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Sample records for acute analgesic tolerance

  1. Methadone Reverses Analgesic Tolerance Induced by Morphine Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Posa, Luca; Accarie, Alison; Marie, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opiates such as morphine are the most powerful analgesics, but their protracted use is restrained by the development of tolerance to analgesic effects. Recent works suggest that tolerance to morphine might be due to its inability to promote mu opioid receptor endocytosis, and the co-injection of morphine with a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist like [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin reduces tolerance to morphine. So far, no studies have been conducted to evaluate the ability of methadone to reduce morphine tolerance in morphine-pretreated animals, a treatment sequence that could be encountered in opiate rotation protocol. We investigated the ability of methadone (a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist used in therapy) to reverse morphine tolerance and the associated cellular mechanisms in the periaqueductal gray matter, a region involved in pain control. Methods: We measured analgesic response following a challenge dose of morphine in the hot plate test and investigated regulation of mu opioid receptor (coupling and endocytosis) and some cellular mechanisms involved in tolerance such as adenylate cyclase superactivation and changes in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation state. Results: A chronic treatment with morphine promoted tolerance to its analgesic effects and was associated with a lack of mu opioid receptor endocytosis, adenylate cyclase overshoot, NR2A and NR2B downregulation, and phosphorylation of NR1. We reported that a methadone treatment in morphine-treated mice reversed morphine tolerance to analgesia by promoting mu opioid receptor endocytosis and blocking cellular mechanisms of tolerance. Conclusions: Our data might lead to rational strategies to tackle opiate tolerance in the frame of opiate rotation. PMID:26390873

  2. Chronopharmacology of analgesic effect and tolerance induced by six narcotic analgesics in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z-q; Zhang, C-l; Xu, Y-j; Chang, M-j; Jin, J-j; Luo, L; Li, X-p; Liu, D

    2015-03-01

    Narcotic analgesics, especially morphine, exert significantly different effects depending on the time within one day. The objective of this study was to observe whether the dosing time of 6 narcotic analgesics in mice affected their efficacy, pain tolerance and recovery of tolerance. The chronopharmacology of these 6 narcotics was evaluated using a hot-plate model. Maximum possible effect (MPE) of morphine showed a significant 24 h rhythm, which was higher during the dark phase and lower during the light phase (P<0.05). Conversely, MPEs of fentanyl and bucinnazine groups during the light phase exceeded those during the dark phase (P<0.05). Pain tolerance developed after drug administration at 9:00 am or 9:00 pm for 5 days, of which bucinnazine produced lower tolerance at 9:00 am. After a 2-day washout period, the mice rapidly recovered from tolerance at 3:00 pm for 5-day morphine dosing at 9:00 pm, and for fentanyl dosing at 9:00 am. Not all narcotic analgesics displayed significant circadian variations, and the dosing time-dependent effects also depended on the types of narcotics. Therefore, the time of administration is crucial in clinical pain treatment. Chronotherapy may be more effective to relieve pain while reducing side effects.

  3. A new potent analgesic agent with reduced liability to produce morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Kornel; Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Hanuska, Adrienn; Kató, Erzsébet; Balogh, Mihaly; Köles, László; Palmisano, Martina; Riba, Pal; Hosztafi, Sándor; Romualdi, Patrizia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Ferdinandy, Péter; Fürst, Susanna; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic use of opioids is limited by the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect and the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still not completely understood. For this reason the search for new analgesic derivatives, endowed with lower tolerance, is always an active field. The newly synthesized 14-O-Methylmorphine-6-sulfate (14-O-MeM6SU) shows high efficacy in in vitro assays and a strong analgesic action in the rat tail flick test. The aim of present work was to investigate: the analgesic effect of 14-O-MeM6SU in mouse tail-flick test; the tolerance to analgesic effect of 14-O-MeM6SU compared to morphine in mice, the effects of test compounds on glutamatergic neurotransmission by measuring spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) of layer V pyramidal cells from rat prefrontal cortices; and the effect of acute and chronic 14-O-MeM6SU treatments on opioid receptor gene expression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing μ-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. 14-O-MeM6SU was 17 times more potent than morphine in analgesia and had long duration of action in analgesic dose equipotent to morphine. Mice were treated subcutaneously (s.c.) either with 200 μmol/kg morphine or with 14-O-MeM6SU (12 μmol/kg) twice daily for three days. The magnitude of tolerance or cross-tolerance indicated by the shift in antinociceptive ED50 measured was greater for morphine compared to 14-O-MeM6SU. Subsequent to behavioral testing, patch-clamp experiments in layer V pyramidal neurons of rat prefrontal cortical slices in the presence of bicuculline were performed. Both 14-O-MeM6SU (0.1 μM) and morphine (1 μM) decreased the frequency of sEPSCs, indicating reduction of glutamate release. The effect of the novel compound was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, indicating an opioid mediated action. In contrast, the amplitude was not affected. Finally, gene expression data showed a dose

  4. Acute pain management in the opioid-tolerant patient.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Nicola

    The main goals in treating acute pain in opioid-tolerant patients are effective pain relief and prevention of withdrawal symptoms. This article provides an overview of the issues that practitioners need to consider when caring for potential and actual opioid-tolerant patients experiencing acute pain, for example following surgery or injury. It highlights the importance of a multimodal analgesic approach to pain control and the prevention of withdrawal. It defines the terminology used in managing opioid-tolerant patients in order to allay healthcare professionals' misconceptions.

  5. Assessment of Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia and Analgesic Tolerance in Mice Using Thermal and Mechanical Nociceptive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  6. Continuous morphine produces more tolerance than intermittent or acute treatment.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Shveta V; Madia, Priyanka A; Sirohi, Sunil; Yoburn, Byron C

    2009-05-01

    Dosing protocol and analgesic efficacy have been proposed to be important determinants of the magnitude of opioid tolerance. The present study examined the effect of acute, intermittent and continuous treatment with the low analgesic efficacy agonist morphine on analgesic tolerance. Mice were implanted s.c. with a 25 mg morphine pellet for 1-7 days. Other mice were implanted s.c. with two 25 mg, or one 75 mg morphine pellet for 7 days. The release of morphine from subcutaneous implanted pellets was quantitated using a spectrophotometric assay. In other studies, mice were injected with morphine once (18.5-185 mg/kg/day; approximately 10-100 times ED(50) for morphine analgesia) or once/day for 7 days. Controls were implanted with a placebo pellet or injected with saline. Analysis of drug release from a 25 mg pellet indicated that release was greatest during the first 24 h, declined and then remained relatively constant. The amount of morphine released over 7 days by a 75 mg pellet (23.9 mg) was more than that of a single 25 mg pellet (15.4 mg) but less than two 25 mg pellets (30.8 mg). Following treatment, morphine cumulative dose-response studies were conducted (tail flick). Continuous treatment with morphine using pellet implantation produced a dose-dependent shift in the morphine ED(50) by 3.3, 5.8 and 8.5 fold for one 25 mg pellet, one 75 mg pellet and two 25 mg pellets, respectively. Acute and intermittent morphine administration produced substantially less analgesic tolerance than continuous release of morphine by implant pellets. The maximum shift in the ED(50) was 1.6 for acute treatment and 2.7 for 7 day intermittent treatment; despite a larger total daily dose. The present results indicate that continuous treatment with morphine results in greater analgesic tolerance than acute or intermittent morphine treatment even at comparable daily doses. These results are consistent with the suggestion that intermittent dosing has reduced risk of producing opioid

