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Sample records for acute analgesic tolerance

  1. Analgesic effect and tolerance of Voltaren and Ketogan in acute renal or ureteric colic.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Kromann-Andersen, B; Lendorf, A; Lyngdorf, P; Møller, P

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with renal or ureteric colic were entered into a randomised, prospective, double-blind investigation of the analgesic efficacy and tolerance of Voltaren versus Ketogan, both administered intramuscularly. There were no significant differences regarding pain-relief but side effects were fewer in patients treated with Voltaren. PMID:2645969

  2. Methadone Reverses Analgesic Tolerance Induced by Morphine Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Posa, Luca; Accarie, Alison; Marie, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opiates such as morphine are the most powerful analgesics, but their protracted use is restrained by the development of tolerance to analgesic effects. Recent works suggest that tolerance to morphine might be due to its inability to promote mu opioid receptor endocytosis, and the co-injection of morphine with a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist like [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin reduces tolerance to morphine. So far, no studies have been conducted to evaluate the ability of methadone to reduce morphine tolerance in morphine-pretreated animals, a treatment sequence that could be encountered in opiate rotation protocol. We investigated the ability of methadone (a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist used in therapy) to reverse morphine tolerance and the associated cellular mechanisms in the periaqueductal gray matter, a region involved in pain control. Methods: We measured analgesic response following a challenge dose of morphine in the hot plate test and investigated regulation of mu opioid receptor (coupling and endocytosis) and some cellular mechanisms involved in tolerance such as adenylate cyclase superactivation and changes in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation state. Results: A chronic treatment with morphine promoted tolerance to its analgesic effects and was associated with a lack of mu opioid receptor endocytosis, adenylate cyclase overshoot, NR2A and NR2B downregulation, and phosphorylation of NR1. We reported that a methadone treatment in morphine-treated mice reversed morphine tolerance to analgesia by promoting mu opioid receptor endocytosis and blocking cellular mechanisms of tolerance. Conclusions: Our data might lead to rational strategies to tackle opiate tolerance in the frame of opiate rotation. PMID:26390873

  3. Analgesic tolerance to morphine is regulated by PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    de Guglielmo, Giordano; Kallupi, Marsida; Scuppa, Giulia; Stopponi, Serena; Demopulos, Gregory; Gaitanaris, George; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Opioid drugs are potent analgesics. However, their chronic use leads to the rapid development of tolerance to their analgesic effects and subsequent increase of significant side effects, including drug dependence and addiction. Here, we investigated the role of PPARγ in the development of analgesic tolerance to morphine in mice. Experimental Approach We monitored analgesia on alternate days using the tail immersion test. Key Results Daily administration of morphine (30 mg·kg−1, bid) resulted in the rapid development of tolerance to thermal analgesia. Co-administration of pioglitazone (10 and 30 mg·kg−1, bid) significantly attenuated the development and expression of tolerance. However, pretreatment with GW-9662 (5 mg·kg−1, bid), a selective PPARγ antagonist, completely abolished this effect. Injection of GW-9662 and a lower dose of morphine (15 mg·kg−1, bid) accelerated the development of tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. Subsequently, we found that conditional neuronal PPARγ knockout (KO) mice develop a more rapid and pronounced tolerance to morphine antinociception compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, in PPARγ KO mice, pioglitazone was no longer able to prevent the development of morphine tolerance. Conclusions and Implications Overall, our results demonstrate that PPARγ plays a tonic role in the modulation of morphine tolerance, and its pharmacological activation may help to reduce its development. These findings provide new information about the role of neuronal PPARγ and suggest that combining PPARγ agonists with opioid analgesics may reduce the development of tolerance and possibly attenuate the potential for opioid abuse. PMID:25048682

  4. Topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E

    2013-02-01

    Oral analgesics are commonly prescribed for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, but these agents often produce adverse systemic effects, which sometimes are severe. Topical analgesics offer the potential to provide the same analgesic relief provided by oral analgesics but with minimal adverse systemic effects. This article describes the results of a systematic review of the efficacy of topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain conditions. A literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed was conducted using the keywords topical analgesic AND chronic pain OR acute pain OR neuropathic pain and focused only on individual clinical trials published in English-language journals. The search identified 92 articles, of which 65 were eligible for inclusion in the review. The most commonly studied topical analgesics were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n=27), followed by lidocaine (n=9), capsaicin (n=6), amitriptyline (n=5), glyceryl trinitrate (n=3), opioids (n=2), menthol (n=2), pimecrolimus (n=2), and phenytoin (n=2). The most common indications were acute soft tissue injuries (n=18), followed by neuropathic pain (n=17), experimental pain (n=6), osteoarthritis and other chronic joint-related conditions (n=5), skin or leg ulcers (n=5), and chronic knee pain (n=2). Strong evidence was identified for the use of topical diclofenac and topical ibuprofen in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries or chronic joint-related conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Evidence also supports the use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Currently, limited evidence is available to support the use of other topical analgesics in acute and chronic pain. PMID:23374622

  5. A new potent analgesic agent with reduced liability to produce morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Kornel; Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Hanuska, Adrienn; Kató, Erzsébet; Balogh, Mihaly; Köles, László; Palmisano, Martina; Riba, Pal; Hosztafi, Sándor; Romualdi, Patrizia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Ferdinandy, Péter; Fürst, Susanna; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic use of opioids is limited by the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect and the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still not completely understood. For this reason the search for new analgesic derivatives, endowed with lower tolerance, is always an active field. The newly synthesized 14-O-Methylmorphine-6-sulfate (14-O-MeM6SU) shows high efficacy in in vitro assays and a strong analgesic action in the rat tail flick test. The aim of present work was to investigate: the analgesic effect of 14-O-MeM6SU in mouse tail-flick test; the tolerance to analgesic effect of 14-O-MeM6SU compared to morphine in mice, the effects of test compounds on glutamatergic neurotransmission by measuring spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) of layer V pyramidal cells from rat prefrontal cortices; and the effect of acute and chronic 14-O-MeM6SU treatments on opioid receptor gene expression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing μ-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. 14-O-MeM6SU was 17 times more potent than morphine in analgesia and had long duration of action in analgesic dose equipotent to morphine. Mice were treated subcutaneously (s.c.) either with 200 μmol/kg morphine or with 14-O-MeM6SU (12 μmol/kg) twice daily for three days. The magnitude of tolerance or cross-tolerance indicated by the shift in antinociceptive ED50 measured was greater for morphine compared to 14-O-MeM6SU. Subsequent to behavioral testing, patch-clamp experiments in layer V pyramidal neurons of rat prefrontal cortical slices in the presence of bicuculline were performed. Both 14-O-MeM6SU (0.1 μM) and morphine (1 μM) decreased the frequency of sEPSCs, indicating reduction of glutamate release. The effect of the novel compound was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, indicating an opioid mediated action. In contrast, the amplitude was not affected. Finally, gene expression data showed a dose

  6. Assessment of morphine-induced hyperalgesia and analgesic tolerance in mice using thermal and mechanical nociceptive modalities.

    PubMed

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  7. Assessment of Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia and Analgesic Tolerance in Mice Using Thermal and Mechanical Nociceptive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  8. Acute analgesic effects of nicotine and tobacco in humans: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ditre, Joseph W; Heckman, Bryan W; Zale, Emily L; Kosiba, Jesse D; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-07-01

    Although animal models have consistently demonstrated acute pain inhibitory effects of nicotine and tobacco, human experimental studies have yielded mixed results. The main goal of this meta-analysis was to quantify the effects of nicotine/tobacco administration on human experimental pain threshold and tolerance ratings. A search of PubMed and PsycINFO online databases identified 13 eligible articles, including k = 21 tests of pain tolerance (N = 393) and k = 15 tests of pain threshold (N = 339). Meta-analytic integration for both threshold and tolerance outcomes revealed that nicotine administered through tobacco smoke and other delivery systems (eg, patch, nasal spray) produced acute analgesic effects that may be characterized as small to medium in magnitude (Hedges g = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.21-0.50). Publication bias-corrected estimates remained significant and indicated that these effects may be closer to small. Sex composition was observed to be a significant moderator, such that pain threshold effects were more robust among samples that included more men than women. These results help to clarify a mixed literature and may ultimately help to inform the treatment of both pain and nicotine dependence. Pain and tobacco smoking are both highly prevalent and comorbid conditions. Current smoking has been associated with more severe chronic pain and physical impairment. Acute nicotine-induced analgesia could make smoking more rewarding and harder to give up. Future research should use dynamic measures of experimental pain reactivity and further explore biopsychosocial mechanisms of action. PMID:27023418

  9. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-five Cochrane Reviews of randomised trials testing the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain have been published. This overview brings together the results of all those reviews and assesses the reliability of available data. Objectives To summarise data from all Cochrane Reviews that have assessed the effects of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery, who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic taken alone. Methods We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single Review Group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome numbers of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews we extracted the number needed to treat (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, the percentage of participants remedicating by 6, 8, 12, or 24 hours, and results for participants experiencing at least one adverse event. Main results The overview included 35 separate Cochrane Reviews with 38 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 45,000 participants studied in approximately 350 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design and outcome reporting. The reviews used standardised methods and reporting for both efficacy and harm. Event rates with placebo were consistent in larger data sets. No statistical comparison was undertaken. There were reviews but no trial data were available for acemetacin, meloxicam, nabumetone, nefopam, sulindac, tenoxicam, and tiaprofenic acid. Inadequate amounts of data were available for dexibuprofen, dextropropoxyphene 130

  10. Reversal of morphine analgesic tolerance by ethanol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Gabra, B H; Bailey, C P; Henderson, G; Dewey, W L

    2013-06-01

    The chronic use of opioids in humans, accompanied by the development of tolerance, is a dangerous phenomenon in its own right. However, chronic opioid use is often made more dangerous by the coconsumption of other substances. It has been observed that the blood level of opioids in postmortem analyses of addicts, who consumed ethanol along with the opioid, was much less than that observed in individuals who died from opioids alone. This relationship between ethanol and opioids led us to investigate the hypothesis that ethanol alters tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we report that ethanol significantly and dose-dependently reduced the antinociceptive tolerance produced by morphine and the cross-tolerance between [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine in the mouse tail-flick test. The reversal of morphine tolerance was partially blocked by both the gamma receptor blocker bicuculline and by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) receptor blocker phaclofen and the administration of both inhibitors completely reversed the effects of ethanol on morphine tolerance. Diazepam, like ethanol, decreased morphine tolerance. However, this inhibition was reversed by the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline but not by the GABA(B) antagonist phaclofen. These findings have important implications for individuals who abuse opioids and ethanol as well as suggest a mechanism to reduce the amount of opioid needed in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23528610

  11. Reversal of Morphine Analgesic Tolerance by Ethanol in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hull, L. C.; Gabra, B. H.; Bailey, C. P.; Henderson, G.

    2013-01-01

    The chronic use of opioids in humans, accompanied by the development of tolerance, is a dangerous phenomenon in its own right. However, chronic opioid use is often made more dangerous by the coconsumption of other substances. It has been observed that the blood level of opioids in postmortem analyses of addicts, who consumed ethanol along with the opioid, was much less than that observed in individuals who died from opioids alone. This relationship between ethanol and opioids led us to investigate the hypothesis that ethanol alters tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we report that ethanol significantly and dose-dependently reduced the antinociceptive tolerance produced by morphine and the cross-tolerance between [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine in the mouse tail-flick test. The reversal of morphine tolerance was partially blocked by both the gamma receptor blocker bicuculline and by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor blocker phaclofen and the administration of both inhibitors completely reversed the effects of ethanol on morphine tolerance. Diazepam, like ethanol, decreased morphine tolerance. However, this inhibition was reversed by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline but not by the GABAB antagonist phaclofen. These findings have important implications for individuals who abuse opioids and ethanol as well as suggest a mechanism to reduce the amount of opioid needed in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23528610

  12. Morphine analgesic tolerance in 129P3/J and 129S6/SvEv mice

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Camron D.; Roberts, Kristofer W.; Byun, Janet S.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Morphine analgesic tolerance is heritable in both humans and rodents, with some individuals and strains exhibiting little and others exhibiting robust tolerance. 129S6/SvEv and 129P3/J mice reportedly do not demonstrate tolerance to morphine analgesia. Using our laboratory's standard morphine tolerance regimen and a between-subjects design, tolerance developed in the hot plate and tail withdrawal assays as indicated by a change in analgesic efficacy following a morphine challenge dose. Furthermore, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilipine) blocked morphine tolerance in 129S6/SvEv and CD-1 mice in the hot plate assay. As previously reported, when a within-subjects design and cumulative dosing was employed, no tolerance was observed in the 129P3/J strain. However, using the same morphine regimen and a between-subjects design, comparable tolerance developed between 129P3/J and C57BL/6J strains following a single challenge dose of morphine. Spontaneous hyperalgesia was observed in the tail withdrawal assay following chronic morphine in C57BL/6J, but not 129P3/J mice. Additionally, morphine-tolerant C57BL/6J mice, but not 129P3/J mice, exhibited a large increase in the frequency of tail flicks during the first second following the baseline nociceptive response which may facilitate detection of the response during the tolerant state. We conclude that the method of tolerance assessment affects the ability to detect tolerance and thus, may affect the degree and pattern of heritability of this trait and this could have implications for gene mapping studies. PMID:17196637

  13. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  14. Pharmacological characterization of standard analgesics on oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Nakamura, Saki; Miyake, Takahito; So, Kanako; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an acute peripheral neuropathy triggered by cold in almost all patients during or within hours after its infusion. We recently reported that a single administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hypersensitivity 2 h after the administration in mice. In this study, we examined whether standard analgesics relieve the oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity. Gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate significantly inhibited and morphine and milnacipran decreased the acute cold hypersensitivity, while diclofenac and amitriptyline had no effects. These results suggest that gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate are effective against oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24671055

  15. Analgesic tolerance of opioid agonists in mutant mu-opioid receptors expressed in sensory neurons following intrathecal plasmid gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are known to play critical roles in the receptor functions. Our understanding of their participation in opioid analgesia is mostly based on studies of opioid effects on mutant receptors expressed in in vitro preparations, including cell lines, isolated neurons and brain slices. The behavioral consequences of the mutation have not been fully explored due to the complexity in studies of mutant receptors in vivo. To facilitate the determination of the contribution of phosphorylation sites in MOR to opioid-induced analgesic behaviors, we expressed mutant and wild-type human MORs (hMORs) in sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, a major site for nociceptive (pain) signaling and determined morphine- and the full MOR agonist, DAMGO,-induced effects on heat-induced hyperalgesic behaviors and potassium current (IK) desensitization in these rats. Findings A mutant hMOR DNA with the putative phosphorylation threonine site at position 394 replaced by an alanine (T394A), i.e., hMOR-T, or a plasmid containing wild type hMOR (as a positive control) was intrathecally delivered. The plasmid containing GFP or saline was used as the negative control. To limit the expression of exogenous DNA to neurons of DRGs, a neuron-specific promoter was included in the plasmid. Following a plasmid injection, hMOR-T or hMOR receptors were expressed in small and medium DRG neurons. Compared with saline or GFP rats, the analgesic potency of morphine was increased to a similar extent in hMOR-T and hMOR rats. Morphine induced minimum IK desensitization in both rat groups. In contrast, DAMGO increased analgesic potency and elicited IK desensitization to a significantly less extent in hMOR-T than in hMOR rats. The development and extent of acute and chronic tolerance induced by repeated morphine or DAMGO applications were not altered by the T394A mutation. Conclusions These results indicate that phosphorylation of T394

  16. Endomorphin analog analgesics with reduced abuse liability, respiratory depression, motor impairment, tolerance, and glial activation relative to morphine.

    PubMed

    Zadina, James E; Nilges, Mark R; Morgenweck, Jenny; Zhang, Xing; Hackler, Laszlo; Fasold, Melita B

    2016-06-01

    Opioids acting at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are the most effective analgesics, however adverse side effects severely limit their use. Of particular importance, abuse liability results in major medical, societal, and economic problems, respiratory depression is the cause of fatal overdoses, and tolerance complicates treatment and increases the risk of side effects. Motor and cognitive impairment are especially problematic for older adults. Despite the host of negative side effects, opioids such as morphine are commonly used for acute and chronic pain conditions. Separation of analgesia from unwanted effects has long been an unmet goal of opioid research. Novel MOR agonist structures may prove critical for greater success. Here we tested metabolically stable analogs of the endomorphins, endogenous opioids highly selective for the MOR. Compared to morphine, the analogs showed dramatically improved analgesia-to-side-effect ratios. At doses providing equal or greater antinociception than morphine in the rat, the analogs showed reduced a) respiratory depression, b) impairment of motor coordination, c) tolerance and hyperalgesia, d) glial p38/CGRP/P2X7 receptor signaling, and e) reward/abuse potential in both conditioned place preference and self-administration tests. Differential effects on glial activation indicate a mechanism for the relative lack of side effects by the analogs compared to morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin analogs described here could provide gold standard pain relief mediated by selective MOR activation, but with remarkably safer side effect profiles compared to opioids like morphine. PMID:26748051

  17. Analgesic activity and acute toxicity study of Semecarpus anacardium stem bark extracts using mice

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraju, G. M.; Hoskeri, H. Joy; Krishna, V.; Babu, P. Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The analgesic activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of Semecarpus anacardium was investigated by tail flicking and writhing method using acetyl salicylic acid as the standard reference. Materials and Methods: The staircase method was adopted for the determination of the acute toxicity. LD50 of the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract was 700 mg/kg; however, the LD50 for the methanol extract was 500 mg/kg. After 1 h of oral administration of the extracts, 0.6% acetic acid was administered intraperitoneally and the analgesic activity was evaluated. Results: The number of writhing observed in the control group was 73.33 writhes. The methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity, with 28.33 writhes, than the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract. But, all the extracts showed proved to be less potent than the standard drug which showed 2.33 writhes. Animals pretreated with saline did not show a signify cant effect on the latent period of tail-flick response. The analgesic effect of the petroleum ether extract was comparatively less evident. The maximum possible analgesia (MPA) increased up to 9.1% which remained elevated above the basal levels throughout the observation period. The MPA calculated for the chloroform extract increased to 14.03%. However, the analgesic effect of the methanol extract was also observed at 0.5 h following oral administration and the effect remained significant throughout the 3 h observation period, and was increased to 20.43%. Conclusion: Consistent analgesic activity of all the three S. anacardium extracts was observed by both the methods. The methanol extract was more potent than the petroleum ether and chloroform extracts but was less effective than the standard drug. This investigation supported the ethnomedicinal claims of S. anacardium. PMID:21731397

  18. Interdose interval effects on the development of contextual tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects in rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Benito, Antonio; Reynoso, Jose T; Davis, Kristina W; Susabda, Agnes; Mendez, Ian A; Harraid, James H

    2006-05-01

    Learning models of associative and nonassociative drug tolerance predict that the development of contextual tolerance to drug effects is disrupted when the drug is delivered at short interdose intervals (IDIs). The authors examined the impact of 1 long IDI and 2 short IDIs in the development of contextual nicotine tolerance. Associative tolerance was investigated by giving rats (Rattus norvegicus) 10 subcutaneous injections of nicotine at either long (72-hr) IDIs or short (6-hr and 4.5-hr) IDIs. The delivery of nicotine was either explicitly paired or explicitly unpaired with a distinctive context. A 3rd group of rats was exposed to the experimental procedures but received only saline. Associative tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects was defined as a shift to the right of the dose-response curve (DRC) of rats in the explicitly paired condition with respect to the DRC of rats in the explicitly unpaired condition. Analgesia was assessed with the tail-flick and hot-plate devices. In the tail-flick assessment, associative tolerance was evident in the 72-hr and the 6-hr IDI conditions only. In the hot-plate assessment, associative tolerance was present in the 72-hr IDI condition only. The findings suggest that contextual tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects are positively related to IDI length and are more readily demonstrated with the tail-flick method than with the hot-plate method. Overall, the results supported the thesis that nicotine tolerances that develop to different IDIs are qualitatively different and may be mediated by different psychological and physiological mechanisms. PMID:16756422

  19. Acute postoperative pain predicts chronic pain and long-term analgesic requirements after breast surgery for cancer.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, A; Melemeni, A; Staikou, C; Triga, A; Sarantopoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative pain and analgesic requirements may be associated with chronic pain. The aim of the study was to investigate this association. We studied 98 patients who had cancer breast surgery and served as controls in four previous studies, receiving placebo. We compared the pain and analgesic requirements 0-9 h and 1-6 days postoperatively: a) between patients with chronic pain 3 months postoperatively versus patients without and b) between those patients who consumed analgesics at home versus those who did not. Patients with chronic pain had experienced higher intensity pain at rest the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.033). Patients requiring analgesics at home had consumed postoperatively more opioids (p = 0.005) and more paracetamol (p = 0.037). These patients had experienced pain of higher intensity the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.022, VAS-movement p = 0.009) as well as during the six postoperative days (VAS-rest p = 0.013, VAS-movement p = 0.001). Higher intensities of acute postoperative pain are associated with chronic pain development. Higher analgesic needs and higher acute postoperatively pain intensity are associated with long-term analgesic consumption. PMID:19235522

  20. Preventive Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam in Acute and Chronic Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Oh, Ah-Young; Koo, Bon-Wook; Lim, Dae-Jin; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Han, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer surgery is known to cause severe acute postoperative pain, which can persist for a long time. We administered nefopam preventively to patients undergoing lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy, and evaluated its efficacy on acute and chronic postoperative pain. Enrolled patients were assigned to the nefopam (n = 41) or the control (n = 42) group. Before initiating the operation, 20 mg of nefopam was given to the patients of the nefopam group, and normal saline was used in the control group. Ketorolac was given at the end of surgery, and meloxicam was prescribed in the postoperative period to all patients in both groups. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS), and the rescue analgesic drug was given when the NRS was >5. Implementation of postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT), or hormone therapy was evaluated. The NRS of postoperative pain was significantly lower in the nefopam than in the control group in the postanesthetic care unit (4.5 ± 2.2 vs 5.7 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01), at postoperative 6 h (3.0 ± 1.6 vs 4.5 ± 1.3, respectively; P < 0.001), and at postoperative 24 h (3.1 ± 1.1 vs 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01) with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs. Significantly fewer patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain in the nefopam than in the control group at postoperative 3 months (36.6% vs 59.5%, P = 0.04). Considering only the cohort without postoperative adjuvant RT, the difference in the proportion of patients reporting chronic pain increased (23.5% in the nefopam group vs 61.5% in the control group, P = 0.04). Preventive nefopam was helpful in reducing the acute postoperative pain, with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs, and it contributed to reduced occurrence of chronic pain at postoperative 3 months after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27196485

  1. Urinary tract analgesics for the treatment of patients with acute cystitis: where is the clinical evidence?

    PubMed

    Pergialiotis, Vassilis; Arnos, Pantelis; Mavros, Michael N; Pitsouni, Eleni; Athanasiou, Stavros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2012-08-01

    Acute cystitis is one of the most common health-related problems in the female population. Over the last few decades, a number of drugs labeled as 'urinary tract analgesics' were released; these are available over the counter and are gaining widespread resonance among the North American population. The main representatives of this class of drugs are phenazopyridine and methenamine hippurate. Methenamine's efficacy and side effects have been well studied in a recent systematic review. On the other hand, in contrast to its widespread use, the published clinical evidence regarding phenazopyridine's effectiveness and safety is scarce. In addition, consumers (potentially patients) appear to ignore the limitations of this kind of treatment. In this article, concerns regarding the use of over-the-counter uroanalgesics, with a focus on the relevant clinical evidence, are discussed. PMID:23030327

  2. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  3. Development and preliminary validation of an integrated efficacy-tolerability composite measure for the evaluation of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Katz, Nathaniel P; Mou, Joy; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Xiang, Jim; Vorsanger, Gary; Orman, Camille; Kim, Myoung

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this analysis was to develop and evaluate integrated measures of benefit and tolerability of analgesic drugs in clinical trials. We evaluated an efficacy-tolerability composite (ETC) measure combining different cutoff values for daily pain reduction (≥20%, ≥30%, or ≥50% pain reduction) and adverse events (AEs) (no AE, no or mild AEs, no or mild drug-related AEs). Nine ETC cutoff values (3 × 3) were tested using data from a randomized double-blind trial comparing tapentadol extended release (ER) (n = 310), oxycodone controlled release (CR) (n = 322), and placebo (n = 314) in subjects with chronic low back pain. Efficacy-tolerability composite scores were calculated as the mean number of days a subject met the ETC criterion divided by the number of days the subject was expected to be in study; ETC scores were then averaged in each treatment group. For all 9 ETC measures, validity was demonstrated by significant correlation of ETC scores with patients' Global Impression of change and with change from baseline in pain scores. Tapentadol ER ETC scores were statistically significantly higher than oxycodone CR ETC scores for 4 of the ETC measures. "No/mild drug-related AE and ≥20% pain reduction" demonstrated the best overall validity (correlation with patients' global impression of change) and responsiveness (discrimination between treatment groups), yielding a higher standardized effect size for tapentadol ER compared with placebo (0.19 [95% confidence interval: 0.031-0.346]) and with oxycodone CR (0.23 [95% confidence interval: 0.070-0.383]) than other cutoff values. Thus, we have identified herein a composite measure that seems to be a valid and responsive measure of the overall efficacy and tolerability of analgesics in clinical trials. PMID:25867124

  4. Role of central arginine vasopressin receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline on acute and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Yucel-Ozboluk, Hasret; Orhan, Fulya; Kanat, Ozkan; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, Naciye; Gurun, Mine S

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a crucial role in pain modulation. In addition, our previous studies have proven that centrally administered cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline (CDP-choline; citicoline) elicits an analgesic effect in different pain models in rats. Given that CDP-choline enhances central and peripheral vasopressin levels, the present study was designed to investigate the role of central AVP receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline in acute and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models. For this purpose, rats were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with the AVP V1 or AVP V2 receptor antagonist 15 min before intracerebroventricular injection of CDP-choline or saline, and pain threshold was determined using the Randall-Selitto test. AVP V1 and AVP V2 receptor antagonist blocked the CDP-choline-induced analgesic effect either in acute or neuropathic models of pain in rats. These results suggest, for the first time, that central AVP receptors are involved in the CDP-choline-elicited analgesic effect. PMID:24089014

  5. Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance Effect on Gene Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 in Rat Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Morphine is a potent analgesic but its continual use results in analgesic tolerance. Mechanisms of this tolerance remain to be clarified. However, changes in the functions of μ-opioid and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been proposed in morphine tolerance. We examined changes in gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 (NR1) at mRNA levels in rat striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after induction of morphine tolerance. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: The results showed that long-term morphine a administration induces tolerance to analgesic effect of the opioid, as revealed by a significant decrease in morphine-induced analgesia on day 8 compared to day 1 of the injections (P<0.001). The results also showed that the NR1 gene expression at mRNA level in rats tolerant to morphine was significantly increased in the striatum (P<0.01) but decreased in the PFC (P<0.001). Conclusion: Therefore, changes in the NR1 gene expression in rat striatum and PFC have a region-specific association with morphine-induced analgesic tolerance. PMID:27563417

  6. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Development of Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance and Regulate Functionally Relevant Changes in Serpini1

    PubMed Central

    Tapocik, Jenica D.; Ceniccola, Kristin; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Schwandt, Melanie L.; Solomon, Matthew; Wang, Bi-Dar; Luu, Truong V.; Olender, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Thomas; Maynard, Thomas M.; Elmer, Greg I.; Lee, Norman H.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term opioid treatment results in reduced therapeutic efficacy and in turn leads to an increase in the dose required to produce equivalent pain relief and alleviate break-through or insurmountable pain. Altered gene expression is a likely means for inducing long-term neuroadaptations responsible for tolerance. Studies conducted by our laboratory (Tapocik et al., 2009) revealed a network of gene expression changes occurring in canonical pathways involved in neuroplasticity, and uncovered miRNA processing as a potential mechanism. In particular, the mRNA coding the protein responsible for processing miRNAs, Dicer1, was positively correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that miRNAs play a significant role in the development of analgesic tolerance as measured by thermal nociception. Dicer1 knockdown, miRNA profiling, bioinformatics, and confirmation of high value targets were used to test the proposition. Regionally targeted Dicer1 knockdown (via shRNA) had the anticipated consequence of eliminating the development of tolerance in C57BL/6J (B6) mice, thus supporting the involvement of miRNAs in the development of tolerance. MiRNA expression profiling identified a core set of chronic morphine-regulated miRNAs (miR's 27a, 9, 483, 505, 146b, 202). Bioinformatics approaches were implemented to identify and prioritize their predicted target mRNAs. We focused our attention on miR27a and its predicted target serpin peptidase inhibitor clade I (Serpini1) mRNA, a transcript known to be intricately involved in dendritic spine density regulation in a manner consistent with chronic morphine's consequences and previously found to be correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. In vitro reporter assay confirmed the targeting of the Serpini1 3′-untranslated region by miR27a. Interestingly miR27a was found to positively regulate Serpini1 mRNA and protein levels in multiple neuronal cell lines

  7. Evaluation of the analgesic activity and tolerability of aceclofenac in the treatment of post-episiotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Movilia, P G

    1989-01-01

    The activity and tolerability of aceclofenac, a new arylacetic anti-inflammatory drug, was assessed in the treatment of post-episiotomal pain in a controlled double-blind study with paracetamol. Aceclofenac was administered in single 100 mg doses and paracetamol in single 650 mg doses (both drugs in tablet form) to 60 women aged between 18 and 38 years with post-episiotomal pain. They were randomised into two groups of 30 patients. The severity of the pain was assessed by the patients using an analog visual test (Huskisson's test) before treatment and 0.5, 1,2,3,4,5 and 6h after receiving the drug. At the end of the study, the investigator questioned the patients about the evolution of their pain and any side-effects that might have appeared during the 6 h of observation. On the basis of their replies, the investigator evaluated the pain on a semi-quantitative scale of 5 points. The tolerability was assessed on the basis of the appearance of any undesired effects. The patients treated with drug A* showed a progressive and marked reduction of their pain with a significant difference from the baseline score after the second hour of observation (Huskisson's test) and after the first hour (physician's assessment with the 5-point scale), respectively. The antalgic effect of drug B showed a similar evolution over time to drug A but the analgesic efficacy seemed to be much less.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2663407

  8. Fast Left Prefrontal rTMS Acutely Suppresses Analgesic Effects of Perceived Controllability on the Emotional Component of Pain Experience

    PubMed Central

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Reeves, Scott T.; Frohman, Heather; Madan, Alok; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David; Barth, Kelly; Smith, A. Richard; Gracely, Richard; George, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex may be a promising target for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the management of pain. It is not clear how prefrontal TMS affects pain perception, but previous findings suggest that ventral lateral and medial prefrontal circuits may comprise an important part of a circuit of ‘perceived controllability’ regarding pain, stress and learned helplessness. While the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a common TMS target for treating clinical depression as well as modulating pain, little is known about whether TMS over this area may affect perceived controllability. The present study explored the immediate effects of fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on the analgesic effects of perceived pain controllability. Twenty-four healthy volunteers underwent a laboratory pain task designed to manipulate perception of pain controllability. Real TMS, compared to sham, suppressed the analgesic benefits of perceived-control on the emotional dimension of pain, but not the sensory/discriminatory dimension. Findings suggest that, at least acutely, fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may interrupt the perceived-controllability effect on the emotional dimension of pain experience. While it is not clear whether this cortical area is directly involved with modulating perceived controllability or whether downstream effects are responsible for the present findings, it appears possible that left dorsolateral prefrontal TMS may produce analgesic effects by acting through a cortical ‘perceived control’ circuit regulating limbic and brainstem areas of the pain circuit. PMID:21122992

  9. Analgesic activity of Ugni molinae (murtilla) in mice models of acute pain.

    PubMed

    Delporte, C; Backhouse, N; Inostroza, V; Aguirre, M C; Peredo, N; Silva, X; Negrete, R; Miranda, H F

    2007-05-30

    Leaf extracts of Ugni molinae Turcz. (Myrtaceae) are used in Chilean folk medicine as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The antinociceptive effect of dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA) and methanol (ME) leaf extracts was assessed by intraperitoneal, oral and topical administration in writhing, tail flick, and tail formalin tests in mice. The extracts showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in all the assays under different administration routes. The ED(50) values for the different tests for the DCM, EA, ME extract and reference drug (ibuprofen) were as follows. Writhing test in acetic acid (i.p. administration): 0.21, 0.37, 1.37 and 0.85mg/kg, respectively; tail flick test (oral administration): 199, 189, 120 and 45.9mg/kg. The EC(50) values for tail flick test were (topical administration): 2.0, 0.35, 1.4 and 8.2% (w/v), respectively; and the topical analgesic effects were (formalin assay) 75.5, 77.5, 31.6 and 76.5%, respectively. Ugni molinae extracts produce antinociception in chemical and thermal pain models through a mechanism partially linked to either lipooxygenase and/or cyclooxygenase via the arachidonic acid cascade and/or opioid receptors. Flavonoid glycosides and triterpenoids have been isolated from the plant and can be associated with the observed effect. Our results corroborate the analgesic effects of Ugni molinae, and justify its traditional use for treating pain. PMID:17403589

  10. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tripi, Paul A; Kuestner, Matthew E; Poe-Kochert, Connie S; Rubin, Kasia; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group) (n=27) and remifentanil (study group) (n=27). Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours. Results The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog scale pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit and on postoperative days 1 and 3. Pain scores were higher in the remifentanil group on postoperative day 2 (2.9 vs 3.8). Postoperative morphine requirements were similar between the two groups (0.029 vs 0.017 mg/kg/48 h for the control group and the study group, respectively). Conclusion In patients receiving preincisional ITM during spinal surgery, intraoperative remifentanil does not increase

  11. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M. Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  12. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  13. Antinociceptive effect of palm date spathe hydroalcoholic extract on acute and chronic pain in mice as compared with analgesic effect of morphine and diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Peyghambari, Fatemeh; Dashti-Rahmatabadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rozabadi, Mansooreh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Razieh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Fatemeh Dehghanfi; Pangalizadeh, Mohammadesmaeil; Dehghanimohammadabadi, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: In Persian traditional medicine, palm date spathe (PDS) is introduced as an analgesic. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of PDS on acute and chronic pain in mice in comparison with diclofenac and morphine. Materials and Methods: In this study, which was conducted in summer 2014, 220 male mice (20–30 g) were randomly divided into two categories, each consists of 11 groups as follows: A normal control group, a solvent (Tween 80) control group, 3 morphine positive control groups (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg), 3 diclofenac positive control groups (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg), and 3 main experimental PDS groups (2, 20, and 200 mg/kg). Hot plate was applied on animals in one category and writing test on the other category to assess acute and chronic pain, respectively. Results: In the writing test, the average writing time and number of animals receiving a maximum dosage of morphine, diclofenac, and PDS were significantly less than the control group. In the hot plate test, only groups receiving different doses of morphine at different time points and those received 30 mg/kg diclofenac at 15 min after the intervention showed significant difference with the control group. Conclusion: 200 mg/kg extract of PDS, revealed a significant analgesic effect on chronic pain, but it did not show any analgesic effect on acute pain. PMID:26693469

  14. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  15. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  16. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  17. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  18. Analgesic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics are agents which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS and peripheral pain mediators without changing consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical, and technical problems. Both peripheral and central pain models are included to make the test more evident for the analgesic property of the plant. This chapter highlights methods such as hot plate and formalin and acetic acid-induced pain models to check the analgesic activity of medicinal plants. PMID:26939272

  19. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of low-power optical radiation in acute inflammatory process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Denise M.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Cury, Yara; Frigo, Lucio; Barbosa, Daniella G.; da Silva Melo, Milene; Munin, Egberto

    2004-07-01

    Many research works have explored the use of the low power laser as a tool for the control of inflammatory processes. The anti-inflammatory effect of low power optical radiation and its ability to induce analgesia has been reported for different experimental conditions. Many published works are very qualitative in nature. In this work the action of low power laser radiation on acute inflammatory process is evaluated. The time evolution of rat paw edema and pain induced by carrageenan was experimentally monitored. A 632.8 nm He-Ne laser was used for the treatment. The laser treatment, at a dosage of 2,5 J/cm2, was applied at the first, second and third hour after the induction of the inflammation. A hydroplethysmometer was used for the evaluation of the inflammation. The measurement of pain sensitivity was performed according to the method described by Randall and Selito, (1957). The laser treatment was capable of inhibiting the carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia by 49% (p<0,001) at the second hour after the induction, as compared to the non-treated group. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on hyperalgesia) and at the sixth hour, the achieved inhibition was 49% (p<0,001) and 61% (p<0,001), respectively. In the treated groups, the edema evolution was inhibited by 38% (p<0,01), at the second hour after induction, as compared to the non-treated groups. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on leakage) and at sixth hour the achieved inhibition was 35% (p<0,01) and 30% (p<0,05) respectively.

  20. The analgesic and toxic effects of nornicotine enantiomers alone and in interaction with morphine in rodent models of acute and persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Holtman, Joseph R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Johnson-Hardy, Jaime K.; Wala, Elzbieta P.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholinic receptors (nAChR) are promising targets for the development of novel analgesics. Nicotine and other nAChR-agonists produce profound analgesia in rodent models of acute and persistent pain. However, significant side-effects are of concern. Nornicotine (N-desmethyl-nicotine) appears to activate different nAChR subtypes, has a better pharmacokinetic profile, and produces less toxicity than nicotine. Little is known about its analgesic properties. In the present study, the S(−)- and R(+)- enantiomers of nornicotine were characterized with regard to analgesia and side-effects profile. Efficacy was demonstrated in rat models of pain where central sensitization is involved: i.e. the chronic constriction nerve injury model of peripheral neuropathy and the formalin model of tonic inflammatory pain. The desirable (analgesic) properties resided predominantly in the S(−)- rather than the R(+)- enantiomer. In contrast, undesirable effects (motor in-coordination, reduced locomotor activity, ataxia) were more pronounced with the R(+)- enantiomer. This is an interesting finding, which may suggest separation of toxicity from analgesia by utilization of S(−)-enantiomer of nornicotine. Maximum analgesic effectiveness without significant side-effects was achieved when S(−)-nornicotine (sub-analgesic dose) was combined with a low-dose of the μ-opioid, morphine. These preclinical data suggest that S(−)-nornicotine may be of value, either alone or in combination with an opioid, for treatment of a broad-spectrum of pain (i.e. nociceptive, neuropathic, mixed pain). PMID:19800911

  1. [Analgesic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Pintér, I; Nagy, J

    1998-11-22

    Analgesic nephropathy is a slowly progressive disease caused by the chronic abuse of analgesic mixtures containing two analgesic components combined with potentially addictive substances (coffeine and/or codeine). Pathologically, the nephropathy is characterized by renal papillary necrosis with calcification and chronic interstitial nephritis sometimes in association with transitional-cell carcinoma of the uroepithelium. In the early stage, the clinical characteristics are polyuria, sterile pyuria, sometimes renal colic and haematuria. With further progression of the disease, there are the nonspecific symptoms of advanced renal failure. The incidence of classic analgesic nephropathy among Hungarian patients on chronic renal replacement therapy has proven. There is an urgent need for the estimation of analgesic nephropathy among patients with chronic renal disease and among patients with chronic pain presumably regularly taking analgesics in Hungary. As long as analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin or paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and addictive substances are available "over-the-counter", analgesic nephropathy will continue to be a problem also in our country. PMID:9846064

  2. Central adiponectin acutely improves glucose tolerance in male mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christiane E; Lowe, Chrishanthi; Legler, Karen; Benzler, Jonas; Boucsein, Alisa; Böttiger, Gregor; Grattan, David R; Williams, Lynda M; Tups, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. It is also antiinflammatory. During obesity, adiponectin levels and sensitivity are reduced. Whereas the action of adiponectin in the periphery is well established the neuroendocrine role of adiponectin is largely unknown. To address this we analyzed the expression of adiponectin and the 2 adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) in response to fasting and to diet-induced and genetic obesity. We also investigated the acute impact of adiponectin on central regulation of glucose homeostasis. Adiponectin (1 μg) was injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV), and glucose tolerance tests were performed in dietary and genetic obese mice. Finally, the influence of ICV adiponectin administration on central signaling cascades regulating glucose homeostasis and on markers of hypothalamic inflammation was assessed. Gene expression of adiponectin was down-regulated whereas AdipoR1 was up-regulated in the arcuate nucleus of fasted mice. High-fat (HF) feeding increased AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 gene expression in this region. In mice on a HF diet and in leptin-deficient mice acute ICV adiponectin improved glucose tolerance 60 minutes after injection, whereas normoglycemia in control mice was unaffected. ICV adiponectin increased pAKT, decreased phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase, and did not change phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 immunoreactivity. In HF-fed mice, ICV adiponectin reversed parameters of hypothalamic inflammation and insulin resistance as determined by the number of phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3 β(Ser9) and phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Thr183/Tyr185) immunoreactive cells in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamus. This study demonstrates that the insulin-sensitizing properties of adiponectin are at least partially based on a neuroendocrine mechanism that involves centrally synthesized adiponectin. PMID:24564394

  3. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments. PMID:21752182

  4. Synthesis, modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of UMB 425, a mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist opioid analgesic with reduced tolerance liabilities.

    PubMed

    Healy, Jason R; Bezawada, Padmavani; Shim, Jihyun; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen A; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2013-09-18

    Opioid narcotics are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain and primarily exert their analgesic effects through μ receptors. Although traditional μ agonists can cause undesired side effects, including tolerance, addition of δ antagonists can attenuate said side effects. Herein, we report 4a,9-dihydroxy-7a-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,4a,5,6-hexahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-7(7aH)-one (UMB 425) a 5,14-bridged morphinan-based orvinol precursor synthesized from thebaine. Although UMB 425 lacks δ-specific motifs, conformationally sampled pharmacophore models for μ and δ receptors predict it to have efficacy similar to morphine at μ receptors and similar to naltrexone at δ receptors, due to the compound sampling conformations in which the hydroxyl moiety interacts with the receptors similar to orvinols. As predicted, UMB 425 exhibits a mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist profile as determined in receptor binding and [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays in CHO cells. In vivo studies in mice show that UMB 425 displays potent antinociception in the hot plate and tail-flick assays. The antinociceptive effects of UMB 425 are blocked by naloxone, but not by the κ-selective antagonist norbinaltorphimine. During a 6-day tolerance paradigm, UMB 425 maintains significantly greater antinociception compared to morphine. These studies thus indicate that, even in the absence of δ-specific motifs fused to the C-ring, UMB 425 has mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist properties in vitro that translate to reduced tolerance liabilities in vivo. PMID:23713721

  5. Synthesis, Modeling, and Pharmacological Evaluation of UMB 425, a Mixed μ Agonist/δ Antagonist Opioid Analgesic with Reduced Tolerance Liabilities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioid narcotics are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain and primarily exert their analgesic effects through μ receptors. Although traditional μ agonists can cause undesired side effects, including tolerance, addition of δ antagonists can attenuate said side effects. Herein, we report 4a,9-dihydroxy-7a-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,4a,5,6-hexahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-7(7aH)-one (UMB 425) a 5,14-bridged morphinan-based orvinol precursor synthesized from thebaine. Although UMB 425 lacks δ-specific motifs, conformationally sampled pharmacophore models for μ and δ receptors predict it to have efficacy similar to morphine at μ receptors and similar to naltrexone at δ receptors, due to the compound sampling conformations in which the hydroxyl moiety interacts with the receptors similar to orvinols. As predicted, UMB 425 exhibits a mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist profile as determined in receptor binding and [35S]GTPγS functional assays in CHO cells. In vivo studies in mice show that UMB 425 displays potent antinociception in the hot plate and tail-flick assays. The antinociceptive effects of UMB 425 are blocked by naloxone, but not by the κ-selective antagonist norbinaltorphimine. During a 6-day tolerance paradigm, UMB 425 maintains significantly greater antinociception compared to morphine. These studies thus indicate that, even in the absence of δ-specific motifs fused to the C-ring, UMB 425 has mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist properties in vitro that translate to reduced tolerance liabilities in vivo. PMID:23713721

  6. Novel analgesic combination of tramadol, paracetamol, caffeine and taurine in the management of moderate to moderately severe acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Santhosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute low back pain is one the leading cause of doctor's visit in our country with innumerable medication for treatment. Finding an ideal analgesic medication with better efficacy and least adverse effects is always a challenging task to the treating doctor. Methods In this study we compared the efficacy and safety profile of a fixed dose combination of novel analgesic tramadol 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg/caffeine 30 mg/taurine 250 mg with commonly used tramadol 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg tablet in the treatment of moderate to moderately severe acute low back pain. Patients attending 50 clinics throughout India were enrolled in either of the above group and were asked to take one tablet every 6th hour for five consecutive days. The pain evaluation in both groups was done with verbal pain relief scale and pain intensity scale at end of treatment. Results Proportion of patients in novel combination group compared to tramadol/paracetamol only group responding to treatment based on treatment satisfaction (good and excellent) and mean pain intensity (no pain or mild pain), were 81% Vs 45%, (p < 0.001) and 83% Vs 66% (p < 0.001) respectively. Common expected adverse drug reaction like nausea, vomiting and dizziness occurred with far less frequency in patients under novel combination group. Conclusion We conclude that significantly more patients in novel combination drug group compared to tramadol/paracetamol only group had a superior analgesic effect with lesser adverse reactions. PMID:24396231

  7. Influence of the ambient acceleration field upon acute acceleration tolerance in chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Spangler, W. L.; Rhode, E. A.; Burton, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper measured the acceleration tolerance of domestic fowl (Rhode Island Red cocks), acutely exposed to a 6 Gz field, as the time over which a normal heart rate can be maintained. This period of circulatory adjustment ends abruptly with pronounced bradycardia. For chickens which previously have been physiologically adapted to 2.5 -G field, the acute acceleration tolerance is greatly increased. The influence of the ambient acceleration field on the adjustment of the circulatory system appears to be a general phenomenon.

  8. Combination analgesic efficacy: individual patient data meta-analysis of single-dose oral tramadol plus acetaminophen in acute postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jayne E; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2002-02-01

    The primary aims of this study were to assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose oral tramadol plus acetaminophen in acute postoperative pain and to use meta-analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of the combination drug compared with its components. Individual patient data from seven randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trials of tramadol plus acetaminophen were supplied for analysis by the R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Raritan, New Jersey, USA. All trials used identical methods and assessed single-dose oral tramadol (75 mg or 112.5 mg) plus acetaminophen (650 mg or 975 mg) in adult patients with moderate or severe postoperative pain. Summed pain intensity and pain relief data over six and eight hours and global evaluations of treatment effect after eight hours were extracted. Number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for one patient to obtain at least 50% pain relief was calculated. NNTs derived from pain relief data were compared with those derived from pain intensity data and global evaluations. Information on adverse effects was collected. Combination analgesics (tramadol plus acetaminophen) had significantly lower (better) NNTs than the components alone, and comparable efficacy to ibuprofen 400 mg. This could be shown for dental but not postsurgical pain, because more patients were available for the former. Adverse effects were similar for the combination drugs and the opioid component alone. Common adverse effects were dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and headache. In sum, this meta-analysis demonstrated analgesic superiority of the combination drug over its components, without additional toxicity. PMID:11844632

  9. Preventive Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam in Acute and Chronic Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery: A Prospective, Double-Blind, and Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Oh, Ah-Young; Koo, Bon-Wook; Lim, Dae-Jin; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Han, Ji-Won

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer surgery is known to cause severe acute postoperative pain, which can persist for a long time. We administered nefopam preventively to patients undergoing lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy, and evaluated its efficacy on acute and chronic postoperative pain.Enrolled patients were assigned to the nefopam (n = 41) or the control (n = 42) group. Before initiating the operation, 20 mg of nefopam was given to the patients of the nefopam group, and normal saline was used in the control group. Ketorolac was given at the end of surgery, and meloxicam was prescribed in the postoperative period to all patients in both groups. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS), and the rescue analgesic drug was given when the NRS was >5. Implementation of postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT), or hormone therapy was evaluated.The NRS of postoperative pain was significantly lower in the nefopam than in the control group in the postanesthetic care unit (4.5 ± 2.2 vs 5.7 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01), at postoperative 6 h (3.0 ± 1.6 vs 4.5 ± 1.3, respectively; P < 0.001), and at postoperative 24 h (3.1 ± 1.1 vs 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01) with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs. Significantly fewer patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain in the nefopam than in the control group at postoperative 3 months (36.6% vs 59.5%, P = 0.04). Considering only the cohort without postoperative adjuvant RT, the difference in the proportion of patients reporting chronic pain increased (23.5% in the nefopam group vs 61.5% in the control group, P = 0.04).Preventive nefopam was helpful in reducing the acute postoperative pain, with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs, and it contributed to reduced occurrence of chronic pain at postoperative 3 months after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27196485

  10. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  11. The role of experiential avoidance in acute pain tolerance: a laboratory test.

    PubMed

    Feldner, Matthew T; Hekmat, Hamid; Zvolensky, Michael J; Vowles, Kevin E; Secrist, Zachary; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W

    2006-06-01

    The present investigation examined the role of experiential avoidance in terms of acute pain tolerance and subsequent recovery. Seventy nonclinical participants completed the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and underwent a well-established cold pressor task. Results indicated that individuals reporting higher levels of experiential avoidance had lower pain endurance and tolerance and recovered more slowly from this particular type of aversive event. Consistent with theoretical prediction, these findings suggest that experiential avoidance may play a role in tolerance of acute pain. PMID:15882839

  12. Analgesics, allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Szczeklik, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    1 Recent studies of idiosyncratic reactions to analgesics have revealed several clinical patterns with a different pathogenesis. 2 In the pathogenesis of a common type of asthma precipitated by aspirin, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase leading to disturbances in metabolism of arachidonic acid is of fundamental importance. 3 In some patients with urticaria/angioedema, symptoms are due to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase by analgesics; in others the cause might be impurities in commercial preparations of aspirin; and in others the mechanisms are still unknown. 4 There is a distinct group of patients who develop anaphylactic shock or urticaria following administration of pyrazolone drugs, but who tolerate aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. This type of hypersensitivity seems to have an immunological background. PMID:7002192

  13. The future of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Topically applied analgesic therapies have been used throughout history to treat a variety of patient conditions that present with pain. Before modem pharmaceuticals became readily available, mud-based emollients, salves, cold therapies, and other natural remedies were often used. Now we have effective therapies and are developing advanced topical analgesics as we learn more about the physiology and pathophysiology of pain. The use of topical analgesics may be associated with fewer patient systemic side effects than are seen with oral, parenteral, or transdermally administered agents, making the topical route of administration attractive to prescribers and patients. With further refinement of existing drugs and the development of novel agents, topical analgesics may offer relief for treating patient pain conditions that are currently challenging to treat, such as pain resulting from burns, wound debridement, and pressure ulcers. Recognizing the value of a multimodal approach, topical analgesics may offer a therapeutic option that can become part of a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient. With continued advancements in targeted drug-delivery systems, topical analgesics may be able to provide a method to prevent or reverse the phenomena of peripheral and central sensitization, or the neuroplastic changes believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain states in patients. For those patients at risk for developing chronic pain states, such as complex regional pain syndrome, the combination of cutaneous stimulation (achieved through rubbing during application) and analgesic effects produced by the drug itself may prevent the disabling pain that often emerges during the subacute phase of disease. In summary, better utilization of currently available topical analgesics and continued research promise to ensure that topical analgesics are, and will continue to be, important tools in the treatment of patients with resistant pain. PMID

  14. Experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina. IV: Retinal tolerance time to acute ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, S. S.; Weingeist, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ophthalmoscopic, fluorescein angiographic, electrophysiological, and morphological studies on 63 eyes of rhesus monkeys with acute transient experimental occlusion of the central artery of the retina (OCAR) showed that the retina suffered irreparable damage after ischaemia of 105 minutes but recovered well after ischaemia of 97-98 minutes. The tolerance time of the brain to acute transient ischaemia is many times shorter than that of the retina. The metabolism of ischaemic neurones (in the retina and brain) is discussed with a view to explaining this difference, and also the various factors possibly responsible for the retina's longer tolerance to ischaemia, as compared to the brain. PMID:7426553

  15. Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation, Inc. MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Alternate Language URL Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys) Page Content On this page: Acute Kidney Failure ...

