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Sample records for acute abdominal distress

  1. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  2. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  3. Diagnostic implications of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and abdominal diseases: a preliminary observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) because of acute or decompensated chronic abdominal disease and acute respiratory failure need to have the potential infection diagnosed as well as its site (pulmonary or abdominal). For this purpose, we measured soluble triggering receptor expression on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in alveolar and peritoneal fluid. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 21) with acute or decompensated chronic abdominal disease and acute respiratory failure were included. sTREM was measured in alveolar (A-sTREM) and peritoneal (P-sTREM) fluids. Results An infection was diagnosed in all patients. Nine patients had a lung infection (without abdominal infection), 5 had an abdominal infection (without lung infection) and seven had both infections. A-sTREM was higher in the patients with pneumonia compared to those without pneumonia (1963 ng/ml (1010-3129) vs. 862 ng/ml (333-1011); P 0.019). Patients with abdominal infection had an increase in the P-sTREM compared to patients without abdominal infection (1941 ng/ml (1088-3370) vs. 305 ng/ml (288-459); P < 0.001). A cut-off point of 900 pg/ml of A-sTREM-1 had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 80% (NPV 57%; PPV 93%, AUC 0.775) for the diagnosis of pneumonia. In abdominal infections, a cut-off point for P-sTREM of 900 pg/ml had the best results (sensitivity 92%; specificity 100%; NPV 90%, PPV 100%, AUC = 0.903). Conclusions sTREM-1 measured in alveolar and peritoneal fluids is useful in assessing pulmonary and peritoneal infection in critical-state patients-A-sTREM having the capacity to discriminate between a pulmonary and an extra-pulmonary infection in the context of acute respiratory failure. PMID:21294874

  4. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  5. Abdominal actinomycosis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Robert Joseph; Riela, Steven; Patel, Ravi; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency department, reporting worsening sharp lower right quadrant abdominal pain for 3 days. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of inflammation in the peritoneal soft tissues adjacent to an enlarged and thick-walled appendix, an appendicolith, no abscess formation and a slightly thickened caecum consistent with acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic appendectomy, the caecum was noted to be firm, raising suspicion of malignancy. Surgical oncology team was consulted and open laparotomy with right hemicolectomy was performed. Pathology reported that the ileocaecal mass was not a malignancy but was, rather, actinomycosis. The patient was discharged after 10 days of intravenous antibiotics in the hospital, with the diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis. Although the original clinical and radiological findings in this case were highly suggestive of acute appendicitis, abdominal actinomycosis should be in the differential for right lower quadrant pain as it may be treated non-operatively.

  6. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  7. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  8. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributed to Neosartorya infection. The mold grew rapidly in culture of both sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman with ARDS, which developed as the culmination of a...

  9. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  10. Controversies involving hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Liliane; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by a diffuse inflammatory reaction of lung parenchyma induced by a direct insult to the alveolar epithelium (pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome) or an indirect lesion through the vascular endothelium (extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome). The main therapeutic strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome is the ventilatory support. However, mechanical ventilation can worsen lung injury. In this context, a protective ventilatory strategy with low tidal volume has been proposed. The use of low tidal volume reduced the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, but result in hypercapnic acidosis. The current article presents a review of literature on the effects of permissive hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome. To that end, we carried out a systematic review of scientific literature based on established criteria for documental analysis including clinical and experimental articles, using as data bases MedLine, LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, Cochrane. Hypercapnic acidosis has been considered by some authors as a modulator of the inflammatory process of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, clinical and experimental studies on the effects of hypercapnic acidosis have shown controversial results. Therefore it is important to better elucidate the role of hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300 mm Hg), moderate (100 mm Hg < PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 200 mm Hg), and severe (PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 100 mm Hg) and 4 ancillary variables for severe ARDS: radiographic severity, respiratory system compliance (≤40 mL/cm H2O), positive end-expiratory pressure (≥10 cm H2O), and corrected expired volume per minute (≥10 L/min). The draft Berlin Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P < .001) and increased median duration of mechanical ventilation in survivors (5 days; interquartile [IQR], 2-11; 7 days; IQR, 4-14; and 9 days; IQR, 5-17, respectively; P < .001). Compared with the AECC definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P

  13. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, and there is a significant need for more effective medicinal chemical agents for use in these severe and lethal lung injury syndromes. To facilitate future chemical-based drug discovery research on new agent development, this paper reviews present pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS in the context of biological and biochemical drug activities. The complex lung injury pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS offers an array of possible targets for drug therapy, including inflammation, cell and tissue injury, vascular dysfunction, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidant injury. Added targets for pharmacotherapy outside the lungs may also be present, since multiorgan or systemic pathology is common in ALI/ARDS. The biological and physiological complexity of ALI/ARDS requires the consideration of combined-agent treatments in addition to single-agent therapies. A number of pharmacologic agents have been studied individually in ALI/ARDS, with limited or minimal success in improving survival. However, many of these agents have complementary biological/biochemical activities with the potential for synergy or additivity in combination therapy as discussed in this article. PMID:18691048

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in lambs. Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ulvund, M J; Grønstøl, H

    1984-01-01

    Lambs suffering from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) showed elevated PCV, neutrophilia, a tendency towards lymphopenia, eosinopenia, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia and extremely low serum Ca values during the first couple of days after the outbreak of symptoms. During the very early phase, plasma potassium values were mostly lowered (Figs. 1-3, Table I). The possible involvement of histamine is shortly discussed: either 1) through an atopic reaction, 2) because of acute ruminal acidosis and sudden histamine formation, or 3) involvement of endotoxins.

  15. Faculty Role in Responding to the Acutely Distressed College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lisa Stacey

    2010-01-01

    The acutely distressed student, one who exhibits disturbing or disruptive behavior that is outside of the norm of other students due to significant mental illness and who may be at risk to harm oneself or others, poses considerable challenges to today's higher education institutions (Amanda, 1994; Jed Foundation, 2006; McKinley & Dworkin, 1989).…

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, A; Grocott, M P W; Postle, A D; Cusack, R

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with low tidal volumes and moderate positive end expiratory pressure, multi-organ support, and treatment where possible of the underlying cause. Moreover, advances in general supportive measures such as appropriate antimicrobial therapy, early enteral nutrition, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal ulceration are likely contributory reasons for the improved outcomes. Although therapies such as corticosteroids, nitric oxide, prostacyclins, exogenous surfactants, ketoconazole and antioxidants have shown promising clinical effects in animal models, these have failed to translate positively in human studies. Most recently, clinical trials with β2 agonists aiding alveolar fluid clearance and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids have also provided disappointing results. Despite these negative studies, mortality seems to be in decline due to advances in overall patient care. Future directions of research are likely to concentrate on identifying potential

  17. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  18. An Acute Abdominal Catastrophe in a HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Patel, Harish; Vootla, Vamshidhar; Khan, Usman; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    We report this case of a 45-year-old man with HIV-AIDS on HAART therapy who presented with acute abdominal pain and renal failure. He was found to have pneumatosis intestinalis on computerized axial tomography scan of the abdomen. He underwent emergent explorative laparotomy, which revealed a necrotic large bowel segment for which a right-sided hemicolectomy and ileostomy were performed. The patient subsequently developed septic shock and hypoxic respiratory failure. He expired a week after the surgical procedure. Acute abdominal events due to vascular catastrophes secondary to hypercoagulability, endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis have been reported in HIV positive patients.

  19. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Young; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2016-04-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  20. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-02-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure that is characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities to treat ARDS have been investigated over the past several decades, supportive therapies remain the mainstay of treatment. In this article, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of ARDS and present emerging aspects of ARDS pathophysiology that encompass modulators of the innate immune response, damage signals, and aberrant proteolysis that may serve as a foundation for future therapeutic targets.

  1. Acute tocolysis for fetal distress: terbutaline versus magnesium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Magann, E F; Cleveland, R S; Dockery, J R; Chauhan, S P; Martin, J N; Morrison, J C

    1993-11-01

    Forty-six women in active labour who developed fetal distress requiring abdominal delivery were randomized to receive 0.25 mg of terbutaline (subcutaneously) or magnesium sulphate as a 4-g bolus (intravenously) to decrease uterine activity. The terbutaline-treated group in contrast to the magnesium sulphate-treated group had reduced uterine activity as measured by Montevideo units (p < 0.002). This decrease in uterine activity was noted more rapidly in all 23 patients who received terbutaline, 1.8 +/- 0.74 minutes compared to 7.5 +/- 2.1 minutes in the 16 of 23 patients (magnesium sulphate-treated women) in whom a decrease in uterine activity occurred (p < 0.001). Umbilical cord arterial blood pH at delivery was less than 7.20 in only 2 of the 23 patients treated with terbutaline versus 7 of the 23 in the magnesium sulphate-treated group. We conclude that terbutaline is an effective and more rapid-acting tocolytic agent to arrest uterine activity prior to delivery for fetal distress. PMID:8179541

  2. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  3. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-03-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome.

  4. Positive end expiratory pressure in acute and chronic respiratory distress.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, A; Chan, V; Hird, M F

    1992-01-01

    The optimum level of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) was determined in 16 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (median gestational age 29 weeks, median postnatal age 1 day) and in 16 infants with chronic respiratory distress (median gestational age 25 weeks, median postnatal age 15 days). All infants were studied at a PEEP sequence of 3, 0, 3, 6, and 3 cm H2O, all other ventilator parameters being kept constant. Each PEEP level was maintained for 20 minutes and at the end of each period arterial blood gas was checked. During acute respiratory distress syndrome there were no significant changes in oxygenation but arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) significantly decreased from a mean of 4.93 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 4.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and increased to a mean of 5.87 kPa at 6 cm H2O. In the infants with chronic respiratory distress, oxygenation fell from a mean of 8.66 kPa at 3 cm H2O to 6.40 kPa at 0 cm H2O and improved at 6 cm H2O to a mean of 10.50 kPa. There were no significant changes in PaCO2. We conclude that addition of PEEP, up to 6 cm H2O, may be useful even after the first week of life. High levels of PEEP, however, have previously been reported, in certain infants, to result in circulatory disturbance. It is therefore important to assess the use of 6 cm H2O PEEP in a controlled study of longer term clinical outcome. PMID:1575557

  5. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    PubMed

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice.

  6. [Alcohol and acute respiratory distress syndrome: casuality or causality?].

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Xavier; Guardiola, Juan J; Soler, Manuel

    2013-06-18

    Alcohol has been considered an important risk factor for the development of pneumonia since the last century. Nevertheless, it was not thought that it had relevant effects on lung structure and functions until recently. Recent studies have shown that the risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is 2-4 times higher among alcoholic patients with sepsis or trauma, and that alcoholism can play a roll in more than 50% of cases in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although alcoholism per se does not cause acute lung injury it predisposes to pulmonary dysfunction after inflammatory stress, that is present in clinical situations that cause ARDS leading to its development and complicating its outcome. Recent investigations in animals and humans with alcohol abuse have uncovered several alterations currently known as the "alcoholic lung". This revision discusses the association between alcohol abuse and lung injury/ARDS and tries to explain the physiopathology along with possible treatments.

  7. [ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME CAUSED BY BETA-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS].

    PubMed

    Skipskiy, I M; Efimov, N W; Remizov, A S; Miroshnikov, B I

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of iatrogenic lesion of the lungs in a 61 year old patient following simultaneous subtotal resection and plastic surgery of esophagus using a gastric stem with the removed cardial portion along with subtotal mediastinal lympho-dissection for the treatment of 2 x 1 cm T2NoMO tumour in the middle third of esophagus. The patient's medical history contained no evidence of previous pulmonary pathology, preoperative chest X-ray study revealed neither focal nor infiltrative changes in the lungs. On day 5 after extensive surgical intervention with the use of a parenteral beta-lactam antibiotic, the patient developed acute respiratory distress the symptoms of which increased wavelike during the next 4.5 weeks in association with subfebrility, leukocytosis, enhanced ESR and large shaded areas in the lungs. These conditions were regarded as signs of pneumonia that required the application of increasingly more powerful beta-lactam antibiotics. All these symptoms became less apparent and completely disappeared within 2 days and 1 week respectively after withdrawal of the antibiotics and prescription of parenteral prednisolone. It confirmed the iatrogenic origin of lung lesions regarded by the authors as recurring acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by beta-lactam antibiotics.

  8. Relevant Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite distinct epidemiology and outcomes, pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is often managed based on evidence extrapolated from treatment of adults. The impact of non-pulmonary processes on mortality as well as the lower mortality rate compared to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) renders the utilization of short-term mortality as a primary outcome measure for interventional studies problematic. However, data regarding alternatives to mortality are profoundly understudied, and proposed alternatives, such as ventilator-free days, may be themselves subject to hidden biases. Given the neuropsychiatric and functional impairment in adult survivors of ARDS, characterization of these morbidities in children with PARDS is of paramount importance. The purpose of this review is to frame these challenges in the context of the existing pediatric literature, and using adult ARDS as a guide, suggest potential clinically relevant outcomes that deserve further investigation. The goal is to identify important areas of study in order to better define clinical practice and facilitate future interventional trials in PARDS. PMID:27242980

  9. Acute renal infarction: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Butt, Mohammed A; Syed, Yadullah; Carr, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and under-diagnosed disease. Its clinical presentation is nonspecific and often mimics other more common disease entities. The diagnosis is usually missed or delayed, which frequently results in irreversible renal parenchyma damage. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis, as timely intervention may prevent loss of kidney function. We report a case of acute renal infarction following coronary angiography in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who initially presented with acute abdominal pain mimicking appendicitis.

  10. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  11. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage in evaluating acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barbee, C L; Gilsdorf, R B

    1975-06-01

    A study was performed to determine the value of peritoneal lavage in the acute abdomen not related to trauma. Lavage was performed in 33 patients in the evaluation of abdominal pain of sufficient degree to warrant consideration for surgical intervention. Peritoneal lavage was truly positive or truly negative in 64% of the cases. It showed false negative results in 28% and false positive results in 8%. The lavage was most accurate in the evaluation of appendicitis, colonic disease, and intra abdominal bleeding. It was highly inaccurate in the evaluation of cholecystitis and peptic ulcer disease. It was concluded that the peritoneal lavage can be a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with abdominal pain and should be considered in difficult diagnostic problems but not routinely employed.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: prevention and early recognition.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Candelaria; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torrents, Eva; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). ARDS results in increased use of critical care resources and healthcare costs, yet the overall mortality associated with these conditions remains high. Research focusing on preventing ARDS and identifying patients at risk of developing ARDS is necessary to develop strategies to alter the clinical course and progression of the disease. To date, few strategies have shown clear benefits. One of the most important obstacles to preventive interventions is the difficulty of identifying patients likely to develop ARDS. Identifying patients at risk and implementing prevention strategies in this group are key factors in preventing ARDS. This review will discuss early identification of at-risk patients and the current prevention strategies. PMID:23617961

  13. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Giri, Prabhas Prasun; Roy, Swapan; Bhattyacharya, Sukanta; Pal, Priyankar; Dhar, Sandipan

    2011-11-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis) after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum). She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications. PMID:22345792

  14. PEEP titration during prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Guérin, Claude; Ayzac, Louis; Mancebo, Jordi; Bates, Dina M; Malhotra, Atul; Talmor, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    No major trial evaluating prone positioning for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has incorporated a high-positive end-expiratory pressure (high-PEEP) strategy despite complementary physiological rationales. We evaluated generalizability of three recent proning trials to patients receiving a high-PEEP strategy. All trials employed a relatively low-PEEP strategy. After protocol ventilator settings were initiated and the patient was positioned per treatment assignment, post-intervention PEEP was not more than 5 cm H2O in 16.7 % and not more than 10 cm H2O in 66.0 % of patients. Post-intervention PEEP would have been nearly twice the set PEEP had a high-PEEP strategy been employed. Use of either proning or high-PEEP likely improves survival in moderate-severe ARDS; the role for both concomitantly remains unknown.

  15. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  16. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  17. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  18. [Role of heat flow generated by an abdominal cavity in monitoring of acute surgical pathology of abdominal organs].

    PubMed

    Bodiaka, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    Despite of significant development of modern surgery results of treatment of acute diffused peritonitis and acute intestinal obstruction are still unsatisfactory. Successful treatment of these conditions depends considerably on timely and adequate diagnosing as it gives a choice of optimal treatment tactics. Measuring of a human body heat flow in areas of organs affected by pathology in cases of acute diffused peritonitis and acute intestinal obstruction provides a possibility to improve the principles of early differential diagnosing, to form new approaches to treatment tactics and monitoring of general health status of a patient during early postoperative treatment. 47 patient suffering from acute diffused peritonitis and 42 patients suffering from acute intestinal obstruction have been examined; the patients were divided into groups based on abdominal cavity exudates character, intestinal obstruction type and intra-abdominal hypertension grade. Measurement of abdominal cavity heat flow was performed by a contact method with use of thermoelectric medical thermometer. Intra-abdominal hypertension was measured by generally used transvesical method. It has been established that abdominal cavity heat flow correlates with character of abdominal cavity exudates; this is also confirmed by reliable difference between serous peritonitis and fibrinopurulent peritonitis indices. Indices in case of acute intestinal obstruction are lower than ones in case of acute diffused peritonitis as there are no inflammatory changes of peritoneum. Development of intra-abdominal hypertension of grades 3-4 directly influences the heat flow extent; this is explained by accelerated and aggravated pathological changes of inner organs cased by the main disease. Thus, abdominal cavity heat flow fully reflects degree of purulent and inflammatory processes of abdominal cavity organs and can be used for additional diagnosing and clinical course monitoring.

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D'Angelo, Paolo

    2015-02-24

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  1. Presentation of Osteitis and Osteomyelitis Pubis as Acute Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Diane V; Scott, Kendall G

    2007-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is the most common inflammatory condition of the pubic symphysis and may present as acute abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain. Osteomyelitis pubis can occur concurrently and spontaneously with osteitis pubis. Primary care physicians should consider these conditions in patients presenting with abdominal and pelvic pain. A thorough history, including type of physical activity, and a focused physical examination will be useful, and imaging modalities may be helpful. A biopsy and culture of the pubic symphysis will usually confirm the diagnosis. Treatment for osteitis pubis generally involves rest and anti-inflammatory medications. Failure with this conservative treatment should alert the physician to the possibility of osteomyelitis, which needs treatment with antibiotics. Prognosis for recovery is excellent with definitive diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21461096

  2. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation.

  3. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    PubMed Central

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  4. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:27790273

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in the global context.

    PubMed

    Buregeya, Egide; Fowler, Robert A; Talmor, Daniel S; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Kiviri, Willy; Riviello, Elisabeth D

    2014-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinically defined syndrome of hypoxia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates due to inflammatory pathways triggered by pulmonary and nonpulmonary insults, and ARDS is pathologically correlated with diffuse alveolar damage. Estimates of ARDS's impact in the developed world vary widely, with some of the discrepancies attributed to marked differences in the availability of intensive care beds and mechanical ventilation. Almost nothing is known about the epidemiology of ARDS in the developing world, in part due to a clinical definition requiring positive pressure ventilation, arterial blood gases, and chest radiography. Current frameworks for comparing the epidemiology of death and disability across the world including the GBD (Global Burden of Disease Study) 2010 are ill-suited to quantifying critical illness syndromes including ARDS. Modifications to the definition of ARDS to allow a provision for environments without the capacity for positive pressure ventilation, and to allow for alternate diagnostic techniques including pulse oximetry and ultrasound, may make it possible to quantify and describe the impact of ARDS in the global context. PMID:25667180

  7. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation. PMID:27630415

  8. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation. PMID:27630415

  9. Extracorporeal lung assist for sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is one of the major causes of ICU deaths. Extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) has been used as a rescue therapy for most severe form of ARDS. However, its survival benefit had not been shown until CESAR trial in 2009. This has been because the concept of lung protective ventilation strategy had not yet known. Since CESAR trial, the clinical application of ECLA for ARDS as a method to achieve lung rest has wide spread. The effectiveness is further appreciated during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The succeeded countries achieved building the transportation systems to collect ECLA patients. With the accumulating evidences of survival benefit, the long-term outcome such as pulmonary function and quality of life are in concern. PumplessECLA which is a newly developed form of ECLA is also reviewed. In this essay we will firstly review the basics of ARDS and ECLA. Then the historical development of ECLA evidences for ARDS are reviewed. PMID:25567336

  10. Acute abdominal pain in childhood, with special reference to cases not due to acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, P F

    1969-02-01

    Appendicitis is not the only common cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Almost equally common is an acute episode which in its early stages resembles acute appendicitis but which subsides without treatment in 24 to 48 hours. The clinical features of this syndrome are contrasted with those of appendicitis. The two conditions cannot always be distinguished on clinical grounds, leading to admission to hospital for observation and the finding of a normal appendix in 14% of operations for suspected appendicitis. Reasons are given for abandoning attempts to diagnose acute mesenteric adenitis at the bedside.

  11. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Won

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications.

  13. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality. The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18–29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived. We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this

  14. Noninvasive ventilation for patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nava, Stefano; Schreiber, Ania; Domenighetti, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Few studies have been performed on noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat hypoxic acute respiratory failure in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The outcomes of these patients, for whom endotracheal intubation is not mandatory, depend on the degree of hypoxia, the presence of comorbidities and complications, and their illness severity. The use of NIV as an alternative to invasive ventilation in severely hypoxemic patients with ARDS (ie, P(aO(2))/F(IO(2)) < 200) is not generally advisable and should be limited to hemodynamically stable patients who can be closely monitored in an intensive care unit by highly skilled staff. Early NIV application may be extremely helpful in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates, in whom intubation dramatically increases the risk of infection, pneumonia, and death. The use of NIV in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome and other airborne diseases has generated debate, despite encouraging clinical results, mainly because of safety issues. Overall, the high rate of NIV failure suggests a cautious approach to NIV use in patients with ALI/ARDS, including early initiation, intensive monitoring, and prompt intubation if signs of NIV failure emerge. PMID:22008399

  15. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  16. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  17. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respir atory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS. PMID:26261640

  18. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared with that of the UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P < 0.05), and the APACHE II score in the GS+UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS.

  19. Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Karen J; Lewis, James F

    2007-09-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a life-threatening form of respiratory failure that affects a heterogeneous population of critically ill patients. Although overall mortality appears to be decreasing in recent years due to improvements in supportive care, there are presently no proven, effective pharmacological therapies to treat ARDS and prevent its associated complications. The most common cause of death in ARDS is not hypoxemia or pulmonary failure, but rather multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), suggesting that improving survival in patients with ARDS may be linked to decreasing the incidence or severity of MODS. The key to developing novel treatments depends, in part, on identifying and understanding the mechanisms by which ARDS leads to MODS, although the heterogeneity and complexity of this disorder certainly poses a challenge to investigators. Novel therapies in development for treatment of ALI/ARDS include exogenous surfactant, therapies aimed at modulating neutrophil activity, such as prostaglandin and complement inhibitors, and treatments targeting earlier resolution of ARDS, such as beta-agonists and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. From a clinical perspective, identifying subpopulations of patients most likely to benefit from a particular therapy and recognising the appropriate stage of illness in which to initiate treatment could potentially lead to better outcomes in the short term.

  20. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Therapeutic modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sebag, Sara C; Bastarache, Julie A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intraalveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. As such, there have been numerous investigations modulating TF activity in a variety of experimental systems in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for ALI/ARDS. This review will summarize current understanding of the role of TF and other proteins of the coagulation cascade as well the fibrinolysis pathway in the development of ALI/ARDS with an emphasis on the pathways that are potential therapeutic targets. These include the TF inhibitor pathway, the protein C pathway, antithrombin, heparin, and modulation of fibrinolysis through plasminogen activator- 1 (PAI-1) or plasminogen activators (PA). Although experimental studies show promising results, clinical trials to date have proven unsuccessful in improving patient outcomes. Modulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis has complex effects on both hemostasis and inflammatory pathways and further studies are needed to develop new treatment strategies for patients with ALI/ARDS. PMID:21401517

  2. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  3. Organophosphate poisoning complicated by a tachyarrhythmia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Nel, L; Hatherill, M; Davies, J; Andronikou, S; Stirling, J; Reynolds, L; Argent, A

    2002-10-01

    A 9-year-old child presented with documented organophosphate insecticide poisoning. His course was initially complicated by a tachyarrhythmia with QT-interval prolongation that responded promptly to intravenous magnesium. However, following partial recovery, he developed progressive acute respiratory distress syndrome characterized by irreversible fibrosis and obliteration of the lung parenchyma. PMID:12354276

  4. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  5. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  6. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  7. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with abdominal aortic stent-graft acute thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Ludovic; Hireche, Kheira; Marty-Ané, Charles; Alric, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient on low molecular weight heparin bridge therapy who developed acute abdominal aortic stent-graft thrombosis 1 week after uncomplicated endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The diagnosis was confirmed by a computed tomographic scan of the abdomen. The patient was successfully treated by conversion to open repair. The postoperative course was marked by subacute left limb ischemia related to an in vivo cross-reactivity of danaparoid with the heparin immune complex. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with acute abdominal aortic stent-graft thrombosis. PMID:23711968

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  9. Abdominal compartment syndrome in severe acute pancreatitis treated with percutaneous catheter drainage.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonyoung; Lee, Seungho; Lee, Hyo Deok; Kim, Min; Kim, Kyeongmin; Jeong, Yusook; Park, Seon Mee

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the main causes of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). IAH contributes to multiple physiologic alterations and leads to the development of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) that induces multiorgan failure. We report a case of ACS in a patient with severe acute pancreatitis. A 44-year-old man who was admitted in a drunk state was found to have severe acute pancreatitis. During management with fluid resuscitation in an intensive care unit, drowsy mentality, respiratory acidosis, shock requiring inotropes, and oliguria developed in the patient, with his abdomen tensely distended. With a presumptive diagnosis of ACS, abdominal decompression through percutaneous catheter drainage was performed immediately. The intraperitoneal pressure measured with a drainage catheter was 31 mm Hg. After abdominal decompression, the multiorgan failure was reversed. We present a case of ACS managed with percutaneous catheter decompression. PMID:25325011

  10. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical.

  11. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject. PMID:15292826

  12. Recruitment manoeuvres in acute respiratory distress syndrome: Little evidence for routine use.

    PubMed

    Poole, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The use of alveolar recruitment manoeuvres for the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is a topic of uncertainty in current critical care practice. Acute respiratory distress syndrome leads to inflammatory atelectasis, which challenges the gas exchange properties of the lung. Recruitment of atelectatic lung tissue requires elevation of transpulmonary pressure. Transpulmonary pressure can be suppressed at a given airway pressure when pleural pressures are elevated. The present review discusses recruitment of lung tissue in detail, highlighting the key research in the field. Differing techniques for recruiting lung tissue, as well as various outcome measures to determine efficacy, are analyzed and critiqued. The commonly used sustained inflation manoeuvre is perhaps regarded as the only strategy to recruit the lung, explaining its prevalence. Staircase recruitment with positive end-expiratory pressure titration is shown to be an equally - if not more - effective therapy that devotes attention to the maintenance of lung recruitment.

  13. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application.

  14. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. PMID:24485531

  15. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults. PMID:25139919

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: use of specialized nutrients in pediatric patients and infants.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Trobaugh, Kimberly A

    2011-02-01

    With a high rate of mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has limited treatments options. Immune-enhanced formulas, containing eicosapentaenoic acid, borage oil, and antioxidants, have shown to be beneficial in adults patients with ARDS, decreasing mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and new organ dysfunction. There is promising research in pediatric patients with improvement in oxygenation status found, but further trials are needed to realize these benefits in pediatric and infant populations. PMID:21266694

  17. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-08-19

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults.

  18. [Pneumomediastinum: an aspect of pulmonary barotrauma during mechanical ventilation of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Y; En-Nafaa, I; Chkoura, K; Boughalem, M; Kamili, N Drissi

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite compliance with the recommendations of protective mechanical ventilation, it can results in serious complications including the pulmonary barotrauma. This is often manifested by a pneumothorax. This observation describes an unusual aspect of barotrauma which is pneumomediastinum. The authors also point out the role of chest imaging in the management of mechanical ventilation during ARDS.

  19. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la presión intraabdominal es el estado de equilibrio de la presión de la cavidad abdominal en reposo y puede presentar cambios durante la ventilación mecánica o espontánea. El objetivo fue determinar la presión intraabdominal como predictor de cirugía en el paciente con dolor abdominal agudo. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio de casos y controles anidado en una cohorte de pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en el servicio de urgencias de un hospital de segundo nivel, en el periodo comprendido entre abril y diciembre de 2013. Se incluyeron 37 pacientes, todos fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente con previa toma de la presión intraabdominal. Se formaron los grupos con el resultado del estudio anatomopatológico: con evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 28) y sin evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 9). Resultados: en los casos el 100 % presentó presión intraabdominal alta con una p = 0.01, RM: 5 (IC 95 %: 2.578-9.699). En los casos la media de la presión intraabdominal fue de 11.46 y en los controles de 9.2 (p = 0.183). Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal que requiere cirugía para su resolución tiene relación directa con una presión intraabdominal > 5 mmHg.

  20. Approach to the Patient with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janz, David R; Ware, Lorraine B

    2014-01-01

    Given the high incidence and mortality of ARDS in critically ill patients, every practitioner needs a bedside approach both for early identification of patients at risk for ARDS and for the appropriate evaluation of patients who meet the diagnostic criteria of ARDS. Recent advances such as the Lung Injury Prediction Score, the Early Acute Lung Injury score, and validation of the SpO2/FiO2 ratio for assessing the degree of hypoxemia are all practical tools to aid the practitioner in caring for patients at risk of ARDS and will likely become more important in the future as more preventative therapies for ARDS are investigated. For patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for ARDS, the practitioner should focus on a thorough search for an underlying cause as well as the concurrent possibility of an underlying disease process that mimics the clinical syndrome of ARDS. PMID:25453418

  1. Experiences of Indonesian mother managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chiu-Lien; Huang, Chu-Yu; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Lin, Hung-Ru; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the Indonesian mothers' experiences of managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain. The descriptive qualitative research design comprises semi-structured interviews with 11 Indonesian mothers. The qualitative content analysis revealed three themes, including (1) insight of abdominal pain, (2) "inheritance of the strategies for assessment of management for abdominal pain from the family of origin", (3) "obstacles and insights related to cultural differences". The results presented that pain management was affected by family, environment, cultural background and religious beliefs. Healthcare providers should provide culturally competent pain management care for the patients of difference nationalities.

  2. Fluid Management With a Simplified Conservative Protocol for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Dickerson, Justin B.; Brown, Samuel M.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Schoenfeld, David; Tidswell, Mark; Hite, R. Duncan; Rock, Peter; Miller, Russell R.; Morris, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Lite). The objective of this study was to compare the performance of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal protocols. Design Retrospective comparison of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal. Primary outcome was cumulative fluid balance over 7 days. Secondary outcomes were 60-day adjusted mortality and ventilator-free days through day 28. Safety outcomes were prevalence of acute kidney injury and new shock. Setting ICUs of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network participating hospitals. Patients Five hundred three subjects managed with FACTT Conservative, 497 subjects managed with FACTT Liberal, and 1,124 subjects managed with FACTT Lite. Interventions Fluid management by protocol. Measurements and Main Results Cumulative fluid balance was 1,918 ± 323 mL in FACTT Lite, −136 ±491 mL in FACTT Conservative, and 6,992 ± 502 mL in FACTT Liberal (p < 0.001). Mortality was not different between groups (24% in FACTT Lite, 25% in FACTT Conservative and Liberal, p = 0.84). Ventilator-free days in FACTT Lite (14.9 ±0.3) were equivalent to FACTT Conservative (14.6±0.5) (p = 0.61) and greater than in FACTT Liberal (12.1 ±0.5, p < 0.001 vs Lite). Acute kidney injury prevalence was 58% in FACTT Lite and 57% in FACTT Conservative (p = 0.72). Prevalence of new shock in FACTT Lite (9%) was lower than in FACTT Conservative (13%) (p = 0.007 vs Lite) and similar to FACTT Liberal (11%) (p = 0.18 vs Lite). Conclusions FACTT Lite had a greater cumulative fluid balance than FACTT Conservative but had equivalent clinical and safety outcomes

  3. Mouse Models of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Review of Analytical Approaches, Pathologic Features, and Common Measurements.

    PubMed

    Aeffner, Famke; Bolon, Brad; Davis, Ian C

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe pulmonary reaction requiring hospitalization, which is incited by many causes, including bacterial and viral pneumonia as well as near drowning, aspiration of gastric contents, pancreatitis, intravenous drug use, and abdominal trauma. In humans, ARDS is very well defined by a list of clinical parameters. However, until recently no consensus was available regarding the criteria of ARDS that should be evident in an experimental animal model. This lack was rectified by a 2011 workshop report by the American Thoracic Society, which defined the main features proposed to delineate the presence of ARDS in laboratory animals. These should include histological changes in parenchymal tissue, altered integrity of the alveolar capillary barrier, inflammation, and abnormal pulmonary function. Murine ARDS models typically are defined by such features as pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in cytological preparations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or lung sections. Common pathophysiological indicators of ARDS in mice include impaired pulmonary gas exchange and histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates into the lung. Thus, morphological endpoints remain a vital component of data sets assembled from animal ARDS models.

  4. Serum amylase and lipase in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Chase, C W; Barker, D E; Russell, W L; Burns, R P

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine 1) the incidence and magnitude of elevation in admission serum amylase and lipase levels in extrapancreatic etiologies of acute abdominal pain, and 2) the test most closely associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase levels were obtained in 306 patients admitted for evaluation of acute abdominal pain. Patients were categorized by anatomic location of identified pathology. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare the enzyme levels between patient groups and to determine the correlation between elevation in serum amylase and lipase. Twenty-seven (13%) of 208 patients with an extrapancreatic etiology of acute abdominal pain demonstrated an elevated admission serum amylase level with a maximum value of 385 units (U)/L (normal range 30-110 U/L). Twenty-six (12.5%) of these 208 patients had an elevated admission serum lipase value with a maximum of 3685 U/L (normal range 5-208 U/L). Of 48 patients with abdominal pain resulting from acute pancreatitis, admission serum amylase ranged from 30 to 7680 U/L and lipase ranged from 5 to 90,654 U/L. Both serum amylase and lipase elevations were positively associated with a correct diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (P < 0.001) with diagnostic efficiencies of 91 and 94 per cent, respectively. A close correlation between elevation of admission serum amylase and lipase was observed (r = 0.87) in both extrapancreatic and pancreatic disease processes. Serum amylase and lipase levels may be elevated in nonpancreatic disease processes of the abdomen. Significant elevations (greater than three times upper limit of normal) in either enzyme are uncommon in these disorders. The strong correlation between elevations in the two serum enzymes in both pancreatic and extrapancreatic etiologies of abdominal pain makes them redundant measures. Serum lipase is a better test than serum amylase either to exclude or to support a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

  5. [Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fumes and zinc dust inhalation].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Soda, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fume inhalation and zinc powder inhalation are presented. Case 1 demonstrated acute respiratory symptoms during the work of distortion correction of iron boards, coated with a rust preventative including rich zinc using an acetylene gas burner. Case 2 occurred after the work of applying a rust preventative that included zinc powder, mainly using an airless compressor. Since both were working in a boathouse, without using protective equipment, the possible causes of Case 1 and 2 were inhalation exposure to zinc fumes and zinc powder, respectively. The two patients showed similar clinical courses, including favorable treatment outcomes, mimicking acute respiratory failure complicated by a metal fume fever. PMID:24930880

  6. [Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fumes and zinc dust inhalation].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Soda, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Two cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome related to zinc fume inhalation and zinc powder inhalation are presented. Case 1 demonstrated acute respiratory symptoms during the work of distortion correction of iron boards, coated with a rust preventative including rich zinc using an acetylene gas burner. Case 2 occurred after the work of applying a rust preventative that included zinc powder, mainly using an airless compressor. Since both were working in a boathouse, without using protective equipment, the possible causes of Case 1 and 2 were inhalation exposure to zinc fumes and zinc powder, respectively. The two patients showed similar clinical courses, including favorable treatment outcomes, mimicking acute respiratory failure complicated by a metal fume fever.

  7. Indwelling catheter and conservative measures in the treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome in fulminant acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao-Xi; Huang, Hai-Rong; Zhou, Hong

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of combined indwelling catheter, hemofiltration, respiration support and traditional Chinese medicine (e.g. Dahuang) in treating abdominal compartment syndrome of fulminant acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Patients with fulminant acute pancreatitis were divided randomly into 2 groups of combined indwelling catheter celiac drainage and intra-abdominal pressure monitoring and routine conservative measures group (group 1) and control group (group 2). Routine non-operative conservative treatments including hemofiltration, respiration support, gastrointestinal TCM ablution were also applied in control group patients. Effectiveness of the two groups was observed, and APACHE II scores were applied for analysis. RESULTS: On the second and fifth days after treatment, APACHE II scores of group 1 and 2 patients were significantly different. Comparison of effectiveness (abdominalgia and burbulence relief time, hospitalization time) between groups 1 and 2 showed significant difference, as well as incidence rates of cysts formation. Mortality rates of groups 1 and 2 were 10.0% and 20.7%, respectively. For patients in group 1, celiac drainage quantity and intra-abdominal pressure, and hospitalization time were positively correlated (r = 0.552, 0.748, 0.923, P < 0.01) with APACHE II scores. CONCLUSION: Combined indwelling catheter celiac drainage and intra-abdominal pressure monitoring, short veno-venous hemofiltration (SVVH), gastrointestinal TCM ablution, respiration support have preventive and treatment effects on abdominal compartment syndrome of fulminant acute pancreatitis. PMID:16937509

  8. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome: the importance of ventilator settings

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eduardo L. V.; Nakamura, Maria A. M.; Morais, Caio C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is commonly used to prevent endotracheal intubation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure who fail an NIV trial carry a worse prognosis as compared to those who succeed. Additional factors are also knowingly associated with worse outcomes: higher values of ICU severity score, presence of severe sepsis, and lower ratio of arterial oxygen tension to fraction of inspired oxygen. However, it is still unclear whether NIV failure is responsible for the worse prognosis or if it is merely a marker of the underlying disease severity. There is therefore an ongoing debate as to whether and which ARDS patients are good candidates to an NIV trial. In a recent paper published in JAMA, “Effect of Noninvasive Ventilation Delivered by Helmet vs. Face Mask on the Rate of Endotracheal Intubation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial”, Patel et al. evaluated ARDS patients submitted to NIV and drew attention to the importance of the NIV interface. We discussed their interesting findings focusing also on the ventilator settings and on the current barriers to lung protective ventilation in ARDS patients during NIV. PMID:27747041

  9. Diver with acute abdominal pain, right leg paresthesias and weakness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Corson, K; Minky, K; Mader, J

    2002-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was brought to an emergency department by the United States Coast Guard with chief complaints of severe abdominal pain, right leg paresthesia and weakness following four deep air dives. Physical examination before recompression treatment was remarkable for diffuse abdominal tenderness and right leg weakness. The patient was diagnosed in the emergency room with type II decompression sickness (DCS) and underwent standard recompression therapy. He experienced complete resolution of weakness after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, but his abdominal pain was persistent. Further investigation led to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with perforation. The patient underwent appendectomy and intravenous antibiotic therapy and was discharged to his home on hospital day five without complications. This case reinforces the importance of careful clinical assessment of divers and illustrates the potentially wide differential diagnosis of DCS. This is the first reported case of recompression treatment of a diver with acute appendicitis and type II DCS.