  7. Morphine analgesic tolerance in 129P3/J and 129S6/SvEv mice

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Camron D.; Roberts, Kristofer W.; Byun, Janet S.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Morphine analgesic tolerance is heritable in both humans and rodents, with some individuals and strains exhibiting little and others exhibiting robust tolerance. 129S6/SvEv and 129P3/J mice reportedly do not demonstrate tolerance to morphine analgesia. Using our laboratory's standard morphine tolerance regimen and a between-subjects design, tolerance developed in the hot plate and tail withdrawal assays as indicated by a change in analgesic efficacy following a morphine challenge dose. Furthermore, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilipine) blocked morphine tolerance in 129S6/SvEv and CD-1 mice in the hot plate assay. As previously reported, when a within-subjects design and cumulative dosing was employed, no tolerance was observed in the 129P3/J strain. However, using the same morphine regimen and a between-subjects design, comparable tolerance developed between 129P3/J and C57BL/6J strains following a single challenge dose of morphine. Spontaneous hyperalgesia was observed in the tail withdrawal assay following chronic morphine in C57BL/6J, but not 129P3/J mice. Additionally, morphine-tolerant C57BL/6J mice, but not 129P3/J mice, exhibited a large increase in the frequency of tail flicks during the first second following the baseline nociceptive response which may facilitate detection of the response during the tolerant state. We conclude that the method of tolerance assessment affects the ability to detect tolerance and thus, may affect the degree and pattern of heritability of this trait and this could have implications for gene mapping studies. PMID:17196637

  8. The analgesic efficacy of fentanyl: relationship to tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-01

    This study determined if fentanyl analgesic efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation. To estimate efficacy, mice were injected i.p. with saline or clocinnamox (CCAM), an irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist, (0.32-25.6 mg/kg) and 24 h later fentanyl cumulative dose-response studies were conducted. CCAM dose dependently shifted the fentanyl dose-response function to the right. The apparent efficacy (tau) of fentanyl, based on the operational model of agonism, was estimated as 58, indicating that fentanyl is a high analgesic efficacy agonist. Next, mice were infused with fentanyl (1, 2 or 4 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Controls were implanted with placebo pellets. At the end of 7 days, morphine cumulative dose-response studies or mu-opioid receptor saturation binding studies were conducted. Fentanyl infusions dose dependently decreased morphine potency with the highest fentanyl dose reducing morphine potency by approximately 6 fold. Chronic infusion with fentanyl (4 mg/kg/day) significantly reduced mu-opioid receptor density by 28% without altering affinity, whereas lower infusion doses had no effect. Taken together, the present results strengthen the proposal that opioid analgesic efficacy predicts mu-opioid receptor regulation and the magnitude of tolerance.

  9. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  10. Pharmacological characterization of standard analgesics on oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Nakamura, Saki; Miyake, Takahito; So, Kanako; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an acute peripheral neuropathy triggered by cold in almost all patients during or within hours after its infusion. We recently reported that a single administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hypersensitivity 2 h after the administration in mice. In this study, we examined whether standard analgesics relieve the oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity. Gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate significantly inhibited and morphine and milnacipran decreased the acute cold hypersensitivity, while diclofenac and amitriptyline had no effects. These results suggest that gabapentin, tramadol, mexiletine, and calcium gluconate are effective against oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24671055

  11. Analgesic activity and acute toxicity study of Semecarpus anacardium stem bark extracts using mice

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraju, G. M.; Hoskeri, H. Joy; Krishna, V.; Babu, P. Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The analgesic activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of Semecarpus anacardium was investigated by tail flicking and writhing method using acetyl salicylic acid as the standard reference. Materials and Methods: The staircase method was adopted for the determination of the acute toxicity. LD50 of the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract was 700 mg/kg; however, the LD50 for the methanol extract was 500 mg/kg. After 1 h of oral administration of the extracts, 0.6% acetic acid was administered intraperitoneally and the analgesic activity was evaluated. Results: The number of writhing observed in the control group was 73.33 writhes. The methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity, with 28.33 writhes, than the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract. But, all the extracts showed proved to be less potent than the standard drug which showed 2.33 writhes. Animals pretreated with saline did not show a signify cant effect on the latent period of tail-flick response. The analgesic effect of the petroleum ether extract was comparatively less evident. The maximum possible analgesia (MPA) increased up to 9.1% which remained elevated above the basal levels throughout the observation period. The MPA calculated for the chloroform extract increased to 14.03%. However, the analgesic effect of the methanol extract was also observed at 0.5 h following oral administration and the effect remained significant throughout the 3 h observation period, and was increased to 20.43%. Conclusion: Consistent analgesic activity of all the three S. anacardium extracts was observed by both the methods. The methanol extract was more potent than the petroleum ether and chloroform extracts but was less effective than the standard drug. This investigation supported the ethnomedicinal claims of S. anacardium. PMID:21731397

  12. [An evaluation of the analgesic activity and tolerance of ST-679 in patients with pain following orthopedic and traumatological interventions].

    PubMed

    De Santis, E; La Pinta, M; Nolfe, G

    1993-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy and tolerability of ST-679 (administered in a single oral dose of 1200 mg) was evaluated in a double-blind parallel-group study, as compared with paracetamol (administered in a single oral dose of 1000 mg) on 40 patients with pain following orthopedic or traumatological surgery. ST-679 was shown to possess better analgesic qualities with respect to paracetamol, in that the effect establishes itself more quickly and, moreover, both the maximum analgesic activity performed as well as the constant level on which such activity tends to stabilize is greater. No adverse reaction was recorded for either treatment, but ST-679 demonstrated a better tolerability with regard to paracetamol.

  13. Analgesic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    At least two distinct forms of analgesic nephropathy are presently recognized. One form is classical analgesic nephropathy that is associated with habitual consumption of predominantly combination analgesic products. This disease takes many years to develop and is characterized by a dense interstitial fibrosis and the insidious development of renal failure. Renal papillary necrosis had been classically associated with this illness. New diagnostic tests to make an early diagnosis of the lesion may be on the horizon with the recognition that the non-contrasted CT scan may be useful. Further studies will be necessary to confirm this in the U.S. population of analgesic users. The second form of analgesic nephropathy is typically an acute renal failure associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In part this disease has been predictable based on the fact that there is an at-risk population of patients who are more vulnerable to developing it. Other features of nonsteroidal induced toxicity are also recognized (see Table 3). It is hoped that the increased recognition that chronic and acute analgesic use may lead to renal failure will result in strategies that will apprise consumers and physicians of this risk, and thereby lead to reduction in the prevalence of these two forms of analgesic-related kidney disease. PMID:9601134

  14. Preventive Analgesic Efficacy of Nefopam in Acute and Chronic Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Oh, Ah-Young; Koo, Bon-Wook; Lim, Dae-Jin; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Han, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer surgery is known to cause severe acute postoperative pain, which can persist for a long time. We administered nefopam preventively to patients undergoing lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy, and evaluated its efficacy on acute and chronic postoperative pain. Enrolled patients were assigned to the nefopam (n = 41) or the control (n = 42) group. Before initiating the operation, 20 mg of nefopam was given to the patients of the nefopam group, and normal saline was used in the control group. Ketorolac was given at the end of surgery, and meloxicam was prescribed in the postoperative period to all patients in both groups. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS), and the rescue analgesic drug was given when the NRS was >5. Implementation of postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT), or hormone therapy was evaluated. The NRS of postoperative pain was significantly lower in the nefopam than in the control group in the postanesthetic care unit (4.5 ± 2.2 vs 5.7 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01), at postoperative 6 h (3.0 ± 1.6 vs 4.5 ± 1.3, respectively; P < 0.001), and at postoperative 24 h (3.1 ± 1.1 vs 3.8 ± 1.5, respectively; P = 0.01) with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs. Significantly fewer patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain in the nefopam than in the control group at postoperative 3 months (36.6% vs 59.5%, P = 0.04). Considering only the cohort without postoperative adjuvant RT, the difference in the proportion of patients reporting chronic pain increased (23.5% in the nefopam group vs 61.5% in the control group, P = 0.04). Preventive nefopam was helpful in reducing the acute postoperative pain, with reduced use of rescue analgesic drugs, and it contributed to reduced occurrence of chronic pain at postoperative 3 months after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27196485