  16. Abundance of plasma antioxidant proteins confers tolerance to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Padhy, Gayatri; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Ganju, Lilly; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-09-01

    Systematic identification of molecular signatures for hypobaric hypoxia can aid in better understanding of human adaptation to high altitude. In an attempt to identify proteins promoting hypoxia tolerance during acute exposure to high altitude, we screened and identified hypoxia tolerant and susceptible rats based on hyperventilation time to a simulated altitude of 32,000 ft (9754 m). The hypoxia tolerance was further validated by estimating 8-isoprotane levels and protein carbonyls, which revealed that hypoxia tolerant rats possessed significant lower plasma levels as compared to susceptible rats. We used a comparative plasma proteome profiling approach using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF for both groups, along with an hypoxic control group. This resulted in the identification of 19 differentially expressed proteins. Seven proteins (TTR, GPx-3, PON1, Rab-3D, CLC11, CRP, and Hp) were upregulated in hypoxia tolerant rats, while apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) was upregulated in hypoxia susceptible rats. We further confirmed the consistent higher expression levels of three antioxidant proteins (PON1, TTR, and GPx-3) in hypoxia-tolerant animals using ELISA and immunoblotting. Collectively, these proteomics-based results highlight the role of antioxidant enzymes in conferring hypoxia tolerance during acute hypobaric hypoxia. The expression of these antioxidant enzymes could be used as putative biomarkers for screening altitude adaptation as well as aiding in better management of altered oxygen pathophysiologies. PMID:24067188

  17. Prescribing Opioid Analgesics for Acute Dental Pain: Time to Change Clinical Practices in Response to Evidence and Misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond A; Gordon, Sharon M; Moore, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    As the nation comes to terms with a prescription opioid epidemic, dentistry is beginning to understand its own unintentional contribution and seek ways to address it. The article urges dental providers to reexamine entrenched prescribing habits and thought patterns regarding treatment of acute dental pain. It points to evidence suggesting that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are nonaddictive and usually more effective for managing many cases of acute dental pain. The authors provide therapeutic recommendations to help dental providers change prescribing patterns. PMID:27517474

  18. Analgesic effect of percutaneously absorbed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an experimental study in a rat acute inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Shirasaka, Masayoshi; Konno, Shin-ichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Background External medication that is absorbed percutaneously may be used to reduce inflammation and relieve pain from acute injuries such as ankle sprains and bruises. The plaster method of percutaneous absorption for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was established in Japan in 1988. However, due to the possibility of a placebo effect, the efficacy of this method remains unclear. This experimental study was conducted to control for the placebo effect and to study the efficacy of the plaster method in relieving pain by using a rat model of inflammation. Methods Male Wistar-Imamichi rats were used. A yeast suspension was injected into the right hind paw to induce inflammation. A sheet (2.0 × 1.75 cm) containing the drug was adhered to the inflamed paw. Five treatment groups were used, and each sheet contained a single drug: loxoprofen sodium (loxoprofen-Na) (2.5 mg); felbinac (1.75 mg); indomethacin (1.75 mg); ketoprofen (0.75 mg); or base only (control, 0 mg). Mechanical pain threshold, expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and amount of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in the inflamed paw were evaluated. Results Pain threshold increased after treatment, and was significantly increased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Amounts of PGE2 were significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na and indomethacin groups compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Expression of c-Fos was significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Percutaneously absorbed NSAIDs have an analgesic effect, inhibit expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and reduce PGE2 in inflamed tissue, indicating the efficacy of this method of administration for acute inflammation and localized pain. PMID:18234123

  19. Interaction between Analgesic Effect of Nano and Conventional size of Zinc Oxide and Opioidergic System Activity in Animal Model of Acute Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kesmati, Mahnaz; Torabi, Mozhgan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Today Nano-medicine tries to produce new drugs to reduce the dosage and side effects of their conventional forms. According to the interaction between zinc and opioidergic system activity, this study has investigated the effect of new kind of zinc supplement, nano zinc oxide (nZnO), in compared to its conventional form (cZnO), in presence and absence of opioidergic system activity on acute pain. Methods Adult male Wistar rats (weighting 200±20gr) divided into groups: control (receiving saline %0.9), nZnO (1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg), cZnO (1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg), naloxone 1mg/kg, morphine 6 mg/kg, and co-injected groups of morphine and/or naloxone with nZnO (5mg/kg) and/or cZnO 10 mg/kg. Hot plate assay was used to evaluation of nociception and post injected latencies were recorded every 30 min for 90 min after I.P. injections of drugs. In co-injected groups latency time recorded after 60 minutes. Results Data indicated that both of ZnO supplements reduced latency time in dose and time dependent on the effect of nZnO was higher than cZnO. Also these components could improve anti-nociception effect of morphine and naloxone could not change the effect of these supplements. Discussion It seems that nZnO has more efficacy than its conventional form to showing analgesic effect that probably is related to the physicochemical properties of nZnO. Also may be these supplements have interaction with opioideric system in body. PMID:25436088

  20. A novel analgesic Isolated from a Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chaoran; Wang, Lien; Parks, Gregory Scott; Zhang, Xiuli; Guo, Zhimou; Ke, Yanxiong; Li, Kang-Wu; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Vo, Benjamin; Borrelli, Emiliana; Ge, Guangbo; Yang, Ling; Wang, Zhiwei; Garcia-Fuster, M. Julia; Luo, Z. David; Liang, Xinmiao; Civelli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Current pain management is limited, in particular, with regard to chronic pain. In an attempt to discover novel analgesics, we combined the approach developed to characterize traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), as part of the “herbalome” project, with the reverse pharmacology approach aimed at discovering new endogenous transmitters and hormones. Results In a plant used for centuries for its analgesic properties, we identify a compound, dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB) that is effective at alleviating thermally induced acute pain. We synthesize DHCB and show that it displays moderate dopamine receptor antagonist activities. By using selective pharmacological compounds and dopamine receptor knockout (KO) mice, we show that DHCB antinociceptive effect is primarily due to its interaction with D2 receptors, at least at low doses. We further show that DHCB is effective against inflammatory pain and injury-induced neuropathic pain and furthermore causes no antinociceptive tolerance. Conclusion Our study casts DHCB as a different type of analgesic compound and as a promising lead in pain management. PMID:24388848

  1. εPKC confers acute tolerance to cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Rachel; Sun, Guo-Hua; Yenari, Midori A.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2008-01-01

    In response to mild ischemic stress, the brain elicits endogenous survival mechanisms to protect cells against a subsequent lethal ischemic stress, referred to as ischemic tolerance. The molecular signals that mediate this protection are thought to involve the expression and activation of multiple kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). Here we demonstrate that εPKC mediates cerebral ischemic tolerance in vivo. Systemic delivery of ψεRACK, an εPKC-selective peptide activator, confers neuroprotection against a subsequent cerebral ischemic event when delivered immediately prior to stroke. In addition, activation of εPKC by ψεRACK treatment decreases vascular tone in vivo, as demonstrated by a reduction in microvascular cerebral blood flow. Here we demonstrate the role of acute and transient εPKC in early cerebral tolerance in vivo and suggest that extra-parenchymal mechanisms, such as vasoconstriction, may contribute to the conferred protection. PMID:18586397

  2. Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented. PMID:26141334

  3. [Chronic use of analgesics].

    PubMed

    Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Pommer, W; Molzahn, M

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of longterm analgesic intake are presented, based on a case-control-study on the relation between regular analgesic intake and endstage renal failure in the area of West Berlin (1984-86). Lifetime analgesic consumption of more than 1000 persons were investigated. A total of 285 longterm analgesic users (185 cases = 35.8%; 100 controls = 19.3%) were detected. An odd ratio of 2.44 (95% CI: 1.77-3.39) was computed. Regular analgesic intake was defined as an intake of at least 15 analgesic doses per month continuously over a period of at least 12 months. 90% of the regular users preferred mixed analgesics compounds, in most cases with the psychotropic additive caffeine. PMID:2238838

  4. Effects of Acute Alcohol Tolerance on Perceptions of Danger and Willingness to Drive after Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Amlung, Michael T.; Morris, David H.; McCarthy, Denis M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Drinking and driving is associated with elevated rates of motor vehicle accidents and fatalities. Previous research suggests that alcohol impairs judgments about the dangers of risky behaviors; however, how alcohol affects driving-related judgments is less clear. Impairments have also been shown to differ across limbs of the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) curve, which is known as acute tolerance. Objectives Examine whether perceptions about the dangerousness of driving after drinking and willingness to drive differed across ascending and descending limbs of the BAC curve. Test whether reductions in perceived danger were associated with willingness to drive on the descending limb. Methods Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate dose of alcohol (peak BAC = 0.10 g%) or placebo. We assessed perceived dangerousness and willingness to drive at matched BACs (~0.067-0.068 g%) on the ascending and descending limbs. Results Both perceived danger and willingness to drive showed acute tolerance in the alcohol group. Participants judged driving to be significantly less dangerous and were more willing to drive on the descending limb compared to the ascending limb. The magnitude of change in perceived danger significantly predicted willingness to drive on the descending limb. Conclusions Decreased impairment associated with acute tolerance may lead individuals to underestimate the dangerousness of driving after drinking and in turn make poor decisions regarding driving. This study further emphasizes the descending limb as a period of increased risk and offers support for enhancing prevention efforts by targeting drivers at declining BAC levels. PMID:24752657

  5. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, J. G.; van Wel, J. H.; Spronk, D. B.; Toennes, S. W.; Kuypers, K. P. C.; Theunissen, E. L.; Verkes, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  6. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  7. Pharmacokinetics and acute tolerance of a double virus inactivated plasma derived factor VIII concentrate.

    PubMed

    Saez, A; Bosh, N; Boadas, N; Arguello, A; Horvat, D; Dinapoli, G; Lisciani, R

    1999-07-01

    To further reduce the risk of possible viral disease transmission, an additional virucidal step was performed in the manufacturing process of a solvent/detergent treated factor VIII concentrate, which consisted of heating the lyophilized preparation at 100 degrees C for 30 min (Emoclot DI; ISI, Italy). Because thermal treatment may modify factor VIII bioavailability, the pharmacokinetic parameters and the acute tolerance of the single viral inactivated concentrate (preparation A) were compared with that of the double viral inactivated one (preparation B). Fifteen patients with severe haemophilia A and positive for HAV Ab were enrolled in a double-blind cross-over study and injected with 32.5 IU kg-1 of preparation A and 27 IU kg-1 of the preparation B. No significant differences between terminal half-life, area under the curve/dose, clearance/kg, volume of distribution at the steady state, in vivo recovery and acute tolerance of the two preparations was observed. The only statistical difference was restricted to Cmax. PMID:10469180

  8. Efficacy and Tolerability of 5- vs 10-Day Cefixime Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, J; Steinfeld, P; Drath, L; Keienburg, T; Troester, K

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oral cefixime 400mg once daily for 5 days was compared with standard 10-day therapy in a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, controlled clinical trial of 222 patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Clinical and bacteriological efficacy were assessed after 6, 11 and 30 days. A total of 167 patients were evaluable for efficacy on a per-protocol basis. Clinical efficacy (cure or improvement based on the quality and quantity of expectorated sputum and symptoms of dyspnoea) at day 11 was statistically equivalent (p < 0.01) between the treatment groups, with a successful clinical response achieved in 91% (5-day) and 89% (10-day) of patients. Bacteriological efficacy was also similar with 5- and 10-day treatment. During treatment, more patients reported an adverse event possibly or probably related to the study medication in the 10-day than in the 5-day treatment group (19 vs 14%). However, this difference was not statistically significant. Oral cefixime 400mg once daily is an effective and well tolerated treatment for acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Short-term (5-day) therapy offers clinical efficacy similar to that of standard (10-day) therapy. PMID:18370461

  9. Analgesic efficacy of lysine clonixinate plus tramadol versus tramadol in multiple doses following impacted third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Perez-Urizar, J; Martínez-Rider, R; Torres-Roque, I; Garrocho-Rangel, A; Pozos-Guillen, A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy, trismus control, and tolerability of the combination of lysine clonixinate and tramadol (LCT) versus tramadol (T) alone after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. This study was a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, including two study groups of 20 patients each, who exhibited acute pain subsequent to surgical extraction of two mandibular third molars. Pain intensity was quantified over a 96-h period using a visual analogue scale and a 5-point verbal rating scale. Secondary indicators of analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy, trismus control, and tolerability were determined. Patients administered LCT exhibited better therapeutic effects that those administered T. Fifty percent of patients in the LCT group rated this therapy as 'excellent analgesia' compared with only 10% in the T group. The onset of the analgesic effect of LCT was significantly faster, without any therapeutic failures. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to anti-inflammatory effect or trismus. The results of this study suggest that the postsurgical analgesic efficacy of LCT in combination (LC 125 mg + T 25 mg) is superior to that obtained with T alone, administered at the standard dose of 50 mg, for up to 96 h after the extraction of both impacted mandibular third molars. PMID:24042066

  10. A review of the clinical efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan in acute migraine.

    PubMed

    Dodick, David W

    2003-07-01

    Almotriptan is a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT)(1B/1D)-receptor agonist approved for the acute treatment of migraine. In 3500 acute migraine patients enrolled in short-term trials and 1500 patients in long-term open-label trials, almotriptan 12.5 mg was effective and well-tolerated. Almotriptan maintains a consistency of response across three attacks and patients continue to respond to almotriptan for up to 1 year. Results from two comparative studies and a meta-analysis of 53 randomised, placebo-controlled studies of oral triptans in > 24,000 patients, confirm that almotriptan 12.5 mg demonstrates comparable efficacy with sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg. The incidence of treatment-related adverse events with almotriptan is comparable to that of placebo and significantly lower than that with sumatriptan. Drug-drug interaction studies indicate that almotriptan may be coadministered with other commonly prescribed drugs without dose modification. Almotriptan can be recommended as first-line treatment for acute migraine. PMID:12831340

  11. The analgesic efficacy of etoricoxib compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen in an acute postoperative pain model: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, David J; Desjardins, Paul J; King, Thomas R; Erb, Tara; Geba, Gregory P

    2004-09-01

    Our objective in this study was to compare the analgesic effects of etoricoxib and oxycodone/acetaminophen in a postoperative dental pain model. Patients experiencing moderate to severe pain after extraction of two or more third molars were randomized to single doses of etoricoxib 120 mg (n = 100), oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg (n = 100), or placebo (n = 25). The primary end-point was total pain relief over 6 h. Other end-points included patient global assessment of response to therapy; onset, peak, and duration of effect; and rescue opioid analgesic use. Active treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo for all efficacy measures. Total pain relief over 6 h for etoricoxib was significantly more than for oxycodone/acetaminophen (P < 0.001). Patient global assessment of response to therapy at 6 and 24 h was superior for etoricoxib. Both drugs achieved rapid onset, although the time was faster for oxycodone/acetaminophen by 5 min. The peak effect was similar for both drugs. Compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen patients, etoricoxib patients experienced a longer analgesic duration, had a smaller percentage requiring rescue opioids during 6 and 24 h, and required less rescue analgesia during 6 and 24 h. Oxycodone/acetaminophen treatment resulted in more frequent adverse events (AEs), drug-related AEs, nausea, and vomiting compared with etoricoxib treatment. In conclusion, etoricoxib 120 mg provided superior overall efficacy compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg and was associated with significantly fewer AEs. PMID:15333415

  12. Tolerance of acute hypoxia while performing operator activity and after a prolonged period under altered gas environment conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloshchinskiy, P.; Golets, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Sergiyenko, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Human and animal studies on physiological factors in resistance to acute hypoxia are elaborated. Results show that tolerance of acute hypoxia depends on gas composition and temperature in a sealed cabin, on the length of the stay and motive regime, and on the kind of operator and professional activity. After preliminary adaptation to hypoxia, resistance of the body increases not only to insufficiency of oxygen in inspired air, but also to the effects of other extremum factors of manned space flight.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanna; Gubbay, Anthony; Branford, Ruth; Sato, Hiroe

    2013-01-01

    Summary points • Individual variability in pain perception and differences in the efficacy of analgesic drugs are complex phenomena and are partly genetically predetermined. • Analgesics act in various ways on the peripheral and central pain pathways and are regarded as one of the most valuable but equally dangerous groups of medications. • While pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, metabolism in particular, have been scrutinised by genotype–phenotype correlation studies, the clinical significance of inherited variants in genes governing pharmacodynamics of analgesics remains largely unexplored (apart from the µ-opioid receptor). • Lack of replication of the findings from one study to another makes meaningful personalised analgesic regime still a distant future. • This narrative review will focus on findings related to pharmacogenetics of commonly used analgesic medications and highlight authors’ views on future clinical implications of pharmacogenetics in the context of pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26516523

  14. Opioid and adjuvant analgesics: compared and contrasted.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ilyas Ahmed; Walsh, Declan; Brito-Dellan, Norman

    2011-08-01

    AAs (1-2 days). Rotation among opioids is a useful therapeutic strategy to improve analgesic response or minimize toxicity. Most AAs are unsuitable for rescue dosing because of their pharmacological characteristics. The mu agonist side effect profile is similar among the different opioid agents, regardless of the route of administration. The appropriate use of AAs will reduce opioid-related side effects. No apparent tolerance to analgesia develops with AAs. Abrupt discontinuation of an opioid after chronic repeated use for more than a few days will cause a withdrawal syndrome of variable severity. Adjuvant analgesics are an essential tool in cancer pain. PMID:21622486

  15. Acute pain management in opioid-tolerant patients: a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, C A; Roberts, L J; Somogyi, A A; MacIntyre, P E

    2011-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, in parallel with other developed countries, the number of patients prescribed opioids on a long-term basis has grown rapidly over the last decade. The burden of chronic pain is more widely recognised and there has been an increase in the use of opioids for both cancer and non-cancer indications. While the prevalence of illicit opioid use has remained relatively stable, the diversion and abuse of prescription opioids has escalated, as has the number of individuals receiving methadone or buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. As a result, the proportion of opioid-tolerant patients requiring acute pain management has increased, often presenting clinicians with greater challenges than those faced when treating the opioid-naïve. Treatment aims include effective relief of acute pain, prevention of drug withdrawal, assistance with any related social, psychiatric and behavioural issues, and ensuring continuity of long-term care. Pharmacological approaches incorporate the continuation of usual medications (or equivalent), short-term use of sometimes much higher than average doses of additional opioid, and prescription of non-opioid and adjuvant drugs, aiming to improve pain relief and attenuate opioid tolerance and/or opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Discharge planning should commence at an early stage and may involve the use of a 'Reverse Pain Ladder' aiming to limit duration of additional opioid use. Legislative requirements may restrict which drugs can be prescribed at the time of hospital discharge. At all stages, there should be appropriate and regular consultation and liaison with the patient, other treating teams and specialist services. PMID:21970125

  16. Efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan versus zolmitriptan for the acute treatment of menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, G; Acuto, G; Cabarrocas, X; Esbri, R; Benedetto, C; Bussone, G

    2006-05-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) attacks are a challenge for the headache specialist, because they are particularly difficult to treat. Almotriptan is a second-generation triptan successfully used for the acute treatment of migraine. No data on the efficacy and safety of almotriptan in MM treatment have been published previously. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan in the symptomatic treatment of MM attacks and to compare these parameters to those obtained with zolmitriptan, another second-generation triptan. Data from a multicentre, multinational, randomised, double-blind, parallel clinical trial, conducted at 118 centres in 9 European countries, to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of almotriptan 12.5 mg vs. zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in the acute treatment of migraine were analysed retrospectively. Of the 1061 patients included, 902 were women and 255 of these treated a MM attack: 136 with almotriptan and 119 with zolmitriptan. No significant difference between the two treatments was found. Two hours after dosing, 67.9% of almotriptan-treated and 68.6% of zolmitriptan-treated patients had obtained pain relief; while 44.9% and 41.2%, respectively, were pain free. Recurrence rates 2-24 h after dosing were 32.8% for almotriptan and 34.7% for zolmitriptan. Adverse events in the 24 h after dosing were reported by 19.8% of those taking almotriptan and 23.1% of those taking zolmitriptan. In conclusion, almotriptan is effective and safe in the treatment of MM attacks. PMID:16688629

  17. Electroencephalography and analgesics.

    PubMed

    Malver, Lasse Paludan; Brokjaer, Anne; Staahl, Camilla; Graversen, Carina; Andresen, Trine; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    To assess centrally mediated analgesic mechanisms in clinical trials with pain patients, objective standardized methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) has many advantages. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of present findings in analgesics assessed with spontaneous EEG and evoked brain potentials (EPs) in humans. Furthermore, EEG methodologies will be discussed with respect to translation from animals to humans and future perspectives in predicting analgesic efficacy. We searched PubMed with MeSH terms 'analgesics', 'electroencephalography' and 'evoked potentials' for relevant articles. Combined with a search in their reference lists 15 articles on spontaneous EEG and 55 papers on EPs were identified. Overall, opioids produced increased activity in the delta band in the spontaneous EEG, but increases in higher frequency bands were also seen. The EP amplitudes decreased in the majority of studies. Anticonvulsants used as analgesics showed inconsistent results. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine showed an increase in the theta band in spontaneous EEG and decreases in EP amplitudes. Tricyclic antidepressants increased the activity in the delta, theta and beta bands in the spontaneous EEG while EPs were inconsistently affected. Weak analgesics were mainly investigated with EPs and a decrease in amplitudes was generally observed. This review reveals that both spontaneous EEG and EPs are widely used as biomarkers for analgesic drug effects. Methodological differences are common and a more uniform approach will further enhance the value of such biomarkers for drug development and prediction of treatment response in individual patients. PMID:23593934

  18. Application of acute maximal exercise to protect orthostatic tolerance after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Crandall, C. G.; Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed at the conclusion of prolonged simulated microgravity would improve blood pressure stability during an orthostatic challenge. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cardiac output (Q), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and changes in leg volume were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope in seven subjects immediately prior to reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) under two experimental conditions: 1) after maximal supine cycle ergometry performed 24 h before returning to the upright posture (exercise) and 2) without exercise (control). After HDT, the reduction of LBNP tolerance time from pre-HDT levels was greater (P = 0.041) in the control condition (-2.0 +/- 0.2 min) compared with the exercise condition (-0.4 +/- 0.2 min). At presyncope after HDT, FVR and NE were higher (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with control, whereas MAP, HR, E, AVP, PRA, ANP, and leg volume were similar in both conditions. Plasma volume (PV) and carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were reduced after control HDT, but were restored by the exercise treatment. Maintenance of orthostatic tolerance by application of acute intense exercise after 16 days of simulated microgravity was associated with greater circulating levels of NE, vasoconstriction, Q, baroreflex sensitivity, and PV.

  19. Endotoxin tolerance alleviates experimental acute liver failure via inhibition of high mobility group box 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sai-Nan; Hu, Dan-Ping; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been widely reported to mediate damage caused by inflammatory responses. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of HMGB1 in endotoxin tolerance (ET) alleviating inflammation of acute liver failure (ALF) rats and its possible signaling mechanism. To mimic ET, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.1 mg/kg once a day intraperitoneally for consecutive five days) before subsequent ALF induction. ALF was induced by intraperitoneal administration of D-GalN/LPS. ET induced by LPS pretreatment significantly improved the survival rate of ALF rats. Moreover, after ALF induction, ET+ALF rats exhibited lower serum enzyme (ALT, AST and TBiL) levels, lower production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-a and HMGB1) and more minor liver histopathological damage than ALF rats. ET+ALF rats showed enhanced expression levels of HMGB1, decreased levels of STAT1 and p-STAT1, augmented expression of SOCS1 in liver tissues than ALF rats. These results indicated that ET induced by low-dose LPS pretreatment may alleviate inflammation and liver injury in experimental acute liver failure rats mainly through inhibition of hepatic HMGB1 translocation and release. PMID:26464648

  20. Endotoxin tolerance alleviates experimental acute liver failure via inhibition of high mobility group box 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sai-Nan; Hu, Dan-Ping; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been widely reported to mediate damage caused by inflammatory responses. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of HMGB1 in endotoxin tolerance (ET) alleviating inflammation of acute liver failure (ALF) rats and its possible signaling mechanism. To mimic ET, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (0.1 mg/kg once a day intraperitoneally for consecutive five days) before subsequent ALF induction. ALF was induced by intraperitoneal administration of D-GalN/LPS. ET induced by LPS pretreatment significantly improved the survival rate of ALF rats. Moreover, after ALF induction, ET+ALF rats exhibited lower serum enzyme (ALT, AST and TBiL) levels, lower production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-a and HMGB1) and more minor liver histopathological damage than ALF rats. ET+ALF rats showed enhanced expression levels of HMGB1, decreased levels of STAT1 and p-STAT1, augmented expression of SOCS1 in liver tissues than ALF rats. These results indicated that ET induced by low-dose LPS pretreatment may alleviate inflammation and liver injury in experimental acute liver failure rats mainly through inhibition of hepatic HMGB1 translocation and release. PMID:26464648

  1. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  2. Evaluating the therapeutic efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and acute tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsh, Zainab A.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Al-Muhayawi, Saad M.; ElAssouli, Sufian M.; Elfiky, Iman A.; Mourad, Samiha A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus (C. speciosus) rhizome in pediatric and adult patients suffering from acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis as an alternative to antibiotics use. Methods: This pilot cohort trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014, among 15 patients with acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis who were administered nasal drops of aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome at a dose of 15-30 drops every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measure was the clinical improvement and remission rate within the first 5 days. Results: The administration of C. speciosus resulted in an improvement in acute symptoms in 60% of the patients treated within the first 24 hours, and remission rate of 93% by day 5, without any recorded adverse effects. Conclusion: This study revealed a significant efficacy of the aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis. PMID:26219454

  3. Building a Better Analgesic: Multifunctional Compounds that Address Injury-Induced Pathology to Enhance Analgesic Efficacy while Eliminating Unwanted Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, T. M.; Brookshire, S. W.; Skinner, D. P.; Hanlon, K. E.; Giuvelis, D.; Yamamoto, T.; Davis, P.; Campos, C. R.; Nair, P.; Deekonda, S.; Bilsky, E. J.; Porreca, F.; Hruby, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain. PMID:23860305

  4. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5 h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Methods Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 220 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. Results The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (−70.3 min p = 0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50 min respectively, p < 0.0001). In the second study, the NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg combination failed to show any significant improvements vs. either component alone. Conclusions Only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination demonstrated improvement in both sleep latency vs. DPH 50 mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440 mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2) PMID:25996289

  5. Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Ekblom, Björn; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Larsen, Filip J

    2014-10-01

    The maximum power principle dictates that open biological systems tend to self-organize to a level of efficiency that allows maximal power production. Applying this principle to cellular energetics and whole-body physiology would suggest that for every metabolic challenge, an optimal efficiency exists that maximizes power production. On exposure to hypoxia, it would be favorable if metabolic efficiency would rapidly adjust so as to better preserve work performance. We tested this idea in humans by measuring metabolic efficiency and exercise tolerance under normoxic (Fio2=20.9%) and hypoxic (Fio2=16%) conditions, where Fio2 is fraction of inhaled oxygen. The results were compared with respirometric analyses of skeletal muscle mitochondria from the same individuals. We found that among healthy trained subjects (n=14) with a wide range of metabolic efficiency (ME), those with a high ME during normoxic exercise were able to better maintain exercise capacity (Wmax) in hypoxia. On hypoxic exposure, these subjects acutely decreased their efficiency from 19.2 to 17.4%, thereby likely shifting it closer to a degree of efficiency where maximal power production is achieved. In addition, mitochondria from these subjects had a lower intrinsic respiration compared to subjects that showed a large drop in Wmax in hypoxia An acute shift in efficiency was also demonstrated in isolated mitochondria exposed to physiological levels of hypoxia as P/O ratio increased from 0.9 to 1.3 with hypoxic exposure. These findings suggest the existence of a physiological adaptive response by which metabolic efficiency is dynamically optimized to maximize power production. PMID:24970395

  6. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  7. Acute effects of exposure to orthochlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) and the development of tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Beswick, F. W.; Holland, P.; Kemp, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Beswick, F. W., Holland, P., and Kemp, K. H. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 298-306. Acute effects of exposure to orthochlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) and the development of tolerance. Of the many compounds capable of producing irritation of the eyes and upper respiratory tract two, ω-chloroacetophenone and orthochlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS), have been used as riot control agents. The latter, CS, has been in use for more than 10 years and is currently still in service. When dispersed as a smoke consisting of 1-micron diameter particles CS will produce lachrymation and pain and discomfort in the upper respiratory tract and chest. Exposed individuals become apprehensive and highly motivated to escape from the smoke. Recovery from these effects occurs within minutes of the affected individual reaching fresh air. The present study reports the effects produced by CS aerosol on 35 healthy male volunteers who were exposed in such a way that the total dose of the agent received by each man was greater than that which he might have received in an actual riot; this was achieved by taking advantage of the fact that adaptation to the effects of CS occurs if exposure is gradual and to low concentrations. In addition to the clinical observations, cardiological, respiratory, and biochemical observations were made. No abnormalities were observed in the electrocardiogram, respiratory function tests or the blood biochemistry and cell constitution. Such changes that were observed could be ascribed to the emotional stress and discomfort of the experiment. PMID:5044601

  8. Electroencephalography and analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Malver, Lasse Paludan; Brokjær, Anne; Staahl, Camilla; Graversen, Carina; Andresen, Trine; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    To assess centrally mediated analgesic mechanisms in clinical trials with pain patients, objective standardized methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) has many advantages. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of present findings in analgesics assessed with spontaneous EEG and evoked brain potentials (EPs) in humans. Furthermore, EEG methodologies will be discussed with respect to translation from animals to humans and future perspectives in predicting analgesic efficacy. We searched PubMed with MeSH terms ‘analgesics’, ‘electroencephalography’ and ‘evoked potentials’ for relevant articles. Combined with a search in their reference lists 15 articles on spontaneous EEG and 55 papers on EPs were identified. Overall, opioids produced increased activity in the delta band in the spontaneous EEG, but increases in higher frequency bands were also seen. The EP amplitudes decreased in the majority of studies. Anticonvulsants used as analgesics showed inconsistent results. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine showed an increase in the theta band in spontaneous EEG and decreases in EP amplitudes. Tricyclic antidepressants increased the activity in the delta, theta and beta bands in the spontaneous EEG while EPs were inconsistently affected. Weak analgesics were mainly investigated with EPs and a decrease in amplitudes was generally observed. This review reveals that both spontaneous EEG and EPs are widely used as biomarkers for analgesic drug effects. Methodological differences are common and a more uniform approach will further enhance the value of such biomarkers for drug development and prediction of treatment response in individual patients. PMID:23593934

  9. Application of an Alcohol Clamp Paradigm to Examine Inhibitory Control, Subjective Responses and Acute Tolerance in Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Hendershot, Christian S.; Wardell, Jeffrey D.; Strang, Nicole M.; Markovich, Mike S.D.; Claus, Eric D.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in acute alcohol effects on cognitive control and subjective responses—and acute tolerance to these effects—are implicated in the risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related harms. Few studies have examined these effects in drinkers under age 21. Additionally, studies of acute tolerance typically involve bolus oral alcohol administration, such that estimates of tolerance are confounded with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limb. The current study examined cognitive control and subjective responses in young heavy drinkers (n = 88, M = 19.8 years old [SD = 0.8]) during a single-session alcohol clamp protocol. Participants completed an intravenous alcohol session comprising an ascending limb (0 to 80mg% in 20 minutes) and a BAC plateau (80mg% for 80 minutes). Serial assessments included a cued go/no-go task and measures of stimulation, sedation and craving. Relevant individual difference factors (ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking) were examined as moderators. Multi-level modeling demonstrated that response inhibition worsened following initial rise in BAC and showed increasing impairment during the BAC plateau. ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking moderated this effect. Significant within-person associations between stimulation and craving were evident on the ascending limb only. Participants with higher ADHD symptoms reported steeper increases in stimulation during the ascending limb. These findings provide initial information about subjective and behavioral responses during pseudo-constant BAC, and potential moderators of these outcomes, in late adolescence. Additional studies with placebo-controlled designs are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26053322

  10. Preliminary clinical experience with meptazinol, a new analgesic.

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, W; De Sy, W

    1975-01-01

    The analgesic effect of intravenous meptazinol at various dosage levels was studied in 30 patients suffering from acute renal colic. Out of a total of 41 injections (dose range: 20 to 120 mg.) a favourable analgesic response was recorded on 39 occasions. The onset of action was rapid with the minimun duration of action of 1 hour. Higher doses increased the drug's action but were accompanied by nausea and dizziness. There was no overall effect on blood pressure or heart rate. PMID:1097195

  11. Efficacy and Tolerability of Fixed-Dose Combination of Dexketoprofen and Dicyclomine Injection in Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, A.; Mahajan, A. D.; Oswal, D. S.; Erram, S. S.; Sheth, D. N.; Balamurugan, S.; Kamat, V.; Enadle, R. P.; Badadare, A.; Bhatnagar, S. K.; Walvekar, R. S.; Dhorepatil, S.; Naik, R. C.; Basu, I.; Kshirsagar, S. N.; Keny, J. V.; Sengupta, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of dexketoprofen and dicyclomine (DXD) injection in patients with acute renal colic. Patients and Methods. Two hundred and seventeen patients were randomized to receive either DXD (n = 109) or fixed-dose combination of diclofenac and dicyclomine injection (DLD; n = 108), intramuscularly. Pain intensity (PI) was self-evaluated by patients on visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours. Efficacy parameters were proportion of responders, difference in PI (PID) at 8 hours, and sum of analogue of pain intensity differences (SAPID). Tolerability was assessed by patients and physicians. Results. DXD showed superior efficacy in terms of proportion of responders (98.17% versus 81.48; P < 0.0001), PID at 8 hours (P = 0.002), and SAPID0–8 hours (P = 0.004). The clinical global impression for change in pain was significantly better for DXD than DLD. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in both groups. However, global assessment of tolerability was rated significantly better for DXD. Conclusion. DXD showed superior efficacy and tolerability than DLD in patients clinically diagnosed to be suffering from acute renal colic. PMID:22577544

  12. Managing Opioid-Tolerant Patients in the Perioperative Surgical Home.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, John T; Schwenk, Eric S; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R

    2016-06-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is important to decrease perioperative morbidity and improve patient satisfaction. Opioids are associated with potential adverse events that may lead to significant risk. Uncontrolled pain is a risk factor in the transformation of acute pain to chronic pain. Balancing these issues can be especially challenging in opioid-tolerant patients undergoing surgery, for whom rapidly escalating opioid doses in an effort to control pain can be associated with increased complications. In the perioperative surgical home model, anesthesiologists are positioned to coordinate a comprehensive perioperative analgesic plan that begins with the preoperative assessment and continues through discharge. PMID:27208711

  13. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  14. Acute rapamycin treatment improved glucose tolerance through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Terrier, Frédéric; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to investigate the potential role of TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in rainbow trout. Fasted fish were first treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin or vehicle and then submitted to a second intraperitoneal administration of glucose 4 h later. Our results revealed that intraperitoneal administration of glucose induced hyperglycemia for both vehicle and rapamycin treatments, which peaked at 2 h. Plasma glucose level in vehicle-treated fish was significantly higher than in rapamycin-treated fish at 8 and 17 h, whereas it remained at the basal level in rapamycin-treated fish. Glucose administration significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) in vehicle-treated fish, while rapamycin completely abolished the activation of S6K1 in rapamycin-treated fish, without inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt on Thr-308 or Ser-473. Despite the lack of significant variation in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA abundance, mRNA abundance for glucokinase (GK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) I and II, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) was reduced by rapamycin 17 h after glucose administration. The inhibition effect of rapamycin on GK and FBPase was further substantiated at the activity level. The suppression of GK gene expression and activity by rapamycin provided the first in vivo evidence in fish that glucose regulates hepatic GK gene expression and activity through a TORC1-dependent manner. Unlike in mammals, we observed that acute rapamycin treatment improved glucose tolerance through the inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in rainbow trout. PMID:25163922

  15. Central nervous system effects of meclizine and dimenhydrinate: evidence of acute tolerance to antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Manning, C; Scandale, L; Manning, E J; Gengo, F M

    1992-11-01

    Relative daytime drowsiness and performance impairment produced by meclizine and dimenhydrinate was assessed in 24 healthy male volunteers. Subjects received either dimenhydrinate, 100 mg, at 8:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 4:00 PM; meclizine, 50 mg, at 8:00 AM, with placebo at 12:00 PM and 4:00 PM; or placebo at all three times in this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Impairment of mental performance was assessed by choice reaction time testing and digit symbol substitution scores. Drowsiness was self-assessed on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and on a visual analog scale. Both antihistamines produced changes in digit symbol substitution, recognition time, and subjective assessments of sleepiness different from placebo. Expressed as change from baseline, the greatest reductions in digit symbol substitution scores after dimenhydrinate occurred 3 hours after the first dose (6.6 +/- 7) and were not different from the greatest measured change after meclizine (5.8 +/- 8), which occurred 9 hours after the dose was administered. Similar results were obtained with the other psychometric test scores. Self-rated sleepiness after dimenhydrinate was greatest 1 hour after the first dose, and was significantly greater than the largest degree of sleepiness after meclizine, which occurred at 7 hours after the dose. The effects of the first dose of dimenhydrinate on psychometric test scores were compared with the magnitude of the effects produced by subsequent doses. The magnitude of effect of the first dose of dimenhydrinate was significantly greater than the magnitude of effect produced by subsequent doses. The data suggest the possibility that acute tolerance to central nervous system impairment develops with multiple doses of dimenhydrinate. PMID:1474173

  16. Can quantitative sensory testing predict responses to analgesic treatment?

    PubMed

    Grosen, K; Fischer, I W D; Olesen, A E; Drewes, A M

    2013-10-01

    The role of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in prediction of analgesic effect in humans is scarcely investigated. This updated review assesses the effectiveness in predicting analgesic effects in healthy volunteers, surgical patients and patients with chronic pain. A systematic review of English written, peer-reviewed articles was conducted using PubMed and Embase (1980-2013). Additional studies were identified by chain searching. Search terms included 'quantitative sensory testing', 'sensory testing' and 'analgesics'. Studies on the relationship between QST and response to analgesic treatment in human adults were included. Appraisal of the methodological quality of the included studies was based on evaluative criteria for prognostic studies. Fourteen studies (including 720 individuals) met the inclusion criteria. Significant correlations were observed between responses to analgesics and several QST parameters including (1) heat pain threshold in experimental human pain, (2) electrical and heat pain thresholds, pressure pain tolerance and suprathreshold heat pain in surgical patients, and (3) electrical and heat pain threshold and conditioned pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Heterogeneity among studies was observed especially with regard to application of QST and type and use of analgesics. Although promising, the current evidence is not sufficiently robust to recommend the use of any specific QST parameter in predicting analgesic response. Future studies should focus on a range of different experimental pain modalities rather than a single static pain stimulation paradigm. PMID:23658120

  17. Three Newly Approved Analgesics: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Saraghi, Mana; Hersh, Elliot V.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, three new analgesic entities, tapentadol immediate release (Nucynta) diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules (Zipsor), and bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL) were granted US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to treat acute pain. Tapentadol immediate-release is a both a mu-opioid agonist and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules are a novel formulation of diclofenac potassium, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and its putative mechanism of action is through inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. This novel formulation of diclofenac allows for improved absorption at lower doses. Liposomal bupivacaine is a new formulation of bupivacaine intended for single-dose infiltration at the surgical site for postoperative analgesia. Bupivacaine is slowly released from this liposomal vehicle and can provide prolonged analgesia at the surgical site. By utilizing NSAIDs and local anesthetics to decrease the transmission of afferent pain signals, less opioid analgesics are needed to achieve analgesia. Since drug-related adverse events are frequently dose related, lower doses from different drug classes may be employed to reduce the incidence of adverse effects, while producing synergistic analgesia as part of a multimodal analgesic approach to acute pain. PMID:24423420

  18. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11383909

  19. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11508792

  20. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care. PMID:27177483

  1. Spontaneous resolution of acute rejection and tolerance induction with IL-2 fusion protein in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, R; Unadkat, J; Zhang, W; Zhang, D; Ng, T W; Wang, Y; Jiang, J; Lakkis, F; Rubin, P; Lee, W P A; Gorantla, V S; Zheng, X X

    2015-05-01

    Vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) has emerged as a treatment option for treating nonlife-threatening conditions. Therefore, in order to make VCA a safe reconstruction option, there is a need to minimize immunosuppression, develop tolerance-inducing strategies and elucidate the mechanisms of VCA rejection and tolerance. In this study we explored the effects of hIL-2/Fc (a long-lasting human IL-2 fusion protein), in combination with antilymphocyte serum (ALS) and short-term cyclosporine A (CsA), on graft survival, regulatory T cell (Treg) proliferation and tolerance induction in a rat hind-limb transplant model. We demonstrate that hIL-2/Fc therapy tips the immune balance, increasing Treg proliferation and suppressing effector T cells, and permits VCA tolerance as demonstrated by long-term allograft survival and donor-antigen acceptance. Moreover, we observe two distinct types of acute rejection (AR), progressive and reversible, within hIL-2/Fc plus ALS and CsA treated recipients. Our study shows differential gene expression profiles of FoxP3 versus GzmB, Prf1 or interferon-γ in these two types of AR, with reversible rejection demonstrating higher Treg to Teff gene expression. This correlation of gene expression profile at the first clinical sign of AR with VCA outcomes can provide the basis for further inquiry into the mechanistic aspects of VCA rejection and future drug targets. PMID:25676865

  2. EFFECT OF ZINC EXPOSURE ON SUBSEQUENT ACUTE TOLERANCE TO HEAVY METALS IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish usually show increased tolerance to metals in solution if proviously given an opportunity to acclimate to near lethal concentrations of the metal (Dixon and Sprngue 1981a; McCarter and Roch 1983; Bradley et al. 1985; Chapman 1985), and tolerence has been correlated with an i...

  3. Application of an alcohol clamp paradigm to examine inhibitory control, subjective responses, and acute tolerance in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Christian S; Wardell, Jeffrey D; Strang, Nicole M; Markovich, Mike S D; Claus, Eric D; Ramchandani, Vijay A

    2015-06-01

    Individual differences in acute alcohol effects on cognitive control and subjective responses--and acute tolerance to these effects--are implicated in the risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related harms. Few studies have examined these effects in drinkers under age 21. Additionally, studies of acute tolerance typically involve bolus oral alcohol administration, such that estimates of tolerance are confounded with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limb. The current study examined cognitive control and subjective responses in young heavy drinkers (n = 88; M = 19.8 years old, SD = 0.8) during a single-session alcohol clamp protocol. Participants completed an intravenous alcohol session comprising an ascending limb (0 to 80 mg% in 20 min) and a BAC plateau (80 mg% for 80 min). Serial assessments included a cued go/no-go task and measures of stimulation, sedation, and craving. Relevant individual difference factors (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] symptoms and sensation seeking) were examined as moderators. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that response inhibition worsened following initial rise in BAC and showed increasing impairment during the BAC plateau. ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking moderated this effect. Significant within-person associations between stimulation and craving were evident on the ascending limb only. Participants with higher ADHD symptoms reported steeper increases in stimulation during the ascending limb. These findings provide initial information about subjective and behavioral responses during pseudoconstant BAC, and potential moderators of these outcomes, in late adolescence. Additional studies with placebo-controlled designs are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26053322

  4. Analgesic and hypnotic activities of Laghupanchamula: A preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurvedic classics, two types of Laghupanchamula -five plant roots (LP) have been mentioned containing four common plants viz. Kantakari, Brihati, Shalaparni, and Prinshniparni and the fifth plant is either Gokshura (LPG) or Eranda (LPE). LP has been documented to have Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Shulanashka (analgesic), Jvarahara (antipyretic), and Rasayana (rejuvenator) activities. Aim: To evaluate the acute toxicity (in mice), analgesic and hypnotic activity (in rats) of 50% ethanolic extract of LPG (LPGE) and LPE (LPEE). Materials and Methods: LPEG and LPEE were prepared separately by using 50% ethanol following the standard procedures. A graded dose (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) response study for both LPEE and LPGE was carried out for analgesic activity against rat tail flick response which indicated 500 mg/kg as the optimal effective analgesic dose. Hence, 500 mg/kg dose of LPEE and LPGE was used for hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing model in analgesic activity and for evaluation of hypnotic activity. Results: Both the extracts did not produce any acute toxicity in mice at single oral dose of 2.0 g/kg. Both LPGE and LPEE (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 60 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail-flick method by 25.1-62.4% and 38.2-79.0% respectively. LPGE and LPEE (500 mg/kg) increased reaction time in hot-plate test at peak 60 min analgesic effect by 63.2 and 85.8% and reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 55.9 and 65.8% respectively. Both potentiated pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis as indicated by increased duration of sleep in treated rats. Conclusion: The analgesic and hypnotic effects of LP formulations authenticate their uses in Ayurvedic system of Medicine for painful conditions. PMID:25364205

  5. Acute cross-tolerance to opioids in heroin delta-opioid-responding Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Rady, J J; Fujimoto, J M

    2000-01-01

    It is generally thought that the mu receptor actions of metabolites, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM) and morphine, account for the pharmacological actions of heroin. However, upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration in Swiss Webster mice, heroin and 6MAM act on delta receptors while morphine acts on mu receptors. Swiss Webster mice made tolerant to subcutaneous (s.c.) morphine by morphine pellet were not cross-tolerant to s.c. heroin (at 20 min in the tail flick test). Now, opioids were given in combination, s.c. (6.5 h) and i.c.v. (3 h) preceding testing the challenging agonist i.c.v. (at 10 min in the tail flick test). The combination (s.c. + i.c.v.) morphine pretreatment induced tolerance to the mu action of morphine but no cross-tolerance to the delta action of heroin, 6MAM and DPDPE and explained why morphine pelleting did not produce cross-tolerance to s.c. heroin above. Heroin plus heroin produced tolerance to delta agonists but not to mu agonists. Surprisingly, all combinations of morphine with the delta agonists produced tolerance to morphine which now acted through delta receptors (inhibited by i.c.v. naltrindole), an unusual change in receptor selectivity for morphine. PMID:10810246

  6. Zomepirac sodium -- a new oral analgesic.

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Zomepirac sodium is a new oral analgesic that is more effective than aspirin, with no apparent tolerance or potential for addiction. It causes gastrointestinal bleeding similar to that caused by large doses of aspirin. For occasional moderate pain not responsive to aspirin, zomepirac may prove to be preferable to oral narcotics such as codeine, oxycodone, propoxyphene, pentazocine and meperidine. For chronic use, the safety and continued effectiveness of the new drug remain to be determined; it probably cannot replace oral narcotics in narcotic-dependent patients. For severe pain, as in myocardial infarction, renal colic and after some operations, zomepirac is no substitute for parenteral morphine. PMID:7005639

  7. BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF ACUTE CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS: TOLERANCE TO PROLONGED INHIBITION OF CHOLINESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), a commercially prevalent organophosphate (OP) pesticide, inhibits blood and brain cholinesterase for up to 10 weeks after acute s.c. injection in rats. his prolonged inhibition suggested that acute CPF may affect muscarinic receptors and behavior as does repea...

  8. Acute hyperglycemia alters von Willebrand factor but not the fibrinolytic system in elderly subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Ludovico; Coppola, Antonino; Grassia, Antonio; Mastrolorenzo, Luigia; Lettieri, Biagio; De Lucia, Domenico; De Nanzio, Annarita; Gombos, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    To assess whether acute hyperglycemia affects fibrinolytic balance in elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 40 non-obese elderly subjects (20 NGT, age 68 +/- 8 years; and 20 IGT, age 69 +/- 11 years) were studied. On two experimental days, randomly allocated and spaced 1 week apart, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were measured in each subject at baseline (0) and 30, 60, 90, 120 min after the ingestion of 75 g glucose or a similarly sweet dose of aspartame (250 mg) (control test). In both NGT and IGT elderly subjects, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and fibrinogen plasma levels did not significantly change after both oral aspartame and glucose load. In IGT subjects, vWF plasmatic levels decreased after glucose (not aspartame) oral load, reaching the minimum level at 90 min after load (82.7 +/- 7.8 versus 93.7 +/- 10.2, P <0.01). These results demonstrate that acute hyperglycemia does not modify plasma fibrinolysis in elderly subjects. The decrease of plasma concentration of vWF in IGT elderly subjects requires cautious interpretation and further extensive investigations. PMID:15613917

  9. Efficacy and tolerability of treatment with azacitidine for 5 days in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiv, Santhosh K; Hilton, Christie; Khan, Cyrus; Rossetti, James M; Benjamin, Heather L; Fazal, Salman; Sahovic, Entezam; Shadduck, Richard K; Lister, John

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients aged ≥60 years tolerate standard induction chemotherapy poorly. Therapy with azacitidine at a dose of 75 mg/m2/day for 7 days appears to be better tolerated, and is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of elderly AML patients with bone marrow (BM) blast counts of 20–30%. Here, we report the results of a prospective, phase 2, open-label study that evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of a 5-day regimen of single-agent subcutaneous azacitidine 100 mg/m2/day administered every 28 days in 15 elderly patients with newly diagnosed AML, 14 of whom had BM blast counts >30%. The overall response rate was 47%. Complete remission, partial remission, and hematologic improvement were achieved by 20, 13, and 13% of patients, respectively. Median overall survival was 355 days for the entire cohort, and 532 days for responders. Median time to best response was 95 days, and median treatment duration was 198 days (range = 13–724 days). Grade 3–4 hematologic toxicities comprised predominantly febrile neutropenia (40%) and thrombocytopenia (20%). Febrile neutropenia was the most common cause of hospitalization. Nonhematologic toxicities, consisting of injection-site skin reactions and fatigue (Grades 1–2), occurred in 73% (n = 11) of patients. No treatment-related deaths occurred during the study. The dose and schedule of therapy remained constant in all but four patients. The findings of this study suggest that administration of subcutaneous azacitidine 100 mg/m2/day for 5 days every 28 days is a feasible, well-tolerated, and effective alternative to standard induction chemotherapy in elderly patients with AML. PMID:25132519

  10. Analgesic effect of Persian Gulf Conus textile venom

    PubMed Central

    Tabaraki, Nasim; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Moradi, Ali Mashinchian; Vosughi, Gholamhossein; Mostafavi, Pargol Ghavam

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Cone snails are estimated to consist of up to 700 species. The venom of these snails has yielded a rich source of novel peptides. This study was aimed to study the analgesic effect of Persian Gulf Conus textile and its comparison with morphine in mouse model. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected in Larak Island. The venom ducts were Isolated and kept on ice then homogenized. The mixture centrifuged at 10000 × g for 20 min. Supernatant was considered as extracted venom. The protein profile of venom determined using 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Venom was administered intraperitoneally (IP) to evaluate the LD50 in Swiss albino mice. Different concentrations of Conus textile venom were injected intrathecally to mice to evaluate their analgesic effect in comparison to morphine. Injection was carried out between the L5 and L6 vertebrae. Differences between groups in the first and second phase were tested with Two-Way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: SDS-PAGE indicated 12 bands ranged between 6 and 180 KDa. Finally, ten ng of Conus crude venom showed the best analgesic activity in formalin test. No death observed up to 100 mg/kg. Analgesic activity of crude venom was more significant (P<0.05) in acute pain than inflammatory pain. The analgesic effect of 10 ng Conus venom was the same as morphine for reduction of inflammatory pain (P=0.27). Conclusion: The venom of Persian Gulf Conus textile contains an analgesic component for reliving of acute pain which can lead to find an analgesic drug. PMID:25729549

  11. Acute effects of guar gum on glucose tolerance and intestinal absorption of nutrients in rats.

    PubMed

    Daumerie, C; Henquin, J C

    1982-03-01

    The mechanism by which non-digestible fibres improve oral glucose tolerance is still unclear. We have studied the effects of guar gum on oral carbohydrate tolerance and intestinal absorption of nutrients in anaesthetized rats. Addition of guar to an intragastric glucose load (1 g/kg) markedly delayed the rise in plasma glucose levels when the concentration of the gum was adequate (10 mg/ml). The insulin response was somewhat less marked, but the differences were not significant. When glucose was introduced directly into the duodenum, the gum only slightly reduced the rise in glucose levels, during the first 15 min. If sucrose (1 g/kg) was infused in the duodenum, acarboseR, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, but not guar, slowed the rise in plasma glucose and insulin levels. Intestinal absorption was measured in a tied duodenojejunal loop. Guar decreased active transport of glucose (4 mmol/l) by approximately 20%, but had no significant effect on the passive transport of glucose (100 mmol/l), nor on the absorption of sucrose (40 mmol/l) or leucine (4 mmol/l). At the concentration which improved glucose tolerance (10 mg/ml), but not at lower concentrations, guar gum markedly slowed gastric emptying. These results suggest that guar gum improves tolerance to oral carbohydrates mainly by decreasing the rate of gastric emptying, but inhibition of intestinal absorption may also be involved in the presence of low concentrations of the sugars. PMID:6284563

  12. Analgesic profile of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from Marrubium vulgare.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M M; de Jesus, R A; Cechinel-Filho, V; Schlemper, V

    1998-04-01

    Marrubium vulgare L. is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to cure a variety of diseases. Recently we have demonstrated that a hydroalcoholic extract of this plant showed significant, nonspecific antispasmodic effects on isolated smooth muscle. In this report, we have investigated the possible analgesic effects of the same hydroalcoholic extract in different models of pain in mice. The results suggest that this extract exhibits significant analgesic activity, antagonizing chemically-induced acute pain. Such effects may be related to the presence of steroids and terpenes, which were detected by TLC analysis. PMID:23195761

  13. [Intramuscular etofenamate in the treatment of acute lumbago. Effectiveness and tolerance in comparison with intramuscular diclofenac-Na].

