to general multidimensional data that have been converted to time-series data, a typical example being image data acquired by raster scanning. However, unlike most prior image-data-compression algorithms, this algorithm neither depends on nor exploits the two-dimensional spatial correlations that are generally present in images. In order to understand the essence of this compression algorithm, it is necessary to understand that the net effect of this algorithm and the associated decompression algorithm is to approximate the original stream of data as a sequence of finite series of Chebyshev polynomials. For the purpose of this algorithm, a block of data or interval of time for which a Chebyshev polynomial series is fitted to the original data is denoted a fitting interval. Chebyshev approximation has two properties that make it particularly effective for compressing serial data streams with minimal loss of scientific information: The errors associated with a Chebyshev approximation are nearly uniformly distributed over the fitting interval (this is known in the art as the "equal error property"); and the maximum deviations of the fitted Chebyshev polynomial from the original data have the smallest possible values (this is known in the art as the "min-max property").

  11. Angelic Hierarchical Planning: Optimal and Online Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-06

    describe an alternative “satisficing” algorithm, AHSS . 4.1 Abstract Lookahead Trees Our ALT data structures support our search algorithms by efficiently...Angelic Hierarchical Satisficing Search ( AHSS ), which at- tempts to find a plan that reaches the goal with at most some pre-specified cost α. AHSS can be...much more efficient than AHA*, since it can commit to a plan without first proving its optimality. At each step, AHSS (see Algorithm 3) begins by

  12. Genetic Algorithms Viewed as Anticipatory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Irina; Kalisz, Eugenia; Negreanu, Lorina

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposes a new version of genetic algorithms—the anticipatory genetic algorithm AGA. The performance evaluation included in the paper shows that AGA is superior to traditional genetic algorithm from both speed and accuracy points of view. The paper also presents how this algorithm can be applied to solve a complex problem: image annotation, intended to be used in content based image retrieval systems.

  13. Advanced spectral signature discrimination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Cao, Wenjie; Samat, Alim

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the task of hyperspectral signature analysis. Hyperspectral signature analysis has been studied a lot in literature and there has been a lot of different algorithms developed which endeavors to discriminate between hyperspectral signatures. There are many approaches for performing the task of hyperspectral signature analysis. Binary coding approaches like SPAM and SFBC use basic statistical thresholding operations to binarize a signature which are then compared using Hamming distance. This framework has been extended to techniques like SDFC wherein a set of primate structures are used to characterize local variations in a signature together with the overall statistical measures like mean. As we see such structures harness only local variations and do not exploit any covariation of spectrally distinct parts of the signature. The approach of this research is to harvest such information by the use of a technique similar to circular convolution. In the approach we consider the signature as cyclic by appending the two ends of it. We then create two copies of the spectral signature. These three signatures can be placed next to each other like the rotating discs of a combination lock. We then find local structures at different circular shifts between the three cyclic spectral signatures. Texture features like in SDFC can be used to study the local structural variation for each circular shift. We can then create different measure by creating histogram from the shifts and thereafter using different techniques for information extraction from the histograms. Depending on the technique used different variant of the proposed algorithm are obtained. Experiments using the proposed technique show the viability of the proposed methods and their performances as compared to current binary signature coding techniques.

  14. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  15. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms. I: optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T

    2015-05-20

    Two modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative phase retrieval algorithms are proposed. The first we refer to as the spatial phase perturbation GS algorithm (SPP GSA). The second is a combined GS hybrid input-output algorithm (GS/HIOA). In this paper (Part I), it is demonstrated that the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are both much better at avoiding stagnation during phase retrieval, allowing them to successfully locate superior solutions compared with either the GS or the HIO algorithms. The performances of the SPP GS and GS/HIO algorithms are also compared. Then, the error reduction (ER) algorithm is combined with the HIO algorithm (ER/HIOA) to retrieve the input object image and the phase, given only some knowledge of its extent and the amplitude in the Fourier domain. In Part II, the algorithms developed here are applied to carry out known plaintext and ciphertext attacks on amplitude encoding and phase encoding double random phase encryption systems. Significantly, ER/HIOA is then used to carry out a ciphertext-only attack on AE DRPE systems.

  16. Overview of an Algorithm Plugin Package (APP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linda, M.; Tilmes, C.; Fleig, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Science software that runs operationally is fundamentally different than software that runs on a scientist's desktop. There are complexities in hosting software for automated production that are necessary and significant. Identifying common aspects of these complexities can simplify algorithm integration. We use NASA's MODIS and OMI data production systems as examples. An Algorithm Plugin Package (APP) is science software that is combined with algorithm-unique elements that permit the algorithm to interface with, and function within, the framework of a data processing system. The framework runs algorithms operationally against large quantities of data. The extra algorithm-unique items are constrained by the design of the data processing system. APPs often include infrastructure that is vastly similar. When the common elements in APPs are identified and abstracted, the cost of APP development, testing, and maintenance will be reduced. This paper is an overview of the extra algorithm-unique pieces that are shared between MODAPS and OMIDAPS APPs. Our exploration of APP structure will help builders of other production systems identify their common elements and reduce algorithm integration costs. Our goal is to complete the development of a library of functions and a menu of implementation choices that reflect common needs of APPs. The library and menu will reduce the time and energy required for science developers to integrate algorithms into production systems.

  17. One cutting plane algorithm using auxiliary functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabotin, I. Ya; Kazaeva, K. E.

    2016-11-01

    We propose an algorithm for solving a convex programming problem from the class of cutting methods. The algorithm is characterized by the construction of approximations using some auxiliary functions, instead of the objective function. Each auxiliary function bases on the exterior penalty function. In proposed algorithm the admissible set and the epigraph of each auxiliary function are embedded into polyhedral sets. In connection with the above, the iteration points are found by solving linear programming problems. We discuss the implementation of the algorithm and prove its convergence.

  18. Monte Carlo algorithm for free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Tong, Ning-Hua

    2015-07-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm for the free energy calculation based on configuration space sampling. An upward or downward temperature scan can be used to produce F(T). We implement this algorithm for the Ising model on a square lattice and triangular lattice. Comparison with the exact free energy shows an excellent agreement. We analyze the properties of this algorithm and compare it with the Wang-Landau algorithm, which samples in energy space. This method is applicable to general classical statistical models. The possibility of extending it to quantum systems is discussed.

  19. Ascent guidance algorithm using lidar wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Evin J.; Bradt, Jerre E.; Hardtla, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation of a general nonlinear programming guidance algorithm that incorporates wind measurements in the computation of ascent guidance steering commands is discussed. A nonlinear programming (NLP) algorithm that is designed to solve a very general problem has the potential to address the diversity demanded by future launch systems. Using B-splines for the command functional form allows the NLP algorithm to adjust the shape of the command profile to achieve optimal performance. The algorithm flexibility is demonstrated by simulation of ascent with dynamic loading constraints through a set of random wind profiles with and without wind sensing capability.

  20. A new frame-based registration algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, C. H.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Sumanaweera, T. S.; Yen, S. Y.; Napel, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for frame registration. Our algorithm requires only that the frame be comprised of straight rods, as opposed to the N structures or an accurate frame model required by existing algorithms. The algorithm utilizes the full 3D information in the frame as well as a least squares weighting scheme to achieve highly accurate registration. We use simulated CT data to assess the accuracy of our algorithm. We compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to two commonly used algorithms. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable to the best existing techniques with knowledge of the exact mathematical frame model. For CT data corrupted with an unknown in-plane rotation or translation, the proposed technique is also comparable to the best existing techniques. However, in situations where there is a discrepancy of more than 2 mm (0.7% of the frame dimension) between the frame and the mathematical model, the proposed technique is significantly better (p < or = 0.05) than the existing techniques. The proposed algorithm can be applied to any existing frame without modification. It provides better registration accuracy and is robust against model mis-match. It allows greater flexibility on the frame structure. Lastly, it reduces the frame construction cost as adherence to a concise model is not required.

  1. Solving Maximal Clique Problem through Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajawat, Shalini; Hemrajani, Naveen; Menghani, Ekta

    2010-11-01

    Genetic algorithm is one of the most interesting heuristic search techniques. It depends basically on three operations; selection, crossover and mutation. The outcome of the three operations is a new population for the next generation. Repeating these operations until the termination condition is reached. All the operations in the algorithm are accessible with today's molecular biotechnology. The simulations show that with this new computing algorithm, it is possible to get a solution from a very small initial data pool, avoiding enumerating all candidate solutions. For randomly generated problems, genetic algorithm can give correct solution within a few cycles at high probability.

  2. Automatic control algorithm effects on energy production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnerney, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model was developed using actual wind time series and turbine performance data to simulate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model was used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long term energy production. The results from local site and turbine characteristics were generalized to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  3. Distilling the Verification Process for Prognostics Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Indranil; Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose R.; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The goal of prognostics and health management (PHM) systems is to ensure system safety, and reduce downtime and maintenance costs. It is important that a PHM system is verified and validated before it can be successfully deployed. Prognostics algorithms are integral parts of PHM systems. This paper investigates a systematic process of verification of such prognostics algorithms. To this end, first, this paper distinguishes between technology maturation and product development. Then, the paper describes the verification process for a prognostics algorithm as it moves up to higher maturity levels. This process is shown to be an iterative process where verification activities are interleaved with validation activities at each maturation level. In this work, we adopt the concept of technology readiness levels (TRLs) to represent the different maturity levels of a prognostics algorithm. It is shown that at each TRL, the verification of a prognostics algorithm depends on verifying the different components of the algorithm according to the requirements laid out by the PHM system that adopts this prognostics algorithm. Finally, using simplified examples, the systematic process for verifying a prognostics algorithm is demonstrated as the prognostics algorithm moves up TRLs.

  4. A simple greedy algorithm for reconstructing pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert G

    2013-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple greedy algorithm for searching for high likelihood pedigrees using micro-satellite (STR) genotype information on a complete sample of related individuals. The core idea behind the algorithm is not new, but it is believed that putting it into a greedy search setting, and specifically the application to pedigree learning, is novel. The algorithm does not require age or sex information, but this information can be incorporated if desired. The algorithm is applied to human and non-human genetic data and in a simulation study.