  15. Urinary tract analgesics for the treatment of patients with acute cystitis: where is the clinical evidence?

    PubMed

    Pergialiotis, Vassilis; Arnos, Pantelis; Mavros, Michael N; Pitsouni, Eleni; Athanasiou, Stavros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2012-08-01

    Acute cystitis is one of the most common health-related problems in the female population. Over the last few decades, a number of drugs labeled as 'urinary tract analgesics' were released; these are available over the counter and are gaining widespread resonance among the North American population. The main representatives of this class of drugs are phenazopyridine and methenamine hippurate. Methenamine's efficacy and side effects have been well studied in a recent systematic review. On the other hand, in contrast to its widespread use, the published clinical evidence regarding phenazopyridine's effectiveness and safety is scarce. In addition, consumers (potentially patients) appear to ignore the limitations of this kind of treatment. In this article, concerns regarding the use of over-the-counter uroanalgesics, with a focus on the relevant clinical evidence, are discussed.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  17. Development and preliminary validation of an integrated efficacy-tolerability composite measure for the evaluation of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Katz, Nathaniel P; Mou, Joy; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Xiang, Jim; Vorsanger, Gary; Orman, Camille; Kim, Myoung

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this analysis was to develop and evaluate integrated measures of benefit and tolerability of analgesic drugs in clinical trials. We evaluated an efficacy-tolerability composite (ETC) measure combining different cutoff values for daily pain reduction (≥20%, ≥30%, or ≥50% pain reduction) and adverse events (AEs) (no AE, no or mild AEs, no or mild drug-related AEs). Nine ETC cutoff values (3 × 3) were tested using data from a randomized double-blind trial comparing tapentadol extended release (ER) (n = 310), oxycodone controlled release (CR) (n = 322), and placebo (n = 314) in subjects with chronic low back pain. Efficacy-tolerability composite scores were calculated as the mean number of days a subject met the ETC criterion divided by the number of days the subject was expected to be in study; ETC scores were then averaged in each treatment group. For all 9 ETC measures, validity was demonstrated by significant correlation of ETC scores with patients' Global Impression of change and with change from baseline in pain scores. Tapentadol ER ETC scores were statistically significantly higher than oxycodone CR ETC scores for 4 of the ETC measures. "No/mild drug-related AE and ≥20% pain reduction" demonstrated the best overall validity (correlation with patients' global impression of change) and responsiveness (discrimination between treatment groups), yielding a higher standardized effect size for tapentadol ER compared with placebo (0.19 [95% confidence interval: 0.031-0.346]) and with oxycodone CR (0.23 [95% confidence interval: 0.070-0.383]) than other cutoff values. Thus, we have identified herein a composite measure that seems to be a valid and responsive measure of the overall efficacy and tolerability of analgesics in clinical trials.

  18. Analgesic tolerance without demonstrable opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of sustained-release morphine for treatment of chronic nonradicular low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; D'Arcy, Nicole; Brady, Caitlin; Zamora, Abigail Kathleen; Young, Chelsea Anne; Kim, Julie Eunwoo; Clemenson, Anna Marie; Angst, Martin S; Clark, J David

    2012-08-01

    Although often successful in acute settings, long-term use of opioid pain medications may be accompanied by waning levels of analgesic response not readily attributable to advancing underlying disease, necessitating dose escalation to attain pain relief. Analgesic tolerance, and more recently opioid-induced hyperalgesia, have been invoked to explain such declines in opioid effectiveness over time. Because both phenomena result in inadequate analgesia, they are difficult to distinguish in a clinical setting. Patients with otherwise uncomplicated low-back pain were titrated to comfort or dose-limiting side effects in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using sustained-release morphine or weight-matched placebo capsules for 1 month. A total of 103 patients completed the study, with an average end titration dose of 78 mg morphine/d. After 1 month, the morphine-treated patients developed tolerance to the analgesic effects of remifentanil, but did not develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia. On average, these patients experienced a 42% reduction in analgesic potency. The morphine-treated patients experienced clinically relevant improvements in pain relief, as shown by a 44% reduction in average visual analogue scale pain levels and a 31% improvement in functional ability. The differences in visual analogue scale pain levels (P = .003) and self-reported disability (P = .03) between both treatment groups were statistically significant. After 1 month of oral morphine therapy, patients with chronic low-back pain developed tolerance but not opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Improvements in pain and functional ability were observed.

  19. Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance Effect on Gene Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 in Rat Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Morphine is a potent analgesic but its continual use results in analgesic tolerance. Mechanisms of this tolerance remain to be clarified. However, changes in the functions of μ-opioid and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been proposed in morphine tolerance. We examined changes in gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 (NR1) at mRNA levels in rat striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after induction of morphine tolerance. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: The results showed that long-term morphine a administration induces tolerance to analgesic effect of the opioid, as revealed by a significant decrease in morphine-induced analgesia on day 8 compared to day 1 of the injections (P<0.001). The results also showed that the NR1 gene expression at mRNA level in rats tolerant to morphine was significantly increased in the striatum (P<0.01) but decreased in the PFC (P<0.001). Conclusion: Therefore, changes in the NR1 gene expression in rat striatum and PFC have a region-specific association with morphine-induced analgesic tolerance. PMID:27563417

  20. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Development of Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance and Regulate Functionally Relevant Changes in Serpini1

    PubMed Central

    Tapocik, Jenica D.; Ceniccola, Kristin; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Schwandt, Melanie L.; Solomon, Matthew; Wang, Bi-Dar; Luu, Truong V.; Olender, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Thomas; Maynard, Thomas M.; Elmer, Greg I.; Lee, Norman H.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term opioid treatment results in reduced therapeutic efficacy and in turn leads to an increase in the dose required to produce equivalent pain relief and alleviate break-through or insurmountable pain. Altered gene expression is a likely means for inducing long-term neuroadaptations responsible for tolerance. Studies conducted by our laboratory (Tapocik et al., 2009) revealed a network of gene expression changes occurring in canonical pathways involved in neuroplasticity, and uncovered miRNA processing as a potential mechanism. In particular, the mRNA coding the protein responsible for processing miRNAs, Dicer1, was positively correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that miRNAs play a significant role in the development of analgesic tolerance as measured by thermal nociception. Dicer1 knockdown, miRNA profiling, bioinformatics, and confirmation of high value targets were used to test the proposition. Regionally targeted Dicer1 knockdown (via shRNA) had the anticipated consequence of eliminating the development of tolerance in C57BL/6J (B6) mice, thus supporting the involvement of miRNAs in the development of tolerance. MiRNA expression profiling identified a core set of chronic morphine-regulated miRNAs (miR's 27a, 9, 483, 505, 146b, 202). Bioinformatics approaches were implemented to identify and prioritize their predicted target mRNAs. We focused our attention on miR27a and its predicted target serpin peptidase inhibitor clade I (Serpini1) mRNA, a transcript known to be intricately involved in dendritic spine density regulation in a manner consistent with chronic morphine's consequences and previously found to be correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. In vitro reporter assay confirmed the targeting of the Serpini1 3′-untranslated region by miR27a. Interestingly miR27a was found to positively regulate Serpini1 mRNA and protein levels in multiple neuronal cell lines

  1. MicroRNAs Are Involved in the Development of Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance and Regulate Functionally Relevant Changes in Serpini1.