    PubMed

    Stratz, T

    1990-04-30

    In a controlled multi-center single-blind study, the relative efficacy and tolerance of i.m. injectable preparations of etofenamat(e) and diclofenac sodium were investigated in 96 patients with acute lumbago. Treatment resulted in obvious improvement in function and reduction in pain, no statistical difference being found between the two drugs. In 43% of the patients treated with etofenamat(e) and 27% of those receiving diclofenac, the final medical report indicated very good therapeutic results. Under etofenamat(e) i.m. therapy, no side effects occurred, and in no case did treatment have to be discontinued. Under diclofenac, two patients experienced adverse reactions, one allergic exanthema, and the other itching and a sensation of heat. A further patient experienced no improvement after the first injection and discontinued treatment. PMID:2142116

  14. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  15. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15% for the treatment of acute herpetic keratitis: background, effectiveness, tolerability, safety, and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Timothy Y; Hong, Bennett Y

    2014-01-01

    Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a leading cause of ocular morbidity and the number one infectious cause of unilateral corneal blindness in the developed parts of the globe. Recurrent keratitis can result in progressive corneal scarring, thinning, and vascularization. Antiviral agents employed against HSV have primarily been nucleoside analogs. Early generation drugs included idoxuridine, iododesoxycytidine, vidarabine, and trifluridine. While effective, they tended to have low bioavailability and measurable local cellular toxicity due to their nonselective mode of action. Acyclovir 0.3% ointment is a more selective agent, and had become a first-line topical drug for acute HSV keratitis in Europe and other places outside of the US. Ganciclovir 0.15% gel is the most recently approved topical treatment for herpes keratitis. Compared to acyclovir 0.3% ointment, ganciclovir 0.15% gel has been shown to be better tolerated and no less effective in several Phase II and III trials. Additionally, topical ganciclovir does not cause adverse systemic side effects and is therapeutic at lower concentrations. Based on safety, efficacy, and tolerability, ganciclovir 0.15% gel should now be considered a front-line topical drug in the treatment of dendritic herpes simplex epithelial keratitis. Topics of future investigation regarding other potential uses for ganciclovir gel may include the prophylaxis of recurrent HSV epithelial keratitis, treatment of other forms of ocular disease caused by herpesviruses and adenovirus, and ganciclovir gel as an adjunct to antitumor therapy. PMID:25187721

  16. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  17. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  18. The choice of the intravenous fluid influences the tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia in anesthetized domestic pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The correction of hypovolemia with acellular fluids results in acute normovolemic anemia. Whether the choice of the infusion fluid has an impact on the maintenance of oxygen (O2) supply during acute normovolemic anemia has not been investigated so far. Methods Thirty-six anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs were hemodiluted to their physiological limit of anemia tolerance, reflected by the individual critical hemoglobin concentration (Hbcrit). Hbcrit was defined as the Hb-concentration corresponding with the onset of supply-dependency of total body O2-consumption (VO2). The hemodilution protocol was randomly performed with either tetrastarch (6% HES 130/0.4, TS-group, n = 9), gelatin (3.5% urea-crosslinked polygeline, GEL-group, n = 9), hetastarch (6% HES 450/0.7, HS-group, n = 9) or Ringer's solution (RS-group, n = 9). The primary endpoint was the dimension of Hbcrit, secondary endpoints were parameters of central hemodynamics, O2 transport and tissue oxygenation. Results In each animal, normovolemia was maintained throughout the protocol. Hbcrit was met at 3.7 ± 0.6 g/dl (RS), 3.0 ± 0.6 g/dl (HS P < 0.05 vs. RS), 2.7 ± 0.6 g/dl (GEL, P < 0.05 vs. RS) and 2.1 ± 0.4 g/dl (TS, P < 0.05 vs. GEL, HS and RS). Hemodilution with RS resulted in a significant increase of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and a decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2), and O2 extraction ratio was increased, when animals of the TS-, GEL- and HS-groups met their individual Hbcrit. Conclusions The choice of the intravenous fluid has an impact on the tolerance of acute normovolemic anemia induced by acellular volume replacement. Third-generation tetrastarch preparations (e.g., HES 130/0.4) appear most advantageous regarding maintenance of tissue oxygenation during progressive anemia. The underlying mechanism includes a lower degree of extravasation and favourable effects on microcirculatory function. PMID:22546374

  19. Etodolac: analgesic effects in musculoskeletal and postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Pena, M

    1990-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have shown etodolac to be an effective analgesic. The purpose of the present report is to review results of 14 studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of etodolac in a variety of painful conditions. Presented are the results of four postsurgical pain studies, one study of acute gouty arthritis and nine studies of acute musculoskeletal disorders: acute low back pain, acute painful shoulder, tendinitis and bursitis, and acute sports injuries. A single oral dose of etodolac (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) was compared with aspirin (650 mg) or a combination of acetaminophen (600 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) for the relief of pain up to 12 h following oral, urogenital or orthopedic surgery. In multiple dose studies of acute gouty arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, etodolac 200 or 300 mg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 200 mg three times a day (t.i.d.) was compared with naproxen 500 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., diclofenac 50 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., and piroxicam 20 or 40 mg once a day (o.d.) administered over 5 to 14 days. The efficacy of etodolac was at least equal and in some ways superior to aspirin and acetaminophen plus codeine in the relief of postsurgical pain. In studies of acute gouty arthritis, significant improvement from baseline were seen for all efficacy parameters evaluated for both the etodolac- and naproxen-treated patients. All the present studies of musculoskeletal conditions have shown etodolac to be effective and comparable in analgesic efficacy to naproxen, diclofenac or piroxicam. In summary, etodolac therapy for pain following surgery, in acute gouty arthritis and in acute musculoskeletal conditions resulted in analgesia comparable to that provided by several well-established analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:2150571

  20. Site and mechanism of morphine tolerance in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    AKBARALI, H. I.; INKISAR, A.; DEWEY, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation is a major clinical problem. The effects of morphine, and other narcotics, on the gastrointestinal tract persist over long-term use thus limiting the clinical benefit of these excellent pain relievers. The effects of opioids in the gut, including morphine, are largely mediated by the μ-opioid receptors at the soma and nerve terminals of enteric neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that regional differences exist in both acute and chronic morphine along the gastrointestinal tract. While tolerance develops to the analgesic effects and upper gastrointestinal motility upon repeated morphine administration, tolerance does not develop in the colon with chronic opioids resulting in persistent constipation. Here, we review the mechanisms by which tolerance develops in the small but not the large intestine. The regional differences lie in the signaling and regulation of the μopioid receptor in the various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The differential role of β-arrestin2 in tolerance development between central and enteric neurons defines the potential for therapeutic approaches in developing ligands with analgesic properties and minimal constipating effects. PMID:25257923

  1. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dhirender; Kumar, Ajay; Kaushik, Pawan; Rana, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae) is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models. PMID:22761611

  2. Amino acid mixture acutely improves the glucose tolerance of healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Kammer, Lynne M; Ding, Zhenping; Lassiter, David G; Hwang, Jungyun; Nelson, Jeffrey L; Ivy, John L

    2012-01-01

    Certain amino acids have been reported to influence carbohydrate metabolism and blood glucose clearance, as well as improve the glucose tolerance in animal models. We hypothesized that an amino acid mixture consisting of isoleucine and 4 additional amino acids would improve the glucose response of healthy overweight men and women to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twenty-two overweight healthy subjects completed 2 OGTTs after consuming 2 different test beverages. The amino acid mixture beverage (CHO/AA) consisted of 0.088 g cystine 2HCl, 0.043 g methionine, 0.086 g valine, 12.094 g isoleucine, 0.084 g leucine, and 100 g dextrose. The control beverage (CHO) consisted of 100 g dextrose only. Venous blood samples were drawn 10 minutes before the start of ingesting the drinks and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after the completion of the drinks. During the OGTT, the plasma glucose response for the CHO/AA treatment was significantly lower than that of the CHO treatment (P < .01), as was the plasma glucose area under the curve (CHO/AA 806 ± 31 mmol/L·3 hours vs CHO 942 ± 40 mmol/L·3 hours). Differences in plasma glucose between treatments occurred at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after supplement ingestion. Plasma glucagon during the CHO/AA treatment was significantly higher than during the CHO treatment. However, there were no significant differences in plasma insulin or C-peptide responses between treatments. These results suggest that the amino acid mixture lowers the glucose response to an OGTT in healthy overweight subjects in an insulin-independent manner. PMID:22260861

  3. The efficacy and tolerability of frovatriptan and dexketoprofen for the treatment of acute migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Rolando, Sara; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Benedetto, Chiara

    2014-08-01

    Frovatriptan is a triptan characterized by a high affinity for 5-HT1B/1D receptors and a long half-life contributing to a more sustained and prolonged action than other triptans. Dexketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with a relatively short half-life and rapid onset of action, blocking the action of cyclo-oxygenase, which is involved in prostaglandins' production, thus reducing inflammation and pain. Both drugs have been successfully employed as monotherapies for the treatment of acute migraine attacks. The combination of these two drugs (frovatriptan 2.5 mg plus dexketoprofen 25 or 37.5 mg) has been tested in migraine sufferers, showing a rapid and good initial efficacy, with 2-h pain free rates of 51%, and a high persistence in the 48-h following the onset of pain: recurrence occurred in only 29% of attacks and sustained pain free rates were 43% at 24- and 33% at 48-h. PMID:25056381

  4. Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GSK1322322 in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Ralph; O'Riordan, William D.; Dumont, Etienne; Jones, Lori S.; Kurtinecz, Milena; Zhu, John Z.

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 represents a new class of antibiotics that targets an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation, peptide deformylase. This multicenter, randomized, phase IIa study compared the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 at 1,500 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with that of linezolid at 600 mg b.i.d. in patients suspected of having Gram-positive acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). The primary endpoint was assessment of the safety of GSK1322322, and a key secondary endpoint was the number of subjects with a ≥20% decrease in lesion area from the baseline at 48 and 72 h after treatment initiation. GSK1322322 administration was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events, most commonly, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Adverse events (86% versus 74%) and withdrawals (28% versus 11%) were more frequent in the GSK1322322-treated group. Treatment with GSK1322322 and linezolid was associated with ≥20% decreases from the baseline in the lesion area in 73% (36/49) and 92% (24/26) of the patients, respectively, at the 48-h assessment and in 96% (44/46) and 100% (25/25) of the patients, respectively, at the 72-h assessment. Reductions in exudate/pus, pain, and skin infection scores were comparable between the GSK1322322 and linezolid treatments. The clinical success rates within the intent-to-treat population and the per-protocol population that completed this study were 67 and 91%, respectively, in the GSK1322322-treated group and 89 and 100%, respectively, in the linezolid-treated group. These results will be used to guide dose selection in future studies with GSK1322322 to optimize its tolerability and efficacy in patients with ABSSSIs. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01209078 and at http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com [PDF113414].) PMID:25136015

  5. Allopregnanolone preclinical acute pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to predict tolerability and efficacy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Ronald W; Solinsky, Christine M; Loya, Carlos M; Salituro, Francesco G; Rodgers, Kathleen E; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The predicted

  6. Effects of acute NH3 air pollution on N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichen species.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Maslaňáková, Ivana; Grassi, Alice; Bačkor, Martin; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Lichens are sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) in the environment. However, in order to use them as reliable indicators in biomonitoring studies, it is necessary to establish unequivocally the occurrence of certain symptoms following the exposure to NH3 in the environment. In this paper, we simulated an episode of acute air pollution due to the release of NH3. The biological effects of acute air pollution by atmospheric NH3 have been investigated using N-sensitive (Flavoparmelia caperata) and N-tolerant (Xanthoria parietina) species. Lichen samples were exposed to ecologically relevant NH3 concentrations for 8 weeks, simulating three areas of impact: a control area (2 μg/m(3)), an area of intermediate impact (2-35 μg/m(3)) and an area of high impact (10-315 μg/m(3)), with a peak of pollution reached between the fourth and fifth week. Ammonia affected both the photobiont and the mycobiont in F. caperata, while in X. parietina only the photosynthetic performance of the photobiont was altered after exposure to the highest concentration. In the photobiont of F. caperata we recorded chlorophyll degradation as indicated by OD435/415 ratio, decrease of the photosynthetic performance (as reflected by the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry FV/FM and the performance index PIABS); in the mycobiont, ergosterol reduction, membrane lipid peroxidation (as reflected by the increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), alteration (decrease) of the secondary metabolite usnic acid. No effects were detected on caperatic acid and dehydrogenase activity. In X. parietina, the only signal determined by NH3 was the alteration of FV/FM and the performance index PIABS. The results suggest that physiological parameters in N-sensitive lichens well reflect the effects of NH3 exposure and can be applied as early indicators in monitoring studies. PMID:26342688

  7. CO2-O2 Interactions in Extension of Tolerance to Acute Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Gelfand, R.

    1996-01-01

    Advantageous and/or detrimental influences associated with purposeful deviations from atmospheric levels of O2 and CO2 are studied. Specific goals have been directed to simulating situations of emergency or accidental exposure to hypoxic (10% O2) environments. They included establishing dynamic effects of hypoxia with and without CO2 (rate of acute adaptation), and stable-state (equilibrium) effects on blood and brain oxygenation. They also included effects on the physiological parameters of respiration and blood gas composition which underlie brain oxygenation. For 10% O2, a complete experiment consisted of three identical rest-exercise phases of 32 minutes duration. Following a five minute air control period, each inspired gas was administered over the next 27 minutes. The test gases were room air control, 10% +/- 0.1% O2 with 4% +/- 0.1% CO2, and 10% +/- 0.1% O2. A minimum of 45 minutes separated each phase. Relative to inspiration of 10% O2, brain oxygenation is enhanced by addition of 4% CO2. This is accomplished by increasing the rate at which O2 in arterial blood is supplied to the brain circulation (well above even the normoxic level), and on relative improvement in the arterial pressure of O2.

  8. CO2-O2 interactions in extension of tolerance to acute hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    Objectives and results of experimental projects a re summarized. The scope of information desired included (1) physiological and performance consequences of exposures to simulated microgravity, in rest and graded physical activity, (2) separate influences of graded degrees of atmospheric hypercapnia and hypoxia, and (3) composite effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia. The research objectives were selected for close relevance to existing quantitative information concerning interactions of hypercapnia and hypoxia on respiratory and brain circulatory control. They include: (1) to determine influences of normoxic immersion on interrelations of pulmonary ventilation, arterial PCO2 and PO2, and brain blood flow, in rest and physical work; (2) to determine influence of normoxic immersion on respiratory reactivity to atmospheric hypercapnia at rest; (3) to determine influence of atmospheric hypoxia on respiratory reactivity to hypercapnia at rest and in work; and (4) to provide physiological baselines of data concerning adaptations in acute exposures to aid in investigation of rates of adaptation or deteriorations in physiological or performance capability during subsequent multi-day exposures. A list of publications related to the present grant period is included along with an appendix describing the Performance Measurement System (human perceptual, cognitive and psychomotor functions).

  9. Acute and chronic hypoxia: implications for cerebral function and exercise tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; Twomey, Rosie; Amann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To outline how hypoxia profoundly affects neuronal functionality and thus compromise exercise-performance. Methods Investigations using electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) detecting neuronal changes at rest and those studying fatiguing effects on whole-body exercise performance in acute (AH) and chronic hypoxia (CH) were evaluated. Results At rest during very early hypoxia (<1-h), slowing of cerebral neuronal activity is evident despite no change in corticospinal excitability. As time in hypoxia progresses (3-h), increased corticospinal excitability becomes evident; however, changes in neuronal activity are unknown. Prolonged exposure (3–5 d) causes a respiratory alkalosis which modulates Na+ channels, potentially explaining reduced neuronal excitability. Locomotor exercise in AH exacerbates the development of peripheral-fatigue; as the severity of hypoxia increases, mechanisms of peripheral-fatigue become less dominant and CNS hypoxia becomes the predominant factor. The greatest central-fatigue in AH occurs when SaO2 is ≤75%, a level that coincides with increasing impairments in neuronal activity. CH does not improve the level of peripheral-fatigue observed in AH; however, it attenuates the development of central-fatigue paralleling increases in cerebral O2 availability and corticospinal excitability. Conclusions The attenuated development of central-fatigue in CH might explain, the improvements in locomotor exercise-performance commonly observed after acclimatisation to high altitude. PMID:25593787

  10. Test-dependent relationship of the antidepressant and analgesic effects of amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Casas, J; Gibert-Rahola, J; Chover, A J; Micó, J A

    1995-11-01

    Antidepressants have been found to be of value in the treatment of pain of various etiologies. Nevertheless, the data are conflicting as it is often difficult to distinguish between the analgesic and antidepressant action. The analgesic effect of acutely administered amitriptyline at doses of 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg was investigated in four nociceptive tests involving physical (hot plate and tail flick tests), or noxious chemical stimuli (acetic acid and formalin tests). Relationships were established between the analgesic actions and the antidepressant effect of acutely administered amitriptyline at doses of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg in the forced swimming test. The results demonstrated a relationship between the antidepressant effect and the analgesic action in the tail flick test, but not in the hot plate, acetic acid and formalin tests. Thus, the type of noxious stimulus may be a determining factor in the relationship between these two pharmacological actions. PMID:8786671

  11. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  12. Does acute lead (Pb) contamination influence membrane fatty acid composition and freeze tolerance in intertidal blue mussels in arctic Greenland?

    PubMed

    Thyrring, Jakob; Juhl, Bodil Klein; Holmstrup, Martin; Blicher, Martin E; Sejr, Mikael K

    2015-11-01

    In their natural habitats, organisms are exposed to multiple stressors. Heavy metal contamination stresses the cell membrane due to increased peroxidation of lipids. Likewise, sub-zero air temperatures potentially reduce membrane functionality in ectothermal animals. We tested if acute lead (Pb) exposure for 7 days would influence survival in intertidal blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) after exposure to realistic sub-zero air temperatures. A full factorial experiment with five tissue Pb concentrations between 0 and 3500 μg Pb/g and six sub-zero temperatures from 0 to -17 °C were used to test the hypothesis that sub-lethal effects of Pb may increase the lethality caused by freezing in blue mussels exposed to temperatures simulating Greenland winter conditions. We found a significant effect of temperature on mortality. However, the short-term exposure to Pb did not result in any effects of Pb, nor did we find interactions between Pb and temperature. We analysed the relative abundance of major phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the gill tissue, but we found no significant effect of Pb tissue concentration on PLFA composition. Results suggest that Pb accumulation has limited effects on freeze tolerance and does not induce membrane damage in terms of persistent lipid peroxidation. PMID:26438355

  13. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  14. Development of tolerance to the inhibitory effects of ethanol in the rat isolated vas deferens: effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    DeTurck, K. H.; Pohorecky, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contractions of the rat vas deferens elicited by the addition of noradrenaline (NA), K+-depolarizing solutions or by electrical stimulation were recorded before and after incubation with ethanol 181 mM. In tissues from untreated rats, the contractions were inhibited 40-50% by such exposure. Injection of ethanol (2 g kg-1) significantly attenuated ethanol's reduction of peak tension generated by the lowest concentration of NA (10(-4) mM). Chronic administration of ethanol, 18-14 g kg-1 daily for two weeks, resulted in significant tolerance to ethanol. Tissues of treated animals demonstrated ethanol-induced decreases of roughly one-half those of the maltose dextrin (isocaloric) and water (fluid control) groups. This tolerance persisted for at least 48 h after ethanol treatment had been terminated. Overall, the data suggest that ethanol acts both pre- and postsynaptically to produce acute inhibition of smooth muscle contractions or tolerance to these actions upon chronic exposure. PMID:3730699

  15. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Daphne retusa Hemsl.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Jin, Huizi; Xu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua; Yan, Shikai; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2008-10-30

    Daphne retusa Hemsl. belongs to the genus Daphne, a member of Thymelaeaceae family. The barks and stems of Daphne retusa are used as a folkloric medicine 'Zhu Shi Ma' in Western China because of its effects of detumescence and acesodyne. In this paper, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the 75% ethanol extract of the stems and barks of Daphne retusa and different fractions partitioned with petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats, while the acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test as models for evaluating the centrally and peripherally analgesic activity. The results showed the plant has significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the result of the acute toxicity test at which the MTD was above 5g/kg indicates that the plant extract is relatively safe in, and/or non-toxic to, mice. The findings of these experimental animal studies indicate that the Daphne retusa ethanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, and thus provide pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of 'Zhu shima' in the treatment and/of management of anti-inflammatory and painful conditions in China. PMID:18692124

  16. Can repeated exposure to morphine change the spinal analgesic effects of lidocaine in rats?*

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Ali; Moghadam, Shervin Farkhondehkish; Rajaei, Samira; Mansouri, Zahra; Manaheji, Homa Shardi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic opium exposure leads to altered response to opioid compounds. The aim of this study was to assess the behavioral effects of opium tolerance on the analgesic effects of intrathecal lidocaine in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four adult male Sprague Dawley rats with intrathecal (IT) catheters were divided into 3 groups of 8. The first group was morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (ML). Rats in the second group were not morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (L), while the third group consisted of not morphine tolerant rats that received IT placebo. Tail flick test was done and maximal possible antinociceptive effects (MPAE) were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: While percent of MPAE significantly increased in the L group, it had a significant reduction in the ML group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: After intrathecal lidocaine administration, a hyperalgesic response was seen in morphine tolerant rats and an analgesic response was seen in the lidocaine group. PMID:22973332

  17. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    PubMed

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  18. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  19. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  20. Experimental evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Rai, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Edible mushrooms have been used as flavorful foods and as health nutritional supplements for several centuries. A number of bioactive molecules have been identified in numerous mushroom species Objective: To evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus florida using various experimental models in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity studies were performed whereby dose of 250 mg/ kg and 500 mg/kg was selected for present study, Analgesic activity was determined using hot plate method, tail flick method, acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced pain in rats, while carrageenan was used to induce inflammation and anti-inflammatory studies were performed. Results: HEE showed significant (P < 0.01) analgesic and anti-inflammatory response against all experimental models. Conclusion: These studies conclude that Pleurotus florida possesses analgesic and anti- inflammatory potential which might be due to presence of myochemicals like flavonoids, phenolics and polysaccharides. PMID:23543896

  1. Modeling Nociception in Zebrafish: A Way Forward for Unbiased Analgesic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Curtright, Andrew; Rosser, Micaela; Goh, Shamii; Keown, Bailey; Wagner, Erinn; Sharifi, Jasmine; Raible, David W.; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain conditions are often debilitating, inflicting severe physiological, emotional and economic costs and affect a large percentage of the global population. However, the development of therapeutic analgesic agents based primarily on targeted drug development has been largely ineffective. An alternative approach to analgesic development would be to develop low cost, high throughput, untargeted animal based behavioral screens that model complex nociceptive behaviors in which to screen for analgesic compounds. Here we describe the development of a behavioral based assay in zebrafish larvae that is effective in identifying small molecule compounds with analgesic properties. In a place aversion assay, which likely utilizes supraspinal neuronal circuitry, individually arrayed zebrafish larvae show temperature-dependent aversion to increasing and decreasing temperatures deviating from rearing temperature. Modeling thermal hyperalgesia, the addition of the noxious inflammatory compound and TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate sensitized heat aversion and reversed cool aversion leading larvae to avoid rearing temperature in favor of otherwise acutely aversive cooler temperatures. We show that small molecules with known analgesic properties are able to inhibit acute and/or sensitized temperature aversion. PMID:25587718

  2. [Analgesic properties of morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative RU-1205].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Grechko, O Iu; Shtareva, D M; Anisimova, V A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the analgesic activity of a morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative (RU-1205) in comparison to butorphanol. It is established that the test compound exhibits a pronounced analgesic activity, which exceeded that ofbutorphanol six times in the hot-plate test and was comparable to the reference drug effect in the tail-flick and acetic acid-induced writhing tests. It is established that the analgesic action of RU-1205 is based on the kappa-opioidergic mechanism. PMID:24432563

  3. Clinical and pathological aspects of analgesic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nanra, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    1 Analgesic nephropathy is part of the analgesic syndrome which has gastrointestinal, haematological, cardiovascular, psychological and psychiatric, and pregnancy and gonadal manifestations; premature ageing may also be a feature. 2 Analgesic nephropathy is a form of renal disease characterized by renal papillary necrosis, secondary chronic interstitial nephritis and renal failure with features of predominant tubulointerstitial dysfunction. 3 The percentage of patients with analgesic nephropathy who present with terminal renal failure is 12%. With appropriate management, 17% of analgesic nephropathy patients improve, 50% remain stable and 23% deteriorate. The 6 year cumulative survival is 70%. The major factors influencing deterioration are malignant hypertension, persistent proteinuria and small initial renal size. 4 The risk of renal papillary carcinoma in patients who regularly take analgesics is 8 per 100,000 patients per year. 5 Renal papillary necrosis is a consequence of the chronic toxicity of all non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and results from medullary ischaemia secondary to suppression of prostaglandin E2 synthesis and from direct cellular toxicity. 6 Analgesic nephropathy is a preventable form of renal disease and renal failure. It can be prevented by limiting the abuse potential of analgesics rather than by making minor modifications in the composition of analgesic mixtures. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:7002190

  4. Analgesic principle from Abutilon indicum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Amin, S; Islam, M; Takahashi, M; Okuyama, E; Hossain, C F

    2000-04-01

    Bioactivity guided isolation of Abutilon indicum yielded eugenol [4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol], which was found to possess significant analgesic activity. At doses of 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol exhibited 21.30 (p < 0.05), 42.25 (p < 0.01) and 92.96% (p < 0.001) inhibition of acetic acid induced writhing in mice. At a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol showed 33.40% (p < 0.05) prolongation of tail flicking time determined by the radiant heat method. PMID:10798248

  5. 11C choline PET guided salvage radiotherapy with volumetric modulation arc therapy and hypofractionation for recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU failure: preliminary results of tolerability and acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L E; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  6. Analgesics as Reinforcers with Chronic Pain: Evidence from Operant Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Eric E.; Martin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously preclinical pain research has focused on simple behavioral endpoints to assess the efficacy of analgesics in acute and chronic pain models, primarily reflexive withdrawal from an applied mechanical or thermal stimulus. However recent research has been aimed at investigating other behavioral states in the presence of pain, including spontaneous, non-elicited pain. One approach is to investigate the reinforcing effects of analgesics in animals with experimental pain, which should serve as reinforcers by virtue of their ability to alleviate the relevant subjective states induced by pain. The gold standard for assessing drug reinforcement is generally accepted to be drug self-administration, and this review highlights the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in animals with experimental neuropathic pain, and the extent to which this behavior is altered in chronic pain states. Additionally, intracranial self-stimulation is an operant procedure that has been used extensively to study drug reinforcement mechanisms and the manner in which neuropathic pain alters the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in this paradigm will also be discussed. Drug self-administration and intracranial self-stimulation have promise as tools to investigate behavioral effects of analgesics in animals with chronic pain, particularly regarding the mechanisms through which these drugs motivate consumption in a chronic pain state. PMID:23973302

  7. Generating Orally-Active Galanin Analogs with Analgesic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pruess, Timothy H.; Grussendorf, Erin; White, H. Steve; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous neuropeptide galanin has anticonvulsant and analgesic properties mediated by galanin receptors expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Our previous work showed that combination of truncation of the galanin peptide along with N-and C-terminal modifications afforded analogs that suppressed seizures or pain following intraperitoneal administration. To generate orally-active galanin analogs, the previously reported lead compound Gal-B2 (NAX 5055) was redesigned by (1) central truncation, (2) introduction of D-amino acids, (3) and addition of backbone spacers. Analog D-Gal(7-Ahp)-B2, containing 7-amino heptanoic acid as a backbone spacer and oligo-D-lysine motif at the C-terminus, exhibited anticonvulsant and analgesic activity post intraperitoneal administration. Oral administration of D-Gal(7-Ahp)-B2 demonstrated analgesic activity with reduction in both acute and inflammatory pain in the mouse formalin model of pain at doses as low as 8 mg/kg. PMID:22374865

  8. Analgesics as reinforcers with chronic pain: Evidence from operant studies.

    PubMed

    Ewan, Eric E; Martin, Thomas J

    2013-12-17

    Previously preclinical pain research has focused on simple behavioral endpoints to assess the efficacy of analgesics in acute and chronic pain models, primarily reflexive withdrawal from an applied mechanical or thermal stimulus. However recent research has been aimed at investigating other behavioral states in the presence of pain, including spontaneous, non-elicited pain. One approach is to investigate the reinforcing effects of analgesics in animals with experimental pain, which should serve as reinforcers by virtue of their ability to alleviate the relevant subjective states induced by pain. The gold standard for assessing drug reinforcement is generally accepted to be drug self-administration, and this review highlights the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in animals with experimental neuropathic pain, and the extent to which this behavior is altered in chronic pain states. Additionally, intracranial self-stimulation is an operant procedure that has been used extensively to study drug reinforcement mechanisms and the manner in which neuropathic pain alters the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in this paradigm will also be discussed. Drug self-administration and intracranial self-stimulation have promise as tools to investigate behavioral effects of analgesics in animals with chronic pain, particularly regarding the mechanisms through which these drugs motivate consumption in a chronic pain state. PMID:23973302

  9. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum. PMID:25162606

  10. Tramadol: a new centrally acting analgesic.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K S; Han, N H

    1997-03-15

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage and administration of tramadol are reviewed. Tramadol is a synthetic analogue of codeine that binds to mu opiate receptors and inhibits norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake. It is rapidly and extensively absorbed after oral doses and is metabolized in the liver. Analgesia begins within one hour and starts to peak in two hours. In patients with moderate postoperative pain, i.v. or i.m. tramadol is roughly equal in efficacy to meperidine or morphine; for severe acute pain, tramadol is less effective than morphine. Oral tramadol can also be effective after certain types of surgery. Tramadol and meperidine are equally effective in postoperative patient-controlled analgesia. In epidural administration for pain after abdominal surgery, tramadol is more effective than bupivacaine but less effective than morphine. In patients with ureteral calculi, both dipyrone and butylscopolamine are more effective than tramadol. For labor pain, i.m. tramadol works as well as meperidine and is less likely to cause neonatal respiratory depression. Oral tramadol is as effective as codeine for acute dental pain. In several types of severe or refractory cancer pain, tramadol is effective, but less so than morphine; for other types of chronic pain, such as low-back pain, oral tramadol works as well as acetaminophen-codeine. Common adverse effects of tramadol include dizziness, nausea, dry mouth, and sedation. The abuse potential seems low. The recommended oral dosage is 50-100 mg every four to six hours. Tramadol is an effective, if expensive, alternative to other analgesics in some clinical situations. PMID:9075493

  11. Safety issues of current analgesics: an update

    PubMed Central

    CAZACU, IRINA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Pain represents a complex experience which can be approached by various medicines. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics are the most common drugs used to manage different types of pain. The increased attention nowadays to pain management entailed concomitantly more frequent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to analgesic use. Drug-drug interactions can be sometimes responsible for the adverse effects. However, a significant proportion of analgesic ADRs are preventable, which would avoid patient suffering. In order to draw the attention to analgesics risks and to minimize the negative consequences related to their use, the present review comprises a synthesis of the most important safety issues described in the scientific literature. It highlights the potential risks of the most frequently used analgesic medicines: non-opioid (paracetamol, metamizole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and opioid analgesics. Even if there is a wide experience in their use, they continue to capture attention with safety concerns and with potential risks recently revealed. Acknowledging potential safety problems represents the first step for health professionals in assuring a safe and efficient analgesic treatment with minimum risks to patients. Taking into consideration all medical and environmental factors and carefully monitoring the patients are also essential in preventing and early detecting analgesic ADRs. PMID:26528060

  12. Analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic activities of the venom prepared from the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Forsskal, 1775)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxins derived from jellyfishes have been exploited as a model for the development of new drug promising applications to treat neurodegenerative diseases. The present work is aimed to evaluate the acute toxicity of crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca and then to screen the analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic (anti-BuChE) activities of the crude venom and its fractions. Methods Sephadex G75 gel was used to separate crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca, which led to some fractions. In addition, in vivo analgesic and in vitro plasma antibutyrylcholinestrasic activities were carried out with Pelagia crude venom and its fractions respectively. Results The crude venom and its fractions displayed analgesic and anti-BuChE activities at different doses without inducing acute toxicity. Fraction 2 possesses the highest analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic properties. The crude venom and fraction 1 had shown to possess less significant inhibitory activity against analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic models. Conclusions Based on this study, the crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca is found to be a useful tool for probing pharmacological activity. The purification and the determination of chemical structures of compounds of active fractions of the venom are under investigation. PMID:22691546

  13. Effects of oxytocin-related peptides on acute morphine tolerance: opposite actions by oxytocin and its receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Sarnyai, Z; Izbéki, F; Szabó, G; Telegdy, G; Barth, T; Jost, K; Brtnik, F

    1987-05-01

    The hormonally and behaviorally active nonapeptide oxytocin (OXT), its behaviorally active N-terminal octapeptide desglycinamide9-OXT and Z-prolyl-D-leucine, a synthetic analog of the C-terminal prolyl7-leucine8 sequence, inhibited the development both of a moderate and of a strong tolerance to morphine. N-alpha-Acetyl-(2-0-methyltyrosine)-OXT and (penicillamine1-2-0-methyltyrosine)- lysine8-vasopressin, both OXT receptor antagonists, facilitated the development of a moderate morphine tolerance. The i.c.v. injection of either antagonist prevented the effects of i.c.v. and s.c. OXT treatment on the development of tolerance. The effect of desglycinamide9-OXT, but not that of Z-prolyl-D-leucine was also prevented by N-alpha-acetyl-(2-0-methyltyrosine)-OXT. It is concluded that OXT and desglycinamide9-OXT, but not Z-prolyl-D-leucine, attenuate morphine tolerance by affecting putative oxytocinergic binding sites in the mouse brain. The fact that i.c.v. injection of the receptor antagonist also blocked the effect of s.c. OXT treatment argues in favor of the possibility that a minor proportion of s.c. OXT (or behaviorally active fragments thereof) may reach central nervous system target sites. PMID:3033220

  14. Treatment of renal colic by prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors and avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic).

    PubMed

    el-Sherif, A E; Foda, R; Norlen, L J; Yahia, H

    1990-12-01

    In a study of the pain-relieving effect of 3 drugs commonly used to treat acute renal colic in this hospital, intravenous indomethacin and intramuscular diclofenac (prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors) were compared with intravenous Avafortan (analgesic antispasmodic). As first-line analgesics, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, if given intravenously, offer an effective alternative to Avafortan. Of 145 patients studied, 32 required a second injection for complete relief of pain. Administering a second dose of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors resulted in equally significant pain relief rate even though the route was intramuscular. PMID:2265331

  15. Comparison of Conorphone, A Mixed Agonist-Antagonist Analgesic, to Codeine for Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Wirdezk, Peggy R.; Butler, Donald P.; Fox, Philip C.

    1984-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of two doses of conorphone (20 and 40 mg), a mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic, were compared to two doses of codeine for postoperative pain in the oral surgery model. Each subject received 2 of the 4 possible treatment at two separate sessions in an incomplete block, single crossover design. Both doses of conorphone and the 60 mg dose of codeine were superior to 30 mg of codeine for the various indices of analgesic activity. The 40 mg dose of conorphone resulted in a high incidence of side effects (25/30 subjects) such as drowsiness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. The low dose of conorphone resulted in side effects similar to 60 mg of codeine with the exception of a greater incidence of drowsiness. These data suggest that while 40 mg of conorphone may not be well tolerated clinically, 20 mg of conorphone may be an alternative to 60 mg of codeine for postoperative pain. PMID:6597688

  16. [Mechanism of action of the analgesic flupirtine].

    PubMed

    Nickel, B; Herz, A; Jakovlev, V; Tibes, U

    1985-01-01

    To answer the questions of mode and site of action partly supplementary, partly new investigations with flupirtine (Katadolon) were carried out which are described below. The investigation for opiate receptor affinity of flupirtine in rat brain homogenate did not show any reduction in 3He-etorphine binding up to the highest concentration of flupirtine of 10(-5) mol/1. This result suggests that flupirtine either has a very low opiate receptor affinity or lacks it fully. Therefore the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not based on opiate mechanism. The intracerebroventricular and intrathecal administration of flupirtine and the other analgesics tested showed dose dependent analgesic activity in doses which, when applied systemically, did not cause any analgesia in rats. Thus these substances show cerebral or spinal analgesic activity. In relation to the effective doses (ED50 in micrograms/rat) flupirtine was of the same efficacy in both kinds of administration. Pethidine tested comparatively was found to be less potent by intrathecal than by intracerebroventricular application. On the other hand, morphine was weaker by intracerebroventricular than by intrathecal application. As in the experiments by oral administration, naloxone did not show any effect on the analgesic activity of flupirtine, neither by intracerebroventricular nor by intrathecal application. On the other hand, the analgesic effects of pethidine and morphine were completely suppressed by naloxone. These results demonstrate that the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not caused by the opiate mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3002399

  17. PREDICTING THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE INHALED FOR 24 HRS IN RATS: DOSE METRICS, METABOLISM AND BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) is improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration ( Br[ToI)] instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a...

  18. Adjunctive analgesic therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A

    2008-11-01

    Adjunctive analgesic therapies are interventions for pain that involve agents or techniques other than the traditional analgesics (opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and local anesthetics). Adjunctive therapies may be pharmacologic or nonpharmacologic in nature. The focus of this article is on pharmacologic interventions with potential utility as adjunctive analgesics in veterinary medicine. Pharmacology of selected agents, including medetomidine, ketamine, amantadine, gabapentin, systemic lidocaine, and pamidronate, is discussed in addition to evidence for their safety and efficacy and guidelines for their use in veterinary patients. PMID:18954680

  19. Involvement of protein kinase C and Src tyrosine kinase in acute tolerance to ethanol inhibition of spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, W-K; Lin, H-H; Lai, C-C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein kinases in the development of acute tolerance to the effects of ethanol on spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated pressor responses during prolonged ethanol exposure. Experimental approach: Blood pressure responses induced by intrathecal injection of NMDA were recorded. The levels of several phosphorylated residues on NMDA receptor NR1 (GluN1) (NR1) and NMDA receptor NR2B (GluN2B) (NR2B) subunits were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Key results: Ethanol inhibited spinal NMDA-induced pressor responses at 10 min, but the inhibition was significantly reduced at 40 min following continuous infusion. This effect was dose-dependently blocked by chelerythrine [a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, 1–1000 pmol] or PP2 (a Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 1–100 pmol) administered intrathecally 10 min following ethanol infusion. A significant increase in the immunoreactivity of phosphoserine 896 of NR1 subunits (pNR1-Ser896) and phosphotyrosine 1336 of NR2B subunits (pNR2B-Tyr1336) was found in neurons of intermediolateral cell column during the development of tolerance. Levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 were also significantly increased in lateral horn regions of the spinal cord slices incubated with ethanol for 40 min in vitro. The increases in pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 levels were inhibited by post-treatment with chelerythrine and PP2, respectively, both in the in vivo and in vitro studies. Conclusions and implications: The results suggest that activation of PKC and Src tyrosine kinase during prolonged ethanol exposure leading to increases in the levels of pNR1-Ser896 and pNR2B-Tyr1336 may contribute to acute tolerance to inhibition by ethanol of NMDA receptor function. PMID:19703167

  20. Pharmacologic Characterization in the Rat of a Potent Analgesic Lacking Respiratory Depression, IBNtxA

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, Steven G.; Majumdar, Susruta; Narayan, Ankita; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John E.

    2014-01-01

    IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) is a potent analgesic in mice lacking many traditional opioid side effects. In mice, it displays no respiratory depression, does not produce physical dependence with chronic administration, and shows no cross-tolerance to morphine. It has limited effects on gastrointestinal transit and shows no reward behavior. Biochemical studies indicate its actions are mediated through a set of μ-opioid receptor clone MOR-1 splice variants associated with exon 11 that lack exon 1 and contain only six transmembrane domains. Like the mouse and human, rats express exon 11–associated splice variants that also contain only six transmembrane domains, raising the question of whether IBNtxA would have a similar pharmacologic profile in rats. When given systemically, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats, with an ED50 value of 0.89 mg/kg s.c., approximately 4-fold more potent than morphine. It shows no analgesic cross-tolerance in morphine-pelleted rats. IBNtxA displays no respiratory depression as measured by blood oxygen saturation. In contrast, oximetry shows that an equianalgesic dose of morphine lowers blood oxygen saturation values by 30%. IBNtxA binding is present in a number of brain regions, with the thalamus standing out with very high levels and the cerebellum with low levels. As in mice, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats with a favorable pharmacologic profile and reduced side effects. PMID:24970924

  1. Pharmacologic characterization in the rat of a potent analgesic lacking respiratory depression, IBNtxA.

    PubMed

    Grinnell, Steven G; Majumdar, Susruta; Narayan, Ankita; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2014-09-01

    IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) is a potent analgesic in mice lacking many traditional opioid side effects. In mice, it displays no respiratory depression, does not produce physical dependence with chronic administration, and shows no cross-tolerance to morphine. It has limited effects on gastrointestinal transit and shows no reward behavior. Biochemical studies indicate its actions are mediated through a set of μ-opioid receptor clone MOR-1 splice variants associated with exon 11 that lack exon 1 and contain only six transmembrane domains. Like the mouse and human, rats express exon 11-associated splice variants that also contain only six transmembrane domains, raising the question of whether IBNtxA would have a similar pharmacologic profile in rats. When given systemically, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats, with an ED50 value of 0.89 mg/kg s.c., approximately 4-fold more potent than morphine. It shows no analgesic cross-tolerance in morphine-pelleted rats. IBNtxA displays no respiratory depression as measured by blood oxygen saturation. In contrast, oximetry shows that an equianalgesic dose of morphine lowers blood oxygen saturation values by 30%. IBNtxA binding is present in a number of brain regions, with the thalamus standing out with very high levels and the cerebellum with low levels. As in mice, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats with a favorable pharmacologic profile and reduced side effects. PMID:24970924

  2. Overcoming obstacles to developing new analgesics.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Clifford J

    2010-11-01

    Despite substantial investment by the pharmaceutical industry over several decades, there has been little progress in developing new, efficacious and safe analgesics. As a result, many large pharmaceutical companies are leaving the area of pain medication. Nevertheless, the chances of success could increase if analgesic drug development strategy changed. To achieve such a paradigm shift we must understand why development of drugs for pain relief is so challenging. PMID:20948534

  3. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  4. Prescription Analgesic Use Among Young Adults: Adherence to Physician Instructions and Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Arria, Amelia M.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To understand the extent to which medication adherence was related to diversion of prescription analgesics. Design Cross-sectional analyses of data from the College Life Study, a prospective study of young adults. Setting Participants were originally sampled as incoming first-time first-year college students from one large public university in the mid-Atlantic U.S. Participants 192 young adults aged 21 to 26 who were prescribed an analgesic to treat acute pain in the past year. Outcome Measure Diversion of prescription analgesics. The study tested two competing hypotheses: 1) individuals who skip doses (Under-Users) are at greatest risk for diversion because they have leftover medication; and 2) individuals who over-use their prescriptions (Over-Users) are at greatest risk for diversion, perhaps because of a general propensity to engage in deviant behavior. Results 58% followed physician’s instructions regarding their prescription analgesic medication;27% under-used and 16% over-used their prescribed medication. Twenty-seven percent of the total sample diverted their medication, with Over-Users being the most likely to divert (63%). Holding constant demographic characteristics and perceived harmfulness of nonmedical use, Over-Users were almost five times as likely as Adherent Users to divert analgesic medications (P<.05). Conclusions Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between adherence and diversion. If these findings are replicated, physicians who are involved in pain management for acute conditions among young adults should take steps to monitor adherence and reduce diversion of prescription analgesics. PMID:21539698

  5. Atorvastatin attenuates the antinociceptive tolerance of morphine via nitric oxide dependent pathway in male mice.

    PubMed

    Hassanipour, Mahsa; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Shirzadian, Armin; Rahimi, Nastaran; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Dehpour, Ahmadreza

    2016-07-01

    The development of morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance limits its therapeutic efficacy in pain management. Atorvastatin, or competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, is mainstay agent in hypercholesterolemia treatment. Beyond the cholesterol-lowering activity, exploration of neuroprotective properties of this statin indicates its potential benefit in central nervous disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of atorvastatin in development and expression of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance in male mice and probable involvement of nitric oxide. Chronic and acute treatment with atorvastatin 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, could alleviate morphine tolerance in development and expression phases. Chronic co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors including L-NAME (non selective NOS inhibitor; 2mg/kg), aminoguanidine (selective inducible NOS inhibitor; 50mg/kg) and 7-NI (selective neuronal NOS inhibitor; 15mg/kg) with atorvastatin blocked the protective effect of atorvastatin in tolerance reversal. Moreover, reversing the atorvastatin effect was also observed in acute simultaneous treatment of L-NAME (5mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg) with atorvastatin. Co-treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (chronic dose: 10mg/kg and acute dose: 20mg/kg) was associated with prevention of atorvastatin anti-tolerance properties. Our results revealed that the atorvastatin modulating role in morphine antinociceptive tolerance is mediated at least in part via nitric oxide in animal pain models of hot plate and tail flick. PMID:27381980

  6. Treatment of mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injury: diflunisal vs acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Muncie, H L; King, D E; DeForge, B

    1986-08-01

    Acute soft tissue injuries create pain and limitation of function. Treatment requires analgesia and time for full recovery. Acetaminophen with codeine (650 mg plus 60 mg, respectively, every 4 to 6 hours) is used frequently as the analgesic of choice. Diflunisal (1,000 mg initially then 500 mg twice a day) vs acetaminophen with codeine was prospectively studied in the treatment of acute mild to moderate pain from soft tissue injuries. Thirty-five patients with acute strains, sprains, or low back pain were randomized to treatment (17 acetaminophen with codeine vs 18 diflunisal). Both groups were similar in the amount of pain and type of injury at initiation of therapy. Patient pain rating went from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.6 +/- 1.5 for acetaminophen with codeine and from 3.3 +/- 0.6 to 1.3 +/- 1.1 for diflunisal. However, 65 percent of acetaminophen with codeine patients experienced side effects, with 35 percent of these patients stopping the medication because of intolerable side effects. In the diflunisal group, 28 percent of the patients experienced side effects and 5 percent had to stop the medication early. Diflunisal was found to be an effective analgesic in mild to moderate pain of acute soft tissue injuries, and caused fewer and more tolerable side effects than did acetaminophen with codeine. PMID:2942630

  7. The distinctive significance of analgesic drugs and olfactory stimulants on learned pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakama-Kitamura, Mototaka

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain is often intractable to analgesics, and in animals it involves a conditioned nociceptive response (CR) - learned pain. The neural pathways of nociception and olfactory function in the brain overlap. The influence of olfactory stimuli on acute pain has been studied in some depth in animal and human models, but the influence of olfactory stimuli on learned pain has not been understood. We examined the effects of analgesic drugs and olfactory stimulants (preferred or repellent odor) on acute pain, the unconditioned nociceptive response (UCR) and the CR in mice. The CR was provoked by repeated injection of formalin into the hind-paw in animals in the same context, which elicited the typical pain behaviors of paw licking (including biting). The analgesic drugs acetaminophen, fentanyl, gabapentin and fluvoxamine diminished the UCR but did not affect the CR. In contrast, the preferred odor reduced both the UCR and the CR. Our findings suggest that, like chronic pain, the CR is resistant to analgesic drugs and that preferred odor suppress the neural pathways that mediate the CR of pain perception. PMID:25242616

  8. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities of the ethyl acetate fraction of Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Fotso, Aurélien Fotso; Longo, Frida; Djomeni, Paul Désiré Dzeufiet; Kouam, Siméon Fogue; Spiteller, Michael; Dongmo, Alain Bertrand; Savineau, J P

    2014-04-01

    Bidens pilosa is an Asteraceae widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments including pain and inflammation. The present work was undertaken to assess the analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the ethyl acetate fraction of methylene chloride/methanol (1:1) extract of leaves of Bidens pilosa at the gradual doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively. The analgesic properties of Bidens pilosa were investigated using the acetic acid writhing, hot plate, capsaicin and formalin-induced pain models. This was followed by a study of the antiinflammatory properties using carrageenan, dextran, histamine and serotonin to induce acute inflammation in rat hind paw. The extract provided a significant (p < 0.01) reduction in pain induced by all four models of nociception. It also presented significant (p < 0.05) antiinflammatory activity in all four models of acute inflammation. These results show that the ethyl acetate fraction of methylene chloride/methanol (1:1) of Bidens pilosa has both analgesic and antiinflammatory properties. The qualitative analysis of the fraction by the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint revealed the presence of two flavonoids, namely quercetin and iso-okanin, known to have antiinflammatory and antinociceptive properties, which could be responsible for the analgesic and antiinflammatory effects observed. PMID:24242914

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mutant and Null Mice Retain Morphine-Induced Tolerance, Hyperalgesia, and Physical Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Theresa Alexandra; Leduc-Pessah, Heather; Skelhorne-Gross, Graham; Nicol, Christopher J. B.; Milne, Brian; Trang, Tuan; Cahill, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal) were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (−) naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+) naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence. PMID:24824631

  10. Analgesic efficacy of morphine applied topically to painful ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Paul, James; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2003-06-01

    The analgesic effects of morphine applied topically to painful ulcers was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study of five patients with painful sacral sores. Patients were treated for two days with either 10 mg morphine sulfate or placebo (water for injection) applied topically to the ulcer. After a two-day wash-out period, patients were crossed over for a further two days of the alternative treatment. Patients were asked to rate analgesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and to document any local or systemic adverse effects. All patients reported lower VAS scores with morphine compared to placebo and no local or systemic adverse events attributable to morphine were noted by either patients or nursing staff. This pilot study suggests that morphine applied topically is an effective method of producing local analgesia, well tolerated by patients, and not associated with systemic adverse effects. PMID:12782436

  11. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  12. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Coxon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  13. Tolerability and Clinical Activity of Post-Transplantation Azacitidine in Patients Allografted for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated on the RICAZA Trial.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Charles; Jilani, Nadira; Siddique, Shamyla; Yap, Christina; Khan, Josephine; Nagra, Sandeep; Ward, Janice; Ferguson, Paul; Hazlewood, Peter; Buka, Richard; Vyas, Paresh; Goodyear, Oliver; Tholouli, Eleni; Crawley, Charles; Russell, Nigel; Byrne, Jenny; Malladi, Ram; Snowden, John; Dennis, Mike

    2016-02-01

    Disease relapse is the major causes of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). As well as demonstrating significant clinical activity in AML, azacitidine (AZA) upregulates putative tumor antigens, inducing a CD8(+) T cell response with the potential to augment a graft-versus-leukemia effect. We, therefore, studied the feasibility and clinical sequelae of the administration of AZA during the first year after transplantation in 51 patients with AML undergoing allogeneic SCT. Fourteen patients did not commence AZA either because of transplantation complications or withdrawal of consent. Thirty-seven patients commenced AZA at a median of 54 days (range, 40 to 194 days) after transplantation, which was well tolerated in the majority of patients. Thirty-one patients completed 3 or more cycles of AZA. Sixteen patients relapsed at a median time of 8 months after transplantation. No patient developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. The induction of a post-transplantation CD8(+) T cell response to 1 or more tumor-specific peptides was studied in 28 patients. Induction of a CD8(+) T cell response was associated with a reduced risk of disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR], .30; 95% confidence interval [CI], .10 to .85; P = .02) and improved relapse-free survival (HR, .29; 95% CI, .10 to .83; P = .02) taking into account death as a competing risk. In conclusion, AZA is well tolerated after transplantation and appears to have the capacity to reduce the relapse risk in patients who demonstrate a CD8(+) T cell response to tumor antigens. These observations require confirmation in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26363443