  5. Thermostat algorithm for generating target ensembles.

    PubMed

    Bravetti, A; Tapias, D

    2016-02-01

    We present a deterministic algorithm called contact density dynamics that generates any prescribed target distribution in the physical phase space. Akin to the famous model of Nosé and Hoover, our algorithm is based on a non-Hamiltonian system in an extended phase space. However, the equations of motion in our case follow from contact geometry and we show that in general they have a similar form to those of the so-called density dynamics algorithm. As a prototypical example, we apply our algorithm to produce a Gibbs canonical distribution for a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator.

  6. A parallel algorithm for global routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brouwer, Randall J.; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1990-01-01

    A Parallel Hierarchical algorithm for Global Routing (PHIGURE) is presented. The router is based on the work of Burstein and Pelavin, but has many extensions for general global routing and parallel execution. Main features of the algorithm include structured hierarchical decomposition into separate independent tasks which are suitable for parallel execution and adaptive simplex solution for adding feedthroughs and adjusting channel heights for row-based layout. Alternative decomposition methods and the various levels of parallelism available in the algorithm are examined closely. The algorithm is described and results are presented for a shared-memory multiprocessor implementation.

  7. Generation of attributes for learning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yuh-Jyh; Kibler, D.

    1996-12-31

    Inductive algorithms rely strongly on their representational biases. Constructive induction can mitigate representational inadequacies. This paper introduces the notion of a relative gain measure and describes a new constructive induction algorithm (GALA) which is independent of the learning algorithm. Unlike most previous research on constructive induction, our methods are designed as preprocessing step before standard machine learning algorithms are applied. We present the results which demonstrate the effectiveness of GALA on artificial and real domains for several learners: C4.5, CN2, perceptron and backpropagation.

  8. Improved algorithm for hyperspectral data dimension determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Jie; DU, Lei; LI, Jing; HAN, Yachao; GAO, Zihong

    2017-02-01

    The correlation between adjacent bands of hyperspectral image data is relatively strong. However, signal coexists with noise and the HySime (hyperspectral signal identification by minimum error) algorithm which is based on the principle of least squares is designed to calculate the estimated noise value and the estimated signal correlation matrix value. The algorithm is effective with accurate noise value but ineffective with estimated noise value obtained from spectral dimension reduction and de-correlation process. This paper proposes an improved HySime algorithm based on noise whitening process. It carries out the noise whitening, instead of removing noise pixel by pixel, process on the original data first, obtains the noise covariance matrix estimated value accurately, and uses the HySime algorithm to calculate the signal correlation matrix value in order to improve the precision of results. With simulated as well as real data experiments in this paper, results show that: firstly, the improved HySime algorithm are more accurate and stable than the original HySime algorithm; secondly, the improved HySime algorithm results have better consistency under the different conditions compared with the classic noise subspace projection algorithm (NSP); finally, the improved HySime algorithm improves the adaptability of non-white image noise with noise whitening process.

  9. Introduction to Cluster Monte Carlo Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijten, E.

    This chapter provides an introduction to cluster Monte Carlo algorithms for classical statistical-mechanical systems. A brief review of the conventional Metropolis algorithm is given, followed by a detailed discussion of the lattice cluster algorithm developed by Swendsen and Wang and the single-cluster variant introduced by Wolff. For continuum systems, the geometric cluster algorithm of Dress and Krauth is described. It is shown how their geometric approach can be generalized to incorporate particle interactions beyond hardcore repulsions, thus forging a connection between the lattice and continuum approaches. Several illustrative examples are discussed.

  10. Approximate learning algorithm in Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Boltzmann machines can be regarded as Markov random fields. For binary cases, they are equivalent to the Ising spin model in statistical mechanics. Learning systems in Boltzmann machines are one of the NP-hard problems. Thus, in general we have to use approximate methods to construct practical learning algorithms in this context. In this letter, we propose new and practical learning algorithms for Boltzmann machines by using the belief propagation algorithm and the linear response approximation, which are often referred as advanced mean field methods. Finally, we show the validity of our algorithm using numerical experiments.

  11. A new algorithm for the detection of seismic quiescence: introduction of the RTM algorithm, a modified RTL algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Toshiyasu; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Nakamura, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    There are a number of reports on seismic quiescence phenomena before large earthquakes. The RTL algorithm is a weighted coefficient statistical method that takes into account the magnitude, occurrence time, and place of earthquake when seismicity pattern changes before large earthquakes are being investigated. However, we consider the original RTL algorithm to be overweighted on distance. In this paper, we introduce a modified RTL algorithm, called the RTM algorithm, and apply it to three large earthquakes in Japan, namely, the Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake in 1995 ( M JMA7.3), the Noto Hanto earthquake in 2007 ( M JMA 6.9), and the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake in 2008 ( M JMA 7.2), as test cases. Because this algorithm uses several parameters to characterize the weighted coefficients, multiparameter sets have to be prepared for the tests. The results show that the RTM algorithm is more sensitive than the RTL algorithm to seismic quiescence phenomena. This paper represents the first step in a series of future analyses of seismic quiescence phenomena using the RTM algorithm. At this moment, whole surveyed parameters are empirically selected for use in the method. We have to consider the physical meaning of the "best fit" parameter, such as the relation of ACFS, among others, in future analyses.

  12. A Modified Decision Tree Algorithm Based on Genetic Algorithm for Mobile User Classification Problem

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-sheng; Fan, Shu-jiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to offer mobile customers better service, we should classify the mobile user firstly. Aimed at the limitations of previous classification methods, this paper puts forward a modified decision tree algorithm for mobile user classification, which introduced genetic algorithm to optimize the results of the decision tree algorithm. We also take the context information as a classification attributes for the mobile user and we classify the context into public context and private context classes. Then we analyze the processes and operators of the algorithm. At last, we make an experiment on the mobile user with the algorithm, we can classify the mobile user into Basic service user, E-service user, Plus service user, and Total service user classes and we can also get some rules about the mobile user. Compared to C4.5 decision tree algorithm and SVM algorithm, the algorithm we proposed in this paper has higher accuracy and more simplicity. PMID:24688389

  13. A modified decision tree algorithm based on genetic algorithm for mobile user classification problem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-sheng; Fan, Shu-jiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to offer mobile customers better service, we should classify the mobile user firstly. Aimed at the limitations of previous classification methods, this paper puts forward a modified decision tree algorithm for mobile user classification, which introduced genetic algorithm to optimize the results of the decision tree algorithm. We also take the context information as a classification attributes for the mobile user and we classify the context into public context and private context classes. Then we analyze the processes and operators of the algorithm. At last, we make an experiment on the mobile user with the algorithm, we can classify the mobile user into Basic service user, E-service user, Plus service user, and Total service user classes and we can also get some rules about the mobile user. Compared to C4.5 decision tree algorithm and SVM algorithm, the algorithm we proposed in this paper has higher accuracy and more simplicity.

  14. Motion Cueing Algorithm Development: Initial Investigation and Redesign of the Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telban, Robert J.; Wu, Weimin; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this project four motion cueing algorithms were initially investigated. The classical algorithm generated results with large distortion and delay and low magnitude. The NASA adaptive algorithm proved to be well tuned with satisfactory performance, while the UTIAS adaptive algorithm produced less desirable results. Modifications were made to the adaptive algorithms to reduce the magnitude of undesirable spikes. The optimal algorithm was found to have the potential for improved performance with further redesign. The center of simulator rotation was redefined. More terms were added to the cost function to enable more tuning flexibility. A new design approach using a Fortran/Matlab/Simulink setup was employed. A new semicircular canals model was incorporated in the algorithm. With these changes results show the optimal algorithm has some advantages over the NASA adaptive algorithm. Two general problems observed in the initial investigation required solutions. A nonlinear gain algorithm was developed that scales the aircraft inputs by a third-order polynomial, maximizing the motion cues while remaining within the operational limits of the motion system. A braking algorithm was developed to bring the simulator to a full stop at its motion limit and later release the brake to follow the cueing algorithm output.

  15. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  16. Algorithmic Mechanism Design of Evolutionary Computation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We consider algorithmic design, enhancement, and improvement of evolutionary computation as a mechanism design problem. All individuals or several groups of individuals can be considered as self-interested agents. The individuals in evolutionary computation can manipulate parameter settings and operations by satisfying their own preferences, which are defined by an evolutionary computation algorithm designer, rather than by following a fixed algorithm rule. Evolutionary computation algorithm designers or self-adaptive methods should construct proper rules and mechanisms for all agents (individuals) to conduct their evolution behaviour correctly in order to definitely achieve the desired and preset objective(s). As a case study, we propose a formal framework on parameter setting, strategy selection, and algorithmic design of evolutionary computation by considering the Nash strategy equilibrium of a mechanism design in the search process. The evaluation results present the efficiency of the framework. This primary principle can be implemented in any evolutionary computation algorithm that needs to consider strategy selection issues in its optimization process. The final objective of our work is to solve evolutionary computation design as an algorithmic mechanism design problem and establish its fundamental aspect by taking this perspective. This paper is the first step towards achieving this objective by implementing a strategy equilibrium solution (such as Nash equilibrium) in evolutionary computation algorithm. PMID:26257777

  17. Algorithm for genome contig assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    An algorithm was developed for genome contig assembly which extended the range of data types that could be included in assembly and which ran on the order of a hundred times faster than the algorithm it replaced. Maps of all existing cosmid clone and YAC data at the Human Genome Information Resource were assembled using ICA. The resulting maps are summarized.

  18. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  19. Algorithms and the Teaching of Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, K. Ffoulkes

    1967-01-01

    The construction of algorithms to present grammatical rules is advocated on the basis of clarity and ease of memorization. Algorithmic procedure is demonstrated for the introduction of subordinate clauses by conjunctions in German, and the formation of plural nouns in English. (AF)

  20. Excursion-Set-Mediated Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    Excursion-set-mediated genetic algorithm (ESMGA) is embodiment of method of searching for and optimizing computerized mathematical models. Incorporates powerful search and optimization techniques based on concepts analogous to natural selection and laws of genetics. In comparison with other genetic algorithms, this one achieves stronger condition for implicit parallelism. Includes three stages of operations in each cycle, analogous to biological generation.