  10. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  11. Psychological distress related to smoking cessation in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Santos, Thyego Mychell; Godoy, Irma; de Godoy, Ilda

    2016-01-01

    Among all causes of preventable deaths, smoking is responsible for the greatest number of deaths worldwide and predisposes to fatal, noncommunicable diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. Lifestyle changes are effective in the treatment of patients with smoking-related diseases and assist in the prevention of premature mortality. Our objective was to investigate the available scientific evidence regarding the psychological distress related to smoking cessation in patients who have had acute myocardial infarction. To that end, we conducted an integrative review of the literature in order to summarize relevant studies on this topic. The selected databases were Scopus, PubMed Central, Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science (Core Collection), ScienceDirect, EMBASE, SciELO, LILACS e PsycINFO. On the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria adopted for this study, 14 articles were selected for analysis. Those studies showed that the prevalence of psychological distress is higher among smokers than among nonsmokers, and distress-related symptoms are much more common in smokers with acute myocardial infarction than in those without. Smoking cessation depends on the active participation of the smoker, whose major motivation is the underlying disease. Most studies have shown that there is a need to create treatment subgroups as a means of improving the treatment provided. This review article expands the knowledge regarding smoking cessation and shows the need to invest in future research that investigates subgroups of smokers diagnosed with the major smoking-related comorbidities, such as acute myocardial infarction, in order to develop specific interventions and psychological support strategies. PMID:26982043

  12. Ultrasound in newborns and children suffering from non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: imaging with clinical and surgical correlation.

    PubMed

    di Giacomo, Vincenza; Trinci, Margherita; van der Byl, Giulia; Catania, Vincenzo Davide; Calisti, Alessandro; Miele, Vittorio

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review ultrasonographic appearance of the most common causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients and to understand the applications and limitations of this technique giving a practical approach showing different clinical cases. A pictorial review of cases was made presenting the most common causes of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; sonographic features are discussed. Ultrasound in conjunction with Color Doppler imaging is a valuable tool in the evaluation of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; causes of acute abdomen in children could vary depending on the ages of the children.

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  14. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  15. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  16. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics.

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  18. Clinical trial design in prevention and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curley, Gerard F; McAuley, Daniel F

    2014-12-01

    Our ability to define appropriate molecular targets for preclinical development and develop better methods needs to be improved, to determine the clinical value of novel acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) agents. Clinical trials must have realistic sample sizes and meaningful end points and use the available observation and meta-analytical data to inform design. Biomarker-driven studies or defined ARDS subsets should be considered to categorize specific at-risk populations most likely to benefit from a new treatment. Innovations in clinical trial design should be pursued to improve the outlook for future interventional trials in ARDS.

  19. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  20. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  1. The Influence of Prehospital Systemic Corticosteroid Use on Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Gajic, Ognjen; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of systemic corticosteroids in pathophysiology and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Use of prehospital systemic corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and improve hospital outcomes. Design This is a preplanned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort from a trial by the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. Setting Twenty-two acute care hospitals. Patients Five thousand eighty-nine patients with at least one risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome at the time of hospitalization. Intervention Propensity-based analysis of previously recorded data. Measurements and Main Results Three hundred sixty-four patients were on systemic corticosteroids. Prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 7.7% and 6.9% (odds ratio, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.8–1.7]; p = 0.54) for patients on systemic corticosteroid and not on systemic corticosteroids, respectively. A propensity for being on systemic corticosteroids was derived through logistic regression by using all available covariates. Subsequently, 354 patients (97%) on systemic corticosteroids were matched to 1,093 not on systemic corticosteroids by their propensity score for a total of 1,447 patients in the matched set. Adjusted risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.54–1.38]), invasive ventilation (odds ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.62–1.12]), and inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.63–1.49]) was then calculated from the propensity-matched sample using conditional logistic regression model. No significant associations were present. Conclusions Prehospital use of systemic corticosteroids neither decreased the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome among patients hospitalized with at one least risk factor, nor affected the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Combined Extracorporeal Co2 Removal and Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury: The Pulmonary and Renal Support in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Study*

    PubMed Central

    Castanier, Matthias; Signouret, Thomas; Soundaravelou, Rettinavelou; Lepidi, Anne; Seghboyan, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining extracorporeal Co2 removal with continuous renal replacement therapy in patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Design: Prospective human observational study. Settings: Patients received volume-controlled mechanical ventilation according to the acute respiratory distress syndrome net protocol. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration therapy was titrated to maintain maximum blood flow and an effluent flow of 45 mL/kg/h with 33% predilution. Patients: Eleven patients presenting with both acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury required renal replacement therapy. Interventions: A membrane oxygenator (0.65 m2) was inserted within the hemofiltration circuit, either upstream (n = 7) or downstream (n = 5) of the hemofilter. Baseline corresponded to tidal volume 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight without extracorporeal Co2 removal. The primary endpoint was 20% reduction in Paco2 at 20 minutes after extracorporeal Co2 removal initiation. Tidal volume was subsequently reduced to 4 mL/kg for the remaining 72 hours. Measurements and Main Results: Twelve combined therapies were conducted in the 11 patients. Age was 70 ± 9 years, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II was 69 ± 13, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was 14 ± 4, lung injury score was 3 ± 0.5, and Pao2/Fio2 was 135 ± 41. Adding extracorporeal Co2 removal at tidal volume 6 mL/kg decreased Paco2 by 21% (95% CI, 17–25%), from 47 ± 11 to 37 ± 8 Torr (p < 0.001). Lowering tidal volume to 4 mL/kg reduced minute ventilation from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 5.2 ± 1.1 L/min and plateau pressure from 25 ± 4 to 21 ± 3 cm H2O and raised Paco2 from 37 ± 8 to 48 ± 10 Torr (all p < 0.001). On an average of both positions, the oxygenator’s blood flow was 410 ± 30 mL/min and the Co2 removal rate was 83 ± 20 mL/min. The oxygenator blood flow (p <0.001) and the Co2 removal rate (p = 0.083) were higher when

  3. [Extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy by the acute infectious diseases of the abdominal cavity in children].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, R O; Bataev, S M

    2012-01-01

    Surgery on the reason of the "acute abdomen" in children often reveals the persisting vaginal peritoneal defects, which further lead to hernia formation. 23 children (aged 4-15 years) were operated on the acute uncomplicated appendicitis (n=10), acute mesadenitis (n=3), appendicular local and pelvioperitonitis (n=9) and ovary apoplexia (n=1). Inguinal hernia was revealed in all patients during laparoscopy. After videoendoscopic sanation of the abdomen and appendectomy (if it was necessary) the extraperitoneal ligation herniorraphy in author's modification was performed. The were no cases of abdominal complications as well as hernia recurrence among the treated patients.

  4. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  5. Pulmonary histopathology in dalmatians with familial acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Syrjä, P; Saari, S; Rajamäki, M; Saario, E; Järvinen, A-K

    2009-11-01

    The histopathological changes in the lungs of 12 related Dalmatians with idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are described. Affected dogs had multiple foci of marked atypical hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, patchy ongoing fibrosis with myofibroblastic metaplasia, smooth muscle hyperplasia and occasional honeycombing of alveolar walls, and hyperplasia of atypical type II pneumocytes. There was an abrupt transition between these proliferative lesions and areas of acute alveolar oedema with hyaline membranes in partially normal lung. Diseased areas were associated with moderate lymphohistiocytic interstitial inflammation. Immunohistochemical labelling for cytokeratin expression indicated that the metaplastic epithelium was of bronchiolar origin and that it extended into peribronchiolar alveolar spaces. Some of the bronchiolar lesions were pre-neoplastic and one adult dog suffered from bronchoalveolar carcinoma. These lesions are compared with the two forms of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia reported as causes of ARDS in man: acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The observed lesions in the Dalmatians are distinct from the diffuse alveolar damage that characterizes AIP, but show some histological similarities to the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) that occurs in IPF with acute exacerbation in man. UIP has not previously been described in the dog.

  6. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation). PMID:23672857

  7. Proteomic study of acute respiratory distress syndrome: current knowledge and implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Joseph E; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common cause of acute respiratory failure, and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. Dozens of clinical trials targeting ARDS have failed, with no drug specifically targeting lung injury in widespread clinical use. Thus, the need for drug development in ARDS is great. Targeted proteomic studies in ARDS have identified many key pathways in the disease, including inflammation, epithelial injury, endothelial injury or activation, and disordered coagulation and repair. Recent studies reveal the potential for proteomic changes to identify novel subphenotypes of ARDS patients who may be most likely to respond to therapy and could thus be targeted for enrollment in clinical trials. Nontargeted studies of proteomics in ARDS are just beginning and have the potential to identify novel drug targets and key pathways in the disease. Proteomics will play an important role in phenotyping of patients and developing novel therapies for ARDS in the future. PMID:27031735

  8. Estimation of dead space fraction can be simplified in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are characterized by a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema responsible for a significant impairment of gas exchange. The pulmonary dead space increase, which is due primarily to an alteration in pulmonary blood flow distribution, is largely responsible for carbon dioxide retention. Previous studies, computing the pulmonary dead space by measuring the expired carbon dioxide and the Enghoff equation, found that the dead space fraction was significantly higher in the non-survivors; it was even an independent risk of death. The computation of the dead space not by measuring the expired carbon dioxide but by applying a rearranged alveolar gas equation that takes into account only the weight, age, height, and temperature of the patient could lead to widespread clinical diffusion of this measurement at the bedside. PMID:20840798

  9. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  10. Disseminated Cryptococcal Infection Resulting in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) as the Initial Clinical Presentation of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Tam, Eric; Rajayer, Salil; Morante, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a cosmopolitan but rare opportunistic mycosis which is usually caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Although the most common and worrisome disease manifestation is meningoencephalitis, pulmonary cryptococcosis has the potential to be lethal. The diagnosis of cryptococcal pneumonia is challenging, given its non-specific clinical and radiographic features. Respiratory failure leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome as a consequence of cryptococcal disease has been infrequently addressed in the literature. We herein present a case of disseminated cryptococcal infection leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome, refractory shock, and multiorgan dysfunction as the initial clinical manifestation in a patient who was newly diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:27086819

  11. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  12. A Torted Ruptured Intra-abdominal Testicular Seminoma Presenting As An Acute Abdomen.

    PubMed

    Nickalls, Oliver James; Tan, Char Loo; Thian, Yee Liang

    2015-12-01

    The susceptibility of the undescended testis to malignant transformation is well documented. The most common location of the undescended testis is within the inguinal canal, with only a minority located within the abdominal cavity. When a testicular mass develops, the risk of torsion increases. We describe a large intra-abdominal testicular seminoma that had undergone torsion, rupture and haemorrhage, presenting as an acute abdomen. A 30 year old man presented to the emergency department with right iliac fossa pain. Computed tomography in the emergency department showed haemoperitoneum and a torted large left testicular mass, likely malignant. The patient underwent laparotomy and excision of the mass. Histologic examination revealed a grossly enlarged seminomatous testis which had torted and ruptured. While pre-operative imaging diagnosis of an intra-abdominal testicular seminoma has been published, reports are few. To the best of the author's knowledge pre-operative imaging diagnosis of a malignant testicular mass with torsion and intra-abdominal haemorrhage presenting as an acute abdomen has not been described before.

  13. [Acute and chronic progressive abdominal pain: what is the role of radiogical imaging?].

    PubMed

    Antes, G

    2005-06-01

    There are many causes for acute or chronic progressive abdominal pain. Although only about one percent of these patients suffer from acute mesenteric ischemia (MI), an efficient diagnostic work-up is mandatory to reduce the high mortality. An overview about the possibilities of conventional and modern imaging modalities is given. Plain films and ultrasonography are still important in the basic work-up, however, its sensitivity is limited. Angiography has a high sensitivity and specitivity. However, angiography is not always available. Modern spiral-CT is widely available and its sensitivity is already similar to angiography. An other advantage of CT is the possibility to detect the most other frequent causes of abdominal pain. Therefore CT should be performed as fast as possible.

  14. An 86-year-old man with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Paul M E L; Posthouwer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    An 86-year-old man presented with severe pain in the upper abdomen along with fever. On physical examination, we found an arterial blood pressure of 84/43 mm Hg, a heart rate of 80 bpm and a temperature of 38.3°C. The abdomen was painful and peristalsis was absent. Empiric antibiotic therapy for sepsis was started with amoxicillin/clavulanate and gentamicin. CT scan of the abdomen revealed an emphysematous cholecystitis. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystostomy was applied. Bile cultures revealed Clostridium perfringens. Emphysematous cholecystitis is a life-threatening form of acute cholecystitis that occurs as a consequence of ischaemic injury to the gallbladder, followed by translocation of gas-forming bacteria (ie, C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Streptococci). The mortality associated with emphysematous cholecystitis is higher than in non-emphysematous cholecystitis (15% vs 4%). Therefore, early diagnosis with radiological imaging is of vital importance. PMID:26869625

  15. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  16. Risk Factors for the Development of Intra-Abdominal Fungal Infections in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Brian J.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-abdominal fungal infections (AFI) complicating acute pancreatitis arise in the context of pancreatic necrosis. Our goal was to determine which risk factors contribute to AFI in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods Records were reviewed from 479 non-transfer patients admitted to our medical center with acute pancreatitis from 1985–2009. Using multivariable regression models, risk factors for AFI were identified. Results Out of 479 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis, 17 patients were subsequently found to have an AFI and 3 of these patients expired. The mean length of stay for patients with an AFI was 24 days and 76% were admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients with AFI were more likely to have received prophylactic antibiotics on admission (OR 1.7, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.3), TPN within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7) or to have necrosis on CT scan within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7). Multivariable regression models identified admission antibiotic use (OR 1.6, 95% C.I. 1.4–1.8) as the strongest predictor of AFI. Conclusion Admission antibiotics are the biggest risk factor for the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections in acute pancreatitis. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent infected necrosis should therefore be discouraged. PMID:25872170

  17. Acute right lower abdominal pain in women of reproductive age: Clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoglu, Sinan; Hatipoglu, Filiz; Abdullayev, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study possible gynecological organ pathologies in the differential diagnosis of acute right lower abdominal pain in patients of reproductive age. METHODS: Following Clinical Trials Ethical Committee approval, the retrospective data consisting of physical examination and laboratory findings in 290 patients with sudden onset right lower abdominal pain who used the emergency surgery service between April 2009 and September 2013, and underwent surgery and general anesthesia with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis were collated. RESULTS: Total data on 290 patients were obtained. Two hundred and twenty-four (77.2%) patients had acute appendicitis, whereas 29 (10%) had perforated appendicitis and 37 (12.8%) had gynecological organ pathologies. Of the latter, 21 (7.2%) had ovarian cyst rupture, 12 (4.2%) had corpus hemorrhagicum cyst rupture and 4 (1.4%) had adnexal torsion. Defense, Rovsing’s sign, increased body temperature and increased leukocyte count were found to be statistically significant in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis and gynecological organ pathologies. CONCLUSION: Gynecological pathologies in women of reproductive age are misleading in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:24744594

  18. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation – a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, J.; Bogdanski, R.; Ortiz, J. U.; Kuschel, B.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Lobmaier, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss. PMID:27065489

  19. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: role of nutritional modulation of inflammation through dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Mizock, Barry A; DeMichele, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most serious form of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. ARDS represents the expression of an acute, diffuse, inflammatory process in the lungs consequent to a variety of infectious and noninfectious conditions. It is characterized pathologically by damage to pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells, with subsequent alveolar-capillary leak and exudative pulmonary edema. The main clinical features of ARDS include rapid onset of dyspnea, severe defects in gas exchange, and imaging studies demonstrating diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. The role of nutrition in the management of ARDS has traditionally been supportive. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of certain dietary oils (eg, fish oil, borage oil) to modulate pulmonary inflammation, thereby improving lung compliance and oxygenation, and reducing time on mechanical ventilation. This article reviews the alterations in the immune response that underlie ARDS, discusses the physiology of dietary oils as immunonutrients, summarizes animal and human studies that explore the therapeutic effects of dietary oils, and provides clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:16215155

  20. Classifying Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Severity: Correcting the Arterial Oxygen Partial Pressure to Fractional Inspired Oxygen at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Hernández-Cárdenas, Carmen Margarita; Lugo-Goytia, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the well-known Berlin definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there is a recommended adjustment for arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FIO2) at altitude, but without a reference as to how it was derived. PMID:27623033

  1. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  2. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  3. Argument against the Routine Use of Steroids for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Silvia M.; Hough, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Steroids have a plausible mechanism of action of reducing severity of lung disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but have failed to show consistent benefits in patient-centered outcomes. Many studies have confounding from the likely presence of ventilator-induced lung injury and steroids may have shown benefit because administration minimized ongoing inflammation incited by injurious ventilator settings. If steroids have benefit, it is likely for specific populations that fall within the heterogeneous diagnosis of ARDS. Those pediatric patients with concurrent active asthma or reactive airway disease of prematurity, in addition to ARDS, are the most common group likely to derive benefit from steroids, but are poorly studied. With the information currently available, it does not appear that the typical adult or pediatric patient with ARDS derives benefit from steroids and steroids should not be given on a routine basis. PMID:27517035

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Medjo, Biljana; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina; Nikolic, Dimitrije; Cuturilo, Goran; Djukic, Slobodanka

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy on oxygenation and mortality in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Thirty-three children with ARDS and an arterial SatO2 <88% despite mechanical ventilation were analyzed. Patients in the iNO group were prospectively enrolled and treated with conventional therapy plus iNO. The control group consisted of retrospectively analyzed patients treated only with conventional therapy. A significant increase in PaO2/FiO2 ratio (25.6%) and decrease in oxygenation index (19.5%) was observed after 4 h of iNO treatment, when compared to baseline values. A positive response to iNO was detected in 69% of patients, and there was no difference between pulmonary and extrapulmonary ARDS. There was no difference in mortality and duration of mechanical ventilation between iNO and control group. PMID:22885439

  5. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: how to optimize oxygen transport and to improve prognosis].

    PubMed

    Shtabnitskiy, V A; Chuchalin, A G

    2014-01-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and current approaches to correcting respiratory failure. It highlights the historical and present-day data on the efficiency of extracorporeal membrane hemoxygenation, high-frequency ventilation, surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide therapy, and prone ventilation. The examinations have shown that ventilation in the prone position and extracorporeal membrane hemoxygenation not only improve gas exchange, but have a positive prognostic impact. The use of inhaled nitric oxide and surfactant achieves improved oxygenation for a while, but has no substantial effect on prognosis. The place of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in the treatment of patients with ARDS has not been fully determined as some examinations have indicated a positive prognostic impact and other examinations have shown none or a negative impact.

  6. [Pumpless extracorporeal pulmonary care: an alternative in the treatment of persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tomicic, V; Montalván, C; Espinoza, M; Graf, J; Martínez, E; Umaña, A; Torres, J

    2008-01-01

    A 34-year old woman who developed persistent and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with underlying myelomonocytic leukemia (M4FAB) is described. After ruling out the most common causes of pulmonary infiltration in this type of patient and one week of broad spectrum antibiotics and steroids therapy, we proposed leukemic pulmonary infiltration as etiological diagnosis. Despite using a protective ventilatory strategy, recruitment maneuvers, prone position and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, her gas exchange became worse. Under this condition we used a Pumpless-Extracorporeal life assist (PELA) and begun chemotherapy. The method, arterial blood gases, hemodynamic parameters and ventilatory mechanics before and after its use are described. The patient remained on P-ELA for nine days; one week later she was extubated and ten days after she was discharged from the Intensive Care Unit the patient left the hospital in good health condition.

  7. Argument against the Routine Use of Steroids for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Silvia M; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-01-01

    Steroids have a plausible mechanism of action of reducing severity of lung disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but have failed to show consistent benefits in patient-centered outcomes. Many studies have confounding from the likely presence of ventilator-induced lung injury and steroids may have shown benefit because administration minimized ongoing inflammation incited by injurious ventilator settings. If steroids have benefit, it is likely for specific populations that fall within the heterogeneous diagnosis of ARDS. Those pediatric patients with concurrent active asthma or reactive airway disease of prematurity, in addition to ARDS, are the most common group likely to derive benefit from steroids, but are poorly studied. With the information currently available, it does not appear that the typical adult or pediatric patient with ARDS derives benefit from steroids and steroids should not be given on a routine basis. PMID:27517035

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  10. Clinical review: Lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years lung imaging has greatly contributed to the current understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the past few years, in addition to chest X-ray and lung computed tomography, newer functional lung imaging techniques, such as lung ultrasound, positron emission tomography, electrical impedance tomography and magnetic resonance, have been gaining a role as diagnostic tools to optimize lung assessment and ventilator management in ARDS patients. Here we provide an updated clinical review of lung imaging in ARDS over the past few years to offer an overview of the literature on the available imaging techniques from a clinical perspective. PMID:24238477

  11. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  12. Extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: report of a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influenza H1N1 epidemics in 2009 led a substantial number of people to develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory hypoxemia. In these patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was used as rescue oxygenation therapy. Several randomized clinical trials and observational studies suggested that extracorporeal membrane oxygenation associated with protective mechanical ventilation could improve outcome, but its efficacy remains uncertain. Organized by the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF) in conjunction with the Société Française d’Anesthésie et de Réanimation (SFAR), the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF), the Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et d’Urgences Pédiatriques (GFRUP), the Société Française de Perfusion (SOFRAPERF), the Société Française de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire (SFCTV) et the Sociedad Española de Medecina Intensiva Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC), a Consensus Conference was held in December 2013 and a jury of 13 members wrote 65 recommendations to answer the five following questions regarding the place of extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: 1) What are the available techniques?; 2) Which patients could benefit from extracorporeal life support?; 3) How to perform extracorporeal life support?; 4) How and when to stop extracorporeal life support?; 5) Which organization should be recommended? To write the recommendations, evidence-based medicine (GRADE method), expert panel opinions, and shared decisions taken by all the thirteen members of the jury of the Consensus Conference were taken into account. PMID:24936342

  13. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  14. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  15. Vibrio vulnificus infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, S M; Liu, C C; Chiou, Y Y; Yang, H B; Chen, C T

    2000-05-01

    A 9-year-old girl with nephrotic syndrome visited a local hospital after developing fever, chills, and edematous changes and multiple hemorrhagic bullae on both legs over 2 days. Cultures of blood and an aspirate from the bullae yielded Vibrio vulnificus. The patient was transferred to our hospital because of persistent fever, generalized edema, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. We treated this patient as a V. vulnificus infection complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. With minocycline and ceftazidime combination therapy was instituted. Emergency fasciotomy and continuous peritoneal dialysis were performed. The patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during the hospitalization, requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. She eventually died. The histopathological findings showed diffuse alveolar damage with lobular pneumonitis. Hyaline membranes, composed of proteinaceous exudate and cellular debris, covered the alveolar surfaces. Microscopic examinations of lung could not distinguish the effects of cytolysin from other insults to lungs that occur in ARDS. This report highlights the postmortem pathological findings in V. vulnificus infection in a child with nephrotic syndrome complicated by ARDS.

  16. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  17. Submersion and early-onset acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Wayde; MacDonald, Russell D

    2011-01-01

    Drowning is a common cause of accidental death, particularly in younger people, and acute respiratory failure is common in these patients. This case report describes a healthy 18-year-old man who suffered a cardiorespiratory arrest due to submersion while swimming in a freshwater lake. First-responder cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation using an automated external defibrillator resulted in a return of spontaneous circulation. The patient was evacuated to a tertiary care center by a rotor-wing air medical crew. The crew experienced difficulties in oxygenating and ventilating the patient because of early-onset acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This case report describes the pathophysiology and prehospital management of a patient with suspected early-onset ARDS secondary to drowning. This case report is unique because it describes the oxygenation and ventilation difficulties encountered in managing this patient in the transport setting, and possible strategies to deal with these difficulties. Finally, this case report highlights the prehospital bypass decision-making process for patients requiring specialized medical care.

  18. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome and during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, Davide; Algieri, Ilaria; Grasso, Salvatore; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The use of low tidal volume ventilation and low to moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels is a widespread strategy to ventilate patients with non-injured lungs during general anesthesia and in intensive care as well with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Higher PEEP levels have been recommended in severe ARDS. Due to the presence of alveolar collapse, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) by causing a transient elevation in airway pressure (i.e. transpulmonary pressure) have been suggested to improve lung inflation in non-inflated and poorly-inflated lung regions. Various types of RMs such as sustained inflation at high pressure, intermittent sighs and stepwise increases of PEEP and/or airway plateau inspiratory pressure have been proposed. The use of RMs has been associated with mixed results in terms of physiological and clinical outcomes. The optimal method for RMs has not yet been identified. The use of RMs is not standardized and left to the individual physician based on his/her experience. Based on the same grounds, RMs have been proposed to improve lung aeration during general anesthesia. The aim of this review was to present the clinical evidence supporting the use of RMs in patients with ARDS and during general anesthesia and as well their potential biological effects in experimental models of acute lung injury.

  19. [Genetic predisposition and Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: New tools for genetic study].

    PubMed

    Erranz, M Benjamín; Wilhelm, B Jan; Riquelme, V Raquel; Cruces, R Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe form of respiratory failure. Theoretically, any acute lung condition can lead to ARDS, but only a small percentage of individuals actually develop the disease. On this basis, genetic factors have been implicated in the risk of developing ARDS. Based on the pathophysiology of this disease, many candidate genes have been evaluated as potential modifiers in patient, as well as in animal models, of ARDS. Recent experimental data and clinical studies suggest that variations of genes involved in key processes of tissue, cellular and molecular lung damage may influence susceptibility and prognosis of ARDS. However, the pathogenesis of pediatric ARDS is complex, and therefore, it can be expected that many genes might contribute. Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variations are likely associated with susceptibility to ARDS in children with primary lung injury. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies can objectively examine these variations, and help identify important new genes and pathogenetic pathways for future analysis. This approach might also have diagnostic and therapeutic implications, such as predicting patient risk or developing a personalized therapeutic approach to this serious syndrome.

  20. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  1. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia.

    PubMed

    Elsharif, M; Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-11-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients.

  2. The potential role and limitations of echocardiography in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Cianchi, Giovanni; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Batacchi, Stefano; Peris, Adriano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    Bedside use of Doppler echocardiography is being featured as a promising, clinically useful tool in assessing the pulmonary circulation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present review is aimed at summarizing the available evidence obtained with echocardiography on right ventricle (RV) function and pulmonary circulation in ARDS and to highlight the potential of this technique in clinical practice (only articles in English language were considered). According to the available evidence on echocardiographic findings, the following conclusions can be drawn: (a) echocardiography (transthoracic and transesophageal) has a growing role in the management ARDS patients mainly because of the strict interactions between the lung (and ventilation) and the RV and pulmonary circulation; (b) there may be a continuum of alterations in RV size and function and pulmonary circulation which may end in the development of acute cor pulmonale, probably paralleling ARDS disease severity; and (c) the detection of acute cor pulmonale should prompt intensivists to tailor their ventilatory strategy to the individual patient depending on the echocardiography findings. Bearing in mind the clinical role and growing importance of echocardiography in ARDS and the available evidence on this topic, we present a flow chart including the parameters to be measured and the timing of echo exams in ARDS patients. Despite the important progress that echocardiography has gained in the evaluation of patients with ARDS, several open questions remain and echocardiography still appears to be underused in these patients. A more systematic use of echocardiography (mainly through shared protocols) in ARDS could help intensivists to tailor the optimal treatment in individual patients as well as highlighting the limits and potential of this methodology in patients with ALI. PMID:26660667

  3. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer K.; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  4. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption for the treatment of a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lucisano, Gaetano; Capria, Maria; Matera, Giovanni; Presta, Pierangela; Comi, Nicolino; Talarico, Roberta; Rametti, Linda; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy based on non-specific pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator adsorption on a special resin cartridge coupled with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration or continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and is one of the emerging treatments for septic patients. However, in the literature, there are limited data about its efficacy in treating patients with acute diseases but without the traditional criteria for sepsis. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumonia and acute kidney injury, whose clinical conditions rapidly improved after early CPFA therapy.

  5. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption for the treatment of a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lucisano, Gaetano; Capria, Maria; Matera, Giovanni; Presta, Pierangela; Comi, Nicolino; Talarico, Roberta; Rametti, Linda; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida

    2011-01-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy based on non-specific pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator adsorption on a special resin cartridge coupled with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration or continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and is one of the emerging treatments for septic patients. However, in the literature, there are limited data about its efficacy in treating patients with acute diseases but without the traditional criteria for sepsis. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumonia and acute kidney injury, whose clinical conditions rapidly improved after early CPFA therapy. PMID:25984170

  6. A 23-year-old Man with Leptospirosis and Acute Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Momal; Kao, Janet J

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by the spirochete Leptospira interrogans. Most cases of leptospirosis are mild to moderate, and self-limited. The course of disease, however, may be complicated by multiorgan dysfunction such as in Weil's disease. We present a case of Weil's disease with pancreatitis in a young Caucasian man residing in Hawai‘i. Although leptospirosis is common in Hawai‘i, few patients present with pancreatitis. This report of leptospirosis-induced pancreatitis should help raise awareness of clinicians to assess for pancreatitis when evaluating a patient with leptospirosis and acute abdominal pain. PMID:27738562

  7. Intra-abdominal pressure: Time ripe to revise management guidelines of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Jaipuria, Jiten; Bhandari, Vimal; Chawla, Avneet Singh; Singh, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review evidence on pathophysiology of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in acute pancreatitis (AP) with its clinical correlates. METHODS: Systematic review of available evidence in English literature with relevant medical subject heading terms on PubMed, Medline and Scopus with further search from open access sources on internet as suggested by articles retrieved. RESULTS: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is increasingly gaining recognition as a point of specific intervention with potential to alter disease outcome and improve mortality in AP. IAH can be expected in at least 17% of patients presenting with diagnosis of AP to a typical tertiary care hospital (prevalence increasing to 50% in those with severe disease). Abdominal compartment syndrome can be expected in at least 15% patients with severe disease. Recent guidelines on management of AP do not acknowledge utility of surveillance for IAP other than those by Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery. We further outline pathophysiologic mechanisms of IAH; understanding of which advances our knowledge and helps to coherently align common observed variations in management related conundrums (such as fluid therapy, nutrition and antibiotic prophylaxis) with potential to further individualize treatment in AP. CONCLUSION: We suggest that IAP be given its due place in future practice guidelines and that recommendations be formed with help of a broader panel with inclusion of clinicians experienced in management of IAH. PMID:26909242

  8. Characterization of oleic acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome model in rat.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Sharma, Parul; Pandey, Ratna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2014-07-01

    Animal studies using oleic acid (OA) model to produce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to establish an acute model of ARDS in rats using OA and to characterize its effect on cardio-respiratory parameters and lethality. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery of anesthetized adult rats were cannulated. A dose of OA (30-90 microL; iv) was injected in each animal and changes in respiratory frequency (RF), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded. Minute ventilation and PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio were also determined. At the end, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content and histological examination. At all doses of OA, there was immediate decrease followed by increase in RF, however at 75 and 90 microL of OA, RF decreased abruptly and the animals died by 63 +/- 8.2 min and 19 +/- 6.3 min; respectively. In all the groups, HR and MAP changes followed the respiratory changes. The minute ventilation increased in a dose-dependent manner while the values of P/F ratio decreased correspondingly. Pulmonary edema was induced at all doses. Histological examination of the lung showed alveolar damage, microvascular congestion, microvascular injury, infiltration of inflammatory cells, pulmonary edema and necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. With these results, OA can be used to induce different grades of ARDS in rats and OA doses of 50, 60 and 75 microL resemble mild, moderate and severe forms of ARDS respectively. Hence, OA model serves as a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of ARDS.

  9. Substance P and neutral endopeptidase in development of acute respiratory distress syndrome following fire smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon S; Sun, Nina N; Lantz, R Clark; Witten, Mark L

    2004-10-01

    To characterize the tachykininergic effects in fire smoke (FS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we designed a series of studies in rats. Initially, 20 min of FS inhalation induced a significant increase of substance P (SP) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 1 h and persisted for 24 h after insult. Conversely, FS disrupted 51.4, 55.6, 46.3, and 43.0% enzymatic activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP, a primary hydrolyzing enzyme for SP) 1, 6, 12, and 24 h after insult, respectively. Immunolabeling density of NEP in the airway epithelium largely disappeared 1 h after insult due to acute cell damage and shedding. These changes were also accompanied by extensive influx of albumin and granulocytes/lymphocytes in BALF. Furthermore, levels of BALF SP and tissue NEP activity dose dependently increased and decreased, respectively, following 0, low (10 min), and high (20 min) levels of FS inhalation. However, neither the time-course nor the dose-response study observed a significant change in the highest affinity neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) for SP. Finally, treatment (10 mg/kg im) with SR-140333B, an NK-1R antagonist, significantly prevented 20-min FS-induced hypoxemia and pulmonary edema 24 h after insult. Further examination indicated that SR-140333B (1.0 or 10.0 mg/kg im) fully abolished early (1 h) plasma extravasation following FS. Collectively, these findings suggest that a combination of sustained SP and NEP inactivity induces an exaggerated neurogenic inflammation mediated by NK-1R, which may lead to an uncontrolled influx of protein-rich edema fluid and cells into the alveoli as a consequence of increased vascular permeability. PMID:15194566

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a welder exposed to metal fumes.

    PubMed

    Barbee, J Y; Prince, T S

    1999-05-01

    A 43-year-old man began having malaise, chills, and fever 12 hours after cutting a galvanized steel grating with an acetylene torch at work. Over the next 72 hours, his symptoms persisted and became worse with progressive shortness of breath. He was admitted to the hospital and begun on antibiotics and steroids. The next day his condition had deteriorated to the point that he had to be intubated. Chest x-ray film and computed tomography showed patchy and interstitial infiltration bilaterally, consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Open lung biopsy showed focal mild interstitial pneumonia. Multiple laboratory studies were negative for an infectious or an immune process. The patient remained on mechanical ventilation for 10 days and was discharged from the hospital 2 days after extubation. He continued to improve, with minimal symptoms and a return to normal activity levels several months after the incident with no continued treatment. Re-creation of his exposure was done under controlled circumstances, with air sampling revealing elevated air levels for cadmium and zinc and borderline levels of arsenic, manganese, lead, and iron.

  11. The acute respiratory distress syndrome in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: analysis of a series of 47 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bucciarelli, S; Espinosa, G; Asherson, R A; Cervera, R; Claver, G; Gómez‐Puerta, J A; Ramos‐Casals, M; Ingelmo, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a non‐cardiogenic form of pulmonary oedema characterised by severe hypoxaemia refractory to oxygen therapy, with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiographs. It can be precipitated by various serious medical and surgical conditions, including systemic autoimmune diseases. The “catastrophic” variant of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an accelerated form of this systemic autoimmune condition which results in multiorgan failure because of multiple small vessel occlusions. Objective To analyse the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with catastrophic APS who develop ARDS. Methods Cases with ARDS were selected from the web site based international registry of patients with catastrophic APS (CAPS registry) (http://www.med.ub.es/MIMMUN/FORUM/CAPS.HTM) and their characteristics examined. Results Pulmonary involvement was reported in 150 of 220 patients with catastrophic APS (68%) and 47 patients (21%) were diagnosed as having ARDS. Nineteen (40%) of these patients died. Pathological studies were undertaken in 10 patients and thrombotic microangiopathy was present in seven. There were no differences in age, sex, precipitating factors, clinical manifestations, or mortality between catastrophic APS patients with and without ARDS. Conclusions ARDS is the dominant pulmonary manifestation of catastrophic APS. Thus the existence of ARDS in the context of an APS makes it necessary to rule out the presence of the catastrophic variant of this syndrome. PMID:15919677

  12. Venovenous Extracorporeal Life Support in Single-Ventricle Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Alison B.; Oishi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    There is new and growing experience with venovenous extracorporeal life support (VV ECLS) for neonatal and pediatric patients with single-ventricle physiology and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Outcomes in this population have been defined but could be improved; survival rates in single-ventricle patients on VV ECLS for respiratory failure are slightly higher than those in single-ventricle patients on venoarterial ECLS for cardiac failure (48 vs. 32–43%), but are lower than in patients with biventricular anatomy (58–74%). To that end, special consideration is necessary for patients with single-ventricle physiology who require VV ECLS for ARDS. Specifically, ARDS disrupts the balance between pulmonary and systemic blood flow through dynamic alterations in cardiopulmonary mechanics. This complexity impacts how to run the VV ECLS circuit and the transition back to conventional support. Furthermore, these patients have a complicated coagulation profile. Both venous and arterial thrombi carry marked risk in single-ventricle patients due to the vulnerability of the pulmonary, coronary, and cerebral circulations. Finally, single-ventricle palliation requires the preservation of low resistance across the pulmonary circulation, unobstructed venous return, and optimal cardiac performance including valve function. As such, the proper timing as well as the particular conduct of ECLS might differ between this population and patients without single-ventricle physiology. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of VV ECLS in the single-ventricle population in the context of these special considerations. PMID:27446889

  13. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome: The safe way is the best way.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raquel S; Silva, Pedro L; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rm

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a serious problem in critically ill patients and is associated with in-hospital mortality rates of 33%-52%. Recruitment maneuvers (RMs) are a simple, low-cost, feasible intervention that can be performed at the bedside in patients with ARDS. RMs are characterized by the application of airway pressure to increase transpulmonary pressure transiently. Once non-aerated lung units are reopened, improvements are observed in respiratory system mechanics, alveolar reaeration on computed tomography, and improvements in gas exchange (functional recruitment). However, the reopening process could lead to vascular compression, which can be associated with overinflation, and gas exchange may not improve as expected (anatomical recruitment). The purpose of this review was to discuss the effects of different RM strategies - sustained inflation, intermittent sighs, and stepwise increases of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and/or airway inspiratory pressure - on the following parameters: hemodynamics, oxygenation, barotrauma episodes, and lung recruitability through physiological variables and imaging techniques. RMs and PEEP titration are interdependent events for the success of ventilatory management. PEEP should be adjusted on the basis of respiratory system mechanics and oxygenation. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest that RMs are associated with lower mortality in patients with ARDS. However, the optimal RM method (i.e., that providing the best balance of benefit and harm) and the effects of RMs on clinical outcome are still under discussion, and further evidence is needed.

  14. Pulmonar recruitment in acute respiratory distress syndrome. What is the best strategy?

    PubMed

    Santos, Cíntia Lourenço; Samary, Cynthia dos Santos; Fiorio Júnior, Pedro Laurindo; Santos, Bruna Lourenço; Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Supporting patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), using a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volume and limitation of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is a standard practice in the intensive care unit. However, these strategies can promote lung de-recruitment, leading to the cyclic closing and reopening of collapsed alveoli and small airways. Recruitment maneuvers (RM) can be used to augment other methods, like positive end-expiratory pressure and positioning, to improve aerated lung volume. Clinical practice varies widely, and the optimal method and patient selection for recruitment maneuvers have not been determined, considerable uncertainty remaining regarding the appropriateness of RM. This review aims to discuss recent findings about the available types of RM, and compare the effectiveness, indications and adverse effects among them, as well as their impact on morbidity and mortality in ARDS patients. Recent developments include experimental and clinical evidence that a stepwise extended recruitment maneuver may cause an improvement in aerated lung volume and decrease the biological impact seen with the traditionally used sustained inflation, with less adverse effects. Prone positioning can reduce mortality in severe ARDS patients and may be an useful adjunct to recruitment maneuvers and advanced ventilatory strategies, such noisy ventilation and BIVENT, which have been useful in providing lung recruitment.

  15. Enrichment of the lung microbiome with gut bacteria in sepsis and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Singer, Benjamin H; Newstead, Michael W; Falkowski, Nicole R; Erb-Downward, John R; Standiford, Theodore J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are major causes of mortality without targeted therapies. Although many experimental and clinical observations have implicated gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases, culture-based studies have failed to demonstrate translocation of bacteria to the lungs in critically ill patients. Here, we report culture-independent evidence that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut bacteria both in a murine model of sepsis and in humans with established ARDS. Following experimental sepsis, lung communities were dominated by viable gut-associated bacteria. Ecological analysis identified the lower gastrointestinal tract, rather than the upper respiratory tract, as the likely source community of post-sepsis lung bacteria. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans with ARDS, gut-specific bacteria (Bacteroides spp.) were common and abundant, undetected by culture and correlated with the intensity of systemic inflammation. Alveolar TNF-α, a key mediator of alveolar inflammation in ARDS, was significantly correlated with altered lung microbiota. Our results demonstrate that the lung microbiome is enriched with gut-associated bacteria in sepsis and ARDS, potentially representing a shared mechanism of pathogenesis in these common and lethal diseases. PMID:27670109

  16. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype.