    PubMed

    Tapocik, Jenica D; Ceniccola, Kristin; Mayo, Cheryl L; Schwandt, Melanie L; Solomon, Matthew; Wang, Bi-Dar; Luu, Truong V; Olender, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Thomas; Maynard, Thomas M; Elmer, Greg I; Lee, Norman H

    2016-01-01

    Long-term opioid treatment results in reduced therapeutic efficacy and in turn leads to an increase in the dose required to produce equivalent pain relief and alleviate break-through or insurmountable pain. Altered gene expression is a likely means for inducing long-term neuroadaptations responsible for tolerance. Studies conducted by our laboratory (Tapocik et al., 2009) revealed a network of gene expression changes occurring in canonical pathways involved in neuroplasticity, and uncovered miRNA processing as a potential mechanism. In particular, the mRNA coding the protein responsible for processing miRNAs, Dicer1, was positively correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that miRNAs play a significant role in the development of analgesic tolerance as measured by thermal nociception. Dicer1 knockdown, miRNA profiling, bioinformatics, and confirmation of high value targets were used to test the proposition. Regionally targeted Dicer1 knockdown (via shRNA) had the anticipated consequence of eliminating the development of tolerance in C57BL/6J (B6) mice, thus supporting the involvement of miRNAs in the development of tolerance. MiRNA expression profiling identified a core set of chronic morphine-regulated miRNAs (miR's 27a, 9, 483, 505, 146b, 202). Bioinformatics approaches were implemented to identify and prioritize their predicted target mRNAs. We focused our attention on miR27a and its predicted target serpin peptidase inhibitor clade I (Serpini1) mRNA, a transcript known to be intricately involved in dendritic spine density regulation in a manner consistent with chronic morphine's consequences and previously found to be correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. In vitro reporter assay confirmed the targeting of the Serpini1 3'-untranslated region by miR27a. Interestingly miR27a was found to positively regulate Serpini1 mRNA and protein levels in multiple neuronal cell lines

  2. Remifentanil-acute opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hun; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    The use of opioids may seem to be a double-edged sword; they provide straight analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects initially, but subsequently are associated with the expression of acute opioid tolerance (AOT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) that have been reported in experimental studies and clinical observations. It has been suggested that opioids can induce an acute tolerance and hyperalgesia in dose- and/or time-dependent manners even when used within the clinically accepted doses. Recently, remifentanil has been used for pain management in clinical anesthesia and in the intensive care units because of its rapid onset and offset. We reviewed articles analyzing AOT and/or OIH by remifentanil and focused on the following issues: (1) evidence of remifentanil inducing AOT and/or OIH and (2) importance of AOT and/or OIH in considering the reduction of remifentanil dosage or adopting preventive modulations. Twenty-four experimental and clinical studies were identified using electronic searches of MEDLINE (PubMed, Ovid, Springer, and Elsevier). However, the development of AOT and OIH by remifentanil administration remains controversial. There is no sufficient evidence to support or refute the existence of OIH in humans.

  3. Spontaneous restoration of transplantation tolerance after acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Daniels, Melvin D; Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Jianjun; Young, James; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Husain, Aliya N; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Chong, Anita S

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation is a cure for end-stage organ failure but, in the absence of pharmacological immunosuppression, allogeneic organs are acutely rejected. Such rejection invariably results in allosensitization and accelerated rejection of secondary donor-matched grafts. Transplantation tolerance can be induced in animals and a subset of humans, and enables long-term acceptance of allografts without maintenance immunosuppression. However, graft rejection can occur long after a state of transplantation tolerance has been acquired. When such an allograft is rejected, it has been assumed that the same rules of allosensitization apply as to non-tolerant hosts and that immunological tolerance is permanently lost. Using a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, we show that when Listeria monocytogenes infection precipitates acute rejection, thus abrogating transplantation tolerance, the donor-specific tolerant state re-emerges, allowing spontaneous acceptance of a donor-matched second transplant. These data demonstrate a setting in which the memory of allograft tolerance dominates over the memory of transplant rejection.

  4. Intrathecal morphine attenuates acute opioid tolerance secondary to remifentanil infusions during spinal surgery in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tripi, Paul A; Kuestner, Matthew E; Poe-Kochert, Connie S; Rubin, Kasia; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The unique pharmacokinetic properties of remifentanil with a context-sensitive half-life unaffected by length of infusion contribute to its frequent use during anesthetic management during posterior spinal fusion in children and adolescents. However, its intraoperative administration can lead to increased postoperative analgesic requirements, which is postulated to be the result of acute opioid tolerance with enhancement of spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Although strategies to prevent or reduce tolerance have included the coadministration of longer acting opioids or ketamine, the majority of these studies have demonstrated little to no benefit. The current study retrospectively evaluates the efficacy of intrathecal morphine (ITM) in preventing hyperalgesia following a remifentanil infusion. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion with segmental spinal instrumentation, to evaluate the effects of ITM on hyperalgesia from remifentanil. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they did or did not receive remifentanil during the surgery: no remifentanil (control group) (n=27) and remifentanil (study group) (n=27). Data included demographics, remifentanil dose and duration, Wong–Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, and postoperative intravenous morphine consumption in the first 48 postoperative hours. Results The demographics of the two study groups were similar. There were no differences in the Wong–Baker visual analog scale pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit and on postoperative days 1 and 3. Pain scores were higher in the remifentanil group on postoperative day 2 (2.9 vs 3.8). Postoperative morphine requirements were similar between the two groups (0.029 vs 0.017 mg/kg/48 h for the control group and the study group, respectively). Conclusion In patients receiving preincisional ITM during spinal surgery, intraoperative remifentanil does not increase

  5. Association of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance with changes in gene expression of GluN1 and MOR1 in rat spinal cord and midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Miraki, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We aimed to examine association of gene expression of MOR1 and GluN1 at mRNA level in the lumbosacral cord and midbrain with morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Analgesic effects of morphine administrated intraperitoneally at doses of 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg were examined using a hot plate test in rats with and without a history of 15 days morphine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Morphine-induced analgesic tolerance was also assessed on days 1, 5, 10 and 15 of chronic morphine injections. Two groups with history of 15 days injections of saline or morphine (10 mg/kg) were decapitated on day 15 and their lumbosacral cord and midbrain were dissected for evaluating MOR1 and GluN1 gene expression. Results: The results of the hot plate test showed that morphine (5 and 10 mg/kg) induced significant analgesia in naïve rats but its analgesic effects in rats receiving 15 days injections of morphine (10 mg/kg) was decreased, indicating tolerance to morphine analgesia. The results also showed that the GluN1 gene expression in tolerant rats was decreased by 71% in the lumbosacral cord but increased by 110 % in the midbrain compared to the control group. However, no significant change was observed for the MOR1 gene expression in both areas. Conclusion: It can be concluded that tolerance following administration of morphine (10 mg/kg) for 15 days is associated with site specific changes in the GluN1 gene expression in the spinal cord and midbrain but the MOR1 gene expression is not affected. PMID:27803778