  1. Explaining the Cross-Multiplication Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handa, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    Many high-school mathematics teachers have likely been asked by a student, "Why does the cross-multiplication algorithm work?" It is a commonly used algorithm when dealing with proportion problems, conversion of units, or fractional linear equations. For most teachers, the explanation usually involves the idea of finding a common denominator--one…

  2. A quantum Algorithm for the Moebius Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    We give an efficient quantum algorithm for the Moebius function from the natural numbers to -1,0,1. The cost of the algorithm is asymptotically quadratic in log n and does not require the computation of the prime factorization of n as an intermediate step.

  3. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  4. Genetic algorithms and the immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Perelson, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Using genetic algorithm techniques we introduce a model to examine the hypothesis that antibody and T cell receptor genes evolved so as to encode the information needed to recognize schemas that characterize common pathogens. We have implemented the algorithm on the Connection Machine for 16,384 64-bit antigens and 512 64-bit antibodies. 8 refs.

  5. The Porter Stemming Algorithm: Then and Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In 1980, Porter presented a simple algorithm for stemming English language words. This paper summarises the main features of the algorithm, and highlights its role not just in modern information retrieval research, but also in a range of related subject domains. Design/methodology/approach: Review of literature and research involving use…

  6. Faster Algorithms on Branch and Clique Decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.; van Leeuwen, Erik Jan; van Rooij, Johan M. M.; Vatshelle, Martin

    We combine two techniques recently introduced to obtain faster dynamic programming algorithms for optimization problems on graph decompositions. The unification of generalized fast subset convolution and fast matrix multiplication yields significant improvements to the running time of previous algorithms for several optimization problems. As an example, we give an O^{*}(3^{ω/2k}) time algorithm for Minimum Dominating Set on graphs of branchwidth k, improving on the previous O *(4 k ) algorithm. Here ω is the exponent in the running time of the best matrix multiplication algorithm (currently ω< 2.376). For graphs of cliquewidth k, we improve from O *(8 k ) to O *(4 k ). We also obtain an algorithm for counting the number of perfect matchings of a graph, given a branch decomposition of width k, that runs in time O^{*}(2^{ω/2k}). Generalizing these approaches, we obtain faster algorithms for all so-called [ρ,σ]-domination problems on branch decompositions if ρ and σ are finite or cofinite. The algorithms presented in this paper either attain or are very close to natural lower bounds for these problems.

  7. Quantum Algorithm for Linear Programming Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joag, Pramod; Mehendale, Dhananjay

    The quantum algorithm (PRL 103, 150502, 2009) solves a system of linear equations with exponential speedup over existing classical algorithms. We show that the above algorithm can be readily adopted in the iterative algorithms for solving linear programming (LP) problems. The first iterative algorithm that we suggest for LP problem follows from duality theory. It consists of finding nonnegative solution of the equation forduality condition; forconstraints imposed by the given primal problem and for constraints imposed by its corresponding dual problem. This problem is called the problem of nonnegative least squares, or simply the NNLS problem. We use a well known method for solving the problem of NNLS due to Lawson and Hanson. This algorithm essentially consists of solving in each iterative step a new system of linear equations . The other iterative algorithms that can be used are those based on interior point methods. The same technique can be adopted for solving network flow problems as these problems can be readily formulated as LP problems. The suggested quantum algorithm cansolveLP problems and Network Flow problems of very large size involving millions of variables.

  8. Synthesis of an algorithm for interference immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of an algorithm for adaptive interference nulling of an 8-element phased antenna array. An adaptive beamforming system has been built on the basis of the algorithm. The paper discusses results of experimental functioning of navigation satellite systems user equipment fitted with an adaptive phased antenna array in interference environments.

  9. Trees, bialgebras and intrinsic numerical algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary work about intrinsic numerical integrators evolving on groups is described. Fix a finite dimensional Lie group G; let g denote its Lie algebra, and let Y(sub 1),...,Y(sub N) denote a basis of g. A class of numerical algorithms is presented that approximate solutions to differential equations evolving on G of the form: dot-x(t) = F(x(t)), x(0) = p is an element of G. The algorithms depend upon constants c(sub i) and c(sub ij), for i = 1,...,k and j is less than i. The algorithms have the property that if the algorithm starts on the group, then it remains on the group. In addition, they also have the property that if G is the abelian group R(N), then the algorithm becomes the classical Runge-Kutta algorithm. The Cayley algebra generated by labeled, ordered trees is used to generate the equations that the coefficients c(sub i) and c(sub ij) must satisfy in order for the algorithm to yield an rth order numerical integrator and to analyze the resulting algorithms.

  10. The Modular Clock Algorithm for Blind Rendezvous

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 vi Page...50 Random Strategy vs. Modular Clock Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Modified Modular Clock Algorithm...Spectrum has become such a precious commodity that the auction of five blocks of 700 MHz spectrum raised $20 billion dollars from big market players

  11. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  12. Efficient Learning Algorithms with Limited Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores efficient learning algorithms in settings which are more restrictive than the PAC model of learning (Valiant) in one of the following two senses: (i) The learning algorithm has a very weak access to the unknown function, as in, it does not get labeled samples for the unknown function (ii) The error guarantee required from the…

  13. A novel algorithm for Bluetooth ECG.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Utpal T; Desai, Uday B

    2012-11-01

    In wireless transmission of ECG, data latency will be significant when battery power level and data transmission distance are not maintained. In applications like home monitoring or personalized care, to overcome the joint effect of previous issues of wireless transmission and other ECG measurement noises, a novel filtering strategy is required. Here, a novel algorithm, identified as peak rejection adaptive sampling modified moving average (PRASMMA) algorithm for wireless ECG is introduced. This algorithm first removes error in bit pattern of received data if occurred in wireless transmission and then removes baseline drift. Afterward, a modified moving average is implemented except in the region of each QRS complexes. The algorithm also sets its filtering parameters according to different sampling rate selected for acquisition of signals. To demonstrate the work, a prototyped Bluetooth-based ECG module is used to capture ECG with different sampling rate and in different position of patient. This module transmits ECG wirelessly to Bluetooth-enabled devices where the PRASMMA algorithm is applied on captured ECG. The performance of PRASMMA algorithm is compared with moving average and S-Golay algorithms visually as well as numerically. The results show that the PRASMMA algorithm can significantly improve the ECG reconstruction by efficiently removing the noise and its use can be extended to any parameters where peaks are importance for diagnostic purpose.

  14. Alocomotino Control Algorithm for Robotic Linkage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2016-10-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a control algorithm that transitions a robotic linkage system between stabilized states producing responsive locomotion. The developed algorithm is demonstrated using a simple robotic construction consisting of a few links with actuation and sensing at each joint. Numerical and experimental validation is presented.

  15. Statistical Methods in Algorithm Design and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weide, Bruce W.

    The use of statistical methods in the design and analysis of discrete algorithms is explored. The introductory chapter contains a literature survey and background material on probability theory. In Chapter 2, probabilistic approximation algorithms are discussed with the goal of exposing and correcting some oversights in previous work. Chapter 3…

  16. A Parallel Rendering Algorithm for MIMD Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.; Orloff, Tobias

    1991-01-01

    Applications such as animation and scientific visualization demand high performance rendering of complex three dimensional scenes. To deliver the necessary rendering rates, highly parallel hardware architectures are required. The challenge is then to design algorithms and software which effectively use the hardware parallelism. A rendering algorithm targeted to distributed memory MIMD architectures is described. For maximum performance, the algorithm exploits both object-level and pixel-level parallelism. The behavior of the algorithm is examined both analytically and experimentally. Its performance for large numbers of processors is found to be limited primarily by communication overheads. An experimental implementation for the Intel iPSC/860 shows increasing performance from 1 to 128 processors across a wide range of scene complexities. It is shown that minimal modifications to the algorithm will adapt it for use on shared memory architectures as well.

  17. Algorithm refinement for the stochastic Burgers' equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Foo, Jasmine; Garcia, Alejandro L. . E-mail: algarcia@algarcia.org

    2007-04-10

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm refinement (AR) scheme for an excluded random walk model whose mean field behavior is given by the viscous Burgers' equation. AR hybrids use the adaptive mesh refinement framework to model a system using a molecular algorithm where desired while allowing a computationally faster continuum representation to be used in the remainder of the domain. The focus in this paper is the role of fluctuations on the dynamics. In particular, we demonstrate that it is necessary to include a stochastic forcing term in Burgers' equation to accurately capture the correct behavior of the system. The conclusion we draw from this study is that the fidelity of multiscale methods that couple disparate algorithms depends on the consistent modeling of fluctuations in each algorithm and on a coupling, such as algorithm refinement, that preserves this consistency.

  18. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  19. An efficient quantum algorithm for spectral estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Adrian; Rebentrost, Patrick; Marvian, Iman; Eisert, Jens; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-03-01

    We develop an efficient quantum implementation of an important signal processing algorithm for line spectral estimation: the matrix pencil method, which determines the frequencies and damping factors of signals consisting of finite sums of exponentially damped sinusoids. Our algorithm provides a quantum speedup in a natural regime where the sampling rate is much higher than the number of sinusoid components. Along the way, we develop techniques that are expected to be useful for other quantum algorithms as well—consecutive phase estimations to efficiently make products of asymmetric low rank matrices classically accessible and an alternative method to efficiently exponentiate non-Hermitian matrices. Our algorithm features an efficient quantum–classical division of labor: the time-critical steps are implemented in quantum superposition, while an interjacent step, requiring much fewer parameters, can operate classically. We show that frequencies and damping factors can be obtained in time logarithmic in the number of sampling points, exponentially faster than known classical algorithms.

  20. A region labeling algorithm based on block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    2009-10-01

    The time performance of region labeling algorithm is important for image process. However, common region labeling algorithms cannot meet the requirements of real-time image processing. In this paper, a technique using block to record the connective area is proposed. By this technique, connective closure and information related to the target can be computed during a one-time image scan. It records the edge pixel's coordinate, including outer side edges and inner side edges, as well as the label, and then it can calculate connecting area's shape center, area and gray. Compared to others, this block based region labeling algorithm is more efficient. It can well meet the time requirements of real-time processing. Experiment results also validate the correctness and efficiency of the algorithm. Experiment results show that it can detect any connecting areas in binary images, which contains various complex and quaint patterns. The block labeling algorithm is used in a real-time image processing program now.

  1. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2014-02-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates.