  17. Gamma scintigraphic analysis of albumin flux in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sugerman, H.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Strash, A.M.; Glauser, F.L.

    1984-06-01

    Computerized gamma-scintigraphy provides a new method for the analysis of albumin flux in patients with pulmonary permeability edema. In this technique, 10 mCi of /sup 99/mTc -tagged human serum albumin is administered and lung:heart radioactivity ratios are determined. This ratio remains constant unless there is a leak of albumin, when a rising ratio with time, called the ''slope index'' (SI), is seen. Thirty-five scintigraphic studies were obtained in 28 patients by means of a portable computerized gamma-camera. Thirteen of these patients had clinical evidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and six had or were recovering from left ventricular induced congestive heart failure (CHF). Five of the patients with CHF and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) below 30 mm Hg had normal scintigraphic studies. The patients with ARDS were found to have significantly higher SIs than patients who did not have, or had recovered from, ARDS. Positive SIs were present from 1 to 8 days following the apparent onset of ARDS in seven studies in five patients. Recovery of gas exchange was associated with a return to a normal SI in four patients. In conclusion, computerized gamma-scintigraphy was a sensitive, noninvasive tool for the detection of a pathologic increase in pulmonary protein flux. Positive scintigraphic findings were associated with significantly impaired gas exchange. The method documented that the leak of albumin in patients with ARDS may last for days but resolves with recovery.

  18. Untargeted LC-MS Metabolomics of Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Differentiates Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome from Health

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charles R.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kovach, Melissa A.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Burant, Charles F.; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a significant hazard to human health and is clinically challenging because there are no prognostic biomarkers and no effective pharmacotherapy. The lung compartment metabolome may detail the status of the local environment that could be useful in ARDS biomarker discovery and the identification of drug target opportunities. However, neither the utility of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as a biofluid for metabolomics nor the optimal analytical platform for metabolite identification are established. To address this, we undertook a study to compare metabolites in BALF samples from patients with ARDS and healthy controls using a newly developed liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectroscopy (MS) platform for untargeted metabolomics. Following initial testing of three different high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns, we determined that reversed phase (RP)-LC and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), were the most informative chromatographic methods because they yielded the most and highest quality data. Following confirmation of metabolite identification, statistical analysis resulted in 37 differentiating metabolites in the BALF of ARDS compared with health across both analytical platforms. Pathway analysis revealed networks associated with amino acid metabolism, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, phospholipids and purine metabolism in the ARDS BALF. The complementary analytical platforms of RPLC and HILIC-LC generated informative, insightful metabolomics data of the ARDS lung environment. PMID:24289193

  19. Necrostatin-1 protects against oleic acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Yao, Dun-Chen; Yu, Yu-Zhong; Li, Sheng-Jie; Chen, Bing-Jun; Hu, Gui-He; Xi, Chang; Wang, Zi-Hui; Wang, Hong-Yan; Li, Jian-Hua; Tu, Yong-Sheng

    2016-09-30

    Necroptosis is a recently discovered necrotic cell death which is regulated by receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3 under the stimulus of death signal and can be inhibited by necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) specifically. Therefore, the aim was to investigate the role of necroptosis in a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by oleic acid (OA) and assess the effect of Nec-1 on lung injury in ARDS. Our results found that RIPK1, RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) were abundantly expressed in rat lung tissues of OA-induced ARDS. Nec-1 pretreatment improved pulmonary function and attenuated lung edema dramatically in OA-induced ARDS rats. Furthermore, Nec-1 reduced RIPK1-RIPK3 interaction and down-regulated RIPK1-RIPK3-MLKL signal pathway, and inhibited inflammatory response by reducing neutrophil infiltration and protein leakage into lung tissue in OA-induced ARDS. Collectively, our study proves the intervention of necroptosis in OA-induced ARDS. Moreover, our findings imply that Nec-1 plays an important role in the treatment of ARDS via inhibiting necroptosis and inflammation. PMID:27586277

  20. [The basics on mechanical ventilation support in acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tomicic, V; Fuentealba, A; Martínez, E; Graf, J; Batista Borges, J

    2010-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is understood as an inflammation-induced disruption of the alveolar endothelial-epithelial barrier that results in increased permeability and surfactant dysfunction followed by alveolar flooding and collapse. ARDS management relies on mechanical ventilation. The current challenge is to determine the optimal ventilatory strategies that minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) while providing a reasonable gas exchange. The data support that a tidal volume between 6-8 ml/kg of predicted body weight providing a plateau pressure < 30 cmH₂O should be used. High positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) has not reduced mortality, nevertheless secondary endpoints are improved. The rationale used for high PEEP argues that it prevents cyclic opening and closing of airspaces, probably the major culprit of development of VILI. Chest computed tomography has contributed to our understanding of anatomic-functional distribution patterns in ARDS. Electric impedance tomography is a technique that is radiation-free, but still under development, that allows dynamic monitoring of ventilation distribution at bedside.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cardiovascular surgery: current concepts and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hoegl, Sandra; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Vohwinkel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review gives an update on current treatment options and novel concepts on the prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cardiovascular surgery patients. Recent findings The only proven beneficial therapeutic options in ARDS are those that help to prevent further ventilator-induced lung injury, such as prone position, use of lung-protective ventilation strategies, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In the future also new approaches like mesenchymal cell therapy, activation of hypoxia-elicited transcription factors or targeting of purinergic signaling may be successful outside the experimental setting. Owing to the so far limited treatment options, it is of great importance to determine patients at risk for developing ARDS already perioperatively. In this context, serum biomarkers and lung injury prediction scores could be useful. Summary Preventing ARDS as a severe complication in the cardiovascular surgery setting may help to reduce morbidity and mortality. As cardiovascular surgery patients are of greater risk to develop ARDS, preventive interventions should be implemented early on. Especially, use of low tidal volumes, avoiding of fluid overload and restrictive blood transfusion regimes may help to prevent ARDS. PMID:26598954

  2. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the “sponge lung” - and the “shape matching” -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients’ response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  3. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  4. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dejan V.; Johnson, Colin D.; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  5. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  6. Intrapleural steroid instillation for multiple organ failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) increases mortality in patients with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). This study evaluates the feasibility of intrapleural steroid instillation (IPSI) in patients with ARDS and MODS unresponsive to conventional extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Ninety-two of 467 patients who underwent ECMO between 2005 and 2009 had ARDS, and 30 consecutive adult patients of these 92 patients with severe ARDS and MODS were retrospectively analyzed in this study. Nine of these 30 patients, who did not respond to therapy and whose condition deteriorated, were managed with IPSI. All patients met the inclusion criteria of hemodynamic instability with high catecholamine infusion requirement and 100% oxygen demand in ventilation and ECMO flow. On initial diagnosis of ARDS, no differences in prognostic scorings were observed in patients who underwent conventional treatment (n = 21) and those who underwent IPSI (n = 9). Blood oxygenation, tidal volume, changing in chest radiographic findings, and survival rates were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival until discharge from the hospital. Pulmonary radiographic appearance improved after 3 days of IPSI treatment (P = 0.008); the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen also increased significantly after 5 days of IPSI treatment (P = 0.028). Moreover, the 28-day mortality rate (P = 0.017), 60-day mortality rate (P = 0.003), and survival rate (78% vs. 19%; P = 0.003) significantly improved in patients undergoing IPSI, which therefore appears to be an easily implemented and highly effective treatment for patients with severe ARDS in combination with MODS, particularly in patients who fail to respond to conventional treatment.

  7. Can We Optimize Long-Term Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome by Targeting Normoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian; Christie, Jason D.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Lanken, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    Since its original description in 1967, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been recognized as a devastating condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in critical care medicine and ARDS management have led to a substantial increase in the number of ARDS survivors. Long-term cognitive impairment after critical illness is a significant public health concern. ARDS survivors frequently experience long-term cognitive impairment, as well as physical impairment, psychiatric morbidity, and reduced health-related quality of life. At present, no intensive care unit–based intervention has been proven to reduce the risk of long-term cognitive impairment after ARDS. To address the urgent need to identify strategies to preserve long-term health, investigators have advocated the measurement of short- and long-term outcomes in clinical trials. Maintaining adequate oxygen delivery to preserve organ function is of vital importance in ARDS management. The optimal target range for arterial oxygenation in ARDS remains unknown, due in part to the challenge to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation and to minimize harm, such as oxygen toxicity. An approach targeted to subnormal oxygenation values (partial pressure of arterial oxygen, 55–80 mm Hg) has emerged as a means to accomplish these aims. In this perspective, we critically evaluate this strategy from short- and long-term perspectives, with a focus on the potential long-term cognitive effects of the strategy. We conclude with a proposal to consider resetting the target range for arterial oxygenation higher (85–110 mm Hg) as a potential strategy to improve the long-term outcomes of ARDS survivors. PMID:24621125

  8. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419–0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34–0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P–V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  9. Titration of tidal volume and induced hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roupie, E; Dambrosio, M; Servillo, G; Mentec, H; el Atrous, S; Beydon, L; Brun-Buisson, C; Lemaire, F; Brochard, L

    1995-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation may promote overdistension-induced pulmonary lesions in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The static pressure-volume (P-V) curve of the respiratory system can be used to determine the lung volume and corresponding static airway pressure at which lung compliance begins to diminish (the upper inflection point, or UIP). This fall in compliance may indicate overdistension of lung units. We prospectively studied 42 patients receiving mechanical ventilation with an FIO2 of 0.5 or more for at least 24 h. According to the Lung Injury Score (LIS), 25 patients were classified as having ARDS (LIS > 2.5), while 17 patients constituted a non-ARDS control group. The P-V curve was obtained every 2 d. Mechanical ventilation initially used standard settings (volume-control mode, a positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] adjusted to the lower inflection point on the P-V curve, and a tidal volume [VT] of 10 ml/kg). The end-inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat) was compared to the UIP, and VT was lowered when the Pplat was above the UIP. In the range of lung volume studied on the P-V curves (up to 1600 ml), a UIP could be shown in only one control patient (at 23 cm H2O). By contrast, a UIP was present on the P-V curve obtained from all patients with ARDS, corresponding to a mean airway pressure of 26 +/- 6 cm H2O, a lung volume of 850 +/- 200 ml above functional residual capacity and 610 +/- 235 ml above PEEP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599810

  10. Surfactant chemical composition and biophysical activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T J; Longmore, W J; Moxley, M A; Whitsett, J A; Reed, C R; Fowler, A A; Hudson, L D; Maunder, R J; Crim, C; Hyers, T M

    1991-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung injury and damage to the alveolar type II cells. This study sought to determine if endogenous surfactant is altered in ARDS. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in patients at-risk to develop ARDS (AR, n = 20), with ARDS (A, n = 66) and in normal subjects (N, n = 29). The crude surfactant pellet was analyzed for total phospholipids (PL), individual phospholipids, SP-A, SP-B, and minimum surface tension (STmin). PL was decreased in both AR and A (3.48 +/- 0.61 and 2.47 +/- 0.40 mumol/ml, respectively) compared to N (7.99 +/- 0.60 mumol/ml). Phosphatidylcholine was decreased in A (62.64 +/- 2.20% PL) compared to N (76.27 +/- 2.05% PL). Phosphatidylglycerol was 11.58 +/- 1.21% PL in N and was decreased to 6.48 +/- 1.43% PL in A. SP-A was 123.64 +/- 20.66 micrograms/ml in N and was decreased to 49.28 +/- 21.68 micrograms/ml in AR and to 29.88 +/- 8.49 micrograms/ml in A. SP-B was 1.28 +/- 0.33 micrograms/ml in N and was decreased to 0.57 +/- 0.24 micrograms/ml in A. STmin was increased in AR (15.1 +/- 2.53 dyn/cm) and A (29.04 +/- 2.05 dyn/cm) compared to N (7.44 +/- 1.61 dyn/cm). These data demonstrate that the chemical composition and functional activity of surfactant is altered in ARDS. Several of these alterations also occur in AR, suggesting that these abnormalities occur early in the disease process. PMID:1752956

  11. Proteomic Profiles in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Differentiates Survivors from Non-Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L.; Viken, Kevin J.; Jagtap, Pratik D.; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S.; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B.; Ingbar, David H.; Wendt, Christine H.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  12. Hyperpolarized Gas Diffusion MRI for the Study of Atelectasis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of CT, PET, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI)—a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces—is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of 3He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces; (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces; and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. PMID:24920074

  13. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTH17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome1

    PubMed Central

    Li, John T.; Melton, Andrew C.; Su, George; Hamm, David E.; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O’Kane, Cecilia M.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Muir, Roshell R.; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. Here we report that expansion of antigen-specific αβT helper 17 (αβTH17) cells contribute to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in antigen-specific αβTH17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Loss of IL-17 receptor C or antibody blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTH17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the T cell receptor. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, since we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ARDS and recombinant IL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTH17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  14. Circulating nucleosomes are associated with mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-06-01

    Mechanisms underlying pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) are poorly understood. The recent implication of circulating nucleosomes as pathogenic in sepsis and trauma-associated ARDS in adults led us to investigate the significance of nucleosomes in PARDS. We conducted a prospective, observational study on children with PARDS at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between July 2014 and September 2015. Plasma was collected within 48 h of PARDS onset and nucleosomes quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples from 76 children with PARDS (11 deaths, 14%) were collected early [median 15 (IQR 7, 21) h] after PARDS onset. Nucleosome levels were higher in nonsurvivors [0.59 AU (IQR 0.46, 0.84)] relative to survivors [0.21 AU (IQR 0.08, 0.33), rank sum P < 0.001]. Nucleosome levels were not associated with either Berlin (P = 0.845) or PALICC (P = 0.886) oxygenation categories, nor with etiology of PARDS (P = 0.527). Nucleosomes were correlated with increasing numbers of nonpulmonary organ failures (P = 0.009 for trend), and were higher in patients whose PaO2 /FiO2 worsened (P = 0.012) over the first 72 h of PARDS. In regression analysis, nucleosome levels were independently associated with mortality after adjusting for either age, severity of illness score, number of nonpulmonary organ failures, vasopressor score, or PaO2 /FiO2 (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma nucleosome levels in early PARDS were associated with increased mortality, correlated with number of nonpulmonary organ failures, and preceded worsening oxygenation. The potential utility of this biomarker for prognostication, risk stratification, and mechanistic insight should be investigated further. PMID:27130528

  15. Dual hit lipopolysaccharide & oleic acid combination induced rat model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagawane, T.N.; Gaikwad, R.V.; Kshirsagar, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite advances in therapy and overall medical care, acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management remains a problem. Hence the objective of this study was to develop a rat model that mimics human ALI/ARDS. Methods: Four groups of Wistar rats, 48 per group were treated with (i) intratracheal (IT) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) dissolved in normal saline (NS), (ii) intravenous (iv) oleic acid (OA) (250 μl/kg) suspension in bovine serum albumin (BSA), (iii) dual hit: IT LPS (2 mg/kg) dissolved in NS and iv OA (100 μl/kg) and (iv) control group: IT NS and iv BSA. From each group at set periods of time various investigations like chest X-rays, respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), total cell count, differential cell count, total protein count and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological examination were done. Results: It was noted that the respiratory rate, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher at 4 h in the dual hit group as compared to LPS, OA and control groups. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were significantly higher in the dual hit group as compared to LPS at 8 and 24 h, OA at 8 h and control (at all time intervals) group. IL-1β levels were significantly higher in LPS and dual hit groups at all time intervals, but not in OA and control groups. The injury induced in dual hit group was earlier and more sustained as compared to LPS and OA alone. Interpretation & conclusions: The lung pathology and changes in respiration functions produced by the dual hit model were closer to the diagnostic criteria of ALI/ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury and the injury persisted longer as compared to LPS and OA single hit model. Therefore, the ARDS model produced by the dual hit method was closer to the diagnostic criteria of ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury. PMID

  16. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  17. “Obesity Paradox” in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Asystematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Guo; Xin, Wang; Ying, Wang; Guohong, Xing; Shuying, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether an “obesity paradox” exists in the respiratory system, especially in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies have postulated a causal relation between obesity and ARDS/ALI but have lacked power to form a definitive conclusion. Objective To investigate the relationships between obesity, ARDS/ALIrisk, and mortality. Methods A systematic search current to April 2016 was performed in Pubmed, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane databases to find relevant studies. All studies that estimate the effect of obesity in the morbidity and mortality of ARDS/ALI were included. Results A total of 24 studies including 9,187,248 subjects were analyzed. The combined results from 16 studies that examined the effect of obesity in morbidity of ARDS/ALI showed an89% increase in odds ratio(pooled odds ratios (OR) 1.89, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.45 to 2.47). In subgroup analysis, compared to normal weight, obesity was associated with an increased risk of ARDS/ALI (OR1.57, 95% CI 1.30–1.90 for obese (BMI30-39.9kg/m2); OR1.75, 95% CI 1.42–2.15 for obese(BMI≥30kg/m2); OR1.67, 95% CI 1.04–2.68 for morbid obese(BMI≥40kg/m2)). The combined results from 9 studies that examined the effect of obesity in mortality of ARDS/ALI had a pooled odds ratio(pooled OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.98). Inversely, obesity was significantly associated with reduced risk of ARDS/ALI mortality(OR0.88, 95% CI 0.78–1.00 for overweight(BMI≤18.5m2); OR0.74, 95% CI 0.64–0.84 for obese (BMI30-39.9kg/m2);OR0.84, 95% CI 0.75–0.94 for 60days mortality; OR0.38, 95% CI 0.22–0.66 for 90days mortality). Conclusions Our data identify obesity as an important risk factor for the development of ARDS/ALI; however, ARDS/ALI outcomes are improved in this population when compared to individuals with a normal body mass index. This meta-analysis results supported ‘‘obesity paradox” in ARDS/ALI. PMID:27684705

  18. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  19. Porocephalosis due to encysted Armillifer nymph presenting as an acute abdominal emergency: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ibinaiye, P O; Dauda, M M; Damisa, K L

    2011-09-01

    A rare case of porocephalosis infection presenting with an acute abdominal emergency in a 60 year old Nigerian is presented. The characteristic radiologic appearance of Armillifer nymph is described, and clinical findings which may be caused by this parasite are reviewed. A brief review of the epidemiology of porocephalosis is also included. PMID:21909153

  20. Influence of acute aerobic exercise on adiponectin oligomer concentrations in middle-aged abdominally obese men.

    PubMed

    Numao, Shigeharu; Katayama, Yasutomi; Hayashi, Yoichi; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2011-02-01

    Exercise intensity may induce changes in total adiponectin and adiponectin oligomer levels. However, the effects of acute aerobic exercise on total adiponectin and adiponectin oligomers in middle-aged abdominally obese men remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of aerobic exercise intensity on changes in the concentrations of total adiponectin and adiponectin oligomers (high-molecular weight [HMW] and middle- plus low-molecular weight [MLMW] adiponectin), and the endocrine mechanisms involved in exercise-induced changes in adiponectin oligomer profiles in middle-aged abdominally obese men. Using a crossover design, 9 middle-aged abdominally obese men (age, 54.1 ± 2.4 years; body mass index, 27.9 ± 0.6 kg/m²) underwent 2 trials that consisted of 60 minutes of stationary cycle exercise at either moderate-intensity (ME) or high-intensity (HE) aerobic exercise (50% or 70% of peak oxygen uptake, respectively). Blood samples were collected to measure the concentrations of adiponectin oligomers, hormones (catecholamines, insulin, and growth hormone), metabolites (free fatty acid, glycerol, triglyceride, and glucose), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α). After exercise, plasma catecholamine concentrations were higher during HE than during ME (P < .05). Total adiponectin concentration decreased at the end of HE (P < .05), but remained unchanged after ME. The HMW adiponectin concentration did not change at either intensity, whereas the MLMW concentration decreased at the end of HE (P < .05). The ratio of HMW to total adiponectin concentration increased significantly (P < .05), whereas the ratio of MLMW to total adiponectin concentration decreased significantly (P < .05), at the end of HE. The percentage changes in epinephrine concentration from baseline to the end of exercise were correlated with the percentage changes in total adiponectin concentration (r = -0.67, P < .05) and MLMW adiponectin concentration (r

  1. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  2. Systemic combined melatonin-mitochondria treatment improves acute respiratory distress syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Lee, Fan-Yen; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Leu, Steve; Wu, Ying-Chung; Lu, Hung-I; Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Su, Hong-Lin; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-03-01

    Despite high in-hospital mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there is no effective therapeutic strategy. We tested the hypothesis that combined melatonin-mitochondria treatment ameliorates 100% oxygen-induced ARDS in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) were equally categorized into normal controls, ARDS, ARDS-melatonin, ARDS with intravenous liver-derived mitochondria (1500 μg per rat 6 hr after ARDS induction), and ARDS receiving combined melatonin-mitochondria. The results showed that 22 hr after ARDS induction, oxygen saturation (saO2 ) was lowest in the ARDS group and highest in normal controls, significantly lower in ARDS-melatonin and ARDS-mitochondria than in combined melatonin-mitochondria group, and significantly lower in ARDS-mitochondria than in ARDS-melatonin group. Conversely, right ventricular systolic blood pressure and lung weight showed an opposite pattern compared with saO2 among all groups (all P < 0.001). Histological integrity of alveolar sacs showed a pattern identical to saO2 , whereas lung crowding score exhibited an opposite pattern (all P < 0.001). Albumin level and inflammatory cells (MPO+, CD40+, CD11b/c+) from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a pattern opposite to saO2 (all P < 0.001). Protein expression of indices of inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, NF-κB), oxidative stress (oxidized protein, NO-1, NOX-2, NOX-4), apoptosis (mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3, and PARP), fibrosis (Smad3, TGF-β), mitochondrial damage (cytochrome C), and DNA damage (γ-H2AX+) exhibited an opposite pattern compared to saO2 in all groups, whereas protein (HO-1, NQO-1, GR, GPx) and cellular (HO-1+) expressions of antioxidants exhibited a progressively increased pattern from normal controls to ARDS combined melatonin-mitochondria group (all P < 0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin-mitochondrial was superior to either treatment alone in attenuating ARDS in this rat model.

  3. Prognostic and diagnostic value of plasma soluble ST2 concentrations in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Volk, Jessica A.; Christiani, David C.; Harris, R. Scott; Matthay, Michael A.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Soluble ST2 (sST2) is a biomarker of myocardial strain and inflammation. The characteristics of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) include inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. We sought to determine whether plasma sST2 concentration is associated with outcome and response to conservative fluid management, and whether sST2 concentration discriminates ARDS from decompensated heart failure (HF). Design, Setting, and Patients We assayed plasma sST2 concentrations in 826 patients in the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conservative fluid management in ARDS, as well as a cohort of patients with decompensated HF. We tested whether sST2 was associated with outcome, response to therapy, and diagnostic utility for ARDS vs. HF. Measurements and Main Results Non-survivors had higher day 0 (P<.0001) and day 3 (P<.0001) sST2 concentrations. After adjustment for severity of illness, higher sST2 concentration was associated with mortality, with odds ratio (ORadj) 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99 – 2.20, P=.06) at day 0, 2.94 (95% CI 2.00 – 4.33, P<.0001) at day 3, and 3.63 (95% CI 2.38 – 5.53, P<.0001) if sST2 increased between days. Cumulative fluid balance was more positive among patients with higher day 0 (median 5212 mL, interquartile range [IQR] 200 – 12284 vs. 2020 mL, −2034 – 7091; P<0.0001), and day 3 sST2 (median 7678 mL, IQR 2217 – 14278 vs. 1492 mL, −2384 – 6239; P<0.0001). sST2 showed excellent discriminative ability between the FACTT and HF populations (Area under ROC curve=0.98, P<0.0001). Conclusions Higher sST2 concentrations are associated with worse outcome in ARDS and may have value for discriminating ARDS from heart failure. PMID:23939353

  4. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical use of serial quantitative computed tomography (CT) to characterize lung disease and guide the optimization of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is limited by the risk of cumulative radiation exposure and by the difficulties and risks related to transferring patients to the CT room. We evaluated the effects of tube current-time product (mAs) variations on quantitative results in healthy lungs and in experimental ARDS in order to support the use of low-dose CT for quantitative analysis. Methods In 14 sheep chest CT was performed at baseline and after the induction of ARDS via intravenous oleic acid injection. For each CT session, two consecutive scans were obtained applying two different mAs: 60 mAs was paired with 140, 15 or 7.5 mAs. All other CT parameters were kept unaltered (tube voltage 120 kVp, collimation 32 × 0.5 mm, pitch 0.85, matrix 512 × 512, pixel size 0.625 × 0.625 mm). Quantitative results obtained at different mAs were compared via Bland-Altman analysis. Results Good agreement was observed between 60 mAs and 140 mAs and between 60 mAs and 15 mAs (all biases less than 1%). A further reduction of mAs to 7.5 mAs caused an increase in the bias of poorly aerated and nonaerated tissue (-2.9% and 2.4%, respectively) and determined a significant widening of the limits of agreement for the same compartments (-10.5% to 4.8% for poorly aerated tissue and -5.9% to 10.8% for nonaerated tissue). Estimated mean effective dose at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 17.8, 7.4, 2.0 and 0.9 mSv, respectively. Image noise of scans performed at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 10, 16, 38 and 74 Hounsfield units, respectively. Conclusions A reduction of effective dose up to 70% has been achieved with minimal effects on lung quantitative results. Low-dose computed tomography provides accurate quantitative results and could be used to characterize lung compartment distribution and

  5. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Powerful Modality for Pulmonary Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Hua-Ping; Li, Yan-Ming; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute and lethal clinical syndrome that is characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure and diffuse alveolar inflammatory damage. This review aimed to search and discuss the mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic studies on different subsets of ARDS patients. Data Sources: Original research articles were collected from the PubMed database published in English up to December 2015. Study Selection: The literature search was done using the term “(acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (proteomics OR proteome OR mass spectrum OR differential in-gel electrophoresis OR two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis)”. Related original research articles were included and were carefully analyzed. Results: Eight original proteomic researches on ARDS patients were found. The common proteomic modalities were two-dimensional (2D) high-performance liquid chromatography-based electronic spray ion-MS/MS and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/differential in-gel electrophoresis-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/MS. They compared the proteome between ARDS patients and normal controls and analyzed the dynamic changes of proteome at different ARDS stages or severity. The disturbed proteome in ARDS patients includes plasma acute-phase proteins, inflammatory/immune-associated proteins, and coagulation proteins. Conclusions: Although several previous studies have provided some useful information about the lung proteome in ARDS patients and gained several interesting disease-associated biomarkers, clinical proteomic studies in ARDS patients are still in the initial stage. An increased cooperation is still needed to establish a global and faithful database containing disease-specific proteome from the largest ARDS subsets. PMID:27647196

  6. Splenic infarction – A rare cause of acute abdominal pain following gastric surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal; Isil, Gurhan; Bozkurt, Emre; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes in gastric cancer surgery is indispensable for treating gastric cancers located in the proximal third of the stomach. Splenic vascular injury is a matter of debate resulting on time or delayed splenectomy. We aimed to share our experience and plausible mechanisms causing this complication in two case reports. Case presentations Two male patients with gastric cancer were diagnosed with acute splenic infarction following gastric surgery in the early postoperative period. Both underwent emergent exploratory laparotomy. Splenectomy was performed due to splenic infarction. Discussion Because we observed this rare complication in recent patients whose surgery was performed using vessel-sealing device for splenic hilar dissection, we suggested that extensive mobilization of the surrounding tissues of splenic vascular structures hilum using the vessel sealer could be the reason. Conclusion In case of acute abdominal pain radiating to left shoulder, splenic complications should be taken into consideration in gastric cancer patients performed radical gastrectomy. Meticulous dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes should be carried out to avoid any splenic vascular injury. PMID:25818369

  7. Acute sodium bicarbonate loading has negligible effects on resting and exercise blood pressure but causes gastrointestinal distress.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Laura E; Kelly, Patrick V; Eliot, Kathrin A; Weiss, Edward P

    2013-06-01

    Oral ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (bicarbonate loading) has acute ergogenic effects on short-duration, high-intensity exercise. Because sodium bicarbonate is 27% sodium, ergogenic doses (ie, 300 mg∙kg⁻¹) result in sodium intakes well above the Dietary Reference Intakes upper limit of 2300 mg/day. Therefore, it is conceivable that bicarbonate loading could have hypertensive effects. Therefore, we performed a double-blind crossover trial to evaluate the hypothesis that bicarbonate loading increases resting and exercise blood pressure (BP). A secondary hypothesis was that bicarbonate loading causes gastrointestinal distress. Eleven endurance-trained men and women (exercise frequency, 4.6 ± 0.4 sessions/wk; duration, 65 ± 6 min/session) underwent testing on two occasions in random sequence: once after bicarbonate loading (300 mg∙kg⁻¹) and once after placebo ingestion. BP and heart rate were measured before bicarbonate or placebo consumption, 30 minutes after consumption, during 20 min of steady state submaximal cycling exercise, and during recovery. Bicarbonate loading did not affect systolic BP during rest, exercise, or recovery (P = .38 for main treatment effect). However, it resulted in modestly higher diastolic BP (main treatment effect, +3.3 ± 1.1 mmHg, P = .01) and higher heart rate (main treatment effect, +10.1 ± 2.4 beats per minute, P = .002). Global ratings of gastrointestinal distress severity (0-10 scale) were greater after bicarbonate ingestion (5.1 ± 0.5 vs 0.5 ± 0.2, P < .0001). Furthermore, 10 of the 11 subjects (91%) experienced diarrhea, 64% experience bloating and thirst, and 45% experienced nausea after bicarbonate loading. In conclusion, although a single, ergogenic dose of sodium bicarbonate does not appear to have acute, clinically important effects on resting or exercise BP, it does cause substantial gastrointestinal distress.

  8. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  9. [Scoring of severity of patients' condition with acute surgical diseases and injuries of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Lesik, P S; Kharisov, A M; Pashaev, A A

    2015-07-01

    Ten of the most frequent symptoms that do not require special methods of their determination except general clinical examinations established by any health care professional on pre-hospital stage were determined on the basis of analysis of more than one thousand records of patients with acute surgical abdominal diseases and clinical symptom load. The authors performed an assessment of each symptom depending on severity of patient's condition ranging from 1 point (satisfactory condition) till 5 points (critical condition). Information has been obtained: in case of satisfactory condition--up to 10 points, moderate--up to 20 points, heavy--up to 30 points, extremely heavy condition--up to 45 points and terminal condition--more than 45 points. Thus, conditional descriptive method of assessment of patient's condition during the clinical examination is combined with objective-scoring. The given method combines numeric expression with methods accepted in literature--"MFS-CA", "APACHE II" and allows to perform an objective assessment of the treatment process at different stages, to practice health care standards, to perform an analysis of outcomes. The article provides tables, which substantiate proposed method.

  10. A new horizon for the use of non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has assumed an important role in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF). NIV, compared with standard medical therapy, improves survival and reduces complications in selected patients with ARF. NIV represents the first-line intervention for some forms of ARF, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The use of NIV is also well supported for immunocompromised patients who are at high risk for infectious complications from endotracheal intubation. Selection of appropriate patients is crucial for optimizing NIV success rates. Appropriate ventilator settings, a well-fitting and comfortable interface, and a team skilled and experienced in managing NIV are key components to its success. In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Patel et al. reported the results of their single-center trial of 83 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) who were randomly assigned to NIV delivered via a helmet or face mask. Patients assigned to the helmet group exhibited a significantly lower intubation rate and were more likely to survive through 90 days. This perspective reviews the findings of this trial in the context of current clinical practice and in light of data from the literature focused on the potential reasons for success of NIV delivered through a helmet compared to face mask. The implications for early management of patients with ARDS are likewise discussed. PMID:27761452

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Burn Patients: A Comparison of the Berlin and American-European Definitions.

    PubMed

    Sine, Christy R; Belenkiy, Slava M; Buel, Allison R; Waters, J Alan; Lundy, Jonathan B; Henderson, Jonathan L; Stewart, Ian J; Aden, James K; Liu, Nehemiah T; Batchinsky, Andriy; Cannon, Jeremy W; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the Berlin definition to the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC) definition in determining the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and associated mortality in the critically ill burn population. Consecutive patients admitted to our institution with burn injury that required mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were included for analysis. Included patients (N = 891) were classified by both definitions. The median age, % TBSA burn, and injury severity score (interquartile ranges) were 35 (24-51), 25 (11-45), and 18 (9-26), respectively. Inhalation injury was present in 35.5%. The prevalence of ARDS was 34% using the Berlin definition and 30.5% using the AECC definition (combined acute lung injury and ARDS), with associated mortality rates of 40.9 and 42.9%, respectively. Under the Berlin definition, mortality rose with increased ARDS severity (14.6% no ARDS; 16.7% mild; 44% moderate; and 59.7% severe, P < 0.001). By contrast, under the AECC definition increased mortality was seen only for ARDS category (14.7% no ARDS; 15.1% acute lung injury; and 46.0% ARDS, P < 0.001). The mortality of the 22 subjects meeting the AECC, but not the Berlin definition was not different from patients without ARDS (P = .91). The Berlin definition better stratifies ARDS in terms of severity and correctly excludes those with minimal disease previously captured by the AECC.

  12. Surfactant therapy in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and in near-term or term newborns with acute RDS.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R

    2006-05-01

    Many different surfactant preparations derived from animal sources, as well as synthetic surfactants, are available for the treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Natural, modified surfactants containing surfactant-associated proteins appear to be more effective than non-protein-containing synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials with poractant alfa at a higher initial dose of 200 mg/kg appear to be associated with rapid weaning of FiO2, less need for additional doses, and decreased mortality in infants <32 weeks gestation when compared with beractant. Early rescue (<30 min of age) surfactant therapy is an effective method to minimize over treatment of some preterm infants who may not develop RDS. Surfactant therapy followed by rapid extubation to nasal ventilation appears to be more beneficial than continued mechanical ventilation. In near-term or term newborns with acute RDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be 70% effective in improving respiratory failure.

  13. Effect of extracorporeal CO2 removal on right ventricular and hemodynamic parameters in a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Landburg, Pearl P; Lagrand, Wim K; Schultz, Marcus J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2016-09-01

    We present a female patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) necessitating intubation and mechanical ventilation on the intensive care unit (ICU). High ventilatory pressures were needed because of hypoxia and severe hypercapnia with respiratory acidosis, resulting in right ventricular dysfunction with impaired haemodynamic stability. A veno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) circuit was initiated, effectively eliminating carbon dioxide while improving oxygenation and enabling a reduction in applied ventilatory pressures. We noted a marked improvement of right ventricular function with restoration of haemodynamic stability. Within one week, the patient was weaned from both ECCO2R and mechanical ventilation. Besides providing adequate gas exchange, extracorporeal assist devices may be helpful in ameliorating right ventricular dysfunction during ARDS.

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated successfully by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a nearly drowned patient.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Kazuma; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Asada, Toshifumi; Hiruma, Takahiro; Doi, Kento; Gunshin, Masataka; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Anraku, Masaki; Nakajima, Susumu; Nakajima, Jun; Yahagi, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    This report highlights about one acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) case after near-drowning resuscitated using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Few cases have been reported about ECMO use for near-drowning and in most of these cases, ECMO was initiated within the first week. However, in our report, we would like to emphasize that seemingly irreversible secondary worsening of ARDS after nearly drowned patient was successfully treated by ECMO use more than 1 week after near-drowning followed by discharge without home oxygen therapy, social support, or any complication. This is probably due to sufficient lung rest for ventilator-associated lung injury during ECMO use. Based on our case's clinical course, intensive care unit physicians must consider ECMO even in the late phase of worsened ARDS after near-drowning.

  15. [Nitric oxide inhalation as an effective therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome due to near-drowning: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Hirosako, S; Yamaguchi, T; Saita, N; Suga, M; Kukita, I; Okamoto, K; Ando, M

    1999-12-01

    A 16-year-old boy with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to near-drowning was admitted to our hospital. ARDS was treated with low-level nitric oxide (NO) inhalation (ranging from 4 ppm to 1 ppm) for 24 days. Oxygenation was improved and pulmonary hypertension was reduced after NO inhalation, but systemic blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output were not affected. PaO2 improved from 153 Torr to 354 Torr under identical ventilating conditions (F1O2 1.0), and mean pulmonary arterial pressure fell from 40 mm Hg to 27 mmHg. It has been reported that NO inhalation alleviates ventilation-flow mismatch and pulmonary hypertension. It is unclear, however, whether this therapy improves the prognosis for ARDS. In our patient, NO inhalation was effective in alleviating the oxygenation impairment and pulmonary hypertension associated with ARDS.

  16. Lavage-induced Surfactant Depletion in Pigs As a Model of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Russ, Martin; Kronfeldt, Sebastian; Boemke, Willehad; Busch, Thilo; Francis, Roland C E; Pickerodt, Philipp A

    2016-01-01

    Various animal models of lung injury exist to study the complex pathomechanisms of human acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and evaluate future therapies. Severe lung injury with a reproducible deterioration of pulmonary gas exchange and hemodynamics can be induced in anesthetized pigs using repeated lung lavages with warmed 0.9% saline (50 ml/kg body weight). Including standard respiratory and hemodynamic monitoring with clinically applied devices in this model allows the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies (drugs, modern ventilators, extracorporeal membrane oxygenators, ECMO), and bridges the gap between bench and bedside. Furthermore, induction of lung injury with lung lavages does not require the injection of pathogens/endotoxins that impact on measurements of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. A disadvantage of the model is the high recruitability of atelectatic lung tissue. Standardization of the model helps to avoid pitfalls, to ensure comparability between experiments, and to reduce the number of animals needed. PMID:27684585

  17. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation is an effective treatment for severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome with refractory hypoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Xiong; Wang, Zhao-Ni; Li, Ya-Ting; Pan, Li; Yang, Li-Fen; Hu, Yan; Sun, Yue-Yu; Cai, Liang-Ming; Chen, Zhuang-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Early or primary application of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has been recently suggested not to offer benefit to patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the rescue effects of HFOV on severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) with hypoxemia refractory to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether severe PARDS children would benefit from HFOV when oxygenation deteriorated on CMV and to identify any potential risk factors related to mortality. Patients and methods In a retrospective and observational study, 48 children with severe PARDS between January 2009 and July 2015 were divided into two groups: 26 in HFOV group and 22 in CMV group. Data regarding demographic, underlying conditions, arterial blood gases and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed. Results The arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspiration oxygen (FiO2) ratio and PaO2 improved significantly during HFOV, whereas arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygenation index decreased. There was no statistical difference in the in-hospital mortality between the groups (P=0.367). The odds ratio of survival in HFOV group was 2.74 (95% confidence interval 0.52 to 14.58, P=0.237). The pediatric intensive care unit length of stay and total ventilation duration were longer in HFOV group (P=0.048 and P=0.000, respectively). Vasoactive agents were used more frequently in HFOV group (P=0.007). The incidence of new air leak was similar between the two groups (P=0.674). The presence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and heavier body weight were identified as predictors of mortality in the HFOV group (P=0.006 and P=0.020, respectively). Conclusion HFOV as an efficient alternative therapy could significantly improve hypoxemia and promote CO2 removal in severe PARDS children when oxygenation progressively worsens on CMV. PMID:27799777

  18. Severe Acute Infection Due to Serratia marcescens Causing Respiratory Distress in An Immunocompetent Adult.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sada, Pablo; Escalante, Mikel; Lizarralde, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The role of Serratia marcescens changed from a harmless saprophytic microorganism to an important opportunistic human pathogen. It often causes nosocomial device-associated outbreaks and rarely serious invasive community acquired infections. We present a case of a community-acquired Serratia marcescens bacteremia leading to Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a previously healthy 51-year-old man without identifiable risk factors. Full recovery was achieved with solely medical treatment and observation in ICU during three days. To our knowledge it is an extremely uncommon presentation and just few cases have been previously reported in the literature.