  14. Tolerability and Clinical Activity of Post-Transplantation Azacitidine in Patients Allografted for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated on the RICAZA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Charles; Jilani, Nadira; Siddique, Shamyla; Yap, Christina; Khan, Josephine; Nagra, Sandeep; Ward, Janice; Ferguson, Paul; Hazlewood, Peter; Buka, Richard; Vyas, Paresh; Goodyear, Oliver; Tholouli, Eleni; Crawley, Charles; Russell, Nigel; Byrne, Jenny; Malladi, Ram; Snowden, John; Dennis, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the major causes of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). As well as demonstrating significant clinical activity in AML, azacitidine (AZA) upregulates putative tumor antigens, inducing a CD8+ T cell response with the potential to augment a graft-versus-leukemia effect. We, therefore, studied the feasibility and clinical sequelae of the administration of AZA during the first year after transplantation in 51 patients with AML undergoing allogeneic SCT. Fourteen patients did not commence AZA either because of transplantation complications or withdrawal of consent. Thirty-seven patients commenced AZA at a median of 54 days (range, 40 to 194 days) after transplantation, which was well tolerated in the majority of patients. Thirty-one patients completed 3 or more cycles of AZA. Sixteen patients relapsed at a median time of 8 months after transplantation. No patient developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. The induction of a post-transplantation CD8+ T cell response to 1 or more tumor-specific peptides was studied in 28 patients. Induction of a CD8+ T cell response was associated with a reduced risk of disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR], .30; 95% confidence interval [CI], .10 to .85; P = .02) and improved relapse-free survival (HR, .29; 95% CI, .10 to .83; P = .02) taking into account death as a competing risk. In conclusion, AZA is well tolerated after transplantation and appears to have the capacity to reduce the relapse risk in patients who demonstrate a CD8+ T cell response to tumor antigens. These observations require confirmation in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26363443

  15. Antioedematous and Analgesic Properties of Fertile Fronds of Drynaria quercifolia.

    PubMed

    Anuja, G I; Latha, P G; Shine, V J; Suja, S R; Shikha, P; Satheesh Kumar, K; Rajasekharan, S

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissue cells to harmful stimuli including trauma, tissue necrosis, and infections which plays a key role in the pathophysiology of many deadly diseases. In ethnomedicine Drynaria quercifolia fronds are used to treat inflammation as poultice on swellings and as antibacterial, hepatoprotective, and antipyretic agent. Herein, we have evaluated the antioedematous, antiproliferative, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic extract of fertile fronds of D. quercifolia (FF) by standard procedures. Oral administration of FF produced significant inhibition of carrageenan and histamine induced paw oedema in Wistar rats. FF significantly reduced both wet weight and dry weight of granuloma tissue which shows the inhibitory effect on exudative and proliferative phases of inflammation. FF significantly attenuated acute and delayed phases of formalin induced pain, acetic acid-induced writhing, capsaicin-induced nociception, and hot plate test in mice. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of coumarins, flavonoids, glycosides, phenolics, saponins, steroids, tannins, and terpenoids. Total phenolic content was 186 mg/g equivalent of gallic acid. The HPLC estimation showed flavanone glycoside naringin (1.2%) and its aglycone naringenin (0.02%). The presence of potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic principles in FF and their synergistic action may be the reason for the proposed therapeutic effects. PMID:24575313

  16. Allopregnanolone Preclinical Acute Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies to Predict Tolerability and Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The

  17. Alcohol, tobacco and analgesics--Busselton, 1972.

    PubMed

    Woodings, T

    1975-08-01

    Mass health examinations carried out in Busselton in November and December, 1972, revealed that drinking and smoking were more prevalent amongst men, whereas more women took analgesic drugs. Compared with older age groups more young people consumed alcohol, tobacco and analgesics. Younger people are also taking up smoking and drinking at earlier ages than the older age groups. These findings stress the need for better health education to alter the attitudes of younger people. The people of Busselton would support legislation to allow spot breathalyser tests for drivers, women (70%) providing stronger support than men (57%). This suggests that public opinion could support continuing legislation to combat road accidents. Comparisons between the North Shore, Sydney, and Busselton populations indicated somewhat higher proportions of the urban people were consuming alcohol, tobacco and analgesics, particularly urban women. However, both Australian samples revealed disturbingly high proportions of subjects taking excessive monthly quantities of analgesics (3% to 5%) compared with the United Kingdom (2-8%). Previous reports of the high proportion of Traralgon people taking drugs or medication is supported by the Busselton data, which suggest the Australia requires stricter statutory control of analgesics, compulsory warnings on labels and restriction of sales to pharmacists. PMID:1160770

  18. Mutagenic and analgesic activities of aniline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sicardi, S M; Martiarena, J L; Iglesias, M T

    1991-08-01

    Phenacetin (1), acetaminophen (2), acetanilide (3), 4-aminophenol (4), and aniline (5) were tested in S.J.L. Swiss mice for their mutagenic and analgesic activities. The S-analogues of 1 and 2, 4-mercaptoacetanilide (6) and 4-ethylthioacetanilide (7), respectively, were synthesized and tested in the same way to define if both activities could be separated by molecular modification. All the compounds tested exhibited analgesic activity with ED50 values ranging from 12.6 to 158.5 mg/kg. The compounds could be arranged in a decreasing order of analgesic activity as follows: 3 greater than 4 congruent to 5 congruent to 6 greater than 1 congruent to 7 greater than 2. All the compounds, except 6, were positive mutagens in the micronucleus test (statistically significant). The order of relative mutagenic potencies was 1 congruent to 7 greater than 4 greater than 2 congruent to 3 congruent to 5. A narrow dose-response curve relationship was found for 5 and its metabolite 4, the relative mutagenic potencies of which suggest ring hydroxylation as the major pathway of biotoxification. No parallelism was found between analgesic and mutagenic activities, so they could be separated by pharmacomodulation: 6 was more effective as an analgesic in the acetic acid test than 2, and no mutagenic activity was found at the doses assayed. PMID:1791537

  19. Analgesic efficacy of the cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitor rofecoxib in post-dental surgery pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morrison, B W; Christensen, S; Yuan, W; Brown, J; Amlani, S; Seidenberg, B

    1999-06-01

    Previous data have suggested that rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-specific inhibitor, had analgesic effects similar to those of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs when tested in the post-dental surgery pain model. The objective of this parallel-group, double-masked, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled clinical trial was to assess more fully the analgesic efficacy of rofecoxib in the treatment of postoperative dental pain. After dental surgery, 151 patients (50.3% women; mean age, 18.3 years; 93.4% white) experiencing moderate-to-severe pain were to receive a single dose of placebo, rofecoxib 50 mg, or ibuprofen 400 mg. Analgesic efficacy was assessed for up to 24 hours postdose using self-administered questionnaires. Tolerability was assessed using spontaneous reports of adverse experiences, physical findings, and laboratory measurements. The results of this study demonstrated that rofecoxib 50 mg was more effective than placebo on all measures of analgesic efficacy. Rofecoxib 50 mg exhibited overall analgesic effects, onset of analgesia, and peak analgesic effects that were not significantly different from those of ibuprofen 400 mg, with a significantly longer duration of action (P < 0.05). We concluded that rofecoxib was efficacious in the treatment of postoperative dental pain and that COX-2-derived prostanoids play a role in treatment of the pain associated with dental surgery. PMID:10440619

  20. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question “which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?”. Materials and Methods A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Results Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 – 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study. PMID:26053953

  1. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  2. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  3. Splenic CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) dendritic cells derived from endotoxin-tolerant mice attenuate experimental acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai-Nan; Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Dong, Jin-Zhong; Shi, Chun-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sheng-Guo; Tang, Xin-Yue; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is suggested to attenuate the severity of acute liver failure (ALF) in mice, possibly through both innate and adaptive immunity. However, the involvement of regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) in ET has not been fully elucidated. In this study, their effect on ALF in mice was investigated. Splenic DCregs from ET-exposed mice (ET-DCregs) showed lower expression levels of CD40, CD80, and MHC-II markers and stronger inhibition of allogenic T cells and regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 secretion than splenic DCregs from normal mice (nDCregs). Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and P65 in splenic ET-DCregs were significantly lower than those in the splenic nDCregs. The survival rate was significantly increased and liver injury was mitigated in mice with ALF treated with splenic ET-DCregs. In addition, A20 expression was decreased in the liver of ALF mice, but elevated after infusion of splenic nDCregs and ET-DCregs, and a much higher elevation was observed after infusing the latter cells. The functionality of splenic DCregs was altered after ET exposure, contributing to protection of the livers against D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. PMID:27625297

  4. Use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Nicholson, A; Church, D B; Pearson, M R

    1996-09-01

    Responses (486) were collared from a survey of 5054 Australian veterinarians on their use of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. Almost all respondents used glucocorticoids (usually prednisolone) to treat allergic, pruritic dermatoses in dogs, while two-thirds also gave fatty acid supplements and one-half used antihistamines. Almost 60% of respondents initially injected a glucocorticoid (frequently a long-acting preparation) when treating inflammatory skin diseases in dogs. More than 90% of respondents used glucocorticoids to treat immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia or thrombocytopenia, and about one-third also gave cytotoxic drugs. Administration of prednisolone on alternate days was generally favoured for long-term enteral steroid therapy. Phenylbutazone was the most preferred treatment for painful or inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders of dogs, but aspirin and pentosan polysulphate were also used widely. Regarding the use of analgesics drugs generally, both narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were used more widely in dogs than in cats, but alpha-2 agonists were used similarly in both species. The most commonly used narcotic analgesics were pethidine and buprenorphine in both species, while the NSAIDs used most often were flunixin and dipyrone in dogs and ketoprofen in cats. More than 80% of respondents generally used analgesic drugs with potentially painful surgical procedures, with doses given usually before anaesthetic recovery. Analgesic use rates varied with the condition, ranging from 94% for patients with acute severe trauma, through 60% for cruciate ligament repair and 29% for perineal herniorrahphy, to about 5% for ovariohysterectomy and dog castration. The three clinical signs most frequently nominated as indicators of pain in dogs and cats were (in descending order) vocalisation, response to handling or palpating the affected area, and mental depression. Other items mentioned frequently were

  5. Noninterventional Study of Transdermal Fentanyl (Fentavera) Matrix Patches in Chronic Pain Patients: Analgesic and Quality of Life Effects

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P < 0.0001) decreases in patients' ratings of pain intensity, and impairment of walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  6. Noninterventional study of transdermal fentanyl (fentavera) matrix patches in chronic pain patients: analgesic and quality of life effects.

    PubMed

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P < 0.0001) decreases in patients' ratings of pain intensity, and impairment of walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  7. Synthesis of conolidine, a potent non-opioid analgesic for tonic and persistent pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarselli, Michael A.; Raehal, Kirsten M.; Brasher, Alex K.; Streicher, John M.; Groer, Chad E.; Cameron, Michael D.; Bohn, Laura M.; Micalizio, Glenn C.

    2011-06-01

    Management of chronic pain continues to represent an area of great unmet biomedical need. Although opioid analgesics are typically embraced as the mainstay of pharmaceutical interventions in this area, they suffer from substantial liabilities that include addiction and tolerance, as well as depression of breathing, nausea and chronic constipation. Because of their suboptimal therapeutic profile, the search for non-opioid analgesics to replace these well-established therapeutics is an important pursuit. Conolidine is a rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product recently isolated from the stem bark of Tabernaemontana divaricata (a tropical flowering plant used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and Thai medicine). Although structurally related alkaloids have been described as opioid analgesics, no therapeutically relevant properties of conolidine have previously been reported. Here, we describe the first de novo synthetic pathway to this exceptionally rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product, the first asymmetric synthesis of any member of this natural product class, and the discovery that (±)-, (+)- and (-)-conolidine are potent and efficacious non-opioid analgesics in an in vivo model of tonic and persistent pain.

  8. Synthesis of conolidine, a potent non-opioid analgesic for tonic and persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Tarselli, Michael A; Raehal, Kirsten M; Brasher, Alex K; Streicher, John M; Groer, Chad E; Cameron, Michael D; Bohn, Laura M; Micalizio, Glenn C

    2011-06-01

    Management of chronic pain continues to represent an area of great unmet biomedical need. Although opioid analgesics are typically embraced as the mainstay of pharmaceutical interventions in this area, they suffer from substantial liabilities that include addiction and tolerance, as well as depression of breathing, nausea and chronic constipation. Because of their suboptimal therapeutic profile, the search for non-opioid analgesics to replace these well-established therapeutics is an important pursuit. Conolidine is a rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product recently isolated from the stem bark of Tabernaemontana divaricata (a tropical flowering plant used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and Thai medicine). Although structurally related alkaloids have been described as opioid analgesics, no therapeutically relevant properties of conolidine have previously been reported. Here, we describe the first de novo synthetic pathway to this exceptionally rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product, the first asymmetric synthesis of any member of this natural product class, and the discovery that (±)-, (+)- and (-)-conolidine are potent and efficacious non-opioid analgesics in an in vivo model of tonic and persistent pain. PMID:21602859

  9. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  10. Cross Acclimation between Heat and Hypoxia: Heat Acclimation Improves Cellular Tolerance and Exercise Performance in Acute Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ben J.; Miller, Amanda; James, Rob S.; Thake, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The potential for cross acclimation between environmental stressors is not well understood. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of fixed-workload heat or hypoxic acclimation on cellular, physiological, and performance responses during post acclimation hypoxic exercise in humans. Method: Twenty-one males (age 22 ± 5 years; stature 1.76 ± 0.07 m; mass 71.8 ± 7.9 kg; V˙O2 peak 51 ± 7 mL.kg−1.min−1) completed a cycling hypoxic stress test (HST) and self-paced 16.1 km time trial (TT) before (HST1, TT1), and after (HST2, TT2) a series of 10 daily 60 min training sessions (50% N V˙O2 peak) in control (CON, n = 7; 18°C, 35% RH), hypoxic (HYP, n = 7; fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.14, 18°C, 35% RH), or hot (HOT, n = 7; 40°C, 25% RH) conditions. Results: TT performance in hypoxia was improved following both acclimation treatments, HYP (−3:16 ± 3:10 min:s; p = 0.0006) and HOT (−2:02 ± 1:02 min:s; p = 0.005), but unchanged after CON (+0:31 ± 1:42 min:s). Resting monocyte heat shock protein 72 (mHSP72) increased prior to HST2 in HOT (62 ± 46%) and HYP (58 ± 52%), but was unchanged after CON (9 ± 46%), leading to an attenuated mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise in HOT and HYP HST2 compared to HST1 (p < 0.01). Changes in extracellular hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α followed a similar pattern to those of mHSP72. Physiological strain index (PSI) was attenuated in HOT (HST1 = 4.12 ± 0.58, HST2 = 3.60 ± 0.42; p = 0.007) as a result of a reduced HR (HST1 = 140 ± 14 b.min−1; HST2 131 ± 9 b.min−1 p = 0.0006) and Trectal (HST1 = 37.55 ± 0.18°C; HST2 37.45 ± 0.14°C; p = 0.018) during exercise. Whereas PSI did not change in HYP (HST1 = 4.82 ± 0.64, HST2 4.83 ± 0.63). Conclusion: Heat acclimation improved cellular and systemic physiological tolerance to steady state exercise in moderate hypoxia. Additionally we show, for the first time, that heat acclimation improved cycling time trial performance to a magnitude

  11. Ethnic Differences in Analgesic Drug Related Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Franklyn L.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated ethnic differences among 121 analgesic drug-related deaths. Data from the medical examiner's office and interviews with survivors indicated greater codeine involvement for non-Whites and greater propoxyphene involvement for Whites, higher incidences of illicit drug abuse among non-Whites, and more abuse of prescribed drugs among…

  12. [Anilides with analgesic and antipyretic activity].

    PubMed

    Mulé, A; Pirisino, G; Piu, L; Satta, M; Manca, P; Peana, A

    1985-01-01

    Several trimethylcyclopentyl and trimethylcyclopentenyl acetanilides, mono- and di-substituted on the aromatic nucleus as well as the corresponding acyl derivatives from aniline it self and corresponding phenylacetanilides, were prepared and tested as analgesics and antipyretics. Several compounds exhibit considerable activity in some cases superior to that of acetanilide. PMID:3872232

  13. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  14. The Influence of Genotype Polymorphism on Morphine Analgesic Effect for Postoperative Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although opioids are the most commonly used medications to control postoperative pain in children, the analgesic effects could have a large inter-individual variability according to genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the analgesic effect of morphine for postoperative pain in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 88 healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy, who received morphine during the operation. The postoperative pain score, frequency of rescue analgesics, and side effects of morphine were assessed in the post-anesthesia care unit. The children were genotyped for OPRM1 A118G, ABCB1 C3435T, and COMT Val158Met. Results Children with at least one G allele for OPRM1 (AG/GG) had higher postoperative pain scores compared with those with the AA genotype at the time of discharge from the post-anesthesia care unit (P = 0.025). Other recovery profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant relationship between genotypes and postoperative pain scores in analysis of ABCB1 and COMT polymorphisms. Conclusions Genetic polymorphism at OPRM1 A118G, but not at ABCB1 C3435T and COMT Val158Met, influences the analgesic effect of morphine for immediate acute postoperative pain in children. PMID:26839669

  15. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health. PMID:22931048

  16. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, JM; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, JJ; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:21718302

  17. The Analgesic Effect of the Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 in Pancreatic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, Maximilian; Reinelt, Leonard; Neumann, Jens; Holdt, Lesca; Ilmer, Matthias; Renz, Bernhard; Hartwig, Werner; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; D'Haese, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic pancreatitis is one of the main risk factors for pancreatic cancer. In acute and chronic pancreatitis, oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. In this respect, the recently described mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 effectively scavenges reactive oxygen species at nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the influence of SkQ1 on tissue injury and pain in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Methods. Both acute and chronic pancreatitis were induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal cerulein injections and treatment with SkQ1 was carried out by peroral applications. Hyperalgesia was assessed by behavioral observation and measurement of abdominal mechanical sensitivity. Blood serum and pancreatic tissue were harvested for analysis of lipase and histology. Results. SkQ1 did not influence pain, serological, or histological parameters of tissue injury in acute pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis, a highly significant reduction of pain-related behavior (p < 0.0001) was evident, but histological grading revealed increased tissue injury in SkQ1-treated animals (p = 0.03). Conclusion. After SkQ1 treatment, tissue injury is not ameliorated in acute pancreatitis and increased in chronic pancreatitis. However, we show an analgesic effect in chronic pancreatitis. Further studies will need to elucidate the risks and benefits of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as an analgesic. PMID:27274778

  18. [Caffeine as adjuvant analgeticum for treating acute pain].

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2013-10-14

    Based on 19 studies (7,238 participants) a Cochrane review concludes that the addition of caffeine to an analgesic drug provides superior analgesia compared with the analgesic drug alone. The benefit is small, with a number needed to treat of approx. 16. The use of analgesics containing caffeine is associated with an increased risk of the development of physical dependence, overuse headache, and withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation. Combination analgesics with caffeine should only be used temporarily and exclusively for the treatment of acute pain conditions. PMID:24629115

  19. Efficacy and tolerability of an ectoine mouth and throat spray compared with those of saline lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis: a prospective, controlled, observational clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dörte; Lindemann, Torben; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Scherner, Olaf; Knop, Markus; Bilstein, Andreas; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this observational trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a mouth and throat spray containing ectoine in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis. The outcome was compared with control treatment using saline lozenges. This study was designed as a prospective, controlled, non-randomized, observational multicenter clinical trial and was conducted in Germany. The study population consisted of 95 patients. The decision for treatment with either spray or lozenges was based on the patients' preference for pharyngeal or oral application. Investigators assessed symptoms specific to acute pharyngitis/laryngitis and determined the pharyngitis symptom score. Both patients and investigators evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of the treatment applied. Treatment with the spray showed higher efficacy, 1.95 ± 0.81 versus 1.68 ± 0.67 (investigators) and 1.97 ± 0.88 versus 1.57 ± 0.69 (patients, p < 0.05). Treatment with the spray resulted in significantly greater reduction of cervical lymph node swelling (p < 0.05), ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.62, ∆ lozenges = 0.21 ± 0.62. The lozenges showed some advantage in relieving cough, ∆ lozenges = 0.62 ± 0.94 versus ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.85. Both patients and investigators rated the tolerability of both medical devices as "good" to "very good". Adverse events of mild to moderate severity were either possibly related or not related to the medical devices used. No serious adverse events occurred. Taken together, while the tolerability was consistent in both treatment groups, the ectoine-based spray showed superior efficacy in treating acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis. PMID:27126336

  20. Spider peptide Phα1β induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (ω-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Phα1β in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Phα1β produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ω-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Phα1β was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 ± 5% of inhibition). In this study, Phα1β was as efficacious as ω-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Phα1β has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients. PMID:23718272

  1. Comparison of carprofen and pethidine as postoperative analgesics in the cat.

    PubMed

    Balmer, T V; Irvine, D; Jones, R S; Roberts, M J; Slingsby, L; Taylor, P M; Waterman, A E; Waters, C

    1998-04-01

    The postoperative analgesia and sedation in cats given carprofen (4.0 mg/kg bodyweight by subcutaneous injection preoperatively) was compared to that in cats given pethidine (3.3 mg/kg bodyweight by intramuscular injection postoperatively) in a controlled, randomised, blinded, multicentre clinical trial. Further dosing with the particular analgesic was allowed if a cat was exhibiting unacceptable pain. In total, 57 carprofen cases and 59 pethidine cases were evaluated. Significantly fewer cats in the carprofen group required additional doses of analgesic, and mean pain scores were significantly lower from four hours after ovariohysterectomy, and at 18 to 24 hours after castration, compared to the pethidine group. In conclusion, carprofen provided as good a level of postoperative analgesia as pethidine, but of a longer duration (at least 24 hours) and was well tolerated. It thus provides an option for 'pre-emptive analgesia' in cats about to undergo surgery. PMID:9577756

  2. Effects of a Rhodiola rosea L. extract on acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Laura; Perfumi, Marina

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of Rhodiola rosea L. extract on acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice. Therefore animals were injected with repeated administration of morphine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneous) twice daily for five or six days, in order to make them tolerant or dependent. Rhodiola rosea L. extract (0, 10, 15 and 20 mg/kg) was administered by the intragastric route 60 min prior to each morphine injection (for acquisition) or prior the last injection of morphine or naloxone on test day (for tolerance or dependence expression, respectively). Morphine tolerance was evaluated by testing its analgesic effect in the tail flick test at the 1st and 5th days. Morphine dependence was evaluated by counting the number of withdrawal signs (jumping, rearing, forepaw tremor, teeth chatter) after naloxone injection (5 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) on the test day (day 6). Results showed that Rhodiola rosea L. extract significantly reduced the expression of morphine tolerance, while it was ineffective in modulating its acquisition. Conversely, Rhodiola rosea L. extract significantly and dose-dependently attenuated both development and expression of morphine dependence after chronic or acute administration. These data suggest that Rhodiola rosea L. may have human therapeutic potential for treatment of opioid addiction. PMID:20142299

  3. Pain and Poppies: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Salvemini, Daniela; Salter, Michael W.; Gutstein, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Treating pain is one of the most difficult challenges in medicine and a key facet of disease management. The isolation of morphine by Friedrich Sertürner in 1804 added an essential pharmacological tool in the treatment of pain and spawned the discovery of a new class of drugs known collectively as opioid analgesics. Revered for their potent pain-relieving effects, even Morpheus the god of dreams could not have dreamt that his opium tincture would be both a gift and a burden to humankind. To date, morphine and other opioids remain essential analgesics for alleviating pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as analgesic tolerance (diminished pain-relieving effects), hyperalgesia (increased pain sensitivity), and drug dependence. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the effect of chronic pain on opioid reward. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is pervasive and afflicts >100 million Americans. Treating pain in these individuals is notoriously difficult and often requires opioids, one of the most powerful and effective classes of drugs used for controlling pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as a loss of pain-relieving effects (analgesic tolerance), paradoxical pain (hyperalgesia), and addiction. Despite the potential side effects, opioids remain the pharmacological cornerstone of modern pain therapy. This review highlights recent breakthroughs in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the cellular control of opioid systems in reward and aversion. The findings will challenge traditional views of the good, the bad, and the ugly of opioids. PMID:26468188

  4. Post-operative dental pain and analgesic efficacy. Part II. Analgesic usage and efficacy after dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Blair, G S; Wyatt, F A

    1983-12-01

    The analgesics taken by patients after oral and periodontal surgery were noted over a three day observation period. Analgesic consumption matched closely the pain experience. The efficacy of self-prescribed analgesics was extrapolated from the pain scores obtained in the first 12 hours after surgery, and overall, the apparent efficacy appears poor. However, those patients who reported taking aspirin recorded significantly less pain than those who took either paracetamol or combination analgesics. Analgesic efficacy was not related to dose, although a significant correlation was noted between the number of paracetamol tablets taken and pain severity. PMID:6580916

  5. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  6. Biomedicine of Enkephalin-Derived Glycopeptide Analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polt, Robin

    The incorporation of glycosides into peptide neurotransmitters imparts drug-like character to the neurotransmitter "message" via "membrane hopping". The importance of the glycopeptide-membrane interaction is emphasized, and the biousian theory is briefly explained. Application of this approach to enkephalins, the endogenous opioid peptides, leads to potent analgesic compounds capable of systemic delivery. The clinical applications of these compounds are advocated by the author.

  7. Pharmacogenomics and Opioid Analgesics: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Variation exists in patient response on analgesic treatment in terms of efficacy and safety. This variation may be in part explained by pharmacogenomics. This paper aimed to review data on pharmacogenomics of opioid analgesics focusing on the effect of genetic variation on the efficacy and safety of these agents. Current evidence suggests that pharmacogenomics contribute to variation in efficacy and safety of opioids. However, most data come from case control studies and case reports. In addition, a recognized drawback in the field of pharmacogenomics is the common occurrence of false positive association between polymorphisms and the investigated outcome. Prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the clinical implications of available data as well as to define the guidelines for the clinical application of pharmacogenomic data. Furthermore, basic research should focus on the identification of biologically meaningful polymorphisms enabling a hypothesis with biological plausibility driven research in the field of pharmacogenomics of analgesics. Moreover, the publication of relevant negative results should be favoured. PMID:26075211

  8. Recent pharmacological advances in paediatric analgesics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Palmer, G M

    2006-08-01

    Growth and development are two linked processes that distinguish children from adults. The use of size as the primary covariate during pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses allows exploration of the effects of age. Allometric scaling models have assisted understanding of the developmental clearance changes in common analgesic drugs such as paracetamol, morphine, tramadol and local anaesthetics agents. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (pharmacogenomics [PG]) and their impact on hepatic drug metabolism for opioids, tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and drug receptor responses are increasingly reported. Altered chemical structure or formulations of common analgesics alter pharmacodynamic (PD) effects enhancing safety and efficacy for NSAIDs by stereoselectivity and the addition of nitric oxide, for intravenous paracetamol by formulation and structural difference from propacetamol and for local anaesthetics through stereoselectivity. This article focuses upon recent data for analgesics used in paediatric pain management including paracetamol, NSAIDs, morphine, tramadol, amide local anaesthetics and ketamine. It centres on PK and clinical studies in neonates, infants and children. PG studies are acknowledged as potentially allowing individual drug therapy tailoring through a decrease in between-patient population variability, although the impact of PG in the very young is less certain. There are few data describing age-related PD changes in children despite recognition that the number, affinity and type of receptors or the availability of natural ligands changes with age. PMID:16854558

  9. Valproate attenuates the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Tamae; Tanabe, Serabi; Jin, Hisayo; Nishino, Takashi; Aoe, Tomohiko

    2010-11-19

    Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic. Repeated administration of morphine induces tolerance, thus reducing the effectiveness of analgesic treatment. Although some adjuvant analgesics can increase morphine analgesia, the precise molecular mechanism behind their effects remains unclear. Opioids bind to the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Morphine tolerance may be derived from alterations in the intracellular signal transduction after MOR activation. Chronic morphine treatment activates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), whose inhibition diminishes morphine tolerance. Valproate is widely prescribed as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorders because it increases the amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. Although the activation of GABAergic neurons may be responsible for the chief pharmacologic effect of valproate, recent studies have shown that valproate also suppresses GSK3β activity. We examined the effect of valproate on the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance in a mouse model of thermal injury. Mice were treated with morphine alone or with morphine and valproate twice daily for 5 days. The resulting antinociceptive effects were assessed using a hot plate test. While mice treated with morphine developed tolerance, co-administration of valproate attenuated the development of tolerance and impaired the activation of GSK3β in mice brains. Valproate alone did not show analgesic effects; nevertheless, it functioned as an adjuvant analgesic to prevent the development of morphine tolerance. These results suggest that the modulation of GSK3β activity by valproate may be useful and may play a role in the prevention of morphine tolerance. PMID:20816918

  10. Pain tolerance selectively increased by a sweet-smelling odor.

    PubMed

    Prescott, John; Wilkie, Jenell

    2007-04-01

    The mechanism underlying reported analgesic effects of odors in humans is unclear, although odor hedonics has been implicated. We tested whether odors that are sweet smelling through prior association with tasted sweetness might influence pain by activating the same analgesic mechanisms as sweet tastes. Inhalation of a sweet-smelling odor during a cold-pressor test increased tolerance for pain compared with inhalation of pleasant and unpleasant low-sweetness odors and no odor. There were no significant differences in pain ratings among the odor conditions. These results suggest that smelled sweetness can produce a naturally occurring conditioned increase in pain tolerance. PMID:17470253

  11. A thermal threshold testing device for evaluation of analgesics in cats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M J; Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M

    2002-06-01

    A thermal analgesiometric device was developed for unrestrained cats. Heat was provided by an electrical element potted together with a temperature sensor in thermally conductive epoxy in a 5 gm probe. This was attached to an elasticated band round the cat's thorax with an inflated bladder maintaining constant pressure between probe and skin. A safety cut-off was set at 60 degrees C. End point was a skin flick, turning, or jumping. Threshold temperatures in untreated cats were around 40 degrees C and repeatable to 4 degrees C with 5, 10 or 15 minutes between tests. Threshold temperature was stable in tests at 15 minutes intervals without false positives or negatives. Tests repeated at weekly intervals were repeatable to within 4 degrees C. Treatment with the opioid analgesic pethidine increased the threshold temperatures 10.2 (6.7) degrees C 45 minutes after treatment. The device was well tolerated for at least 24 hours and the analgesic effect of an opioid was detected. The system appears suitable for use in investigations into analgesic pharmacology in cats. PMID:12076115

  12. Impact of Internet Pharmacy Regulation on Opioid Analgesic Availability*

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Edward W.; Wines, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Access to prescription opioid analgesics has made Internet pharmacies the object of increased regulatory scrutiny, but the effectiveness of regulatory changes in curtailing availability of opioid analgesics from online sources has been not assessed. As part of an ongoing investigation into the relationship between the Internet and substance abuse, we examined the availability of prescription opioid analgesics from online pharmacies. Method: From a pharmacy watch Web site, we constructed a data set of postings entered every 3 months beginning November 1, 2005, that were related to the purchase of prescription opioid analgesics. Trained examiners assessed whether the final post described accessibility of pain medications that was increasing or decreasing. Results: We identified 45 threads related to the availability of opioid analgesics from Internet pharmacies. Of the 41 (91%) threads describing the declining availability of opioid analgesic agents from Internet pharmacies, 34 (82%) received posts on November 1, 2007. Despite the subjective nature of the research question, there was high interobserver agreement between coders (κ = .845) that availability of opioid analgesics from online pharmacies had decreased. This finding was supported by a dramatic rise in the number of pageviews (an accepted measure of Web site visitor interest in a page's content) of Web pages describing decreased availability of opioid analgesics. Conclusions: These data suggest striking decreases in the availability of prescription opioid analgesic pharmaceuticals. This self-reported change in drug availability may be related to increased regulation of and law enforcement operations directed against Internet pharmacies. PMID:18781245

  13. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Freya; Naunton, Mark; Thomas, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of analgesics. Phenacetin was subsequently exclusively blamed for this disease. However, the role of a single analgesic as a sole cause of analgesic nephropathy was challenged, and a number of researchers have since attempted to determine the extent of involvement of other analgesics including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, and paracetamol. Case presentation We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of NSAID-induced nephropathy with poor pain control and reluctance to use paracetamol. We attempt to briefly review the evidence of paracetamol being implicated in the development of analgesic-induced nephropathy. Conclusion There is a lack of concrete data regarding causative analgesics, including paracetamol. Patients should therefore not be withheld paracetamol, an effective and commonly recommended agent, for fear of worsening renal function. PMID:25548527

  14. Side effects of commonly prescribed analgesic medications.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Duong, Vicky; Ho, Stanley; Ngo, Kathryn C; Greer, Christopher L; Weeks, Douglas L

    2014-05-01

    Analgesics, including opioids, steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, acetaminophen, antiepileptics, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, are medications commonly used to treat many forms of pain. However, all of these agents may have significant adverse side effects. Adverse effects may occasionally be inseparable from desired effects. Side effects are often dose dependent and time dependent. It is critical that the prescribing practitioner and the dispensing pharmacist provide a thorough, understandable review of the potential side effects to all patients before these drugs are administered. Proper monitoring and follow-up during therapy are crucial. PMID:24787343

  15. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  16. The cannabinoid CB₂ receptor-selective phytocannabinoid beta-caryophyllene exerts analgesic effects in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Klauke, A-L; Racz, I; Pradier, B; Markert, A; Zimmer, A M; Gertsch, J; Zimmer, A

    2014-04-01

    The widespread plant volatile beta-caryophyllene (BCP) was recently identified as a natural selective agonist of the peripherally expressed cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB₂). It is found in relatively high concentrations in many spices and food plants. A number of studies have shown that CB₂ is critically involved in the modulation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain responses. In this study, we have investigated the analgesic effects of BCP in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that orally administered BCP reduced inflammatory (late phase) pain responses in the formalin test in a CB₂ receptor-dependent manner, while it had no effect on acute (early phase) responses. In a neuropathic pain model the chronic oral administration of BCP attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, and reduced spinal neuroinflammation. Importantly, we found no signs of tolerance to the anti-hyperalgesic effects of BCP after prolonged treatment. Oral BCP was more effective than the subcutaneously injected synthetic CB₂ agonist JWH-133. Thus, the natural plant product BCP may be highly effective in the treatment of long lasting, debilitating pain states. Our results have important implications for the role of dietary factors in the development and modulation of chronic pain conditions. PMID:24210682

  17. A preliminary evaluation of antihyperglycemic and analgesic activity of Alternanthera sessilis aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alternanthera sessilis is used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for alleviation of severe pain. The objective of this study was to scientifically analyze the analgesic (non-narcotic) property of aerial parts of the plant along with antihyperglycemic activity. Methods Antihyperglycemic activity was measured by oral glucose tolerance tests. Analgesic (non-narcotic) activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal writhings in intraperitoneally administered acetic acid-induced pain model in mice. Results Administration of methanol extract of aerial parts led to dose-dependent and significant reductions in blood glucose levels in glucose-loaded mice. At doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, the extract reduced blood sugar levels by 22.9, 30.7, 45.4 and 46.1%, respectively compared to control animals. By comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, reduced blood glucose level by 48.9%. In analgesic activity tests, the extract at the above four doses reduced the number of abdominal writhings by 27.6, 37.9, 41.4, and 44.8%, respectively. A standard analgesic drug, aspirin, reduced the number of writhings by 31.0 and 51.7%, respectively, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight. Conclusion The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant to alleviate pain. At the same time, the antihyperglycemic activity result suggests that the plant may be a potential source for blood sugar lowering drug(s). PMID:24885344

  18. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    PubMed

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05). Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05). We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain. PMID:26274819

  19. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05). Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05). We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain. PMID:26274819

  20. Pain and analgesic response after third molar extraction and other postsurgical pain.

    PubMed

    Barden, Jodie; Edwards, Jayne E; McQuay, Henry J; Andrew Moore, R

    2004-01-01

    There is uncertainty over whether the patient group in which acute pain studies are conducted (pain model) has any influence on the estimate of analgesic efficacy. Data from four recently updated systematic reviews of aspirin 600/650 mg, paracetamol 600/650 mg, paracetamol 1000 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg were used to investigate the influence of pain model. Area under the pain relief versus time curve equivalent to at least 50% maximum pain relief over 6 h was used as the outcome measure. Event rates with treatment and placebo, and relative benefit (RB) and number needed to treat (NNT) were used as outputs from the meta-analyses. The event rate with placebo was systematically statistically lower for dental than postsurgical pain for all four treatments. Event rates with analgesics, RB and NNT were infrequently different between the pain models. Systematic difference in the estimate of analgesic efficacy between dental and postsurgical pain models remains unproven, and, on balance, no major difference is likely. PMID:14715393

  1. Combined cannabis/methaqualone withdrawal treated with psychotropic analgesic nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Mark A; Harker, Nadine; Lichtigfeld, Frederick J

    2006-07-01

    This article reports the first single-blind study using psychotropic analgesic nitrous oxide (PAN) for treating acute withdrawal states following the abuse of methaqualone combined and smoked with cannabis. Smoked methaqualone combined with cannabis is called "white pipe" (WP). South Africa is the only country in the world where WP is a major form of substance abuse. This article demonstrates in 101 consecutively treated patients given placebo (100% oxygen) followed by PAN that this therapy produced a measurable therapeutic effect (more than 50% improvement) in 87 patients. This study confirms that WP is a form of substance abuse confined mainly to young adult male subjects. PMID:16861151

  2. Tolerability and patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Roose, S P

    1999-01-01

    Currently available antidepressants interact with several types of receptors, which may explain both wanted and unwanted effects of these drugs. These effects are different and distinctive, and knowledge about them may help clinicians understand differences between compounds in terms of their tolerability profiles. Given roughly comparable efficacy, tolerability profile is the critical determinant in selecting an antidepressant medication for a particular patient. In addition, tolerability is inseparably linked to patient compliance, both in acute and long-term treatment, and ultimately to overall success of treatment. Refinement in pharmacologic profiles of all newly introduced antidepressants resulted in overall advantages in tolerability in comparison with older tricyclic compounds. However, differences in receptor interactions between antidepressants are directly reflected in tolerability (adverse event) profiles. Among new antidepressants, mirtazapine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors share favorable overall tolerability and safety, especially with respect to low premature termination rates because of adverse events, cardiac safety, and safety in overdose. However, the different pharmacologic profile of mirtazapine is reflected in its different tolerability profile. Because of interactions with the histamine (H1) receptor, mirtazapine may be related to transient initial somnolence and weight gain in some patients. Its serotonin-2 (5-HT2)-blocking properties may account for lack of sexual dysfunction, insomnia, nervousness, and agitation. Mirtazapine's 5-HT3-blocking properties are unique among all currently available antidepressants and may account for lack of gastrointestinal adverse events. PMID:10446736

  3. Antiinflammatory and analgesic activities of Zizyphus lotus root barks.

    PubMed

    Borgi, W; Ghedira, K; Chouchane, N

    2007-01-01

    The root barks of Zizyphus lotus were extracted with water, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol to determine their antiinflammatory and analgesic activities. Aqueous extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) given intraperitoneally (i.p.) showed a significant and dose-dependent antiinflammatory and analgesic activity. PMID:17107758

  4. Use and abuse of opioid analgesics in chronic pain.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B.

    1993-01-01

    Primary care physicians are frequently required to treat patients with chronic debilitating pain. Opioid analgesics can successfully manage chronic pain. To prescribe opioid analgesics effectively, physicians must identify appropriate patients. Several methods can be used to identify and distinguish appropriate patients, addicted patients, and for-profit drug seekers. PMID:8097128

  5. Safety of nimesulide, meloxicam and rofecoxib as alternative analgesics.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, G; Kalyoncu, A F

    2000-01-01

    Paracetamole and codeine are safe alternative analgesics for analgesic intolerant patients. Recently marketed selective and specific COX2 inhibitors are also considered to be safe for this group of patients. In this survey we wanted to disclose the safety of nimesulide and meloxicam and rofecoxib where they have been marketed recently in Turkey. PMID:11269899

  6. [Evaluation of the peripartum effects of 2 analgesics: meperidine and tramadol, used in labor].

    PubMed

    Fieni, S; Angeri, F; Kaihura, C T; Ricci, L; Bedocchi, L; Galanti, B; Rossi, T; Benassi, G; Benassi, L

    2000-01-01

    The need for analgesia to overcome pain in labour is highly requested by women today. Various ways either non pharmachologic e.g. Emotional sustain, psycho-prophylactic preparation, yoga and hypnosis or pharmachologic such as epidural blockade or parenteral are used. Therefore in our study we evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of the two opioids usually used today in parenteral analgesia to reduce pain during labour: Tramadol and Meperidine. We studied two groups of patients each made up of 20 women in labour, all at term and with a physiologic course of pregnancy. 75 mg i.m. of Meperidine chloryhydrate were somministered in the first group while in the second group 100 mg i.m. of tramadol chloryhydrate were somministered. Various maternal, fetal and neonatal parameters were then monitored demonstrating--A moderate maternal analgesic effect in both drugs (evaluated through the analogic grading of pain). In the group to whom Meperidine was given, sedative effects on the mother were observed associated with respiratory depression in the newborn (the latter evaluated through the Apgar index at 1st and 5th minute of life and pH of the blood obtained at the umbilical cord. The data obtained permitted us to conclude that Tramadol in accordance to the obtained in literature gives an analogous analgesic effect, with better tolerability for the absence of collateral effects on the mother, fetus and newborn. PMID:11424777

  7. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study to Compare Preemptive Analgesic Efficacy of Novel Antiepileptic Agent Lamotrigine in Patients Undergoing Major Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bhosale, Uma A; Gupta, Ankush; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Sardesai, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: If postoperative acute pain remains unrelieved, it may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Preemptive analgesic initiated before surgery offers premature analgesia even before exposure to an initial noxious stimulus bestowing effective postoperative analgesia. In developed countries, it is regularly practiced as a part of well-defined protocol. In our country however, only a few centers practice it and that too irregularly and with undefined protocol. Few studies support preemptive analgesic efficacy of novel antiepileptic agent gabapentin. Though lamotrigine is a proven analgesic in animal models of chronic pain and clinical studies of gabapentin-resistant neuropathic pain, a literature search revealed scarce data on its preemptive analgesic efficacy. Aims: The present study is designed to study the preemptive analgesic efficacy of lamotrigine in comparison with diclofenac sodium in postoperative pain control. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included 90 patients of both sexes, between 18 years and 70 years undergoing major surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated into placebo, control, and test groups and received the respective treatment 30 min before the induction of anesthesia. Aldrete score and pain score were recorded using visual analog scale (VAS), facial rating scale (FRS), and behavioral rating scale (BRS) at awakening and at 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 24 h. Postoperative rescue analgesic consumption for 24 h was recorded. Results: Significantly higher pain scores were observed in the placebo group postoperatively for 2 h on all pain scales (P < 0.05), whereas in the control group it was significantly higher at 1 h (P < 0.05). The test group patients were more comfortable throughout the study and postoperative analgesic requirement was significantly less (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study recommends the use of single oral dose lamotrigine as preemptive analgesic for effective postoperative pain control. PMID

  8. Venom-based biotoxins as potential analgesics.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Cairns, Brian Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Chronic pain is a common debilitating condition with negative social and economic consequences. Management of chronic pain is challenging and the currently available medications do not yet yield satisfactory outcomes for many patients. Venom-derived biotoxins from various venomous species consist of several substances with different structures and compositions that include peptides. A unique characteristic of some venom-based biotoxins is the ability to block essential components of the pain signaling system, notably ion channels. This property is leading to the evaluation of the potential of biotoxins as analgesics to manage chronic pain. In addition to their therapeutic potential, biotoxins have also been essential tools to probe mechanisms underlying pain signaling, channelopathies and receptor expression. This review discusses venom-derived peptidergic biotoxins that are in preclinical stages or already in clinical trials. Some promising results from preliminary in vitro studies, ongoing challenges and unmet needs will also be discussed. PMID:25234848

  9. Evaluation of the Analgesic Activity of Standardized Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula in Healthy Human Participants Using Hot Air Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pokuri, Venkata Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain affects millions of people worldwide, opioid analgesics have been used for chronic painful conditions. Due to their adverse effects, safer alternatives would be beneficial. Terminalia chebula, with proven analgesic action has been evaluated in the hot air pain model for its analgesic activity. Aim To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose of Terminalia chebula using hot air pain model in healthy human participants. Setting and Design Randomized, Double blind, Placebo controlled, Cross over study. Materials and Methods After taking written informed consent to IEC approved protocol, 12 healthy human participants were randomized to receive either single oral dose of two capsules of Terminalia chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double blinded manner. Thermal pain was assessed using hot air analgesiometer, to deliver thermal pain stimulus. Mean Pain Threshold time and Mean Pain Tolerance time measured in seconds at baseline and 180 minutes post drug. A washout period of two weeks was given for cross-over between the two treatments. Results Terminalia chebula significantly increased mean pain threshold and tolerance time compared to baseline and placebo. Mean pain threshold time increased from 34.06±2.63 seconds to 41.00±2.99 seconds (p<0.001) and mean pain tolerance time increased from 49.67± 3.72 seconds to 57.30±3.07 seconds (p<0.001). The increase in mean percentage change for pain threshold time is 20.42% (p<0.001) and for pain tolerance time is 17.50% (p<0.001). Conclusion In the present study, Terminalia chebula significantly increased Pain Threshold time and Pain Tolerance time compared to Placebo. Study medications were well tolerated. PMID:26155489

  10. Evaluation of efficacy, tolerability, and treatment satisfaction with almotriptan in 3 consecutive migraine attacks. The migraine--satisfaction with treatment: reality with Almogran study.

    PubMed

    Massiou, Hélène; Pradalier, Andre; Donnet, Anne; Lanteri-Minet, Michel; Allaf, Bashar

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the open-label, multicenter Migraine--Satisfaction with Treatment: Reality with Almogran study was to assess efficacy, tolerability, and satisfaction with almotriptan 12.5 mg among migraineurs who were not achieving adequate results with their current acute therapy. Data from 434 patients (342 evaluable), were obtained for 929 attacks by 154 neurologists in France. Using a questionnaire developed by the National Agency for Accreditation and Evaluation in Health (ANAES), almotriptan was associated with an increased proportion of patients experiencing significant relief at 2 h (69.3 vs. 26.6%), tolerating the medication well (91.2 vs. 76.0%), able to resume activities (70.5 vs. 24.9%), and taking only 1 dose (59.4 vs. 28.1%) compared with previous therapies. At 2 h, headache pain had disappeared in 33.4% of attacks and was mild in 26.9%. Recurrence rate was 28.4% and rescue analgesics were used in 20.9% of attacks. The rate of adverse event-related discontinuations was 2.6%. The proportion of patients who were very satisfied/satisfied overall with almotriptan treatment was 69%. Almotriptan 12.5 mg was effective, well-tolerated and associated with a high rate of treatment satisfaction in patients whose previous acute migraine therapy was inadequate according to the ANAES recommendations. PMID:16772716

  11. Individual Difference Variables and the Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Analgesic Imagery Interventions on Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Wanta, Britt; Bumpus, Molly

    2008-01-01

    Clinicians in acute care settings are often called upon to manage cancer pain unrelieved by medications. Cognitive-behavioral strategies, such as relaxation and imagery, are recommended for cancer pain management; however, there appear to be individual differences in their effects. This pilot study examined variation in pain outcomes achieved with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and analgesic imagery interventions among hospitalized patients with cancer pain, and assessed the influence of four individual difference variables (cognitive ability, outcome expectancy, previous experience, and concurrent symptoms) on pain relief achieved with each intervention. A crossover design was used in which 40 hospitalized cancer patients received two trials of PMR, two trials of analgesic imagery, and two trials of a control condition. In comparing means between treatment and control conditions, both PMR and analgesic imagery produced greater improvements in pain intensity, pain-related distress, and perceived control over pain than the control condition. However, individual responder analysis revealed that only half of the participants achieved a clinically meaningful improvement in pain with each intervention. Patients who achieved a meaningful improvement in pain with analgesic imagery reported greater imaging ability, more positive outcome expectancy, and fewer concurrent symptoms than those who did not achieve a meaningful reduction in pain. Similar relationships were not significant for the PMR intervention. Investigators should continue efforts to identify factors that moderate the effects of cognitive-behavioral pain coping strategies so that clinicians can identify the most beneficial treatments for individual patients. PMID:18504089

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Enhanced Analgesic Effect of Oxycodone Compared to Morphine in Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B.; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  14. Studies on the analgesic activities of Jia-Yuan-Qing pill and its safety evaluation in mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Teng, Li-rong; Song, Jing-jing; Meng, Qing-fan; Lu, Jia-hui; Zhang, Wei-wei; Wei, Kang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Di; Teng, Le-sheng

    2014-09-01

    The analgesic activity of Porcellio laevis Latreille, Rhizoma Corydalis, and Radix Cynanchi Paniculati have been reported in recent years. A new formula named Jia-Yuan-Qing pill (JYQP) is therefore created by combining the three herbs at 9:7:7 ratio according to traditional Chinese theories. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of JYQP as a novel painkiller in various models. Acute toxicity test was applied to evaluate the safety of JYQP. Acetic-acid-induced writhing, hot plate test, formalin test, and naloxone-pretreated writhing test were employed to elaborate the analgesic activity of JYQP and its possible mechanism. A bone cancer pain mouse model was performed to further assess the effect of JYQP in relieving cancer pain. Test on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms was conduct to examine the physical dependence of mice on JYQP. Data revealed that JYQP reduced writhing and stretching induced by acetic acid; however, this effect could not be blocked by naloxone. JYQP specifically suppressed the phase II reaction time in formalin-treated mice; meanwhile, no analgesic effect of JYQP in hot plate test was observed, indicating that JYQP exerts analgesic activity against inflammatory pain rather than neurogenic pain. Furthermore, JYQP could successfully relieve bone cancer pain in mice. No physical dependence could be observed upon long-term administration in mice. Collectively, our present results provide experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of JYQP as an effective and safe agent for pain treatment. PMID:24677096

  15. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and GC-MS Studies on Castanospermum australe A. Cunn. & C. Fraser ex Hook.