  2. Efficient multiple-way graph partitioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dasdan, A.; Aykanat, C.

    1995-12-01

    Graph partitioning deals with evenly dividing a graph into two or more parts such that the total weight of edges interconnecting these parts, i.e., cutsize, is minimized. Graph partitioning has important applications in VLSI layout, mapping, and sparse Gaussian elimination. Since graph partitioning problem is NP-hard, we should resort to polynomial-time algorithms to obtain a good solution, or hopefully a near-optimal solution. Kernighan-Lin (KL) propsoed a 2-way partitioning algorithms. Fiduccia-Mattheyses (FM) introduced a faster version of KL algorithm. Sanchis (FMS) generalized FM algorithm to a multiple-way partitioning algorithm. Simulated Annealing (SA) is one of the most successful approaches that are not KL-based.

  3. Algorithms for improved performance in cryptographic protocols.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn

    2003-11-01

    Public key cryptographic algorithms provide data authentication and non-repudiation for electronic transmissions. The mathematical nature of the algorithms, however, means they require a significant amount of computation, and encrypted messages and digital signatures possess high bandwidth. Accordingly, there are many environments (e.g. wireless, ad-hoc, remote sensing networks) where public-key requirements are prohibitive and cannot be used. The use of elliptic curves in public-key computations has provided a means by which computations and bandwidth can be somewhat reduced. We report here on the research conducted in an LDRD aimed to find even more efficient algorithms and to make public-key cryptography available to a wider range of computing environments. We improved upon several algorithms, including one for which a patent has been applied. Further we discovered some new problems and relations on which future cryptographic algorithms may be based.

  4. Marshall Rosenbluth and the Metropolis algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Gubernatis, J.E.

    2005-05-15

    The 1953 publication, 'Equation of State Calculations by Very Fast Computing Machines' by N. Metropolis, A. W. Rosenbluth and M. N. Rosenbluth, and M. Teller and E. Teller [J. Chem. Phys. 21, 1087 (1953)] marked the beginning of the use of the Monte Carlo method for solving problems in the physical sciences. The method described in this publication subsequently became known as the Metropolis algorithm, undoubtedly the most famous and most widely used Monte Carlo algorithm ever published. As none of the authors made subsequent use of the algorithm, they became unknown to the large simulation physics community that grew from this publication and their roles in its development became the subject of mystery and legend. At a conference marking the 50th anniversary of the 1953 publication, Marshall Rosenbluth gave his recollections of the algorithm's development. The present paper describes the algorithm, reconstructs the historical context in which it was developed, and summarizes Marshall's recollections.

  5. Algorithms for radio networks with dynamic topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham, Nachum; Ogier, Richard; Rutenburg, Vladislav V.; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Jose

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project was the development of advanced algorithms and protocols that efficiently use network resources to provide optimal or nearly optimal performance in future communication networks with highly dynamic topologies and subject to frequent link failures. As reflected by this report, we have achieved our objective and have significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in this area. The research topics of the papers summarized include the following: efficient distributed algorithms for computing shortest pairs of disjoint paths; minimum-expected-delay alternate routing algorithms for highly dynamic unreliable networks; algorithms for loop-free routing; multipoint communication by hierarchically encoded data; efficient algorithms for extracting the maximum information from event-driven topology updates; methods for the neural network solution of link scheduling and other difficult problems arising in communication networks; and methods for robust routing in networks subject to sophisticated attacks.

  6. A Learning Algorithm for Multimodal Grammar Inference.

    PubMed

    D'Ulizia, A; Ferri, F; Grifoni, P

    2011-12-01

    The high costs of development and maintenance of multimodal grammars in integrating and understanding input in multimodal interfaces lead to the investigation of novel algorithmic solutions in automating grammar generation and in updating processes. Many algorithms for context-free grammar inference have been developed in the natural language processing literature. An extension of these algorithms toward the inference of multimodal grammars is necessary for multimodal input processing. In this paper, we propose a novel grammar inference mechanism that allows us to learn a multimodal grammar from its positive samples of multimodal sentences. The algorithm first generates the multimodal grammar that is able to parse the positive samples of sentences and, afterward, makes use of two learning operators and the minimum description length metrics in improving the grammar description and in avoiding the over-generalization problem. The experimental results highlight the acceptable performances of the algorithm proposed in this paper since it has a very high probability of parsing valid sentences.

  7. Algorithms for security in robotics and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simov, Borislav Hristov

    The dissertation presents algorithms for robotics and security. The first chapter gives an overview of the area of visibility-based pursuit-evasion. The following two chapters introduce two specific algorithms in that area. The algorithms are based on research done together with Dr. Giora Slutzki and Dr. Steven LaValle. Chapter 2 presents a polynomial-time algorithm for clearing a polygon by a single 1-searcher. The result is extended to a polynomial-time algorithm for a pair of 1-searchers in Chapter 3. Chapters 4 and 5 contain joint research with Dr. Srini Tridandapani, Dr. Jason Jue and Dr. Michael Borella in the area of computer networks. Chapter 4 presents a method of providing privacy over an insecure channel which does not require encryption. Chapter 5 gives approximate bounds for the link utilization in multicast traffic.

  8. Automatic ionospheric layers detection: Algorithms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, María G.; Zuccheretti, Enrico; Cabrera, Miguel A.; Bianchi, Cesidio; Sciacca, Umberto; Baskaradas, James

    2016-03-01

    Vertical sounding is a widely used technique to obtain ionosphere measurements, such as an estimation of virtual height versus frequency scanning. It is performed by high frequency radar for geophysical applications called ;ionospheric sounder; (or ;ionosonde;). Radar detection depends mainly on targets characteristics. While several targets behavior and correspondent echo detection algorithms have been studied, a survey to address a suitable algorithm for ionospheric sounder has to be carried out. This paper is focused on automatic echo detection algorithms implemented in particular for an ionospheric sounder, target specific characteristics were studied as well. Adaptive threshold detection algorithms are proposed, compared to the current implemented algorithm, and tested using actual data obtained from the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS-INGV) at Rome Ionospheric Observatory. Different cases of study have been selected according typical ionospheric and detection conditions.

  9. Petascale algorithms for reactor hydrodynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Lottes, J.; Pointer, W. D.; Siegel, A.

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent algorithmic developments that have enabled large eddy simulations of reactor flows on up to P = 65, 000 processors on the IBM BG/P at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Petascale computing is expected to play a pivotal role in the design and analysis of next-generation nuclear reactors. Argonne's SHARP project is focused on advanced reactor simulation, with a current emphasis on modeling coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics (TH). The TH modeling comprises a hierarchy of computational fluid dynamics approaches ranging from detailed turbulence computations, using DNS (direct numerical simulation) and LES (large eddy simulation), to full core analysis based on RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subchannel models. Our initial study is focused on LES of sodium-cooled fast reactor cores. The aim is to leverage petascale platforms at DOE's Leadership Computing Facilities (LCFs) to provide detailed information about heat transfer within the core and to provide baseline data for less expensive RANS and subchannel models.

  10. Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew; Sohl, Garett; Scharf, Daniel; Benowitz, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying for spacecraft is a rapidly developing field that will enable a new era of space science. For one of its missions, the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project has selected a formation flying interferometer design to detect earth-like planets orbiting distant stars. In order to advance technology needed for the TPF formation flying interferometer, the TPF project has been developing a distributed real-time testbed to demonstrate end-to-end operation of formation flying with TPF-like functionality and precision. This is the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST) . This FAST was conceived to bring out issues in timing, data fusion, inter-spacecraft communication, inter-spacecraft sensing and system-wide formation robustness. In this paper we describe the FAST and show results from a two-spacecraft formation scenario. The two-spacecraft simulation is the first time that precision end-to-end formation flying operation has been demonstrated in a distributed real-time simulation environment.

  11. Firmware algorithms for PINGU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankova, Daria; Anderson, Tyler; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    PINGU is a future low energy extension for the IceCube experiment. It will be implemented as several additional closer positioned stings of digital optical modules (DOMs) inside the main detector volume. PINGU would be able to register neutrinos with energies as low as few GeV. One of the proposed designs for the new PINGU DOMs is an updated version of IceCube DOMs with newer electronic components, particularly a better more modern FPGA. With those improvements it is desirable to run some waveform feature extraction directly on the DOM, thus decreasing amount of data sent over the detector's bandwidth-limited cable. In order to use the existing feature extraction package for this purpose the signal waveform needs to be prepared by subtracting of a variable baseline from it. The baseline shape is dependant mostly on the environment temperature, which causes the long term drift of the signal, and the induction used in signal readout electronics, which modifies the signal shape. Algorithms have been selected to counter those baseline variances, modeled and partly implemented in FPGA fabric. The simulation shows good agreement between initial signal and the ``corrected'' version.

  12. Advanced algorithms for information science

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.; Brislawn, C.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Kelley, B.; Kim, W.H.; Mazieres, B.; Roeder, H.; Strottman, D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In a modern information-controlled society the importance of fast computational algorithms facilitating data compression and image analysis cannot be overemphasized. Feature extraction and pattern recognition are key to many LANL projects and the same types of dimensionality reduction and compression used in source coding are also applicable to image understanding. The authors have begun developing wavelet coding which decomposes data into different length-scale and frequency bands. New transform-based source-coding techniques offer potential for achieving better, combined source-channel coding performance by using joint-optimization techniques. They initiated work on a system that compresses the video stream in real time, and which also takes the additional step of analyzing the video stream concurrently. By using object-based compression schemes (where an object is an identifiable feature of the video signal, repeatable in time or space), they believe that the analysis is directly related to the efficiency of the compression.

  13. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making.

  14. Exploration of new multivariate spectral calibration algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Melgaard, David Kennett; Martin, Laura Elizabeth; Wehlburg, Christine Marie; Pell, Randy J.; Guenard, Robert D.

    2004-03-01

    A variety of multivariate calibration algorithms for quantitative spectral analyses were investigated and compared, and new algorithms were developed in the course of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. We were able to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid classical least squares/partial least squares (CLSIPLS) calibration algorithms to maintain calibrations in the presence of spectrometer drift and to transfer calibrations between spectrometers from the same or different manufacturers. These methods were found to be as good or better in prediction ability as the commonly used partial least squares (PLS) method. We also present the theory for an entirely new class of algorithms labeled augmented classical least squares (ACLS) methods. New factor selection methods are developed and described for the ACLS algorithms. These factor selection methods are demonstrated using near-infrared spectra collected from a system of dilute aqueous solutions. The ACLS algorithm is also shown to provide improved ease of use and better prediction ability than PLS when transferring calibrations between near-infrared calibrations from the same manufacturer. Finally, simulations incorporating either ideal or realistic errors in the spectra were used to compare the prediction abilities of the new ACLS algorithm with that of PLS. We found that in the presence of realistic errors with non-uniform spectral error variance across spectral channels or with spectral errors correlated between frequency channels, ACLS methods generally out-performed the more commonly used PLS method. These results demonstrate the need for realistic error structure in simulations when the prediction abilities of various algorithms are compared. The combination of equal or superior prediction ability and the ease of use of the ACLS algorithms make the new ACLS methods the preferred algorithms to use for multivariate spectral calibrations.