  19. Serum, Saliva, and Urine Irisin with and Without Acute Appendicitis and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Aydin, Suleyman; Sarac, Mehmet; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kalayci, Mehmet; Artas, Gokhan; Yardim, Meltem; Kazez, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A 112-amino-acid protein irisin (IRI) is widely expressed in many organs, but we currently do not know whether appendix tissue and blood cells express it. If appendix tissue and neutrophil cells express IRI, measuring its concentration in biological fluids might be helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), since neutrophil cells are the currently gold-standard laboratory parameters for the diagnosis of AA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based measurements of the proposed myokine IRI for the discrimination of patients with AA from those with acute abdominal pain (AP) and healthy controls. Moreover, immunoreactivity to IRI was investigated in appendix tissues and blood cells. Samples were collected on admission (T1), 24 hours (T2), and 72 hours (T3) postoperatively from patients with suspected AA and from patients with AP corresponding to T1–T3, whereas control subject blood was once corresponding to T1. IRI was measured in serum, saliva, and urine by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas in appendix tissue and blood cells, IRI was detected by immunohistohcemistry. Appendix tissue and blood cells (except for erythrocytes) are new sources of IRI. Basal saliva, urine, and serum levels were higher in children with AA compared with postoperative levels (T2) that start to decline after surgery. This is in line with the finding that IRI levels are higher in children with AA when compared with those with AP or control subject levels, most likely due to a large infiltration of neutrophil cells in AA that release its IRI into body fluids. Measurement of IRI in children with AA parallels the increase or decrease in the neutrophil count. This new finding shows that the measurement of IRI and neutrophil count can together improve the diagnosis of AA, and it can distinguish it from AP. IRI can be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of AA and offers an additional parameter to

  20. [Ultrastructural changes in the lung in acute adult respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, K; Széll, K; Kádas, L

    1980-04-01

    Morphological alterations of the lung in respiratory distress syndrome of adults (ARDS) were analyzed in 10 cases with traumatic-and septic shock, laryngitis subglottica descendens and bronchopneumonia. For the better understanding of the pathomechanism of the disease in addition to the standard methods, first of all ultrastructural alterations were studied. Two phases of the morphologic alterations could be distinguished, the phase of the destruction and the phase of the repair. These two processes are not sharply distinguishable. Genesis of the characteristic histological alterations (damage to the epithelial and endothelial cells, formation of hyaline membranes, microcoagulation, proliferation of the type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts, fibrosis) is discussed, with regard to the data of the literature.

  1. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Heng; Gu, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Su; Chen, Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill. Methods Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data. Results Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001) and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50–0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001). In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients. Conclusions Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness. PMID:27182704

  2. Customization of an open-lung ventilation strategy to treat a case of life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grooms, David A; Sibole, Stephen H; Tomlinson, James R; Marik, Paul E; Chatburn, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    The ARDS Network low-tidal-volume protocol is considered the standard of care for patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The protocol is built on the foundation of low-tidal-volume ventilation, use of a combined PEEP and F(IO(2)) table, and managing alveolar end-inspiratory pressure by limiting the plateau airway pressure to ≤ 30 cm H(2)O. Although this strategy, to date, is the only method that significantly improves ALI/ARDS survival, alternative methods of improving hypoxemia and minimizing ventilator-induced lung injury, in conjunction with low-tidal-volume ventilation, can be used for life-threatening ARDS. We present a case in which we customized the use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers by analyzing the hysteresis of the pressure-volume curve to assess lung recruitability, decremental PEEP to sustain lung recruitment, and careful use of plateau pressure ≥ 30 cm H(2)O, which improved our patient's life-threatening hypoxemia within the first 36 min of arrival to our ICU.

  3. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  4. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  5. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support.

  6. Immunohistochemical expression of MPO, CD163 and VEGF in inflammatory cells in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Maretta, Milan; Toth, Stefan; Jonecova, Zuzana; Kruzliak, Peter; Kubatka, Peter; Pingorova, Stanislava; Vesela, Jarmila

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious medical condition occurring in patients with polytrauma, pulmonary or non-pulmonary sepsis, pneumonia and many other circumstances. It causes inflammation of the lung parenchyma leading to impaired gas exchange with a systemic release of inflammatory mediators, causing consequential lung tissue injury, hypoxemia and frequently multiple organ failure. The aim of current study was to describe expression of inflammatory markers (myeloperoxidase, CD163 and vascular endothelial growth factor) by the cells in acute phase of ARDS. The lung samples of a 20-year-old man who had suffered a serious motorbike accident were obtained for histological examination. He died on the seventh day as a consequence of respiratory failure. Our results imply that expression of CD163 was restricted to activated alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Immunopositivityof MPO was observed in neutrophil granulocytes within lung alveoli and lung blood vessels. Myeloperoxidase positivity was observed in alveolar macrophages, too. Vascular endothelial growth factor was expressed in cytoplasm of neutrophil granulocytes, monocytes, small-sized alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes localized mostly inside lung alveoli. On the contrary, no positivity was observed in lung endothelial cells of blood vessels. PMID:25120850

  7. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome--where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Cusack, Rebecca; Goss, Victoria; Postle, Anthony D; Grocott, Mike P W

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  8. Surgical management of a large peritoneal pseudocyst causing acute kidney injury secondary to abdominal compartment syndrome in a rare case of congenital absence of omentum during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benjamin P; Hunjan, Tia; Terry, Jayne

    2016-09-01

    Complete congenital absence of the omentum is very rare with only one previously reported case. We present a unique case of the management of a pregnant woman with a large pelvic pseudocyst caused by complications related to congenital absence of omentum, resulting in acute kidney injury, likely secondary to acute compartment syndrome. This case highlights the importance of considering acute compartment syndrome in critically unwell pregnant women and reiterates the need to measure intra-abdominal pressure when clinically indicated. Given that pregnancy is in itself a state of intra-abdominal hypertension, obstetricians should maintain a high index of suspicion in the context of additional risk factors. PMID:27630753

  9. Prevention and Mitigation of Acute Death of Mice after Abdominal Irradiation by the Antioxidant N-Acetyl-cysteine (NAC)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Dan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Griffin, Robert J.; Jackson, Cassie; Corry, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) injury is a major cause of acute death after total-body exposure to large doses of ionizing radiation, but the cellular and molecular explanations for GI death remain dubious. To address this issue, we developed a murine abdominal irradiation model. Mice were irradiated with a single dose of X rays to the abdomen, treated with daily s.c. injection of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or vehicle for 7 days starting either 4 h before or 2 h after irradiation, and monitored for up to 30 days. Separately, mice from each group were assayed 6 days after irradiation for bone marrow reactive oxygen species (ROS), ex vivo colony formation of bone marrow stromal cells, and histological changes in the duodenum. Irradiation of the abdomen caused dose-dependent weight loss and mortality. Radiation-induced acute death was preceded not only by a massive loss of duodenal villi but also, surprisingly, abscopal suppression of stromal cells and elevation of ROS in the nonirradiated bone marrow. NAC diminished these radiation-induced changes and improved 10- and 30-day survival rates to >50% compared with <5% in vehicle-treated controls. Our data establish a central role for abscopal stimulation of bone marrow ROS in acute death in mice after abdominal irradiation. PMID:20426657

  10. Strong correlation between lung ultrasound and chest computerized tomography imaging for the detection of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Huang, Daozheng; Guo, Liheng; Chen, Quanfu; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a clinical imaging technique for diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In humans and several large animals, LUS demonstrates similar specificity and sensitivity to computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Current study evaluated the degree of agreement between LUS and CT imaging in characterizing ALI/ARDS in rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged by LUS before randomization into three groups to receive intratracheal saline, 3 or 6 mg/kg LPS respectively (n=10). LUS and CT imaging was conducted 2 hours after instillation. Cross table analyses and kappa statistics were used to determine agreement levels between LUS and CT assessments of lung condition. Results Before instillation, rats presented with a largely A-pattern in LUS images, however, a significantly increase B-lines were observed in all groups after instillation and showed dose response to LPS or to saline. One rat treated with 6 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) presented with lung consolidation. The agreement between the LUS and the CT in detecting the main characteristics of ALI/ARDS in rat was strong (r=0.758, P<0.01, k=0.737). Conclusions In conclusion, LUS detects ALI/ARDS with high agreement with micro PET/CT scanning in a rat model, suggesting that LUS represents a positive refinement in rat ALI/ARDS disease models. PMID:27499930

  11. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Chronic Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Flageole, Helene; Ouahed, Jodie; Walton, J. Mark; Yousef, Yasmin

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is defined as an elevated intraabdominal pressure with evidence of organ dysfunction. The majority of published reports of ACS are in neonates with abdominal wall defects and in adults following trauma or burns, but it is poorly described in children. We describe the unusual presentation of an 11-year-old boy with a long history of chronic constipation who developed acute ACS requiring resuscitative measures and emergent disimpaction. He presented with a 2-week history of increasing abdominal pain, nausea, diminished appetite and longstanding encopresis. On exam, he was emaciated with a massively distended abdomen with a palpable fecaloma. Abdominal XR confirmed these findings. Within 24 hours of presentation, he became tachycardic and oliguric with orthostatic hypotension. Following two enemas, he acutely deteriorated with severe hypotension, marked tachycardia, acute respiratory distress, and a declining mental status. Endotracheal intubation, fluid boluses, and vasopressors were commenced, followed by emergent surgical fecal disimpaction. This resulted in rapid improvement in vital signs. He has been thoroughly investigated and no other condition apart from functional constipation has been identified. Although ACS secondary to constipation is extremely unusual, this case illustrates the need to actively treat constipation and what can happen if it is not. PMID:22606517

  12. Incidence and Predictors of Acute Psychological Distress and Dissociation after Motor Vehicle Collision: a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gemma C.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Liberzon, Israel; Bair, Eric; Swor, Robert; Peak, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, David; Domeier, Robert; Hendry, Phyllis; McLean, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors examined the incidence and predictors of peritraumatic distress and dissociation after one of the most common forms of civilian trauma exposure: motor vehicle collision (MVC). Methods In this study, patients presenting to the emergency department after MVC who were without serious injury and discharged to home after evaluation (n = 935) completed an emergency department interview evaluating sociodemographic, collision-related, and psychological characteristics. Results The incidence and predictors of distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory score ≥ 23) and dissociation (Michigan Critical Events Perception Scale score >3) were assessed. Distress was present in 355 of 935 patients (38%) and dissociation was present in 260 of 942 patients (28%). These outcomes showed only moderate correlation (r = 0.45), and had both shared and distinct predictors. Female gender, anxiety symptoms prior to MVC, and vehicle damage severity predicted both distress and dissociation. Higher socioeconomic status (higher education, higher income, full time employment) had a protective effect against distress but not dissociative symptoms. Better physical health and worse overall mental health were associated with increased risk of dissociation, but not distress. Distress but not dissociation was associated with lower patient confidence in recovery and a longer expected duration of recovery. Conclusion There are unique predictors of peritraumatic distress and dissociation. Further work is needed to better understand the neurobiology of peritraumatic distress and dissociation, and the influence of these peritraumatic outcomes on persistent psychological sequelae. PMID:24983475

  13. [Aorto-caval fistula as a results of abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture imitating acute renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Zaniewski, Maciej; Ludyga, Tomasz; Kazibudzki, Marek; Kowalewska-Twardela, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Aorto-caval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm. It occurs in 1-6% of cases. The classic diagnostic signs of an ACF (pulsatile abdominal mass with bruit and right ventricular failure) are present only in a half of the patients. The most common diagnostic imaging procedures like ultrasound and computed tomography often are not sufficient enough. This leads to the delay in diagnosis, which has a great impact on the results of operation. We report a case of a patient, who was treated before admission to the Clinic because of azotemia and oliguria suggesting renal failure.

  14. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation identified by investigating the cause of upper abdominal pain associated with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohei; Monden, Kazuteru; Ueki, Toru; Tatsukawa, Masashi; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Kousaku; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    A man in his 60s with epigastric pain was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and subsequently recovered following conservative treatment. However, because of repeated upper abdominal pain and the formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst, he was transferred to our institution for evaluation. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanning confirmed abnormal vessels in the tail of the pancreas and early venous return to the splenic vein in the early arterial phase. Abdominal angiography revealed a racemose vascular network in the tail of the pancreas, confirming the presence of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in this region. This AVM was thought to be the cause of the acute pancreatitis, so a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and there has been no recurrence at the 7-month postoperative follow-up. Surgical resection has a low recurrence rate and good outcome;thus, if a pancreatic AVM appears difficult to treat with conservative medical therapy, surgical resection appears to be the definitive treatment. PMID:27383106

  15. [Acute abdominal pain due to splenic infarction in a patient with heterozygous sickle cell disease exposed to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Semba, Edgar; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Jiménez Bustamante, Jorge; Arteaga Caro, Ronal; García Del Aguila, José Luis; Chávez Gil, Vannya

    2006-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathy S, Depranocytosis or Sickle Cell Disease is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the world. In its heterozygous form (Sickle Cell Trait), it affects 8% of the black population in the U.S. and 25% of the black population in Africa, and is found less frequently in the Mediterranean area, India, Middle East and Latin America. The basic alteration is a substitution of glutamic acid by valin in the sixth position of the beta globin chain, which causes polymerization at low oxygen tension thereby distorting the structure of erythrocytes and increasing blood viscosity, which, in turn, generates obstructions of the capillary arterial blood flow to different areas of the body thus causing microinfarctions. Although Splenic Infarction is rare, it is recognized as a serious complication of Heterozygous Sickle Cell Disease (Sickle Cell Trait). We present the case of a 21 year-old mestizo male patient who came in with an acute case of abdominal pain after arriving to work in the Casapalca mining city (located in the Peruvian Andes at 4200 m.a.s.l.) and was referred to our Hospital in Lima for exams. We present the case because it is an unusual cause of acute abdominal pain, and because this condition is rare in Peru and there are few publications about it. PMID:17211489

  16. Journey of a survivor of near drowning, polymicrobial pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, Margaret M; Wahl, Gary; Yamshchikov, Alexandra V; Smith, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    This article discusses a woman who collapsed and landed in a puddle of water in a park near a horse trail. Her rescue and resuscitation started an extraordinary effort by her body to heal from multiple insults. This case study highlights the diagnosis and support of polymicrobial pneumonia secondary to near drowning and the multisystem complications throughout the 3-month hospitalization. It highlights the evidence for treatment of the polymicrobial nature of submersion injury, acute lung injury, and benefits of progressive mobility. Social media as a tool for the family's communication and coping are also discussed.

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Manifested by Leptospirosis Successfully Teated by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO).

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Ben, Ren-Jy; Wu, Hau-Ming; Chang, Shih-Kun; Liu, Mei-Yu; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is recognized as a zoonotic disease that is emerging worldwide. Severe manifestations are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates and may therefore pose an important risk to public health, especially in certain high prevalence areas like Taiwan. The severe pulmonary form of leptospirosis is a lesser known entity and is characterized by intra-alveolar hemorrhage and can lead to acute respiratory failure with resistant hypoxemia, which leads to high mortality rates despite maximally invasive mechanical ventilation and adequate treatment. We herein present a case of severe leptospirosis complicated by massive pulmonary hemorrhage, which was successfully managed by extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26568015

  18. Association of serum interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score with clinical outcome in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swaroopa, Deme; Bhaskar, Kakarla; Mahathi, T.; Katkam, Shivakrishna; Raju, Y. Satyanarayana; Chandra, Naval; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Studies on potential biomarkers in experimental models of acute lung injury (ALI) and clinical samples from patients with ALI have provided evidence to the pathophysiology of the mechanisms of lung injury and predictor of clinical outcome. Because of the high mortality and substantial variability in outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), identification of biomarkers such as cytokines is important to determine prognosis and guide clinical decision-making. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have included thirty patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit diagnosed with ARDS, and serum samples were collected on day 1 and 7 and were analyzed for serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 by ELISA method, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring was done on day 1. Results: The mortality in the patients observed with ARDS was 34%. APACHE II score was significantly higher in nonsurvivors as compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in gender and biochemical and hematological parameters among the survivors and nonsurvivors. Serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels on day 1 were significantly higher in all the ARDS patients as compared to healthy controls and these levels were returned to near-normal basal levels on day 7. The serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels measured on day 7 were of survivors. As compared to survivors, the IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors measured on day 1. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation of APACHE II with IL-8. By using APACHE II score, IL-6, and IL-8, the receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted and the provided predictable accuracy of mortality (outcome) was 94%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of measuring the cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with ARDS in predicting the clinical outcome. PMID:27688627

  19. Association of serum interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score with clinical outcome in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Swaroopa, Deme; Bhaskar, Kakarla; Mahathi, T.; Katkam, Shivakrishna; Raju, Y. Satyanarayana; Chandra, Naval; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Studies on potential biomarkers in experimental models of acute lung injury (ALI) and clinical samples from patients with ALI have provided evidence to the pathophysiology of the mechanisms of lung injury and predictor of clinical outcome. Because of the high mortality and substantial variability in outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), identification of biomarkers such as cytokines is important to determine prognosis and guide clinical decision-making. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have included thirty patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit diagnosed with ARDS, and serum samples were collected on day 1 and 7 and were analyzed for serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 by ELISA method, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring was done on day 1. Results: The mortality in the patients observed with ARDS was 34%. APACHE II score was significantly higher in nonsurvivors as compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in gender and biochemical and hematological parameters among the survivors and nonsurvivors. Serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels on day 1 were significantly higher in all the ARDS patients as compared to healthy controls and these levels were returned to near-normal basal levels on day 7. The serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels measured on day 7 were of survivors. As compared to survivors, the IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors measured on day 1. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation of APACHE II with IL-8. By using APACHE II score, IL-6, and IL-8, the receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted and the provided predictable accuracy of mortality (outcome) was 94%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of measuring the cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with ARDS in predicting the clinical outcome.

  20. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  1. A Markov computer simulation model of the economics of neuromuscular blockade in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Macario, Alex; Chow, John L; Dexter, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Background Management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is clinically challenging and costly. Neuromuscular blocking agents may facilitate mechanical ventilation and improve oxygenation, but may result in prolonged recovery of neuromuscular function and acute quadriplegic myopathy syndrome (AQMS). The goal of this study was to address a hypothetical question via computer modeling: Would a reduction in intubation time of 6 hours and/or a reduction in the incidence of AQMS from 25% to 21%, provide enough benefit to justify a drug with an additional expenditure of $267 (the difference in acquisition cost between a generic and brand name neuromuscular blocker)? Methods The base case was a 55 year-old man in the ICU with ARDS who receives neuromuscular blockade for 3.5 days. A Markov model was designed with hypothetical patients in 1 of 6 mutually exclusive health states: ICU-intubated, ICU-extubated, hospital ward, long-term care, home, or death, over a period of 6 months. The net monetary benefit was computed. Results Our computer simulation modeling predicted the mean cost for ARDS patients receiving standard care for 6 months to be $62,238 (5% – 95% percentiles $42,259 – $83,766), with an overall 6-month mortality of 39%. Assuming a ceiling ratio of $35,000, even if a drug (that cost $267 more) hypothetically reduced AQMS from 25% to 21% and decreased intubation time by 6 hours, the net monetary benefit would only equal $137. Conclusion ARDS patients receiving a neuromuscular blocker have a high mortality, and unpredictable outcome, which results in large variability in costs per case. If a patient dies, there is no benefit to any drug that reduces ventilation time or AQMS incidence. A prospective, randomized pharmacoeconomic study of neuromuscular blockers in the ICU to asses AQMS or intubation times is impractical because of the highly variable clinical course of patients with ARDS. PMID:16539706

  2. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  3. Genetic susceptibility to nosocomial pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and poor outcome in patients at risk of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Smelaya, Tamara V; Vesnina, Irina N; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Moroz, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    Genetic susceptibility may partially explain the clinical variability observed during the course of similar infections. To establish the contribution of genetic host factors in the susceptibility to critical illness, we genotyped 750 subjects (419 at high risk of critical illness) for 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the xenobiotics detoxification/oxidative stress and vascular homeostasis metabolic pathways. In the group of nosocomial pneumonia (NP; 268 patients) the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is significantly higher for the carriers of CYP1A1 rs2606345 T/T genotypes and AhR rs2066853 G/A-A/A genotypes. AGTR1 rs5186 allele C is more common among NP non-survivors. The duration of stay in intensive care units (ICU) is higher for NP patients with ABCB1 rs1045642-T allele. The cumulative effect of the risk alleles in the genes comprising two sets of genes partners (xenobiotics detoxification: CYP1A1, AhR and RAS family: ACE, AGT, AGTR1) is associated with the development of both NP and ARDS.

  4. Setting ventilation parameters guided by electrical impedance tomography in an animal trial of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Leonhardt, Steffen; Rossaint, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Since mechanical ventilation can cause harm to lung tissue it should be as protective as possible. Whereas numerous options exist to set ventilator parameters, an adequate monitoring is lacking up to date. The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) provides a non-invasive visualization of ventilation which is relatively easy to apply and commercially available. Although there are a number of published measures and parameters derived from EIT, it is not clear how to use EIT to improve clinical outcome of e.g. patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe disease with a high mortality rate. On the one hand, parameters should be easy to obtain, on the other hand clinical algorithms should consider them to optimize ventilator settings. The so called Global inhomogeneity (GI) index bases on the fact that ARDS is characterized by an inhomogeneous injury pattern. By applying positive endexpiratory pressures (PEEP), homogeneity should be attained. In this study, ARDS was induced by a double hit procedure in six pigs. They were randomly assigned to either the EIT or the control group. Whereas in the control group the ARDS network table was used to set the PEEP according to the current inspiratory oxygen fraction, in the EIT group the GI index was calculated during a decremental PEEP trial. PEEP was kept when GI index was lowest. Interestingly, PEEP was significantly higher in the EIT group. Additionally, two of these animals died ahead of the schedule. Obviously, not only homogeneity of ventilation distribution matters but also limitation of over-distension.

  5. [Vegetable oil-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in near drowning: evaluation based on extravascular lung water index].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Rinka, Hiroshi; Kaji, Arito

    2008-06-01

    Lipoid pneumonia usually presents after chronic recurrent ingestion of oily substances or accidental aspiration during "fire-eating" demonstrations. Massive exposure by near drowning extremely rare and potentially fatal. We present here a case of survival after total immersion in oil in her workplace. A 66-year-old woman who nearly drowned in a vat of vegetable oil was admitted as an emergency case with severe hypoxia after rescue. Chest computed tomography (CT) findings showed bilateral ground-glass opacity, consolidation, and the case fulfilled the criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage performed on admission indicated oil droplets and marked neutrophilia (67%), which made us diagnose ARDS induced by lipoid pneumonia. We commenced treatment with pulsed steroids and strictly managed fluid balance under mechanical ventilation. Despite immediate improvement in oxygenation, the value of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) measured by the PiCCO system consistently remained over 30 ml/Kg through her clinical course. We concluded that lipoid pneumonia is characterized by prolonged elevatation of pulmonary vascular permeability.

  6. Mesobuthus tamulus venom induces acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats involving additional mechanisms as compared to oleic acid model.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Tiwari, Anil K; Patne, Shashikant C U; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2015-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is produced after Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) envenomation and compared it with oleic acid (OA)-induced ARDS. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery were cannulated in anesthetized adult rats. Lethal dose of MBT venom (5 mg/kg) or OA (75 μL) was administered intravenously and the time-dependent changes in respiratory frequency (RF), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded. Minute ventilation (MV) and the PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio were also determined. At the end lungs were excised, one lung was used for histopathological examination and the other was used for determination of pulmonary water content physically. MBT venom or OA produced hypoxemia, pulmonary pathology (alveolar damage, infiltration of inflammatory cells, capillary damage and exudation) and pulmonary edema implicating for ARDS. However, the hypoxemia in MBT venom group was associated with decreased MV, apnea/bradypnea, and bradycardia whereas, in OA group it was seen with increased MV, tachypnea, and tachycardia. Lack of effect of hypoxemic drive on RF/MV or HR in MBT venom group unlike OA group, suggests the involvement of medullary centers. The present results demonstrate that MBT venom produces ARDS. However MBT venom-induced ARDS involves pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary mechanisms.

  7. Toward Smarter Lumping and Smarter Splitting: Rethinking Strategies for Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Clinical Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Hallie C; Calfee, Carolyn S; Thompson, B Taylor; Angus, Derek C; Liu, Vincent X

    2016-07-15

    Both quality improvement and clinical research efforts over the past few decades have focused on consensus definition of sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although clinical definitions based on readily available clinical data have advanced recognition and timely use of broad supportive treatments, they likely hinder the identification of more targeted therapies that manipulate select biological mechanisms underlying critical illness. Sepsis and ARDS are by definition heterogeneous, and patients vary in both their underlying biology and their severity of illness. We have long been able to identify subtypes of sepsis and ARDS that confer different prognoses. The key is that we are now on the verge of identifying subtypes that may confer different response to therapy. In this perspective, inspired by a 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference Symposium entitled "Lumpers and Splitters: Phenotyping in Critical Illness," we highlight promising approaches to uncovering patient subtypes that may predict treatment responsiveness and not just differences in prognosis. We then discuss how this information can be leveraged to improve the success and translatability of clinical trials by using predictive enrichment and other design strategies. Last, we discuss the challenges and limitations to identifying biomarkers and endotypes and incorporating them into routine clinical practice. PMID:27244481

  8. [Contribution of abdominal sonography in acute appendicitis diagnostics--our experience].

    PubMed

    Smíd, D; Skalický, T; Treska, V

    2009-08-01

    Acute apendicitis is the most frequent case of acute abdomen. During a two year period (2006-2007) it was performed in Department of Surgery of Faculty Hospital in Pilsen 678 appendectomies, 30 days post-operative mortality rate was 0%. Abdomen ultrasonography like helping method to clinic examination was performed in 313 patients, suspect of acute appendicitis was in 191 patients (61%), in remaining patients was normal ultrasound picture.

  9. The biological effects of higher and lower positive end-expiratory pressure in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute lung injury with intra-abdominal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), but the role of PEEP in minimizing lung injury remains controversial. We hypothesized that in the presence of acute lung injury (ALI) with IAH: 1) higher PEEP levels improve pulmonary morphofunction and minimize lung injury; and 2) the biological effects of higher PEEP are more effective in extrapulmonary (exp) than pulmonary (p) ALI. Methods In 48 adult male Wistar rats, ALIp and ALIexp were induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally and intraperitoneally, respectively. After 24 hours, animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated (tidal volume of 6 mL/kg). IAH (15 mmHg) was induced and rats randomly assigned to PEEP of 5 (PEEP5), 7 (PEEP7) or 10 (PEEP10) cmH2O for 1 hour. Results In both ALIp and ALIexp, higher PEEP levels improved oxygenation. PEEP10 increased alveolar hyperinflation and epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5, independent of ALI etiology. In ALIp, PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased lung elastance compared to PEEP5 (4.3 ± 0.7 and 4.3 ± 0.9 versus 3.1 ± 0.3 cmH2O/mL, respectively, P <0.01), without changes in alveolar collapse, interleukin-6, caspase-3, type III procollagen, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expressions. Moreover, PEEP10 increased diaphragmatic injury compared to PEEP5. In ALIexp, PEEP7 decreased lung elastance and alveolar collapse compared to PEEP5 (2.3 ± 0.5 versus 3.6 ± 0.7 cmH2O/mL, P <0.02, and 27.2 (24.7 to 36.8) versus 44.2 (39.7 to 56.9)%, P <0.05, respectively), while PEEP7 and PEEP10 increased interleukin-6 and type III procollagen expressions, as well as type II epithelial cell damage compared to PEEP5. Conclusions In the current models of ALI with IAH, in contrast to our primary hypothesis, higher PEEP is more effective in

  10. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Meta-analysis of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome based on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Li, Suwei; Zhang, Jiuzhi; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Lili; Deng, Qiuming; Wan, Xianyao

    2014-11-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the potential benefits of high doses of ambroxol treatment for acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by conducting a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the Pubmed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases through December 2013. Only RCTs evaluating high doses of ambroxol (≥15 mg/kg or 1000 mg/day) treatment for patients with ALI/ARDS were selected. We included 10 RCTs involving 508 patients. Adjuvant treatment with high doses of ambroxol increased PaO(2)/FiO(2) (weight mean differences [WMD] = 69.18, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 41.71-96.65), PO(2) (WMD = 11.74, 95% CI: 8.50-14.99), and SaO(2) (WMD = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.71) compared with usual treatment. Treatment with high doses of ambroxol appeared to reduce serum tumor necrosis factor-α level (WMD -7.92 µg/L; 95% CI, -10.94 to -4.9) and interleukin-6 level (WMD = -20.65 µg/L, 95% CI: -24.74 to -16.55) and to increase serum superoxide dismutase level (WMD = 19.07 NU/mL, 95% CI: 6.16-31.97). The findings suggest that treatment with high doses of ambroxol appears to improve PaO(2)/FiO(2), PO(2), and SaO(2), and the benefits might be related to ambroxol's anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:25174313

  12. Efficacy of low tidal volume ventilation in patients with different clinical risk factors for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eisner, M D; Thompson, T; Hudson, L D; Luce, J M; Hayden, D; Schoenfeld, D; Matthay, M A

    2001-07-15

    In patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a recent ARDS Network randomized controlled trial demonstrated that a low tidal volume (VT) mechanical ventilation strategy (6 ml/kg) reduced mortality by 22% compared with traditional mechanical ventilation (12 ml/kg). In this study, we examined the relative efficacy of low VT mechanical ventilation among 902 patients with different clinical risk factors for ALI/ARDS who participated in ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. The clinical risk factor for ALI/ARDS was associated with substantial variation in mortality. The risk of death (before discharge home with unassisted breathing) was highest in patients with sepsis (43%); intermediate in subjects with pneumonia (36%), aspiration (37%), and other risk factors (35%); and lowest in those with trauma (11%) (p < 0.0001). Despite these differences in mortality, there was no evidence that the efficacy of the low VT strategy varied by clinical risk factor (p = 0.76, for interaction between ventilator group and risk factor). There was also no evidence of differential efficacy of low VT ventilation in the other study outcomes: proportion of patients achieving unassisted breathing (p = 0.59), ventilator-free days (p = 0.58), or development of nonpulmonary organ failure (p = 0.44). Controlling for demographic and clinical covariates did not appreciably affect these results. After reclassifying the clinical risk factors as pulmonary versus nonpulmonary predisposing conditions and infection-related versus non-infection-related conditions, there was still no evidence that the efficacy of low VT ventilation differed among clinical risk factor subgroups. In conclusion, we found no evidence that the efficacy of the low VT ventilation strategy differed among clinical risk factor subgroups for ALI/ARDS.

  13. Exploring the heterogeneity of effects of corticosteroids on acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The effectiveness of corticosteroid therapy on the mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains under debate. We aimed to explore the grounds for the inconsistent results in previous studies and update the evidence. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science up to December 2013. Eligible studies included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and cohort studies that reported mortality and that had corticosteroid nonusers for comparison. The effect of corticosteroids on ARDS mortality was assessed by relative risk (RR) and risk difference (RD) for ICU, hospital, and 60-day mortality using a random-effects model. Results Eight RCTs and 10 cohort studies were included for analysis. In RCTs, corticosteroids had a possible but statistically insignificant effect on ICU mortality (RD, −0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.53 to −0.03 and RR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.25) but no effect on 60-day mortality (RD, −0.01; 95% CI, −0.12 to 0.10 and RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.26). In cohort studies, corticosteroids had no effect on ICU mortality (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.49) but non-significantly increased 60-day mortality (RR, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.78). In the subgroup analysis by ARDS etiology, corticosteroids significantly increased mortality in influenza-related ARDS (three cohort studies, RR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.40 to 4.27). Conclusions The effects of corticosteroids on the mortality of ARDS differed by duration of outcome measures and etiologies. Corticosteroids did not improve longer-term outcomes and may cause harm in certain subgroups. Current data do not support routine use of corticosteroids in ARDS. More clinical trials are needed to specify the favorable and unfavorable subgroups for corticosteroid therapy. PMID:24708846

  14. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Jerry A.; Caceres, Silvia M.; Kret, Jennifer E.; Poch, Katie R.; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V.; Nichols, David P.; Saavedra, Milene T.; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L.; Geraci, Mark W.; Burnham, Ellen L.; Fessler, Michael B.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated

  15. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C.; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J.; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M.; Webby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  16. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Caceres, Silvia M; Kret, Jennifer E; Poch, Katie R; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V; Nichols, David P; Saavedra, Milene T; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Geraci, Mark W; Burnham, Ellen L; Fessler, Michael B; Suratt, Benjamin T; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated

  17. The role of stretch-activated ion channels in acute respiratory distress syndrome: finally a new target?

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and oxygen therapy (hyperoxia; HO) comprise the cornerstones of life-saving interventions for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Unfortunately, the side effects of MV and HO include exacerbation of lung injury by barotrauma, volutrauma, and propagation of lung inflammation. Despite significant improvements in ventilator technologies and a heightened awareness of oxygen toxicity, besides low tidal volume ventilation few if any medical interventions have improved ARDS outcomes over the past two decades. We are lacking a comprehensive understanding of mechanotransduction processes in the healthy lung and know little about the interactions between simultaneously activated stretch-, HO-, and cytokine-induced signaling cascades in ARDS. Nevertheless, as we are unraveling these mechanisms we are gathering increasing evidence for the importance of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in the activation of lung-resident and inflammatory cells. In addition to the discovery of new SAC families in the lung, e.g., two-pore domain potassium channels, we are increasingly assigning mechanosensing properties to already known Na(+), Ca(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) channels. Better insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms of SACs will improve our understanding of the pathways leading to ventilator-induced lung injury and lead to much needed novel therapeutic approaches against ARDS by specifically targeting SACs. This review 1) summarizes the reasons why the time has come to seriously consider SACs as new therapeutic targets against ARDS, 2) critically analyzes the physiological and experimental factors that currently limit our knowledge about SACs, and 3) outlines the most important questions future research studies need to address. PMID:27521425

  18. High PEEP in acute respiratory distress syndrome: quantitative evaluation between improved arterial oxygenation and decreased oxygen delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, A.; Haque, M.; Wang, W.; Bates, D. G.; Hardman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is widely used to improve oxygenation and prevent alveolar collapse in mechanically ventilated patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although PEEP improves arterial oxygenation predictably, high-PEEP strategies have demonstrated equivocal improvements in ARDS-related mortality. The effect of PEEP on tissue oxygen delivery is poorly understood and is difficult to quantify or investigate in the clinical environment. Methods. We investigated the effects of PEEP on tissue oxygen delivery in ARDS using a new, high-fidelity, computational model with highly integrated respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The model was configured to replicate published clinical trial data on the responses of 12 individual ARDS patients to changes in PEEP. These virtual patients were subjected to increasing PEEP levels during a lung-protective ventilation strategy (0–20 cm H2O). Measured variables included arterial oxygenation, cardiac output, peripheral oxygen delivery, and alveolar strain. Results. As PEEP increased, tissue oxygen delivery decreased in all subjects (mean reduction of 25% at 20 cm H2O PEEP), despite an increase in arterial oxygen tension (mean increase 6.7 kPa at 20 cm H2O PEEP). Changes in arterial oxygenation and tissue oxygen delivery differed between subjects but showed a consistent pattern. Static and dynamic alveolar strain decreased in all patients as PEEP increased. Conclusions. Incremental PEEP in ARDS appears to protect alveoli and improve arterial oxygenation, but also appears to impair tissue oxygen delivery significantly because of reduced cardiac output. We propose that this trade-off may explain the poor improvements in mortality associated with high-PEEP ventilation strategies. PMID:27799180

  19. Low-Dose Heparin Anticoagulation During Extracorporeal Life Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Conscious Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Prat, Nicolas J.; Meyer, Andrew D.; Langer, Thomas; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Parida, Bijaya K.; Batchinsky, Andriy I.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Over 32% of burned battlefield causalities develop trauma-induced hypoxic respiratory failure, also known as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recently, 9 out of 10 US combat soldiers’ survived life-threatening trauma-induced ARDS supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a portable form of cardiopulmonary bypass. Unfortunately, the size, incidence of coagulation complications, and the need for systematic anticoagulation for traditional ECMO devices have prevented widespread use of this lifesaving technology. Therefore, a compact, mobile, ECMO system using minimal anticoagulation may be the solution to reduce ARDS in critically ill military and civilian patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort laboratory investigation to evaluate the coagulation function in an ovine model of oleic acid induced ARDS supported with veno-venous ECMO. The experimental design approximated the time needed to transport from a battlefield setting to an advanced facility and compared bolus versus standard heparin anticoagulation therapy. Results: Comprehensive coagulation and hemostasis assays did not show any difference because of ECMO support over 10 h between the two groups but did show changes because of injury. Platelet count and function did decrease with support on ECMO, but there was no significant bleeding or clot formation during the entire experiment. Conclusions: A bolus heparin injection is sufficient to maintain ECMO support for up to 10 h in an ovine model of ARDS. With a reduced need for systematic anticoagulation, ECMO use for battlefield trauma could reduce significant morbidity and mortality from ventilator-induced lung injury and ARDS. Future studies will investigate the mechanisms and therapies to support patients for longer periods on ECMO without coagulation complications. Level of Evidence: V—therapeutic animal experiment. PMID:26263439

  20. Outcome of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in acute respiratory distress syndrome after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joo Han; Woo, Won Ki; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Bong Joon; Kim, Ha Eun; Kim, Do Jung; Suh, Jee Won; Shin, Yu Rim; Park, Han Ki; Lee, Seung Hyun; Joo, Hyun Chel; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung Chul; Yoo, Kyung Jong; Kim, Young Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a known risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome in patients who required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) for postcardiotomy ARDS despite other rescue modalities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 13 patients (mean age, 54.7±5.9 years) who received VV-ECMO support for refractory ARDS after cardiac surgery between March 2013 and February 2016 at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University (Seoul, Korea). Results At the start of VV-ECMO, the average lung injury score was 3.0±0.2, and the Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction (RESP) score was −4±1.1. Although 7 patients initiated VV-ECMO support within 24 h from operation, the remaining 6 started at a median of 8.5 days (range, 5−16 days). Nine (69.3%) patients were successfully weaned from VV-ECMO. After a median follow-up duration of 14.5 months (range, 1.0−33.0 months) for survivors, the 1-year overall survival was 58.6%±14.4%. The differences in the overall survival from VV-ECMO according to the RESP score risk classes were borderline significant (100% in class III, 50%±25% in class IV, and 20%±17.9% in class V; P=0.088). Conclusions VV-ECMO support can be a feasible rescue strategy for adult patients who develop refractory ARDS after a cardiac surgery. Additionally, the RESP score seems a valuable prognostic tool for post-ECMO survival outcome in this patient population as well. PMID:27499972

  1. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J; Sloan, Susan E; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-04-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  2. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Caceres, Silvia M; Kret, Jennifer E; Poch, Katie R; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V; Nichols, David P; Saavedra, Milene T; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Geraci, Mark W; Burnham, Ellen L; Fessler, Michael B; Suratt, Benjamin T; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated

  3. The expression of ob gene is not acutely regulated by insulin and fasting in human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Vidal, H; Auboeuf, D; De Vos, P; Staels, B; Riou, J P; Auwerx, J; Laville, M

    1996-07-15

    The regulation of ob gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated using a reverse transcription-competitive PCR method to quantify the mRNA level of leptin. Leptin mRNA level was highly correlated with the body mass index of 26 subjects (12 lean, 7 non-insulin-dependent diabetic, and 7 obese patients). The effect of fasting on ob gene expression was investigated in 10 subjects maintained on a hypocaloric diet (1045 KJ/d) for 5 d. While their metabolic parameters significantly changed (decrease in insulinemia, glycemia, and resting metabolic rate and increase in plasma ketone bodies), the caloric restriction did not modify the leptin mRNA level in the adipose tissue. To verify whether insulin regulates ob gene expression, six lean subjects underwent a 3-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (846 +/- 138 pmol/liter) clamp. Leptin and Glut 4 mRNA levels were quantified in adipose tissue biopsies taken before and at the end of the clamp. Insulin infusion produced a significant threefold increase in Glut 4 mRNA while leptin mRNA was not affected. It is concluded that ob gene expression is not acutely regulated by insulin or by metabolic factors related to fasting in human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:8755631

  4. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  5. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  6. Clinical ethics residency for nurses: an education model to decrease moral distress and strengthen nurse retention in acute care.