  6. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity. PMID:25446875

  8. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M. Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  9. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  10. Utility of the sore throat pain model in a multiple-dose assessment of the acute analgesic flurbiprofen: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sore throat pain model has been conducted by different clinical investigators to demonstrate the efficacy of acute analgesic drugs in single-dose randomized clinical trials. The model used here was designed to study the multiple-dose safety and efficacy of lozenges containing flurbiprofen at 8.75 mg. Methods Adults (n = 198) with moderate or severe acute sore throat and findings of pharyngitis on a Tonsillo-Pharyngitis Assessment (TPA) were randomly assigned to use either flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges (n = 101) or matching placebo lozenges (n = 97) under double-blind conditions. Patients sucked one lozenge every three to six hours as needed, up to five lozenges per day, and rated symptoms on 100-mm scales: the Sore Throat Pain Intensity Scale (STPIS), the Difficulty Swallowing Scale (DSS), and the Swollen Throat Scale (SwoTS). Results Reductions in pain (lasting for three hours) and in difficulty swallowing and throat swelling (for four hours) were observed after a single dose of the flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenge (P <0.05 compared with placebo). After using multiple doses over 24 hours, flurbiprofen-treated patients experienced a 59% greater reduction in throat pain, 45% less difficulty swallowing, and 44% less throat swelling than placebo-treated patients (all P <0.01). There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Utilizing the sore throat pain model with multiple doses over 24 hours, flurbiprofen 8.75 mg lozenges were shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for sore throat pain. Other pharmacologic actions (reduced difficulty swallowing and reduced throat swelling) and overall patient satisfaction from the flurbiprofen lozenges were also demonstrated in this multiple-dose implementation of the sore throat pain model. Trial registration This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT01048866, registration date: January 13, 2010. PMID:24988909

  11. Antinociceptive effect of palm date spathe hydroalcoholic extract on acute and chronic pain in mice as compared with analgesic effect of morphine and diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Peyghambari, Fatemeh; Dashti-Rahmatabadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rozabadi, Mansooreh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Razieh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Fatemeh Dehghanfi; Pangalizadeh, Mohammadesmaeil; Dehghanimohammadabadi, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: In Persian traditional medicine, palm date spathe (PDS) is introduced as an analgesic. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of PDS on acute and chronic pain in mice in comparison with diclofenac and morphine. Materials and Methods: In this study, which was conducted in summer 2014, 220 male mice (20–30 g) were randomly divided into two categories, each consists of 11 groups as follows: A normal control group, a solvent (Tween 80) control group, 3 morphine positive control groups (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg), 3 diclofenac positive control groups (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg), and 3 main experimental PDS groups (2, 20, and 200 mg/kg). Hot plate was applied on animals in one category and writing test on the other category to assess acute and chronic pain, respectively. Results: In the writing test, the average writing time and number of animals receiving a maximum dosage of morphine, diclofenac, and PDS were significantly less than the control group. In the hot plate test, only groups receiving different doses of morphine at different time points and those received 30 mg/kg diclofenac at 15 min after the intervention showed significant difference with the control group. Conclusion: 200 mg/kg extract of PDS, revealed a significant analgesic effect on chronic pain, but it did not show any analgesic effect on acute pain. PMID:26693469

  12. The analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on acute thermal pain perception-a central neural correlate study with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Electrical acupuncture (EA) has been utilized in acute pain management. However, the neuronal mechanisms that lead to the analgesic effect are still not well defined. The current study assessed the intensity [optimal EA (OI-EA) vs. minimal EA (MI-EA)] effect of non-noxious EA on supraspinal regions related to noxious heat pain (HP) stimulation utilizing an EA treatment protocol for acute pain and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with correlation in behavioral changes. Subjects underwent five fMRI scanning paradigms: one with heat pain (HP), two with OI-EA and MI-EA, and two with OI-EA and HP, and MI-EA and HP. Results While HP resulted in activations (excitatory effect) in supraspinal areas known for pain processing and perception, EA paradigms primarily resulted in deactivations (suppressive effect) in most of these corresponding areas. In addition, OI-EA resulted in a more robust supraspinal sedative effect in comparison to MI-EA. As a result, OI-EA is more effective than MI-EA in suppressing the excitatory effect of HP in supraspinal areas related to both pain processing and perception. Conclusion Intensities of EA plays an important role in modulating central pain perception. PMID:21645415

  13. The pharmacology of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Pain management of patients continues to pose challenges to clinicians. Given the multiple dimensions of pain--whether acute or chronic, mild, moderate, or severe, nociceptive or neuropathic--a multimodal approach may be needed. Fortunately, clinicians have an array of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment choices; however, each modality must be chosen carefully, because some often used oral agents are associated with safety and tolerability issues that restrict their use in certain patients. In particular, orally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are known to cause systemic adverse effects in some patients. To address this problem, a number of topical therapies in various therapeutic classes have been developed to reduce systemic exposure and minimize the risks of patients developing adverse events. For example, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations produce a site-specific effect (ie, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition) while decreasing the systemic exposure that may lead to undesired effects in patients. Similarly, derivatives of acetylsalicylic acid (ie, salicylates) are used in topical analgesic formulations that do not significantly enter the patient's systemic circulation. Salicylates, along with capsaicin, menthol, and camphor, compose the counterirritant class of topical analgesics, which produce analgesia by activating and then desensitizing epidermal nociceptors. Additionally, patches and creams that contain the local anesthetic lidocaine, alone or co-formulated with other local anesthetics, are also used to manage patients with select acute and chronic pain states. Perhaps the most common topical analgesic modality is the cautious application of cutaneous cold and heat. Such treatments may decrease pain not by reaching the target tissue through systemic distribution, but by acting more directly on the affected tissue. Despite the tolerability benefits associated with avoiding

  14. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  15. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings.

  16. Sleep restriction acutely impairs glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pawan K; Foppen, Ewout; Kalsbeek, Andries; Challet, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Chronic sleep curtailment in humans has been related to impairment of glucose metabolism. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute sleep deprivation on glucose tolerance in rats. A group of rats was challenged by 4-h sleep deprivation in the early rest period, leading to prolonged (16 h) wakefulness. Another group of rats was allowed to sleep during the first 4 h of the light period and sleep deprived in the next 4 h. During treatment, food was withdrawn to avoid a postmeal rise in plasma glucose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed immediately after the sleep deprivation period. Sleep deprivation at both times of the day similarly impaired glucose tolerance and reduced the early-phase insulin responses to a glucose challenge. Basal concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, and corticosterone remained unchanged after sleep deprivation. Throughout IVGTTs, plasma corticosterone concentrations were not different between the control and sleep-deprived group. Together, these results demonstrate that independent of time of day and sleep pressure, short sleep deprivation during the resting phase favors glucose intolerance in rats by attenuating the first-phase insulin response to a glucose load. In conclusion, this study highlights the acute adverse effects of only a short sleep restriction on glucose homeostasis. PMID:27354542

  17. Phase IA Clinical Trial Evaluating the Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Analgesic Efficacy of an Intrathecally Administered Neurotensin A Analogue in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Sang, Christine N; Barnabe, Kate J; Kern, Steven E

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated CGX-1160 in a Phase Ia clinical trial to determine the safety of escalating doses in patients with central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Our secondary objective was to detect a trend toward analgesic efficacy. Four subjects received 3 consecutive escalating doses of CGX-1160 starting at 25 μg/h over 6 hours until 2 consecutive subjects experienced any adverse effect; 2 of the 4 subjects received 2 sequences of 3 consecutive dose escalations. Maximum tolerated dose was defined by the development of diarrhea (900 μg/h over 6 hours). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were collected for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation. The CSF concentration-versus-time data fit to a biexponential PK model, showing a rapid redistribution phase followed by a significantly slower terminal elimination phase. Incorporating an effect site delay into the model improved the fit to the data (concentration producing 50% of the maximum effect [C50 ], 58.7 ug/mL at the site of drug effect). Maximal reduction from the baseline pain intensity was 63%. In summary, CGX-1160 was generally well tolerated when administered intrathecally at doses up to 1000 μg/h. Peak analgesic effect occurred after the peak intrathecal concentration, indicating the presence of an effect site compartment to the PK model to represent the concentration and effect profiles for this unique compound. PMID:27310326