  15. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  16. A Winner Determination Algorithm for Combinatorial Auctions Based on Hybrid Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Genrang; Lin, ZhengChun

    The problem of winner determination in combinatorial auctions is a hotspot electronic business, and a NP hard problem. A Hybrid Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm(HAFSA), which is combined with First Suite Heuristic Algorithm (FSHA) and Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm (AFSA), is proposed to solve the problem after probing it base on the theories of AFSA. Experiment results show that the HAFSA is a rapidly and efficient algorithm for The problem of winner determining. Compared with Ant colony Optimization Algorithm, it has a good performance with broad and prosperous application.

  17. Algorithm Improvement Program Nuclide Identification Algorithm Scoring Criteria And Scoring Application - DNDO.

    SciTech Connect

    Enghauser, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The goal of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Algorithm Improvement Program (AIP) is to facilitate gamma-radiation detector nuclide identification algorithm development, improvement, and validation. Accordingly, scoring criteria have been developed to objectively assess the performance of nuclide identification algorithms. In addition, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application for automated nuclide identification scoring has been developed. This report provides an overview of the equations, nuclide weighting factors, nuclide equivalencies, and configuration weighting factors used by the application for scoring nuclide identification algorithm performance. Furthermore, this report presents a general overview of the nuclide identification algorithm scoring application including illustrative examples.

  18. Parallelization of Edge Detection Algorithm using MPI on Beowulf Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Nazleeni; Amir, Ruzaini; Aziz, Izzatdin A.; Jung, Low Tan; Shukri, Siti Rohkmah

    In this paper, we present the design of parallel Sobel edge detection algorithm using Foster's methodology. The parallel algorithm is implemented using MPI message passing library and master/slave algorithm. Every processor performs the same sequential algorithm but on different part of the image. Experimental results conducted on Beowulf cluster are presented to demonstrate the performance of the parallel algorithm.

  19. A new algorithm for attitude-independent magnetometer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, Roberto; Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm is developed for inflight magnetometer bias determination without knowledge of the attitude. This algorithm combines the fast convergence of a heuristic algorithm currently in use with the correct treatment of the statistics and without discarding data. The algorithm performance is examined using simulated data and compared with previous algorithms.

  20. SAGE II inversion algorithm. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Lenoble, J.; Brogniez, C.; Pruvost, P.

    1989-01-01

    The operational Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II multichannel data inversion algorithm is described. Aerosol and ozone retrievals obtained with the algorithm are discussed. The algorithm is compared to an independently developed algorithm (Lenoble, 1989), showing that the inverted aerosol and ozone profiles from the two algorithms are similar within their respective uncertainties.

  1. ALGORITHM FOR SORTING GROUPED DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to sort data sets in ascending or descending order. This becomes more difficult for grouped data, i.e., multiple sets of data, where each set of data involves several measurements or related elements. The sort becomes increasingly cumbersome when more than a few elements exist for each data set. In order to achieve an efficient sorting process, an algorithm has been devised in which the maximum most significant element is found, and then compared to each element in succession. The program was written to handle the daily temperature readings of the Voyager spacecraft, particularly those related to the special tracking requirements of Voyager 2. By reducing each data set to a single representative number, the sorting process becomes very easy. The first step in the process is to reduce the data set of width 'n' to a data set of width '1'. This is done by representing each data set by a polynomial of length 'n' based on the differences of the maximum and minimum elements. These single numbers are then sorted and converted back to obtain the original data sets. Required input data are the name of the data file to read and sort, and the starting and ending record numbers. The package includes a sample data file, containing 500 sets of data with 5 elements in each set. This program will perform a sort of the 500 data sets in 3 - 5 seconds on an IBM PC-AT with a hard disk; on a similarly equipped IBM PC-XT the time is under 10 seconds. This program is written in BASIC (specifically the Microsoft QuickBasic compiler) for interactive execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series operating under PC-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 40K of 8 bit bytes. A hard disk is desirable for speed considerations, but is not required. This program was developed in 1986.

  2. Distributed sensor data compression algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, Barry; Lin, Freddie

    2006-04-01

    Theoretically it is possible for two sensors to reliably send data at rates smaller than the sum of the necessary data rates for sending the data independently, essentially taking advantage of the correlation of sensor readings to reduce the data rate. In 2001, Caltech researchers Michelle Effros and Qian Zhao developed new techniques for data compression code design for correlated sensor data, which were published in a paper at the 2001 Data Compression Conference (DCC 2001). These techniques take advantage of correlations between two or more closely positioned sensors in a distributed sensor network. Given two signals, X and Y, the X signal is sent using standard data compression. The goal is to design a partition tree for the Y signal. The Y signal is sent using a code based on the partition tree. At the receiving end, if ambiguity arises when using the partition tree to decode the Y signal, the X signal is used to resolve the ambiguity. We have extended this work to increase the efficiency of the code search algorithms. Our results have shown that development of a highly integrated sensor network protocol that takes advantage of a correlation in sensor readings can result in 20-30% sensor data transport cost savings. In contrast, the best possible compression using state-of-the-art compression techniques that did not take into account the correlation of the incoming data signals achieved only 9-10% compression at most. This work was sponsored by MDA, but has very widespread applicability to ad hoc sensor networks, hyperspectral imaging sensors and vehicle health monitoring sensors for space applications.

  3. SU-E-T-215: Comparison of VMAT-SABR Treatment Plans with Flattened Filter (FF) Beam and Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Beam for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Kang, S; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to access VMAT-SABR plan using flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam, and compare the verification results for all pretreatment plans. Methods: SABR plans for 20 prostate patients were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. A prescription dose was 42.7 Gy/7 fractions. Four SABR plans for each patient were calculated using Acuros XB algorithm with both FF and FFF beams of 6- and 10-MV. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) and technical parameters were recorded and compared. A pretreatment verification was performed and the gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. Results: For each patient, the DVHs are closely similar for plans of four different beams. There are small differences showed in dose distributions and corresponding DVHs when comparing the each plan related to the same patient. Sparing on bladder and rectum was slightly better on plans with 10-MV FF and FFF than with 6-MV FF and FFF, but this difference was negligible. However, there was no significance in the other OARs. The mean agreement of 3%/3mm criteria was higher than 97% in all plans. The mean MUs and deliver time employed was 1701±101 and 3.02±0.17 min for 6-MV FF, 1870±116 and 1.69±0.08 min for 6-MV FFF, 1471±86 and 2.68±0.14 min for 10-MV FF, and 1619±101 and 0.98±0.04 min for 10-MV FFF, respectively. Conclusion: Dose distributions on prostate SABR plans using FFF beams were similar to those generated by FF beams. However, the use of FFF beam offers a clear benefit in delivery time when compared to FF beam. Verification of pretreatment also represented the acceptable and comparable results in all plans using FF beam as well as FFF beam. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of FFF beam is feasible and efficient technique for prostate SABR.

  4. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric comparison among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralateral lung V5Gy(p≤0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p<0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p=0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p=0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p=0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans compared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p<0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p=0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an increase in dose to the

  5. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p < 0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p < 0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p = 0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an

  6. Novel and efficient tag SNPs selection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Pei; Hung, Che-Lun; Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2014-01-01

    SNPs are the most abundant forms of genetic variations amongst species; the association studies between complex diseases and SNPs or haplotypes have received great attention. However, these studies are restricted by the cost of genotyping all SNPs; thus, it is necessary to find smaller subsets, or tag SNPs, representing the rest of the SNPs. In fact, the existing tag SNP selection algorithms are notoriously time-consuming. An efficient algorithm for tag SNP selection was presented, which was applied to analyze the HapMap YRI data. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better performance than the existing tag SNP selection algorithms; in most cases, this proposed algorithm is at least ten times faster than the existing methods. In many cases, when the redundant ratio of the block is high, the proposed algorithm can even be thousands times faster than the previously known methods. Tools and web services for haplotype block analysis integrated by hadoop MapReduce framework are also developed using the proposed algorithm as computation kernels.

  7. Least significant qubit algorithm for quantum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jianzhi; Wang, Shen; Li, Qiong

    2016-11-01

    To study the feasibility of the classical image least significant bit (LSB) information hiding algorithm on quantum computer, a least significant qubit (LSQb) information hiding algorithm of quantum image is proposed. In this paper, we focus on a novel quantum representation for color digital images (NCQI). Firstly, by designing the three qubits comparator and unitary operators, the reasonability and feasibility of LSQb based on NCQI are presented. Then, the concrete LSQb information hiding algorithm is proposed, which can realize the aim of embedding the secret qubits into the least significant qubits of RGB channels of quantum cover image. Quantum circuit of the LSQb information hiding algorithm is also illustrated. Furthermore, the secrets extracting algorithm and circuit are illustrated through utilizing control-swap gates. The two merits of our algorithm are: (1) it is absolutely blind and (2) when extracting secret binary qubits, it does not need any quantum measurement operation or any other help from classical computer. Finally, simulation and comparative analysis show the performance of our algorithm.

  8. Algorithm Optimally Allocates Actuation of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motaghedi, Shi

    2007-01-01

    A report presents an algorithm that solves the following problem: Allocate the force and/or torque to be exerted by each thruster and reaction-wheel assembly on a spacecraft for best performance, defined as minimizing the error between (1) the total force and torque commanded by the spacecraft control system and (2) the total of forces and torques actually exerted by all the thrusters and reaction wheels. The algorithm incorporates the matrix vector relationship between (1) the total applied force and torque and (2) the individual actuator force and torque values. It takes account of such constraints as lower and upper limits on the force or torque that can be applied by a given actuator. The algorithm divides the aforementioned problem into two optimization problems that it solves sequentially. These problems are of a type, known in the art as semi-definite programming problems, that involve linear matrix inequalities. The algorithm incorporates, as sub-algorithms, prior algorithms that solve such optimization problems very efficiently. The algorithm affords the additional advantage that the solution requires the minimum rate of consumption of fuel for the given best performance.