    PubMed

    Grace, Pamela J; Robinson, Ellen M; Jurchak, Martha; Zollfrank, Angelika A; Lee, Susan M

    2014-12-01

    The experience of unaddressed moral distress can lead to nurse attrition and/or distancing from patients, compromising patient care. Nurses who are confident in their ethical decision making abilities and moral agency have the antidote to moral distress for themselves and their colleagues and can act as local or institutional ethics resources. We describe a grant-funded model education program designed to increase ethics competence throughout the institution.

  7. A rare cause of acute abdominal disease: two reports of caecal diverticulum perforation.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, İbrahim; Eren, Abdülkadir

    2016-05-01

    Diverticulum of the caecum is a rare lesion. From a clinical point of view, the inflammation it causes can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis, causing difficulties in diagnosis and thus prescription of appropriate treatment. It is almost impossible to differentiate this disease from acute appendicitis through physical examination alone, and radiological imaging may also prove insufficient. For this reason, it is common to perioperatively diagnose diverticula of the caecum. Two cases of patients who underwent surgery for perforated caecal diverticula are presently described. PMID:27598596

  8. Fish oil-supplemented parenteral nutrition could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xianxiang; Yang, Enqin; Zhang, Nanyang; Cao, Shougen; Zhou, Yanbing

    2015-09-01

    The objectives were to confirm that intravenous fish oil (FO) emulsions could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis and to explore the mechanisms of these effects. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups randomly. Two days after central venous catheterization, rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture to produce abdominal sepsis. Rats were assigned to receive normal saline or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) containing standard soybean oil emulsions or FO-supplemented TPN at the onset of sepsis for 5 days. A sham operation and control treatment were performed in control group rats. Acute lung injury scores, peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets, plasma cytokines, and Foxp3 expression in the spleen were determined. Compared with the normal saline and TPN without FO, FO-supplemented TPN beneficially altered the distributions of the T-lymphocyte subsets and downregulated the acute lung injury scores, plasma cytokines, and expression of Foxp3 due to sepsis. Fish oil-supplemented TPN can decrease acute lung injury scores, alleviate histopathology, reduce the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage fluid, modulate the lymphocyte subpopulation in the peripheral blood, downregulate Foxp3 expression in the spleen, and reduce plasma cytokines, which means that FO-supplemented TPN can alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

  9. Feasibility of 68Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [15O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion. PMID:27069763

  10. Feasibility of (68)Ga-labeled Siglec-9 peptide for the imaging of acute lung inflammation: a pilot study in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Retamal, Jaime; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Borges, João Batista; Feinstein, Ricardo; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Antoni, Gunnar; Hedenstierna, Göran; Roivainen, Anne; Larsson, Anders; Velikyan, Irina

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for noninvasive, specific and quantitative imaging of inherent inflammatory activity. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) translocates to the luminal surface of endothelial cells upon inflammatory challenge. We hypothesized that in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), positron emission tomography (PET) with sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) based imaging agent targeting VAP-1 would allow quantification of regional pulmonary inflammation. ARDS was induced by lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Hemodynamics, respiratory system compliance (Crs) and blood gases were monitored. Dynamic examination using [(15)O]water PET-CT (10 min) was followed by dynamic (90 min) and whole-body examination using VAP-1 targeting (68)Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-ethylene glycol-conjugated Siglec-9 motif peptide ([(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9). The animals received an anti-VAP-1 antibody for post-mortem immunohistochemistry assay of VAP-1 receptors. Tissue samples were collected post-mortem for the radioactivity uptake, histology and immunohistochemistry assessment. Marked reduction of oxygenation and Crs, and higher degree of inflammation were observed in ARDS animals. [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET showed significant uptake in lungs, kidneys and urinary bladder. Normalization of the net uptake rate (Ki) for the tissue perfusion resulted in 4-fold higher uptake rate of [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 in the ARDS lungs. Immunohistochemistry showed positive VAP-1 signal in the injured lungs. Detection of pulmonary inflammation associated with a porcine model of ARDS was possible with [(68)Ga]Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET when using kinetic modeling and normalization for tissue perfusion. PMID:27069763

  11. Repeated lung lavage with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treating severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to nasogastric tube malposition for enternal nutrition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kao, Xiaoming; Yu, Wenkui; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2012-01-01

    Enternal nutritional support, a frequently applied technique for providing nutrition and energy, played a pivotal role in the treatment of high risk patients. However, severe complications induced by malposition of nasogastric tube caused great danger and even death to the patients. In this case report, we present a patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by bronchopleural fistula (BPF) due to malposition of nasogastric tube. Repeated lung lavage combined with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was performed after transferring to the ICU of our hospital. Finally, the patient recovered and discharged 7 days after admission.

  12. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Nationwide Registry-Based Study in Taiwan, 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-10-01

    Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan.We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality.The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18-29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived.We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this analysis

  13. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  14. Receptor Interacting Protein 3-Mediated Necroptosis Promotes Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haobo; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Zhongjun; Xie, Wanli; Feng, Yinglu; Socorburam, Tumenjavkhlan; Wu, Gui; Xia, Zhengyuan; Wu, Qingping

    2016-01-01

    Necrosis amplifies inflammation and plays important roles in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Necroptosis is a newly identified programmed necrosis that is mediated by receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3). However, the potential involvement and impact of necroptosis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS remains unknown. We therefore explored the role and mechanism of RIP3-mediated necroptosis in LPS-induced ARDS. Mice were instilled with increasing doses of LPS intratracheally to induce different degrees of ARDS. Lung tissues were harvested for histological and TUNEL staining and western blot for RIP3, p-RIP3, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL), total and cleaved caspases-3/8. Then, wild-type and RIP3 knock-out mice were induced ARDS with 30 mg/kg LPS. Pulmonary cellular necrosis was labeled by the propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Levels of TNF-a, Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-1α, IL-10 and HMGB1, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, neutrophil counts and total protein concentration were measured. Results showed that in high dose LPS (30mg/kg and 40mg/kg) -induced severe ARDS, RIP3 protein was increased significantly, accompanied by increases of p-RIP3 and MLKL, while in low dose LPS (10mg/kg and 20mg/kg) -induced mild ARDS, apoptosis was remarkably increased. In LPS-induced severe ARDS, RIP3 knock-out alleviated the hypothermia symptom, increased survival rate and ameliorated the lung tissue injury RIP3 depletion also attenuated LPS-induced increase in IL-1α/β, IL-6 and HMGB1 release, decreased tissue MPO activity, and reduced neutrophil influx and total protein concentration in BALF in severe ARDS. Further, RIP3 depletion reduced the necrotic cells in the lung and decreased the expression of MLKL, but had no impact on cleaved caspase-3 in LPS-induced ARDS. It is concluded that RIP3-mediated necroptosis is a major mechanism of enhanced inflammation and lung tissue injury in high dose

  15. Expiratory washout versus optimization of mechanical ventilation during permissive hypercapnia in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Richecoeur, J; Lu, Q; Vieira, S R; Puybasset, L; Kalfon, P; Coriat, P; Rouby, J J

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three ventilatory techniques for reducing PaCO2 in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with permissive hypercapnia: (1) expiratory washout alone at a flow of 15 L/min, (2) optimized mechanical ventilation defined as an increase in the respiratory frequency to the maximal rate possible without development of intrinsic positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP) combined with a reduction of the instrumental dead space, and (3) the combination of both methods. Tidal volume was set according to the pressure-volume curve in order to obtain an inspiratory plateau airway pressure equal to the upper inflection point minus 2 cm H2O after setting the PEEP at 2 cm H2O above the lower inflection point and was kept constant throughout the study. The three modalities were compared at the same inspiratory plateau airway pressure through an adjustment of the extrinsic PEEP. During conventional mechanical ventilation using a respiratory frequency of 18 breaths/min, respiratory acidosis (PaCO2 = 84 +/- 24 mm Hg and pH = 7.21 +/- 0.12) was observed. Expiratory washout and optimized mechanical ventilation (respiratory frequency of 30 +/- 4 breaths/min) had similar effects on CO2 elimination (DeltaPaCO2 = -28 +/- 11% versus -27 +/- 12%). A further decrease in PaCO2 was observed when both methods were combined (DeltaPaCO2 = -46 +/- 7%). Extrinsic PEEP had to be reduced by 5.3 +/- 2.1 cm H2O during expiratory washout and by 7.3 +/- 1.3 cm H2O during the combination of the two modes, whereas it remained unchanged during optimized mechanical ventilation alone. In conclusion, increasing respiratory rate and reducing instrumental dead space during conventional mechanical ventilation is as efficient as expiratory washout to reduce PaCO2 in patients with severe ARDS and permissive hypercapnia. When used in combination, both techniques have additive effects and result in PaCO2 levels close to normal values. PMID:10390383

  16. Albumin versus crystalloid solutions in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) fluid therapy might be necessary. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine the effects of colloid therapy compared to crystalloids on mortality and oxygenation in adults with ARDS. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified through a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and LILACS. Articles published up to 15th February 2013 were independently screened, abstracted, and assessed (Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool) to provide evidence-based therapy recommendations. RCTs were eligible if they compared colloid versus crystalloid therapy on lung function, inflammation, damage or mortality in adults with ARDS. Primary outcome parameters were respiratory mechanics, gas exchange lung inflammation and damage as well as hospital mortality. Kidney function, need for renal replacement therapy, hemodynamic stabilization and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay served as secondary outcomes. Results A total of 3 RCTs out of 4130 potential trials found in the databases were selected for qualitative and quantitative analysis totaling 206 patients who received either albumin or saline. Overall risk of bias was unclear to high in the identified trials. Calculated pooled risk of death was not statistically significant (albumin 34 of 100 (34.0%) versus 40 of 104 (38.5%), relative risk (RR) = 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 1.28, P = 0.539). Weighted mean difference (WMD) in PaO2/FiO2 (mmHg) improved in the first 48 hours (WMD = 62, 95% CI 47 to 77, P <0.001, I2 = 0%) after therapy start and remained stable after 7 days (WMD = 20, 95% CI 4 to 36, P = 0.017, I2 = 0%). Conclusions There is a high need for RCTs investigating the effects of colloids in ARDS patients. Based on the findings of this review, colloid therapy with albumin improved oxygenation but did not affect mortality. PMID:24405693

  17. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Nationwide Registry-Based Study in Taiwan, 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-10-01

    Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan.We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality.The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18-29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived.We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this analysis

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stiff, which decreases the lungs' ability to expand. The level of oxygen in the blood can ... Tests used to diagnose ARDS include: Arterial blood gas Blood tests, including CBC and blood chemistries Blood ...

  19. Right heart failure in acute respiratory distress syndrome: An unappreciated albeit a potential target for intervention in the management of the disease.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has gone down recently. In spite of this trend, the absolute numbers continue to be high even with improvements in ventilator strategies and a better understanding of fluid management with this disease. A possible reason for this could be an under-recognized involvement of the pulmonary vasculature and the right side of the heart in ARDS. The right heart is not designed to function under situations leading to acute elevations in afterload as seen in ARDS, and hence it decompensates. This brief review focuses on the magnitude of the problem, its detection in the intensive care unit, and recognizes the beneficial effect of prone-positioning on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart. PMID:26628826

  20. The Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Treatment of Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    García de Acilu, M.; Leal, S.; Caralt, B.; Roca, O.; Sabater, J.; Masclans, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined as the acute onset of noncardiogenic edema and subsequent gas-exchange impairment due to a severe inflammatory process. Recent report on the prognostic value of eicosanoids in patients with ARDS suggests that modulating the inflammatory response through the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids may be a useful strategy for ARDS treatment. The use of enteral diets enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) has reported promising results, showing an improvement in respiratory variables and haemodynamics. However, the interpretation of the studies is limited by their heterogeneity and methodology and the effect of ω-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion or enteral diets on patients with ARDS remains unclear. Therefore, the routine use of ω-3 fatty acid-enriched nutrition cannot be recommended and further large, homogeneous, and high-quality clinical trials need to be conducted to clarify the effectiveness of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:26339627

  1. Pumpless extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide combined with ventilation using low tidal volume and high positive end-expiratory pressure in a patient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bein, T; Zimmermann, M; Hergeth, K; Ramming, M; Rupprecht, L; Schlitt, H J; Slutsky, A S

    2009-02-01

    The effects of the combination of a 'lowest' lung ventilation with extracorporeal elimination of carbon dioxide by interventional lung assist are described in a patient presenting with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to fulminant pneumonia. Reducing tidal volume to 3 ml.kg(-1) together with interventional lung assist resulted in a decrease in severe hypercapnia without alveolar collapse or hypoxaemia but with a decrease in serum levels of interleukin-6. This approach was applied for 12 days with recovery of the patient, without complications. Extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide by interventional lung assist may be a useful tool to enable 'ultraprotective' ventilation in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  2. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  3. The Role of Extra-Anatomic Bypass in the Surgical Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Gokhan; Bozok, Şahin; Ergene, Şaban; Karakisi, Sedat Ozan; Tufekci, Nebiye; Kazdal, Hızır; Ogullar, Sabri; Kucuker, Seref Alp

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic occlusion is rare catastophic pathology with high rates of mortality and severe morbidity. In this study, we aimed to share our experience in the management of aortic occlusion and to assess the outcomes of extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Methods Eighteen patients who had undergone extra-anatomic bypass interventions in the cardiovascular surgery department of our tertiary care center between July 2009 and May 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. All patients were preoperatively assessed with angiograms (conventional, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance angiography) and Doppler ultrasonography. Operations consisted of bilateral femoral thromboembolectomy, axillobifemoral extra-anatomic bypass and femoropopliteal bypass and were performed on an emergency basis. Results In all patients during early postoperative period successful revascularization outcomes were obtained; however, one of these operated patients died on the 10th postoperative due to multiorgan failure. The patients were followed up for a mean duration of 21.2±9.4 months (range, 6 to 36 months). Amputation was not warranted for any patient during postoperative follow-up. Conclusion To conclude, acute aortic occlusion is a rare but devastating event and is linked with substantial morbidity and mortality in spite of the recent advances in critical care and vascular surgery. Our results have shown that these hazardous outcomes may be minimized and better rates of graft patency may be achieved with extra-anatomic bypass techniques tailored according to the patient. PMID:26078925

  4. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  5. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Form a Barrier between Necrotic and Viable Areas in Acute Abdominal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Fedorov, Volodymyr; Vovk, Volodymyr; Leppkes, Moritz; Dumych, Tetiana; Chopyak, Valentyna; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) of decondensed DNA and histones that trap and immobilize particulate matter and microbial pathogens like bacteria. NET aggregates reportedly surround and isolate large objects like monosodium urate crystals, which cannot be sufficiently cleared from tissues. In the setting of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, massive tissue necrosis occurs, which is organized as pancreatic pseudocysts (1). In contrast to regular cysts, these pseudocysts are not surrounded by epithelial layers. We hypothesize that, instead, the necrotic areas observed in necrotizing pancreatitis are isolated from the surrounding healthy tissues by aggregated NETs. These may form an alternative, putatively transient barrier, separating necrotic areas from viable tissue. To test this hypothesis, we investigated histological samples from the necropsy material of internal organs of two patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and peritonitis accompanied by multiple organ failure. Tissues including the inflammatory zone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated for signs of inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils and NETs were detected by immunohistochemistry for DNA, neutrophil elastase (NE), and citrullinated histone H3. Interestingly, in severely affected areas of pancreatic necrosis or peritonitis, chromatin stained positive for NE and citrullinated histone H3, and may, therefore, be considered NET-derived. These NET structures formed a layer, which separated the necrotic core from the areas of viable tissue remains. A condensed layer of aggregated NETs, thus, spatially shields and isolates the site of necrosis, thereby limiting the spread of necrosis-associated proinflammatory mediators. We propose that necrotic debris may initiate and/or facilitate the formation of the NET-based surrogate barrier. PMID:27777576

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium tuberculosis in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ebrahim S.; Baharoon, Salim A.; Alsafi, Eiman; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss our center’s experience with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a major tertiary referral hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium TB infection who were admitted for critical care in a single center of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 2004 to 2013. Results: In our review of 350 patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to Intensive Care Unit, 11 cases of TB complicated with ARDS were identified. The mean age of patients was 51.9 years. The median time from hospital admission to pulmonary TB diagnosis and start of therapy was 5 days, while the median time from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment was 18 days. The mortality rate was 64%, and the median length of hospital stay before death was 21.4 days. Delayed treatment, as well as high acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and CURB-65 scores at presentation, were independent risk factors for death. Conclusion: Patients with pulmonary TB infrequently present to intensive care with acute symptoms that meet all criteria for ARDS. Such a presentation of TB carries a high mortality risk. PMID:27570853

  7. Act fast and ventilate soft: the Düsseldorf hands-on translation of the acute respiratory distress syndrome Berlin definition.

    PubMed

    Luedike, Peter; Totzeck, Matthias; Meyer, Christian; Westenfeld, Ralf; Kindgen-Milles, Detlef; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-10-01

    Early identification of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and forceful implementation of standardized therapy algorithms are the mandatory basis of an effective therapy to improve patient outcome. Recently, a new definition of ARDS was implemented, which simplified the diagnostic criteria for ARDS. Evidence-based therapies are rare, but some cornerstone interventions can be recommended. Lung-protective ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure and low tidal volume and early prone positioning in severe cases improve survival rate. We here present an integrated "Düsseldorf hands-on translation" in the form of a "one-page" standard operating procedure in order to fasten and standardize both diagnosis and therapeutic algorithms on an intensive care unit.

  8. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  9. Oral contrast for CT in patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal and pelvic pain: what should be its current role?

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania Z; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Positive oral contrast agents, including barium suspensions and water-soluble iodinated solutions, have traditionally been used in conjunction with the CT evaluation of patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Due to continued advancements in CT technology, and due to increasing obesity and correspondingly a general increase in the intra-abdominal and intra-pelvic fat separating bowel loops in North American patients and in patients in other parts of the world over the past few decades, the ability of radiologists to accurately evaluate the cause of acute symptoms has substantially improved. Recent research and evolving imaging society guidelines/systematic reviews increasingly support performing CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis without the need for positive oral contrast in these types of adult patient populations, in most clinical situations. Increased patient throughput, patient preference, patient safety, and most importantly, retention of high diagnostic accuracy, are reasons for this recent change in practice to routinely omit the use of enteric contrast agents for the majority of patients presenting with acute abdominal and pelvic pain whom are undergoing emergency CT. PMID:27166963

  10. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Andrzej; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection), in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval. Conclusion The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. PMID:26124664

  11. The Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Is Effective Against A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) Influenza Virus in a Mouse Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Burnham, Andrew J.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Armstrong, Jianling; Guan, Yi; Shu, Yuelong; Peiris, Joseph Malik Sriyal; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. High mortality and uncertainty about the effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) in humans infected with influenza A(H7N9) viruses are public health concerns. Methods. Susceptibility of N9 viruses to NAIs was determined in a fluorescence-based assay. The NAI oseltamivir (5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day) was administered to BALB/c mice twice daily starting 24, 48, or 72 hours after A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus challenge. Results. All 12 avian N9 and 3 human H7N9 influenza viruses tested were susceptible to NAIs. Without prior adaptation, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) caused lethal infection in mice that was restricted to the respiratory tract and resulted in pulmonary edema and acute lung injury with hyaline membrane formation, leading to decreased oxygenation, all characteristics of human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Oseltamivir at 20 and 80 mg/kg protected 80% and 88% of mice when initiated after 24 hours, and the efficacy decreased to 70% and 60%, respectively, when treatment was delayed by 48 hours. Emergence of oseltamivir-resistant variants was not detected. Conclusions. H7N9 viruses are comparable to currently circulating influenza A viruses in susceptibility to NAIs. Based on these animal studies, early treatment is associated with improved outcomes. PMID:24133191

  12. Omental infarction and its mimics: imaging features of acute abdominal conditions presenting with fat stranding greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Tonerini, Michele; Calcagni, Francesca; Lorenzi, Silvia; Scalise, Paola; Grigolini, Alessandro; Bemi, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    The segmental omental infarction is a rare self-limited disorder presenting with aspecific clinical symptoms that may mimic several acute abdominal conditions. Therefore, a correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches range from monitoring to surgery. As omental infarction results in an important fat stranding that is much greater than the degree of bowel wall thickening, it suggests a narrower differential diagnosis: appendicitis, diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, and mesenteric panniculitis. In this pictorial essay, we point out the importance of imaging in identifying this typical sign allowing alternate diagnoses such as segmental omental infarction that can be conservatively managed.

  13. [Exocrine function of the pancreas and pathological histology of the stomach in patients with stomach yin deficiency syndrome (SYDS) research on SYDS following abdominal operation or with severe acute abdominal diseases (Part 3)].

    PubMed

    Qi, Q H; Wu, X Z; Bai, J W

    1990-08-01

    Exocrine function of pancreas (BT-PABA test) in 13 patients with SYDS was examined and gastric membrane in 5 cases with SYDS other than gastric diseases was observed under light- and electro-microscopy. The results were as follows: urine rate of recovery of PABA in SYDS was 35. 42 +/- 14.33% and that in the control with same age was 64.70 +/- 10.55%. The rate in SYDS was decreased obviously (P less than 0.001). Under light microscopy gastric mucosa of patients with SYDS showed slight gland degenerative atrophy, smaller cytoplasm, eosinophilic decrease of parietal cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells in interstitial tissue. Under electro-microscopy, the main changes of the gastric mucosa with SYDS were severe mitochondria damage, inflating rough endoplasmic pools and large vacuole at which membrane major particles of ribosomes disappeared, degenerated secretory vessels and formation of myelin figure in parietal cells, decrease of secretory particles in main cells, degeneration in some degree and decrease of nervous secretory particles in G cells and damaged interstitial capillaries. The results in this study suggested that the exocrine function of pancreas in patients with SYDS after abdominal operation or with severe acute abdominal diseases was decreased and there were some damages in energy supply and protein manufacturing systems of the gastric mucosa and functional disturbances of main cells, parietal cells and G cells in patients with SYDS.

  14. [Semeiotics of abdominal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Guseĭnov, G K; Ramazanova, A M; Guseĭnov, A G

    1984-01-01

    Examination of 119 patients with abdominal tuberculosis permitted the description of the characteristic semiotics of the illness. Today the patients with abdominal tuberculosis are mainly women of child-bearing age with a long-term tuberculosis catamnesis and intoxication, with a history of tuberculosis of different sites, those suffering from tuberculosis or its sequels at present (64%), those with pains (94%), discomfort or swelling of the abdomen (79%), malfunction of the gastrointestinal tract (65%), weight loss (86%), malnutrition (72%), anemia (63%), not infrequently with inflammatory induration (43%) or ascites in the abdominal cavity (39%). In addition to this characteristic semiotics, the patients with abdominal tuberculosis may demonstrate the most different and unexpected symptoms up to acute abdomen (23%). To make differential diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis, one has often to resort to diagnostic laparotomy, laparoscopy, Koch's test and to trial therapy.

  15. Association of CTRC and SPINK1 gene variants with recurrent hospitalizations for pancreatitis or acute abdominal pain in lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Karine; Dubois-Bouchard, Camélia; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are important inter-individual variations in the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Several genes involved in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism or serine proteases pathways are known to influence the risk of pancreatitis. Aim: To evaluate the association between genes regulating serine proteases, chymotrypsin C (CTRC) and serine peptidase inhibitor kazal type1 (SPINK1), and recurrence of hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis or severe abdominal pain in patients with Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (LPLD), a rare and extreme monogenic model of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. Method: The CTRC and SPINK1 genes promoter and coding regions sequencing has been performed in a sample of 38 LPLD adults (22 men and 16 women) and 100 controls (53 men and 47 women). Estimation of the association of CTRC and SPINK1 gene variants or combinations of variants with history of hospitalizations for pancreatitis or acute abdominal pain in LPLD was investigated using non-parametric analyses with correction for multiple testing and logistic regression models controlling for age, gender, family history, and life habits. Results: Gene sequencing followed by genotype-stratified analyses of the CTRC and SPINK1 genes in LPLD and controls revealed a positive association between recurrence of hospitalizations and the rs545634 (CTRC)—rs11319 (SPINK1) combination [OR = 41.4 (CI: 2.0–848.0); p = 0.016]. In all models, a positive family history of pancreatitis was a significant predictor of recurrent hospitalizations independently of the contribution of SPINK1 or CTRC (p < 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that a positive family history of pancreatitis and genetic markers in the serine protease pathways could be associated with a risk of recurrent hospitalization for acute pancreatitis in severe hypertriglyceridemia due to LPLD. PMID:24795752

  16. Sudden death of a patient with pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection by acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Akihiro; Wang, Lei; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kunieda, Yasuyuki; Katano, Harutaka; Nakajima, Noriko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Takagi, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    We describe an autopsy case of a patient with pandemic influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan, who developed rapidly progressive viral pneumonia exhibiting diffuse alveolar damage. A 41-year-old female visited our hospital with a fever of 38.7C. She was a public health nurse with no underlying disease and had had contact with a group of elementary school students who had been infected with the influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus 1 week earlier. She was prescribed oseltamivir and returned to the hotel where she was staying alone. The next day, she was found dead in her hotel room. At autopsy, both lungs were voluminous and microscopic examination revealed acute-stage, severe diffuse alveolar damage with remarkable mononuclear cell infiltration and hyaline membrane formation in the lungs. CD8-positive T lymphocytes were dominantly observed. Immunohistochemically, influenza A viral protein was confirmed in the damaged type II pneumocytes and also in the infiltrated macrophages. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of both pre- and post-mortem pharyngeal swabs confirmed a novel influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection. This is the second autopsy case of influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection in Japan, and the findings indicated that the patient died due to an exceptionally rapid progression of viral pneumonia. This case indicates that patients with influenza (A/H1N1pdm) virus infection should be carefully monitor for acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:20093769

  17. Comparison of quantitative computed tomography analysis and single-indicator thermodilution to measure pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare quantitative computed tomography (CT) analysis and single-indicator thermodilution to measure pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Method Ten patients with ARDS were included. All underwent spiral CT of the thorax for estimating gas content of lung (GVCT), tissue volume of lung (TVCT), tissue volume index (TVI), mean radiographic attenuation (CTmean) for the whole lung and gas-to-tissue ratio (g/t). Pulmonary thermal volume (PTV) and extravascular lung water index (ELWI) were determined by the PiCCO plus system. CT or single-indicator thermodilution variables were correlated with respiratory system compliance (Crs), PaO2/FiO2, and Acute Physiology And Chronic Health EvaluationII (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Results 1) TVCT and PTV were positively correlated (r =0.8878; P = 0.0006; equation of regression line: PTV = 1.0793 × TVCT + 179.8) as were TVI and ELWI (r =0.9459; P < 0.0001; equation of regression line: ELWI = 1.4506 × TVI-8.7792). The bias between TVCT and PTV as well as TVI and ELWI was -277 ± 217 and 0.62 ± 4.56, respectively. 2) ELWI and CT distribution of lung-tissue compartments were not correlated. 3) CT or single-indicator thermodilution variables were not correlated with Crs, PaO2/FiO2 or APACHE II or SOFA score. Conclusion Quantitative CT analysis and single-indicator thermodilution showed good agreement in measuring pulmonary edema. PMID:24625023

  18. Use of ECMO in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Survey of Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nirmal S; Wille, Keith M; Zhi, Degui; Thannickal, Victor J; Brodie, Daniel M; Hoopes, Charles W; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Mortality of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains high. Once conventional mechanical ventilation fails, alternative modes of therapy are used; most of which have limited evidence to support their use. No definitive guidelines exist for the management of these patients with alternate modalities of treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional national survey of 302 adult critical care training programs in the United States to understand the current preferences of intensivists regarding the use of different therapies for severe ARDS, including the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A total of 381 responses were received: 203 critical care faculty and 174 critical care trainees. Airway pressure release ventilation was the initial choice of treatment reported by most when conventional mechanical ventilation strategy failed followed by inhaled nitric oxide and prone positioning. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation availability was reported by 80% of the respondents at their institutions. Most respondents (83%) would consider ECMO in patients who fail optimal mechanical ventilation strategies, and the majority (60%) believed that ECMO use can facilitate lung protective ventilation, but few favored its use as a first-line modality. The majority of respondents reported limited knowledge of ECMO and desired specific ECMO education during training. PMID:25914957

  19. 3,5,4′-Tri-O-acetylresveratrol Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome via MAPK/SIRT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijie; Zhao, Yilin; Wang, Ruixuan; Chen, Tingting; Li, Wangping; Nan, Yandong; Liu, Xueying; Jin, Faguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate the protecting effects of 3,5,4′-tri-O-acetylresveratrol (AC-Rsv) on LPS-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Lung injuries have been evaluated by histological examination, wet-to-dry weight ratios, and cell count and protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Inflammation was assessed by MPO activities and cytokine secretion in lungs and cells. The results showed that AC-Rsv significantly reduced the mortality of mice stimulated with LPS. Pretreatment of AC-Rsv attenuated LPS-induced histological changes, alleviated pulmonary edema, reduced blood vascular leakage, and inhibited the MPO activities in lungs. What was more, AC-Rsv and Rsv treatment reduced the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in lungs and NR8383 cells, respectively. Further exploration revealed that AC-Rsv and Rsv treatment relieved LPS-induced inhibition on SIRT1 expression and restrained the activation effects of LPS on MAPKs and NF-κB activation both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, in vivo results have also demonstrated that the protecting effects of Rsv on LPS-induced inflammation would be neutralized when SIRT1 was in-hibited by EX527. Taken together, these results indicated that AC-Rsv protected lung tissue against LPS-induced ARDS by attenuating inflammation via p38 MAPK/SIRT1 pathway. PMID:26648661

  20. Improved arterial oxygenation with biologically variable or fractal ventilation using low tidal volumes in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boker, Abdulaziz; Graham, M Ruth; Walley, Keith R; McManus, Bruce M; Girling, Linda G; Walker, Elizabeth; Lefevre, Gerald R; Mutch, W Alan C

    2002-02-15

    We compared biologically variable ventilation (V (bv); n = 9) with control mode ventilation (V (c); n = 8) at low tidal volume (VT)--initial 6 ml/kg--in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Hemodynamics, respiratory gases, airway pressures, and VT data were measured. Static P-V curves were generated at 5 h. Interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 were measured in serum and tracheal aspirate. By 5 h, higher Pa(O(2)) (173 +/- 30 mm Hg versus 119 +/- 23 mm Hg; mean +/- SD; p < 0.0001 group x time interaction [G x T]), lower shunt fraction (6 +/- 1% versus 9 +/- 3%; p = 0.0026, G x T) at lower peak airway pressure (21 +/- 2 versus 24 +/- 1 cm H(2)O; p = 0.0342; G x T) occurred with V (bv). IL-8 concentrations in tracheal aspirate and wet:dry weight ratios were inversely related; p = 0.011. With V (c), IL-8 concentrations were 3.75-fold greater at wet:dry weight ratio of 10. IL-10 concentrations did not differ between groups. In both groups, ventilation was on the linear portion of the P-V curve. With V (bv), VT variability demonstrated an inverse power law indicating fractal behavior. In this model of ARDS, V (bv) improved Pa(O(2)) at lower peak airway pressure and IL-8 levels compared with V (c).

  1. Clinical Trial Design - Effect of prone positioning on clinical outcomes in infants and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Martha A.Q.; Arnold, John H.; Thompson, John E.; Fackler, James C.; Grant, Mary Jo; Fineman, Lori D.; Cvijanovich, Natalie; Barr, Frederick E.; Molitor-Kirsch, Shirley; Steinhorn, David M.; Matthay, Michael A.; Hibberd, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes the methodology of an ongoing clinical trial of prone positioning in pediatric patients with acute lung injury (ALI). Nonrandomized studies suggest that prone positioning improves oxygenation in patients with ALI/ARDS without the risk of serious iatrogenic injury. It is not known if these improvements in oxygenation result in improvements in clinical outcomes. A clinical trial was needed to answer this question. Materials and Methods The pediatric prone study is a multi-center, randomized, non-crossover, controlled clinical trial. The trial is designed to test the hypothesis that at the end of 28 days, children with ALI treated with prone positioning will have more ventilator free days than children treated with supine positioning. Secondary endpoints include the time to recovery of lung injury, organ failure free days, functional outcome, adverse events, and mortality from all causes. Pediatric patients, 42 weeks post-conceptual age to 18 years of age, are enrolled within 48 hours of meeting ALI criteria. Patients randomized to the prone group are positioned prone within 4 hours of randomization and remain prone for 20 hours each day during the acute phase of their illness for a maximum of 7 days. Both groups are managed according to ventilator protocol, extubation readiness testing, and sedation protocols and hemodynamic, nutrition and skin care guidelines. Conclusions This paper describes the process, multidisciplinary input, and procedures used to support the design of the clinical trial, as well as the challenges faced by the clinical scientists during the conduct of the clinical trial. PMID:16616620

  2. [Indices of tissue necrosis markers in acute pyo-destructive diseases of organs of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Makarov, S V; Rodionov, P N; Kochetkov, L N

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of indices of lactate dehydrogenase (LDG) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in a group of patients with extensive necrotic alterations in organs of the abdominal cavity and in a group of patients without extensive necroses has shown that in the first group there were higher levels of LDG and CPK. It shows that the LDG and CPK indices may be used as markers of tissue necrosis of the abdominal organs. In addition, in patients who died against the background of growing polyorganic insufficiency the LDG and CPK level by the end of treatment was statistically reliably higher than on admission of the same patients that may be an indicator of growing phenomena of dystrophy and micronecroses in vitals, so the indices of LDG and CPK may show the degree of severity of polyorganic insufficiency and determine its prognosis.

  3. Recent developments in the treatment of acute abdominal and facial attacks of hereditary angioedema: focus on human C1 esterase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Lourdes Pastó; Bellfill, Ramon Lleonart; Caus, Joaquim Marcoval

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially fatal genetic disorder typified by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) of the C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) and characterized by swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, abdominal viscera, and upper airway. Type III is normal estrogen-sensitive C1-INH HAE. Bradykinin, the main mediator of HAE, binds to endothelial B2 receptors, increasing vascular permeability and resulting in edema. HAE management includes short- and long-term prophylaxis. For treating acute episodes, C1-INH concentrate is recommended with regression of symptoms achieved in 30–90 min. Infusions of 500–1000 U have been used in Europe for years. Two plasma-derived C1-INH concentrates have been licensed recently in the United States: Berinert® for treating acute attacks and Cinryze® for prophylaxis in adolescent/adult patients. A recombinant C1-INH that is being considered for approval (conestat alfa) exhibited significant superiority versus placebo. Ecallantide (Kalbitor®) is a selective kallikrein inhibitor recently licensed in the United States for treating acute attacks in patients aged >16 years. It is administered in three 10-mg subcutaneous injections with the risk of anaphylactic reactions. Icatibant (Firazyr®) is a bradykinin B2 receptor competitor. It is administered subcutaneously as a 30-mg injection and approved in Europe but not in the United States. PMID:23776358

  4. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  5. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Following Axillo-femoral Bypass in a Patient with Stanford B Acute Aortic Dissection Accompanied by Abdominal Visceral Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takayuki; Bonkohara, Yukihiro; Azuma, Takashi; Iijima, Masaki; Higashidate, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was transfer-red to the emergency department of our medical center with worsening chest and back pain. Computed tomography revealed Stanford type B aortic dissection. There was a false lumen from the distal arch to the abdominal aorta just above the celiac artery. Although she was at 1st treated conservatively, she abruptly developed acute renal failure and lower limb ischemia because of an enlarged false lumen, and emergency axillo-femoral bypass surgery was performed with an 8 mm tube graft. However, renal failure gradually worsened, which necessitated continuous hemodiafiltration was performed. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair was then performed, and her renal function recovered. PMID:27586321

  6. [Ascending-to-abdominal Aorta Bypass under Percutaneous Cardiopulmonary Support for Lower Body Organ Malperfusion Secondary to Acute Type B Aortic Dissection; Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kemmochi, Reiko; Matsumoto, Mitsuaki; Kubo, Yoji; Oka, Takefumi; Yoshikawa, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of uncomplicated Stanford B acute aortic dissection. Antihypertensive therapy was initially started; however, he suddenly experienced vomiting, diarrhea, anuria, and paraparesis on the fourteenth hospital day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) revealed expansion of the false lumen and severe stenosis of the true lumen at the distal aortic arch, which caused malperfusion syndrome of the lower body. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) was immediately initiated to restore lower body organ perfusion, and an extra-anatomic ascending-to-abdominal aorta bypass was performed with a 16-mm Dacron graft. Postoperative CECT revealed expansion and good patency of both of the true lumen and the bypass graft. His symptoms improved except for the paraparesis; he was eventually able to ambulate using a crutch after postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:27220932

  7. [ROLE OF MICROFLORA OF THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY EXUDATE IN THE ENDOGENIC INTOXICATION OCCURRENCE IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING COMPLICATED ACUTE CHOLECYSTITIS WITH CONCURRENT CARDIAC INSUFFICIENCY OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS].

    PubMed

    Ivantsok, V M

    2015-05-01

    While complicated acute cholecystitis (ACH) course the focus of infection constitutes one of the main causes of the endogenic intoxication (EI) occurrence, what leads to ischemic and hypoxic myocardial damage. There were presented the treatment results analysis in 213 patients, ageing 60 years old and older, managed for an ACH, complicated by peritonitis, paravesical abscess, with concurrent cardiac insufficiency of ischemic genesis, to whom laparoscopic cholecytectomy (LCHE) was conducted. Microflora of the abdominal cavity exudates in the patients, suffering an ACH of various severity, was studied. More rapid regression of inflammatory process, the EI severity and the ischemic-hypoxic myocardial affection reduction, positive impact on hemodynamics, reduction of myocardial ischemia severity were noted while local affection, when bacteriophages for treatment were applied.