  18. Pharmacology of systemic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Camu, Frederic; Vanlersberghe, Caroline

    2002-12-01

    Systemic administration of analgesic drugs is still the most widely used method for providing pain relief in acute painful situations. Opioids may be selected on the basis of their physicochemical characteristics and their diffusion index to the brain. But in clinical practice, their very steep concentration-analgesic effect relationship remains a critical aspect of opioid therapy. Thus, small fluctuations in plasma concentrations of opioids may lead to profound fluctuations in analgesic effect when their plasma and effect-site concentrations are near the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC). Combining drugs acting on different mechanisms of nociceptive modulation offers benefits from additive/synergistic effects and will decrease the incidence of their adverse effects. Evidence-based reviews showed that effective pain relief using non-opioid analgesics relied on paracetamol supplemented with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The role of COX-2 selective inhibitors (CSIs) in acute pain relief still requires further evaluation. NSAIDs, CSIs and paracetamol share the property of morphine sparing in situations of severe (post-operative) pain. CSIs may be beneficial in patients in whom post-operative bleeding is a major surgical risk as the effects of NSAIDs on coagulation may last for days. Finally, low-dose ketamine infusions remain a worthwhile addition to opioid therapy. Analgesic concentrations of ketamine are 1/5th to 1/10th the anaesthetic concentration and exert significant inhibition on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. PMID:12516886

  19. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  20. The analgesic and toxic effects of nornicotine enantiomers alone and in interaction with morphine in rodent models of acute and persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Holtman, Joseph R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Johnson-Hardy, Jaime K.; Wala, Elzbieta P.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholinic receptors (nAChR) are promising targets for the development of novel analgesics. Nicotine and other nAChR-agonists produce profound analgesia in rodent models of acute and persistent pain. However, significant side-effects are of concern. Nornicotine (N-desmethyl-nicotine) appears to activate different nAChR subtypes, has a better pharmacokinetic profile, and produces less toxicity than nicotine. Little is known about its analgesic properties. In the present study, the S(−)- and R(+)- enantiomers of nornicotine were characterized with regard to analgesia and side-effects profile. Efficacy was demonstrated in rat models of pain where central sensitization is involved: i.e. the chronic constriction nerve injury model of peripheral neuropathy and the formalin model of tonic inflammatory pain. The desirable (analgesic) properties resided predominantly in the S(−)- rather than the R(+)- enantiomer. In contrast, undesirable effects (motor in-coordination, reduced locomotor activity, ataxia) were more pronounced with the R(+)- enantiomer. This is an interesting finding, which may suggest separation of toxicity from analgesia by utilization of S(−)-enantiomer of nornicotine. Maximum analgesic effectiveness without significant side-effects was achieved when S(−)-nornicotine (sub-analgesic dose) was combined with a low-dose of the μ-opioid, morphine. These preclinical data suggest that S(−)-nornicotine may be of value, either alone or in combination with an opioid, for treatment of a broad-spectrum of pain (i.e. nociceptive, neuropathic, mixed pain). PMID:19800911

  1. [Acute toxicity and analgesic activity of the global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire].

    PubMed

    Bouidida, El Houcine; Alaoui, Katim; Cherrah, Yahia; Fkih-Tetouani, Souad; Idrissi, Abdelkader Il

    2006-01-01

    The global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire are especially rich in secondary metabolites of the type iridoid lactonique and glucosidique and of type lupane triterpine. The aerial part of each species is crushed, and then extracted by cold maceration in methanol. These total extracts are in the form of suspension in Arabic gum with 5%, they are tested on the mice for the tests of acute toxicity like for the peripheral analgesic activity according to the test of Koster; and also on the rats for the central analgesic activity of the morphine type based on the test "Tail Flick". The acute toxicity evaluation of these extracts follows upon the determination of the lethal amounts 50% of essential oils from these two species, already given it is specified here by the lethal dose 50% (DL50) of 1672 +/- 232 mg/kg with confidence limits [1030 - 2320] mg/kg for Nepeta atlantica and 1401 +/- 97.29 mg/kg with confidence limits [1130 - 1670] mg/kg for Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata. The tests of Koster in the mouse and the "Tail Flik" in the rat showed that the global extracts of the studied species have all two greatly peripheral analgesic activity with an important protection against abdominal cramp 67.91% and 75.53% for 60 mg/kg IP respectively for Nepeta atlantica and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. Reticulata, which rise up to 90.10% and 92.89% for 120 mg/kg IP. A central morphine like analgesic activity is record with 120 mg/kg IP for the two species.

  2. Acute clinical tolerance of creatinol O-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Melloni, G F; Minoja, G M; Lureti, G F; Merlo, L; Pamparana, F; Brusoni, B

    1979-01-01

    Acute clinical tolerance to N-methyl-N-(beta-hydroxyethyl) guanidine O-phosphate (creatinol O-phosphate, COP) was investigated in volunteer human subjects without heart or renal disease and without other serious illness. COP was administered i.v. at three different dosages, 1020 mg (group A), 2040 mg (group B) and 3060 mg (group C), in comparison with a placebo (group D). Arterial pressure, heart rate, ECG pattern and a complete blood analysis showed no change at any COP dosage, with the exception of blood phosphate, which increased in groups B and C. Cumulative urinary excretion of phosphate and creatinine and diuresis increased, whereas other urine parameters did not change. The phosphate and creatinine increases derived from the COP molecule and the increase in diuresis from a simple osmotic process required to dilute the phosphate in the tubular fluid. All these alterations were statistically significant and dose-related with COP and had been expected. COP proved to be a very well tolerated drug without any evident side effect.

  3. Ketorolac, an injectable nonnarcotic analgesic.

    PubMed

    Litvak, K M; McEvoy, G K

    1990-12-01

    Clinical studies of the injectable nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAIA) ketorolac tromethamine are reviewed, and the chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and adverse effects of ketorolac are described. Ketorolac exhibits anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activity. Although the exact mechanisms of action have not been determined, its effects appear to be associated principally with the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. After oral, i.m., or i.v. administration, ketorolac and its metabolites are excreted mainly in urine. Ketorolac tromethamine has been used for the symptomatic relief of moderate to severe postoperative pain, including that associated with abdominal, gynecologic, oral, orthopedic, or urologic surgery. Ketorolac has also been used for the relief of acute renal colic, pain associated with trauma, and visceral pain associated with cancer. When administered i.m., ketorolac produced analgesia comparable to that of i.m. doses of meperidine, pentazocine, or morphine. The most common adverse effects associated with short-term administration are nervous system and gastrointestinal effects; these are usually mild and occur in about 39% of patients. Unlike opiate analgesics, ketorolac does not appear to cause tolerance or physical dependence in patients receiving long-term therapy. Ketorolac tromethamine has been administered concomitantly with morphine or meperidine without apparent adverse interaction. For short-term pain management, an initial i.m. ketorolac tromethamine loading dose of 30 or 60 mg is recommended. Ketorolac tromethamine appears to be as effective as morphine or meperidine for short-term management of moderate to severe postoperative pain. It lacks the respiratory depressant effects of opiate analgesics but shares the toxic potentials of other NSAIAs.