  9. An algorithmic approach to crustal deformation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iz, Huseyin Baki

    1987-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of crustal deformation measurements has become important as a result of current improvements in geodetic methods and an increasing amount of theoretical and observational data provided by several earth sciences. A first-generation data analysis algorithm which combines a priori information with current geodetic measurements was proposed. Relevant methods which can be used in the algorithm were discussed. Prior information is the unifying feature of this algorithm. Some of the problems which may arise through the use of a priori information in the analysis were indicated and preventive measures were demonstrated. The first step in the algorithm is the optimal design of deformation networks. The second step in the algorithm identifies the descriptive model of the deformation field. The final step in the algorithm is the improved estimation of deformation parameters. Although deformation parameters are estimated in the process of model discrimination, they can further be improved by the use of a priori information about them. According to the proposed algorithm this information must first be tested against the estimates calculated using the sample data only. Null-hypothesis testing procedures were developed for this purpose. Six different estimators which employ a priori information were examined. Emphasis was put on the case when the prior information is wrong and analytical expressions for possible improvements under incompatible prior information were derived.

  10. Improved wavefront reconstruction algorithm from slope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuc, Phan Huy; Manh, Nguyen The; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Ghim, Young-Sik; Yang, Ho-Soon; Lee, Yun-Woo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a wavefront reconstruction algorithm from slope measurements based on a zonal method. In this algorithm, the slope measurement sampling geometry used is the Southwell geometry, in which the phase values and the slope data are measured at the same nodes. The proposed algorithm estimates the phase value at a node point using the slope measurements of eight points around the node, as doing so is believed to result in better accuracy with regard to the wavefront. For optimization of the processing time, a successive over-relaxation method is applied to iteration loops. We use a trial-and-error method to determine the best relaxation factor for each type of wavefront in order to optimize the iteration time and, thus, the processing time of the algorithm. Specifically, for a circularly symmetric wavefront, the convergence rate of the algorithm can be improved by using the result of a Fourier Transform as an initial value for the iteration. Various simulations are presented to demonstrate the improvements realized when using the proposed algorithm. Several experimental measurements of deflectometry are also processed by using the proposed algorithm.

  11. Passive MMW algorithm performance characterization using MACET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bradford D.; Watson, John S.; Amphay, Sengvieng A.

    1997-06-01

    As passive millimeter wave sensor technology matures, algorithms which are tailored to exploit the benefits of this technology are being developed. The expedient development of such algorithms requires an understanding of not only the gross phenomenology, but also specific quirks and limitations inherent in sensors and the data gathering methodology specific to this regime. This level of understanding is approached as the technology matures and increasing amounts of data become available for analysis. The Armament Directorate of Wright Laboratory, WL/MN, has spearheaded the advancement of passive millimeter-wave technology in algorithm development tools and modeling capability as well as sensor development. A passive MMW channel is available within WL/MNs popular multi-channel modeling program Irma, and a sample passive MMW algorithm is incorporated into the Modular Algorithm Concept Evaluation Tool, an algorithm development and evaluation system. The Millimeter Wave Analysis of Passive Signatures system provides excellent data collection capability in the 35, 60, and 95 GHz MMW bands. This paper exploits these assets for the study of the PMMW signature of a High Mobility Multi- Purpose Wheeled Vehicle in the three bands mentioned, and the effect of camouflage upon this signature and autonomous target recognition algorithm performance.

  12. Algorithm for dynamic Speckle pattern processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñe, J.; Guzmán, R.; Torres-Ruiz, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a new algorithm for determining surface activity by processing speckle pattern images recorded with a CCD camera. Surface activity can be produced by motility or small displacements among other causes, and is manifested as a change in the pattern recorded in the camera with reference to a static background pattern. This intensity variation is considered to be a small perturbation compared with the mean intensity. Based on a perturbative method we obtain an equation with which we can infer information about the dynamic behavior of the surface that generates the speckle pattern. We define an activity index based on our algorithm that can be easily compared with the outcomes from other algorithms. It is shown experimentally that this index evolves in time in the same way as the Inertia Moment method, however our algorithm is based on direct processing of speckle patterns without the need for other kinds of post-processes (like THSP and co-occurrence matrix), making it a viable real-time method. We also show how this algorithm compares with several other algorithms when applied to calibration experiments. From these results we conclude that our algorithm offer qualitative and quantitative advantages over current methods.

  13. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  14. Selecting materialized views using random algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Hao, Zhongxiao; Liu, Chi

    2007-04-01

    The data warehouse is a repository of information collected from multiple possibly heterogeneous autonomous distributed databases. The information stored at the data warehouse is in form of views referred to as materialized views. The selection of the materialized views is one of the most important decisions in designing a data warehouse. Materialized views are stored in the data warehouse for the purpose of efficiently implementing on-line analytical processing queries. The first issue for the user to consider is query response time. So in this paper, we develop algorithms to select a set of views to materialize in data warehouse in order to minimize the total view maintenance cost under the constraint of a given query response time. We call it query_cost view_ selection problem. First, cost graph and cost model of query_cost view_ selection problem are presented. Second, the methods for selecting materialized views by using random algorithms are presented. The genetic algorithm is applied to the materialized views selection problem. But with the development of genetic process, the legal solution produced become more and more difficult, so a lot of solutions are eliminated and producing time of the solutions is lengthened in genetic algorithm. Therefore, improved algorithm has been presented in this paper, which is the combination of simulated annealing algorithm and genetic algorithm for the purpose of solving the query cost view selection problem. Finally, in order to test the function and efficiency of our algorithms experiment simulation is adopted. The experiments show that the given methods can provide near-optimal solutions in limited time and works better in practical cases. Randomized algorithms will become invaluable tools for data warehouse evolution.

  15. Algorithms for Disconnected Diagrams in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gambhir, Arjun Singh; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Orginos, Konstantinos; Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Computing disconnected diagrams in Lattice QCD (operator insertion in a quark loop) entails the computationally demanding problem of taking the trace of the all to all quark propagator. We first outline the basic algorithm used to compute a quark loop as well as improvements to this method. Then, we motivate and introduce an algorithm based on the synergy between hierarchical probing and singular value deflation. We present results for the chiral condensate using a 2+1-flavor clover ensemble and compare estimates of the nucleon charges with the basic algorithm.

  16. Algorithmic Perspectives on Problem Formulations in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2000-01-01

    This work is concerned with an approach to formulating the multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) problem that reflects an algorithmic perspective on MDO problem solution. The algorithmic perspective focuses on formulating the problem in light of the abilities and inabilities of optimization algorithms, so that the resulting nonlinear programming problem can be solved reliably and efficiently by conventional optimization techniques. We propose a modular approach to formulating MDO problems that takes advantage of the problem structure, maximizes the autonomy of implementation, and allows for multiple easily interchangeable problem statements to be used depending on the available resources and the characteristics of the application problem.

  17. Geometric Transforms for Fast Geometric Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    approximation algorithm extends the ideas of the first by defining a transform based on a " pie -slice" diagram and Use Of the floor function. 8.1 .1...2. The second (-approxinate algorithm reduces the time from O(N/(()I/") to O(N + 1 /() by using a tr’nisformu hascd on a " pie -slic e" diagram (Figure...N + 1/).) Bentley, Weide, and Yao [18] have used a simple " pie -slice" diagram for their Voronoi diagram algorithm and Weide [09] has used the floor

  18. An exact accelerated stochastic simulation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mjolsness, Eric; Orendorff, David; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-04-14

    An exact method for stochastic simulation of chemical reaction networks, which accelerates the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA), is proposed. The present "ER-leap" algorithm is derived from analytic upper and lower bounds on the multireaction probabilities sampled by SSA, together with rejection sampling and an adaptive multiplicity for reactions. The algorithm is tested on a number of well-quantified reaction networks and is found experimentally to be very accurate on test problems including a chaotic reaction network. At the same time ER-leap offers a substantial speedup over SSA with a simulation time proportional to the 23 power of the number of reaction events in a Galton-Watson process.

  19. Quantum hyperparallel algorithm for matrix multiplication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-04-29

    Hyperentangled states, entangled states with more than one degree of freedom, are considered as promising resource in quantum computation. Here we present a hyperparallel quantum algorithm for matrix multiplication with time complexity O(N(2)), which is better than the best known classical algorithm. In our scheme, an N dimensional vector is mapped to the state of a single source, which is separated to N paths. With the assistance of hyperentangled states, the inner product of two vectors can be calculated with a time complexity independent of dimension N. Our algorithm shows that hyperparallel quantum computation may provide a useful tool in quantum machine learning and "big data" analysis.

  20. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  1. Quantum algorithms for quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stephen P; Lee, Keith S M; Preskill, John

    2012-06-01

    Quantum field theory reconciles quantum mechanics and special relativity, and plays a central role in many areas of physics. We developed a quantum algorithm to compute relativistic scattering probabilities in a massive quantum field theory with quartic self-interactions (φ(4) theory) in spacetime of four and fewer dimensions. Its run time is polynomial in the number of particles, their energy, and the desired precision, and applies at both weak and strong coupling. In the strong-coupling and high-precision regimes, our quantum algorithm achieves exponential speedup over the fastest known classical algorithm.

  2. Online clustering algorithms for radar emitter classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Lee, Jim P Y; Senior; Li, Lingjie; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Wong, K Max

    2005-08-01

    Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters from received radar pulse samples. The main challenges of this task are the high dimensionality of radar pulse samples, small sample group size, and closely located radar pulse clusters. In this paper, two new online clustering algorithms are developed for radar emitter classification: One is model-based using the Minimum Description Length (MDL) criterion and the other is based on competitive learning. Computational complexity is analyzed for each algorithm and then compared. Simulation results show the superior performance of the model-based algorithm over competitive learning in terms of better classification accuracy, flexibility, and stability.