  8. A Stromal Cell–Derived Factor 1α Analogue Improves Endothelial Cell Function in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changrun; Goodwin, Andrew; Buie, Joy N Jones; Cook, James; Halushka, Perry; Argraves, Kelley; Zingarelli, Basilia; Zhang, Xian; Wang, Liping; Fan, Hongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is a critical mediator of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies have demonstrated that stromal cell–derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) promotes EC barrier integrity. Our previous studies used a SDF-1α analogue CTCE-0214 (CTCE) in experimental sepsis and demonstrated that it attenuated vascular leak and modulated microRNA (miR) levels. We examined the hypothesis that CTCE improves EC function in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS through increasing miR-126 expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were treated with thrombin to disrupt the EC integrity followed by incubation with CTCE or SDF-1α. Barrier function was determined by trans-endothelial electrical resistance assay. CTCE-induced alterations in miRNA expression and signaling pathways involved in barrier function were determined. Thrombin-induced vascular leak was abrogated by both CTCE and SDF-1α. CTCE also prevented thrombin-induced decreases of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin cell surface expression and expansion of the intercellular space. CTCE increased miR-126 levels and induced activation of AKT/Rac 1 signaling. Cotreatment with a miR-126 inhibitor blocked the protective effects of CTCE on AKT activation and endothelial permeability. In subsequent in vivo studies, ARDS was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS. Intravenous injection of CTCE diminished the injury severity as evidenced by significant reductions in protein, immune cells, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, increased miR-126 expression and decreased pulmonary vascular leak and alveolar edema. Taken together, our data show that CTCE improves endothelial barrier integrity through increased expression of miR-126 and activation of Rac 1 signaling and represents an important potential therapeutic strategy in ARDS. PMID:27031787

  9. Administration of microparticles from blood of the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats serves to induce pathologic changes of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxia; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intratracheal and intravenous administration of microparticles (MPs) on developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The blood MPs from lipopolysaccharide-treated rats were collected and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular source of the MPs was identified by fluorescent-labeled antibodies after the circulating MPs were delivered to naïve rats. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 productions in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were determined 24 h after the rats received intratracheal and intravenous administration of the MPs. Histopathologic examination of lungs was performed by light microscope. A TEM image of MPs showed spherical particles at a variable diameter from 0.1 to 0.5 µm. Endothelial- and leukocyte-derived vesicles were abundant in the investigated samples. Treatment with MPs may lead to significant increases in MPO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 productions in BALF and plasma of the rats (all P < 0.001). Morphological observation indicated that alveolar structures were destroyed with a large amount of neutrophil infiltration in the lungs of the MP-treated rats. Perivascular and/or intra-alveolar hemorrhage were serious and hyaline membrane formed in the alveoli. Intratracheal and intravenous approaches to delivery of the circulating MPs to naïve recipient rats may induce ARDS. This presents an inducer of the onset of ARDS and provides potential therapeutic targets for attenuating lung injury. PMID:26088862

  10. Effect of intravenous β-2 agonist treatment on clinical outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (BALTI-2): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fang Gao; Perkins, Gavin D; Gates, Simon; Young, Duncan; McAuley, Daniel F; Tunnicliffe, William; Khan, Zahid; Lamb, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In a previous randomised controlled phase 2 trial, intravenous infusion of salbutamol for up to 7 days in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) reduced extravascular lung water and plateau airway pressure. We assessed the effects of this intervention on mortality in patients with ARDS. Methods We did a multicentre, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, randomised trial at 46 UK intensive-care units between December, 2006, and March, 2010. Intubated and mechanically ventilated patients (aged ≥16 years) within 72 h of ARDS onset were randomly assigned to receive either salbutamol (15 μg/kg ideal bodyweight per h) or placebo for up to 7 days. Randomisation was done by a central telephone or web-based randomisation service with minmisation by centre, pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2) ratio, and age. All participants, caregivers, and investigators were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was death within 28 days of randomisation. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered, ISRCTN38366450 and EudraCT number 2006-002647-86. Findings We randomly assigned 162 patients to the salbutamol group and 164 to the placebo group. One patient in each group withdrew consent. Recruitment was stopped after the second interim analysis because of safety concerns. Salbutamol increased 28-day mortality (55 [34%] of 161 patients died in the salbutamol group vs 38 (23%) of 163 in the placebo group; risk ratio [RR] 1·47, 95% CI 1·03–2·08). Interpretation Treatment with intravenous salbutamol early in the course of ARDS was poorly tolerated. Treatment is unlikely to be beneficial, and could worsen outcomes. Routine use of β-2 agonist treatment in ventilated patients with this disorder cannot be recommended. Funding UK Medical Research Council, UK Department of Health, UK Intensive Care Foundation. PMID:22166903

  11. Soluble Forms and Ligands of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: An Observational Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jabaudon, Matthieu; Blondonnet, Raiko; Roszyk, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Guérin, Renaud; Perbet, Sébastien; Cayot, Sophie; Bouvier, Damien; Blanchon, Loic; Sapin, Vincent; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The main soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) is elevated during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However other RAGE isoforms and multiple ligands have been poorly reported in the clinical setting, and their respective contribution to RAGE activation during ARDS remains unclear. Our goal was therefore to describe main RAGE isoforms and ligands levels during ARDS. Methods 30 ARDS patients and 30 mechanically ventilated controls were prospectively included in this monocenter observational study. Arterial, superior vena cava and alveolar fluid levels of sRAGE, endogenous-secretory RAGE (esRAGE), high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1), S100A12 and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) were measured in duplicate ELISA on day 0, day 3 and day 6. In patients with ARDS, baseline lung morphology was assessed with computed tomography. Results ARDS patients had higher arterial, central venous and alveolar levels of sRAGE, HMGB1 and S100A12, but lower levels of esRAGE and AGEs, than controls. Baseline arterial sRAGE, HMGB1 and S100A12 were correlated with nonfocal ARDS (AUC 0.79, 0.65 and 0.63, respectively). Baseline arterial sRAGE, esRAGE, S100A12 and AGEs were associated with severity as assessed by PaO2/FiO2. Conclusions This is the first kinetics study of levels of RAGE main isoforms and ligands during ARDS. Elevated sRAGE, HMGB1 and S100A12, with decreased esRAGE and AGEs, were found to distinguish patients with ARDS from those without. Our findings should prompt future studies aimed at elucidating RAGE/HMGB1/S100A12 axis involvement in ARDS. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01270295. PMID:26274928

  12. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jian-Bo; Qiu, Chun-Fang; Chen, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Min-Ying; Chen, Juan; Guan, Xiang-Dong; Ouyang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: An acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still one of the major challenges in critically ill patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) on ARDS in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS rat model. Methods: Thirty-six rats were randomized into three groups: control, LPS, and LPS + JNK inhibitor. Rats were sacrificed 8 h after LPS treatment. The lung edema was observed by measuring the wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio of the lung. The severity of pulmonary inflammation was observed by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of lung tissue. Moreover, the neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted to observe the airway inflammation. In addition, lung collagen accumulation was quantified by Sircol Collagen Assay. At the same time, the pulmonary histologic examination was performed, and lung injury score was achieved in all three groups. Results: MPO activity in lung tissue was found increased in rats treated with LPS comparing with that in control (1.26 ± 0.15 U in LPS vs. 0.77 ± 0.27 U in control, P < 0.05). Inhibiting JNK attenuated LPS-induced MPO activity upregulation (0.52 ± 0.12 U in LPS + JNK inhibitor vs. 1.26 ± 0.15 U in LPS, P < 0.05). Neutrophils in BALF were also found to be increased with LPS treatment, and inhibiting JNK attenuated LPS-induced neutrophils increase in BALF (255.0 ± 164.4 in LPS vs. 53 (44.5-103) in control vs. 127.0 ± 44.3 in LPS + JNK inhibitor, P < 0.05). At the same time, the lung injury score showed a reduction in LPS + JNK inhibitor group comparing with that in LPS group (13.42 ± 4.82 vs. 7.00 ± 1.83, P = 0.001). However, the lung W/D ratio and the collagen in BALF did not show any differences between LPS and LPS + JNK inhibitor group. Conclusions: Inhibiting JNK alleviated LPS-induced acute lung inflammation and had no effects on pulmonary edema and fibrosis. JNK inhibitor might be a potential therapeutic medication in ARDS, in the

  13. Effect of Noninvasive Ventilation Delivered by Helmet vs Face Mask on the Rate of Endotracheal Intubation in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhakti K.; Wolfe, Krysta S.; Pohlman, Anne S.; Hall, Jesse B.; Kress, John P.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with a face mask is relatively ineffective at preventing endotracheal intubation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Delivery of NIV with a helmet may be a superior strategy for these patients. OBJECTIVE To determine whether NIV delivered by helmet improves intubation rate among patients with ARDS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single-center randomized clinical trial of 83 patients with ARDS requiring NIV delivered by face mask for at least 8 hours while in the medical intensive care unit at the University of Chicago between October 3, 2012, through September 21, 2015. INTERVENTIONS Patients were randomly assigned to continue face mask NIV or switch to a helmet for NIV support for a planned enrollment of 206 patients (103 patients per group). The helmet is a transparent hood that covers the entire head of the patient and has a rubber collar neck seal. Early trial termination resulted in 44 patients randomized to the helmet group and 39 to the face mask group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who required endotracheal intubation. Secondary outcomes included 28-day invasive ventilator–free days (ie, days alive without mechanical ventilation), duration of ICU and hospital length of stay, and hospital and 90-day mortality. RESULTS Eighty-three patients (45% women; median age, 59 years; median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II score, 26) were included in the analysis after the trial was stopped early based on predefined criteria for efficacy. The intubation rate was 61.5% (n = 24) for the face mask group and 18.2% (n = 8) for the helmet group (absolute difference, −43.3%; 95% CI, −62.4%to −24.3%; P < .001). The number of ventilator-free days was significantly higher in the helmet group (28 vs 12.5, P < .001). At 90 days, 15 patients (34.1%) in the helmet group died compared with 22 patients (56.4%) in the face mask group

  14. Deficiency of endogenous acute phase serum amyloid A protects apoE−/− mice from angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Webb, NR; De Beer, MC; Wroblewski, JM; Ji, A; Bailey, W; Shridas, P; Charnigo, RJ; Noffsinger, VP; Witta, J; Howatt, DA; Balakrishnan, A; Rateri, DL; Daugherty, A; De Beer, FC

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a major cause of death in the aged population, is characterized by vascular inflammation and matrix degradation. Serum amyloid A (SAA), an acute phase reactant linked to inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase induction, correlates with aortic dimensions before aneurysm formation in humans. We investigated whether SAA deficiency in mice impacts AAA formation during angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Approach and Results Plasma SAA increased ~60-fold in apoE−/− mice 24 hours after i.p. AngII injection (100 μg/kg; n = 4) and ~15-fold after chronic 28-day AngII infusion (1,000 ng/kg/min; n = 9). AAA incidence and severity after 28-day AngII infusion was significantly reduced in apoE−/− mice lacking both acute phase SAA isoforms (SAAKO; n = 20) compared to apoE−/− mice (SAAWT; n = 20) as assessed by in vivo ultrasound and ex vivo morphometric analyses, despite a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after AngII infusion. Atherosclerotic lesion area of the aortic arch was similar in SAAKO and SAAWT mice after 28-day AngII infusion. Immunostaining detected SAA in AAA tissues of AngII-infused SAAWT mice that co-localized with macrophages, elastin breaks, and enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. MMP-2 activity was significantly lower in aortas of SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after 10-day AngII infusion. Conclusion Lack of endogenous acute phase SAA protects against experimental AAA through a mechanism that may involve reduced MMP-2 activity. PMID:25745063

  15. Predictors of Percutaneous Catheter Drainage (PCD) after Abdominal Paracentesis Drainage (APD) in Patients with Moderately Severe or Severe Acute Pancreatitis along with Fluid Collections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hui; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hong-tao; Chen, Tao; Xu, Chuan; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Zheng-cai; Tang, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although we previously demonstrated abdominal paracentesis drainage (APD) preceding percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) as the central step for treating patients with moderately severe (MSAP) or severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), the predictors leading to PCD after APD have not been studied. Methods Consecutive patients with MSAP or SAP were recruited between June 2011 and June 2013. As a step-up approach, all patients initially received medical management, later underwent ultrasound-guided APD before PCD, if necessary, followed by endoscopic necrosectomy through the path formed by PCD. APD primarily targeted fluid in the abdominal or pelvic cavities, whereas PCD aimed at (peri)pancreatic fluid. Results Of the 92 enrolled patients, 40 were managed with APD alone and 52 received PCD after APD (14 required necrosectomy after initial PCD). The overall mortality was 6.5%. Univariate analysis showed that among the 20 selected parameters, 13 factors significantly affected PCD intervention after APD. Multivariate analysis revealed that infected (peri)pancreatic collections (P = -0.001), maximum extent of necrosis of more than 30% of the pancreas (P = -0.024), size of the largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection (P = -0.007), and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD (P = -0.008) were all independent predictors of PCD. Conclusions Infected (peri)pancreatic collections, a largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection of more than 100 ml, and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD could effectively predict the need for PCD in the early course of the disease. PMID:25659143

  16. [Survival by a young woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders and with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to severe pneumonia who showed increased serum neutrophil elastase activity].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirokazu; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Nakajima, Shigenori

    2006-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders was found to have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis due to severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. S. pneumoniae was detected by an in vitro rapid immunochromatographic assay for S. pneumoniae antigen in urine on the day of admission and by blood culture 2 days after admission. Symptoms and laboratory findings improved after treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate, antibiotics, and mechanical ventilation. Treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate also decreased serum neutrophil elastase activity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of early treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate in ARDS due to severe pneumonia.

  17. Assessment of PaO2/FiO2 for stratification of patients with moderate and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Jesús; Blanco, Jesús; del Campo, Rafael; Andaluz-Ojeda, David; Díaz-Domínguez, Francisco J; Muriel, Arturo; Córcoles, Virgilio; Suárez-Sipmann, Fernando; Tarancón, Concepción; González-Higueras, Elena; López, Julia; Blanch, Lluis; Pérez-Méndez, Lina; Fernández, Rosa Lidia; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent update of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) proposed an empirical classification based on ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) at ARDS onset. Since the proposal did not mandate PaO2/FiO2 calculation under standardised ventilator settings (SVS), we hypothesised that a stratification based on baseline PaO2/FiO2 would not provide accurate assessment of lung injury severity. Design A prospective, multicentre, observational study. Setting A network of teaching hospitals. Participants 478 patients with eligible criteria for moderate (100300). Primary and secondary outcomes Group severity and hospital mortality. Results At ARDS onset, 173 patients had a PaO2/FiO2≤100 but only 38.7% met criteria for severe ARDS at 24 h under SVS. When assessed under SVS, 61.3% of patients with severe ARDS were reclassified as moderate, mild and non-ARDS, while lung severity and hospital mortality changed markedly with every PaO2/FiO2 category (p<0.000001). Our model of risk stratification outperformed the stratification using baseline PaO2/FiO2 and non-standardised PaO2/FiO2 at 24 h, when analysed by the predictive receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve: area under the ROC curve for stratification at baseline was 0.583 (95% CI 0.525 to 0.636), 0.605 (95% CI 0.552 to 0.658) at 24 h without SVS and 0.693 (95% CI 0.645 to 0.742) at 24 h under SVS (p<0.000001). Conclusions Our findings support the need for patient assessment under SVS at 24 h after ARDS onset to assess disease severity, and have implications for the

  18. The Ratio of Partial Pressure Arterial Oxygen and Fraction of Inspired Oxygen 1 Day After Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Onset Can Predict the Outcomes of Involving Patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Sung, Mei-I; Liu, Hsiao-Hua; Chen, Chin-Ming; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chao, Chien-Ming; Ho, Chung-Han; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hsing, Shu-Chen; Cheng, Kuo-Chen

    2016-04-01

    The initial hypoxemic level of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) defined according to Berlin definition might not be the optimal predictor for prognosis. We aimed to determine the predictive validity of the stabilized ratio of partial pressure arterial oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio) following standard ventilator setting in the prognosis of patients with ARDS.This prospective observational study was conducted in a single tertiary medical center in Taiwan and compared the stabilized PaO2/FiO2 ratio (Day 1) following standard ventilator settings and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the day patients met ARDS Berlin criteria (Day 0). Patients admitted to intensive care units and in accordance with the Berlin criteria for ARDS were collected between December 1, 2012 and May 31, 2015. Main outcome was 28-day mortality. Arterial blood gas and ventilator setting on Days 0 and 1 were obtained.A total of 238 patients met the Berlin criteria for ARDS were enrolled, and they were classified as mild (n = 50), moderate (n = 125), and severe (n = 63) ARDS, respectively. Twelve (5%) patients who originally were classified as ARDS did not continually meet the Berlin definition, and a total of 134 (56%) patients had the changes regarding the severity of ARDS from Day 0 to Day 1. The 28-day mortality rate was 49.1%, and multivariate analysis identified age, PaO2/FiO2 on Day 1, number of organ failures, and positive fluid balance within 5 days as significant risk factors of death. Moreover, the area under receiver-operating curve for mortality prediction using PaO2/FiO2 on Day 1 was significant higher than that on Day 0 (P = 0.016).PaO2/FiO2 ratio on Day 1 after applying mechanical ventilator is a better predictor of outcomes in patients with ARDS than those on Day 0.

  19. T helper type 2-polarized invariant natural killer T cells reduce disease severity in acute intra-abdominal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, R V; Mazzuca, D M; Xu, S X; Porcelli, S A; Fraser, D D; Martin, C M; Welch, I; Mele, T; Haeryfar, S M M; McCormick, J K

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by a severe systemic inflammatory response to infection that is associated with high morbidity and mortality despite optimal care. Invariant natural killer T (iNK T) cells are potent regulatory lymphocytes that can produce pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus shaping the course and nature of immune responses; however, little is known about their role in sepsis. We demonstrate here that patients with sepsis/severe sepsis have significantly elevated proportions of iNK T cells in their peripheral blood (as a percentage of their circulating T cells) compared to non-septic patients. We therefore investigated the role of iNK T cells in a mouse model of intra-abdominal sepsis (IAS). Our data show that iNK T cells are pathogenic in IAS, and that T helper type 2 (Th2) polarization of iNK T cells using the synthetic glycolipid OCH significantly reduces mortality from IAS. This reduction in mortality is associated with the systemic elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 and reduction of several proinflammatory cytokines within the spleen, notably interleukin (IL)-17. Finally, we show that treatment of sepsis with OCH in mice is accompanied by significantly reduced apoptosis of splenic T and B lymphocytes and macrophages, but not natural killer cells. We propose that modulation of iNK T cell responses towards a Th2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy in early sepsis. PMID:24965554

  20. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  1. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  2. The clinical usefulness of extravascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability index to diagnose and characterize pulmonary edema: a prospective multicenter study on the quantitative differential diagnostic definition for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by features other than increased pulmonary vascular permeability. Pulmonary vascular permeability combined with increased extravascular lung water content has been considered a quantitative diagnostic criterion of ALI/ARDS. This prospective, multi-institutional, observational study aimed to clarify the clinical pathophysiological features of ALI/ARDS and establish its quantitative diagnostic criteria. Methods The extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) were measured using the transpulmonary thermodilution method in 266 patients with PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 300 mmHg and bilateral infiltration on chest radiography, in 23 ICUs of academic tertiary referral hospitals. Pulmonary edema was defined as EVLWI ≥ 10 ml/kg. Three experts retrospectively determined the pathophysiological features of respiratory insufficiency by considering the patients' history, clinical presentation, chest computed tomography and radiography, echocardiography, EVLWI and brain natriuretic peptide level, and the time course of all preceding findings under systemic and respiratory therapy. Results Patients were divided into the following three categories on the basis of the pathophysiological diagnostic differentiation of respiratory insufficiency: ALI/ARDS, cardiogenic edema, and pleural effusion with atelectasis, which were noted in 207 patients, 26 patients, and 33 patients, respectively. EVLWI was greater in ALI/ARDS and cardiogenic edema patients than in patients with pleural effusion with atelectasis (18.5 ± 6.8, 14.4 ± 4.0, and 8.3 ± 2.1, respectively; P < 0.01). PVPI was higher in ALI/ARDS patients than in cardiogenic edema or pleural effusion with atelectasis patients (3.2 ± 1.4, 2.0 ± 0.8, and 1.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.01). In ALI/ARDS patients, EVLWI increased with increasing pulmonary vascular permeability (r = 0.729, P < 0.01) and was weakly

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  5. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  8. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  10. Relationship of gastrointestinal symptoms and psychosocial distress to gastric retention in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to determine whether gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain, non-pain GI symptoms, nausea) and/or psychosocial distress differ between children with/without gastroparesis and whether the severity of GI symptoms and/or psychosocial distress is related to the degree of gastro...

  11. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  12. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  13. Abdominal aortic grafting for spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hiroto; Shibuya, Takashi; Shintani, Takashi; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Satoh, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    This case report concerns a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection, which developed into claudication and rest pain in the lower extremity. Multi-row detector computed tomography showed the entry site of the abdominal aortic dissection at the second lumbar artery, while the reentry site was found intraoperatively at the median sacral artery, indicating that the false lumen had progressed and compressed the true lumen. A direct approach involving grafting appears to be an effective procedure for resolving mesenteric and lower extremity hypoperfusion due to aortic dissection with a dilated false channel, even during the acute period. PMID:19879731

  14. The NOTA study: non-operative treatment for acute appendicitis: prospective study on the efficacy and safety of antibiotic treatment (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid) in patients with right sided lower abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Giorgini, Eleonora; Biscardi, Andrea; Villani, Silvia; Clemente, Nicola; Senatore, Gianluca; Filicori, Filippo; Antonacci, Nicola; Baldoni, Franco; De Werra, Carlo; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2011-01-01

    Background Case control studies that randomly assign patients with diagnosis of acute appendicitis to either surgical or non-surgical treatment yield a relapse rate of approximately 14% at one year. It would be useful to know the relapse rate of patients who have, instead, been selected for a given treatment based on a thorough clinical evaluation, including physical examination and laboratory results (Alvarado Score) as well as radiological exams if needed or deemed helpful. If this clinical evaluation is useful, the investigators would expect patient selection to be better than chance, and relapse rate to be lower than 14%. Once the investigators have established the utility of this evaluation, the investigators can begin to identify those components that have predictive value (such as blood analysis, or US/CT findings). This is the first step toward developing an accurate diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm which will avoid risks and costs of needless surgery. Methods/design This will be a single-cohort prospective observational study. It will not interfere with the usual pathway, consisting of clinical examination in the Emergency Department (ED) and execution of the following exams at the physician's discretion: full blood count with differential, C reactive protein, abdominal ultrasound, abdominal CT. Patients admitted to an ED with lower abdominal pain and suspicion of acute appendicitis and not needing immediate surgery, are requested by informed consent to undergo observation and non operative treatment with antibiotic therapy (Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid). The patients by protocol should not have received any previous antibiotic treatment during the same clinical episode. Patients not undergoing surgery will be physically examined 5 days later. Further follow-up will be conducted at 7, 15 days, 6 months and 12 months. The study will conform to clinical practice guidelines and will follow the recommendations of the Declaration of Helsinki. The protocol

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  16. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  17. Acute poisoning following ingestion of medicines: initial management. How to treat life-threatening complications and to evaluate the risk of delayed effects and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    Acute poisoning following ingestion of medications, both intentional and unintentional, is frequent and more or less severe. It is often unclear whether a toxic dose has been ingested. This review examines the initial management of patients with suspected acute poisoning, based on a review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. We examined clinical practice guidelines, which are mostly based on observational, pharmacological and toxicological data, as well as empirical data. Few comparative trials are available. In life-threatening situations, the first priority is to call an emergency response mobile unit and to implement life-support techniques, i.e., resuscitation for cardiorespiratory arrest; respiratory support if necessary; and the left lateral head-down position and glucose injection if the patient is unconscious. Prompt, initial measures may also include: anticonvulsant injection for status epilepticus (diazepam, for example); a sedative for extreme agitation (diazepam or clorazepate if there is no risk of respiratory depression; otherwise haloperidol); atropine for severe bradycardia; elevating the legs for hypotension; and naloxone in case of respiratory depression due to opioids. Drug poisoning can be life-threatening.The extent of the risk should be assessed by questioning the patient and close contacts, examining the immediate environment, and carrying out a clinical examination to identify a major toxic condition. The severity of poisoning is assessed by gathering all information about the patient, the drug(s) ingested, the circumstances of ingestion, and any other substances ingested at the same time. A poison control centre may be called to assist with diagnosis, to predict the clinical consequences, and to guide patient management. Activated charcoal can reduce the gastrointestinal absorption of some drugs. It should be given as soon as possible, preferably within 2 hours after ingestion of a drug known to be adsorbed by

  18. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  19. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn. PMID:26760414

  20. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated.

  1. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  2. Tester for Distress Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Distress beacons on aircraft and boats checked for proper operation with aid of onboard monitor. Monitor mounted in aircraft cockpit or at wheel of boat. Connected to beacon electronics by cable. Monitor used with interface circuitry in beacon, which acts as buffer so that operation of beacon is not adversely affected if monitor is removed or if connecting cable is accidentally short circuited.

  3. Bowel perforation presenting with acute abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema in a 14-year-old girl with an abandoned distal peritoneal shunt catheter: case report.

    PubMed

    Riccardello, Gerald J; Barr, Luke K; Bassani, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The authors report the case of 14-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and previously shunt-treated hydrocephalus who presented with right-sided abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema that developed over a 1-week period. A CT scan of the patient's abdomen revealed a retained distal ventriculoperitoneal (VP) catheter with air tracking from the catheter to the upper chest wall. Given the high suspicion of the catheter being intraluminal, an exploratory laparotomy was performed and revealed multiple jejunal perforations. The patient required a partial small-bowel resection and reanastomosis for complete removal of the retained catheter. Six other similar cases of bowel perforation occurring in patients with abandoned VP and subdural-peritoneal shunts have been reported. The authors analyzed these cases with regard to age of presentation, symptomatic presentation, management, morbidity, and mortality. While there was 0% mortality associated with bowel perforation secondary to a retained distal VP catheter, the morbidity was significantly high and included peritonitis and small bowel resection.

  4. Gas exchange in the respiratory distress syndromes.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard K; Jobe, Alan

    2012-07-01

    This article describes the gas exchange abnormalities occurring in the acute respiratory distress syndrome seen in adults and children and in the respiratory distress syndrome that occurs in neonates. Evidence is presented indicating that the major gas exchange abnormality accounting for the hypoxemia in both conditions is shunt, and that approximately 50% of patients also have lungs regions in which low ventilation-to-perfusion ratios contribute to the venous admixture. The various mechanisms by which hypercarbia may develop and by which positive end-expiratory pressure improves gas exchange are reviewed, as are the effects of vascular tone and airway narrowing. The mechanisms by which surfactant abnormalities occur in the two conditions are described, as are the histological findings that have been associated with shunt and low ventilation-to-perfusion. PMID:23723019

  5. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS. PMID:27602092

  6. Regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pulmonary neutrophil aggregation mediated by nuclear factor-κB in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongman; Zhao, Jiping; Xue, Guansheng; Wang, Junfei; Wu, Jinxiang; Wang, Donghui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the regulatory effect of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78) on pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mice, and the therapeutic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), was investigated. BALB/c mice were divided into control, LPS and PDTC + LPS groups using a random number table. The phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was detected using a western blot, and the mRNA expression levels of CINC were evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 was detected using immunohistochemistry. The production of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10 in serum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total number of leukocytes and proportion of PMNs in BALF was also determined. Following injection with LPS (20 mg/kg), the expression levels of p-NF-κB, CINC and ENA-78 were increased in lung tissue, and the expression levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the number of PMNs increased in serum and BALF. However, in comparison with the LPS group, the degree of lung injury was reduced in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC. In addition, the expression level of p-NF-κB and the production of chemokines in lung tissue decreased in ARDS mice that were treated with PDTC, and the number of PMNs in BALF also decreased. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB may result in the synthesis and release of CINC and ENA-78, which induce the accumulation of PMNs in the lung. Therefore, PDTC may be used to reduce the production of chemokines and cytokines, thereby decreasing the activation of PMNs in lung tissue and reducing the damage of lung tissue in ARDS.

  7. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  8. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Erşahin, Y; Mutluer, S; Tekeli, G

    1996-12-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst in an infrequent complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. We reviewed ten patients with abdominal pseudocyst. There were five girls and five boys, aged between 4 months and 14 years. The number of shunt procedures prior to the presentation varied between one and five. Only one patient had had a previous shunt infection. No patients had undergone prior abdominal surgery other than VP shunting. The time from the last shunting procedure to the development of abdominal pseudocyst ranged from 3 weeks to 5 years. Presenting symptoms and signs were mainly related to abdominal complaints in all patients. Three patients also had signs of shunt malfunction. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound in all patients. Shunt infection was determined in six patients. Repositioning if the peritoneal catheter seemed to have a higher rate of recurrence. The diagnosis of abdominal pseudocyst should be considered in VP-shunted patients presenting with abdominal complaints.

  9. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  10. What Is Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) or critical care unit (CCU) of a hospital. Therapies commonly used ... may be done. (See ATS fact sheet on Tracheostomy). What is an ICU and what can I ...

  11. Moral Distress among Iranian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Tabatabaei, Shahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the moral distress among Iranian registered nurses. Methods: This was a descriptive –analytic study, in which 264 out of 1000 nurses were randomly selected as a sample group and completed the questionnaire. The nurses’ moral distress was assessed using Corley’s 30-item Moral Distress Scale adapted for use in an Iranian population. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 19. Results: In this study, no correlation was found between the level of moral distress and any of the demographic data. The mean moral distress score ranged from 3.56 to 5.83, indicating moderate to high levels of moral distress. The item with the highest mean score was “working with unsafe levels of nurse staffing”. The item with the lowest mean score was “giving medication intravenously to a patient who has refused to take it”. Nurses working in EMS and NICU units had the highest levels of moral distress. Conclusion: A higher degree of moral distress is observed among nurses who work in health care systems. The results of this study highly recommend practical and research-oriented evaluation of moral distress in the medical society in Iran. Our findings suggest that Iranian version of MDS is a reliable instrument to measure moral distress in nurses. PMID:26005478

  12. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  13. [Abdominal compartment syndrome in video laparoscopic surgery. Etiopathogenetic aspects, physiopathology and personal experience].

    PubMed

    Alberti, A; Giannetto, G; Littori, F; Di Marco, D; Dattola, P; Dattola, A; Basile, M

    1998-01-01

    The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a very seven pathology, consequence oh abdominal injuries and traumatism, acute pancreatitis, aortic aneurism rupture, acute peritonitis. The etiopatogenesis is the increase of intra-abdominal pressure with systemic consequences for cardiorespiratory and renal failure. The authors after careful physiopathologic consideration, describe, a case report of ACS in the laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis. To conclusion, we report very important the accurate intraoperative monitoring of vital parameters (PCO2, PO2, Pa, Fc, PVC, Ph, Diuresis) and immediate decision at laparotomic conversion for abdominal decompression. PMID:11762082

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  15. [Abdominal compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pottecher, T; Segura, P; Launoy, A

    2001-04-01

    French physicians dealing with abdominal emergencies are not very familiar with the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Increased abdominal pressure has deleterious consequences on local (intestine, liver, kidney) circulation, leading to death in the absence of correct treatment. Abdominal trauma and ruptured aortic aneurism are the main causes of ACS. Clinical presentation may be misleading: respiratory failure, oliguria or circulatory symptoms are often predominant. Abdominal palpation is inefficient for evaluating intra-abdominal pressure (IAP); only measurement of cystic pressure allows precise evaluation of IAP. Abdominal decompression is the treatment of choice. It must be performed as soon as IAP exceeds 25 mmHg. The procedure may be risky with a high incidence of severe complications when ischaemic territories are reperfused. Recent data underline the importance of compensation of hypovolemia before decompression. Abdominal closure may necessitate various techniques (aponevrotomy, Bogota bags, etc.). At any rate, IAP must remain low at the end of the procedure. In case of suspicion of ACS, early measurement of IAP is mandatory. If pressure is over 25 mmHg, a decompressive procedure must be initiated. PMID:11340703

  16. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Józsa, Gergő; Mohay, Gabriella; Pintér, András; Vástyán, Attila

    2015-09-13

    19 children were diagnosed with abdominal cysts of different origin in the Surgical Unit of the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary between 2010 and 2013. The authors discuss the details of representative cases of a parovarial cyst, an intestinal duplication, and an omental cyst with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, diagnostic tools, and surgical interventions. The authors conclude that abdominal cysts often cause mild symptoms only, and they are discovered accidentally by ultrasound imaging performed for other reasons. In some cases, the cyst can cause severe complaints or even acute abdomen requiring emergency surgery. Laporoscopy may be a valuable method both in diagnosis and surgical therapy. Abdominal CT or MRI are not required in the majority of the patients.

  17. Abdominal compliance: A bench-to-bedside review.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Annika Reintam; Björck, Martin; De Keulenaer, Bart; Regli, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal compliance (AC) is an important determinant and predictor of available workspace during laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, critically ill patients with a reduced AC are at an increased risk of developing intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome, both of which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite this, AC is a concept that has been neglected in the past.AC is defined as a measure of the ease of abdominal expansion, expressed as a change in intra-abdominal volume (IAV) per change in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP):AC = ΔIAV / ΔIAPAC is a dynamic variable dependent on baseline IAV and IAP as well as abdominal reshaping and stretching capacity. Whereas AC itself can only rarely be measured, it always needs to be considered an important component of IAP. Patients with decreased AC are prone to fulminant development of abdominal compartment syndrome when concomitant risk factors for intra-abdominal hypertension are present.This review aims to clarify the pressure-volume relationship within the abdominal cavity. It highlights how different conditions and pathologies can affect AC and which management strategies could be applied to avoid serious consequences of decreased AC.We have pooled all available human data to calculate AC values in patients acutely and chronically exposed to intra-abdominal hypertension and demonstrated an exponential abdominal pressure-volume relationship. Most importantly, patients with high level of IAP have a reduced AC. In these patients, only small reduction in IAV can significantly increase AC and reduce IAPs.A greater knowledge on AC may help in selecting a better surgical approach and in reducing complications related to intra-abdominal hypertension.

  18. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  20. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  1. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  2. Tinnitus-Related Distress and the Personality Characteristic Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Delb, Wolfgang; Balkenhol, Tobias; Hiller, Wolfgang; Hörmann, Karl

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that personality traits may be prognostic for the severity of suffering from tinnitus. Resilience as measured with the Wagnild and Young resilience scale represents a positive personality characteristic that promotes adaptation to adverse life conditions including chronic health conditions. Aim of the study was to explore the relation between resilience and tinnitus severity. In a cross-sectional study with a self-report questionnaire, information on tinnitus-related distress and subjective tinnitus loudness was recorded together with the personality characteristic resilience and emotional health, a measure generated from depression, anxiety, and somatic symptom severity scales. Data from 4705 individuals with tinnitus indicate that tinnitus-related distress and to a lesser extent the experienced loudness of the tinnitus show an inverse correlation with resilience. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship between resilience and tinnitus-related distress is mediated by emotional health. This indirect effect indicates that high resilience is associated with better emotional health or less depression, anxiety, and somatic symptom severity, which in turn is associated with a less distressing tinnitus. Validity of resilience as a predictor for tinnitus-related distress is supported but needs to be explored further in longitudinal studies including acute tinnitus patients. PMID:25120934

  3. Tackling science's distress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    If arguments for limiting support for science continue to dominate the public discourse about science, “we will be talking our way into scientific decline,” said Frank Press, president of the National Academy of Sciences, to the academy's annual meeting on April 30. Press is the latest in a number of prominent figures on the Washington science scene, from George E. Brown, Jr. (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Science Committee, to Mary L. Good, head of the National Science Board, to take stock of the U.S. science enterprise.Press lauded President Bush's current budget request for science, calling it the best one in recent years. The new federal budget caps, however, provide a counterweight by creating a “fixed pie” for spending. Added to this, the university science community is in severe distress, Press said, suffering from outmoded laboratories, rising costs, budget cuts, and new and expensive government regulations, among other burdens. The budget caps also force federally funded laboratories and universities to compete with each other for support.

  4. Decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, E.; Malbrain, M.; Nesbitt, I.; Cohen, J.; Kaloiani, V.; Ivatury, R.; Mone, M.; Debergh, D.; Björck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of decompressive laparotomy on outcomes in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome has been poorly investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to describe the effect of decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome on organ function and outcomes. Methods This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients who underwent decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. The primary endpoints were 28‐day and 1‐year all‐cause mortality. Changes in intra‐abdominal pressure (IAP) and organ function, and laparotomy‐related morbidity were secondary endpoints. Results Thirty‐three patients were included in the study (20 men). Twenty‐seven patients were surgical admissions treated for abdominal conditions. The median (i.q.r.) Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 26 (20–32). Median IAP was 23 (21–27) mmHg before decompressive laparotomy, decreasing to 12 (9–15), 13 (8–17), 12 (9–15) and 12 (9–14) mmHg after 2, 6, 24 and 72 h. Decompressive laparotomy significantly improved oxygenation and urinary output. Survivors showed improvement in organ function scores, but non‐survivors did not. Fourteen complications related to the procedure developed in eight of the 33 patients. The abdomen could be closed primarily in 18 patients. The overall 28‐day mortality rate was 36 per cent (12 of 33), which increased to 55 per cent (18 patients) at 1 year. Non‐survivors were no different from survivors, except that they tended to be older and on mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Decompressive laparotomy reduced IAP and had an immediate effect on organ function. It should be considered in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome. PMID:26891380

  5. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  6. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients.

  7. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients. PMID:15321562

  8. [Abdominal actinomycosis: four cases].

    PubMed

    Ghannouchi Jaafoura, N; Kaabia, N; Khalifa, M; Ben Jazia, I; Hachfi, W; Braham, A; Letaief, A; Bahri, F

    2008-12-01

    The abdominal actinomycosis (AA) is a rare and often unrecognised suppurative chronic illness. It is caused by an anaerobic Gram positive bacteria, Actinomyces israelii. Abdominal actinomycosis is responsible for pseudotumoral syndrome often leading, to a large and mutilating surgery whereas a prolonged treatment by antibiotics would have permitted to cure the disease. The diagnosis is obtained generally from anatomopathologic exam. We report four cases of abdominal actinomycosis being revealed by a pseudotumoral syndrome. The diagnosis was only made after surgery. In spite of an active treatment by antibiotics during several months, two of our patients had a relapse of the infectious process. These four observations confirm the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties previously reported by other authors.

  9. Attachment insecurity, responses to critical incident distress, and current emotional symptoms in ambulance workers.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Janice; Maunder, Robert G; Schwartz, Brian; Gurevich, Maria

    2012-02-01

    Ambulance workers are exposed to critical incidents that may evoke intense distress and can result in long-term impairment. Individuals who can regulate distress may experience briefer post-incident distress and fewer long-term emotional difficulties. Attachment research has contributed to our understanding of individual differences in stress regulation, suggesting that secure attachment is associated with effective support-seeking and coping strategies, and fewer long-term difficulties. We tested the effect of attachment insecurity on emotional distress in ambulance workers, hypothesizing that (1) insecure attachment is associated with symptoms of current distress and (2) prolonged recovery from acute post-critical incident distress, coping strategies and supportive contact mediate this relationship. We measured (1) attachment insecurity, (2) acute distress, coping and social contact following an index critical incident and (3) current symptoms of post-traumatic stress, depression, somatization and burnout and tested the hypothesized associations. Fearful-avoidant insecure attachment was associated with all current symptoms, most strongly with depression (R=0.38, p<0.001). Fearful-avoidant attachment insecurity was also associated with maladaptive coping, reduced social support and slower recovery from social withdrawal and physical arousal following the critical incident, but these processes did not mediate the relationship between attachment insecurity and current symptoms. These findings are relevant for optimizing post-incident support for ambulance workers.

  10. Acute lung injury following exposure to nitric acid

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, T. K.; Shah, Samir; Lobo, Ivona; Uppe, Abhay; Mehta, Ankur

    2009-01-01

    We present a series of three cases of survival following inhalation of nitric acid fumes, which resulted in acute respiratory distress. Inhalation of nitric acid fumes and its decomposition gases such as nitrogen dioxide results in delayed onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Intensive respiratory management, ventilatory support, and steroids can help in survival. PMID:20532002

  11. [Hematoma of the abdominal wall as differential diagnosis of cystic pelvic tumor].

    PubMed

    Marroquin-Nisch, J; Grüneberger, A; Hewel, T

    1995-02-01

    In a woman patient aged 80 years under anticoagulation with dicumarol (Marcumar), abdominal pain suddenly occurred which was located on the right side as well as signs of acute bleeding. Preoperative sonography and computer scan showed a large, cystic tumour, most likely originating from the right ovary with infiltration of the abdominal wall. Intraoperative diagnosis was a large haematoma of the abdominal wall and the retroperitoneum penetrating into the free abdomen.