    PubMed Central

    Sajeesh, Thankarajan; Parimelazhagan, Thangaraj

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Castanospermum australe and to profile phytochemicals by GC-MS. The ethanolic extracts were prepared by successive solvent extraction using Soxhlet apparatus. The analgesic activity was analyzed by hot plate method and acetic acid-induced writhing test whereas anti-inflammatory study was done by carrageenan induced paw oedema model. The acute toxicity study revealed that ethanol extracts of leaf and bark of C. australe were safe even at a higher dose of 2000 mg/kg whereas ethanol extract of seed was toxic at the same dose. In both hot plate method (5.85 s) and acetic acid-induced writhing test (57%), the leaf ethanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity (P < 0.001) at a dose of 400 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extract was exhibited by the reduction in paw linear diameter by 64.76% at 400 mg/kg in carrageenan induced paw oedema. The GC-MS analysis of the ethanol extract of leaf revealed sixteen major compounds of which 1,7-dimethyl-4,10-dioxa-1,7-diazacyclododecane, (+)-N-methylephedrine, and permethylspermine were found to be pharmaceutically and the most important. These findings justify that C. australe can be a valuable natural analgesic and anti-inflammatory source which seemed to provide potential phytotherapeutics against various ailments. PMID:24672339

  16. Analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of highest analgesic demand after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bierylo, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Swietlana; Szymusik, Iwona; Kolacz, Marcin; Dabrowski, Michal J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures in female patients. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of greatest postoperative analgesic demand after CS. This period was defined by detailed analysis of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) usage. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized trial included 60 parturients who were scheduled for elective CS. Participants received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine supplemented with normal saline (control group) or with fentanyl 25 μg (fentanyl group). To evaluate primary endpoints, we measured total pethidine consumption over the period of greatest PCA pethidine requirement. For verification of secondary endpoints, we recorded intravenous PCA requirement in other time windows, duration of effective analgesia, pain scores assessed by visual analog scale, opioid side effects, hemodynamic changes, neonatal Apgar scores, and intraoperative pain. Detailed analysis of hour-by-hour PCA opioid requirements showed that the greatest demand for analgesics among patients in the control group occurred during the first 12 hours after surgery. Patients in the fentanyl group had significantly reduced opioid consumption compared with the controls during this period and had a prolonged duration of effective analgesia. The groups were similar in visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related side effects (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, oversedation, and respiratory depression), and neonatal Apgar scores. Mild respiratory depression occurred in 1 patient in each group. Fewer patients experienced intraoperative pain in the fentanyl group (3% vs 23%; relative risk 6.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9–51.6). The requirement for postoperative analgesics is greatest during the first 12 hours after induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CS. The addition of intrathecal fentanyl to spinal anesthesia is effective for

  17. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  18. Acute paraquat exposure determines dose-dependent oxidative injury of multiple organs and metabolic dysfunction in rats: impact on exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo D; Gonçalves, Reggiani V; Cupertino, Marli C; Santos, Eliziária C; Bigonha, Solange M; Fernandes, Geraldo J M; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Natali, Antônio J

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the pathological morphofunctional adaptations related to the imbalance of exercise tolerance triggered by paraquat (PQ) exposure in rats. The rats were randomized into four groups with eight animals each: (a) SAL (control): 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution; (b) PQ10: PQ 10 mg/kg; (c) PQ20: PQ 20 mg/kg; and (d) PQ30: PQ 30 mg/kg. Each group received a single injection of PQ. After 72 hours, the animals were subjected to an incremental aerobic running test until fatigue in order to determine exercise tolerance, blood glucose and lactate levels. After the next 24 h, lung, liver and skeletal muscle were collected for biometric, biochemical and morphological analyses. The animals exposed to PQ exhibited a significant anticipation of anaerobic metabolism during the incremental aerobic running test, a reduction in exercise tolerance and blood glucose levels as well as increased blood lactate levels during exercise compared to control animals. PQ exposure increased serum transaminase levels and reduced the glycogen contents in liver tissue and skeletal muscles. In the lung, the liver and the skeletal muscle, PQ exposure also increased the contents of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, superoxide dismutase and catalase, as well as a structural remodelling compared to the control group. All these changes were dose-dependent. Reduced exercise tolerance after PQ exposure was potentially influenced by pathological remodelling of multiple organs, in which glycogen depletion in the liver and skeletal muscle and the imbalance of glucose metabolism coexist with the induction of lipid, protein and DNA oxidation, a destructive process not counteracted by the upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27277193

  19. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Jianguang; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xun, Xiaohong; Tang, Dongfang; Peng, Dezheng; Yi, Jianming; Liu, Zhonghua; Shi, Xiaoliu

    2014-01-01

    μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV) is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design. PMID:25123556

  20. Intrathecal ziconotide: a review of its use in patients with chronic pain refractory to other systemic or intrathecal analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Ziconotide (Prialt(®)) is a synthetic conopeptide analgesic that acts by selectively antagonizing N-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Intrathecal ziconotide is the only non-opioid intrathecal analgesic that is FDA-approved for use in patients with treatment-refractory, chronic pain. The efficacy of intrathecal ziconotide was demonstrated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with treatment-refractory noncancer-related pain or cancer- or AIDS-related pain. Across trials, ziconotide recipients had significantly greater reductions in pain intensity during ziconotide treatment than those receiving placebo (primary endpoint). At the end of the titration period, approximately one-sixth to one-third of patients with noncancer chronic pain and one-half with cancer- or AIDS-related pain who received ziconotide reached a pain response threshold (≥30 % reduction in the pain intensity score). In ziconotide responders, analgesic effects were enduring, with some patients continuing treatment over extended periods. Across trials, the chief tolerability concerns in ziconotide recipients during the titration phase and during extended treatment were related to CNS adverse events. These were mostly of mild to moderate intensity, although serious adverse events were commonly attributed to ziconotide treatment, especially in trials with rapid ziconotide titration and that permitted higher dosages. In general, clinically important non-CNS adverse events were infrequent, and during the ziconotide titration phase, relatively few patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events. Ongoing research will assess various strategies for selecting patients for ziconotide treatment and for enhancing its efficacy and tolerability. At the present time, intrathecal ziconotide provides a treatment option for patients with severe, unremitting pain who have failed to respond to other intensive analgesic regimens. PMID:23999971

  1. Acute toxic effects of the herbicide formulation and the active ingredient used in cycloxydim-tolerant maize cultivation on embryos and larvae of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Lötters, Stefan; Veith, Michael; Viertel, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Most genetically engineered herbicide-tolerant crops are still awaiting approval in Europe. There is, however, a recent trend for the cultivation of cycloxydim-tolerant maize hybrids for use in maize production. We studied the acute toxic effects of the complementary herbicide Focus(®) Ultra and its active ingredient cycloxydim on embryos and early-stage larvae of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). The results indicate that the herbicide formulation is significantly more toxic than the active ingredient alone. Therefore, it is suggested that the added substances either solely or in a synergistic action with the active ingredient are responsible for adverse effects. The formulation was found to be moderately toxic to embryos but highly toxic to early larvae. Based on calculated teratogenic indices, both cycloxydim and Focus(®) Ultra seem to be non-teratogenic and also the minimum Focus(®) Ultra concentration to inhibit growth in embryos and larvae was close to the LC50 values. The data suggest that tests with the rainbow trout are not in all cases appropriate to assess the risk in aquatically developing anurans. This is demonstrated by 96-h LC50 values, which are for rainbow trout more than 50- to 20-fold higher than for early X. laevis larvae. However, based on worst-case predicted environmental concentrations for surface waters, there is apparently a large safety margin in field use of Focus(®) Ultra if buffer strips between the farm land and the amphibian habitats are regarded. PMID:25634323

  2. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) [Polygalaceae] root-bark aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A O

    2008-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) in mice and rats. The analgesic effect of SLE was evaluated by 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' analgesic test methods in mice; while its anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects were examined in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus models. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg) and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs for comparison. SLE (50-800 mg/kg i. p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally- and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. The plant's extract (SLE, 50-800 mg/kg p. o.) also dose-dependently and significantly inhibited (p < 0.05-0.001) fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation, and caused significant hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05-0.001) in normal (normoglycaemic) and STZ-treated diabetic (hyperglycaemic) rats. The results of this experimental animal study indicate that S. longepedunculata root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties. These findings lend pharmacological credence to the anecdotal, folkloric and ethnomedical uses of S. longepedunculata root-bark in the treatment, management and/or control of painful, arthritic, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in some rural communities of South Africa. PMID:18046514

  3. [A novel analgesics made from Cannabis].

    PubMed

    Szendrei, Kálmán

    2004-01-20

    Bayer AG has recently announced that it acquired exclusive rights for the marketing of GW Pharmaceuticals' new medicine Sativex in Europe and in other regions. Sativex is a sublingual spray on Cannabis extract basis, and is equipped with an electronic tool to facilitate accurate dosing and to prevent misuses. It is standardized for the THC and CBD. The new analgesic is proposed for the treatment of muscle spasticity and pains accompanying multiple sclerosis and as an efficient analgetic for neurogenic pain not responding well to opioids and to other therapies available. The entirely new mechanism of action through the recently discovered cannabinoid receptor system may offer a real therapeutic potential to the drug. Although the Government of Netherlands has authorized the sale of pharmaceutical grade Cannabis herb by pharmacies in the Netherlands, the availability on the pharmaceutical market of the registered preparation may render requests for the authorization of the smoking of Cannabis herb (marihuana) by individuals suffering of multiple sclerosis, neurogenic pain, AIDS wasting syndrome unnecessary. Nevertheless, the "old chameleon" plant Cannabis appears to gradually regain its previous status in mainstream therapy and pharmacy. As long as the plant Cannabis and its products continue to be classified as narcotic drugs, medical use of the new preparation will need close supervision. PMID:15042867

  4. Review of the analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Beaver, William T

    2003-04-01

    There is a clear relationship between single doses of ibuprofen over the range 50-400 mg and the peak analgesic effect and the duration of analgesia. The smallest clinically useful dose of ibuprofen is 200 mg. Ibuprofen 400 mg has been shown to be as effective as aspirin 600 or 900 mg/day in models of moderate pain but superior to aspirin or paracetamol in more sensitive models such as dental pain. The duration of action of ibuprofen 400 mg is at least 6 hours compared with 4-6 hours for ibuprofen 200 mg or paracetamol. In patients undergoing oral surgery, ibuprofen 200 mg was broadly comparable with naproxen 220 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg comparable with ketoprofen 25 mg. The combination of ibuprofen and hydrocodone is more effective than either drug alone in patients undergoing abdominal and gynaecological surgery. The absorption of ibuprofen acid is influenced by formulation, and certain salts of ibuprofen (lysine, arginine, potassium) and solubilised formulations have an enhanced onset of activity. These differences are clinically important, offering a shorter time to onset of relief of tension headache compared with paracetamol. PMID:12723741

  5. The incidence of postoperative pain and analgesic usage in children.

    PubMed

    Acs, G; Drazner, E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the incidence of post-restorative dental pain and analgesic usage in children. A questionnaire completed by parents was employed. The mean age of the patients was 8.1 years; and all patients were in the six- to thirteen-year-old range. Pain following routine restorative procedures was reported by 31.5 percent of the patients. Additionally, 52.9 percent of these patients required analgesic relief. PMID:1537941

  6. Therapeutic Implications of Modifying Endogenous Serotonergic Analgesic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Frier, James W.

    1985-01-01

    Basic research strongly implicates the neurotransmitter serotonin as a modulator of endogenous analgesic systems. Recently, clinical strategies have been developed to activate endogenous serotonergic systems as a therapeutic approach to pain control. This paper reviews the biochemistry, anatomical distribution, and physiologic functions of serotonin. The evidence reviewed suggests that precursor loading to increase brain serotonin levels and administration of serotonin receptor inhibitors and serotonin receptor agonists may lead to novel methods of pain control and the development of useful analgesic drugs. PMID:2986489

  7. Phytochemical Screening and Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Oroxylum indicum

    PubMed Central

    Das, B. K.; Al-Amin, M. M.; Russel, S. M.; Kabir, S.; Bhattacherjee, R.; Hannan, J. M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study phytochemical screening and analgesic activity of ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The dried powder of the barks of the plant was extracted with 95% ethanol and was subjected to various phytochemical tests to ascertain the principle constituents contained in the extract. The result revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, glycosides in the ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum. The extract was screened for analgesic activity by using hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin test. The ethanol extract of the plant at two different doses (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed significant (P<0.05) analgesic effect in all test methods (hot plate, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin). The analgesic activity was compared with a standard drug (ketorolac at 10 mg/kg). Based on the present findings and previous literature review it can be concluded that flavonoids and tannins might be responsible for the analgesic activity. We suggest that ethanol extract of Oroxylum indicum might have potential chemical constituents that could be used in the future for the development of novel analgesic agent. PMID:25593396

  8. [Blood-brain barrier transport of opioid analgesics].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Opioid analgesics exhibit cationic properties under physiological conditions, and the mechanism underlying permeation of the blood-brain barrier thus cannot be fully explained by simple diffusion alone. Various types of transporters that exhibit substrate specificity are localized on the blood-brain barrier, and play a role in transporting substances from circulating blood and from brain interstitial fluid. Progress is being made in explaining the mechanisms, functions, and physiological roles of polyspecific organic cation transporters, but little evidence has indicated that these previously identified organic cation transporters are involved in the transport of opioid analgesics across the blood-brain barrier. Consequently, clarifying the role of transporters in the distribution of opioid analgesics into the brain and determining their transport molecule will not only provide clues to effective drug delivery to the brain, but will also contribute to optimizing pain relief treatment, and by extension play a role in drug discovery for analgesics. Currently there are enthusiastic discussions in the literature regarding the existence of putative transporters involved in the transport of opioid analgesics across the blood-brain barrier. This review article introduces the results of our research as well as recent findings on the involvement of transporters in the blood-brain barrier transport of opioid analgesics such as morphine, morphine metabolites, oxycodone, fentanyl, codeine, and pentazocine. PMID:21963971

  9. Atorvastatin and simvastatin as analgesic agents in experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Dwajani, S.; Kumar, V. S. Harish; Keerthi, D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To evaluate the analgesic effect of atorvastatin and simvastatin. 2) To compare analgesic activity of these with an established drug tramadol. Materials and Methods: Healthy Albino rats were taken. They were randomly divided into 4 groups of six animals each. Group I: Normal Saline (0.5 ml), Group II: Tramadol (10 mg/kg BW), Group III: Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg BW) and Group IV: Simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW). The animals were subjected to 3 different tests at different interval of time. The tests conducted were tail clip method, Eddy′s hot plate and hot water tail immersion method. Results: Atorvastatin and simvastatin differ significantly from control hence they have analgesic action and even at any of the time intervals they do not differ significantly from tramadol; hence their analgesic effect is nearly comparable to tramadol. The results of the present study indicate that atorvastatin and simvastatin have analgesic action. Conclusion: These statins are found to have analgesic effect other than hypolipidemic activity and can be used in these patients. However further study has to be undertaken in a broader way. PMID:24826046

  10. [Dextromethorphan enhances analgesic activity of propacetamol--experimental study].

    PubMed

    Dobrogowski, Jan; Wordliczek, Jerzy; Przewłocka, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    While many pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that the addition of N-methyl-d--aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as dextromethorphan, to opioid analgesics, such as morphine may enhance the analgesic effects. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of non-competitive NMDA antagonists and paracetamol (propacetamol) on pain threshold and analgesic potency of this drugs and their combinations in formalin model for pain in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of paracetamol only in doses of 100 g/kg or higher resulted in increase of pain threshold in tail flick and paw pressure tests. The results of our study suggest that there was no significant difference in pain threshold between separate administration of dextromethorphan and in combination with paracetamol. In a formalin model for pain we have shown that paracetamol in non-analgesic doses (10 mg/kg) administered in combination with dextrometorphan, ketamine and mamantine was more effective than those drugs given separately but the best analgesic effect was obtained when combination of paracetamol and dextromethorphan was applied. The addition of higher doses of these combined drugs, that is paracetamol and all three NMDA antagonists did not result in enhancement of dose-dependant analgesia. In conclusion it should be stated that NMDA antagonists improve analgesic effect of paracetamol in the formalin model for pain. although only to a limited extend. PMID:17037292

  11. Use and abuse of over-the-counter analgesic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, F V; Fraser, M I

    1998-01-01

    Pain and discomfort in everyday life are often treated with over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic medications. These drugs are remarkably safe, but serious side effects can occur. Up to 70% of the population in Western countries uses analgesics regularly, primarily for headaches, other specific pains and febrile illness. It is not known whether the patterns of use are consistent with good pain management practices. OTC analgesics are also widely used to treat dysphoric mood states and sleep disturbances, and high levels of OTC analgesic medication use are associated with psychiatric illness, particularly depressive symptoms, and the use of alcohol, nicotine and caffeine. More than 4 g per day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or acetaminophen over long periods is considered abuse. People using excessive amounts of OTC analgesics may need more effective treatments for chronic pain, depression or dysthymia. The possibility that these drugs have subtle reinforcing properties needs to be investigated. Certainly phenacetin, which was taken off the market in the 1970s, had intoxicating effects. A better understanding of patterns of use is needed to determine the extent of problem use of OTC analgesics, and whether health could be improved by educating people about the appropriate use of these drugs. PMID:9505057

  12. Testing and comparison of non-opioid analgesics in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W; MacIver, D N; Newman, L C

    2001-07-01

    Because of the lack of information about effective analgesics in non-mammalian vertebrates, the potency of various non-opioid agents were tested in a model of analgesia by using Northern grass frogs (Rana pipiens). This alternative model has been used widely for investigating opioid analgesic action. Potential non-opioid analgesics tested included antipsychotic, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, antihistamine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID), and partial opioid agents. Northern grass frogs were acclimated to lab conditions in individual cages. Drugs were administered systemically through the dorsal lymph sac, and analgesic effects were estimated by using the acetic acid test (AAT). The AAT is done by placing logarithmic dilutions of acid dropwise on the dorsum of the animal's thigh until a wiping response is obtained. At various doses, chlorpromazine and haloperidol (antipsychotics), chlordiazepoxide (a benzodiazepine), buprenorphine (a partial opioid agonist), and diphenhydramine (a histamine antagonist) produced moderate to strong analgesic effects. Indomethacin and ketorolac (NSAIDs), butorphanol (a partial opioid agonist), and pentobarbital (a barbiturate) produced weaker but noticeable analgesic effects. Our results are the first to document the effectiveness of a wide array of pharmacologically active agents in a novel amphibian model for analgesia. These findings provide needed data regarding the use of alternative, non-opioid agents for the treatment of pain in amphibians and other poikilothermic species. PMID:11451391

  13. Pharmacological evaluation of Mallotus philippinensis (Lam.) Muell.-Arg. fruit hair extract for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Ghildiyal, Shivani; Nath, Gopal; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently, we observed wound healing activity of 50% ethanol extract of Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP) fruit hairs extract (MPE). In several intestinal infections, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we evaluated the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE in different rat experimental models. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan (acute) and turpentine oil induced formalin (subacute) induced paw edema and while granuloma pouch (subacute) in rats. Analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE was undertaken by tail-flick, hot-plate, and acetic acid-induced writhing tests while pentobarbitone-induced hypnotic potentiation in rats. Results: MPE at a dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h after their administration showed inhibition of formalin-induced paw edema by 41.60% (P < 0.001) and carrageenan-induced paw edema by 55.30% (P < 0.001). After 7 days of treatments, MPE showed 38.0% (P < 0.001) inhibition against formalin-induced paw edema and reduced weight of turpentine-induced granuloma pouch by 29.6% (P < 0.01) and volume of exudates by 26.1% (P < 0.01), respectively. MPE (200 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 120 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail flick method and increased reaction time in the hot-plate test while the reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 45.7% (P < 0.001). The pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis model showed potentiation, as defined by increased duration of sleep in treated group rats as compared to control. Conclusion: Thus, the study revealed MPE is effective in reducing acute and subacute inflammation and showed effective and similar analgesic activity. This seemed to be safe in the treatment of pain and inflammation. PMID:27069718

  14. Intracuff alkalized lidocaine reduces sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of intracuff alkalized lidocaine on sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients and its consequence on patient-ventilator interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 patients who expected to require ventilatory support for a period of more than 48 h were randomly assigned to groups S and L. In group S, the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs were inflated with normal saline. In group L, the ETT cuffs were inflated with lidocaine 2% and sodium bicarbonate 8.4%. The investigator and the surgical intensive care unit staff were blinded to the nature of cuff-filled solutions. Sedation was maintained with propofol and fentanyl infusions. The total requirements for propofol and fentanyl, frequency and severity of cough and number of ineffective triggering during the first 24 h of mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction (about 30%) in the requirements for propofol and fentanyl in patients who received intracuff alkalinized lidocaine; P < 0.001. The frequency and severity of cough were significantly lower in group L compared with group S and the frequency of ineffective triggering was significantly lower in group L; P < 0.001 for both comparisons. Conclusion: Intracuff alkalized lidocaine increases ETT tolerance and hence, decreases sedatives/analgesics requirements for mechanically ventilated patients. This results in improved patient-ventilator synchronization. PMID:25422600

  15. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  16. The Diversion of Prescription Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Lugo, Yamilka; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drug diversion involves the unlawful channeling of regulated pharmaceuticals from legal sources to the illicit marketplace, and can occur along all points in the drug delivery process -- from the original manufacturing site, to the wholesale distributor, the physician's office, the retail pharmacy, or the patient. Although a number of recent scientific papers have discussed the problems associated with diversion, empirical data on the scope and magnitude of diversion are limited in the literature. This paper presents findings from a national diversion survey being conducted as part of risk management initiatives supported by Denver Health and Hospital Authority, designed to monitor the abuse and diversion of a variety of prescription opioid analgesics. On a quarterly basis, diversion investigators in 300 jurisdictions distributed throughout the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are sent short questionnaires designed to elicit data on the extent of drug diversion in their areas. During the 20-quarter survey period reported in this paper, a total of 64,655 cases of prescription drug diversion were reported from all of the participating sites. The most widely diverted opioid was hydrocodone, in that it was mentioned in 38.2% of the cases, followed by oxycodone, mentioned in 24.3% of the cases. By contrast, the proportions of cases in which other opioids were mentioned were significantly smaller. The diversion of opioids appears in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, with especially high concentrations in rural areas. How all of these prescription opioids are being diverted to the street, however, is not altogether clear, and in many ways, diversion is a “black box” requiring concentrated systematic study. PMID:25267926

  17. Comparison of efficacy and tolerance of intravenously and orally administered ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients with acute exacerbations of lung infection.

    PubMed

    Strandvik, B; Hjelte, L; Lindblad, A; Ljungberg, B; Malmborg, A S; Nilsson-Ehle, I

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients (17-27 yr) with cystic fibrosis were given ciprofloxacin at 30 pulmonary infectious exacerbations. All patients were chronically colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Twenty-five courses were completed, 13 orally (15 mg/kg b.i.d.) and 12 intravenously (4-6 mg/kg b.i.d.). Clinical efficacy was excellent or good in 85-90% of the courses and growth of P. aeruginosa was markedly reduced in 33-46%. Body weight and clinical score improved significantly. White blood cell count decreased and pulmonary function was improved. Reversible adverse effects, mainly rash and urticaria, appeared at seven occasions, five severe enough to cause interruption of treatment. Clinical efficacy and tolerance were better with oral than intravenous administration at the dosages used in this study. Excellent bioavailability provides additional basis for oral treatment with ciprofloxacin in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:2756354

  18. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2013-01-01

    Background. In folk medicine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is used as a remedy for a variety of diseases. This study investigates the in vivo antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of EVOO on mice and rats. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests in mice, the analgesic effect of EVOO was evaluated. Acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used as standard drugs, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by means of the carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats using acetylsalicylic acid and dexamethasone as standard drugs. Last, the xenograft model in athymic mice was used to evaluate the anticancer effect in vivo. Results. EVOO significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes and reduces acute and inflammatory pain in the two phases of the formalin test. It has also a better effect than Dexamethasone in the anti-inflammatory test. Finally, the intraperitoneal administration of EVOO affects the growth of HCT 116 tumours xenografted in athymic mice. Conclusion. EVOO has a significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. However, further detailed studies are required to determine the active component responsible for these effects and mechanism pathway. PMID:24455277

  19. Lysosomal membrane stability, phagocytosis and tolerance to emersion in the mussel Perna viridis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) following exposure to acute, sublethal, copper.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, S

    2003-08-01

    The mytilid mussel Perna viridis is distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific region and is potentially a suitable candidate for biological effects (biomarker) monitoring in the subtropics. A suite of cytological and physiological responses to acute (48-72 h) copper exposures of 50-200 microgl(-1) were assessed in order to determine the suitability of P. viridis for marine pollution monitoring. Copper elicited significant destabilisation of the haemocyte lysosomal membranes and also impaired phagocytosis. Survival during emersion following exposure to copper was not related to the experimental copper exposures suggesting that higher metal concentrations may be required to interfere with anaerobic enzymes responsible for suppression of metabolism. Based on this preliminary study, cytological biomarkers evaluated in the haemocytes extracted from P. viridis should prove an effective non-destructive means of assessing metal pollution throughout the mussels subtropical range. PMID:12820995

  20. Analgesic effectiveness of the narcotic agonist-antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Raymond W.

    1979-01-01

    1 Two fundamentally different types of narcotic-antogonists have been found to be very effective analgesics with relatively low dependence-producing potentials. 2 These two drug classes can be distinguished as being either morphine-like or nalorphine-like on the basis of their subjective and objective effects after single doses and on chronic administration, and by the character of their abstinence syndromes on abrupt withdrawal or on precipitation by other antagonists. 3 To explain differences in side effects associated with their analgesic actions, the existence of three types of receptors has been postulated: a μ receptor which is believed to be associated with euphoria and other typical morphine-like effects and a kappa (χ) and a sigma (σ) receptor which are believed to be associated with the sedative and psychotomimetic effects, respectively, of the nalorphine-like drugs. 4 The antagonist-analgesics of the morphine-type have the characteristics of being agonists of low intrinsic activity but with high affinity for the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are profadol, propiram and buprenorphine. 5 The antagonist-analgesics of the nalorphine-type are drugs which are believed to have varying degrees of affinity and intrinsic activity at all three receptors, but characteristically seem to act merely as competitive antagonists with no intrinsic activity at the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are pentazocine, nalbuphine and butorphanol. 6 There are considerable differences among the individual drugs of each type in terms of their analgesic and narcotic-antagonistic potencies. However, clear differences in analgesic efficacy among any of the antagonist-analgesics remain to be proved. All give evidence of being capable of relieving pain in nondependent patients in situations in which doses of morphine (or its surrogates) usually used would be effective. 7 The major advantages of the partial agonists of the morphine-type over the

  1. Use of analgesic drugs for pain management in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, I; Chambers, J P

    2012-03-01

    Awareness of pain and its effects is increasing within the veterinary profession, but pain management in food animals has been neglected. Sheep seldom receive analgesics despite various conditions, husbandry practice and experimental procedures being known to be painful, e.g. footrot, mastitis, vaginal prolapse, castration, vasectomy, penis deviation, and laparoscopy. The evidence supporting use of analgesic drugs in this species is reviewed here. Opioid agonists are of dubious efficacy and are short acting. α₂-agonists such as xylazine are good, short-lived analgesics, but induce hypoxaemia. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) such as ketoprofen provide long-lasting analgesia, but not as marked as that from α₂-agonists; they should be more widely used for inflammatory pain. Local anaesthetics reliably block pain signals, but may also induce motor blockade. Balanced analgesia using more than one class of drug, such as an α₂ agonist (e.g. medetomidine) and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist (e.g. ketamine), with the combination selected for the circumstances, probably provides the best analgesia for severe pain. It should be noted that there are no approved analgesic drugs for use in sheep and therefore the use of such drugs in this species has to be off-label. This information may be useful to veterinary practitioners, biomedical researchers, and regulators in animal welfare to develop rational analgesic regimens which ultimately may improve the health and welfare of sheep in both farming and experimental conditions. PMID:22352925

  2. Analgesic safety - myths, mysteries and misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A

    2015-05-01

    Acute episodes of tension-type headache (TTH) are common and affect people of all ages, races and income levels. Two recommended and commonly used drugs for the treatment of this condition are ibuprofen and paracetamol. However, despite - or perhaps because of - their widespread use, many misconceptions persist about their comparative efficacy and safety. Are concerns about the gastrointenstinal (GI) safety of ibuprofen justified in the non-prescription over-the-counter (OTC) setting? Do low doses of ibuprofen - as used for TTH - increase the risk of heart attacks? Is the efficacy of ibuprofen and paracetamol really the same? PMID:25907021

  3. Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study.

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, M.; Hunter, K. M.; Baker, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients. PMID:10323113

  4. Analgesic activity of affinin, an alkamide from Heliopsis longipes (Compositae).

    PubMed

    Rios, María Yolanda; Aguilar-Guadarrama, A Berenice; Gutiérrez, María Del Carmen

    2007-03-21

    Heliopsis longipes (Compositae) is a Mexican plant used as analgesic in pain toothache. A solution of 10mug/ml of dichloromethane extract from this plant showed analgesic activity determined by means of GABA release in mice brain slices. Through a bioassay-directed separation, fractions G-1, G-2, G-4 and G-6 at the same concentration were active. Affinin was the unique and common active compound, and evoke the GABA release 0.5min after administration at 1x10(-4)M concentration. Inactive compound were undeca-2E-en-8,10-dyinoic acid isobutylamide, hinokinin, 2'-hydroxyhinokinin, 3beta-sn-glyceroyl-(1''-palmitoxy)urs-12-ene, 13(18)-ursen-3beta-ol, 13(18)-ursen-3beta-acetate, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol. The analgesic activity of Heliopsis longipes could be associated to affinin. PMID:17113736

  5. Drug Repurposing for the Development of Novel Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sisignano, Marco; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    Drug development consumes huge amounts of time and money and the search for novel analgesics, which are urgently required, is particularly difficult, having resulted in many setbacks in the past. Drug repurposing - the identification of new uses for existing drugs - is an alternative approach, which bypasses most of the time- and cost-consuming components of drug development. Recent, unexpected findings suggest a role for several existing drugs, such as minocycline, ceftriaxone, sivelestat, and pioglitazone, as novel analgesics in chronic and neuropathic pain states. Here, we discuss these findings as well as their proposed antihyperalgesic mechanisms and outline the merits of pathway-based repurposing screens, in combination with bioinformatics and novel cellular reprogramming techniques, for the identification of novel analgesics. PMID:26706620

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pokuri, Venkata Kishan; Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pingali, Usharani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose (1000 mg) of Terminalia chebula using a mechanical pain model in healthy human volunteers. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either single oral dose of 2 capsules of T. chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double-blinded manner. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesy meter (Randall–Selitto test) before and 3 h after administration of test drug. The parameters evaluated were pain threshold force and time; pain tolerance force and time. A washout period of 1-week was given for crossover between active drug and placebo. Results: Terminalia chebula significantly increased the mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time, and pain tolerance force and time compared to placebo (P < 0.001). The mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time (20.8% and 21.0%) was increased more than that of pain tolerance force and time (13.4% and 13.4%). No adverse drug reaction was reported with either of the study medications during the study period. Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions. PMID:27625480

  7. Attenuation of morphine tolerance and dependence by thymoquinone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Parvardeh, Siavash; Masoudi, Alireza; Moghimi, Mahsa; Mahboobifard, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dependence and tolerance are major restricting factors in the clinical use of opioid analgesics. In the present study, the effects of thymoquinone, the major constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, on morphine dependence and tolerance were investigated in mice. Materials and Methods: Male adult NMRI mice were made tolerant and dependent by repeated injections of morphine (50, 50, and 75 mg/kg, i.p. on 9 a.m., 1 p.m., and 5 p.m., respectively) during a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test was used to assess tolerance to the analgesic effects of morphine. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to precipitate withdrawal syndrome in order to assess the morphine dependence. To evaluate the effects of thymoquinone on tolerance and dependence to morphine, different single or repeated doses of thymoquinone were administered in mice. Rotarod was used to assess the motor coordination. Results: Administration of single or repeated doses of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Repeated administration of thymoquinone (20 and 40 mg/kg, for 3 days) and also single injection of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg, on the fourth day) attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. None of the thymoquinone doses (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) produced any antinociceptive effects on their own. Motor coordination of animals was impaired by the high dose of thymoquinone (40 mg/kg). Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that thymoquinone prevents the development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. PMID:27247922

  8. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  9. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  10. Nephrotoxicity of mild analgesics in the Gunn strain of rat

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Roy A.

    1980-01-01

    1 Homozygous members of the Gunn strain of rat, mutant Wistars jaundiced from lack of the enzyme uridine diphosphate glucuronyl transferase, are highly susceptible to analgesic-induced renal papillary necrosis. 2 A single oral dose of aspirin, phenacetin or paracetamol will produce the lesion, a circumstance which does not occur in other strains. 3 The reasons for this susceptibility have not been determined, but the experimental model should prove useful in further studies of the nephrotoxicity of analgesic drugs. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:6776978

  11. Ethical Considerations for Analgesic Use in Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Matava, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of commonly used analgesics in athletes and the ethical implications of their use in athletic settings. Given the highly competitive nature of modern-day sports and the economic impact of athletic performance at elite levels, athletes feel more compelled than ever to play with injury, which has led to the widespread use of a variety of analgesic agents. An ethical dilemma often ensues for team physicians who must balance the medical implications of these drugs with pressure from players, coaches, and management. The most commonly used agents and their ethical and rational use are discussed. PMID:26832973

  12. The analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen compared to acetaminophen with codeine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S A; Kupperman, A

    1991-01-01

    In a single-dose, parallel group, randomized block treatment allocation study, the relative analgesic efficacy of flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, was compared to acetaminophen 650 mg with codeine 60 mg, zomepirac sodium 100 mg, and placebo. A total of 226 post-surgical dental patients (146 females and 80 males) participated in the study. Flurbiprofen in 50 mg and 100 mg dosages demonstrated effective analgesic activity with the 100 mg dosage being at least as effective as the acetaminophen/codeine combination. The results of this study support previous work on flurbiprofen. PMID:1930699

  13. [Pregnancy and lactation period: Which local anesthetics and analgesics?].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show relevant aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. Common medication used in dental offices should be highlighted in special regard to the pregnant patient during dental treatment. The reader should gain more security in the election of the proper drugs for local anesthesia and oral analgesics. Local anaesthetics such as articain with adrenalin in a dilution of 1 : 200 000 can be used for dental treatment at any time. Paracetamol should be used as first line oral analgesic. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period. PMID:27142442

  14. Analgesic drugs and the gut - a reciprocal relationship.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, R

    2015-12-01

    Analgesic drugs, as well as providing pain relief, can cause a range of other symptoms and side effects, most notably on the gastrointestinal system. Conversely, gastrointestinal disease will often require analgesia, and this can be complicated by the fact that the gut is the site of absorption of oral drugs. This paper discusses some of the effects of common oral analgesic drugs on the gastrointestinal tract and their role in managing some of the most common, nonmalignant, chronic gastrointestinal disorders in adults. PMID:27070892

  15. Opioid Analgesics and Depressive Symptoms in Burn Patients: What Is the Real Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Narei; Jung, Myung Hun; Kim, Jee Wook; Chun, Wook; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kee, Baik Seok; Lee, Boung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Major burn injuries are strongly associated with both psychological trauma and severe pain, and opioids are the mainstay analgesics for the treatment of severe burn pain. The objectives of this study are to find the complex relationship between opioid dose, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms during the acute management of pain in burn patients. Methods The symptoms of depression and PTSD were assessed in 43 burn patients immediately following wound stabilization and 2 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Total opioid doses and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores obtained during the second evaluation were positively but weakly correlated after controlling for age and total burn surface area (R=0.33, p=0.03). Moreover, pain management with opioids was significantly more common in burn patients with low Clinician Administered PTSD Scale scores (evaluation 1) and high HAMD scores (evaluation 2) (F=6.66, p=0.001). Conclusion High opioid dose following acute burn trauma might have correlation with depressive symptoms. Monitoring of depressive symptoms may be important following acute burn trauma and consequent opioids pain management, particularly when PTSD symptoms appear minimal during the early stabilization of patients. PMID:27489384

  16. Efficacy, speed of action and tolerability of almotriptan in the acute treatment of migraine: pooled individual patient data from four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dahlöf, C G; Pascual, J; Dodick, D W; Dowson, A J

    2006-04-01

    A meta-analysis of pooled individual patient data from four randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials comparing several doses of almotriptan (n = 1,908) with placebo (n = 386) was used to investigate the efficacy, speed of onset and tolerability of almotriptan in the acute treatment of migraine. As early as 30 min after dosing, almotriptan 12.5 mg was significantly more effective than placebo for pain relief (14.9% vs. 8.2%; P < 0.05) and pain free (2.5% vs. 0.7%; P < 0.05). At 2 h, pain-relief rates were 56.0%, 63.7% and 66.0% for almotriptan 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg, respectively, compared with 35% for placebo; 2-h pain-free rates were 26.7%, 36.4% and 43.4% compared with 13.9% for placebo. All almotriptan dosages were significantly more effective than placebo in eliminating migraine-associated symptoms (P < 0.05) and in achieving sustained pain relief up to 24 h (P < 0.05). The incidence of adverse events after almotriptan 6.25 mg and 12.5 mg was not significantly different from that of placebo. This meta-analysis confirms the findings of individual clinical trials, while demonstrating for the first time, significant pain-free efficacy at 30 min compared with placebo. PMID:16556240

  17. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  18. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  19. Ellagic acid enhances morphine analgesia and attenuates the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam

    2014-10-15

    According to our previous study, ellagic acid has both dose-related central and peripheral antinociceptive effect through the opioidergic and l-arginine-NO-cGMP-ATP sensitive K(+) channel pathways. In the present study, the systemic antinociceptive effects of ellagic acid in animal models of pain, and functional interactions between ellagic acid and morphine in terms of analgesia, tolerance and dependence were investigated. Ellagic acid (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) showed significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Intraperitoneal ellagic acid acutely interacted with morphine analgesia in a synergistic manner in this assay. Ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg; i.p.) also exerted analgesic activity in the hot-plate test. Pre-treatment with naloxone (1mg/kg; i.p.) significantly reversed ellagic acid, morphine as well as ellagic acid-morphine combination-induced antinociceptin in these two tests. More importantly, when co-administered with morphine, ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg) effectively blocked the development of tolerance to morphine analgesia in the hot-plate test. Likewise, ellagic acid dose-dependently prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs including jumping and weight loss. Ellagic acid treatment (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) had no significant effect on the locomotion activity of animals using open-field task. Therefore, these results showed that ellagic acid has notable systemic antinociceptive activity for both tonic and phasic pain models. Altogether, ellagic acid might be used in pain relief alone or in combination with opioid drugs because of enhancing morphine analgesia and preventing morphine-induced tolerance to analgesia and dependence. PMID:25179576

  20. Assessing efficacy of non-opioid analgesics in experimental pain models in healthy volunteers: an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Staahl, Camilla; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    AIM Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review, the second in a series of two, addresses how the efficacy of non-opioid analgesics have been assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. METHODS A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies that included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and non-opioid analgesics. RESULTS Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs worked against various types of acute pain as well as in hyperalgesia. Analgesia from paracetamol was difficult to detect in experimental pain and the pain needed to be assessed with very sensitive methods like evoked brain potentials. The N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists exemplified by ketamine generally needed strong, long-lasting or repeated pain in the skin for detectable analgesia, whereas pain in muscle and viscera generally was more easily attenuated. Gabapentin worked well in several models, particularly those inducing hyperalgesia, whereas lamotrigine was weak in modulation of experimental pain. Imipramine attenuated pain in most experimental models, whereas amitriptyline had weaker effects. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol attenuated pain in only a few models. CONCLUSIONS Pain induction and assessment are very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. Generally, experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of the pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. This knowledge can aid the decisions that need to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering Phase I and II trials. PMID:19740390

  1. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Enhances the Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity of Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Neurons and Induces a Tolerance to the Acute Inhibitory Actions of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with changes in brain reward and control systems, including the prefrontal cortex. In prefrontal areas, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been suggested to have an important role in the development of alcohol-abuse disorders and studies from this laboratory demonstrate that OFC-mediated behaviors are impaired in alcohol-dependent animals. However, it is not known whether chronic alcohol (ethanol) exposure alters the fundamental properties of OFC neurons. In this study, mice were exposed to repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to induce dependence and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine the effects of CIE treatment on lateral OFC (lOFC) neuron excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. Repeated cycles of CIE exposure and withdrawal enhanced current-evoked action potential (AP) spiking and this was accompanied by a reduction in the after-hyperpolarization and a decrease in the functional activity of SK channels. CIE mice also showed an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and this was associated with an increase in GluA1/GluA2 AMPA receptor expression and a decrease in GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. Following CIE treatment, lOFC neurons displayed a persistent long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission following a spike-timing-dependent protocol. Lastly, CIE treatment diminished the inhibitory effect of acute ethanol on AP spiking of lOFC neurons and reduced expression of the GlyT1 transporter. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol leads to enhanced intrinsic excitability and glutamatergic synaptic signaling of lOFC neurons. These alterations may contribute to the impairment of OFC-dependent behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:26286839

  2. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  3. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies. PMID:19135797

  4. Novel polymeric bioerodable microparticles for prolonged-release intrathecal delivery of analgesic agents for relief of intractable cancer-related pain.

    PubMed

    Han, Felicity Y; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Lam, Ai-Leen; Whittaker, Andrew K; Smith, Maree T

    2015-07-01

    Intractable cancer-related pain complicated by a neuropathic component due to nerve impingement is poorly alleviated even by escalating doses of a strong opioid analgesic. To address this unmet medical need, we developed sustained-release, bioerodable, hydromorphone (potent strong opioid)- and ketamine (analgesic adjuvant)-loaded microparticles for intrathecal (i.t.) coadministration. Drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared using a water-in-oil-in-water method with evaporation. Encapsulation efficiency of hydromorphone and ketamine in PLGA (50:50) microparticles was 26% and 56%, respectively. Microparticles had the desired size range (20-60 μm) and in vitro release was prolonged at ≥28 days. Microparticles were stable for ≥6 months when stored refrigerated protected from light in a desiccator. Desirably, i.t. injected fluorescent dye-labeled PLGA microparticles in rats remained in the lumbar region for ≥7 days. In a rat model of neuropathic pain, i.t. coinjection of hydromorphone- and ketamine-loaded microparticles (each 1 mg) produced analgesia for 8 h only. Possible explanations include inadequate release of ketamine and/or hydromorphone into the spinal fluid, and/or insufficient ketamine loading to prevent development of analgesic tolerance to the released hydromorphone. As sub-analgesic doses of i.t. ketamine at 24-48 h intervals restored analgesia on each occasion, insufficient ketamine loading appears problematic. We will investigate these issues in future work. PMID:25990226

  5. [Immune tolerance after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Krajewska, Magdalena; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Progress in immunosuppressive therapy has improved short-term survival of renal allografts by decreasing the frequency of acute rejections. However, the long-term survival of renal grafts has not improved. Transplanted kidneys are lost in the late period after transplantation as a result of vasculopathy and chronic rejection. Immunological tolerance means the lack of immunological activity towards certain antigens while the response towards others remains correct. The induction of immunological tolerance of donor antigens (transplant tolerance) is examined intensively to work out treatment methods which will allow prevention of chronic allograft rejection. The paper includes an overview of current knowledge on allograft tolerance. Immune response to alloantigens is described and the mechanisms of immunological tolerance induction (including clonal deletion, anergy connected with the microchimerism phenomenon, and active suppression caused by regulatory lymphocytes) are characterized. The role of dendritic cells in the process of inducing and maintaining tolerance is highlighted. Tolerance-inducing strategies in renal transplant recipients and clinically applied evaluation methods are presented. At present, optimizing recipient matching is used to decrease the risk of graft rejection. Hopefully, gene therapy will be possible in the near future. However, before introducing such a procedure into clinical studies, optimal therapy conditions and risk evaluation must be defined in tests on animals. PMID:16552396

  6. Analysis of Analgesic Mixtures: An Organic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ned H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an experiment to analyze commercial analgesic preparations (pain relievers) by silica gel thin layer chromatography, followed by preparative (thick) layer chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analysis. Key difference from similar experiments is that students are responsible for devising suitable solvent systems for the thin layer…

  7. Analgesic use and the risk of primary adult brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kathleen M; Nabors, Louis B; Thompson, Zachary J; Rozmeski, Carrie M; Anic, Gabriella A; Olson, Jeffrey J; LaRocca, Renato V; Chowdhary, Sajeel A; Forsyth, Peter A; Thompson, Reid C

    2016-09-01

    Glioma and meningioma are uncommon tumors of the brain with few known risk factors. Regular use of aspirin has been linked to a lower risk of gastrointestinal and other cancers, though evidence for an association with brain tumors is mixed. We examined the association of aspirin and other analgesics with the risk of glioma and meningioma in a large US case-control study. Cases were persons recently diagnosed with glioma or meningioma and treated at medical centers in the southeastern US. Controls were persons sampled from the same communities as the cases combined with friends and other associates of the cases. Information on past use of analgesics (aspirin, other anti-inflammatory agents, and acetaminophen) was collected in structured interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for analgesic use adjusted for potential confounders. All associations were considered according to indication for use. A total of 1123 glioma cases, 310 meningioma cases and 1296 controls were included in the analysis. For indications other than headache, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report regular use of aspirin (OR 0.69; CI 0.56, 0.87), in a dose-dependent manner (P trend < 0.001). No significant associations were observed with other analgesics for glioma, or any class of pain reliever for meningioma. Results suggest that regular aspirin use may reduce incidence of glioma. PMID:26894804

  8. Analgesic use and patterns of estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Oh, Hannah; Daugherty, Sarah E; Xu, Xia; Hankinson, Susan E; Ziegler, Regina G; Eliassen, A Heather

    2014-04-01

    Analgesic use has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of some cancers, with inverse associations between analgesics and colon cancer, and suggestive inverse associations for breast cancer. Estrogen metabolites (EM) have genotoxic and estrogenic potential; genotoxicity may differ by hydroxylation pathway. Analgesic use may impact patterns of estrogen metabolism; effects of analgesics on disease risk could be mediated through these patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 603 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Frequency of aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen use was reported via questionnaire; average frequency in 1997 and 1999 was calculated. Women provided urine samples between 1996 and 1999, collected during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Urinary EM were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We observed no association between analgesic use and estradiol, estrone, or specific pathways of estrogen metabolism. Women reporting more frequent aspirin use had lower methylated 2-catechols (e.g., 2-hydroxyestrone-3-methyl ether, 2+ days/week vs. non-use: 0.95 vs. 1.21 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.07). Non-aspirin NSAID use was positively associated with 17-epiestriol (4+ days/week vs. non-use: 2.48 vs. 1.52 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.11). Acetaminophen use was positively associated with total EM (2+ days/week vs. non-use: 236 vs. 198 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.02, p trend = 0.11), 2-hydroxyestrone-3-methyl ether (1.6 vs. 1.1 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference < 0.01, p trend = 0.02), and 16α-hydroxyestrone (17 vs. 12 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.05). This study provides the first assessment of analgesic use and patterns of estrogen metabolism in women. While we observed some associations between analgesics and

  9. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  10. Prostaglandin synthetase inhibition with indomethacin rectal suppositories in the treatment of acute and chronic urinary calculus obstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, N S

    1986-03-01

    The effect of indomethacin suppositories on both acute urinary colic and urinary calculus, resistant or refractory to conventional therapy with analgesics and spasmolytics was investigated. Fifty-five patients with acute urinary colic refractory to treatment with repeated injections of antispasmodics and analgesics had dramatic or complete pain relief after receiving indomethacin suppositories (100 mg) (P less than 0.01). Fifteen of the 55 patients passed urinary stones within 30 days of treatment with indomethacin. Three out of 30 other patients with renal or ureteric stones were treated with indomethacin suppositories (100 mg) twice daily. Twenty-one of the 30 patients passed their stones within 30 days of treatment. It is concluded that indomethacin suppositories can relieve acute urinary colic resistant to treatment with analgesic/antispasmodic drugs, and facilitate expulsion of urinary calculi. The mechanism of action of indomethacin is discussed in terms of its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and its prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. PMID:3720020

  11. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  12. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa BA

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  13. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa Ba

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA "mimetics" (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  14. RUBY-1: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and tolerability of the novel oral factor Xa inhibitor darexaban (YM150) following acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Mehta, Shamir R.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Gibson, C. Michael; Kovar, Frantisek; Kala, Petr; Garcia-Hernandez, Alberto; Renfurm, Ronny W.; Granger, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To establish the safety, tolerability and most promising regimen of darexaban (YM150), a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, for prevention of ischaemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods In a 26-week, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 1279 patients with recent high-risk non-ST-segment or ST-segment elevation ACS received one of six darexaban regimens: 5 mg b.i.d., 10 mg o.d., 15 mg b.i.d., 30 mg o.d., 30 mg b.i.d., or 60 mg o.d. or placebo, on top of dual antiplatelet treatment. Primary outcome was incidence of major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding events. The main efficacy outcome was a composite of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic thromboembolism, and severe recurrent ischaemia. Results Bleeding rates were numerically higher in all darexaban arms vs. placebo (pooled HR: 2.275; 95% CI: 1.13–4.60, P = 0.022). Using placebo as reference (bleeding rate 3.1%), there was a dose–response relationship (P = 0.009) for increased bleeding with increasing darexaban dose (6.2, 6.5, and 9.3% for 10, 30, and 60 mg daily, respectively), which was statistically significant for 30 mg b.i.d. (P = 0.002). There was no decrease (indeed a numerical increase in the 30 and 60 mg dose arms) in efficacy event rates with darexaban, but the study was underpowered for efficacy. Darexaban showed good tolerability without signs of liver toxicity. Conclusions Darexaban when added to dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS produces an expected dose-related two- to four-fold increase in bleeding, with no other safety concerns but no signal of efficacy. Establishing the potential of low-dose darexaban in preventing major cardiac events after ACS requires a large phase III trial. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00994292 PMID:21878434

  15. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights. PMID:8051515

  16. Religious Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three issues of religious tolerance. The first article examines a case recently decided by the United States Supreme Court on student-led prayers at school events. The second article explores the persecution suffered by members of the Mormon religion during the 19th century. The final article looks at Martin Luther and…

  17. Discovery and analgesic evaluation of 8-chloro-1,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazine-2,3-dione as a novel potent d-amino acid oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dongsheng; Lu, Jun; Xie, Jin; Cui, Junjun; Li, Teng-Fei; Wang, Yan-Chao; Chen, Yuan; Gong, Nian; Li, Xin-Yan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-07-19

    A series of 5-azaquinoxaline-2,3-dione derivatives were synthesized and evaluated on d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) inhibition as potential α-hydroxylactam-based inhibitors. The potent inhibitory activities in vitro suggested that 5-nitrogen could significantly enhance the binding affinity by strengthening relevant hydrogen bond interactions. The analgesic effects of intrathecal and systemic injection of 8-chloro-1,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-b]pyrazine-2,3-dione, a representative molecule of 5-azaquinoxaline-2,3-dione, were investigated in rodents. This research not only confirmed the analgesic effect of the DAAO inhibitors but provided a new class of chemical entities with oral application potential for the treatment of chronic pain and morphine analgesic tolerance. PMID:27089209

  18. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10), and perceived analgesic needs (0–10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = −0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2 = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2 = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  19. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  20. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activity of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid from Annona reticulata L. bark.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Machindra J; Kolhe, Dinesh R; Wakte, Pravin S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2012-02-01

    Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was isolated from the bark of Annona reticulata and studied for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. Analgesic activity was assessed using the hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing, and the antiinflammatory activity using the carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg, exhibited significant (p < 0.05) analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. These activities were comparable to the standard drugs used, and furthermore the analgesic effect of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was blocked by naloxone (2 mg/kg) in both analgesic models. PMID:21674631

  1. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  2. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Bi-yuan-ling granules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bing; Su, Han-Wen; Liu, Huan-Xiang; Yin, Xian; He, Feng; Ren, Yong-Shen; Dai, Kang; Xiang, Mei-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Bi-yuan-ling granule (BLG) is a traditional Chinese medicine compound composed mainly of baicalin and chlorogenic acid. It has been demonstrated to be clinically effective for various inflammatory diseases such as acute rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, atrophic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms of BLG against these diseases are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of BLG, and examine its protective effects on mouse acute lung injury (ALI). The hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing assay in Kunming mice were adopted to evaluate the pain-relieving effects of BLG. The anti-inflammatory activities of BLG were determined by examining the effects of BLG on xylene-caused ear swelling in Kunming mice, the cotton pellet-induced granuloma in rats, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. The results showed that BLG at 15.5 mg/g could significantly relieve the pain by 82.5% (P<0.01) at 1 h after thermal stimulation and 91.2% (P<0.01) at 2 h after thermal stimulation. BLG at doses of 7.75 and 15.5 mg/g reduced the writhing count up to 33.3% (P<0.05) and 53.4% (P<0.01), respectively. Additionally, the xylene-induced edema in mice was markedly restrained by BLG at 7.75 mg/g (P<0.05) and 15.5 mg/g (P<0.01). BLG at 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g significantly reduced paw edema by 34.8% (P<0.05) and 37.9% (P<0.05) at 5 h after carrageenan injection. The granulomatous formation of the cotton pellet was profoundly suppressed by BLG at 2.68, 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g by 15.4%, 38.2% (P<0.01) and 58.9% (P<0.001), respectively. BLG also inhibited lung W/D ratio and the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in ALI mice. In addition, the median lethal dose (LD50), median effective dose (ED50) and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of BLG were found to be 42.7, 3.2 and 12.33 mg/g, respectively. All the findings suggest that BLG has

  3. Analgesic use in dentistry in a tertiary hospital in western Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chayna; Das, Biswadeep; Baral, P

    2004-10-01

    The present study had been planned to determine the pattern of drug utilization of analgesics (non-opioid and opioid analgesics) in dental outpatients in a referral hospital in western Nepal. A total of 1820 prescriptions of dental patients attending the dental outpatient at Manipal Teaching Hospital (MTH), Fulbari, Pokhara, Nepal were collected by a random once-weekly survey between March 2001 and February 2002. The analgesic-containing prescriptions (n = 1346) were separated from the total prescriptions collected. This information was compiled, scored and analyzed in consultation with dentists using WHO guidelines. There were more female patients (56%) than male patients (44%) in this study. The dental disorders most frequently reported in our study were diseases of pulp and periapical tissue (36.5%), gingivitis and periodontal diseases (28.5%) and dental caries (16%) etc. In total, 74% prescriptions contained analgesics which are the second-most commonly prescribed drugs after anti-microbials (44.9%) in dental OPD. The total analgesics prescribed were 1358 that account for 36.7% of total drugs prescribed. Only 5 and 37.8% of analgesics were prescribed generically and from the essential drug list of WHO respectively. All the analgesics were administered orally which included 89.7 and 10.3% of non-opioid analgesics and opioid analgesics (propoxyphene and dextropopoxyphene) respectively. The average duration of analgesic use was 3.5 +/- 0.3 days. The most commonly prescribed non-opioid analgesic was ibuprofen (41%) followed by nimesulide (22%). A total of 38.9% analgesics were fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of two drugs and the most common analgesic combination used was ibuprofen + paracetamol and paracetamol + opioid analgesics. All opioid analgesics were prescribed in combination with paracetamol (10.3%) only. In total, 1.6% analgesics were prescribed concomitantly with gastroprotective agents. All gastroprotective agents (n = 22) were prescribed concomitantly

  4. Perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians in 2001

    PubMed Central

    Hewson, Caroline J.; Dohoo, Ian R.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A random sample of 652 Canadian veterinarians was surveyed to determine perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following common surgeries. The response rate was 57.8%. With the exception of taildocking in puppies, at least 85% of animals received preincisional analgesics, and 30% to 98.1% received postincisional analgesics. A similar survey was conducted in 1994; since then, analgesic usage has increased markedly, as have ratings of the pain caused by different surgeries. In 2001 most veterinarians (62%) used at least 2 classes of analgesic perioperatively. However, strong opioids, local anesthetics, and alpha-2 agonists were underused, and there was an overreliance on weak opioids (butorphanol, meperidine). Up to 12% of veterinarians did not use any analgesics. Nationally, this may have affected many animals monthly; for example, approximately 6000 dogs or cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Continuing education (provincial level) and review articles were considered effective ways to inform veterinarians about optimal analgesic practices. PMID:16642874

  5. Perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians in 2001.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Caroline J; Dohoo, Ian R; Lemke, Kip A

    2006-04-01

    A random sample of 652 Canadian veterinarians was surveyed to determine perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following common surgeries. The response rate was 57.8%. With the exception of taildocking in puppies, at least 85% of animals received preincisional analgesics, and 30% to 98.1% received postincisional analgesics. A similar survey was conducted in 1994; since then, analgesic usage has increased markedly, as have ratings of the pain caused by different surgeries. In 2001 most veterinarians (62%) used at least 2 classes of analgesic perioperatively. However, strong opioids, local anesthetics, and alpha-2 agonists were underused, and there was an overreliance on weak opioids (butorphanol, meperidine). Up to 12% of veterinarians did not use any analgesics. Nationally, this may have affected many animals monthly; for example, approximately 6000 dogs or cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Continuing education (provincial level) and review articles were considered effective ways to inform veterinarians about optimal analgesic practices. PMID:16642874

  6. Analgesic effects of an ethanol extract of the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich (Annonaceae) and the major constituent, xylopic acid in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Boakye-Gyasi, Eric; Abotsi, Wonder K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders including rheumatism, headache, colic pain, and neuralgia. Little pharmacological data exists in scientific literature of the effect of the fruit extract and its major diterpene, xylopic acid, on pain. The present study evaluated the analgesic properties of the ethanol extract of X. aethiopica (XAE) and xylopic acid (XA), in murine models. Materials and Methods: XAE and XA were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (Tail-flick and Hargreaves thermal hyperalgesia tests), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. Results: XAE and XA exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used. XAE (30-300 mg kg-1, p.o.) and XA (10-100 mg kg-1, p.o.) inhibited acetic acid-induced visceral nociception, formalin- induced paw pain (both neurogenic and inflammatory), thermal pain as well as carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in animals. Morphine (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and diclofenac (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.), used as controls, exhibited similar anti-nociceptive activities. XAE and XA did not induce tolerance to their respective anti-nociceptive effects in the formalin test after chronic administration. Morphine tolerance did not also cross-generalize to the analgesic effects of XAE or XA. Conclusions: These findings establish the analgesic properties of the ethanol fruit extract of X. aethiopica and its major diterpene, xylopic acid. PMID:23248562

  7. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  8. Analgesic effects of NB001 on mouse models of arthralgia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Wang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Xin-shang; Tian, Jiao; Han, Jing; Guo, Yan-yan; Feng, Bin; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the critical roles of calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) in the central nervous system in chronic pain. In the present study, we examined the analgesic effects of NB001, a selective inhibitor of AC1, on animal models of ankle joint arthritis and knee joint arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. NB001 treatment had no effect on joint edema, stiffness, and joint destruction. Furthermore, the treatment failed to attenuate the disease progression of arthritis. However, NB001 treatment (3 mg/kg) significantly weakened joint pain-related behavior in the mouse models of ankle joint arthritis and knee joint arthritis. Results indicated that NB001 exhibited an analgesic effect on the animal models of arthritis but was not caused by anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26452469

  9. The discovery and development of analgesics: new mechanisms, new modalities

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Gillian; Williams, Dic

    2010-01-01

    Despite intensive research into pain mechanisms and significant investment in research and development, the majority of analgesics available to prescribers and patients are based on mechanistic classes of compounds that have been known for many years. With considerable ingenuity and innovation, researchers continue to make the best of the mechanistic approaches available, with novel formulations, routes of administration, and combination products. Here we review some of the mechanisms and modalities of analgesics that have recently entered into clinical development, which, coupled with advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain, will hopefully bring the promise of new therapeutics that have the potential to provide improved pain relief for those many patients whose needs remain poorly met. PMID:21041957

  10. Analgesic use - prevalence, biomonitoring and endocrine and reproductive effects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, David M; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Gaudriault, Pierre; Lesné, Laurianne; Serrano, Tania; Main, Katharina M; Jégou, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Paracetamol and NSAIDs, in particular acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ibuprofen, are among the most used and environmentally released pharmaceutical drugs. The differences in international trends in the sale and consumption of mild analgesics reflect differences in marketing, governmental policies, habits, accessibility, disease patterns and the age distribution of each population. Biomonitoring indicates ubiquitous and high human exposure to paracetamol and to salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that analgesics can have endocrine disruptive properties capable of altering animal and human reproductive function from fetal life to adulthood in both sexes. Medical and public awareness about these health concerns should be increased, particularly among pregnant women. PMID:27150289

  11. Oxytocin – A Multifunctional Analgesic for Chronic Deep Tissue Pain

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Ness, Timothy J.; Robbins, Meredith T.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain arising from deep tissues is currently inadequate and there is need for new pharmacological agents to provide analgesia. The endogenous paracrine hormone/neurotransmitter oxytocin is intimately involved in the modulation of multiple physiological and psychological functions. Recent experiments have given clear evidence for a role of oxytocin in the modulation of nociception. The present article reviews the existent human and basic science data related to the direct and indirect effects of oxytocin on pain. Due to its analgesic, anxiolytic, antidepressant and other central nervous system effects, there is strong evidence that oxytocin and other drugs acting through the oxytocin receptor could act as multifunctional analgesics with unique therapeutic value. PMID:25345612

  12. [Evaluation of an analgesic activity in man: thermodolorimetery].