  3. Efficient Algorithms for Langevin and DPD Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goga, N; Rzepiela, A J; de Vries, A H; Marrink, S J; Berendsen, H J C

    2012-10-09

    In this article, we present several algorithms for stochastic dynamics, including Langevin dynamics and different variants of Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD), applicable to systems with or without constraints. The algorithms are based on the impulsive application of friction and noise, thus avoiding the computational complexity of algorithms that apply continuous friction and noise. Simulation results on thermostat strength and diffusion properties for ideal gas, coarse-grained (MARTINI) water, and constrained atomic (SPC/E) water systems are discussed. We show that the measured thermal relaxation rates agree well with theoretical predictions. The influence of various parameters on the diffusion coefficient is discussed.

  4. Recursive algorithms for vector extrapolation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of recursion relations are devised for implementing some extrapolation methods for vector sequences. One class of recursion relations can be used to implement methods like the modified minimal polynomial extrapolation and the topological epsilon algorithm; another allows implementation of methods like minimal polynomial and reduced rank extrapolation; while the remaining class can be employed in the implementation of the vector E-algorithm. Operation counts and storage requirements for these methods are also discussed, and some related techniques for special applications are also presented. Included are methods for the rapid evaluations of the vector E-algorithm.

  5. Comparative Study of Two Automatic Registration Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, D.; Bethel, J.; Crawford, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm is prevalent for the automatic fine registration of overlapping pairs of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. This method along with its vast number of variants, obtains the least squares parameters that are necessary to align the TLS data by minimizing some distance metric between the scans. The ICP algorithm uses a "model-data" concept in which the scans obtain differential treatment in the registration process depending on whether they were assigned to be the "model" or "data". For each of the "data" points, corresponding points from the "model" are sought. Another concept of "symmetric correspondence" was proposed in the Point-to-Plane (P2P) algorithm, where both scans are treated equally in the registration process. The P2P method establishes correspondences on both scans and minimizes the point-to-plane distances between the scans by simultaneously considering the stochastic properties of both scans. This paper studies both the ICP and P2P algorithms in terms of their consistency in registration parameters for pairs of TLS data. The question being investigated in this paper is, should scan A be registered to scan B, will the parameters be the same if scan B were registered to scan A? Experiments were conducted with eight pairs of real TLS data which were registered by the two algorithms in the forward (scan A to scan B) and backward (scan B to scan A) modes and the results were compared. The P2P algorithm was found to be more consistent than the ICP algorithm. The differences in registration accuracy between the forward and backward modes were negligible when using the P2P algorithm (mean difference of 0.03 mm). However, the ICP had a mean difference of 4.26 mm. Each scan was also transformed by the forward and backward parameters of the two algorithms and the misclosure computed. The mean misclosure for the P2P algorithm was 0.80 mm while that for the ICP algorithm was 5.39 mm. The conclusion from this study is

  6. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-08-30

    We present, in a unifying way, the main components of three asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel stochastic molecular-dynamics algorithm that builds on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). We explain how to effectively combine event-driven and classical time-driven handling, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  7. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-02-28

    We present in a unifying way the main components of three examples of asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel event-driven algorithm for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Finally, we describe how to combine MD with DSMC in an event-driven framework, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  8. Algorithms For Integrating Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Walker, K. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved algorithms developed for use in numerical integration of systems of nonhomogenous, nonlinear, first-order, ordinary differential equations. In comparison with integration algorithms, these algorithms offer greater stability and accuracy. Several asymptotically correct, thereby enabling retention of stability and accuracy when large increments of independent variable used. Accuracies attainable demonstrated by applying them to systems of nonlinear, first-order, differential equations that arise in study of viscoplastic behavior, spread of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus and predator/prey populations.

  9. Quantum hyperparallel algorithm for matrix multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Hyperentangled states, entangled states with more than one degree of freedom, are considered as promising resource in quantum computation. Here we present a hyperparallel quantum algorithm for matrix multiplication with time complexity O(N2), which is better than the best known classical algorithm. In our scheme, an N dimensional vector is mapped to the state of a single source, which is separated to N paths. With the assistance of hyperentangled states, the inner product of two vectors can be calculated with a time complexity independent of dimension N. Our algorithm shows that hyperparallel quantum computation may provide a useful tool in quantum machine learning and “big data” analysis.

  10. Refined Genetic Algorithms for Polypeptide Structure Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    designing no v el proteins, in deco ding the information obtained from the Human Genome Pro ject (91), in designing new drugs, and in trying to...function that assigns tness v alues to p ossible solutions and an enco de/ deco de b et w een the algorithm and problem spaces. Al- though these metho ds...genetic algorithms: In tro duction and o v erview of curren t researc h. Parallel Genetic Algorithms, pages 5{35, 1993. 22. Bruce S. Duncan . P arallel ev

  11. Analysis of dissection algorithms for vector computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A.; Poole, W. G., Jr.; Voigt, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two dissection algorithms (one-way and incomplete nested dissection) have been developed for solving the sparse positive definite linear systems arising from n by n grid problems. Concurrently, vector computers (such as the CDC STAR-100 and TI ASC) have been developed for large scientific applications. An analysis of the use of dissection algorithms on vector computers dictates that vectors of maximum length be utilized thereby implying little or no dissection; on the other hand, minimizing operation counts suggest that considerable dissection be performed. In this paper we discuss the resolution of this conflict by minimizing the total time required by vectorized versions of the two algorithms.

  12. An algorithm for online optimization of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; Safranek, James; Wu, Juhao

    2013-10-01

    We developed a general algorithm for online optimization of accelerator performance, i.e., online tuning, using the performance measure as the objective function. This method, named robust conjugate direction search (RCDS), combines the conjugate direction set approach of Powell's method with a robust line optimizer which considers the random noise in bracketing the minimum and uses parabolic fit of data points that uniformly sample the bracketed zone. Moreover, it is much more robust against noise than traditional algorithms and is therefore suitable for online application. Simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to demonstrate the strength of the new algorithm.

  13. Some multigrid algorithms for SIMD machines

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Previously a semicoarsening multigrid algorithm suitable for use on SIMD architectures was investigated. Through the use of new software tools, the performance of this algorithm has been considerably improved. The method has also been extended to three space dimensions. The method performs well for strongly anisotropic problems and for problems with coefficients jumping by orders of magnitude across internal interfaces. The parallel efficiency of this method is analyzed, and its actual performance on the CM-5 is compared with its performance on the CRAY-YMP. A standard coarsening multigrid algorithm is also considered, and we compare its performance on these two platforms as well.

  14. Dual format algorithm implementation with gotcha data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2012-05-01

    The Dual Format Algorithm (DFA) is an alternative to the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) where the image is formed first to an arbitrary grid instead of a Cartesian grid. The arbitrary grid is specifically chosen to allow for more efficient application of defocus and distortion corrections that occur due to range curvature. We provide a description of the arbitrary image grid and show that the quadratic phase errors are isolated along a single dimension of the image. We describe an application of the DFA to circular SAR data and analyze the image focus. For an example SAR dataset, the DFA doubles the focused image size of the PFA algorithm with post imaging corrections.

  15. Algorithms for optimal dyadic decision trees

    SciTech Connect

    Hush, Don; Porter, Reid

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm for constructing optimal dyadic decision trees was recently introduced, analyzed, and shown to be very effective for low dimensional data sets. This paper enhances and extends this algorithm by: introducing an adaptive grid search for the regularization parameter that guarantees optimal solutions for all relevant trees sizes, revising the core tree-building algorithm so that its run time is substantially smaller for most regularization parameter values on the grid, and incorporating new data structures and data pre-processing steps that provide significant run time enhancement in practice.

  16. An Analysis of Algorithms for Solving Discrete Logarithms in Fixed Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Pollard’s Rho Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 H. Pollard’s Kangaroo Algorithm...Pollard’s Kangaroo Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 5. Index Calculus Algorithm...27 16. Pollard’s Rho - Random Sequence Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 17. Pollard’s Kangaroo Algorithm

  17. Finite pure integer programming algorithms employing only hyperspherically deduced cuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed that may be based exclusively on hyperspherically deduced cuts. The algorithms only apply, therefore, to problems structured so that these cuts are valid. The algorithms are shown to be finite.

  18. ANALYZING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS WITH THE WAR ALGORITHM: REVIEW AND UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will review uses of the WAR algorithm and current developments and possible future directions. The WAR algorithm is a methodology for analyzing potential environmental impacts of 1600+ chemicals used in the chemical processing and other industries. The algorithm...

  19. Protein structure optimization with a "Lamarckian" ant colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Mark T; Richardson, E Grace; Carr, Harriet; Johnston, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    We describe the LamarckiAnt algorithm: a search algorithm that combines the features of a "Lamarckian" genetic algorithm and ant colony optimization. We have implemented this algorithm for the optimization of BLN model proteins, which have frustrated energy landscapes and represent a challenge for global optimization algorithms. We demonstrate that LamarckiAnt performs competitively with other state-of-the-art optimization algorithms.

  20. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  1. IIR algorithms for adaptive line enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    David, R.A.; Stearns, S.D.; Elliott, G.R.; Etter, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    We introduce a simple IIR structure for the adaptive line enhancer. Two algorithms based on gradient-search techniques are presented for adapting the structure. Results from experiments which utilized real data as well as computer simulations are provided.

  2. Scheduling Earth Observing Satellites with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesize that evolutionary algorithms can effectively schedule coordinated fleets of Earth observing satellites. The constraints are complex and the bottlenecks are not well understood, a condition where evolutionary algorithms are often effective. This is, in part, because evolutionary algorithms require only that one can represent solutions, modify solutions, and evaluate solution fitness. To test the hypothesis we have developed a representative set of problems, produced optimization software (in Java) to solve them, and run experiments comparing techniques. This paper presents initial results of a comparison of several evolutionary and other optimization techniques; namely the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization, and stochastic hill climbing. We also compare separate satellite vs. integrated scheduling of a two satellite constellation. While the results are not definitive, tests to date suggest that simulated annealing is the best search technique and integrated scheduling is superior.

  3. Universal lossless compression algorithm for textual images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al Zahir, Saif

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, an unparalleled volume of textual information has been transported over the Internet via email, chatting, blogging, tweeting, digital libraries, and information retrieval systems. As the volume of text data has now exceeded 40% of the total volume of traffic on the Internet, compressing textual data becomes imperative. Many sophisticated algorithms were introduced and employed for this purpose including Huffman encoding, arithmetic encoding, the Ziv-Lempel family, Dynamic Markov Compression, and Burrow-Wheeler Transform. My research presents novel universal algorithm for compressing textual images. The algorithm comprises two parts: 1. a universal fixed-to-variable codebook; and 2. our row and column elimination coding scheme. Simulation results on a large number of Arabic, Persian, and Hebrew textual images show that this algorithm has a compression ratio of nearly 87%, which exceeds published results including JBIG2.