  12. Perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kenneth G; Richardson, Clarissa M E; Clark, Dustin

    2012-04-01

    Using a cross-panel design and data from 2 successive cohorts of college students (N = 357), we examined the stability of maladaptive perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress across 3 time points within a college semester. Each construct was substantially stable over time, with procrastination being especially stable. We also tested, but failed to support, a mediational model with Time 2 (mid-semester) procrastination as a hypothesized mechanism through which Time 1 (early-semester) perfectionism would affect Time 3 (end-semester) psychological distress. An alternative model with Time 2 perfectionism as a mediator of the procrastination-distress association also was not supported. Within-time analyses revealed generally consistent strength of effects in the correlations between the 3 constructs over the course of the semester. A significant interaction effect also emerged. Time 1 procrastination had no effect on otherwise high levels of psychological distress at the end of the semester for highly perfectionistic students, but at low levels of Time 1 perfectionism, the most distressed students by the end of the term were those who were more likely to have procrastinated earlier in the semester. Implications of the stability of the constructs and their association over time, as well as the moderating effects of procrastination, are discussed in the context of maladaptive perfectionism and problematic procrastination. PMID:22352949

  13. Perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kenneth G; Richardson, Clarissa M E; Clark, Dustin

    2012-04-01

    Using a cross-panel design and data from 2 successive cohorts of college students (N = 357), we examined the stability of maladaptive perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress across 3 time points within a college semester. Each construct was substantially stable over time, with procrastination being especially stable. We also tested, but failed to support, a mediational model with Time 2 (mid-semester) procrastination as a hypothesized mechanism through which Time 1 (early-semester) perfectionism would affect Time 3 (end-semester) psychological distress. An alternative model with Time 2 perfectionism as a mediator of the procrastination-distress association also was not supported. Within-time analyses revealed generally consistent strength of effects in the correlations between the 3 constructs over the course of the semester. A significant interaction effect also emerged. Time 1 procrastination had no effect on otherwise high levels of psychological distress at the end of the semester for highly perfectionistic students, but at low levels of Time 1 perfectionism, the most distressed students by the end of the term were those who were more likely to have procrastinated earlier in the semester. Implications of the stability of the constructs and their association over time, as well as the moderating effects of procrastination, are discussed in the context of maladaptive perfectionism and problematic procrastination.

  14. Neonatal respiratory distress in a reference neonatal unit in Cameroon: an analysis of prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tochie, Joel Noutakdie; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Langmia, Regina Ndasi; Barla, Esther; Koki-Ndombo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a main cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Early detection of its risk factors and early treatment of its etiologies are major challenges. However, few studies in developing countries have provided data needed to tackle it. We aimed to determine the prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcome of NRD in a tertiary health care centre of Cameroon. Methods We analyzed the hospital files of all newborns admitted to the Neonatal unit of Douala General Hospital from 1st January 2011 to 28th February 2013. NRD was diagnosed based on the presence of one or more of the following signs: an abnormal respiratory rate, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring, chest wall recessions and thoraco-abdominal asynchrony with or without cyanosis, in their files. Socio-demographic and clinical variables of newborns and their mothers were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of NRD was 47.5% out of the 703 newborns studied. Acute fetal distress, elective caesarean delivery, APGAR score < 7 at the 1st minute, prematurity, male gender and macrosomia were independent predictors of NRD. The main etiologies were neonatal infections (31%) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (25%). Its neonatal mortality rate was 24.5%, mainly associated with neonatal sepsis and hyaline membrane disease. Conclusion NRD is a frequent emergency and causes high morbidity and mortality. Most of its risk factors and etiologies are preventable. Adequate follow-up of pregnancy and labor for timely intervention may improve the neonatal outcomes. PMID:27642489

  15. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  16. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  17. Pre-eclampsia renamed and reframed: Intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sawchuck, Diane J; Wittmann, Bernd K

    2014-11-01

    This hypothesis proposes pre-eclampsia is caused by intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy. Sustained or increasing intra-abdominal pressure ⩾12mmHg causes impaired venous return to the heart, systemic vascular resistance, ischemia reperfusion injury, intestinal permeability, translocation of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin to the liver, cytotoxic immune response, systemic inflammatory response, pressure transmission to thoracic and intra-cranial compartments, and multi-organ dysfunction. This hypothesis is predicated on Pascal's law, evidence founded in the intra-abdominal hypertension literature, and the adapted equation ΔIAP-P=ΔIAVF/Cab, where ΔIAP-P=change in intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy, ΔIAVF=change in intra-abdominal vector force (volume and force direction) and Cab=abdominal compliance. Factors causing increased intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy include: progressive uterine expansion, obstetrical factors that increase intra-uterine volume excessively or acutely, maternal anthropometric measurements that affect intra-abdominal pressure thresholds, maternal postures that increase abdominal force direction, abdominal compliance that is decreased, diminished with advancing gestation, or has reached maximum expansion, habitation at high altitude, and rapid drops in barometric pressure. We postulate that the threshold for lipopolysaccharide translocation depends on the magnitude of intra-abdominal pressure, the intestinal microbiome complex, and the degree of intestinal permeability. We advance that delivery cures pre-eclampsia through the mechanism of abdominal decompression.

  18. Pre-eclampsia renamed and reframed: Intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sawchuck, Diane J; Wittmann, Bernd K

    2014-11-01

    This hypothesis proposes pre-eclampsia is caused by intra-abdominal hypertension in pregnancy. Sustained or increasing intra-abdominal pressure ⩾12mmHg causes impaired venous return to the heart, systemic vascular resistance, ischemia reperfusion injury, intestinal permeability, translocation of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin to the liver, cytotoxic immune response, systemic inflammatory response, pressure transmission to thoracic and intra-cranial compartments, and multi-organ dysfunction. This hypothesis is predicated on Pascal's law, evidence founded in the intra-abdominal hypertension literature, and the adapted equation ΔIAP-P=ΔIAVF/Cab, where ΔIAP-P=change in intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy, ΔIAVF=change in intra-abdominal vector force (volume and force direction) and Cab=abdominal compliance. Factors causing increased intra-abdominal pressure in pregnancy include: progressive uterine expansion, obstetrical factors that increase intra-uterine volume excessively or acutely, maternal anthropometric measurements that affect intra-abdominal pressure thresholds, maternal postures that increase abdominal force direction, abdominal compliance that is decreased, diminished with advancing gestation, or has reached maximum expansion, habitation at high altitude, and rapid drops in barometric pressure. We postulate that the threshold for lipopolysaccharide translocation depends on the magnitude of intra-abdominal pressure, the intestinal microbiome complex, and the degree of intestinal permeability. We advance that delivery cures pre-eclampsia through the mechanism of abdominal decompression. PMID:25189485

  19. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  20. Stress and distress.

    PubMed

    Selye, H

    1975-12-01

    I must ask the reader's indulgence for this article's concern with applications of the stress concept, which are distinct from, although related to clinical medicine. It has not been my object to deal with the way physicians have been aided by stress research in the practice of medicine--that information is already widely available. Rather, I have attempted to sketch briefly the history of the stress theory and to demonstrate how this information can help anyone, physician or layman, lead a more complete and satisfying life. The applications of the stress theory have been dealt with at length elsewhere. I believe that we can find within scientifically verified observations the basis of a code of behavior suited to our century. The great laws of nature that regulate the defenses of living beings against stress of any kind are essentially the same at all levels of life, from individual cells to entire complex human organisms and societies. It helps a great deal to understand the fundamental advantages and disadvantages of catatoxic and syntoxic attitudes by studying the biologic basis of self-preservation as reflected in syntoxic and catatoxic chemical mechanisms. When applied to everyday problems, this understanding should lead to choices most likely to provide us the pleasant eustress (from the Greek eu meaning good, as in euphoria) involved in achieving fulfillment and victory, thereby avoiding the self-destructive distress of frustration and failure. So the translation of the laws governing resistance of cells and organs to a code of behavior comes down to three basic precepts: 1. Find your own natural stress level. People differ with regard to the amount and kind of work they consider worth doing to meet the exigencies of daily life and to assure their future security and happiness. In this respect, all of us are influenced by hereditary predispositions and the expectations of our society. Only through planned self-analysis can we establish what we really want

  1. Abdominal lymphangioma in children: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Muramori, Katsumi; Zaizen, Yoshio; Noguchi, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Most cases of abdominal lymphangioma are asymptomatic. However, patients may occasionally present with acute abdomen because of an intestinal obstruction or peritonitis caused by infected cysts, hemorrhaging, and/or torsion. These conditions may differ based on the location of the lymphangioma and do not always require emergency surgery. This report presents two cases of abdominal lymphangioma derived from the omentum, which required emergency surgery because of severe abdominal distension and peritonitis caused by torsion, respectively. In contrast, another case of retroperitoneal lymphangioma presented with acute abdomen and underwent elective surgery after conservative therapy for peritonitis. Elective surgery is acceptable if the symptoms are controllable under conservative therapy. However, it is important not to overlook the possible lethal complications such as intestinal and/or urological obstruction, aggressive peritonitis, and torsion of the cyst, which require emergency surgery.

  2. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    PubMed

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. PMID:26308751

  3. 46 CFR 169.553 - Pyrotechnic distress signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... signals: (1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or, (2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals. (d) (e) All pyrotechnic distress...

  4. 46 CFR 169.553 - Pyrotechnic distress signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... signals: (1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or, (2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals. (d) (e) All pyrotechnic distress...

  5. 46 CFR 169.553 - Pyrotechnic distress signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... signals: (1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or, (2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals. (d) (e) All pyrotechnic distress...

  6. 46 CFR 169.553 - Pyrotechnic distress signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... signals: (1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or, (2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals. (d) (e) All pyrotechnic distress...

  7. 46 CFR 169.553 - Pyrotechnic distress signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... signals: (1) 6 hand red flare distress signals, and 6 hand orange smoke distress signals; or, (2) 12 hand held rocket propelled parachute red flare distress signals. (d) (e) All pyrotechnic distress...

  8. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  9. Back Pain and Emotional Distress

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as analgesic medications, manual therapy and/or physical therapy for symptomatic relief. Questions You Need to Ask In order to minimize emotional distress, it is important to ask your health care provider ques- tions about your back pain so you do not leave the office uncertain ...

  10. Perfectionism, Procrastination, and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Richardson, Clarissa M. E.; Clark, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Using a cross-panel design and data from 2 successive cohorts of college students ( N = 357), we examined the stability of maladaptive perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress across 3 time points within a college semester. Each construct was substantially stable over time, with procrastination being especially stable. We also…

  11. Mindfulness and bodily distress.

    PubMed

    Fjorback, Lone Overby

    2012-11-01

    We have created a mindfulness approach to treat patients who experience multiple, persistent, and disabling physical symptoms that cannot be explained by a well-defined medical or surgical condition. Randomized controlled trials in this area are few, and research is hampered by the lack of clear definitions. Bodily distress syndrome (BDS) or bodily stress is an empirically defined definition unifying various conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and somatization disorder. In the present PhD, we explored whether patients suffering from BDS may be committed to mental training in the form of mindfulness therapy, which is a mindfulness program specifically targeted patients suffering from BDS. The theoretical model for including mindfulness training in the treatment of BDS is based on identified neurobiological impairments in these patients and the neurobiological improvements that mindfulness training may offer. BDS is a major public health issue possibly associated with the pathology of the immuno-endocrine and autonomic nervous system. BDS patients are often stigmatized, and effective treatment is rarely delivered, which leaves these patients isolated, left by themselves, vulnerable to potentially harming medical and/or alternative treatments. Accordingly, there is a need for non-harming practical tools that patients can learn to master so that they can improve the ability to take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group program that employs mindfulness practice to alleviate suffering associated with physical, psychosomatic, and psychiatric disorders. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is designed to prevent depressive relapse. Paper I and II present systematic literature reviews only of randomized controlled trials on MBSR and MBCT. The effect of MBSR has been explored on fibromyalgia in three studies, none of them showed convincing results, but gave some indications as to

  12. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  13. 47 CFR 2.402 - Control of distress traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control of distress traffic. 2.402 Section 2... distress traffic. The control of distress traffic is the responsibility of the mobile station in distress... distress call. These stations may, however, delegate the control of the distress traffic to another station....

  14. 47 CFR 2.402 - Control of distress traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of distress traffic. 2.402 Section 2... distress traffic. The control of distress traffic is the responsibility of the mobile station in distress... distress call. These stations may, however, delegate the control of the distress traffic to another station....

  15. [Cytokine spectrum of blood serum during inflammatory processes in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Lapovets', N Ie

    2010-01-01

    The levels of cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-10) in patients with phlegmonous appendicitis and abdominal tuberculoses were studied. It is established that the level of cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha considerably increases in patients with acute inflammatory process (phlegmonous appendicitis) and the level of interleukines IL-2, IL-10 considerably increases in patients with chronic inflammatory process (abdominal tuberculoses). Such parity of the cytokines levels can serve as a marker for differential diagnostics of acute and chronic inflammatory processes in abdominal cavity.

  16. Evaluation of the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a measure of distress in rats.

    PubMed

    Swan, Melissa P; Hickman, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    The ability to evaluate distress in laboratory animals is needed in order to ensure that husbandry and experimental procedures do not negatively impact animal welfare. Accurate measurement of acute stress and chronic stress, and distinguishing between stress that is harmful (distress) and stress that does no harm (eustress), can be challenging. Whereas corticosterone concentrations are commonly used to measure stress in laboratory animals, the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio has been proposed as a potentially better indicator of chronic stress. Furthermore, an association between such measures of stress and concurrent behavioral indicators of negative welfare is required to determine their accuracy in evaluating distress. The authors compared serum corticosterone concentrations and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios to assess acute or chronic stress in male Sprague Dawley rats. Elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, but not neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios, were associated with acute stress exposure, whereas elevated neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios, but not serum corticosterone concentrations, were associated with chronic stress exposure. Because the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio differences corresponded with a behavioral indicator of distress in chronically stressed rats, it may serve as a valuable tool for the physiological assessment of distress in rats.

  17. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm: an uncommon presentation].

    PubMed

    Taborda, Lúcia; Pereira, Laurinda; Amona, Eurides; Pinto, Erique Guedes; Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Most abdominal aortic aneurysms are asymptomatic, being accidentally found on physical examination or in routinely performed imaging studies. They only require surveillance (which is variable according to the aneurism size) and medical therapy in order to achieve risk factor reduction. However, in certain situations, according to the risk of aneurism rupture, elective surgery or endovascular procedure may be necessary. About 80% of the cases of aneurism rupture occur into the retroperitoneal space, with a high mortality rate. There are uncommon presentations of aneurism rupture as the aorto-caval fistula, which also require fast diagnosis and intervention. The authors present the case of a 71-year-old man, with the previous diagnosis of hypertension, acute myocardial infarction 2 months earlier (undergone primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) and tabagism, who was admitted at the emergency department with intense 24-hour-evolution epigastric pain. On physical examination, the Blood Pressure values measured at the lower limbs were about half the ones measured at the upper limbs and there was an abdominal pulsatile mass, with a high-intensity murmur. As the authors suspected aortic dissection, aneurysm, coarctation or thrombosis, it was done a Computed Tomography scanning with intravenous contrast, which revealed a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm with a mural thrombus. The doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a high debit aorto-caval fistula. The patient was immediately transferred to the Vascular Surgery. However he died 2 hours later, during surgery. PMID:22525642

  18. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration.

  19. High or conventional positive end-expiratory pressure in adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alersi, R; Navarro-Ramírez, C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome may require high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels, though the optimum level remains to be established. Several clinical trials have compared high PEEP levels versus conventional PEEP. Overall, although high PEEP levels improve oxygenation and are safe, they do not result in a significant reduction of the mortality rates. Nevertheless, some metaanalyses have revealed 2 situations in which high PEEP may decrease mortality: When used in severe distress and when PEEP is set following the characteristics of lung mechanics. Five studies have explored this latter scenario. Unfortunately, all of them have small sample sizes and have used different means to determine optimum PEEP. It is therefore necessary to conduct studies of sufficient sample size to compare the treatment of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, using a protective ventilation strategy with high PEEP guided by the characteristics of lung mechanics and ventilation with the protocol proposed by the ARDS Network.

  20. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  1. Distressing near-death experiences.

    PubMed

    Greyson, B; Bush, N E

    1992-02-01

    Most reported near-death experiences include profound feelings of peace, joy, and cosmic unity. Less familiar are the reports following close brushes with death of experiences that are partially or entirely unpleasant, frightening, or frankly hellish. While little is known about the antecedents or aftereffects of these distressing experiences, there appear to be three distinct types, involving (1) phenomenology similar to peaceful near-death experiences but interpreted as unpleasant, (2) a sense of nonexistence or eternal void, or (3) graphic hellish landscapes and entities. While the first type may eventually convert to a typical peaceful experience, the relationship of all three types to prototypical near-death experiences merits further study. The effect of the distressing experience in the lives of individuals deserves exploration, as the psychological impact may be profound and long-lasting.

  2. Nasal diseases and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deping; Luo, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    A high rate of ENT doctors were murdered by nasal disordered patients in China recently. It is obviously important and urgent to find out whether there is any potential relationship between nasal diseases (ND) and psychological distress that might contribute to violent behavior. For this purpose, we carried out this literature review. There is a complex relationship between ND and psychiatric distress, which is mainly considered as a bidirectional causal relationship with other controversy opinions. However, most of the previous studies were found to be focused on allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis, while reports about other ND were rare. Further study is still needed to uncover the secret aspects in this field, and more attentions need to be paid to other ND. PMID:26095351

  3. Acute intestinal anisakiasis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H N; Avcu, S; Pauwels, W; Mortelé, K J; De Backer, A I

    2012-09-01

    Small bowel anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease that results from consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis in a 63-year-old woman presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints one day after ingestion of raw wild-caught herring from the Northsea. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated thickening of the distal small bowel wall, mucosa with hyperenhancement, mural stratification, fluid accumulation within dilated small-bowel loops and hyperemia of mesenteric vessels. In patients with a recent history of eating raw marine fish presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints and CT features of acute small bowel inflammation the possibility of anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes.

  4. Abdominal pain and hyperamylasaemia--not always pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Slack, Sally; Abbey, Ianthe; Smith, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    A raised serum amylase concentration, at least four times the upper limit of normal (ULN), is used to support the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in a patient presenting with abdominal pain. The authors report a case of toxic shock syndrome complicated by a raised serum amylase concentration that peaked at 50 times the ULN in a patient with recurrent abdominal pain. The commonest cause of hyperamylasaemia is pancreatic; however, further investigation of serum lipase and amylase isoenzyme studies found this to be of salivary origin and attributable to soft tissue inflammation of the salivary gland. This case highlights the need to consider non-pancreatic causes of hyperamylasaemia. PMID:22767564

  5. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  6. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  7. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  8. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  9. [The abdominal drop flap].

    PubMed

    Bodin, F; Liverneaux, P; Seigle-Murandi, F; Facca, S; Bruant-Rodier, C; Dissaux, C; Chaput, B

    2015-08-01

    The skin between the mastectomy scar and the future infra-mammary fold may be managed in different ways in delayed breast reconstruction using a DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator). Conserving this skin and positioning the flap skin paddle in the middle of the breast usually highlights skin color disparity because of two visible transition zones. Resection of the entire skin under the scar may be more aesthetic but limits direct closure possibility in case of flap failure. In order to benefit from both aesthetic result and safe surgical method, we propose the abdominal drop flap. The inferior thoracic skin flap is detached from the thoracic wall beyond the future infra-mammary fold, preserved and pushed under the breast.

  10. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haijiang; Yan, Yong; Li, Chunsheng; Guo, Shubin

    2016-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA).

  11. A rare case of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Michas, G; Nikolopoulou, A; Varytimiadi, E; Xydia, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a heterogeneous condition that encompasses acute immune-mediated polyneuropathies. GBS is the most frequent cause of acute neuromuscular paralysis worldwide and constitutes one of the most serious emergencies in neurology. Description of case: As it presents extremely rarely with the first symptom being abdominal pain, herein we report the case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain and diagnosed with GBS. The patient required mechanical ventilation for two weeks and was discharged one month later, after having had a tracheostomy and developed tetraplegia. Conclusion: GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain when other medical or surgical causes have been excluded. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 374-375.

  12. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  13. [The role of laparoscopy in emergency abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Balén, E; Herrera, J; Miranda, C; Tarifa, A; Zazpe, C; Lera, J M

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal emergencies can also be operated on through the laparoscopic approach: the approach can be diagnostic laparoscopy, surgery assisted by laparoscopy or laparotomy directed according to the findings of the laparoscopy. The general contraindications refer above all to the state of haemodynamic instability of the patient and to seriously ill patients (ASA IV). In the absence of any specific counter-indications for the specific laparoscopic procedure to be carried out, many abdominal diseases requiring emergency surgery can be performed with the laparoscopic approach. The most frequent indications are appendicitis, acute colecistitis, gastroduodenal perforation, occlusion of the small intestine, and some abdominal traumas. With a correct selection of patients and the appropriate experience of the surgeon, the results are excellent and better than open surgery (less infection of the wound, complications, hospital stay and postoperative pain). A detailed explanation is given of the basic aspects of the surgical technique in the most frequent procedures of emergency laparoscopy.

  14. Abdominal cystic lymphangiomas in children: presurgical evaluation with imaging.

    PubMed

    Chateil, J-F; Brun, M; Vergnes, P; Andrieu de Lewis, P; Pérel, Y; Diard, F

    2002-02-01

    Cystic lymphangiomas are benign vascular tumors which are most often seen in young children. They are considered to be congenital malformations stemming from sequestration of lymphatic tissue. The authors report 15 cases of abdominal location and detail the findings of imaging in the etiologic and topographic diagnosis of these lesions. The initial incidents were essentially the discovery of a palpable abdominal mass, and more rarely, an acute gastrointestinal complication. There was also one case of prenatal diagnosis. Plain films provide only indirect signs related to the displacement of neighboring organs. Ultrasonography permits the etiologic diagnosis by showing an often voluminous, septated cyst. The intra- or retroperitoneal location of the lesion is sometimes difficult to determine by sonography, in which case CT scanning is usually adequate. For abdominal locations, percutaneous sclerosis is not available, and surgical removal is the only treatment for this disorder. The topography of the lesion and the involvement of retroperitoneal structures is important to determine.

  15. Using the SRQ-20 factor structure to examine changes in mental distress following typhoon exposure.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Kelcey J; Aggen, Steven H; Richardson, Lisa K; Berenz, Erin C; Tran, Trinh Luong; Trung, Lam Tu; Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran Duc; Amstadter, Ananda B

    2014-06-01

    Empirical research is limited regarding postdisaster assessment of distress in developing nations. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure of the 20-item Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) before and after an acute trauma, Typhoon Xangsane, in order to examine changes in mental health symptoms in an epidemiologic sample of Vietnamese adults. The study examined a model estimating individual item factor loadings, thresholds, and a latent change factor for the SRQ-20's single "general distress" common factor. The covariates of sex, age, and severity of typhoon exposure were used to evaluate the disaster-induced changes in SRQ-20 scores while accounting for possible differences in the relationship between individual measurement scale items and the latent mental health construct. Evidence for measurement noninvariance was found. However, allowing sex and age effects on the pre-typhoon and post-typhoon factors accounted for much of the noninvariance in the SRQ-20 measurement structure. A test of no latent change failed, indicating that the SRQ-20 detected significant individual differences in distress between pre- and post-typhoon assessment. Conditioning on age and sex, several typhoon exposure variables differentially predicted levels of distress change, including evacuation, personal injury, and peri-event fear. On average, females and older individuals reported higher levels of distress than males and younger individuals, respectively. The SRQ-20 is a valid and reasonably stable instrument that may be used in postdisaster contexts to assess emotional distress and individual changes in mental health symptoms.

  16. Distress Screening in a Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Clinic: Prevalence and Predictors of Clinically-Significant Distress

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Kristi D.; Arnold, Susanne M.; Love, Celia L.; Kirsh, Kenneth L.; Moore, Pamela G.; Passik, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Screening for distress in cancer patients is recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and a Distress Thermometer has previously been developed and empirically-validated for this purpose. The present study sought to determine the rates and predictors of distress in a sample of patients being seen in a multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic. Consecutive patients (N = 333) were recruited from an outpatient multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic to complete the Distress Thermometer, an associated Problem Symptom List, and two questions about interest in receiving help for symptoms. Over half (61.6%) of patients reported distress at a clinically significant level, and 22.5% of patients indicated interest in receiving help with their distress and/or symptoms. Problems in the areas of family relationships, emotional functioning, lack of information about diagnosis/treatment, physical functioning, and cognitive functioning were associated with higher reports of distress. Specific symptoms of depression, anxiety, pain and fatigue were most predictive of distress. Younger age was also associated with higher levels of distress. Distress was not associated with other clinical variables, including stage of illness or medical treatment approach. Similar results were obtained when individuals who had not yet received a definitive diagnosis of lung cancer (n = 134) were excluded from analyses; however, family problems and anxiety were no longer predictive of distress. Screening for distress in a multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic is feasible and a significant number of patients can be expected to meet clinical criteria for distress. Results also highlight younger age and specific physical and psychosocial symptoms as predictive of clinically-significant distress. Identification of the presence and predictors of distress are the first steps toward appropriate referral and treatment of symptoms and problems that contribute to cancer patients’ distress. PMID

  17. 47 CFR 80.325 - Control of distress traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control of distress traffic. 80.325 Section 80... Safety Procedures § 80.325 Control of distress traffic. (a) Distress traffic consists of all messages relating to the immediate assistance required by the mobile station in distress. In distress traffic,...

  18. 47 CFR 80.325 - Control of distress traffic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of distress traffic. 80.325 Section 80... Safety Procedures § 80.325 Control of distress traffic. (a) Distress traffic consists of all messages relating to the immediate assistance required by the mobile station in distress. In distress traffic,...

  19. Idiopathic abdominal cocoon syndrome with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia in a young case of small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Xiang; Yang, Hai-Rui; Yu, Peng-Fei; Sheng, Hai-Bo; Gu, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome (ACS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction due to total or partial encapsulation of the small intestine by a fibrocollagenous membrane. Idiopathic ACS with abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia is even rarer clinically. We successfully treated a 26-year-old male case of small bowel obstruction with acute peritonitis. He was finally diagnosed with idiopathic ACS with unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism and greater omentum hypoplasia during exploratory laparotomy. He then underwent enterolysis, cryptorchidectomy, and appendectomy. He recovered gradually from the operations and early postoperative inflammatory ileus. There has been no recurrence of intestinal obstruction since the operation, and he is still in follow-up. We analyzed his clinical data and retrospectively reviewed the literature, and our findings may be helpful for the clinical diagnosis and treatment on ACS. PMID:27239122

  20. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  1. 47 CFR 80.1115 - Transmission of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress. (a) A station in the mobile or mobile-satellite service which learns that a mobile unit is in distress must initiate and transmit a distress alert relay in any of the following cases: (1) When the mobile unit in distress is not itself in a position...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1115 - Transmission of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of a distress alert by a station not itself in distress. (a) A station in the mobile or mobile-satellite service which learns that a mobile unit is in distress must initiate and transmit a distress alert relay in any of the following cases: (1) When the mobile unit in distress is not itself in a position...

  3. Renal failure and abdominal hypertension after liver transplantation: determination of critical intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Gianni; Bindi, Lucia; Romanelli, Anna Maria; Bisà, Massimo; Boldrini, Antonella; Consani, Giovanni; Danella, Augusta; Urbani, Lucio; Filipponi, Franco; Mosca, Franco

    2002-12-01

    There is growing interest in measuring intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in postsurgical and critically ill patients because increased pressure can impair various organs and functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different IAP levels on the postoperative renal function of subjects undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. IAP was measured every 8 hours with the urinary bladder pressure method for at least 72 hours after surgery. At the end of the study, the patients were classified on the basis of their IAP values: < or = 18 mm Hg (group A), 19 to 24 mm Hg (group B), > or = 25 mm Hg (group C). The three groups were compared in terms of the incidence of acute renal failure (defined as blood creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL or an increase in the same of > 1.1 mg/dL within 72 hours of surgery), hourly diuresis, blood creatinine, the filtration gradient, hemodynamic variations, and outcome. The incidence of renal failure was higher among the subjects in group C (P < .05 versus group A and < .01 versus group B), who also had higher creatinine levels (P < .01), a greater need for diuretics (P < .01) and a worse outcome (P < .05). Receiver Operator Characteristic curve analysis showed that an abdominal pressure of 25 mm Hg had the best sensitivity/specificity ratio for renal failure. An intra-abdominal pressure of > or = 25 mm Hg is an important risk factor for renal failure in subjects undergoing liver transplant.

  4. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  5. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  6. [A case of octreotide acetate-induced acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kaori; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Eguchi, Ryoji; Nakamura, Hayato; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Otsuki, Makoto

    2007-11-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in July 2000 because of epigastralgia and back pain with past history of repeated upper abdominal pain due to acute pancreatitis since 1995. Abdominal computed tomography on admission showed a swelling in the pancreas head and several large pancreatic pseudocysts. He was diagnosed as acute pancreatitis based on abdominal pain, elevated pancreatic enzymes and computed tomography finding, and given 50 microg octreotide subcutaneously for the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts. Within 3 hours after octreotide injection, he complained of upper abdominal pain and had an elevated serum amylase level. Abdominal pain disappeared after cessation of octreotide injection and the patient was discharged free from abdominal pain. Octreotide might cause acute pancreatitis by inducing spasm of the sphincter of Oddi. Careful check-up of the patients might be needed during treatment with octreotide.

  7. Adult Children of Alcoholics and Psychological Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashubeck, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation of relationship between parental alcoholism and psychological distress and mediating effects of social support and hardiness among undergraduates. Suggests parental alcoholism is positively related to psychological distress and higher levels of social support and hardiness are associated with lower levels of psychological…

  8. Work and Family Roles and Psychological Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voydnaoff, Patricia; Donnelly, Brenda W.

    1989-01-01

    Assessed through analysis of telephone interviews (N=630) extent to which women's higher levels of psychological distress can be explained by work and family role configurations, satisfactions, and strains. Found that, although a relationship existed between work and family roles and psychological distress, factoring in these variables did not…

  9. Toward a Behavioral Profile of Marital Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Neil S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The reinforcers that are most potent in affecting the day-to-day satisfaction levels of married couples differ according to the level of distress. Marital distress is characterized by a tendency to react strongly to the delivery of punishers and to respond in kind. (Author)

  10. 47 CFR 80.314 - Distress communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress communications. 80.314 Section 80.314 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Distress, Alarm, Urgency and Safety...

  11. 47 CFR 80.314 - Distress communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distress communications. 80.314 Section 80.314 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Distress, Alarm, Urgency and Safety...

  12. 47 CFR 80.314 - Distress communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distress communications. 80.314 Section 80.314 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Distress, Alarm, Urgency and Safety...

  13. 47 CFR 80.314 - Distress communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distress communications. 80.314 Section 80.314 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Distress, Alarm, Urgency and Safety...

  14. 47 CFR 80.314 - Distress communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Distress communications. 80.314 Section 80.314 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures Distress, Alarm, Urgency and Safety...

  15. Attributional Models of Depression and Marital Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horneffer, Karen J.; Fincham, Frank D.

    1996-01-01

    Compares attributional models presented in depression and marital literatures by examining simultaneously their prediction of depressive symptoms and marital distress with 150 married couples. Findings show that a model including paths from depressogenic and distress-maintaining marital attributions to both depressive symptoms and marital distress…

  16. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be sent... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... authority of the person responsible for the ship, aircraft or other vehicle carrying the mobile station...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be sent... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... authority of the person responsible for the ship, aircraft or other vehicle carrying the mobile station...

  18. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be sent... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... authority of the person responsible for the ship, aircraft or other vehicle carrying the mobile station...

  19. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be sent... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... authority of the person responsible for the ship, aircraft or other vehicle carrying the mobile station...

  20. 47 CFR 80.1111 - Distress alerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... distress message format, which is relayed through space stations. (b) The distress alert must be sent... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE... authority of the person responsible for the ship, aircraft or other vehicle carrying the mobile station...

  1. [Emergency ultrasound in patients with abdominal pain - where should we "look"].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tanja; Heinz, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is without doubt the imaging technique of choice in patients with acute abdominal pain. Point-of-care ultrasound examinations can help to reduce the number of possible differential diagnoses by exclusion or - as a best case scenario - show us directly the correct diagnosis. Hence patients can benefit from a very early appropriate therapeutic approach. This article illustrates where and how we should "look". After focusing on basic technical settings, typical pathological sonomorphologic changes in patients with some of the most important illnesses are characterized (e. g. acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, acute diverticulitis, acute pancreatitis and urinary tract occlusion). Ultrasound beginners are the target group of this survey.

  2. Abdominal Drainage Following Appendectomy and Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Stone, H. Harlan; Hooper, C. Ann; Millikan, William J.

    1978-01-01

    Consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendectomy (283) or urgent cholecystectomy (51) were prospectively studied for the development of post-operative incisional or peritoneal sepsis. Severity of the original peritoneal infection was carefully recorded, while use of a Penrose dam to drain the peritoneum was randomized according to pre-assigned hospital number. Both aerobic and anaerobic cultures were taken from the abdomen at the time of operation as well as from all postoperative infectious foci. Results demonstrated no essential differences in incidence of wound and peritoneal infection following appendectomy for simple or suppurative appendicitis (187) or following cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis (51). However, with gangrenous or perforative appendicitis (94), incisional and intra-abdominal infection rates were 43% and 45%, respectively, when a drain was used; yet only 29 and 13%, respectively, without a drain. These latter differences were significant (p < 0.001). In addition, intra-abdominal abscesses were three times as likely to drain through the incision than along any tract provided by the rubber conduit. Cultures revealed that hospital pathogens accounted for a greater proportion of wound and peritoneal sepsis after cholecystectomy and appendectomy for simple or suppurative appendicitis if a drain had been inserted than if managed otherwise. By contrast, a mixed bacterial flora was responsible for most infections following appendectomy for gangrenous or perforated appendicitis, irrespective as to use of a drain. PMID:646499

  3. Moral distress: the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Debra R

    2004-01-01

    Moral distress, a complex human experience, has lacked a clear, complete definition. Intuitively, clinicians know that moral distress might be occurring for patients with increasing frequency due to technological advances that alter the natural order of life and death. Yet clinicians have not been able to evaluate the presence or extent of moral distress. To date, moral distress has been investigated mainly as an occupational issue using Jameton's (1984) definition, which has been problematic for several reasons. Without an adequate definition, moral distress can be unrecognized, yet have a silent, clinically significant impact on health. The literature is discussed from several perspectives to show the current state of the science in this topical area, and its potential future.

  4. Moral Distress: Recognition, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Infusion nursing is a unique hybrid of inpatient and ambulatory nursing. The subspecialty of nurses cares for patients requiring treatment over long periods, including cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and patients who require short bursts of treatment, such as those with multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Infusion nurses are exposed to many of the common root causes of moral distress in their practice, similar to nurses caring for terminally ill or critically ill patients. The specific aims of this article are to (1) define moral distress, moral residue, and the crescendo effect; (2) describe ethical stressors that can be confused with moral distress; (3) review the effects of moral distress on different health care providers; and (4) provide strategies to manage moral distress in the workplace using a case example.

  5. [ENDOVASCULAR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURISM REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Maĭstrenko, D N; Generalov, M I; Tarazov, P G; Zherebtsov, F K; Osovskikh, V V; Ivanov, A S; Oleshchuk, A N; Granov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed the single-center experience of treatment of 72 patients with abdominal aortic aneurisms and severe accompanied pathology. The aneurisms were repaired by stent-grafts. All the patients had abdominal aortic aneurisms with the diameters from 41 to 84 mm against the background of severe somatic pathology. It was a contraindication to planned open surgery. An installation of stent-graft was successful in all 72 follow-ups. It wasn't necessary to use a conversion to open surgery. The follow-up period consisted of 44,6?2,1 months. Control ultrasound and computer tomography studies hadn't revealed an increase of aneurism sack sizes or "eakages". A reduction of abdominal aortic aneurism sizes was noted in 37 patients on 4-5% during first year after operation. The stent-graft implantation extends the possibilities of abdominal aortic aneurism treatment for patients from a high surgical risk group. PMID:26234059

  6. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  7. [The characteristics of the abdominal symptoms in craniocerebral trauma sustained in a state of alcoholic intoxication].

    PubMed

    Pedachenko, Ie H; Udod, S V

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on 63 cases of syndrome of nonprimary acute abdomen (SNPAA) in craniocerebral injury (CCI) sustained in the state of alcoholic intoxication, and 59 observations connected with cranio-abdominal injuries (CAI). In the presence of cerebral injuries, one of the specific characteristics of alcohol was that it entailed changes in the abdominal symptomatology either concealing manifestations of severe damage to the abdominal organs or potentiating SNPAA. In all the observations the abdominal symptomatology was less pronounced that in those victims who do not take alcoholic drinks. There have been identified four variants of SNPAA course. In 12.7% of cases manifestations of the above syndrome were related to the CCI pattern only, being associated with origination of pseudodefense of "truncal" genesis. It is advisable that instrumental methods of study into abdominal organs should come to be more widely used in those settings where there is alcohol intoxication with suspected CAI.

  8. Postoperative fistula of the abdominal wall after laparascopic cholecystectomy due to lost gallstones.

    PubMed

    Weiler, H; Grandel, A

    2002-06-01

    Abdominal fistula caused by cholesterol gallstones, which remained in the abdominal wall after laparascopic cholecystectomy: a laparascopic cholecystectomy was performed in a 60-years-old man who was diagnosed as acute necrosing cholecystitis due to cholecystolithiasis. After removal of the gallbladder using an Endocath some gallstones remained in the excision channel of the abdominal wall. Therefore, a fistula developed in the excision channel postoperatively. As the wound healing was disturbed an investigation of the abdominal wall was performed by ultrasound. In the former excision channel several small, oval, formations with high echogenicity and faint ultrasound shadows were detected, corresponding to additional gallstones. After excision of granulation tissue and removal of the cholesterol stones, complete healing of the fistula in the abdominal wall was achieved. PMID:12044854

  9. A man with dilated superficial abdominal veins: A clinical presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Altaf, Sheikh Shoaib; Raina, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) varies tremendously depending upon the type of lymphoma and the areas of involvement. NHL can rarely present as an abdominal mass compressing the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation due to obstruction of inferior vena cava has often been called the inferior vena cava syndrome (IVCS). It can present acutely or chronically. Case Presentation: A 35-year-old male presented with 3 months history of fever, anorexia, weight loss and abdominal discomfort. His abdominal examination showed dilated superficial veins with blood flowing rostrally. CECT abdomen revealed multiple enlarged some necrotic, retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The inferior vena cava was noted to be compressed by the lymph nodes. The lymph node biopsy revealed non- Hodgkin lymphoma, precursor B cell. Conclusion: An abdominal mass compressing the inferior vena cava is a rare but possible cause for appearance of dilated superficial abdominal veins and should be looked for. PMID:27757210

  10. Abdominal ultrasonography, 2nd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume is a new and updated edition of an extensively illustrated text and reference on the capabilities and imaging of gray scale ultrasonography for each major abdominal organ. Each major organ system is treated separately, including liver, gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreas, kidney, retroperitoneum, abdominal vasculature, and more. There are over 500 illustrations and ten pages of full color plates for cross sectional anatomy.