  4. Synthesis, modeling, and pharmacological evaluation of UMB 425, a mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist opioid analgesic with reduced tolerance liabilities.

    PubMed

    Healy, Jason R; Bezawada, Padmavani; Shim, Jihyun; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen A; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2013-09-18

    Opioid narcotics are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain and primarily exert their analgesic effects through μ receptors. Although traditional μ agonists can cause undesired side effects, including tolerance, addition of δ antagonists can attenuate said side effects. Herein, we report 4a,9-dihydroxy-7a-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methyl-2,3,4,4a,5,6-hexahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-7(7aH)-one (UMB 425) a 5,14-bridged morphinan-based orvinol precursor synthesized from thebaine. Although UMB 425 lacks δ-specific motifs, conformationally sampled pharmacophore models for μ and δ receptors predict it to have efficacy similar to morphine at μ receptors and similar to naltrexone at δ receptors, due to the compound sampling conformations in which the hydroxyl moiety interacts with the receptors similar to orvinols. As predicted, UMB 425 exhibits a mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist profile as determined in receptor binding and [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays in CHO cells. In vivo studies in mice show that UMB 425 displays potent antinociception in the hot plate and tail-flick assays. The antinociceptive effects of UMB 425 are blocked by naloxone, but not by the κ-selective antagonist norbinaltorphimine. During a 6-day tolerance paradigm, UMB 425 maintains significantly greater antinociception compared to morphine. These studies thus indicate that, even in the absence of δ-specific motifs fused to the C-ring, UMB 425 has mixed μ agonist/δ antagonist properties in vitro that translate to reduced tolerance liabilities in vivo. PMID:23713721

  5. Novel analgesic combination of tramadol, paracetamol, caffeine and taurine in the management of moderate to moderately severe acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Santhosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute low back pain is one the leading cause of doctor's visit in our country with innumerable medication for treatment. Finding an ideal analgesic medication with better efficacy and least adverse effects is always a challenging task to the treating doctor. Methods In this study we compared the efficacy and safety profile of a fixed dose combination of novel analgesic tramadol 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg/caffeine 30 mg/taurine 250 mg with commonly used tramadol 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg tablet in the treatment of moderate to moderately severe acute low back pain. Patients attending 50 clinics throughout India were enrolled in either of the above group and were asked to take one tablet every 6th hour for five consecutive days. The pain evaluation in both groups was done with verbal pain relief scale and pain intensity scale at end of treatment. Results Proportion of patients in novel combination group compared to tramadol/paracetamol only group responding to treatment based on treatment satisfaction (good and excellent) and mean pain intensity (no pain or mild pain), were 81% Vs 45%, (p < 0.001) and 83% Vs 66% (p < 0.001) respectively. Common expected adverse drug reaction like nausea, vomiting and dizziness occurred with far less frequency in patients under novel combination group. Conclusion We conclude that significantly more patients in novel combination drug group compared to tramadol/paracetamol only group had a superior analgesic effect with lesser adverse reactions. PMID:24396231

  6. Circadian modulation of acute alcohol sensitivity but not acute tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Kim; Lyons, Lisa C

    2011-05-01

    An increased understanding of the factors affecting behavioral and neurological responses to alcohol and alcohol physiology is necessary given the tremendous toll alcohol abuse and alcoholism exert on individuals and society. At the behavioral and molecular levels, the response to alcohol appears remarkably conserved from Drosophila to humans, suggesting that investigations across model species can provide insight into the identification of common modulatory factors. We investigated the interaction between the circadian clock and alcohol sensitivity, alcohol tolerance, and alcohol absorbance in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a loss-of-righting reflex (LoRR) assay, we found that flies exhibit a circadian rhythm in the LoRR, with the greatest sensitivity to alcohol occurring from mid to late night, corresponding to the flies' inactive phase. As predicted, a circadian rhythm in the LoRR was absent in circadian mutant flies and under conditions in which the circadian clock was nonfunctional. Circadian modulation of the response to alcohol was not due to circadian regulation of alcohol absorbance. Similar to other animals, Drosophila develop acute and chronic tolerance to alcohol upon repeat exposures. We found that the circadian clock did not modulate the development of acute alcohol tolerance measured as the difference in sensitivity to alcohol between naïve and pre-exposed flies. Thus, the circadian clock modulates some, but not all, of the behavioral responses to alcohol exposure, suggesting that specific mechanisms underlie the observed circadian modulation of LoRR rather than global cellular circadian regulation. This study provides valuable new insights in our understanding of the circadian modulation of alcohol-induced behaviors that ultimately could facilitate preventative measures in combating alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

  7. Influence of the ambient acceleration field upon acute acceleration tolerance in chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Spangler, W. L.; Rhode, E. A.; Burton, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper measured the acceleration tolerance of domestic fowl (Rhode Island Red cocks), acutely exposed to a 6 Gz field, as the time over which a normal heart rate can be maintained. This period of circulatory adjustment ends abruptly with pronounced bradycardia. For chickens which previously have been physiologically adapted to 2.5 -G field, the acute acceleration tolerance is greatly increased. The influence of the ambient acceleration field on the adjustment of the circulatory system appears to be a general phenomenon.

  8. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  9. The future of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Topically applied analgesic therapies have been used throughout history to treat a variety of patient conditions that present with pain. Before modem pharmaceuticals became readily available, mud-based emollients, salves, cold therapies, and other natural remedies were often used. Now we have effective therapies and are developing advanced topical analgesics as we learn more about the physiology and pathophysiology of pain. The use of topical analgesics may be associated with fewer patient systemic side effects than are seen with oral, parenteral, or transdermally administered agents, making the topical route of administration attractive to prescribers and patients. With further refinement of existing drugs and the development of novel agents, topical analgesics may offer relief for treating patient pain conditions that are currently challenging to treat, such as pain resulting from burns, wound debridement, and pressure ulcers. Recognizing the value of a multimodal approach, topical analgesics may offer a therapeutic option that can become part of a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient. With continued advancements in targeted drug-delivery systems, topical analgesics may be able to provide a method to prevent or reverse the phenomena of peripheral and central sensitization, or the neuroplastic changes believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain states in patients. For those patients at risk for developing chronic pain states, such as complex regional pain syndrome, the combination of cutaneous stimulation (achieved through rubbing during application) and analgesic effects produced by the drug itself may prevent the disabling pain that often emerges during the subacute phase of disease. In summary, better utilization of currently available topical analgesics and continued research promise to ensure that topical analgesics are, and will continue to be, important tools in the treatment of patients with resistant pain. PMID

  10. Prescribing Opioid Analgesics for Acute Dental Pain: Time to Change Clinical Practices in Response to Evidence and Misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond A; Gordon, Sharon M; Moore, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    As the nation comes to terms with a prescription opioid epidemic, dentistry is beginning to understand its own unintentional contribution and seek ways to address it. The article urges dental providers to reexamine entrenched prescribing habits and thought patterns regarding treatment of acute dental pain. It points to evidence suggesting that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are nonaddictive and usually more effective for managing many cases of acute dental pain. The authors provide therapeutic recommendations to help dental providers change prescribing patterns. PMID:27517474

  11. Enzyme genotype and exposure tolerance in fathead minnow populations acutely and chronically exposed to fluoranthene

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    Populations residing in contaminated areas often exhibit enhanced genetically based tolerance. Shifts in enzyme genotype frequencies have been suggested as indicators of these adaptive responses. However, the between extant tolerance and enzyme genotype frequencies in affected populations has not been previously reported. The authors report here on attempts, involving acute and chronic exposures, to select for tolerance in populations of fathead minnows. Offspring of survivors of an acutely exposed population were significantly less tolerant relative to naive fish, whereas offspring of fish exposed to a sub-lethal concentration were significantly more tolerant of exposure. Relationships between differential response in the acute exposure were elucidated using failure-time methods. Genotype at one focus, glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), was significantly related to survival time during this exposure. In addition, significant differences in GPI allele frequency between survivors and their offspring were also apparent. Comparison of offspring of chronically exposed fish with offspring of unexposed fish indicated a significant shift in allele frequencies at the GPI locus. These F1 populations were also exposed acutely to fluoranthene to assess their relative tolerance. Separate failure-time analyses for these populations again indicated a significant relationship between GPI genotype and mortality in the control fish (and at three other loci), but not in the exposure fish. Overall, five loci were significantly related to mortality in the control population, whereas one locus was related to mortality in the exposure offspring. These results suggest that enzyme genotype frequencies can be consistent indicators of population response to exposure and that selection by contaminants may reduce variability in these relationships.