    PubMed

    Hugues, F C; Julien, D; Aboucaya, M; Marche, J

    1975-06-21

    The authors propose an experimental technique which makes possible the evaluation in man of the activity of analgesic or anti-inflammatory medications. The principle of thermodolorimetre threshold of painful thermic sensitivity (S.S.T.D. in the french text) which is stable over a period of time in a given individual receiving a placebo but which varies in a significant fashion in groups treated with a medication belonging to one of the two classifications studied. PMID:1098018

  13. Analgesic Effects of Paracetamol and Morphine After Elective Laparotomy Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Alimian, Mahzad; Pournajafian, Alireza; Kholdebarin, Alireza; Ghodraty, Mohammadreza; Rokhtabnak, Faranak; Yazdkhasti, Payman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids have been traditionally used for postoperative pain control, but they have some unpleasant side effects such as respiratory depression or nausea. Some other analgesic drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also being used for pain management due to their fewer side effects. Objectives: The aim of our study was to compare the analgesic effects of paracetamol, an intravenous non-opioid analgesic and morphine infusion after elective laparotomy surgeries. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical study was performed on 157 ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) I-II patients, who were scheduled for elective laparotomy. These patients were managed by general anesthesia with TIVA technique in both groups and 150 patients were analyzed. Paracetamol (4 g/24 hours) in group 1 and morphine (20 mg/24 hours) in group 2 were administered by infusion pump after surgery. Postoperative pain evaluation was performed by visual analog scale (VAS) during several hours postoperatively. Meperidine was administered for patients complaining of pain with VAS > 3 and repeated if essential. Total doses of infused analgesics, were recorded following the surgery and compared. Analysis was performed on the basis of VAS findings and meperidine consumption. Results: There were no differences in demographic data between two groups. Significant difference in pain score was found between the two groups, in the first eight hours following operation (P value = 0.00), but not after 12 hours (P = 0.14) .The total dose of rescue drug (meperidine) and number of doses injected showed a meaningful difference between the two groups (P = 0.00). Also nausea, vomiting and itching showed a significant difference between the two groups and patients in morphine group, experienced higher levels of them. Conclusions: Paracetamol is not enough for postoperative pain relief in the first eight hour postoperatively, but it can reduce postoperative opioid need and is

  14. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Shikha, H A; Sadhu, S K; Rahman, M T; Datta, B K

    2001-08-01

    Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action. PMID:11534346

  15. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management. PMID:25851460

  16. Analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun-Kun; Ding, Ji-Fei; Liu, Jin; Yang, Yong-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia and its possible mechanism. Methods: A total of 48 PHN Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups randomly: Normal, PHN, PHN+MT and naloxone, 4P-PDOT or L-arginine+120 mg/kg MT (C). Heat pain latency was determined after MT injection for 20 min, 40 min, 80 min and 120 min respectively. The expression levels of δ receptor and MT2 receptor in different tissues of rats were detected by RT-PCR method. NO content was determined. Results: Heat pain latency in PHN rats were lower than that of control group (P<0.05), MT could increase the heat pain latency with dose-dependent, while naloxone, 4P-PDOT and L-arginine could reverse the analgesic effect of MT (P<0.05). The expression levels of δ receptor and MT2 receptor in spinal cord, hypothalamus and hippocampus in PHN+MT (120 mg/kg, i. p.) group were significantly higher than that of PHN group (P<0.05). The NO levels in the brain and spinal cord tissues in PHN group were higher than that of PHN+MT (120 mg/kg) group (P<0.05). Conclusions: MT had significant analgesic effects in the treatment of PHN, and its mechanism was closely related with δopioid receptor, NO and MT2 receptor. PMID:26131073

  17. Analgesic effect of intramuscular and oral nalbuphine in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Beaver, W T; Feise, G A; Robb, D

    1981-02-01

    In a double-blind study using patients' subjective reports as indices of analgesia, the relative analgesic potency of intramuscular and oral nalbuphine was determined in 104 postoperative patients. Effects of single doses of 3 and 9 mg of intramuscular nalbuphine were compared with those of 15- and 45-mg oral doses of nalbuphine by means of a parallel study design (26 patients per treatment group). When both intensity and duration of analgesia are considered (i.e., total analgesic effect), oral nalbuphine is 1/4 to 1/5 as potent as intramuscular nalbuphine. In terms of peak effect, however, oral nalbuphine is only 1/10 as potent. The oral/parenteral potency ratio for total effect is close to those obtained by Houde et al. in studies of morphine (1/6), metopon (1/5), hydromorphone (1/5), and oxymorphone (1/6) and suggests that oral nalbuphine undergoes substantial biotransformation on first pass through gut mucosa and liver. Since intramuscular nalbuphine is approximately equipotent to morphine, it should be feasible to equal the analgesia induced by the usual intramuscular doses of morphine with reasonable oral doses of nalbuphine. Although nalbuphine is a mixed agonist/antagonist analgesic, no psychotomimetic reactions were observed. PMID:7006884

  18. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  19. Topical methadone and meperidine analgesic synergy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikov, Yuri A.; Oksman, Galina; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2010-01-01

    Topical analgesics have many potential advantages over systemic administration. Prior work has shown potent analgesic activity of a number of topical opioids in the radiant heat tailflick assay. The current study confirms the analgesic activity of morphine and extends it to two other mu opioids, methadone and meperidine. Combinations of topical morphine and lidocaine are synergistic. Similarly, the combination of methadone and lidocaine is synergistic. While there appeared to be some potentiation with the combination of meperidine and lidocaine, it did not achieve significance. Systemically, prior studies have shown that co-administration of morphine and methadone was synergistic. The combination of morphine and methadone was also synergistic when given topically. In contrast, the combination of morphine and meperidine was not synergistic systemically and it was not synergistic topically. Thus, the pharmacology of topical opioids mimics that seen with systemic administration. Their activity in the topical model supports their potential utility while the local limitation of their actions offers the possibility of a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:20433826

  20. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  1. Mechanisms of Non-Opioid Analgesics Beyond Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, May; Dionne, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Non-opioid analgesics including both selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors and acetaminophen are the most widely used treatments for pain. Inhibition of COX is thought to be largely responsible for both the therapeutic and adverse effects of this class of drugs. Accumulating evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated effects of non-opioids beyond the inhibition of COX and prostaglandin synthesis that might also explain their therapeutic and adverse effects. These include their interaction with endocannabinoids, nitric oxide, monoaminergic, and cholinergic systems. Moreover, the recent development of microarray technology that allows the study of human gene expression suggests multiple pathways that may be related to the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of non-opioids. The present review will discuss the multiple actions of non-opioids and their interactions with these systems during inflammation and pain, suggesting that COX inhibition is an incomplete explanation for the actions of non-opioids and proposes the involvement of multiple selective targets for their analgesic, as well as, their adverse effects. PMID:19779578

  2. [Oral exposure testing in non-aspirin-induced analgesic intolerance].

    PubMed

    Wiedow, O; Brasch, J; Christophers, E

    1996-12-01

    Although intolerance reaction to analgesics are not uncommon, there is still a lack of standardized procedures to diagnose the problem. We retrospectively analyzed results of scratch tests as well as oral challenges with analgesics in order to evaluate risk and diagnostic relevance of these procedures. In 1987-1992 a total of 650 patients with supposed intolerance to drugs were tested by oral challenge. Among them were 98 patients with a positive history of intolerance to non-aspirin analgesics. In 56 patients the intolerance could be verified by oral challenge. In order of decreasing frequency, the most likely agents were propyphenazone, diclofenac, metamizole, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, indomethacin, phenazone (antipyrine), and paracetamol (acteaminophen). Oral provocation showed clear dose-response relationships. For propyphenazone, the half-effective provocation dose was the same for all symptoms (cutaneous, nasal, bronchial, anaphylactoid). Scratch testing was not of diagnostic significance. Standardized test protocols starting with low dose oral challenges are suitable and helpful in minimizing the risk of severe side effects. PMID:9081936

  3. [Urticaria--angioedema induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics].

    PubMed

    Díez Gómez, M L; Alvarez Cuesta, E; Hinojosa Macías, M; García Cañadillas, F; Alcover Sánchez, R

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two adult patients had been evaluated with a history of Urticaria and Angioedema (U-AE) associated with ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). None developed attacks of bronchospasm. None had chronic urticaria. The same reaction was repeated in 36 individuals on at least two different occasions following administration of these drugs. Based on patients'history we distinguished three groups: Group A: twenty-three patients who had presented U-AE with the administration of pyrazolone drugs. Thereafter, sixteen of them had taken aspirin without adverse reactions. Group B: Nine patients in whom aspirin caused U-AE, after three of them had taken pyrazolone drugs without intolerance. The remaining six had not taken analgesic drugs since the last reaction. Group C: Ten patients who had developed U-AE with aspirin as well as with pyrazolone drugs. The objective of our study was the following: 1) to observe tolerance level of these patients to other NSAID different from those which had produced the first reactions. 2) To test to see if the patients who had suffered U-AE by noramidopyrine and aminophenazone tolerated other pyrazolone drugs like sulfinpyrazone and phenylbutazone. 3) To see if reactions are produced with tartrazine in patients who had presented U-AE with pyrazolone drugs, given that this colouring (tartrazine) is a pyrazolone derivative. Skin test (prick and intracutaneous test) with noramidopyrine, phenylbutazone and noramidopyrine metasulphonate MG, were carried out on the patients in group A, group C and 30 normal controls. In all the groups oral challenge tests were performed with progressive doses of naproxen, indomethacin, paracetamol, ciclofenac, mefenamic acid, piroxicam and phenylbutazone. Oral challenge tests were accomplished with aspirin in group A and with propiphenazone in group B. Oral challenge tests with sulfinpyrazone and tartrazine were also performed on various patients in group A and group C. The interval between

  4. [A double-blind study of the analgesic efficacy in kidney colic of the combination of dipyrone and spasmolytic with ketorolac trometamol].

    PubMed

    Martín Carrasco, C; Rodríguez Vázquez, M; Palacios Garciá, R

    1993-11-01

    We conducted a double-blind study in 34 patients to compare the analgesic efficacy in acute renal colic using 2.5 g dipyrone combined with a spasmolytic agent and 30 mg ketorolac tromethamine, diluted in 100 ml saline solution and injected intravenously. Clinical criteria and the observation of red cells in urine were used for the diagnosis. The intensity of the pain and its development were measured using visual analogue scales (VAS) and a scale of items showing patient improvement. The side effects were spontaneously mentioned by the patients and elicited by direct questioning. It can be confirmed with a beta error of 0.10 that the analgesic effect obtained by both treatments is similar. Nevertheless, the combination of dipyrone and spasmolytic produces more side effects, possibly due to the spasmolytic agent. PMID:8304789

  5. Efficacy of Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic of Superpulsed Low Level Laser Therapy After Impacted Mandibular Third Molars Extractions.

    PubMed

    Pol, Renato; Ruggiero, Tiziana; Gallesio, Giorgia; Riso, Massimo; Bergamasco, Laura; Mortellaro, Carmen; Mozzati, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of superpulsed low level laser therapy (SLLLT) after bilateral extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. Many studies in the literature show the anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of laser therapy after oral surgery.The authors report the preliminary results of 25 patients who underwent bilateral extraction of mandibular eighths included in a single surgery. This is a split-mouth study, a site was randomized chosen to be treated with SLLLT at T0, 24 hours and 48 hours with a GaAs laser diode, whereas the other surgical site was evaluated as control. The suture was removed at 7 days and healing was controlled at 14 days. During the sessions were monitored and recorded the pain, using visual analog scale, and oedema with the visual analog scale and cephalometric measurements of cutaneous points (TR-GO, GO-CA, GO-SP, GO-PO). Each patient received only antibiotic prophylaxis and analgesic therapy as needed.Results indicate that in the treated site SLLLT determines a reduction in pain and swelling statistically significant compared with the control site (P < 0.05). The authors found that the effectiveness of laser therapy is in the first 5 days after surgery, showing a significant reduction of pain and swelling in the treated site than the control site.This study suggests that the SLLLT has a potential in reducing the postoperative discomfort after impacted third molar extractions, due to a reduction in postoperative pain and swelling. Superpulsed low level laser therapy has no side effects and is well tolerated by patients. It also seems to have a role in reducing the intake of drugs. PMID:27159857

  6. Sublingual Sufentanil: A Review in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-04-01

    The sufentanil sublingual tablet system (SSTS; Zalviso(®)) is a novel patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device intended to overcome some of the drawbacks of opioid-based intravenous PCA (IV-PCA). Based on the results of three phase III studies, the SSTS has been approved in the EU for the management of acute moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults in a hospital setting. In a head-to-head comparison with morphine, the gold standard for opioid-based IV-PCA, the SSTS was associated with a more rapid onset of analgesia and higher rates of success, based on patient and healthcare professional global assessments of the method of pain control. Patients and healthcare professionals also rated the SSTS as being easier to use and expressed a greater level of overall satisfaction with this device. The SSTS was generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile typical of that of other opioids and generally similar to that of placebo. By virtue of its preprogrammed, noninvasive design, the SSTS avoids the risk of pump programming errors and other complications (e.g. infections and analgesic gaps) that can occur with IV-PCA technology; it also imposes less restriction on postoperative mobility. As such, the SSTS provides an effective alternative to opioid-based IV-PCA for the management of acute moderate to severe postoperative pain. Future studies should ideally focus on evaluating the relative cost effectiveness of the SSTS and comparing it with other available needle-free PCA modalities. PMID:27067596

  7. A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Y

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine has been an additive in analgesics for many years. However, the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine have not been seriously investigated since a pooled analysis conducted in 1984 showed that caffeine reduces the amount of paracetamol (acetaminophen) necessary for the same effect by approximately 40%. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological research has provided some evidence that caffeine can have anti-nociceptive actions through blockade of adenosine receptors, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme synthesis, or by changes in emotion state. Nevertheless, these actions are only considered in some cases. It is suggested that the actual doses of analgesics and caffeine used can influence the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine, and doses that are either too low or too high lead to no analgesic enhancement. Clinical trials suggest that caffeine in doses of more than 65 mg may be useful for enhancement of analgesia. However, except for in headache pain, the benefits are equivocal. While adding caffeine to analgesics increases the number of patients who become free from headache [rate ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.58], it also leads to more patients with nervousness and dizziness (relative risk = 1.60, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.03). It is suggested that long-term use or overuse of analgesic medications is associated with rebound headache. However, there is no robust evidence that headache after use or withdrawal of caffeine-containing analgesics is more frequent than after other analgesics. Case-control studies have shown that caffeine-containing analgesics are associated with analgesic nephropathy (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 10.3). However, no specific contribution of caffeine to analgesic nephropathy can be identified from these studies. Whether caffeine produces nephrotoxicity on its own, or increases nephrotoxicity due to analgesics, is yet to be established. PMID:11772146

  8. Comparison of the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac gel (Voltarol Emulgel) and felbinac gel (Traxam) in the treatment of soft tissue injuries.

    PubMed

    Bouchier-Hayes, T A; Rotman, H; Darekar, B S

    1990-08-01

    In an observer-blind, randomised study, the efficacy and tolerability of two topical NSAID preparations were assessed in 384 patients with acute soft tissue injuries. The patients were allocated to receive treatment with either diclofenac gel (Voltarol Emulgel) 4 g tds or felbinac gel (Traxam) 4 g tds for three or seven days, depending on the rate of recovery. In every parameter studied (pain at rest, pain on movement, pain on local pressure, swelling, range of movement, bruising, degree of recovery, requirement for rescue analgesics, daily pain levels), diclofenac was found to be more effective at day 3 and day 7, with the single exception of bruising at day 7. Treatment differences were statistically significant in favour of diclofenac for pain at rest (p = 0.03) and bruising on day 3 (p = 0.03), and pain on pressure at day 7 (p = 0.009). The difference in favour of diclofenac in reduction of daily pain level (as recorded on diary cards) did not quite reach significance (p = 0.06). Both preparations were well tolerated, with no significant treatment-related side-effects reported. PMID:2206836

  9. Analgesic Opioid Dose Is an Important Indicator of Postoperative Ileus Following Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit: Experience in the Robotic Surgery Era

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Yoon, Young Eun; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative ileus (POI) is common following bowel resection for radical cystectomy with ileal conduit (RCIC). We investigated perioperative factors associated with prolonged POI following RCIC, with specific focus on opioid-based analgesic dosage. Materials and Methods From March 2007 to January 2013, 78 open RCICs and 26 robot-assisted RCICs performed for bladder carcinoma were identified with adjustment for age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, and body mass index (BMI). Perioperative records including operative time, intraoperative fluid excess, estimated blood loss, lymph node yield, and opioid analgesic dose were obtained to assess their associations with time to passage of flatus, tolerable oral diet, and length of hospital stay (LOS). Prior to general anaesthesia, patients received epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) consisted of fentanyl with its dose adjusted for BMI. Postoperatively, single intravenous injections of tramadol were applied according to patient desire. Results Multivariate analyses revealed cumulative dosages of both PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections as independent predictors of POI. According to surgical modality, linear regression analyses revealed cumulative dosages of PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections to be positively associated with time to first passage of flatus, tolerable diet, and LOS in the open RCIC group. In the robot-assisted RCIC group, only tramadol dose was associated with time to flatus and tolerable diet. Compared to open RCIC, robot-assisted RCIC yielded shorter days to diet and LOS; however, it failed to shorten days to first flatus. Conclusion Reducing opioid-based analgesics shortens the duration of POI. The utilization of the robotic system may confer additional benefit. PMID:25048497

  10. Analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of highest analgesic demand after cesarean section: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bierylo, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Swietlana; Szymusik, Iwona; Kolacz, Marcin; Dabrowski, Michal J

    2016-06-01

    Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures in female patients. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of greatest postoperative analgesic demand after CS. This period was defined by detailed analysis of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) usage.This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized trial included 60 parturients who were scheduled for elective CS. Participants received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine supplemented with normal saline (control group) or with fentanyl 25 μg (fentanyl group). To evaluate primary endpoints, we measured total pethidine consumption over the period of greatest PCA pethidine requirement. For verification of secondary endpoints, we recorded intravenous PCA requirement in other time windows, duration of effective analgesia, pain scores assessed by visual analog scale, opioid side effects, hemodynamic changes, neonatal Apgar scores, and intraoperative pain.Detailed analysis of hour-by-hour PCA opioid requirements showed that the greatest demand for analgesics among patients in the control group occurred during the first 12 hours after surgery. Patients in the fentanyl group had significantly reduced opioid consumption compared with the controls during this period and had a prolonged duration of effective analgesia. The groups were similar in visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related side effects (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, oversedation, and respiratory depression), and neonatal Apgar scores. Mild respiratory depression occurred in 1 patient in each group. Fewer patients experienced intraoperative pain in the fentanyl group (3% vs 23%; relative risk 6.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9-51.6).The requirement for postoperative analgesics is greatest during the first 12 hours after induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CS. The addition of intrathecal fentanyl to spinal anesthesia is effective for intraoperative

  11. A pilot study into the problematic use of opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David T; Allan, Laurie; Griffiths, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the use of strong opioid analgesic drugs for chronic non-cancer pain. Specialists have concluded that fears of problematic drug use are often unfounded. In contrast, others claim the existence of significant problems.'Problematic drug use' includes the following definitions; addiction, abuse, physiological dependence and tolerance.We present a case study and the results of a pilot, longitudinal, cohort study, via a pilot questionnaire, of 22 chronic pain clinic patients following a trial of opioid drugs. The results suggest that chronic non-cancer pain patients can be maintained on opioids with few problems, and likewise can withdraw with minimal adverse effects, other than a return of pain. PMID:11722834

  12. Factors influencing the postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 categories of surgeries, and their opinion toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. An analgesic user was defined as a veterinarian who administers analgesics to at least 50% of dogs or 50% of cats following abdominal surgery, excluding ovariohysterectomy. The veterinarians responding exhibited a bimodal distribution of analgesic use, with 49.5% being defined as analgesic users. These veterinarians tended to use analgesics in 100% of animals following abdominal surgery. Veterinarians defined as analgesic nonusers rarely used postoperative analgesics following any abdominal surgery. Pain perception was defined as the average of pain rankings (on a scale of 1 to 10) following abdominal surgery, or the value for dogs or cats if the veterinarian worked with only 1 of the 2 species. Maximum concern about the risks associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid agonists was defined as the highest ranking assigned to any of the 7 risks evaluated in either dogs or cats. Logistic regression analysis identified the pain perception score and the maximum concern regarding the use of potent opioid agonists in the postoperative period as the 2 factors that distinguished analgesic users from analgesic nonusers. This model correctly classified 68% of veterinarians as analgesic users or nonusers. Linear regression analysis identified gender and the presence of an animal health technologist in the practice as the 2 factors that influenced pain perception by veterinarians. Linear regression analysis identified working with an animal health technologist, graduation within the past 10 years, and attendance at continuing education as factors that influenced maximum concern about the postoperative use

  13. Putative Kappa Opioid Heteromers As Targets for Developing Analgesics Free of Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that upon activation by an agonist, β-arrestin associates with G protein-coupled receptors and acts as a scaffold in creating a diverse signaling network that could lead to adverse effects. As an approach to reducing side effects associated with κ opioid agonists, a series of β-naltrexamides 3–10 was synthesized in an effort to selectively target putative κ opioid heteromers without recruiting β-arrestin upon activation. The most potent derivative 3 (INTA) strongly activated KOR-DOR and KOR-MOR heteromers in HEK293 cells. In vivo studies revealed 3 to produce potent antinociception, which, when taken together with antagonism data, was consistent with the activation of both heteromers. 3 was devoid of tolerance, dependence, and showed no aversive effect in the conditioned place preference assay. As immunofluorescence studies indicated no recruitment of β-arrestin2 to membranes in coexpressed KOR-DOR cells, this study suggests that targeting of specific putative heteromers has the potential to identify leads for analgesics devoid of adverse effects. PMID:24978316

  14. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khadem; Ashraf, Ayesha; Nath Biswas, Nripendra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott in treating diarrhea, pain and inflammation using experimental models. Methods In the present study, acetic acid-induced writhing, xylene-induced ear edema and castor oil-induced diarrheal model were used to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities, respectively. Acute toxicity test was carried out to fix the safe doses of the plant extract. Results The plant extract demonstrated a significant inhibition of writhing (P<0.01) compared with the control group in acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The extract also significantly inhibited the xylene induced ear edema formation (P<0.05). In anti-diarrheal test, the extract significantly decreased the frequency of defecation and increased the mean latent period (P<0.01) in castor oil-induced diarrheal model mice at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Conclusions These results suggest that the extract possesses significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities that support to the ethnopharmacological uses of this plant. PMID:23570002

  15. Evaluation of analgesic effect of skin-to-skin contact compared to oral glucose in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Nájala Borges de Sousa; Garcia, João Batista Santos; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho

    2008-09-30

    Nonpharmacological interventions are important alternatives for pain relief during minor procedures in preterm neonates. Skin-to-skin contact or kangaroo mother care is a human and efficient way of caring for low-weight preterm neonates. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of kangaroo care compared to oral glucose on the response of healthy preterm neonates to a low-intensity acute painful stimulus. Ninety-five preterm neonates with a postmenstrual age of 28-36 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups in a single-blind manner. In group 1 (isolette, n=33), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette during heel lancing and did not receive analgesia. In group 2 (kangaroo method, n=31), the neonate was held in skin-to-skin contact for 10 min before and during the heel-lancing procedure. In group 3 (glucose, n=31), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette and received oral glucose (1 ml, 25%) 2 min before heel lancing. A smaller variation in heart rate (p=0.0001) and oxygen saturation (p=0.0012), a shorter duration of facial activity (brow bulge, eye squeeze and nasolabial furrowing) (p=0.0001), and a lower PIPP (Premature Infant Pain Profile) score (p=0.0001) were observed in group 2. In conclusion, skin-to-skin contact produced an analgesic effect in preterm newborns during heel lancing. PMID:18434021

  16. Prescription opioid analgesic use among adults: United States, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Steven M; Porter, Kathryn S; Paulozzi, Leonard J

    2015-02-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain from surgery, injury, and health conditions such as cancer. Opioid dependence and opioid-related deaths are growing public health problems. Opioid analgesic sales (in kilograms per 10,000) quadrupled from 1999 to 2010 (1), and from 1999 to 2012, opioid-related deaths (per 100,000) more than tripled (2). During 1999–2002, 4.2% of persons aged 18 and over used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days (3). This report provides updated estimates and trends in prescription opioid analgesic use among adults aged 20 and over, overall and by selected subgroups. PMID:25714043

  17. Pharmacokinetics of sustained-release analgesics in mice.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Lon V; Hansen, Ryan J; Dorsey, Kathryn; Kang, Sooah; Lunghofer, Paul J; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine and carprofen, 2 of the most commonly used analgesics in mice, must be administered every 8 to 12 h to provide sustained analgesia. Sustained-release (SR) formulations of analgesics maintain plasma levels that should be sufficient to provide sustained analgesia yet require less frequent dosing and thus less handling of and stress to the animals. The pharmacokinetics of SR formulations of buprenorphine (Bup-SR), butorphanol (Butp-SR), fentanyl (Fent-SR), carprofen (Carp-SR), and meloxicam (Melox-SR) were evaluated in mice over 72 h and compared with those of traditional, nonSR formulations. Bup-SR provided plasma drug levels greater than the therapeutic level for the first 24 to 48 h after administration, but plasma levels of Bup-HCl fell below the therapeutic level by 4 h. Fent-SR maintained plasma levels greater than reported therapeutic levels for 12 h. Therapeutic levels of the remaining drugs are unknown, but Carp-SR provided plasma drug levels similar to those of Carp for the first 24 h after administration, whereas Melox-SR had greater plasma levels than did Melox for the first 8 h. Butp-SR provided detectable plasma drug levels for the first 24 h, with a dramatic decrease over the first 4 h. These results indicate that Bup-SR provides a stable plasma drug level adequate for analgesia for 24 to 48 h after administration, whereas Carp-SR, Melox-SR, Fent-SR, and Butp-SR would require additional doses to provide analgesic plasma levels beyond 24 h in mice. PMID:25255070

  18. Analgesic oral efficacy of tramadol hydrochloride in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; DeCastro, A; Minn, F L

    1992-06-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate agonist with a plasma elimination half-life of 5 to 6 hours and peak plasma levels at about 1 1/2 hours. It derives its activity from attachment to the mu-receptor and blockage of norepinephrine reuptake. The purpose of this single-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the analgesic effectiveness of an oral administration of two dose levels of tramadol hydrochloride (75 or 150 mg) compared with the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 100 mg propoxyphene napsylate in 161 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia was assessed over a 6-hour period. Treatments were compared on the basis of standard scales for pain intensity and relief and a number of derived variables based on these data. A global rating of the study medication was also used to compare treatments. The three active treatments were effective analgesics, statistically superior to placebo for many hourly and summary measures. A dose response was seen between the two tramadol doses, with the 150 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. The 75 mg dose of tramadol was generally more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination after hour 2, and significantly so for some hourly time points, as well as for the global rating of the medication. The 150 mg dose of tramadol was significantly more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination from hour 2 through hour 6 for the sum of pain intensity differences and total pain relief scores, as well as for the global rating of the medication. Tramadol hydrochloride at both dose levels is an effective analgesic agent and at 150 mg is statistically superior to the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination. No serious adverse effects were observed; however, dizziness was more frequently reported with 150 mg tramadol. PMID:1351804

  19. Case-control study on analgesics and nephropathy (SAN): protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lewis, Michael; van der Woude, Fokko; Graf, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background The association between intake of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure is still controversially discussed. A new epidemiologic study was planned and conducted in Germany and Austria. Methods/design The objective of the international, multicenter case-control study was to evaluate the association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and use of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics with particular emphasis on combined formulations. A targeted sample of 1000 new (incident) dialysis patients, aged less than 50 years, was planned to recruit between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004. The age limit was chosen to avoid contamination of the study population with phenacetin-containing analgesics to the extent possible. Four control subjects per ESRD case, matched by age, sex, and region were selected from the population living in the region the case came from. Lifetime exposure to analgesics and potential renal risk factors were recorded in a single face-to-face interview. A set of aids was introduced to reinforce the memory of study participants. A standardized, pre-tested interview questionnaire (participants), a medical documentation sheet (physicians in dialysis centres), a logbook for all activities (dialysis centres) were used to collect the necessary data. Quality management consisted of the standardized procedures, (re-) training and supervision of interviewers, regular checks of all incoming data for completeness and plausibility. The study is scientifically independent and governed by a international Scientific Advisory Committee that bridged the gap between the sponsoring companies and the investigators. Also other advisory groups assisted the managing committee of the study. All relevant German and Austrian nephrological associations supported the study, and the study design was carefully reviewed and approved by the Kidney Foundation of Germany. Discussion The study is expected to answer the main

  20. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood–brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates. PMID:22300099

  1. Unintentional overdose of analgesia secondary to acute dental pain.

    PubMed

    Dodd, M D; Graham, C A

    2002-08-24

    Three cases of unintentional overdose with simple analgesics are presented. Over a two month period, these patients presented to the accident and emergency (A&E) department with acute dental pain, outside normal working hours, having been unable to access emergency dental care. In one case the patient's reason for attendance was to obtain further supplies of analgesics. The patients required admission for assessment of the severity of the overdose in addition to advice about appropriate use of analgesics and advice on access to dental care. None of the patients required treatment for the overdose. These cases serve as a timely reminder of the importance of taking an accurate drug history in emergency situations. They also raise issues of patient education for self medication and access to emergency dental services outside normal working hours. PMID:12222908

  2. Characterization of novel cannabinoid based T-type calcium channel blockers with analgesic effects.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Chris; McDaniel, Steven W; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Petrov, Ravil R; Berger, N Daniel; Diaz, Philippe; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-02-18

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  3. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  4. Characterization of Novel Cannabinoid Based T-Type Calcium Channel Blockers with Analgesic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure–activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  5. A forensic toxicological dilemma: the interpretation of post-mortem concentrations of central acting analgesics.

    PubMed

    Daldrup, Th

    2004-06-10

    Dora V., a 88-year-old pensioner suffering from a hiatus hernia, died at the home of an orthopaedist and his wife, an anaesthetist, immediately after she had received a dose of 300 mg pethidine via intravenous infusion in a timeframe of about 90 min. One day before her death a befriended notary of the couple visited Dora V. and obtained a blank signature. After her death, a will was forged using this signature, rendering the couple sole heirs of Dora V.'s estate with a value of several million euros. Post-mortem toxicology was performed in three different institutes of legal medicine. The concentrations of pethidine in peripheral venous blood were between 6.1 and 6.5mg/l and 9.5 and 17.2mg/kg in brain. Pharmacokinetic calculation confirms the given dose. There was no doubt that the cause of death was acute pethidine intoxication. The accused couple claimed that this dose of pethidine was indicated to relief pain, and as the pathologists said in their expert opinions that the hiatus hernia could explain her death, the court had to acquit the accused. This very special case demonstrates that preconceived murder of a sick person with suitable analgesics cannot be proven--at least not with the methods available to forensic toxicology and pathology. This has to be taken into consideration if euthanasia will be legalised under special circumstances. PMID:15172078

  6. Pharmacist's evolving role in the nonopioid, over-the-counter, analgesic selection process.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacist provides an integral role in pain management and treatment by focusing on the selection and evaluation of analgesic agents in a process that is patient specific, patient focused, and patient centered in a personalized care plan. Counseling patients (and the families of patients) who are using acetaminophen, aspirin, and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for acute musculoskeletal pain and inflammation regarding the appropriate use of these agents is a key component of the pharmacist's overall pharmacotherapeutic role. This article reviews the importance of explaining the therapeutic and nontherapeutic effects of these agents, cautions, contraindications, dosing parameters, and the avoidance of acetaminophen/aspirin and multiple nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use to patients and prescribers. The article also discusses the need to evaluate the cytochrome P450 system and the patient's pharmacotherapy and comorbid disease history to identify potential drug-mediated interactions. Evaluation of patients for comorbidities, allergies, and gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, hematologic, and cardiovascular risks is also addressed, as are essential laboratory tests and the special needs of elderly patients. PMID:26448336

  7. Public Health Detailing—A Successful Strategy to Promote Judicious Opioid Analgesic Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Tuazon, Ellenie; Paone, Denise; Dowell, Deborah; Vo, Linda; Starrels, Joanna L.; Jones, Christopher M.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate knowledge and prescribing changes following a 2-month public health detailing campaign (one-to-one educational visits) about judicious opioid analgesic prescribing conducted among health care providers in Staten Island, New York City, in 2013. Methods. Three detailing campaign recommendations were (1) a 3-day supply of opioids is usually sufficient for acute pain, (2) avoid prescribing opioids for chronic noncancer pain, and (3) avoid high-dose opioid prescriptions. Evaluation consisted of a knowledge survey, and assessing prescribing rates and median day supply per prescription. Prescribing data from the 3-month period before the campaign were compared with 2 sequential 3-month periods after the campaign. Results. Among 866 health care providers visited, knowledge increased for all 3 recommendations (P < .01). After the campaign, the overall prescribing rate decreased similarly in Staten Island and other New York City counties (boroughs), but the high-dose prescribing rate decreased more in Staten Island than in other boroughs (P < .01). Median day supply remained stable in Staten Island and increased in other boroughs. Conclusions. The public health detailing campaign improved knowledge and likely prescribing practices and could be considered by other jurisdictions to promote judicious opioid prescribing. PMID:27400353

  8. A novel analgesic approach to optogenetically and specifically inhibit pain transmission using TRPV1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Yang, Xiang-Yu; Qian, Fu-Ping; Tang, Min; Ma, Chao; Chiang, Li-Yang

    2015-06-01

    Chronic pain is a pathological condition that results in significant loss of life quality, but so far no specific treatment for chronic pain has been developed. Currently available analgesia drugs are either not specific enough or have severe side effects. Therefore a non-invasive approach with high specificity to inhibit nociception becomes essential. In this study, a recombinant virus (AAV5-TRPV1-ArchT-eGFP) was constructed and injected into the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel promoter was used to selectively express inhibitory light-sensitive pump ArchT (the archaerhodopsin from Halorubrum strain TP009) in nociceptive DRG neurons. The successful transfer of ArchT gene was confirmed by a robust expression of green florescent protein in the DRG neurons. In vivo behavioral tests demonstrated that both the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold and the radiant heat evoked paw withdrawal latency were significantly increased upon illumination by a 532 nm green laser light to the paw of a viral-vector injected mice, while the same laser light did not induce any observable change in naïve mice. In conclusion, we have established a novel analgesic approach that can noninvasively and selectively inhibit pain transmission using an acute and controllable optogenetics method. This study may shed light on the application of a novel optogenetic strategy for the treatment of pain. PMID:25797803

  9. Some new 2,3,6-trisubstituted quinazolinones as potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic and COX-II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Shalabh; Archana; Bajaj, Kiran; Sharma, Shipra; Panwar, Hemant; Singh, Tripti; Srivastava, V K

    2003-11-17

    Various 2-(substitutedphenylmethyleneimino)aminoacetylmethylene-3-(2'-substitutedindol-3'-yl)-halosubstituted-4(3H)quinazolinones (5a-5i) and 2-(substituted phenylaminomethyleneacetyl-4'-oxo-1'-thiazolidinyl-3-(2"-substitutedindol-3"-yl) 4(3H)-quinazolinones (6a-6i) have been synthesized in the present studies. The structure of these compounds have been elucidated by elemental (C, H, N) and spectral (IR, 1H NMR and mass) analysis. Furthermore, above said compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory, analgesic, ulcerogenic activities and acute toxicity study. Compound 6d was found to be most potent. Compound exihibiting less ulcerogenic liability and ALD(50) >2000mg/kg po. PMID:14604693

  10. Analgesics use in competitive triathletes: its relationship to doping and on predicting its usage.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Pavel; Dalaker, Robert; Letzel, Stephan; Ulrich, Rolf; Simon, Perikles

    2016-10-01

    The two major objectives of this study were (i) to assess variables that predict the use of analgesics in competitive athletes and (ii) to test whether the use of analgesics is associated with the use of doping. A questionnaire primarily addressing the use of analgesics and doping was distributed among 2,997 triathletes. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the use of analgesics. Moreover, the randomised response technique (RRT) was used to estimate the prevalence of doping in order to assess whether users of analgesics have a higher potential risk for doping than non-users. Statistical power analyses were performed to determine sample size. The bootstrap method was used to assess the statistical significance of the prevalence difference for doping between users and non-users of analgesics. Four variables from a pool of 16 variables were identified that predict the use of analgesics. These were: "version of questionnaire (English)", "gender (female)", "behaviour in case of pain (continue training)", and "hours of training per week (>12 h/week)". The 12-month prevalence estimate for the use of doping substances (overall estimate 13.0%) was significantly higher in athletes that used analgesics (20.4%) than in those athletes who did not use analgesics (12.4%). The results of this study revealed that athletes who use analgesics prior to competition may be especially prone to using doping substances. The predictors of analgesic use found in the study may be of importance to prepare education material and prevention models against the misuse of drugs in athletes. PMID:26911564

  11. Clinical correlates of prescription opioid analgesic use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan V; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2015-03-01

    A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Six percent (n = 165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16 vs. 8 % for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18 vs. 9 % for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11 vs. 4 % for non users) and panic disorder (6 vs. 4 % for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4 and 23 %, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5 and 8 %). The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users. PMID:24951127

  12. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Sharma, Kiran; Sharma, Ajay; Nagpal, Kalpana; Bera, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis). Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR) and alcoholic (PE) fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity. POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05) reduced abdominal writhes than PE. In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p<0.01) to that of omeprazole, and has more ulcer reducing potential then PE. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that P. vietnamenis aqueous fraction possesses biological activity that is close to the standards taken for the treatment of peripheral painful or/and inflammatory and ulcer conditions. PMID:25767759

  13. Analgesic effect of high intensity laser therapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stiglić-Rogoznica, Nives; Stamenković, Doris; Frlan-Vrgoc, Ljubinka; Avancini-Dobrović, Viviana; Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke

    2011-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA), the most common type of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule, impaired muscular stabilization, reduced range of motion and functional disability. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) involves higher-intensity laser radiation and causes minor and slow light absorption by chromophores. Light stimulation of the deep structures, due to high intensity laser therapy, activates cell metabolism through photochemical effect. The transmissions of pain stimulus are slowed down and result in a quick achievement of pain relief. The aim of our research was to investigate the prompt analgesic effect of HILT on patients with KOA. Knee radiographs were performed on all patients and consequently graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale (K/L). A group of 96 patients (75 female, 21 male, mean age 59.2) with K/L 2 and 3 were submitted to HILT therapy. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. HILT consisted in one daily application, over a period of ten days, using protocol wavelength, frequency and duration. The results showed statistically significant decrease in VAS after the treatment (p < 0.001). Considering these results, HILT enables prompt analgesic effects in KOA treatment. Therefore HILT is a reliable option in KOA physical therapy. PMID:22220431

  14. [Paracetamol (perfalgane) as analgesic component of medicinal sedation].

    PubMed

    Mustafaeva, M N; Mizikov, V M

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the possibility of the use of paracetamol (perfalgane) as an analgesic component of medical sedation. The actuality of the problem is the choice effective pharmacological means of protection from peri-operative pain. The theoretical advantages of paracetamol in the scheme of sedoanalgesia are exquisite. We describe a personal experience of efficacy assessment and safety of paracetamol as an analgesic component of the methodology of drug sedation for bronchoscopy in the early postoperative period. We compare analgesia by the means of paracetamol 1000 mg (IV) and tramadol 100 mg (IV). The sedative agent in both groups was midazolam. It turned out, that despite the high efficacy of tramadol as a component of sedoanalgesia, the quality of anialgesia when using perfalagane is almost 5 times higher, both due to the significant number of good results, and to reduced number of adverse events. Use of paracetamol (Perfalgane) instead of tramadol for medical sedation during fibrotracheoscopy in patients in the early postoperative period leads to better quality of analgesia, thus avoiding such undesirable phenomena as hypersedation, respiratory depression, dizziness, and nausea. PMID:21688656

  15. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects of Ixora coccinea.

    PubMed

    Ali Adnan, Md Syed; Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Nasir Uddin, Mir Muhammad; Shohel, M; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Hannan, J M A; Das, Biplab Kumar

    2014-01-27

    Abstract Background: The present study was carried out to explore the potential of the ethanol extract of Ixora coccinea L. (IC) leaves as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic agents using the hot-plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests in rodents. Methods: The extract was prepared by soaking the dried powdered leaves of IC in ethanol for 2 days. The filtrate thus obtained by filtration and evaporation was considered as a stock solution and was used in all experimental models. Results: Oral administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly (p<0.05) increased the reaction time in the hot-plate test. Ixora coccinea (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced 56.14% and 63.16% inhibition (p<0.05) in acetic acid-induced writhing. It also (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced significant (p<0.05) inhibition of paw edema pronounced at 6 h after carrageenan injection. Intraperitoneal administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) lowered the body temperature in brewer's yeast-induced hyperthermia. Conclusions: Based on the findings, it may be concluded that the IC leaves possessed analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities. Phytochemical constituents of IC leaves such as flavonoids, tannins, and triterpenes in ethanol extract could be correlated with its observed biological activities. PMID:24468614

  16. Analgesic effect of butorphanol and levomethadone in detomidine sedated horses.

    PubMed

    Schatzman, U; Armbruster, S; Stucki, F; Busato, A; Kohler, I

    2001-08-01

    The analgesic potency of butorphanol 25 microg/kg bodyweight (BW) and levomethadone 100 microg/kg BW, administered together with detomidine 10 microg/kg BW, was measured in twelve Warmblood horses in a randomized, blinded cross-over study. Detomidine with saline 10 ml 0.9% was used as placebo. The nociceptive threshold was determined using a constant current and a pneumatic pressure model for somatic pair Detomidine alone and in combination with butorphanol or levomethadone caused a significant temporary increase (P < 0.05) of the nociceptive threshold with a maximum effect within 15 min and a return to baseline levels within 90 min. Butorphanol and levomethadone increased the nociceptive threshold and prolonged the duration of anti-nociception significantly from 15 to 75 min (P < 0.05) after drug administration compared with detomidine alone to both test methods. No significant difference between butorphanol and levomethadone was registered. It is concluded that the addition of butorphanol or levomethadone to detomidine increases the nociceptive threshold to somatic pain and prolongs the analgesic effect of detomidine in the horse. PMID:11554491

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  18. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  19. Structure-activity relationships and discovery of a G protein biased μ opioid receptor ligand, [(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro-[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (TRV130), for the treatment of acute severe pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Tao; Pitis, Philip; Liu, Guodong; Yuan, Catherine; Gotchev, Dimitar; Cowan, Conrad L; Rominger, David H; Koblish, Michael; Dewire, Scott M; Crombie, Aimee L; Violin, Jonathan D; Yamashita, Dennis S

    2013-10-24

    The concept of "ligand bias" at G protein coupled receptors has been introduced to describe ligands which preferentially stimulate one intracellular signaling pathway over another. There is growing interest in developing biased G protein coupled receptor ligands to yield safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs. The classical μ opioid morphine elicited increased efficacy and duration of analgesic response with reduced side effects in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, suggesting that G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonists would be more efficacious with reduced adverse events. Here we describe our efforts to identify a potent, selective, and G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonist, TRV130 ((R)-30). This novel molecule demonstrated an improved therapeutic index (analgesia vs adverse effects) in rodent models and characteristics appropriate for clinical development. It is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of acute severe pain. PMID:24063433

  20. Preclinical screening of phyllanthus amarus ethanolic extract for its analgesic and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, S. Sham; Hegde, K. Sundeep; Chandrashekhar, Sharath; Rao, S. N.; Manikkoth, Shyamjith

    2015-01-01

    Background: To discover a new agent which possesses dual property of analgesic and antimicrobial activity, thereby reducing the burden of polypharmacy. Phyllanthus amarus was screened for its analgesic and antimicrobial activities. Objectives: The objective was to evaluate the analgesic and antimicrobial activity, of P. amarus ethanolic extract (PAEE). Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extract of P. amarus was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. An in vivo study using Swiss albino mice was done to screen the central and peripheral analgesic activity of P. amarus extract. The extract was administered at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight orally. The peripheral analgesic activity was assessed using acetic acid induced writhing test. The central analgesic activity was assessed using Eddy's hot plate apparatus. An in vitro study was carried out to study the antimicrobial activity of the above extract using selected species of Streptococcus mutans, and S. salivarius. The antimicrobial activities were determined using the agar well method. Results: The ethanolic extract of P. amarus showed significant (P < 0.05) peripheral and central analgesic activity. In vitro antimicrobial screening indicated that the ethanolic extract had shown a zone of inhibition against S. mutans and S. salivarius in the agar wells. Conclusion: This study showed that PAEE exhibited significant analgesic and antimicrobial activities. PMID:26692753

  1. Opiate and acetylcholine-independent analgesic actions of crotoxin isolated from crotalus durissus terrificus venom.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Ling; Han, Rong; Chen, Zhi-Xing; Chen, Bo-Wen; Gu, Zhen-Lun; Reid, Paul F; Raymond, Laurence N; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2006-08-01

    The venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus is reported to have analgesic activity and the administration of Crotoxin (Cro) to cancer patients is reported to reduce the consumption of analgesics. This study investigated the analgesia induced by Cro and the effects of atropine and naloxone on the antinociceptive activity of Cro in mice and rats. The results showed that Cro at 66.5, 44.3 and 29.5microg/kg (ip) exhibited a dose-dependent analgesic action in mice using the hotplate and acetic acid writhing tests. Cro at 44.3microg/kg (ip) had significant analgesic action in the rat tail-flick test. In the mouse acetic acid-writhing test, intracerebral ventricular administration of Cro 0.3microg/kg produced marked analgesic effects. Microinjection of Cro (0.15microg/kg) into the periaqueductal gray area also elicited a robust analgesic action in rat hotplate test. Atropine at 0.5mg/kg (im) or 10mg/kg (ip) or naloxone at 3mg/kg (ip) failed to block the analgesic effects of Cro. These results suggest that Cro has analgesic effects mediated by an action on the central nervous system. The muscarinic and opioid receptors are not involved in the antinociceptive effects of Cro. PMID:16857228

  2. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  3. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  4. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  5. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  6. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  7. 78 FR 27405 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  8. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  9. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  10. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  11. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  12. 78 FR 29142 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  13. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  14. Regular analgesic intake and the risk of end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pommer, W; Bronder, E; Greiser, E; Helmert, U; Jesdinsky, H J; Klimpel, A; Borner, K; Molzahn, M

    1989-01-01

    The strength of the association between regular analgesic intake (RAI) and end-stage renal failure (EF) has been insufficiently established until now. A case-control study was conducted to estimate the relative risks (RR) of EF after RAI (defined as consumption of 15 or more analgesic doses per month for a continuous period of at least 1 year) for cumulative drug intake, single-ingredient analgesics, combinations, and specific compounds. The case group included all patients with EF undergoing renal replacement therapy in the area of West Berlin (1984-1986, n = 921). Control subjects, matched to cases by sex, age, and nationality, were selected from a group of patients in outpatient clinics. Matching was possible for 517 cases. The RR of EF after RAI of any analgesic was 2.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.77-3.39) and after RAI of combination drugs 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.91-3.67). No significant increase was found, however, after RAI of single-ingredient analgesics. The RR after RAI of combination drugs and for the most preferred analgesic ingredients (phenacetin, paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid, phenazones, caffeine) increased with dose. Furthermore, a dose-time-related RR after RAI of the longest used preparation was found. Thus, the results clearly show an increased RR of EF after RAI related to both dose and exposure time of mixed analgesic compounds, but not for the use of only single-ingredient analgesics. PMID:2801788

  15. The type and prevalence of the use of analgesics among inpatients in a geriatric psychiatry department

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Pernille Jul; Gustafsson, Lea Nørgreen; Høyer, Eyd Hansen; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association between the presence of pain and mental disorder is well known. The extent of pain treatment in psychiatric patients is estimated to be high, but there is a lack of recent studies focusing on analgesic treatment in patients with mental disorders. The use of analgesics can be associated with side effects, and it is possible that analgesics are not the correct treatment for chronic pain among patients with mental disorders. Methods: Data were obtained among inpatients in a geriatric psychiatry department at Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, Denmark, between 1 April 2013 and 1 October 2013. The study examines the extent of analgesic use by patients at admission with a follow up at discharge to note any change during hospitalization. Results: A total of 89 patients aged 68 years or older were included (56 women, 33 men). At admission, 51.7% used analgesics, and this number did not change significantly from admission to discharge. A statistically significant increased risk of analgesic use was found in females (odds ratio 4.0). The indications for analgesic use were not present in 34.5% of the pain-treated patients at admission. At discharge, this number had been reduced to 23.1%. Paracetamol was the drug most frequently used, followed by opioids. Conclusions: The use of analgesics among aged psychiatric inpatients is high. An increased focus on this topic is recommended. PMID:26913174

  16. Personalized Medicine and Opioid Analgesic Prescribing for Chronic Pain: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Apkarian, A. Vania; Ballantyne, Jane C.; Berger, Ann; Borsook, David; Chen, Wen G.; Farrar, John T.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Horn, Susan D.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Inturrisi, Charles E.; Lao, Lixing; Mackey, Sean; Mao, Jianren; Sawczuk, Andrea; Uhl, George R.; Witter, James; Woolf, Clifford J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Lin, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Use of opioid analgesics for pain management has increased dramatically over the past decade, with corresponding increases in negative sequelae including overdose and death. There is currently no well-validated objective means of accurately identifying patients likely to experience good analgesia with low side effects and abuse risk prior to initiating opioid therapy. This paper discusses the concept of data-based personalized prescribing of opioid analgesics as a means to achieve this goal. Strengths, weaknesses, and potential synergism of traditional randomized placebo-controlled trial (RCT) and practice-based evidence (PBE) methodologies as means to acquire the clinical data necessary to develop validated personalized analgesic prescribing algorithms are overviewed. Several predictive factors that might be incorporated into such algorithms are briefly discussed, including genetic factors, differences in brain structure and function, differences in neurotransmitter pathways, and patient phenotypic variables such as negative affect, sex, and pain sensitivity. Currently available research is insufficient to inform development of quantitative analgesic prescribing algorithms. However, responder subtype analyses made practical by the large numbers of chronic pain patients in proposed collaborative PBE pain registries, in conjunction with follow-up validation RCTs, may eventually permit development of clinically useful analgesic prescribing algorithms. Perspective Current research is insufficient to base opioid analgesic prescribing on patient characteristics. Collaborative PBE studies in large, diverse pain patient samples in conjunction with follow-up RCTs may permit development of quantitative analgesic prescribing algorithms which could optimize opioid analgesic effectiveness, and mitigate risks of opioid-related abuse and mortality. PMID:23374939

  17. 21 CFR 348.50 - Labeling of external analgesic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of external analgesic drug products. 348.50 Section 348.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE EXTERNAL ANALGESIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN...