  4. Genetic algorithms at UC Davis/LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, V.R.

    1993-12-31

    A tutorial introduction to genetic algorithms is given. This brief tutorial should serve the purpose of introducing the subject to the novice. The tutorial is followed by a brief commentary on the term project reports that follow.

  5. Computing Algorithms for Nuffield Advanced Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    Defines all recurrence relations used in the Nuffield course, to solve first- and second-order differential equations, and describes a typical algorithm for computer generation of solutions. (Author/GA)

  6. A Minimal Periods Algorithm with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi

    Kosaraju in "Computation of squares in a string" briefly described a linear-time algorithm for computing the minimal squares starting at each position in a word. Using the same construction of suffix trees, we generalize his result and describe in detail how to compute the minimal α power, with a period of length longer than s, starting at each position in a word w for arbitrary exponent α> 1 and integer s ≥ 0. The algorithm runs in O(α|w|)-time for s = 0 and in O(|w|2)-time otherwise. We provide a complete proof of the correctness and computational complexity of the algorithm. The algorithm can be used to detect certain types of pseudo-patterns in words, which was our original goal in studying this generalization.

  7. Dual format algorithm for monostatic SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2010-04-01

    The polar format algorithm for monostatic synthetic aperture radar imaging is based on a linear approximation of the differential range to a scatterer, which leads to spatially-variant distortion and defocus in the resultant image. While approximate corrections may be applied to compensate for these effects, these corrections are ad-hoc in nature. Here, we introduce an alternative imaging algorithm called the Dual Format Algorithm (DFA) that provides better isolation of the defocus effects and reduces distortion. Quadratic phase errors are isolated along a single dimension by allowing image formation to an arbitrary grid instead of a Cartesian grid. This provides an opportunity for more efficient phase error corrections. We provide a description of the arbitrary image grid and we show the quadratic phase error correction derived from a second-order Taylor series approximation of the differential range. The algorithm is demonstrated with a point target simulation.

  8. Synthesis of logic circuits with evolutionary algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,JAKE S.; DAVIDSON,GEORGE S.

    2000-01-26

    In the last decade there has been interest and research in the area of designing circuits with genetic algorithms, evolutionary algorithms, and genetic programming. However, the ability to design circuits of the size and complexity required by modern engineering design problems, simply by specifying required outputs for given inputs has as yet eluded researchers. This paper describes current research in the area of designing logic circuits using an evolutionary algorithm. The goal of the research is to improve the effectiveness of this method and make it a practical aid for design engineers. A novel method of implementing the algorithm is introduced, and results are presented for various multiprocessing systems. In addition to evolving standard arithmetic circuits, work in the area of evolving circuits that perform digital signal processing tasks is described.

  9. Memetic algorithm for community detection in networks.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maoguo; Fu, Bao; Jiao, Licheng; Du, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    Community structure is one of the most important properties in networks, and community detection has received an enormous amount of attention in recent years. Modularity is by far the most used and best known quality function for measuring the quality of a partition of a network, and many community detection algorithms are developed to optimize it. However, there is a resolution limit problem in modularity optimization methods. In this study, a memetic algorithm, named Meme-Net, is proposed to optimize another quality function, modularity density, which includes a tunable parameter that allows one to explore the network at different resolutions. Our proposed algorithm is a synergy of a genetic algorithm with a hill-climbing strategy as the local search procedure. Experiments on computer-generated and real-world networks show the effectiveness and the multiresolution ability of the proposed method.

  10. Advanced CHP Control Algorithms: Scope Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.

    2006-04-28

    The primary objective of this multiyear project is to develop algorithms for combined heat and power systems to ensure optimal performance, increase reliability, and lead to the goal of clean, efficient, reliable and affordable next generation energy systems.

  11. A parallel variable metric optimization algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straeter, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An algorithm, designed to exploit the parallel computing or vector streaming (pipeline) capabilities of computers is presented. When p is the degree of parallelism, then one cycle of the parallel variable metric algorithm is defined as follows: first, the function and its gradient are computed in parallel at p different values of the independent variable; then the metric is modified by p rank-one corrections; and finally, a single univariant minimization is carried out in the Newton-like direction. Several properties of this algorithm are established. The convergence of the iterates to the solution is proved for a quadratic functional on a real separable Hilbert space. For a finite-dimensional space the convergence is in one cycle when p equals the dimension of the space. Results of numerical experiments indicate that the new algorithm will exploit parallel or pipeline computing capabilities to effect faster convergence than serial techniques.

  12. Constructing backbone network by using tinker algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng; Wang, Jianxiong; Yao, Chenggui

    2017-01-01

    Revealing how a biological network is organized to realize its function is one of the main topics in systems biology. The functional backbone network, defined as the primary structure of the biological network, is of great importance in maintaining the main function of the biological network. We propose a new algorithm, the tinker algorithm, to determine this core structure and apply it in the cell-cycle system. With this algorithm, the backbone network of the cell-cycle network can be determined accurately and efficiently in various models such as the Boolean model, stochastic model, and ordinary differential equation model. Results show that our algorithm is more efficient than that used in the previous research. We hope this method can be put into practical use in relevant future studies.

  13. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  14. A segmentation algorithm for noisy images

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a 2-D image segmentation algorithm and addresses issues related to its performance on noisy images. The algorithm segments an image by first constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of the image and then partitioning the spanning tree into sub-trees representing different homogeneous regions. The spanning tree is partitioned in such a way that the sum of gray-level variations over all partitioned subtrees is minimized under the constraints that each subtree has at least a specified number of pixels and two adjacent subtrees have significantly different ``average`` gray-levels. Two types of noise, transmission errors and Gaussian additive noise. are considered and their effects on the segmentation algorithm are studied. Evaluation results have shown that the segmentation algorithm is robust in the presence of these two types of noise.

  15. Five-dimensional Janis-Newman algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbin, Harold; Heurtier, Lucien

    2015-08-01

    The Janis-Newman algorithm has been shown to be successful in finding new stationary solutions of four-dimensional gravity. Attempts for a generalization to higher dimensions have already been found for the restricted cases with only one angular momentum. In this paper we propose an extension of this algorithm to five-dimensions with two angular momenta—using the prescription of Giampieri—through two specific examples, that are the Myers-Perry and BMPV black holes. We also discuss possible enlargements of our prescriptions to other dimensions and maximal number of angular momenta, and show how dimensions higher than six appear to be much more challenging to treat within this framework. Nonetheless this general algorithm provides a unification of the formulation in d=3,4,5 of the Janis-Newman algorithm, from which several examples are exposed, including the BTZ black hole.

  16. Genetic algorithms for the vehicle routing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volna, Eva

    2016-06-01

    The Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) is one of the most challenging combinatorial optimization tasks. This problem consists in designing the optimal set of routes for fleet of vehicles in order to serve a given set of customers. Evolutionary algorithms are general iterative algorithms for combinatorial optimization. These algorithms have been found to be very effective and robust in solving numerous problems from a wide range of application domains. This problem is known to be NP-hard; hence many heuristic procedures for its solution have been suggested. For such problems it is often desirable to obtain approximate solutions, so they can be found fast enough and are sufficiently accurate for the purpose. In this paper we have performed an experimental study that indicates the suitable use of genetic algorithms for the vehicle routing problem.

  17. Genetic algorithms as global random search methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Charles C.; Dhawan, Atam P.

    1995-01-01

    Genetic algorithm behavior is described in terms of the construction and evolution of the sampling distributions over the space of candidate solutions. This novel perspective is motivated by analysis indicating that the schema theory is inadequate for completely and properly explaining genetic algorithm behavior. Based on the proposed theory, it is argued that the similarities of candidate solutions should be exploited directly, rather than encoding candidate solutions and then exploiting their similarities. Proportional selection is characterized as a global search operator, and recombination is characterized as the search process that exploits similarities. Sequential algorithms and many deletion methods are also analyzed. It is shown that by properly constraining the search breadth of recombination operators, convergence of genetic algorithms to a global optimum can be ensured.

  18. Non-Manhattan layout extraction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satkhozhina, Aziza; Ahmadullin, Ildus; Allebach, Jan P.; Lin, Qian; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Hunter, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Automated publishing requires large databases containing document page layout templates. The number of layout templates that need to be created and stored grows exponentially with the complexity of the document layouts. A better approach for automated publishing is to reuse layout templates of existing documents for the generation of new documents. In this paper, we present an algorithm for template extraction from a docu- ment page image. We use the cost-optimized segmentation algorithm (COS) to segment the image, and Voronoi decomposition to cluster the text regions. Then, we create a block image where each block represents a homo- geneous region of the document page. We construct a geometrical tree that describes the hierarchical structure of the document page. We also implement a font recognition algorithm to analyze the font of each text region. We present a detailed description of the algorithm and our preliminary results.

  19. A Comprehensive Review of Swarm Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many swarm optimization algorithms have been introduced since the early 60’s, Evolutionary Programming to the most recent, Grey Wolf Optimization. All of these algorithms have demonstrated their potential to solve many optimization problems. This paper provides an in-depth survey of well-known optimization algorithms. Selected algorithms are briefly explained and compared with each other comprehensively through experiments conducted using thirty well-known benchmark functions. Their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. A number of statistical tests are then carried out to determine the significant performances. The results indicate the overall advantage of Differential Evolution (DE) and is closely followed by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), compared with other considered approaches. PMID:25992655

  20. Rigorous estimates for the relegation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansottera, Marco; Ceccaroni, Marta

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the relegation algorithm by Deprit et al. (Celest. Mech. Dyn. Astron. 79:157-182, 2001) in the light of the rigorous Nekhoroshev's like theory. This relatively recent algorithm is nowadays widely used for implementing closed form analytic perturbation theories, as it generalises the classical Birkhoff normalisation algorithm. The algorithm, here briefly explained by means of Lie transformations, has been so far introduced and used in a formal way, i.e. without providing any rigorous convergence or asymptotic estimates. The overall aim of this paper is to find such quantitative estimates and to show how the results about stability over exponentially long times can be recovered in a simple and effective way, at least in the non-resonant case.