  11. Insight, distress and coping styles in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Michael; Peters, Emmanuelle; Fannon, Dominic; Anilkumar, Anantha P.P.; Aasen, Ingrid; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2007-01-01

    Background The stigma and negative societal views attached to schizophrenia can make the diagnosis distressing. There is evidence that poor insight into symptoms of the disorder and need for treatment may reflect the use of denial as a coping style. However, the relationships between insight and other coping styles have seldom been investigated. Method We examined the associations between insight, distress and a number of coping styles in 65 outpatients with schizophrenia (final n = 57) in a cross-sectional study. Results We found that (i) awareness of symptoms and problems correlated with greater distress, (ii) ‘preference for positive reinterpretation and growth’ coping style correlated with lower distress and with lower symptom awareness (re-labelling), (iii) ‘preference for mental disengagement’ coping style correlated with greater distress and lower awareness of problems, and (iv) ‘social support-seeking’ coping style correlated with greater awareness of illness, but not distress. No relationship occurred between the use of ‘denial’ as a coping style and insight or distress. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that awareness of illness and related problems is associated with greater distress in schizophrenia. However, this investigation has not supported a simple psychological denial explanation for this relationship, as complex relationships emerged between different dimensions of insight and coping styles. The negative association between ‘positive reinterpretation and growth’ and distress suggests that adopting this style may lead to re-labelling symptoms in a less distressing way. Avoidant and isolating styles of coping both appear unhelpful. Psychological interventions should aim to promote more active coping such as discussing a mental health problem with others. PMID:17561377

  12. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  13. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  14. Financial distress during relocation for treatment of a hematological malignancy: Findings for social work.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2016-04-01

    The findings presented in this article are from qualitative research, funded by the Leukaemia Foundation of Queensland, which explored the financial impact of relocation for specialist treatment for hematology patients living in Queensland, Australia. The findings describe the factors that contribute to the lack of, or erosion of, a buffer to the financial distress created by diagnosis and relocation for treatment for a hematological malignancy. Individuals vulnerable to financial distress are those who lose or reduce employment, have restricted or no access to work cover or leave (sick, recreation or long service), have limited savings, and who have major repayments (e.g., home and car repayments). A combination of these factors can facilitate a spiral to acute and irreversible financial distress. The implications of the findings to social work are explored.

  15. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  16. Acute abdomen in adult Celiac disease: an intestinal intussusception case.

    PubMed

    Makay, Ozer; Kazimi, Mircelal; Doğanavşargil, Başak; Osmanoğlu, Necla; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that half of the cases admitted to hospital emergency services complain of abdominal pain and that nearly half of these cases are diagnosed with nonspecific abdominal pain. The population of patients with celiac sprue is rarely encountered at the emergency room. Although acute abdominal pain is rarely seen in adult celiac sprue, it should be added to the differential diagnosis. It should also be remembered that acute abdominal pain in these patients could be originating from perforation, intussusceptions and/or intestinal lymphoma. Herein we report a case of adult celiac sprue where successful surgical exploration was carried out because of entero-enteral intussusception. PMID:17602358

  17. Early psychotherapy process and cluster B and C personality pathology: similarities and differences in interactions with symptomatic and interpersonal distress.

    PubMed

    Kolden, Gregory G; Klein, Marjorie H; Strauman, Timothy J; Chisholm-Stockard, Sarah; Heerey, Erin; Schneider, Kristin L; Smith, Tracey L

    2005-07-01

    Abstract In a prior study (Kolden & Klein, 1996), the authors found that the relationships between global personality pathology and early psychotherapy change processes (as defined by the Generic Model of Psychotherapy) were moderated by the extent of the patient's acute symptomatic and interpersonal distress. In the current study, the authors reanalyzed the same data to examine similarities and differences between personality disorder Clusters B (dramatic, emotional, or erratic) and C (anxious or fearful) in therapy process. In general, we found that more distressed patients reported greater defensiveness. There were no significant interactions between symptomatic distress and personality pathology in the prediction of any of the process variables. However, interpersonal distress moderated relationships between Clusters B and C and some therapy processes. Patients high in Cluster B felt more open and involved in the session when they were less distressed by their interpersonal problems at the start of therapy. In contrast, openness and insight were impeded among patients high in Cluster C when they were less distressed interpersonally. Therapists generally used more direct interventions and exploration of past experiences when working with patients higher in Cluster C pathology. However, therapists used direct interventions more specifically when patients with more severe Cluster B pathology were also higher in interpersonal distress. The discussion considers implications for the facilitation of productive early therapy process in patients suffering from Cluster B or C personality pathology.

  18. A guest in the house: nursing instructors' experiences of the moral distress felt by students during inpatient psychiatric clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Significant research has been done on the impact of moral distress among nurses, particularly in acute and intensive care settings. However, little research to date has investigated the experiences that nursing students have with moral distress. Additionally, there is a dearth of research on the role of nursing instructors' perceptions of their responsibilities to their students when encountering morally distressing situations. This manuscript describes a qualitative study conducted with eight mental health nursing instructors who acknowledged a responsibility for helping students deal with moral distress and ethical issues, but who also struggled with ways to do so. Additionally, instructors expressed frustration with their "guest" status on inpatient psychiatric units and their powerlessness to effect moral change in a medical model of psychiatric care.

  19. Conservative management of abdominal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Okuş, Ahmet; Sevinç, Barış; Ay, Serden; Arslan, Kemal; Karahan, Ömer; Eryılmaz, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Non-operative management of abdominal injuries has recently become more common. Especially non-operative treatment of blunt abdominal trauma is gaining wide acceptance. In this study, the efficacy of non-operative treatment in abdominal trauma (blunt penetrating) is discussed. Material and Methods: All patients who received treatment due to abdominal trauma from November 2008 to January 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The demographic characteristics, type of injury, injured organ, type of treatment (operative vs. nonoperative) and mortality data were evaluated. Results: The study includes 115 patients treated for abdominal trauma in our department. The mechanism of trauma was stab wounds in 60%, blunt abdominal trauma in 23.5% and gunshot wounds in 16.5%. Forty-two patients (36.5%) were operated for hemodynamic instability and/or peritonitis on admission. The remaining 63.5% of patients (n=73) were treated nonoperatively, 10 of whom required laparotomy during follow-up. The remaining 63 patients were treated with non-operative management. The success rate for non-operative treatment was 86.3% and there was no difference in terms of the types of injuries. The mortality rate was 4.3% (n= 5) in the whole series, but there were no deaths among the patients who had received non-operative treatment. In the whole patient group 54.2% (n=63) were treated nonoperatively. Conclusion: Nonoperative treatment in abdominal trauma is safe and effective. Patients with clinical stability and normal physical examination findings can be treated nonoperatively with close monitoring. PMID:25931868

  20. The association of gynecological symptoms with psychological distress in women of reproductive age: a survey from gynecology clinics in Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Chaaya, M. M.; Bogner, H. R.; Gallo, J. J.; Leaf, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    To date there has been no previous research into a possible association between psychological distress and gynecologic symptoms in the Arab world. We hypothesized that psychological distress would be associated with specific gynecologic complaints as well as with psychosocial factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study of women attending gynecology clinics in Beirut, Lebanon. The study sample consisted of 355 women aged 18 to 49 years who were seeking healthcare from gynecologists affiliated with two general teaching hospitals in Beirut. Psychological distress was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Gynecologic complaints were assessed by asking women about presenting gynecologic symptoms. Women who visited the gynecologists for specific complaints, for post-surgical follow-up, or for insertion of coils or other services were more likely to be distressed than women who were attending for a general checkup (χ2= 9.466, p = 0.024). About 50% of women who reported abdominal pain or breast pain also reported significant psychological distress. Only bleeding and infertility were not significantly associated with psychological distress. It is concluded that a high proportion of women who attend gynecology clinics with specific complaints report psychological distress. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the psychological component of gynecological morbidity. PMID:14584304

  1. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in pancreatitis, paediatrics, and trauma.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J; Ejike, Janeth C; Leppäniemi, Ari; De Keulenaer, Bart L; De Laet, Inneke; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; Kimball, Edward; Ivatury, Rao; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is an important contributor to early organ dysfunction among patients with trauma and sepsis. However, the impact of increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) among pediatric, pregnant, non-septic medical patients, and those with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), obesity, and burns has been studied less extensively. The aim of this review is to outline the pathophysiologic implications and treatment options for IAH and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) for the above patient populations. We searched MEDLINE and PubMed to identify relevant studies. There is an increasing awareness of IAH in general medicine. The incidence of IAH and, to a lesser extent, ACS is high among patients with SAP. IAH should always be suspected and IAP measured routinely. In children, normal IAP in mechanically ventilated patients is approximately 7 ± 3 mm Hg. As an IAP of 10-15 mm Hg has been associated with organ damage in children, an IAP greater than 10 mm Hg should be considered IAH in these patients. Moreover, as ACS may occur in children at an IAP lower than 20 mm Hg, any elevation in IAP higher than 10 mm Hg associated with new organ dysfunction should be considered ACS in children until proven otherwise. Monitor IAP trends and be aware that specific interventions may need to be instituted at lower IAP than the current ACS definitions accommodate. Finally, IAH and ACS can occur both in abdominal trauma and extra-abdominal trauma patients. Early mechanical hemorrhage control and the avoidance of excessive fluid resuscitation are key elements in preventing IAH in trauma patients. IAH and ACS have been associated with many conditions beyond the general ICU patient. In adults and in children, the focus should be on the early recognition of IAH and the prevention of ACS. Patients at risk for IAH should be identified early during their treatment (with a low threshold to initiate IAP monitoring). Appropriate actions should be taken when IAP increases

  2. Acute arsenic toxicity--an opaque poison.

    PubMed

    Gray, J R; Khalil, A; Prior, J C

    1989-08-01

    We report a patient with fatal acute arsenic poisoning presenting as vomiting and diarrhea with the finding of intra-abdominal radiopacities on radiographs. These represent the classic features of acute arsenic toxicity and are detailed here as a reminder to others facing a similar puzzling patient with this potentially treatable poisoning.

  3. Acute arsenic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J P; Alvarez, J A

    1989-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute arsenic poisoning should be considered in any patient presenting with severe gastrointestinal complaints. Signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, colicky abdominal pain and profuse, watery diarrhea. Hypotension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances, mental status changes, electrocardiographic abnormalities, respiratory failure and death can result. Quantitative measurement of 24-hour urinary arsenic excretion is the only reliable laboratory test to confirm arsenic poisoning. Treatment includes gastric emesis or lavage, chelation therapy, electrolyte and fluid replacement, and cardiorespiratory support.

  4. Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child and Parent Distress during Venipuncture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated behavioral intervention to control child distress during invasive cancer treatment. Children (n=23) requiring physical restraint to complete venipuncture were alternately assigned to behavioral intervention or attention control condition. Observed child distress, parent-rated child distress, and parent ratings of own distress were…

  5. 47 CFR 80.1113 - Transmission of a distress alert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission of a distress alert. 80.1113... Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1113 Transmission of a distress alert. (a) The... stations that a ship is in distress. These alerts are based on the use of transmissions via...

  6. Predicting symptomatic distress in emergency services personnel.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D S; Marmar, C R; Metzler, T J; Ronfeldt, H M

    1995-06-01

    This study identified predictors of symptomatic distress in emergency services (EMS) personnel exposed to traumatic critical incidents. A replication was performed in 2 groups: 154 EMS workers involved in the 1989 Interstate 880 freeway collapse during the San Francisco Bay area earthquake, and 213 counterparts from the Bay area and from San Diego. Evaluated predictors included exposure, social support, and psychological traits. Replicated analyses showed that levels of symptomatic distress were positively related to the degree of exposure to the critical incident. Level of adjustment was also related to symptomatic distress. After exposure, adjustment, social support, years of experience on the job, and locus of control were controlled, 2 dissociative variables remained strongly predictive of symptomatic response. The study strengthens the literature linking dissociative tendencies and experiences to distress from exposure to traumatic stressors.

  7. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  8. Dietary and non-dietary correlates of gastrointestinal distress during the cycle and run of a triathlon.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick B

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether pre-race dietary and non-dietary factors were associated with gastrointestinal (GI) distress during the cycle and run of a 70.3-mile triathlon. Fifty three participants recorded dietary details the day before and morning of the triathlon and retrospectively reported GI symptoms from the cycle and run. Occurrence and severity of nausea, regurgitation and fullness were combined into an upper GI (UGI) category, while lower abdominal cramps, flatulence and urge to defecate were combined into a lower GI (LGI) category. Spearman's rho coefficients were used to examine whether UGI and LGI were associated with: (1) pre-race diet (kilocalories, carbohydrate, fibre, fat, protein, caffeine); and (2) non-dietary factors (age, body mass index, experience, weight change, GI distress history, finishing time). Of non-dietary factors, only a history of GI distress showed significant associations with GI symptoms during the triathlon (ρ = .32-.36; P < .05). Morning kilocalorie (ρ = .28, P = .04) and carbohydrate (ρ = .36, P < .01) intakes were modestly, positively associated with UGI during the cycle, while morning caffeine intake (ρ = .30, P = .03) showed a modest positive association with LGI during the run. The associations between diet and GI distress variables remained significant after adjusting for non-dietary factors. Competitors of 70.3-mile triathlons should carefully weigh the benefits of higher race-morning energy, carbohydrate and caffeine intakes against their potential to increase GI distress.

  9. Maternal smoking and respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curet, L B; Rao, A V; Zachman, R D; Morrison, J; Burkett, G; Poole, W K

    1983-10-15

    Infants of 603 patients on whom information about smoking habits during pregnancy was available were studied for incidence respiratory distress syndrome. Among the 360 patients who did not smoke, the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome in the neonate was 15.1%, whereas among patients who smoked, the incidence was 9.1%. We speculate that smoking produces a condition of chronic stress in the fetus which brings about an acceleration of fetal pulmonary maturation. PMID:6624813

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  11. Recurrent abdominal pain during childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint among children. A thorough history and physical examination and limited laboratory investigation should enable a physician to make a positive diagnosis of "functional" recurrent abdominal pain in 90% to 95% of cases; an organic cause is identified in only 5% to 10%. The care and thoroughness of the history and physical examination establish the physician's credibility; explaining the clinical basis for the diagnosis and educating the child and parents on what is known about the condition reassures the parents. PMID:8199511

  12. Abdominal Bloating: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, A Young; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  13. Radiological management of abdominal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Mac Erlean, D P; Gibney, R G

    1983-01-01

    Forty-two abdominal and retroperitoneal abscesses were drained percutaneously under ultrasound guidance. A success rate of 85.7% was achieved. Subsequent surgery was required in only 5 patients. Postoperative and spontaneous abscesses did equally well. Most intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal abscesses are amenable to this form of percutaneous drainage. The procedure requires only local anaesthesia and is well tolerated. Surgical management should probably now be reserved for those cases which are considered unsuitable for percutaneous drainage or which fail to resolve following this procedure. PMID:6842496

  14. Laparoscopic excision of intra-abdominal paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Young; Kang, Chang-Moo; Choi, Gi-Hong; Yang, Woo-Ick; Sim, Seo-Bo; Kwon, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Choi, Jin-Sub; Lee, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byong-Ro

    2007-12-01

    Lung fluke, Paragonimus westermani of Paragonimus species usually are accompanied by a persistent cough, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Extrapulmonary paragonimiasis caused by ectopic parasites in aberrant locations such as the abdominal wall, abdominal organs, and brain has been reported and the most commonly involved extrapulmonary organ is the brain. We present a case of 56-year-old male patient with intra-abdominal paragonimiasis who underwent laparoscopic excision of abdominal granuloma caused by parasite infection. An intra-abdominal mass associated with eosinophilia might be related to parasite infection. A laparoscopic approach is the most appropriate treatment modality in such benign abdominal pathology.

  15. Maternal hurricane exposure and fetal distress risk.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Peek, Lori; Weiler, Stephan

    2010-10-01

    Logistic regression and spatial analytic techniques are used to model fetal distress risk as a function of maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew. First, monthly time series compare the proportion of infants born distressed in hurricane affected and unaffected areas. Second, resident births are analyzed in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, before, during, and after Hurricane Andrew. Third, resident births are analyzed in all Florida locales with 100,000 or more persons, comparing exposed and unexposed gravid females. Fourth, resident births are analyzed along Hurricane Andrew's path from southern Florida to northeast Mississippi. Results show that fetal distress risk increases significantly with maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew in second and third trimesters, adjusting for known risk factors. Distress risk also correlates with the destructive path of Hurricane Andrew, with higher incidences of fetal distress found in areas of highest exposure intensity. Hurricane exposed African-American mothers were more likely to birth distressed infants. The policy implications of in utero costs of natural disaster exposure are discussed.

  16. A prophylactic fresh frozen plasma transfusion leads to a possible case of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debasree; Hussain, Rashid; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old man with cholangiocarcinoma presented with fever and abdominal pain. He was hypotensive, jaundiced and had right upper quadrant tenderness. Laboratory testing showed a leucocytosis, elevated liver function tests, total bilirubin and International Normalised Ratio (INR). Given the concern for cholangitis, the patient was given antibiotics and three units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) before biliary drain placement. After drain placement, and within 3 h of receiving blood products, the patient became tachypnoeic and hypoxic with a chest X-ray revealing new bilateral airspace disease. The rapid development of respiratory distress was determined to most likely be transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). He rapidly progressed to intubation and required 100% FiO2, high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and intermittent-prone ventilation for 48 h but eventually recovered and was extubated. TRALI is an under-recognised aetiology for respiratory distress in the critically ill. Adopting a conservative transfusion strategy may prevent TRALI.

  17. The effect of different types of abdominal binders on intra-abdominal pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua-Yu; Liu, Dong; Tang, Hao; Sun, Shi-Jin; Ai, Shan-Mu; Yang, Wen-Qun; Jiang, Dong-Po; Zhang, Lian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of non-elastic/elastic abdominal binders on intra-vesical pressure (IVP), physiological functions, and clinical outcomes in laparotomy patients at the perioperative stage. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from May to October 2014 at the Trauma Surgery Department, Daping Hospital, Chongqing, China. Laparotomy patients were randomly divided into non-elastic abdominal binder group (28 patients), and elastic abdominal binder group (29 patients). Binders were applied for 14 days following the operation, or until discharge. Demographic information, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores (prior to the operation, on the first day after operation, the day IVP measurement was stopped, and one day before discharge), and outcomes were recorded. The IVP was measured before the operation to postoperative day 7. Results: There were no significant differences in the demographic information, outcomes, SOFA or APACHE-II scores between the 2 groups. Initial out-of-bed mobilization occurred earlier in the elastic binder group (3.2 ± 2.0 versus 5.0 ± 3.7 days, p=0.028). A greater increase in IVP was observed in the non-elastic binder group than in the elastic binder group (2.9 ± 1.1 versus 1.1 ± 0.7 mm Hg, p=0.000). Conclusion: Elastic binders have relatively little effect on IVP and are more helpful at promoting postoperative recovery than non-elastic binders. Therefore, elastic binders are more suitable for clinical use. PMID:26739977

  18. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  19. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  20. A Pancreatic Solid Pseudo-Papillary Tumor Detected After Abdominal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Kazuko; Ideguchi, Hiroshi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Solid pseudo-papillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is a relatively benign tumor that is more frequently reported in females. Most patients usually present with abdominal pain or mass. We experienced the girl who identified SPT with the injury. We diagnosed SPT in a previously healthy 14-year-old Asian girl after abdominal injury. She experienced upper abdominal pain and vomiting after being hit by a basketball. Blood examination revealed a high serum amylase level. Abdominal radiography indicated abnormal bowel gases. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a smooth, peripheral and unilocular mass approximately 55 mm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. Based on these observations, acute pancreatitis complicated by a pancreatic mass was initially diagnosed. Therapy for acute pancreatitis was instituted, while we simultaneously investigated the mass. Levels of tumor markers were not profoundly elevated in serum. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed moderate and gradual increase in contrast-enhanced imaging, consistent with findings of SPT of the pancreas. We thus elected surgical resection for her. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed our diagnosis of SPT. SPT of the pancreas should be considered as a differential diagnosis of acute abdomen disorders, especially in instances after minor abdominal injuries in young women, and diagnoses must be confirmed with MRIs.

  1. Distress vs. Non-Distress Approach and the Personal Space of Masculine, Feminine, and Androgynous Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisson, Pamela A.; Thomas, Georgelle

    Examined was the relationship between personal space and sex roles. Feminine females (N=25), androgynous females (N=25) and masculine males (N=25) viewed a film of male and female approaching stimulus persons in distress and non-distress conditions. Subjects marked the Comfortable Interpersonal Distance Scale at the point where they would prefer…

  2. 47 CFR 80.324 - Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress. 80.324 Section 80.324 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...

  3. 47 CFR 80.324 - Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress. 80.324 Section 80.324 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...

  4. 47 CFR 80.324 - Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress. 80.324 Section 80.324 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...

  5. 47 CFR 80.324 - Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress. 80.324 Section 80.324 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...

  6. 47 CFR 80.324 - Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmission of distress message by station not itself in distress. 80.324 Section 80.324 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...

  7. Gender differences and the relationships of perceived background stress and psychological distress with cardiovascular responses to laboratory stressors.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael T; Bocek, Christine M; Burch, Ashley E

    2011-09-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of perceived background stress and self-reported psychological distress on cardiovascular reactivity during acute laboratory stressors. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was used as the measure of perceived background stress, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was used as the measure of psychological distress. A secondary aim was to examine whether background stress and psychological distress affected the susceptibility to induction of a negative mood using music. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured in 149 female and male college students at rest and during a stressful mental arithmetic (MA) task and a mood induction procedure. Higher scores on the GHQ were associated with lower systolic BP reactivity during the MA task by all participants. Higher scores on the PSS and GHQ were also associated with lower diastolic BP and HR reactivity, but only in females. Thus, higher self-reports of background stress and psychological distress tended to result in blunted reactivity to an acute laboratory challenge. Higher levels of background stress and psychological distress were not associated with greater susceptibility to a negative mood induction. This study adds to the growing literature indicating that potentially negative health outcomes may be associated with diminished cardiovascular reactivity under certain conditions.

  8. Gender differences and the relationships of perceived background stress and psychological distress with cardiovascular responses to laboratory stressors.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael T; Bocek, Christine M; Burch, Ashley E

    2011-09-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of perceived background stress and self-reported psychological distress on cardiovascular reactivity during acute laboratory stressors. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was used as the measure of perceived background stress, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was used as the measure of psychological distress. A secondary aim was to examine whether background stress and psychological distress affected the susceptibility to induction of a negative mood using music. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured in 149 female and male college students at rest and during a stressful mental arithmetic (MA) task and a mood induction procedure. Higher scores on the GHQ were associated with lower systolic BP reactivity during the MA task by all participants. Higher scores on the PSS and GHQ were also associated with lower diastolic BP and HR reactivity, but only in females. Thus, higher self-reports of background stress and psychological distress tended to result in blunted reactivity to an acute laboratory challenge. Higher levels of background stress and psychological distress were not associated with greater susceptibility to a negative mood induction. This study adds to the growing literature indicating that potentially negative health outcomes may be associated with diminished cardiovascular reactivity under certain conditions. PMID:21729723

  9. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  10. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. PMID:25239980

  11. An Effort to Develop an Algorithm to Target Abdominal CT Scans for Patients After Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Pernar, Luise I M; Lockridge, Ryan; McCormack, Colleen; Chen, Judy; Shikora, Scott A; Spector, David; Tavakkoli, Ali; Vernon, Ashley H; Robinson, Malcolm K

    2016-10-01

    Abdominal CT (abdCT) scans are frequently ordered for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain, but often do not reveal intra-abdominal pathology. We aimed to develop an algorithm for rational ordering of abdCTs. We retrospectively reviewed our institution's RYGB patients presenting acutely with abdominal pain, documenting clinical and laboratory data, and scan results. Associations of clinical parameters to abdCT results were examined for outcome predictors. Of 1643 RYGB patients who had surgery between 2005 and 2015, 355 underwent 387 abdCT scans. Based on abdCT, 48 (12 %) patients required surgery and 86 (22 %) another intervention. No clinical or laboratory parameter predicted imaging results. Imaging decisions for RYGB patients do not appear to be amenable to a simple algorithm, and patient work-up should be based on astute clinical judgment.

  12. An unusual case of retained abdominal pregnancy for 36 years in a postmenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Kajal Ramendranath; Ratnaparkhi, Chetana Ramesh; Gedam, Bapuji Shrawan; Tayade, Kushal Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy which occurs due to ruptured uterine or tubal pregnancy into the abdomen. Fetal loss is a common complication of these pregnancies and patient presents with acute abdominal pain which is a surgical emergency. Another rare but established complication of this ectopic pregnancy is fetal demise with the dead fetus being retained in the abdomen. It gets macerated and mummified over a period of time and is mostly detected incidentally during imaging. Radiological imaging has hallmark appearances of such a macerated fetus showing multiple fetal parts embedded in a calcified sac termed as lithopedion or stone baby. We report a unique case of retained abdominal pregnancy for 36 years in a 60-year-old postmenopausal female presented with abdominal pain and difficulty in micturition. Computed tomography showed multiple fetal bones in the abdomen surrounded by a membrane which was surprisingly not calcified. PMID:26539374

  13. A rare cause of abdominal lymphadenopathy--tularemia: report of two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Belgin; Tezer, Hasan; Kanık-Yüksek, Saliha; Kılıç, Selçuk; Senel, Emrah

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis occurs worldwide in the northern hemisphere, with great variation in geographic and temporal occurrence. It generally presents as an acute febrile disease with the major clinical presentations including the six classic forms of tularemia: ulceroglandular, glandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal, typhoidal, and pneumonic. In contrast to European countries, where the ulceroglandular form is more prominent, the oropharyngeal form is the most common presentation in Turkey. We present rare cases of oropharyngeal tularemia in a 16-year-old boy and nine-year-old girl. To the best of our knowledge, these are the firstly described abdominal lymphadenopathy cases from Turkey. The second case was admitted with erythema nodosum, and abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected during the investigation. Excisional lymph node biopsy revealed abdominal tularemia. It is necessary to consider tularemia in the differential diagnosis of abdominal lymphadenopathy in tularemia regions. We also conclude that oropharyngeal tularemia can cause lymphadenopathy in any part of the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Maternal and adolescent distress tolerance: the moderating role of gender.

    PubMed

    Daughters, Stacey B; Gorka, Stephanie M; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C

    2014-04-01

    Distress tolerance is defined behaviorally as the ability to maintain goal-directed behavior while experiencing physical or psychological distress. Distress tolerance is closely related to emotion regulation and is a clinically relevant construct contributing to psychopathology across adults and adolescents, yet limited research has examined the development of this construct. A number of studies suggest the importance of parenting in the emergence of emotion regulation capacities in childhood and adolescence. In the current study, we utilize a behavioral measure of distress tolerance to examine whether maternal distress tolerance is related to adolescent distress tolerance, and whether this association differs as a function of gender. We also examine the influence of family emotional climate, namely maternal response to adolescent distress and adolescent attachment. Results indicate a significant maternal distress tolerance by adolescent gender interaction, such that maternal distress tolerance predicts adolescent distress tolerance in daughters, but not sons. The family emotional climate variables were unrelated to maternal or adolescent distress tolerance. Taken together, data indicate that maternal distress tolerance is significantly related to the distress tolerance of adolescent daughters and indicates the potential utility of addressing maternal distress tolerance in clinical work with adolescents. PMID:24364854

  15. Prevention of post-rape psychopathology: preliminary findings of a controlled acute rape treatment study.

    PubMed

    Resnick, H; Acierno, R; Holmes, M; Kilpatrick, D G; Jager, N

    1999-01-01

    Violent sexual assault such as rape typically results in extremely high levels of acute distress. The intensity of these acute psychological reactions may play a role in later recovery, with higher levels of immediate distress associated with poorer outcome. Unfortunately, post-rape forensic evidence collection procedures may serve to increase, rather than reduce initial distress, potentially exacerbating future psychopathology. To address these concerns, an acute time-frame hospital-based video intervention was developed to: (a) minimize anxiety during forensic rape exams, and (b) prevent post-rape posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic, and anxiety. Preliminary data indicated that (1) psychological distress at the time of the exam was strongly related to PTSD symptomatology 6 weeks post-rape, and (2) the video intervention successfully reduced distress during forensic exams.

  16. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  17. Cancer distress screening. Needs, models, and methods.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Linda E; Bultz, Barry D

    2003-11-01

    The idea of screening for distress in oncology populations is not new. Many recommendations have been made regarding the need for routine screening, and methods have been suggested for accomplishing this. However, a synthesis of this body of research is not readily available. This paper summarizes the literature documenting the levels of distress commonly found in cancer patients, followed by discussion of recommended standards for routine distress screening, and a summary of various programs that have attempted to establish clinical screening programs. The computerized quality of life (QL) screening literature is also briefly reviewed as potentially instructive. This review is followed by a theoretical and psychometric assessment of the various screening instruments and screening models that have been suggested in the literature or used clinically and a brief assessment of possible economic costs of psychosocial screening, ending with concrete suggestions for methods and models that could be widely adopted by psychosocial oncology programs.

  18. Moral repugnance, moral distress, and organ sales.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James Stacey

    2015-06-01

    Many still oppose legalizing markets in human organs on the grounds that they are morally repugnant. I will argue in this paper that the repugnance felt by some persons towards sales of human organs is insufficient to justify their prohibition. Yet this rejection of the view that markets in human organs should be prohibited because some persons find them to be morally repugnant does not imply that persons' feelings of distress at the possibility of organ sales are irrational. Eduardo Rivera-Lopez argues that such instinctive distress is an appropriate response to the (rationally defensible) perception that certain kinds of arguments that are offered in favor of legalizing organ sales are "in an important sense, illegitimate." Having argued that repugnance should not ground the prohibition of markets in human organs, I will also argue that the moral distress that some feel towards certain arguments that favor such markets is not rationally defensible, either.

  19. Congenital lateral abdominal wall hernia.

    PubMed

    Montes-Tapia, Fernando; Cura-Esquivel, Idalia; Gutiérrez, Susana; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; de la O-Cavazos, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects that are located outside of the anterior wall are extremely rare and difficult to classify because there are no well accepted guidelines. There are two regions outside of the anterior wall: the flank or lateral wall; and the lumbar region. We report the case of a patient with an oval 3 cm-diameter hernia defect located above the anterior axillary line, which affects all layers of the muscular wall. An anorectal malformation consisting of a recto-vestibular fistula was also identified, and chest X-ray showed dextrocardia. The suggested treatment is repair of the defect before 1 year of age. Given that the anomalies described may accompany lateral abdominal wall hernia, it is important to diagnose and treat the associated defects.

  20. [Abdominal cystic tumor revealing lymphangioleiomyomatosis].

    PubMed

    Barbier, L; Ebbo, M; Andrac-Meyer, L; Schneilitz, N; Le Treut, Y-P; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Hardwigsen, J

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 39 year-old woman with many years of intermittent abdominal pain who was found to have cystic masses evocative of cystic lymphangioma involving the posterior mediastinal and retroperitoneum. Worsening abdominal pain led to a recommendation for laparoscopic unroofing and decompression of the cysts. During the postoperative period, hemorrhagic shock required reintervention with excision of the tumoral mass. Pathologic examination revealed lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). On the 15th postoperative day, the patient developed a chylopneumothorax which required prolonged chest tube drainage. The presence of multiple polycystic lesions in the pulmonary parenchyma supported the diagnosis of diffuse LAM with primary extrapulmonary presentation. This diagnosis should be considered preoperatively since it modifies the treatment: a complete excision of the cystic lesions seems to be necessary in order to prevent bleeding and lymphatic extravasation.

  1. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S

    2016-09-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  2. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology.

  3. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  4. Essential Thrombocytosis-Associated Thromboembolism in the Abdominal Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Mun, Dana; Kang, Chae Hoon; Park, Chong-bin; Cho, Won Chul

    2016-01-01

    Essential thrombocytosis (ET) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by an anomalous increase in platelet production. Many patients with ET are asymptomatic. Few studies have reported ET-associated thromboembolism in large vessels such as the aorta. We report a patient with ET who presented with peripheral embolism from an abdominal aortic thrombus and developed acute limb ischemia. The patient underwent aortic replacement successfully. The patient’s platelet count was controlled with hydroxyurea, and no recurrence was noted over 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27734003

  5. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. METHODS: This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74–94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85–99) specificity for PCD. CONCLUSIONS: When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). PMID:25422025

  6. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  7. Predictors of enduring clinical distress in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N N; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Aaronson, Neil K; van Abbema, Doris L; den Boer, Mathilda D; van Hezewijk, Marjan; Immink, Marcelle; Kaptein, Ad A; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E; Reyners, Anna K L; Russell, Nicola S; Schriek, Manon; Sijtsema, Sieta; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2016-08-01

    To date, little is known about enduring clinical distress as measured with the commonly used distress thermometer. We therefore used the distress thermometer to examine: (a) the prevalence of enduring clinical distress, distress-related problems, and subsequent wish for referral of women with breast cancer, and (b) sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial predictors of enduring clinical distress. The study had a multicenter, prospective, observational design. Patients with primary breast cancer completed a questionnaire at 6 and 15 months postdiagnosis. Medical data were retrieved from chart reviews. Enduring clinical distress was defined as heightened distress levels over time. The prevalence of enduring clinical distress, problems, and wish for referral was examined with descriptive analyses. Associations between predictors and enduring clinical distress were examined with multivariate analyses. One hundred sixty-four of 746 patients (22 %) reported having enduring clinical distress at 6 and 15 months postdiagnosis. Of these, 10 % wanted to be referred for care. Fatigue was the most frequently reported problem by patients with and without clinical distress, at both time points. Lack of muscle strength (OR = 1.82, 95 % CI 1.12-2.98), experience of a low level of life satisfaction (OR = 0.77, 95 % CI 0.67-0.89), more frequent cancer worry (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI 1.05-1.89), and neuroticism (OR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.00-1.18) were predictors of enduring clinical distress. In conclusion, one in five women with breast cancer develops enduring clinical distress. Oncologists, nurse practitioners, and cancer nurses are advised to use single-item questions about distress and distress-related problems to ensure timely detection of high-risk patients. Providers should also routinely assess fatigue and its causes, as fatigue is the most frequently reported distress-related problem over time. PMID:27417105

  8. Nonobstructive Acute Renal Failure with a Large Solitary Fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Blakele; Yilmaz, Ali; DePasquale, Stephen; Boren, Todd

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old African American woman presenting with acute abdominal pain and nonobstructive renal failure was found to have an enlarged fibroid uterus. A differential for sepsis was considered. Lab evaluation revealed an elevated creatinine and myoglobin level at 3.9 mg/dL and 2140 ng/mL, respectively. Ongoing hemodynamic instability mandated surgery for acute abdomen. A 25 cm fibroid uterus was extirpated through a total abdominal hysterectomy. Immediate improvement of acute nephropathy mirrored the postoperative decline in serum myoglobin levels. Myoglobinemia from a massive degenerating fibroid is associated with nonobstructive acute renal failure. PMID:27375910

  9. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  10. Abdominal Tuberculosis May Masquerade Many Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinhasan, Sankappa P.; Puranik, Rekha B.; Kulkarni, Mohan H.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Intestinal tuberculosis needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients with intestinal pathology are encountered. Tuberculosis can mimic other disease entities like, ischemic enteritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, malignancies, intussusception etc., clinically as well as morphologically in resected intestinal specimens. We aimed to study the various clinical presentations leading to intestinal resection, with identification of different etiological factors by histopathological examination; and to illustrate, discuss and describe the various histopathological features of the lesions in these resected intestinal specimens with clinicopathological correlation. Materials and Methods: We studied 100 cases of resected intestinal specimens received during September 2002 to December 2003. We totally encountered 22 request forms with clinical suspicion of ileoceocal tuberculosis. Results: Abdominal tenderness and mass in ileoceocal region were noted in all cases. In many instances, the cases were operated for acute/subacute intestinal obstruction. Clinical and intra-operative diagnoses of tubercular enteritis, in many instances, were finally diagnosed histopathologically as ischemic enteritis (nine cases), chronic nonspecific enteritis (four cases), adenocarcinoma of the caecum, Crohn’s disease, intussusception (each one case), and correctly as intestinal tuberculosis in only six cases. Conclusion: Tuberculosis can mimic various disease entities, clinically and sometimes morphologically. Vice versa is also true. An increased awareness of intestinal tuberculosis coupled with varied clinical presentations, nonspecific signs and symptoms, difficulties in diagnostic methods and need of early and specific treatment should improve the outcome for patients with this disease. PMID:21372347

  11. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  12. Relationship of Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Psychosocial Distress to Gastric Retention in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Gregory K.; Shulman, Robert J.; Malaty, Hoda M.; Czyzewski, Danita; Seghers, Victor J; Thompson, Deborah; Chumpitazi, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (abdominal pain, non-pain GI symptoms, nausea) and/or psychosocial distress differ between children with/without gastroparesis, and secondarily whether the severity of GI symptoms and/or psychosocial distress are related to the degree of gastroparesis. Study design Children 7 – 18 yr. of age (n=100; 63 female) undergoing a 4-hour gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) study completed questionnaires evaluating GI symptoms, anxiety, and somatization for this prospective study. Spearman correlation, Mann-Whitney, t-test, and chi-square tests were utilized as appropriate for statistical analysis. Results Children with gastroparesis (n=25) were younger than those with normal emptying (12.6 ± 3.5 yr. vs. 14.3 ± 2.6, P=0.01). Because questionnaire responses from 7–10-year-old children were inconsistent, only patient-reported symptoms from 11–18-year-olds were used. Within this older group (n=83), children with gastroparesis (n=17) did not differ from children with normal emptying in severity of GI symptoms or psychosocial distress. In children with gastroparesis, gastric retention at 4 hr was related inversely to vomiting (r=−0.506, P=0.038), nausea (r=−0.536, P=0.019), difficulty finishing a meal (r=−0.582, P=0.014), and CSI-24 score (r=−0.544, P=0.024) and positively correlated with frequency of waking from sleep with symptoms (r=0.551, P=0.022). Conclusions The severity of GI symptoms and psychosocial distress do not differ between children with/without gastroparesis who are undergoing GES. In those with gastroparesis, gastric retention appears to be inversely related to dyspeptic symptoms and somatization, and positively related to waking from sleep with symptoms. PMID:24726541

  13. Development of a model of moral distress in military nursing.

    PubMed

    Fry, Sara T; Harvey, Rose M; Hurley, Ann C; Foley, Barbara Jo

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a model of moral distress in military nursing. The model evolved through an analysis of the moral distress and military nursing literature, and the analysis of interview data obtained from US Army Nurse Corps officers (n = 13). Stories of moral distress (n = 10) given by the interview participants identified the process of the moral distress experience among military nurses and the dimensions of the military nursing moral distress phenomenon. Models of both the process of military nursing moral distress and the phenomenon itself are proposed. Recommendations are made for the use of the military nursing moral distress models in future research studies and in interventions to ameliorate the experience of moral distress in crisis military deployments.

  14. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  16. Interpersonal Relationships and Emotional Distress in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine positive and negative qualities in adolescents' interpersonal relationships and their relative importance in predicting emotional distress. Participants were 260 students from three schools in the Dublin area (119 girls; 141 boys), aged 12-18 years (M = 15.32, SD = 1.91). Students completed questionnaires…

  17. Religion and Psychological Distress in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roemer, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces data from a new random sample of Japanese adults. Findings show that reporting of distress symptoms are: (1. positively associated with a religious coping index (i.e., beliefs that religion or supernatural beings provide comfort, support or protection), (2. associated in different directions with ownership of different…

  18. Women's Feminist Consciousness, Anger, and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Ann R.; Good, Glenn E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to bring together several lines of research and theory on women's feminist consciousness from psychology, sociology, and philosophy. Past literatures had suggested bivariate links between feminist identity development and psychological distress, feminist identity and anger, feminist identity and interpersonal conflict,…

  19. Substance Use, Distress, and Adolescent School Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Jane D.; Uemura, Ryotaro

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the associations of substance use, psychological distress, and mental health services receipt with the structure and content of adolescent school-based networks. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we found that substance use was associated with receiving more, but making fewer, peer…

  20. Disordered Eating and Psychological Distress among Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Julie Hicks; Stahl, Sarah T.; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-01-01

    The majority of our knowledge about eating disorders derives from adolescent and young adult samples; knowledge regarding disordered eating in middle and later adulthood is limited. We examined the associations among known predictors of eating disorders for younger adults in an age-diverse sample and within the context of psychological distress.…