  18. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  19. An in vitro investigation of the effect of some analgesics on human enamel.

    PubMed

    McNally, L M; Barbour, M E; O'Sullivan, D J; Jagger, D C

    2006-07-01

    The sale of over-the-counter pain relief medication has increased dramatically in recent years, and typically amounts to several hundred thousands of pounds per year in the UK. Many soluble analgesic preparations contain citric acid, and it has been suggested that these formulations may cause dental erosion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of some over-the-counter analgesics on tooth surface loss from human enamel. Six commonly available analgesics were chosen for this study and the effect of immersing unerupted human enamel was examined using non-contact optical profilometry. Two of the six analgesics investigated caused no detectable erosion (Boots soluble aspirin and Anadin Extra). Three caused statistically significant enamel erosion, but this was very slight and is thought to be clinically insignificant (Alka Seltzer, Panadol and Solpadeine). Only one analgesic caused possible potentially clinical significant enamel erosion. Further studies are needed to determine whether Aspro causes clinically significant enamel erosion. PMID:16774512

  20. Free Radical Scavenging and Analgesic Activities of Cucumis sativus L. Fruit Extract

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D; Kumar, S; Singh, J; Narender; Rashmi; Vashistha, BD; Singh, N

    2010-01-01

    The aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. was screened for free radical scavenging and analgesic activities. The extract was subjected to in vitro antioxidant studies at 250 and 500 μg/ml and analgesic study at the doses 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. The free radical scavenging was compared with ascorbic acid, BHA (Butylated hydroxyl anisole), whereas, the analgesic effect was compared with Diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg). The C. sativus fruit extract showed maximum antioxidant and analgesic effect at 500 μg/ml and 500 mg/kg, respectively. The presence of flavonoids and tannins in the extract as evidenced by preliminary phytochemical screening suggests that these compounds might be responsible for free radical scavenging and analgesic effects. PMID:21264095

  1. Autophagy activation by novel inducers prevents BECN2-mediated drug tolerance to cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kenta; Wang, Nan; Fan, Yuying; Zhang, Weiran; Schoenen, Frank J; Frankowski, Kevin J; Marugan, Juan; Zhou, Yifa; Huang, Sui; He, Congcong

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids and related drugs generate profound behavioral effects (such as analgesic effects) through activating CNR1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 [brain]). However, repeated cannabinoid administration triggers lysosomal degradation of the receptor and rapid development of drug tolerance, limiting the medical use of marijuana in chronic diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms of cannabinoid tolerance are not fully understood, and little is known about its prevention. Here we show that a protein involved in macroautophagy/autophagy (a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway), BECN2 (beclin 2), mediates cannabinoid tolerance by preventing CNR1 recycling and resensitization after prolonged agonist exposure, and deletion of Becn2 rescues CNR1 activity in mouse brain and conveys resistance to analgesic tolerance to chronic cannabinoids. To target BECN2 therapeutically, we established a competitive recruitment model of BECN2 and identified novel synthetic, natural or physiological stimuli of autophagy that sequester BECN2 from its binding with GPRASP1, a receptor protein for CNR1 degradation. Co-administration of these autophagy inducers effectively restores the level and signaling of brain CNR1 and protects mice from developing tolerance to repeated cannabinoid usage. Overall, our findings demonstrate the functional link among autophagy, receptor signaling and animal behavior regulated by psychoactive drugs, and develop a new strategy to prevent tolerance and improve medical efficacy of cannabinoids by modulating the BECN2 interactome and autophagy activity. PMID:27305347

  2. Gastric erosions induced by analgesic drug mixtures in the rat.

    PubMed

    Seegers, A J; Jager, L P; Van Noordwijk, J

    1978-02-01

    Gastric erosions after oral administration of analgesics separately and in admixture have been examined in adult rats. After administration of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), phenacetin, paracetamol and caffeine as single drugs, gastric erosions were only observed with aspirin. The combination of aspirin with phenacetin did not change, that of aspirin with caffeine significantly increased, and aspirin with paracetamol significantly decreased the incidence of gastric lesions compared with aspirin alone. The results for aspirin with paracetamol did not differ from those for the vehicle. Addition of caffeine to the combination of aspirin and phenacetin caused a significant increase in erosions, but when given with aspirin and paracetamol no erosions occurred. The mechanisms underlying the effects of these drugs on aspirin-induced erosions are discussed. PMID:24109

  3. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient. PMID:26510070

  4. Analgesic and antipyretic activities of Momordica charantia Linn. fruits

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Roshan; Mahobia, Naveen; Upwar, Nitin; Waseem, Naheed; Talaviya, Hetal; Patel, Zalak

    2010-01-01

    Plant Momordica charantia Linn. belongs to family Cucurbitaceae. It is known as bitter gourd in English and karela in Hindi. Earlier claims show that the plant is used in stomachic ailments as a carminative tonic; as an antipyretic and antidiabetic agent; and in rheumatoid arthritis and gout. The fruit has been claimed to contain charantin, steroidal saponin, momordium, carbohydrates, mineral matters, ascorbic acid, alkaloids, glucosides, etc. The ethanolic extract of the fruit showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, glycosides, steroids, proteins, and carbohydrates. The present study was carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing and tail-immersion tests in mice, while yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The ethanolic extracts (250 and 500 mg/kg, po.) showed an analgesic and antipyretic effect, which was significantly higher than that in the control rats. The observed pharmacological activities provide the scientific basis to support traditional claims as well as explore some new and promising leads. PMID:22247882

  5. Analgesic regimens for third molar surgery: pharmacologic and behavioral considerations.

    PubMed

    Moore, P A; Werther, J R; Seldin, E B; Stevens, C M

    1986-11-01

    The level of pain following the extraction of impacted third molars was evaluated in 75 patients. Participants were administered acetaminophen 1,000 mg or a placebo before surgery. After surgery, acetaminophen 650 mg was administered either at fixed intervals or as needed to relieve pain. When acetaminophen was administered before surgery, the onset of peak pain was delayed and patient discomfort was decreased 3, 4, and 5 hours after surgery. Patients following the fixed interval regimen after surgery experienced more pain overall and requested the backup narcotic analgesic more frequently. Of the regimens tested, patients preferred the regimen of acetaminophen 1,000 mg administered before surgery with acetaminophen administered as needed for pain after surgery. PMID:3465787

  6. The search for novel analgesics: targets and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Woller, Sarah A.; Ramachandran, Roshni; Sorkin, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of the pain state is of great therapeutic relevance to virtually every medical specialty. Failure to manage its expression has deleterious consequence to the well-being of the organism. An understanding of the complex biology of the mechanisms underlying the processing of nociceptive information provides an important pathway towards development of novel and robust therapeutics. Importantly, preclinical models have been of considerable use in determining the linkage between mechanism and the associated behaviorally defined pain state. This review seeks to provide an overview of current thinking targeting pain biology, the use of preclinical models and the development of novel pain therapeutics. Issues pertinent to the strengths and weaknesses of current development strategies for analgesics are considered. PMID:26097729

  7. Vasorelaxant effect of the analgesic clonixin on rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Morales, M A; Silva, A; Brito, G; Bustamante, S; Ponce, H; Paeile, C

    1995-03-01

    1. A novel vasorelaxant effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx), analgesic and anti-inflammatory, was studied in rat aortic rings. 2. Clx completely relaxed aortic rings contracted by KCl 70 mM and together with its analog flunixin exhibited lesser potency but equal efficacy than verapamil. In comparison, indomethacin, which is a more potent cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor relaxed only about 40% of the maximal contraction of aortic rings. 3. Furthermore, Clx antagonized Ca2+ dependent aortic contraction and BAY K-8644 induced aortic contraction suggesting its calcium antagonist character. 4. From these results it can be concluded that the hypotensive effect seen in rats in vivo after Clx i.v. injection arises because of vasodilatory effect of Clx and gives further support to the proposal that the pharmacological mechanism of action of Clx should be calcium antagonism. PMID:7590098

  8. Diclofenac Sodium Bolus Injection (Dyloject(TM)): A Review in Acute Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-08-01

    An intravenous bolus formulation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium has been developed using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) as a solubility enhancer. HPβCD diclofenac (Dyloject(TM)) is available for use in adults in the USA for the management of mild to moderate pain, and as monotherapy or in combination with opioid analgesics for the management of moderate to severe pain. In two multicentre, phase III studies in adults with acute moderate to severe postoperative pain, HPβCD diclofenac significantly reduced pain intensity and the need for rescue medication compared with placebo. In these studies, the tolerability profile of HPβCD diclofenac was generally similar to that of placebo and adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity. Constipation, infusion-site pain and dizziness were the most frequently reported adverse reactions occurring numerically more frequently with HPβCD diclofenac than placebo. Therapy with HPβCD diclofenac does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular, renal or bleeding-related adverse events versus placebo. Thus, HPβCD diclofenac extends the treatment options currently available for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. PMID:27447189

  9. Overuse of non-prescription analgesics by dental clinic patients

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Kennon J; Ries, Nicole L; Dart, Richard C; Bogdan, Gregory M; Zallen, Richard D; Daly , Frank

    2008-01-01

    Background Many patients present to dental clinics for treatment of painful conditions. Prior to seeking treatment, many of these patients will self-medicate with non-prescription analgesics (NPA), and some will unintentionally overdose on these products. The objective of this study is to describe the use of NPA among dental patients. Methods All adult patients presenting to an urban dental clinic during a two-week period in January and February of 2001 were approached to participate in this research project. Trained research assistants using a standardized questionnaire interviewed patients. Patient demographics and the NPA usage over the 3 days preceding the office visit were recorded. We defined a supra-therapeutic dose as any dose greater than the total recommended daily dose stated on package labeling. Results We approached 194 patients and 127 participated. The mean age of participants was 35.5 years, 52% were male. Analgesic use preceding the visit was reported by 99 of 127 patients, and most (81/99) used a NPA exclusively. Fifty-four percent of NPA users were taking more than one NPA. NPA users reported using ibuprofen (37%), acetaminophen (27%), acetaminophen/aspirin combination product (8%), naproxen (8%), and aspirin (4%). Sixteen patients reported supra-therapeutic use of one or more NPA (some ingested multiple products): ibuprofen (14), acetaminophen (3), and naproxen (5). Conclusion NPA use was common in patients presenting to a dental clinic. A significant minority of patients reported excessive dosing of NPA. Ibuprofen was the most frequently misused product, followed by naproxen and acetaminophen. Though mostly aware of the potential toxicity of NPA, many patients used supra-therapeutic dosages. PMID:19068122

  10. Clinical Correlates of Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Megan V.; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Methods Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Results Six percent (n=165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16% vs. 8% for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18% vs. 9% for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11% vs. 4% for non users) and panic disorder (6% vs. 4% for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4% and 23%, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5% and 8%). Conclusion The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users. PMID:24951127

  11. Ondansetron Does Not Attenuate the Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai-zhi; Shen, Hong; Chen, Yan; Li, Min-guang; Tian, Guo-pin; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if there is any interaction between ondansetron and nefopam when they are continuously co-administrated during patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA). Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority clinical trial comparing nefopam-plus-ondansetron to nefopam alone. A total of 230 postoperative patients using nefopam for PCIA, were randomly assigned either to a group receiving continuous infusion of ondansetron (Group O) or to the other group receiving the same volume of normal saline continuously (Group N). Postoperative pain intensity scores, the sum of pain intensity difference over 24 hours postoperatively (SPID24hr), the incidence of adverse events, and the total consumption of nefopam were evaluated respectively. Results: Postoperative pain was treated successfully in both groups. The mean SPID24hr scores were 95.6 mm in Group N and 109.3mm in Group O [95% confidence interval (CI) -14.28, 24.32]. The lower margin of the 95% CI was above the pre-determined non-inferiority margin (-30mm) for SPID24hr, which indicated that nefopam-plus-ondansetron was not worse than the nefopam alone in term of analgesic efficacy. In addition, there was no statistical difference between the two groups in term of cumulative consumption of nefopam. Compared with Group N, postoperative vomiting was significantly reduced in Group O during the postoperative 24 hours (P < 0.05). Less rescue antiemetics were given to patients in Group O than those receiving nefopam alone (P < 0.05). There were no differences in postoperative nausea between the two groups. Conclusion: Nefopam-plus-ondansetron is not inferior to nefopam alone in relieving the pain in PCIA after minimally invasive surgery. In addition, adverse events are reduced without compromising analgesic efficacy. PMID:24273453

  12. Analgesic synergy between opioid and α2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chabot-Doré, A-J; Schuster, D J; Stone, L S; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    Opioid and α2-adrenoceptor agonists are potent analgesic drugs and their analgesic effects can synergize when co-administered. These supra-additive interactions are potentially beneficial clinically; by increasing efficacy and/or reducing the total drug required to produce sufficient pain relief, undesired side effects can be minimized. However, combination therapies of opioids and α2-adrenoceptor agonists remain underutilized clinically, in spite of a large body of preclinical evidence describing their synergistic interaction. One possible obstacle to the translation of preclinical findings to clinical applications is a lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the synergistic interactions between these two drug classes. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the interactions between different opioid and α2-adrenoceptor agonist combinations in preclinical studies. These studies have identified the spinal cord as an important site of action of synergistic interactions, provided insights into which receptors mediate these interactions and explored downstream signalling events enabling synergy. It is now well documented that the activation of both μ and δ opioid receptors can produce synergy with α2-adrenoceptor agonists and that α2-adrenoceptor agonists can mediate synergy through either the α2A or the α2C adrenoceptor subtypes. Current hypotheses surrounding the cellular mechanisms mediating opioid–adrenoceptor synergy, including PKC signalling and receptor oligomerization, and the evidence supporting them are presented. Finally, the implications of these findings for clinical applications and drug discovery are discussed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641506

  13. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli): involvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhsh, Pariya; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2015-07-01

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli) were investigated in mice and rats. The analgesic activity of neroli was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddy's hot plate methods, while acute and chronic anti-inflammatory effects were investigated by inflammatory paw edema in rat and the cotton pellet-induced granuloma tissue model, respectively. Mechanistic studies were conducted using L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Neroli significantly decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhes in mice compared to animals that received vehicle only. Also, it exhibited a central analgesic effect, as evidenced by a significant increase in reaction time in the hot plate method. The oil also significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The inhibitory activity of neroli (especially at 40 mg/kg) was found to be very close to the standard drug, diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg). In cotton pellet-induced granuloma, neroli was effective regarding the transudate and granuloma formation amount. Neroli was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and twenty-three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the oil, were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5 %), linalyl acetate (19.6 %), nerolidol (9.1 %), E,E-farnesol (9.1 %), α-terpineol (4.9 %), and limonene (4.6 %), which might be responsible for these observed activities. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have significant activity against acute and especially chronic inflammation, and have central and peripheral antinociceptive effects which support the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of pain and inflammation. PMID:25762161

  14. Analgesic effects of ketamine infusion therapy in korean patients with neuropathic pain: A 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Gu; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Sim, Woo Seok; Shin, Byung Seop; Lee, Sang Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    each session; spontaneous reports about AEs during each session; and the patients' and caregivers' checklist of AEs occurring at home for 2 weeks after discharge. All the descriptors of pain expressed by the patients in Korean were recorded and translated into appropriate English terminology on the basis of the literature on Korean verbal descriptors of pain. Each of the translated pain descriptors was then classified into 1 of 18 sensory items. Results: The overall VAS score for pain decreased from a baseline mean (SD) of 7.20 (1.77) to 5.46 (2.29) (P < 0.001) 2 weeks after treatment in 103 patients (53 males and 50 females; mean age, 52.56 [17.33] years) who completed the study. Variables such as age, sex, and the duration and diagnosis of pain were not found to be associated with analgesic effect. Seven of the 18 pain descriptors were found to have a significant response to ketamine infusion treatment between baseline and 2 weeks follow-up: burning pain (P = 0.008); dull, aching pain (P < 0.001); overly sensitive to touch (P = 0.002); stabbing pain (P = 0.008); electric pain (P = 0.031); tingling pain (P < 0.001); and squeezing pain (P < 0.001). A total of 52 patients reported AEs: 33 during infusion and 44 during recovery and up to 2 weeks follow up. The most commonly reported AEs were snoring (15 [15%]) during infusion and dizziness (43 [42%]) during recovery. Conclusions: Ketamine infusion therapy was associated with reduced severity of neuropathic pain and generally well tolerated for up to 2 weeks in these patients with neuropathic pain refractory to standard treatment. Variables such as sex, age, and the diagnosis and duration of pain had no association with the analgesic effect of this treatment. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of treatment with ketamine infusion. PMID:24683255

  15. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity. PMID:27145814

  16. Analgesic exposure in pregnant rats affects fetal germ cell development with inter-generational reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Afshan; van den Driesche, Sander; Wang, Yili; McKinnell, Chris; Macpherson, Sheila; Eddie, Sharon L.; Kinnell, Hazel; Hurtado-Gonzalez, Pablo; Chambers, Tom J.; Stevenson, Kerrie; Wolfinger, Elke; Hrabalkova, Lenka; Calarrao, Ana; Bayne, Rosey AL; Hagen, Casper P.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics which affect prostaglandin (PG) pathways are used by most pregnant women. As germ cells (GC) undergo developmental and epigenetic changes in fetal life and are PG targets, we investigated if exposure of pregnant rats to analgesics (indomethacin or acetaminophen) affected GC development and reproductive function in resulting offspring (F1) or in the F2 generation. Exposure to either analgesic reduced F1 fetal GC number in both sexes and altered the tempo of fetal GC development sex-dependently, with delayed meiotic entry in oogonia but accelerated GC differentiation in males. These effects persisted in adult F1 females as reduced ovarian and litter size, whereas F1 males recovered normal GC numbers and fertility by adulthood. F2 offspring deriving from an analgesic-exposed F1 parent also exhibited sex-specific changes. F2 males exhibited normal reproductive development whereas F2 females had smaller ovaries and reduced follicle numbers during puberty/adulthood; as similar changes were found for F2 offspring of analgesic-exposed F1 fathers or mothers, we interpret this as potentially indicating an analgesic-induced change to GC in F1. Assuming our results are translatable to humans, they raise concerns that analgesic use in pregnancy could potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and grand-daughters. PMID:26813099

  17. [The influence of GABAA receptor on the analgesic action of intrathecally injected oxysophoridine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Gao, Jin-xian; Yi, Zheng-hong; Yan, Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Xu

    2011-05-01

    .This study is to investigate the analgesic effect produced by intrathecal injection (ith) of oxysophoridine (OSR) and the mechanism of GABAA receptor. Warm water tail-flick test was used to detect the analgesic effect of OSR (12.5, 6.25, and 3.13 mg.kg-1 ith) and to observe the influence of GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid) agonist or antagonist on the analgesic effect of OSR in mice. Immunohistochemistry method were used to detect the influence of OSR (12.5 mg.kg-1, ith) on the GABAARalpha1 protein expression in spinal cord. The results obtained covers that OSR (12.5 and 6.25 mg.kg-, ith) alleviates pain significantly with the warm water tail-flick test (P<0.05, P<0.01), the rate of pain threshold increases by 68.45%; GABA and muscimol (MUS) produces analgesic synergism together with the OSR, picrotoxin (PTX) and bicuculline (BIC) antagonize the analgesic effect of OSR; OSR (12.5 mg.kg-1, ith) significantly increase the positive number of GABAARalpha1 nerve cell in spinal cord (P<0.01) and significantly decrease the average grey levels (P<0.01). In conclusion, OSR intrathecal injection has significant analgesic effect. And GABAA receptor in spinal cord is involved in the analgesic mechanism. PMID:21800540

  18. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose–response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:26817983

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Guduchi (Tinospora Cordifolia) Using Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Nishant; Nim, Dwividendra Kumar; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Dixit, Rakesh Kumar; Chaurasia, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is a very well-known signal of ill health and analgesics are the drugs that are used to relieve pain. The main problem with these drugs remains that of side effects. Safer alternatives are natural herbs. Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) is one such plant with analgesic potential but few studies are there. Objective: To evaluate the analgesic activity of commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia). Materials and Methods: For this purpose commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia) by Himalaya Drug Company, Bangalore was used. Albino rats were divided randomly in three groups of six rats each. Group 1 (control) received distilled water orally, group 2 (test) received T. cordifolia extract in dose of 300 mg/kg orally and group 3(standard) received Pentazocine in dose 10mg/kg intraperitoneally. Analgesic activity was evaluated using hot plate and abdominal writhing method. All the observations were analysed statistically using student’s t-test. Observation and Results: T. cordifolia extract significantly (p<0.05) increased the response time and decreased the number of writhes in hot plate method and abdominal writhing method respectively, on comparison with the control group. Conclusions: The above findings suggest that this commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia) possess analgesic activity. This analgesic activity probably involves peripheral as well as central mechanisms as the extract showed analgesic activity in both hot plate and abdominal writhing method. PMID:25302211

  20. Role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam; Behera, Shailaja Shankar; Das, Saurabh Kumar; Jain, Gaurav; Choupoo, Sujali; Raj, Janak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postsurgical pain is the leading complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy that may delay the postoperative recovery and hence we undertook a prospective randomized trial to analyze the role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing above surgery. Material and Methods: A total of 66 cases were randomly assigned to two groups to receive capsule flupirtine (200 mg) or capsule vitamin B complex administered orally, 2 h before the laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. Time to first analgesic requirement, assessment of postoperative pain in terms of visual analog score, and analgesic requirement postoperatively were measured as a primary outcome. Results: Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in the flupirtine group as compared with the placebo group. There was significant pain reduction in early postoperative period (up to 4 h), but no changes occurred thereafter. Total analgesic requirement (including rescue analgesia) and side-effects were comparable between the groups except for higher sedation in flupirtine group. Conclusions: Flupirtine is effective as a preemptive analgesic in providing adequate pain relief during the immediate postoperative period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. However, continuation of drug therapy postoperatively could possibly delineate its optimal analgesic profile more profoundly. PMID:25948895

  1. Carprofen as an analgesic for postoperative pain in cats: dose titration and assessment of efficacy in comparison to pethidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Lascelles, B D; Cripps, P; Mirchandani, S; Waterman, A E

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to titrate the optimal dose of carprofen for single dose usage, for alleviating postoperative pain, under a double-blind and randomised protocol, using both negative and positive controls. Renal tolerance was assessed by screening plasma urea and creatinine. Pre- and postoperative assessment of pain and sedation was made using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scoring system in 60 cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. The cats were randomly assigned to one of six groups: (1) carprofen at 1.0 mg/kg subcutaneously (sc); (2) carprofen at 2.0 mg/kg sc; (3) carprofen at 4.0 mg/kg sc; (4) pethidine at 5.0 mg/kg intramuscularly (im), (5) pethidine at 10.0 mg/kg im: and (6) no analgesics (injection of saline). All injections were given postoperatively on tracheal extubation and administered in a double-blind manner. Assessments were made up to 20 hours post extubation. Prior to induction and at 20 hours post extubation, blood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of the urea and creatinine content to check for any adverse effect on renal function. Cats given pethidine did not appear more sedated than the groups receiving carprofen or saline. Cats receiving carprofen were in less pain postoperatively overall, with 4.0 mg/kg being the most effective dose rate (significantly better than the other doses of carprofen at four and eight hours post extubation). The highest dose of pethidine provided significantly better analgesia than the highest dose of carprofen up to two hours post extubation, but from two to 20 hours post extubation carprofen at 4.0 mg/kg provided significantly better analgesia than the pethidine. None of the analgesic regimens appeared to affect renal function adversely, as measured by urea and creatinine levels. PMID:8926722

  2. [(35)S]GTPγS binding and opioid tolerance and efficacy in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Madia, Priyanka A; Navani, Dipesh M; Yoburn, Byron C

    2012-03-01

    The present study examined efficacy of a series of opioid agonists and then using chronic in vivo treatment protocols, determined tolerance to opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S] thio)triphosphate) binding in mouse spinal cord membranes and compared it directly to spinal analgesic tolerance. The [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay was used to estimate efficacy (E(max) and τ; Operational Model of Agonism) of a series of opioid agonists for G-protein activation in mouse spinal cord. The rank order of opioid agonist efficacy determined in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay using the Operational Model and E(max) was similar. These efficacy estimates correlated with historical analgesic efficacy estimates. For tolerance studies, mice were continuously treated s.c. for 7days with morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, etorphine or fentanyl and [(35)S]GTPγS studies were conducted in spinal cord membranes. Other mice were tested in i.t. analgesia dose response studies (tailflick). Tolerance to DAMGO ([D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin) or morphine stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding (decrease in E(max)) was observed following etorphine and fentanyl treatment only. These treatment protocols downregulate μ-opioid receptor density whereas morphine, oxycodone and hydromorphone do not. Spinal analgesic tolerance was observed following all treatment protocols examined (morphine, oxycodone and etorphine). Opioid antagonist treatment that specifically upregulates (chronic naltrexone) or downregulates (clocinnamox) μ-opioid receptor density produced a corresponding change in opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. Although receptor downregulation and G-protein uncoupling are among potential mechanisms of opioid tolerance, the present results suggest that uncoupling in mouse spinal cord plays a minor role and that the [(35)S]GTPγS assay is particularly responsive to changes in μ-opioid receptor density. PMID:22108651

  3. Preoperative education and use of analgesic before onset of pain routinely for post-thoracotomy pain control can reduce pain effect and total amount of analgesics administered postoperatively.

    PubMed

    Kol, Emine; Alpar, Sule Ecevit; Erdoğan, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of preoperative pain management education and the role of analgesics administration before the onset of pain postoperatively. The study was a prospective, randomized, and single-blind clinical trial, which was conducted January 1, 2008 through October 1, 2008 in the Thoracic Surgery Unit of Akdeniz University Hospital. A total of 70 patients who underwent thoracotomy (35 in the control group and 35 in the study group) were included in the study. Of the patients, 70% (n = 49) were male and 30% (n = 21) were female. Mean age was 51 ± 10 years (range = 25-65). The same analgesia method was used for all patients; the same surgical team performed each operation. Methods, including preemptive analgesia and placement of pleural or thoracic catheter for using analgesics, that were likely to affect pain level, were not used. The same analgesia medication was used for both patient groups. But the study group, additionally, was educated on how to deal with pain preoperatively and on the pharmacological methods to be used after surgery. An intramuscular diclofenac Na 75 mg was administered to the study group regardless of whether or not they reported pain in the first two postoperative hours. The control group did not receive preoperative education, and analgesics were not administered to them unless they reported pain in the postoperative period. The routine analgesics protocol was as follows: diclofenac Na 75 mg (once a day) intramuscular administered upon the complaint of pain following extubation in the postoperative period and 20 mg mepederin intravenously (maximum dose, 100 mg/day), in addition, when the patient expressed pain. Pain severity was assessed during the second, fourth, eighth, 16th, 24th, and 48th hours, and marked using the Verbal Category Scale and the Behavioral Pain Assessment Scale. Additionally, the total dose of daily analgesics was calculated. The demographic characteristics showed a

  4. Adamantyl Analogues of Paracetamol as Potent Analgesic Drugs via Inhibition of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry. PMID:25438056

  5. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  6. [Clinical and economical evaluation of new analgesics for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Ruggeri, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    The management of chronic pain still represent a challenge for physicians. Opioids are the main stem in the treatment of chronic severe pain, not only for their potency, but as they act as central drugs. The main limit to their utilization in clinical practice is the prevalence of side effects, in particular in the gastrointestinal tract, whose constipation represents the most common. Two new formulations are nowadays available on the market: tapentadol PR (TAP PR) and oxycodone/naloxone (OXN). A recent meta-analysis showed that both drugs have a better tolerability profile than a tradizional opioid, such as oxycodone CR (OXY CR), but TAP PR reduces by 47% (RR=0.53) the percentage of patients discontinuing treatment because of side effects, compared to 24% (RR=0.76) of OXN. A similar advantage has been reported in the reduction of the risk of developing nausea and/or vomiting: TAP PR reduces the risk by 47% (RR=0.53), while OXN reduces the risk by only by 10% (RR=0.90). Both drugs reduced by about 40% the risk of constipation (RR=0.61 for TAP PR and for OXN). These results have been recently confirmed by a direct comparison of the two formulations (TAP PR vs OXN) in patients with chronic low back pain with neuropathic component. Both drugs were reported to be effective in reducing pain intensity and neuropathic symptoms, however TAP PR resulted superior to OXN in terms of analgesic efficacy, quality of life, and tolerability, in particular regarding constipation and adherence to treatment. A pharmacoeconomic analysis can be useful to understand the costs of these clinical advantages, and can be done by using a probabilistic analisys and by populating a Markov model that simulates the transition in time of 100 patients through 4 different possible health states: 1) still on treatment; 2) presence of adverse events; 3) discontinuation; 4) death. Both treatments (TAP PR and OXN) have been shown to have an excellent cost-effectiveness profile. In the case of OXN, in

  7. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of stress analgesia: lack of cross-tolerance between stressors.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-31

    Qualitatively different analgesic responses can be evoked in rats by exposure to prolonged, intermittent or brief, continuous footshock stress. These two forms of stress analgesia appear to be mediated by opioid and nonopioid pain-inhibitory substrates, respectively. The present study confirms our previous observation that tolerance develops to only the opioid form of stress analgesia and shows that cross-tolerance does not occur between the opioid and nonopioid forms. These data provide further evidence that independent mechanisms underlie opioid and nonopioid stress analgesia. PMID:6297681

  8. A comparison between acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve and acupressure: methodology, analgesia, and mechanism involved

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Danping; Wang, Xiaolin; He, Jiman

    2013-01-01

    Acupressure is an alternative medicine methodology that originated in ancient China. Treatment effects are achieved by stimulating acupuncture points using acute pressure. Acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve is a newly reported analgesic method based on a current neuroscience concept: stimulation of the peripheral nerves increases the pain threshold. Both methods use pressure as an intervention method. Herein, we compare the methodology and mechanism of these two methods, which exhibit several similarities and differences. Acupressure entails variation in the duration of manipulation, and the analgesic effect achieved can be short-or long-term. The acute effect attained with acupressure presents a scope that is very different from that of the chronic effect attained after long-term treatment. This acute effect appears to have some similarities to that achieved with acute pressure block of the sciatic nerve, both in methodology and mechanism. More evidence is needed to determine whether there is a relationship between the two methods. PMID:23983488

  9. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music: the influence of emotion and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Eduardo A Garza; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception. PMID:22242169

  10. Enhanced analgesic effects of propacetamol and tramadol combination in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyang; Du, Lili; Pan, He; Li, Li; Su, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Drug combinations have more potential advantage of greater analgesia than monotherapy. By the combination of analgesics with different mechanism, potency of analgesia can be maximized while the incidence of adverse effects is minimized. This study was aimed to assess a possible interaction in the antinociceptive effects between tramadol (T) and propacetamol (P) when administered in combination against nociceptive effects induced by physical or chemical injury in mice and rats. Three series of experiments were performed. The first was to determine effects of P and T alone or in combination in the acetic acid (AA)-induced writhing test in mice. Combination of T/P (3.9/67.5, 7.8/135, 15.6/271 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) elicited dose-dependent antinociception. The second determined whether the antinociceptive effects of the drugs observed in a test of persistent chemical pain could be seen in a test of acute thermal pain and the back-paw licking response was tested on the hot plate. The back-paw licking latency at different times after drugs obtained with the combination (16/270, 32/540 mg/kg, i.p. T/P) was longer than the respective values obtained with the individual agents. The third was designed to compare the antinociceptive effects between the drugs, either alone or in combination in the rat tail-flicks test. Combination of T/P (5.5/96, 11/192 mg/kg i.p.) both showed effects of higher potency than T and P, respectively. The data obtained confirmed that propacetamol is able to enhance the antinociceptive activity of tramadol. PMID:21372383

  11. Normothermic central hypovolemia tolerance reflects hyperthermic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that those who are highly tolerant to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) while normothermic are also highly tolerant to this challenge while hyperthermic. Methods Sixty pairs of normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tests to pre-syncope were evaluated. LBNP tolerance was quantified via the cumulative stress index (CSI), which is calculated as the sum of the product of the LBNP level and the duration of each level until test termination (i.e., 20 mmHg × 3 min + 30 mmHg × 3 min, etc.). CSI was compared between normothermic and hyperthermic trials. Internal and skin temperatures, heart rate, and arterial pressure were measured throughout. Results Hyperthermia reduced (P<0.001) CSI from 997 ± 437 to 303 ± 213 mmHg min. There was a positive correlation between normothermic and hyperthermic LBNP tolerance (R2 = 0.38; P<0.001). As a secondary analysis, the 20 trials with the highest LBNP tolerance while normothermic were identified (indicated as the HIGH group; CSI 1,467 ± 356 mmHg min), as were the 20 trials with the lowest normothermic tolerance (indicated as the LOW group; CSI 565 ± 166 mmHg min; P<0.001 between groups). While hyperthermia unanimously reduced CSI in both HIGH and LOW groups, in this hyperthermic condition CSI was ~threefold higher in the HIGH group (474 ± 226 mmHg min) relative to the LOW group (160 ± 115 mmHg min; P<0.001). Conclusions LBNP tolerance while hyperthermic is related to normothermic tolerance and, associated with this finding, those who have a high LBNP tolerance while normothermic remain relatively tolerant when hyperthermic. PMID:24700256

  12. Analgesic and cytotoxic activity of Acorus calamus L., Kigelia pinnata L., Mangifera indica L. and Tabernaemontana divaricata L.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Ahad Ali; Islam, Mohammad Torequl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate analgesic and cytotoxic activity of Acorus calamus L., Kigelia pinnata L., Mangifera indica L., Tabernaemontana divaricata L. extracts by using acetic acid–induced writhing method in mice and brine shrimp lethality assay. Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extracts of the plants were obtained by simple maceration method and were subjected to standardization by using pharmacognostical and phytochemical screening methods, which were followed by acetic acid writhing and brine shrimp lethality test methods. Dose selection was made on the basis of acute oral toxicity study (10–1000 mg/kg body weight). Results and Conclusion: In analgesic test, M. indica L. extract produced 28.16% and 22.02% writhing protection at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight in mice, respectively. While the T. divaricata L. extract produced 22.02% and 33.93%, K. pinnata L. extract produced 11.55% and 47.29% and A. calamus L. extract produced 15.16% and 54.51% of writhing protection at the same doses. The percent mortality (mean ± SD) was found to be 58.7 ± 25.22, 56.25 ± 22.88, 52.50 ± 24.37, and 61.25 ± 26.66 with M. indica L., T. divaricata L., K. pinnata L., and A. calamus L., respectively. And the LC50 and LC90 values were found to be 100 and 300 μg/mL for M. indica L. and that were (200 and 350 μg/mL), (100 and 350 μg/mL) and (50 and 300 μg/mL) for T. divaricata L., K. pinnata L., and A. calamus L., respectively. Thus it can be concluded that bark of M. indica L., leaves of T. divaricata L., bark of K. pinnata L., and roots of A. calamus L. have significant analgesic and cytotoxic activity and can be preferred in the treatment of pain and tumor. PMID:22557926

  13. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  14. Analgesic effects of clinically used compounds in novel mouse models of polyneuropathy induced by oxaliplatin and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Lim, Yu Ling; Rodrigues de Sousa, Silmara; Lewis, Richard J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Cabot, Peter J.; Vetter, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the major dose-limiting side effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin, and there are currently no effective treatments available. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in novel animal models based on intraplantar administration of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and to systematically evaluate the analgesic efficacy of a range of therapeutics. Methods Neuropathy was induced by a single intraplantar injection of cisplatin or oxaliplatin in C57BL/6J mice and assessed by quantification of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The pharmacological basis of cisplatin-induced neuropathy was characterized using a range of selective pharmacological inhibitors. The analgesic effects of phenytoin, amitriptyline, oxcarbazepine, mexiletine, topiramate, retigabine, gabapentin, fentanyl, and Ca2+/Mg2+ were assessed 24 hours after induction of neuropathy. Results Intraplantar administration of cisplatin led to the development of mechanical allodynia, mediated through Nav1.6-expressing sensory neurons. Unlike intraplantar injection of oxaliplatin, cold allodynia was not observed with cisplatin, consistent with clinical observations. Surprisingly, only fentanyl was effective at alleviating cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia despite a lack of efficacy in oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia. Conversely, lamotrigine, phenytoin, retigabine, and gabapentin were effective at reversing oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia but had no effect on cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Oxcarbazepine, amitriptyline, mexiletine, and topiramate lacked efficacy in both models of acute chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Conclusion This study established a novel animal model of cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia consistent with the A-fiber neuropathy seen clinically. Systematic assessment of a range of therapeutics identified several candidates that warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:24714523

  15. Analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine in the presence of high levels of SDF-1α/CXCL12 in the brain.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Khalid; Palma, Jonathan; Cowan, Alan; Geller, Ellen B; Adler, Martin W

    2011-04-01

    Although morphine is often the best option for treating acute and chronic severe pain, its analgesic activity can be blocked in situations in which there are elevated levels of chemokines. Indeed, recently we have shown that elevated brain levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived growth factor-1alpha (SDF-1α/CXCL12, the ligand of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4) diminish the antinociceptive effect of morphine. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether such an effect is restricted to morphine or extends to other opioid medications such as buprenorphine. A sterilized stainless-steel C313G guide cannula was implanted into the periaqueductal grey (PAG), a brain region critical to the processing of pain signals, and a primary site of action of many analgesic compounds. The cold-water (-3°C) tail-flick test (CWT) was used to measure antinociception. Rats were pretreated with SDF-1α/CXCL12 administered into the PAG, and the antinociceptive actions of buprenorphine were measured. Direct infusion of SDF-1α/CXCL12 into the PAG failed to alter the antinociceptive action of buprenorphine. The presence of SDF-1α/CXCL12 in the PAG differentially alters the antinociceptive function of opioid medications. While it was able to diminish the antinociception induced by morphine (Adler et al., 2006), SDF-1α/CXCL12 did not affect the buprenorphine-induced antinociception. Buprenorphine appears to be more effective in the presence of high levels of SDF-1α/CXCL12 in the brain (which frequently occurs during neuroinflammatory conditions). PMID:21112161

  16. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  18. NPYFa, A Chimeric Peptide of Met-Enkephalin, and NPFF Induces Tolerance-Free Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mudgal, Annu; Kumar, Krishan; Mollereau, Catherine; Pasha, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Phe is an endogenous amphiactive analgesic peptide. Neuropeptide FF, on the other hand, is reported for its role in opioid modulation and tolerance development. Based on these reports, in the present study we designed a chimeric peptide NPYFa (YGGFMKKKPQRFamide), having the Met-enkephalin (opioid) and PQRFamide sequence of neuropeptide FF, which can then target both the opioid and neuropeptide FF receptors. We hypothesized that the chimeric peptide so designed would have both analgesic properties and further aid in understanding of the role of neuropeptide FF in the development of opiate tolerance. Our studies indicated that NPYFa induced an early onset, potent, dose-dependent and prolonged antinociception. Additionally, antagonists (MOR, KOR, and DOR) pretreatment studies determined a KOR-mediated antinociception activity of the ligand. Further, in vitro binding studies using the Eu-GTP-γS binding assay on cell lines expressing opioid and NPFF receptors showed binding to both the opioid and neuropeptide FF receptors suggesting a multiple receptor binding character of NPYFa. Moreover, chronic (6 days) treatment with NPYFa exhibited an absence of tolerance development subsequent to its analgesia. The current study proposes NPYFa as a potent, long-acting antinociceptor lacking tolerance development as well as a probe to study opioid analgesia and the associated complex mechanisms of tolerance development. PMID:26802437

  19. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katerina V.-A.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  20. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katerina V-A; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  1. Zero Tolerance in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henault, Cherry

    2001-01-01

    Questions the effectiveness of the widespread use of zero-tolerance policies enacted by school boards to punish students who violate weapon and drug rules. Suggests that enforcement of zero-tolerance policies has not been equitable. Reviews proposal for alternative to zero tolerance. (PKP)

  2. Fasciola hepatica: the flukicidal effect of some anaesthetics and analgesics in common use.

    PubMed

    Burden, D J; Hammet, N C

    1983-09-01

    The anaesthetic halothane and the sedative xylazine were shown to have anthelmintic properties in rats against the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Flukes in rats treated with the local anaesthetic lignocaine or the anaesthetic/analgesic ketamine were unaffected. PMID:6635348

  3. Qualitative Analysis of Analgesic Tablets: An Experiment Employing High Pressure Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Rodney W.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment on the qualitative analysis of several over-the-counter analgesic tablets. Background information, procedures used (including high pressure liquid chromatography), and typical student results are included. (JN)

  4. Successive Relationships Between Maternal Attitudes During Pregnancy, Analgesic Medication During Labor and Delivery, and Newborn Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Raymond K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses using maternal attitudes during pregnancy, obstetric analgesic medication, and labor variables as predictors did not yield impressive relationships to neonatal behavior as measured two days after delivery. (JMB)

  5. Analgesic potential of marrubiin derivatives, a bioactive diterpene present in Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Meyre-Silva, C; Yunes, R A; Schlemper, V; Campos-Buzzi, F; Cechinel-Filho, V

    2005-04-01

    Marrubiin, a furane labdane diterpene, is the main analgesic compound present in Marrubium vulgare, a medicinal plant used in Brazil and other countries to treat several ailments. Considering its important pharmacological action, as well as its high yield, some structural modifications were performed in order to obtain more active compounds. Success was obtained in reducing the lactonic function, in the formation of marrubiinic acid and two esterified derivatives, which exhibited significant analgesic effect against the writhing test in mice. Marrubiinic acid showed better activity and excellent yield, and its analgesic effect was confirmed in other experimental models of pain in mice, suggesting its possible use as a model to obtain new and potent analgesic agents. PMID:15848207

  6. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Brian R.; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities. PMID:24931440

  7. The role of urine toxicology in chronic opioid analgesic therapy.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy

    2007-12-01

    The current trend of treating chronic nonmalignant pain with opioid therapy means that pain management nurses are increasingly involved in the care of patients who are prescribed and using potent opioid analgesics on a daily basis. Although demonstrated to be quite effective in certain patients, sanctioned access to these medications brings with it risks for abuse, addiction, and diversion. Urine toxicology analysis is a valuable, yet underutilized, tool to monitor patterns of medication use and potential use of illicit drugs to evaluate the effect of these on health outcomes. This review provides a guide for the use of urine toxicology in the nursing management of chronic pain patients on opioid therapy, detailing the information provided by urine toxicology analysis, the benefits and limitations of urine drug testing, principles of sample collection, and correct interpretation of findings. It is emphasized that the results of urine toxicology analysis should never be used in isolation to identify abuse, addiction, or diversion, and that patterns of medication and other drug use should always be evaluated with respect to evidence of improved functionality. Nurses involved in the care of patients with chronic pain are encouraged to consider urine toxicology analysis as an integral component in care plan for those on chronic opioid therapy, and to knowledgeably implement and interpret this powerful tool in the practice of pain care. PMID:18036504

  8. A review of analgesic and emotive breathing: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Bordoni, Giovannni

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved in breathing and other non-primarily respiratory functions such as the maintenance of correct posture and lumbar and sacroiliac movement. It intervenes to facilitate cleaning of the upper airways through coughing, facilitates the evacuation of the intestines, and promotes the redistribution of the body’s blood. The diaphragm also has the ability to affect the perception of pain and the emotional state of the patient, functions that are the subject of this article. The aim of this article is to gather for the first time, within a single text, information on the nonrespiratory functions of the diaphragm muscle and its analgesic and emotional response functions. It also aims to highlight and reflect on the fact that when the diaphragm is treated manually, a daily occurrence for manual operators, it is not just an area of musculature that is treated but the entire body, including the psyche. This reflection allows for a multidisciplinary approach to the diaphragm and the collaboration of various medical and nonmedical practitioners, with the ultimate goal of regaining or improving the patient’s physical and mental well-being. PMID:27013884

  9. Managing chronic pain with nonopioid analgesics: a multidisciplinary consult.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel; McCarberg, Bill H

    2012-05-01

    As detailed in this online CME activity (www.cmeaccess.com/AJM/ChronicPain04), determining pain mechanism is an important aspect guiding treatment selection for chronic musculoskeletal pain states. Although broad classifications provide a framework, any combination of mechanisms may be present in a chronic pain patient, and there is growing evidence that pain states generally considered nociceptive may also involve elements of augmented central nervous system pain processing. Nonopioid analgesics, including serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants, and alpha-2-delta ligand anticonvulsants, are the treatments of choice for fibromyalgia and other central neuropathic pain states. Additionally, studies have now shown that certain SNRIs can be effective in treating "classic" nociceptive pain states, such as osteoarthritis, and also are effective for low back pain. In addition to considering biological mechanisms, chronic pain management also involves recognizing and evaluating the contribution of psychological and sociocultural factors that can influence pain chronicity and patient prognosis. A multimodal/multidisciplinary approach incorporating pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy into a program that includes more than 1 discipline is important to improve outcomes in patients with chronic pain. PMID:22482859

  10. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs. PMID:26375198

  11. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brian R; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities. PMID:24931440

  12. National consumption of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in Croatia: 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Krnic, Darko; Anic-Matic, Andrea; Dosenovic, Svjetlana; Draganic, Pero; Zezelic, Sasa; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Background The increased consumption of analgesics has been documented worldwide during the last 2 decades. The aim of the study was to examine the trends in opioid and nonopioid analgesic consumption in Croatia between 2007 and 2013. Methods Data on opioid consumption were extracted from the database of the national authority. All opioid and nonopioid analgesics were included in the analysis. Data were presented as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Adequacy of opioid consumption was calculated using adequacy of consumption measure. Results During the examined 7-year period, the total consumption and total cost of all analgesics in Croatia showed continuous increase. In the M01A group (anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, nonsteroids), ibuprofen had an exponential increasing trend, and in 2011, it overtook diclofenac consumption. Ibuprofen and diclofenac had the highest consumption also in the M02A group of topical products for joint and muscular pain. Tramadol was by far the most consumed type of opioids (N02A group) and paracetamol in the group of other analgesics and antipyretics (N02B). The adequacy of consumption measure value was 0.19, indicating that Croatia is a country with a low opioid consumption. Conclusion Between 2007 and 2013, both consumption of analgesics and their cost in Croatia had an increasing trend. Comparisons with data from other countries, based on the published literature, indicate that analgesic consumption in Croatia is still relatively low. Calculation of the adequacy of opioid consumption indicated that Croatia is a country with low opioid consumption. Further studies are necessary for establishing whether current analgesic consumption in Croatia corresponds to patient needs. PMID:26357478

  13. "Infectious" Transplantation Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shixin; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Pope, Heather; Elliott, James; Kioussis, Dimitris; Davies, Joanna; Waldmann, Herman

    1993-02-01

    The maintenance of transplantation tolerance induced in adult mice after short-term treatment with nonlytic monoclonal antibodies to CD4 and CD8 was investigated. CD4^+ T cells from tolerant mice disabled naive lymphocytes so that they too could not reject the graft. The naive lymphocytes that had been so disabled also became tolerant and, in turn, developed the capacity to specifically disable other naive lymphocytes. This process of "infectious" tolerance explains why no further immunosuppression was needed to maintain long-term transplantation tolerance.

  14. Sedatives and Analgesics Given to Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Kanecia O.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Ku, Lawrence; Watt, Kevin; Laughon, Matthew M.; Bidegain, Margarita; Clark, Reese H.; Smith, P. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the administration of sedatives and analgesics at the end of life in a large cohort of infants in North American neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Study design Data on mortality and sedative and analgesic administration were obtained from infants who died from 1997–2012 in 348 NICUs managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group. Sedatives and analgesics of interest included opioids (fentanyl, methadone, morphine), benzodiazepines (clonazepam, diazepam, lorazepam, midazolam), central alpha-2 agonists (clonidine, dexmedetomidine), ketamine, and pentobarbital. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between administration of these drugs on the day of death and infant demographics and illness severity. Results We identified 19,726 infants who died. Of these, 6188 (31%) received a sedative or analgesic on the day of death; opioids were most frequently administered, 5366/19,726 (27%). Administration of opioids and benzodiazepines increased during the study period, from 16/283 (6%) for both in 1997 to 523/1465 (36%) and 295/1465 (20%) in 2012, respectively. Increasing gestational age, increasing postnatal age, invasive procedure within 2 days of death, more recent year of death, mechanical ventilation, inotropic support, and antibiotics on the day of death were associated with exposure to sedatives or analgesics. Conclusions Administration of sedatives and analgesics increased over time. Infants of older gestational age and those more critically ill were more likely to receive these drugs on the day of death. These findings suggest that drug administration may be driven by severity of illness. PMID:26012893

  15. Analgesic activity of the ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta resin in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Kumar, Dhirendra; Prasad, Raju; Verma, Pawan Kumar; Sardar, Kaustuk K.; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Shorea robusta (Sal), an important traditional Indian medicinal plant used in various ailments and rituals and the indigenous use of the resin of this plant as a medicament for treatment of various inflammatory conditions is well documented in literature. In the present study, ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (SRE) was evaluated for its analgesic activity by making use of different central and peripheral pain models. Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity of SRE was assessed by employing different pain models such as, i) hot plate and tail flick tests for central analgesia, ii) acetic acid- induced writhing (peripheral analgesic model), iii) formalin-induced hind paw licking (both central and peripheral model), iv) carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia (peripheral analgesic model) and v) post-surgical pain (peripheral analgesic model). Results: The extract produced significant central and peripheral analgesic effects, as is evident from increase in reaction time in hot plate and tail flick tests, inhibition in writhing counts in acetic acid-induced writhing test, inhibition of licking time in formalin-induced hind paw licking, increased pain threshold in paw withdrawal latency in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and increased paw withdrawal threshold in post-surgical pain. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate marked antinociceptive effects of SRE. PMID:23087512

  16. Changing Paradigms for Acute Dental Pain: Prevention Is Better Than PRN.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond A; Gordon, Sharon M

    2015-11-01

    A B S T R A C T The drugs available for the management of acute orofacial pain have changed very little since the introduction of ibuprofen into practice 40 years ago. Orally effective opioids, acetaminophen, aspirin and NSAIDs remain the mainstay of analgesic therapy. Increased recognition of the societal and personal impact of opioid diversion and abuse requires re-examination of the traditional approach of prescribing an opioid-containing analgesic combination to be administered by the patient "as needed" (PRN) starting postoperatively. PMID:26798882

  17. Perspectives on opioid tolerance from basic research: behavioural studies after spinal administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W

    1994-01-01

    For tolerance development studies, computer modelling and statistical tests suggested that the equation which best described the decrement of analgesic effect was best served by an exponential decay function. Further analysis of the time course data led to the tentative conclusion that all groups of animals became tolerant at the same rate, regardless of drug or dose. A literature search revealed then, as it does now, that although there are many statements regarding the rate of opioid tolerance, there has been little systematic investigation of this. The Holy Grail of obtaining the rates of tolerance for a number of opioid agents in a systematic study is well within grasp. This information will be needed in clinical practice for the rational choice of opioid with regard to rate of the development of tolerance. The working hypothesis that emerges for the magnitude of opioid tolerance is that more potent agonists produce less tolerance. Further confirmation of this hypothesis has been forthcoming. This suggests that clinical use of more potent opioids, such as fentanyl, should be considered as a substitute for morphine in long term treatment regimens. The working hypothesis for cross-tolerance is that agents acting on the same receptors will show cross-tolerance. Cross-tolerance will also be observed among agents acting on different receptors, but only those that exhibit pharmacological synergy after short term administration. Asymmetry of cross-tolerance can occur, as the magnitude of this cross-tolerance is determined by the relative potency of the toleragen with regard to that of the probe agent. Given the additional factor of receptor selectivity with agents of different receptor classes, types and subtypes, new studies need to be designed combining the toleragen with a selective antagonist to determine the precise receptor mediation of the magnitude of tolerance, and thus cross-tolerance. For example, the delta opioid DADLE infused with a mu selective opioid

  18. The animal pharmacology of buprenorphine, an oripavine analgesic agent.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A; Doxey, J C; Harry, E J

    1977-08-01

    1. The general pharmacology of buprenorphine, a potent analgesic agent derived from oripavine, is described. 2. After cute administration of buprenorphine, the spontaneous locomotor activity of mice was increased; rats displayed stereotyped licking and biting movements; behavioural depression was marked in guinea-pigs but mild in rhesus monkeys. The behaviour of cats was unchanged. 3. In general, buprenorphine reduced heart rate but had no significant effect on arterial blood pressure in conscious rats and dogs. 4. In anaesthetized, open-chest cats buprenorphine (0.10 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) caused no major haemodynamic changes. 5. Buprenorphine (0.01-10 mg/kg i.a.) and morphine (0.30-30 mg/kg, i.a.) increased arterial PCO2 values and reduced PO2 values in conscious rats. With doses of buprenorphine greater than 0.10 mg/kg (a) the duration of respiratory depression became less, (b) ceiling effects occurred such that the maximum effects produced were less than those obtained with morphine. 6. Buprenorphine was a potent and long-lasting antagonist of citric acid-induced coughing in guinea-pigs. 7. At a dose level 20 times greater than the ED50 for antinociception (tail pressure), morphine suppressed urine output to a greater extent than the corresponding dose of buprenorphine in rats. 8. Over the range 0.01-1.0 mg/kg (s.c.), buprenorphine slowed the passage of a charcoal meal along the gastrointestinal tract in rats. After doses in excess of 1 mg/kg, the meal travelled increasingly further such that the distances measured at 10 and 30 mg/kg did not differ significantly from control values. In contrast, the morphine dose-response relationship was linear. PMID:409449

  19. Preclinical evaluation of the abuse potential of the analgesic bicifadine.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; Golembiowska, Krystyna; Kowalska, Magdalena; Tizzano, Joseph P; Skolnick, Phil; Basile, Anthony S

    2009-07-01

    The abuse liability of the analgesic bicifadine was investigated in animal models used to predict the abuse potential of psychostimulants in humans. Bicifadine, cocaine, d-amphetamine, bupropion, and desipramine were evaluated for the production of cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects in rats. Cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion dose-dependently and fully substituted for cocaine. Bicifadine and desipramine produced a maximum mean cocaine-lever selection of 80 and 69%, respectively, but doses yielding peak substitution strongly suppressed response rates. Microdialysis studies in normal waking rats indicated that d-amphetamine increased dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and striatum to a much greater degree than bicifadine, but bicifadine increased 5-hydroxytryptamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and striatum more than d-amphetamine. Bicifadine was also tested for intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys experienced with cocaine administration. Reinforcing effects of bicifadine were observed in only two of four subjects, whereas cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion served as reinforcers in all four monkeys. When evaluated under a progressive ratio procedure, no dose of bicifadine maintained responding to the extent of cocaine, d-amphetamine, or bupropion. The discriminative stimulus effects associated with bicifadine were similar, but not identical, to those of psychostimulants. Although bicifadine maintained self-administration behavior in some subjects, its reinforcing efficacy was very low relative to cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion. These results are consistent with the microdialysis findings of lower dopamine levels and higher 5-hydroxytryptamine levels after administration of bicifadine relative to d-amphetamine. Overall, the current findings support a low abuse potential of bicifadine, more resembling that of antidepressants than psychostimulants. PMID:19357320

  20. Investigation of the in vitro metabolism of the analgesic flupirtine.

    PubMed

    Methling, Karen; Reszka, Przyemslaw; Lalk, Michael; Vrana, Oldrich; Scheuch, Eberhard; Siegmund, Werner; Terhaag, Bernd; Bednarski, Patrick J

    2009-03-01

    The in vitro metabolism of flupirtine, ethyl-N-[2-amino-6-(4-fluorophenylmethyl-amino)pyridine-3-yl]carbamate, a centrally acting analgesic with muscle tone-reducing activity, was studied. Two flupirtine metabolites were already known: the N-acetylated analog D13223 and 4-fluorohippuric acid. The structure of flupirtine suggested that redox chemistry may play a role in metabolism, and cyclic voltammetry studies showed that the drug undergoes facile and irreversible redox reactions. Thus, oxidative metabolism was investigated first. With CYP3A1-induced rat liver microsomes an 18% turnover of flupirtine and a 20 to 25% turnover of D13223 took place over 30 min, but less than 5% turnover of flupirtine was observed with all human liver microsomal preparations tested, evidence that cytochrome P450 does not contribute appreciably to the metabolism in humans. Likewise, no involvement of human monoamine oxidase (isoforms A and B) was found for either flupirtine or D13223. In contrast, flupirtine was an excellent substrate for both human myeloperoxidase and horse radish peroxidase (HRP). These enzymes produced detectable amounts of oxidation products. Incubations of flupirtine with HRP produced an oxidation product that could be trapped with glutathione, the resulting glutathione conjugate was characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR. Metabolism of D13223 by both peroxidases was also observed but to a much lesser extent. Porcine liver esterases cleave the carbamate group of flupirtine, and both human N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 acetylated the hydrolysis product, presumably descarboethoxyflupirtine, with nearly equal efficiencies to yield D13223. Incubations of human liver microsomes with flupirtine or the metabolite D13223 together with UDP-glucuronic acid gave two isomeric N-glucuronides in both cases. PMID:19074524

  1. Analgesic treatment of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Deuis, Jennifer R; Inserra, Marco C; Collins, Lindon S; Namer, Barbara; Cabot, Peter J; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-10-01

    Ciguatera, the most common form of nonbacterial ichthyosarcotoxism, is caused by consumption of fish that have bioaccumulated the polyether sodium channel activator ciguatoxin. The neurological symptoms of ciguatera include distressing, often persistent sensory disturbances such as paraesthesias and the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia. We show that intracutaneous administration of ciguatoxin in humans elicits a pronounced axon-reflex flare and replicates cold allodynia. To identify compounds able to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced Nav responses, we developed a novel in vitro ciguatoxin assay using the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Pharmacological characterisation of this assay demonstrated a major contribution of Nav1.2 and Nav1.3, but not Nav1.7, to ciguatoxin-induced Ca2+ responses. Clinically available Nav inhibitors, as well as the Kv7 agonist flupirtine, inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive ciguatoxin-evoked responses. To establish their in vivo efficacy, we used a novel animal model of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia. However, differences in the efficacy of these compounds to reverse ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia did not correlate with their potency to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced responses in SH-SY5Y cells or at heterologously expressed Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, or Nav1.8, indicating cold allodynia might be more complex than simple activation of Nav channels. These findings highlight the need for suitable animal models to guide the empiric choice of analgesics, and suggest that lamotrigine and flupirtine could be potentially useful for the treatment of ciguatera. PMID:23778293

  2. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the analgesic drug flupirtine in cats.

    PubMed

    De Vito, V; Lebkowska-Wieruszewska, B; Owen, H; Kowalski, C J; Giorgi, M

    2014-11-01

    Flupirtine (FLU) is a non-opioid analgesic drug with no antipyretic or antiphlogistic effects, used in the treatment of a wide range of pain states in human beings. There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of FLU in humans but this is inadequate to recommend its off-label use in veterinary clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of FLU after IV and PO administration in healthy cats. Six mixed breed adult cats were randomly assigned to two treatment groups using an open, single-dose, two-treatment, two-phase, paired, cross-over design (2 × 2 Latin-square). Group 1 (n  =  3) received a single dose of 5 mg/kg of FLU injected IV into the jugular vein. Group 2 (n  =  3) received the same dose via PO route. The wash out period was 1 week. Blood samples (1 mL) were collected at assigned times and plasma was then analysed by a validated HPLC method. No adverse effects at the point of injection and no behavioural changes or alterations in health parameters were observed in the animals during or after the study (up to 7 days after the full study). After IV administration, FLU was detectable in plasma up to 36 h. After PO administration, FLU plasma concentrations were lower than those following IV administration, but they were detectable over the same time range. The terminal part of both mean pharmacokinetic curves showed a similar trend of elimination. The oral bioavailability was approximately 40%. This is the first study of FLU in an animal species of veterinary interest and it could pave the way for the use of this active ingredient in the veterinary field. PMID:25011711

  3. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  4. Analgesic nephropathy as a cause of end-stage renal disease in a 55 year-old Nigerian.

    PubMed

    Okafor, U H; Unuigbe, E I; Onwuchekwa, A C; Emem-Chioma, P

    2012-01-01

    Analgesic nephropathy is a subtle but significant cause of chronic renal failure. There is paucity of data on analgesic nephropathy in Nigeria. This case presentation is to highlight the need to have high index of suspicion in patients at risk of developing analgesic nephropathy. In March 2009 a 55-year-old businessman was referred to the renal unit on account of azotemia by the hematologist who had hitherto managed the patient as a case of refractory anemia. The patient had osteoarthritis for over 10 years and was managed with several analgesic drugs over the same period. He was found to have features suggestive of analgesic nephropathy and had end-stage renal disease. He was commenced on appropriate therapy, and he had a live related kidney transplant six months later. Analgesic nephropathy is preventable and morbidity/mortality can be remarkably reduced with appropriate and prompt intervention. PMID:22718180

  5. Regular use of analgesics is a risk factor for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gago-Dominguez, M; Yuan, J-M; Castelao, J E; Ross, R K; Yu, M C

    1999-01-01

    Phenacetin-based analgesics have been linked to the development of renal pelvis cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The relationship between non-phenacetin types of analgesics and kidney cancer is less clear, although laboratory evidence suggests that these drugs possess carcinogenic potential. A population-based case–control study involving 1204 non-Asian RCC patients aged 25–74 and an equal number of sex-, age- and race-matched neighbourhood controls was conducted in Los Angeles, California, to investigate the relationship between sustained use of analgesics and risk of RCC according to major formulation categories. Detailed information on medical and medication histories, and other lifestyle factors was collected through in-person interviews. Regular use of analgesics was a significant risk factor for RCC in both men and women (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4–1.9 for both sexes combined). Risks were elevated across all four major classes of analgesics (aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents other than aspirin, acetaminophen and phenacetin). Within each class of analgesics, there was statistically significant increasing risk with increasing level of exposure. Although there was some minor variability by major class of formulation, in general individuals in the highest exposure categories exhibited approximately 2.5-fold increase in risk relative to non- or irregular users of analgesics. Subjects who took one regular-strength (i.e. 325 mg) aspirin a day or less for cardiovascular disease prevention were not at an increased risk of RCC (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6–1.4). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10507783

  6. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Alexandra L.; Lymn, Kerry A.; Wallace, Georgia L.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8). Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg) and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg) in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg). Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001). Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:27463799

  7. Analgesic Effects of 1st Generation Anti-histamines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mebae; Shima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sugawara, Shunji; Fujita, Takuo; Tadano, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Endo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is sensed, transmitted, and modified by a variety of mediators and receptors. Histamine is a well-known mediator of pain. In addition to their anti-histaminic effects, the classical, or 1st generation, anti-histamines (1st AHs) possess, to various degrees, anti-muscarinic, anti-serotonergic, anti-adrenergic, and other pharmacologic effects. Although there have been attempts to use 1st AHs as analgesics and/or analgesic adjuvants, the advent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) discouraged such trials. We previously reported that in patients with temporomandibular disorders, osteoporosis, and/or osteoarthritis, the analgesic effects of certain 1st AHs (chlorpheniramine and diphenhydramine) are superior to those of the NSAIDs flurbiprofen and indomethacin. Here, we compared analgesic effects among 1st AHs and NSAIDs against responses shown by mice to intraperitoneally injected 0.7% acetic acid. Since 1st AHs are water soluble, we selected water-soluble NSAIDs. For direct comparison, drugs were intravenously injected 30 min before the above tests. Histamine-H1-receptor-deficient (H1R-KO) mice were used for evaluating H1-receptor-independent effects. The tested 1st AHs (especially cyproheptadine) displayed or tended to display analgesic effects comparable to those of NSAIDs in normal and H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that the anti-serotonergic and/or anti-adrenergic effects of 1st AHs make important contributions to their analgesic effects. Moreover, combination of a 1st AH with an NSAID (cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor) produced remarkably potent analgesic effects. We propose that a 1st AH, by itself or in combination with a cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, should undergo testing to evaluate its usefulness in analgesia. PMID:27040636

  8. Analgesic use and the risk of kidney cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Choueiri, Toni K; Je, Youjin; Cho, Eunyoung

    2014-01-15

    Analgesics are the most commonly used over-the-counter drugs worldwide with certain analgesics having cancer prevention effect. The evidence for an increased risk of developing kidney cancer with analgesic use is mixed. Using a meta-analysis design of available observational epidemiologic studies, we investigated the association between analgesic use and kidney cancer risk. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify eligible case-control or cohort studies published in English until June 2012 for three categories of analgesics: acetaminophen, aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Study-specific effect estimates were pooled to compute an overall relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) using a random-effects model for each category of the analgesics. We identified 20 studies (14 with acetaminophen, 13 with aspirin and five with other NSAIDs) that were performed in six countries, including 8,420 cases of kidney cancer. Use of acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs were associated with an increased risk of kidney cancer (pooled RR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15-1.44 and 1.25; 95% CI: 1.06-1.46, respectively). For aspirin use, we found no overall increased risk (pooled RR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.95-1.28), except for non-US studies (five studies, pooled RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.04-1.33). Similar increases in risks were seen with higher analgesic intake. In this largest meta-analysis to date, we found that acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs are associated with a significant risk of developing kidney cancer. Further work is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms behind these findings. PMID:23400756

  9. Analgesic and Antioxidant Activities of Stem Bark Extract and Fractions of Petersianthus macrocarpus

    PubMed Central

    Orabueze, Celestina Ifeoma; Adesegun, Sunday Adeleke; Coker, Herbert Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: Petersianthus macrocarpus (Lecythidaceae) is widely used in the folk medicine in Nigeria to relieve pain and fever associated with malaria. This study evaluated the analgesic and antioxidant activities of the methanol extract and fractions of the stem bark of the plant. Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity was determined in mice using hotplate and acetic acid-induced writhing models. Morphine sulphate (5 mg/kg, i.p.) and aspirin (100 mg/ml, p.o.) were used as reference analgesic agents. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical; reducing power, iron chelating properties and determination of total phenolic content. Results: The extract at 200 and 500 mg/kg, produced an insignificant (P > 0.05) increase in pain threshold in hotplate but a significant (P < 0.05) increase at 1000 mg/kg. The extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the writhing induced by acetic acid in mice in a dose dependent manner. Fractionation increased the analgesic activities significantly (P < 0.05) in ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions (200 mg/kg). The extract demonstrated strong DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 0.05 mg/ml, good reducing power and weak iron chelating activities. The total phenol content was 142.32 mg/gin term of gallic acid. The antioxidant effects were more pronounced in ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggested that the extract has strong analgesic and antioxidant activities which reside mainly in the polar fractions thus confirming the traditional use of the plant to alleviate pains. SUMMARY Analgesic and antioxidant activities of extract and solvent fractions of Petersianthus macrocarpus investigated indicated that extract has analgesic and antioxidant properties that reside mainly in the polar fractions. Abbreviations Used: DMSO: Dimethyl sulphoxide, ANOVA: analysis of variance, EDTA: ethylene diamne tetraacetic acid, SDM: standard deviation of mean

  10. Predicting Neuroinflammation in Morphine Tolerance for Tolerance Therapy from Immunostaining Images of Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shinn-Long; Chang, Fang-Lin; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Wang, Kuan-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Long-term morphine treatment leads to tolerance which attenuates analgesic effect and hampers clinical utilization. Recent studies have sought to reveal the mechanism of opioid receptors and neuroinflammation by observing morphological changes of cells in the rat spinal cord. This work proposes a high-content screening (HCS) based computational method, HCS-Morph, for predicting neuroinflammation in morphine tolerance to facilitate the development of tolerance therapy using immunostaining images for astrocytes, microglia, and neurons in the spinal cord. HCS-Morph first extracts numerous HCS-based features of cellular phenotypes. Next, an inheritable bi-objective genetic algorithm is used to identify a minimal set of features by maximizing the prediction accuracy of neuroinflammation. Finally, a mathematic model using a support vector machine with the identified features is established to predict drug-treated images to assess the effects of tolerance therapy. The dataset consists of 15 saline controls (1 μl/h), 15 morphine-tolerant rats (15 μg/h), and 10 rats receiving a co-infusion of morphine (15 μg/h) and gabapentin (15 μg/h, Sigma). The three individual models of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons for predicting neuroinflammation yielded respective Jackknife test accuracies of 96.67%, 90.00%, and 86.67% on the 30 rats, and respective independent test accuracies of 100%, 90%, and 60% on the 10 co-infused rats. The experimental results suggest that neuroinflammation activity expresses more predominantly in astrocytes and microglia than in neuron cells. The set of features for predicting neuroinflammation from images of astrocytes comprises mean cell intensity, total cell area, and second-order geometric moment (relating to cell distribution), relevant to cell communication, cell extension, and cell migration, respectively. The present investigation provides the first evidence for the role of gabapentin in the attenuation of morphine tolerance from phenotypic

  11. Rizatriptan: a pharmacoeconomic review of its use in the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L; Foster, Rachel H

    2005-01-01

    Rizatriptan (Maxalt; Maxalt-MLT; Maxalt-Melt) is an oral serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist (triptan) used in the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura in adults. Rizatriptan 5 mg and 10 mg are effective in relieving the symptoms of migraine and the 10 mg dose provided faster pain relief than sumatriptan 50 mg, naratriptan 2.5 mg, ergotamine/caffeine 2 mg/200 mg and possibly zolmitriptan 2.5 mg, while displaying similar tolerability. Two cost-utility analyses performed from a societal perspective indicated that rizatriptan 10 mg was dominant over ergotamine/caffeine 2 mg/200 mg, sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg, naratriptan 2.5 mg, zolmitriptan 2.5 mg and analgesic-based usual care in the acute treatment of migraine. In one analysis also performed from the perspective of a healthcare payer, rizatriptan was still dominant over naratriptan, sumatriptan and zolmitriptan. Rizatriptan was cost effective compared with usual care with an incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained of 31,845 Can dollars (2002 values) and an incremental cost per additional attack aborted of 49.82 Can dollars. A modelled cost-effectiveness analysis conducted from a healthcare payer's perspective indicated that almotriptan 12.5 mg was more cost effective than rizatriptan 10 mg as a result of better tolerability. The incremental cost per additional successfully treated patient (defined as being sustained pain free without adverse events) with almotriptan was 6.94 US dollars (1999 values). In other nonmodelled cost-effectiveness analyses, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 40 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg most consistently displayed the greatest cost effectiveness in different analyses using different clinical endpoints. A modelled analysis of the costs of migraine-related productivity losses in US corporations indicated that the use of rizatriptan rather than usual care to treat migraines could result in annual cost offsets of approximately 84-118 US dollars (2000 values

  12. Effect of surgical castration with or without meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  13. Effect of Surgical Castration with or without Oral Meloxicam on the Acute Inflammatory Response in Yearling Beef Bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture. Analgesics may alleviate pain and inflammation associated with castration of beef cattle. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunom...

  14. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  15. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  16. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed. PMID:27018033

  17. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  18. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  19. Will abuse-deterrent formulations of opioid analgesics be successful in achieving their purpose?

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Bernard

    2012-09-10

    During the last 2 decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of strong opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. This increase has been accompanied by a steep increase in abuse, misuse, and both fatal and non-fatal overdoses involving prescription opioids. The situation is already alarming in the US. Prescription opioid-related harm is a complex, multifactorial issue that requires a multifaceted solution. In this respect, formulations of opioid analgesics designed to resist or deter abuse may be a useful component of a comprehensive opioid risk minimization programme. Such formulations have or are being developed. Abuse-resistant opioids include those that use some kind of physical barrier to prevent tampering with the formulation. Abuse-deterrent opioids are not necessarily resistant to tampering, but contain substances that are designed to make the formulation less attractive to abusers. This article focuses on two products intended to deter abuse that were reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The first (Embeda®) consists of extended-release morphine with sequestered naltrexone, an opioid antagonist that is released if the tablet is compromised by chewing or crushing. Although Embeda® exhibited abuse-deterrent features, its label warns that it can be abused in a manner similar to other opioid agonists. Furthermore, tampering with Embeda® will result in the release of naltrexone, which may precipitate withdrawal in opioid-tolerant individuals. In March 2011, all dosage forms of Embeda® were recalled because the product failed to meet routine stability standards, and its return date to the market is currently unknown. The second product (Acurox®) was intended to be both tamper resistant and abuse deterrent. It consisted of an immediate-release oxycodone tablet with subtherapeutic niacin as an aversive agent and used a gel-forming ingredient designed to inhibit inhalation and prevent extraction of the drug for injection. The new drug

  20. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Some Novel Pyrrolizine Derivatives as COX Inhibitors with Anti-Inflammatory/Analgesic Activities and Low Ulcerogenic Liability.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ahmed M; Ali, Hamed I; Almalki, Waleed H; Azim, Mohamed A; Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory and pain relief medications. However, their use is associated with many drawbacks, including mainly serious gastric and renal complications. In an attempt to circumvent these risks, a set of N-(4-bromophenyl)-7-cyano-6-substituted-H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors. The structural elucidation, in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model and hot plate assay, were performed, respectively. From the results obtained, it was found that the newly synthesized pyrrolizines exhibited IC50 values in the range of 2.45-5.69 µM and 0.85-3.44 µM for COX-1 and COX-2, respectively. Interestingly, compounds 12, 13, 16 and 17 showed higher anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities compared to ibuprofen. Among these derivatives, compounds 16 and 19 displayed better safety profile than ibuprofen in acute ulcerogenicity and histopathological studies. Furthermore, the docking studies revealed that compound 17 fits nicely into COX-1 and COX-2 binding sites with the highest binding affinity, while compound 16 exerted the highest binding affinity for 5-LOX. In light of these findings, these novel pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives represent a promising scaffold for further development into potential dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors with safer gastric profile. PMID:26867188

  1. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and LP 211 elicit an analgesic effect on formalin-induced orofacial pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    DEMİRKAYA, Kadriye; AKGÜN, Özlem Martı; ŞENEL, Buğra; ÖNCEL TORUN, Zeynep; SEYREK, Melik; LACİVİTA, Enza; LEOPOLDO, Marcello; DOĞRUL, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most recently identified serotonin (5-HT) receptor is the 5-HT7 receptor. The antinociceptive effects of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist have been shown in neuropathic and inflammatory animal models of pain. A recent study demonstrated the functional expression of 5-HT7 receptors in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis, which receives and processes orofacial nociceptive inputs. Objective To investigate the antinociceptive effects of pharmacological activation of 5-HT7 receptors on orofacial pain in mice. Material and Methods Nociception was evaluated by using an orofacial formalin test in male Balb-C mice. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists, LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg), were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to a formalin injection. A bolus of 10 µl of 4% subcutaneous formalin was injected into the upper lip of mice and facial grooming behaviors were monitored. The behavioral responses consisted of two distinct periods, the early phase corresponding to acute pain (Phase I: 0–12 min) and the late phase (Phase II: 12–30 min). Results LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) produced an analgesic effect with reductions in face rubbing time in both Phase I and Phase II of the formalin test. Conclusion Our results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor agonists may be promising analgesic drugs in the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27383702

  2. Structure-activity studies and analgesic efficacy of N-(3-pyridinyl)-bridged bicyclic diamines, exceptionally potent agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bunnelle, William H; Daanen, Jerome F; Ryther, Keith B; Schrimpf, Michael R; Dart, Michael J; Gelain, Arianna; Meyer, Michael D; Frost, Jennifer M; Anderson, David J; Buckley, Michael; Curzon, Peter; Cao, Ying-Jun; Puttfarcken, Pamela; Searle, Xenia; Ji, Jianguo; Putman, C Brent; Surowy, Carol; Toma, Lucio; Barlocco, Daniela

    2007-07-26

    A series of exceptionally potent agonists at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been investigated. Several N-(3-pyridinyl) derivatives of bridged bicyclic diamines exhibit double-digit-picomolar binding affinities for the alpha 4 beta 2 subtype, placing them with epibatidine among the most potent nAChR ligands described to date. Structure-activity studies have revealed that substitutions, particularly hydrophilic groups in the pyridine 5-position, differentially modulate the agonist activity at ganglionic vs central nAChR subtypes, so that improved subtype selectivity can be demonstrated in vitro. Analgesic efficacy has been achieved across a broad range of pain states, including rodent models of acute thermal nociception, persistent pain, and neuropathic allodynia. Unfortunately, the hydrophilic pyridine substituents that were shown to enhance agonist selectivity for central nAChRs in vitro tend to limit CNS penetration in vivo, so that analgesic efficacy with an improved therapeutic window was not realized with those compounds. PMID:17585748

  3. Comparison of a narcotic (oxicone) and a non-narcotic anti-inflammatory analgesic (indoprofen) in the treatment of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Persson, N H; Bergqvist, D; Melander, A; Zederfelt, B

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous indoprofen (400 mg), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, was compared with intramuscular oxicodone hydrochloride (= oxicone 10 mg), a narcotic analgesic agent, in regard to efficacy and side effects in the treatment of renal colic. Oxicone was combined with papaverine (20 mg). Patients were randomized to either treatment, and the drugs were given in double-dummy fashion, i.e. one injection of active drug plus one placebo injection. Pain intensity before and after treatment was registered by the patient (visual analog scale) and by a nurse, who also registered side effects. Oxicone was given to 46 patients and indoprofen to 48. The groups did not differ in body weight, age, sex distribution, or pretreatment intensity of pain. More patients required additional treatment in the oxicone than in the indoprofen group (19 v. 10). At 2-5 min after injection, pain reduction was greater with indoprofen, and more patients in this group had pain relief after 3-5 hours. Side effects were less frequent with indoprofen than with oxicone (1 v. 20 patients), in particular from the central nervous system. This difference probably was related to indoprofen's slow and poor penetration of the blood-brain barrier. The study affirmed that non-narcotic cyclooxygenase inhibitors can replace narcotic analgesics for acute pain alleviation in renal colic. Indoprofen seems to be a useful alternative, with low risk of central nervous side effects. PMID:3890435

  4. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities of an extract from Parkia biglobosa used in traditional medicine in the Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Kouadio, F; Kanko, C; Juge, M; Grimaud, N; Jean, A; N'Guessan, Y T; Petit, J Y

    2000-12-01

    In the Ivory coast, Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) is used in traditional medicine as an analgesic drug, especially against dental pain. Of the three extracts obtained from the plant bark, the hexane fraction was studied to determine its analgesic and/or antiinflammatory activities. The results show that this extract possesses a marked analgesic activity when evaluated with the abdominal writhing test in mice, but, like paracetamol, was ineffective with the hot-plate method, a feature suggesting a peripheral mechanism of action. This activity was accompanied by an antiinflammatory effect, somewhat weaker than the analgesic one. PMID:11114002

  5. Direct intrawound administration of dimethylsulphoxide relieves acute pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Prasoon, Pranav; Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Anurag; Shrimal, Prawal; Ray, Subrata B

    2016-04-01

    Wounds associated with injuries such as burns can produce moderate to severe pain. Besides causing distress to the patient, unrelieved pain could delay healing owing to stress-related problems. Thus, pain needs to be treated as early as possible after injury. It was hypothesised that local treatment of wounds with appropriate analgesic drugs could attenuate pain. HOE 140, a bradykinin receptor antagonist, reduced acute inflammatory pain in rats after intrawound administration. In this study, the analgesic effect of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) was investigated in a similar hind-paw incision model in rats. An extremely small quantity (10 µl) of 100% DMSO was administered into the incision site just before closure of the wound. It persistently attenuated guarding behaviour in rats over a period of 3 days without affecting thermal hyperalgesia or allodynia. Accumulated evidence indicates that guarding is equivalent to pain at rest in humans. The possible mechanisms of the analgesic effect could be inhibition of C group of peripheral nerve fibres or even free radical scavenging. Healing of the wound was found to be normal at the end of the study period. In conclusion, DMSO could be useful in the treatment of acute pain resulting from tissue injuries such as burns. PMID:24750992

  6. Pharmacological and phytochemical evaluation of Ocimum sanctum root extracts for its antiinflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anant; Agarwal, Karishma; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Bushra, Umme; Tandon, Sudeep; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases risk of having a range of gastrointestinal problems. Therefore, new anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic drugs having lesser side effects are being searched all overthe world as alternatives to NSAIDs. Aims: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic profile of Ocimum sanctum root extracts. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory profile of hexane (STH), chloroform (STC), ethyl acetate (STE), butanol (STB) and water (STW) extracts of OS was carried out by using carrageenan induced paw edema. STE a most active extract was further validated in dose dependent manner for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity as well as oral toxicity profile in small laboratory animals. Identification of bioactives flux and chemical signature of most active fraction STE was developed by using the high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting. Results: An ethyl acetate fraction (STE) exhibit most potent anti-inflammatory activity followed by STB, STW, STC and STH. Dose response study of STE showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic potential in dose-dependent manner without any toxic effect at dose 2000 mg/kg. Chemical fingerprint revealed the presence of flavanoids. Conclusions: The present research revealed that STE possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. However, future research is advocated to evaluate the pharmacological properties of isolated bioactive compounds. PMID:26109769

  7. Potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. nut.

    PubMed

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Vyawahare, Neeraj S; Hadambar, Avinash A; Thorve, Vrushali S

    2010-12-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. (ANE) nut was screened for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and in vitro antioxidant potential. Three doses of ANE (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg orally) were tested for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Evaluation of analgesic activity of ANE was performed using hot plate and formalin test in mice. ANE showed maximum increase in hot plate reaction time (56.27%, p<0.01), while reduced the duration of licking/biting behaviors in first (39.45%, p<0.05) and second (92.71%, p<0.01) phases of the formalin test indicating significant analgesic activity. ANE reduced the paw edema considerably (86.79% inhibition after 24h, p<0.01) in dose-dependent manner compared to carrageenan-induced rat. In addition, in vitro antioxidant activity of ANE was investigated by total phenolic content (TPC) and hydrogen peroxide assay. The IC(50) observed in hydrogen peroxide assay was 83.14 μg/ml and TPC 120.56±21.09 mg QE/g. Altogether, these results suggest that the hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu could be considered as a potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent. PMID:20849907

  8. Nociceptive Transmission to Rat Primary Somatosensory Cortex – Comparison of Sedative and Analgesic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Granmo, Marcus; Jensen, Tanja; Schouenborg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    CO2-laser C-fibre evoked cortical potentials (LCEPs) is a potentially useful animal model for studies of pain mechanisms. A potential confounding factor when assessing analgesic effects of systemically administered drugs using LCEP is sedation. This study aims to clarify: 1) the relation between level of anaesthesia and magnitude of LCEP, 2) the effects of a sedative and an analgesic on LCEP and dominant EEG frequency 3) the effects of a sedative and analgesic on LCEP when dominant EEG frequency is kept stable. LCEP and EEG were recorded in isoflurane/nitrous-oxide anaesthetized rats. Increasing isoflurane level gradually reduced LCEPs and lowered dominant EEG frequencies. Systemic midazolam (10 μmol/kg) profoundly reduced LCEP (19% of control) and lowered dominant EEG frequency. Similarly, morphine 1 and 3 mg/kg reduced LCEP (39%, 12% of control, respectively) and decreased EEG frequency. When keeping the dominant EEG frequency stable, midazolam caused no significant change of LCEP. Under these premises, morphine at 3 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg, caused a significant LCEP reduction (26% of control). In conclusion, the present data indicate that the sedative effects should be accounted for when assessing the analgesic effects of drug. Furthermore, it is suggested that LCEP, given that changes in EEG induced by sedation are compensated for, can provide information about the analgesic properties of systemically administrated drugs. PMID:23320109

  9. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption. PMID:24618089

  10. Analgesic effect of caffeine and clomipramine: a possible interaction between adenosine and serotonin systems.

    PubMed

    Bach-Rojecky, Lidija

    2003-03-01

    The goals of this study were to determine whether the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine exerts an analgesic effect and to investigate the time-dependent influence of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor clomipramine on the action of caffeine. Results suggest a possible interaction between serotonin and adenosine systems, which may contribute to the analgesic action of drugs. Therefore, the hot-plate and formalin tests were employed in order to measure the response to painful thermic and chemical stimuli. Results have shown that caffeine (1.67, 16.7 and 67 mg kg(-1), i.p.) exerts a direct dose-dependent analgesic action. When caffeine (1.67 and 16.7 mg kg(-1)) was combined with clomipramine (3 mg kg(-1) i.p.), an enhanced analgesic effect was obtained. However, the same combinations were ineffective in a subacute model. In this model, clomipramine was administered for 14 days and the respective dose of caffeine was added on the last day. Therefore, it can be concluded that the serotonin system interacts with the analgesic action of caffeine and that a long-term use of clomipramine probably triggers subsensitivity of adenosine receptors. PMID:14769250

  11. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo; Kang, Dawon

    2016-07-01

    TWIK-related K(+) channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K(+) channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  12. Poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics - New York State, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Mark J; Melnik, Thomas A

    2015-04-17

    Deaths involving opioid analgesics have increased dramatically in the United States. Approximately 4,000 such deaths were documented in 1999, increasing to 16,235 in 2013, reflecting a nearly quadrupled death rate from 1.4 to 5.1 deaths per 100,000. To investigate this increase in New York state, trends in poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics from 2003 to 2012 were examined. Data sources used were New York state vital statistics multiple-cause-of-death data, consisting of data from both the New York City (NYC)* and non-NYC reporting jurisdictions, as well as statewide Medicaid enrollment data. Deaths involving opioid analgesics increased both in number and as a percentage of all drug poisoning deaths, and rates were highest among men, whites, persons aged 45-64 years, persons residing outside of NYC, and Medicaid enrollees. The analysis found that, in 2012, 70.7% of deaths involving opioid analgesics also involved at least one other drug, most frequently a benzodiazepine. These results underscore the potential to mitigate the trend of increasing opioid analgesic-related mortality through initiatives such as New York state's Internet System for Tracking Over-Prescribing (I-STOP) law,† which took effect on August 27, 2013. Provisions under I-STOP include the requirements that providers consult the Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) Registry when writing prescriptions for controlled substances, and that they use electronic prescribing. PMID:25879895

  13. Structure-analgesic activity relationship studies on the C(18)- and C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Li; Shen, Xiang-Li; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Qi, Gong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2009-08-01

    For evaluation of C(18)- and C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids as analgesics, three C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids were isolated from the roots of Aconitum hemsleyanum var. circinatum and A. transsecutum; and twenty-five semisynthetic C(18)- or C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids were prepared from lappaconitine, crassicauline A or yunaconitine. In a mice acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction assay, four crassicauline A analogs and three yunaconitine analogs exhibited good analgesic activities with 77.8-94.1% inhibition range in 0.1-10 mg/kg subcutaneous (s.c.) dose range at the point of 20 min after drug administration. Among them, 8-O-deacetyl-8-O-ethylcrassicauline A (ED(50)=0.0972 mg/kg) and 8-O-ethylyunaconitine (ED(50)=0.0591 mg/kg) were the most potent analgesics relative to the reference drugs lappaconitine (ED(50)=3.50 mg/kg) and crassicauline A (ED(50)=0.0480 mg/kg). Analgesic activity data of these C(18)- and C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids indicate that a tertiary amine in ring A, an acetoxyl or an ethoxyl group at C-8, an aromatic ester at C-14, and the saturation state of the ring D are important structural features necessary to the analgesic activity of the C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids. PMID:19652403

  14. Auditing Analgesic Use in Post-operative Setting in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bathini, Prapthi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Managing postoperative pain efficiently is one important therapeutic challenge in the hospitals. Combination use of analgesics is in vogue, where in drugs from the opioid and non-opioid group are given synergistically. The aim of this study is to audit the use of different analgesics on the first postoperative day. Effort has been made to look into the drug or drug combinations used and other factors associated with their use. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, cross sectional observational study was conducted over a period of 11 months in a tertiary care teaching hospital at Hyderabad with approval from institutional ethics committee. Medical records of 649 patients on the first postoperative day were analysed for analgesics by various indicators. Results: Average number of drugs per encounter was 4.23. Percentage of patients prescribed drugs from national essential drug list/WHO was 81.94%. Most common analgesic (monotherapy) prescribed was tramadol followed by diclofenac and the most common combination drugs prescribed were tramadol+Paracetamol. The most common route of administration was intravenous. All the drugs except piroxicam, were in the lower limit of the recommended daily dose. Conclusion: The present study gives an idea of the overall pattern of analgesic drug use in postoperative patients. The drug combinations used, the most common single use drug can be made out. The health professionals can be encouraged to prescribe by generic name and from the National List of Essential Medicines NLEMs. PMID:26023565

  15. Postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, and to determine their opinions toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. The percentage of animals receiving analgesics postoperatively ranged from 84% of dogs and 70% of cats following orthopedic surgery to 10% of dogs and 9% of cats following castration. In general, with the exception of orthopedic surgery, roughly equal percentages of dogs and cats received postoperative analgesics. Opioids were used almost exclusively to provide postoperative analgesia, with butorphanol the most commonly administered drug to both dogs and cats. Analgesics were usually administered either once or twice postoperatively. With regard to the administration of potent opioid agonists, the 3 major concerns included respiratory depression, bradycardia, and sedation in dogs, and excitement, respiratory depression, and bradycardia in cats. Seventy-seven percent of veterinarians considered their knowledge of issues related to the recognition and control of postoperative pain to be inadequate. Experience in practice is currently the major source of knowledge, with undergraduate veterinary school and research articles in journals ranked as the least important sources. Lectures or seminars delivered at the regional level were the preferred format for continuing education. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8877040

  16. Effect of drugs modulating serotonergic system on the analgesic action of paracetamol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Yogita S.; Belsare, Peeyush; Panditrao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying mechanisms for the analgesic action of paracetamol (PCT) are still under considerable debate. It has been recently proposed that PCT may act by modulating the Serotonin system. This study was conducted to verify the influence of Serotonin modulating drugs (buspirone, ondansetron, and fluoxetine) on the analgesic effect of PCT. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult albino mice were assigned to five groups: Normal saline, PCT, fluoxetine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) + PCT, buspirone (5-HT1A Agonist) + PCT, and ondansetron (5HT3 antagonist) + PCT. Hot-plate and formalin test were used to determine pain threshold, tests being conducted 60 min after the last treatment. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance followed by Dunnet's test. Results: Coadministration of buspirone with PCT attenuated the antinociceptive activity of PCT (P < 0.001), whereas fluoxetine + PCT increased pain threshold in the hot-plate and formalin test (P = 0.0046). Analgesic effect of PCT was not affected by ondansetron in formalin models. It attenuated analgesic action of PCT in hot-plate test (P = 0.0137). Conclusion: The results suggest that 5-HT1 receptors could also be responsible for the analgesic effect of PCT. Also, higher analgesia is produced by co-administration of SSRI (fluoxetine) + PCT. PMID:27298498

  17. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo

    2016-01-01

    TWIK-related K+ channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K+ (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K+ channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  18. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  19. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment. PMID:23486343

  20. Perioperative analgesic effects of intravenous paracetamol: Preemptive versus preventive analgesia in elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hossam Ibrahim Eldesuky Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cesarean section (CS) is the one of the most common surgical procedure in women. There is preoperative stress effect before the delivery of the baby as (intubation and skin incision). There is acute postoperative pain, which may be progressed to chronic pain. All these perioperative stress effects need for various approach of treatment, which including systemic and neuraxial analgesia. The different analgesia modalities may affect and impair early interaction between mother and infant. Preemptive intravenous (I.V.) paracetamol (before induction) may reduce stress response before the delivery of the baby, intraoperative opioids and postoperative pain. Objectives: The aim of this study to compare between the administration of I.V. paracetamol as: Preemptive analgesia (preoperative) and preventive analgesia (at the end of surgery) as regards of hemodynamic, pain control, duration of analgesia, cumulative doses of intraoperative opioids and their related side-effects and to compare between two different protocols of postoperative analgesia and their cumulative doses. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients undergoing elective CS were randomly enrolled in this study and divided into two groups of 30 patients each. Group I: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before induction of anesthesia. Group II: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before the end of surgery. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and peripheral oxygen saturation were recorded. Postoperative pain was assessed by visual analog score. Postoperative pethidine was given by two different protocols: group I: 0.5 mg/kg was divided into 0.25 mg/kg intramuscular and 0.25 mg/kg I.V. Group II was given pethidine 0.5 mg/kg I.V. Doses of intraoperative fentanyl, postoperative pethidine, duration of paracetamol analgesic time, time to next analgesia, and side-effects of opioid were noted and compared. Result: Preemptive group had hemodynamic stability

  1. Frost tolerance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When conducting studies to characterize and determine the underlying mechanisms for freezing tolerance, it is essential to take into account that the type and form of freezing injury varies with the species and its degree of freezing tolerance. There are at least seven different patterns of freezin...

  2. Moving Beyond Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirone, Bill

    2001-01-01

    Operating under the umbrella of the Santa Barbara County Education Office, the Beyond Tolerance Educational Center serves as a resource for educators. It provides county schools with information and programs that promote social awareness and tolerance while teaching kids the dangers of hatred and discrimination. (MLH)

  3. A Lesson in Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnt, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one classroom's experience integrating a three-part lesson that focused on tolerance. In the lesson, students examined works by American folk-art painter Edward Hicks, researched quotes about tolerance in society, and applied calligraphy skills to an original composition.

  4. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  5. Anticancer, Anti-Inflammatory, and Analgesic Activities of Synthesized 2-(Substituted phenoxy) Acetamide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Hegde, Rahul Rama; Hashim, Syed Riaz

    2014-01-01

    The aphorism was to develop new chemical entities as potential anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. The Leuckart synthetic pathway was utilized in development of novel series of 2-(substituted phenoxy)-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide derivatives. The compounds containing 1-phenylethylamine as basic moiety attached to substituted phenols were assessed for their anticancer activity against MCF-7 (breast cancer), SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma), anti-inflammatory activity, and analgesic activity. These investigations revealed that synthesized products 3a–j with halogens on the aromatic ring favors as the anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. Among all, compound 3c N-(1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)-2-(4-nitrophenoxy)acetamide exhibited anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities. In conclusion, 3c may have potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent. PMID:25197642

  6. Anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities of synthesized 2-(substituted phenoxy) acetamide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rani, Priyanka; Pal, Dilipkumar; Hegde, Rahul Rama; Hashim, Syed Riaz

    2014-01-01

    The aphorism was to develop new chemical entities as potential anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic agents. The Leuckart synthetic pathway was utilized in development of novel series of 2-(substituted phenoxy)-N-(1-phenylethyl)acetamide derivatives. The compounds containing 1-phenylethylamine as basic moiety attached to substituted phenols were assessed for their anticancer activity against MCF-7 (breast cancer), SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma), anti-inflammatory activity, and analgesic activity. These investigations revealed that synthesized products 3a-j with halogens on the aromatic ring favors as the anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. Among all, compound 3c N-(1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)-2-(4-nitrophenoxy)acetamide exhibited anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities. In conclusion, 3c may have potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent. PMID:25197642

  7. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of diospyros cordifolia extract.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta; Haldar, Pallab K; Pramanik, Goutam; Panda, Siva P; Bera, Samit

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of stem bark of Diospyros cordifolia (MEDC) Roxb. The analgesic effects of the stem bark of the plant was assessed in mice using the tail-flick method while carrageenan, histamine and dextran induced paw oedema was used to study the antiinflammatory effects in rats. The MEDC exhibited significant (p<0.01) analgesic effects comparable to the reference drug diclofenac sodium. MEDC also was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory potential against carrageenan, histamine and dextran induced rat paw edema. The methanol extract (25 and 50 mg / kg body weight) exhibited significant (p<0.01) activity against all phlogistic agents used in a dose dependent manner. All these effects were compared with reference drug phenylbutazone (100 mg/kg body weight). PMID:22238477

  8. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of a novel steroidal derivative from Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Gupta, Gaurav; Kazmi, Imran; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Afzal, Obaid; Alam, Jahangir; Hakeem, Khalidur Rahman; Pravez, Mohammad; Gupta, Ritu; Anwar, Firoz

    2012-07-01

    A new steroidal derivative, urs Stigmast-4, 20 (21), 23-trien-3-one and other four compounds were isolated from the leaves of Bryophyllum pinnatum. The structure of this new steroid was elucidated and established by standard spectroscopic methods. Carrageenan induced paw edema model was used for anti-inflammatory and acetic acid induced model used for analgesic activity. This new steroidal compound was found to be active in reducing inflammation (% inhibition 87.29 and 84.45 respectively) when compared with diclofenac. Further, it showed 75.72% protection in analgesic activity in acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. In conclusion the % inhibition against carrageenan induced rat paw edema and % protection against acetic acid induced writhings showed by new compound revealed that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of aqueous extract B. pinnatum are mainly due to the presence of this steroidal compound. PMID:22465504

  9. Tolerance Induction in Liver.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M H; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tolerogenicity. The mentioned cells secret anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-β and IL-10 and express negative co-stimulatory molecules like PD-L1 to mediate immunosuppression. Other mechanisms such as microchimerism, soluble major histocompatibility complex and regulatory T cells may take part in tolerance induction. Understanding the mechanisms involved in liver transplant rejection/tolerance helps us to improve therapeutic options to induce hepatic tolerance. PMID:26082828

  10. Structural, conformational and pharmacological study of some amides derived from 3-methyl-2,4-diphenyl-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9 β-amine as potential analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriepa, I.; Gil-Alberdi, B.; Gálvez, E.; Herranz, M. J.; Bellanato, J.; Carmona, P.; Orjales, A.; Berisa, A.; Labeaga, L.

    1999-05-01

    A series of amides derived from 3-methyl-2,4-diphenyl-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9 β-amine were synthesized and studied by IR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The compounds studied displayed in CDCl 3 a preferred flattened chair-chair conformation. IR (at room and variable temperature) and 1H and 13C NMR data showed the presence of an intramolecular NH⋯N-heterocyclic hydrogen bond in the pirazine derivative ( IV). Pharmacological assays on mice were drawn to evaluate drug-induced behavioral alteration peripheral or central acute toxicity and analgesic activity.

  11. α-Terpineol attenuates morphine-induced physical dependence and tolerance in mice: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Parvardeh, Siavash; Moghimi, Mahsa; Eslami, Pegah; Masoudi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dependence and tolerance to opioid analgesics are major problems limiting their clinical application. α-Terpineol is a monoterpenoid alcohol with neuroprotective effects which is found in several medicinal plants such as Myrtus communis, Laurus nobilis, and Stachys byzantina. It has been shown that some of these medicinal plants such as S. byzantina attenuate dependence and tolerance to morphine. Since α-terpineol is one of the bioactive phytochemical constituent of these medicinal plants, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance in mice. Materials and Methods: The mice were rendered dependent or tolerant to morphine by a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test and naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome were used to evaluate tolerance and dependence on morphine, respectively. To investigate a possible role for nitric oxide (NO) in the protective effect of α-terpineol, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and NO precursor, L-arginine, were used. Results: Administration of α-terpineol (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, IP) significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Moreover, α-terpineol (20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. The inhibitory effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance were enhanced by pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg, IP). However, L-arginine (300 mg/kg, IP) antagonized the protective effects of α-terpineol on dependence and tolerance to morphine. Conclusion: These findings indicate that α-terpineol prevents the development of dependence and tolerance to morphine probably through the influence on NO production. PMID:27081466

  12. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of dexketoprofen trometamol and meperidine HCl in the relief of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Sebe, Ahmet; Kozaci, Nalan; Satar, Salim; Acikalin, Ayca; Gulen, Muge; Acehan, Selen

    2014-01-01

    significant decrease was found in the diastolic arterial pressure in the meperidine group. But these changes in vital findings were not serious enough to disrupt patients' clinical status. With this study, we concluded that dexketoprofen trometamol, from the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug group, can be within the primary treatment options for renal colic because of better analgesic efficacy, being well tolerated by patients compared with meperidine hydrochloride. PMID:23665883

  13. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of whi