  12. Analgesic Effects and Safety of Desmopressin, Tramadol and Indomethacin in Patients with Acute Renal Colic; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Salehipour, Mehdi; Afrasiabi, Mohammad Amin; Aminsharifi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of desmopressin (DDAVP), tramadol and indomethacin on pain intensity of patients with acute renal colic caused by urolithiasis. Methods: This prospective, randomized clinical trial was conducted between July 2005 and July 2006 including 120 patients (70 men and 50 women, mean age 38.2±5.8 years) referring to emergency room of Shahid Faghihi hospital with renal colic caused by urolithiasis without any previous treatment. The patients were randomly assigned to three groups: group A received tramadol 50mg intramuscularly (n=40), group B received desmopressin 40 µg intranasally (n=40) and group C received indomethacin 100mg rectally (n=40). The pain was assessed both on admission and 30 minutes after the intervention. The pain intensity and the side effects were compared between two study groups. Results: There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the baseline characteristics. The intensity of pain of presentation was almost similar in all groups. In group A, 30 patients (75%), in group B, 15 patients (37.5%) and in group C, 19 patients (47.5%) had complete pain relief. The pain intensity decreased significantly after the intervention within all three groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to the results of the current study, rectal indomethacin, intramuscular tramadol and intranasal desmopressin are effective and safe routs of controlling pain in acute renal colic secondary to urolithiasis. Tramadol was the most effective agent in controlling the pain. PMID:27162901

  13. A major QTL for acute ethanol sensitivity in the alcohol tolerant and non-tolerant selected rat lines.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, R A; Erwin, V G; Bludeau, P; Deng, X; Fay, T; Floyd, K L; Deitrich, R A

    2009-08-01

    The Alcohol Tolerant and Alcohol Non-Tolerant rats (AT, ANT) were selectively bred for ethanol-induced ataxia as measured on the inclined plane. Here we report on a quantitative trait locus (QTL) study in an F(2) intercross population derived from inbred AT and ANT (IAT, IANT) and a follow-up study of congenics that were bred to examine one of the mapped QTLs. Over 1200 F(2) offspring were tested for inclined plane sensitivity, acute tolerance on the inclined plane, duration of the loss of righting reflex (LORR) and blood ethanol at regain of the righting reflex (BECRR). F(2) rats that were in the upper and lower 20% for inclined plane sensitivity were genotyped with 78 SSLP markers. Significant QTLs for inclined plane sensitivity were mapped on chromosomes 8 and 20; suggestive QTLs were mapped on chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. Highly significant QTLs for LORR duration (LOD = 12.4) and BECRR (LOD = 5.7) were mapped to the same locus on chromosome 1. Breeding and testing of reciprocal congenic lines confirmed the chromosome 1 LORR/BECRR QTL. A series of recombinant congenic sub-lines were bred to fine-map this QTL. Current results have narrowed the QTL to an interval of between 5 and 20 Mb. We expect to be able to narrow the interval to less than 5 Mb with additional genotyping and continued breeding of recombinant sub-congenic lines.

  14. Intrathecal PLC(β3) oligodeoxynucleotides antisense potentiates acute morphine efficacy and attenuates chronic morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Quanhong, Zhou; Ying, Xue; Moxi, Chen; Tao, Xu; Jing, Wang; Xin, Zhang; Li, Wang; Derong, Cui; Xiaoli, Zhang; Wei, Jiang

    2012-09-01

    Morphine is a mainstay for chronic pain treatment, but its efficacy has been hampered by physical tolerance. The underlying mechanism for chronic morphine induced tolerance is complicated and not well understood. PLC(β3) is regarded as an important factor in the morphine tolerance signal pathway. In this study, we determined intrathecal (i.t.) administration of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) of PLC(β3) could quicken the on-set antinociceptive efficacy of acute morphine treatment and prolong the maximum effect up to 4h. The antisense could also attenuate the development of morphine-induced tolerance and left shift the ED50 after 7 day of coadministration with morphine. These results probably were contributed by the PLC(β3) antisense ODN as they successfully knocked down protein expression levels and reduced activity of PLC(β3) in spinal cord in rats. The mismatch group had no such effects. The results confirmed the important involvement of PLC(β3) in both acute morphine efficacy and chronic morphine tolerance at spinal level in rats. This study may provide an idea for producing a novel adjuvant for morphine treatment.

  15. Acute tolerance to rate-decreasing effects of single doses of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Martinez, Gerardo; Friesenhahn, Gregory; Javors, Martin; Lamb, R J

    2008-06-01

    Acute tolerance occurs when behavioral impairment is greater at a given blood ethanol concentration (BAC) on the ascending versus descending limb of the BAC-time curve following administration of a single dose of ethanol, however studies utilizing learned behaviors have not been widely reported. We assessed acute tolerance to single doses of ethanol in five Lewis rats responding under a fixed-ratio (FR8) schedule of food presentation. Response rates for food during 1-min components (ending 2, 4, 11, 18, 33, and 57 min after ethanol administration) were determined, and BAC was measured immediately after each component using a rat breathalyzer. Ethanol (0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg, i.p.) produced dose-related decreases in responding for food that tended to recover over time for all but the highest dose tested. Similarly, dose-related increases in BAC were also observed. Using either an analysis that expressed impairment per unit BAC on the ascending limb versus the descending limb (by assessing the area under the curve (AUC) for behavior and BAC on each limb), the slope of the function that relates the behavioral effect to BAC (each expressed as percent maximum effect), or a variant of the Mellanby method (hysteresis), acute tolerance was observed following a dose of 0.4 g/kg ethanol. Though behavior appeared to recover on the descending limb following higher doses (especially 0.6 and 0.8 g/kg), acute tolerance to these doses was not present. PMID:18328511

  16. εPKC confers acute tolerance to cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Rachel; Sun, Guo-Hua; Yenari, Midori A.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2008-01-01

    In response to mild ischemic stress, the brain elicits endogenous survival mechanisms to protect cells against a subsequent lethal ischemic stress, referred to as ischemic tolerance. The molecular signals that mediate this protection are thought to involve the expression and activation of multiple kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). Here we demonstrate that εPKC mediates cerebral ischemic tolerance in vivo. Systemic delivery of ψεRACK, an εPKC-selective peptide activator, confers neuroprotection against a subsequent cerebral ischemic event when delivered immediately prior to stroke. In addition, activation of εPKC by ψεRACK treatment decreases vascular tone in vivo, as demonstrated by a reduction in microvascular cerebral blood flow. Here we demonstrate the role of acute and transient εPKC in early cerebral tolerance in vivo and suggest that extra-parenchymal mechanisms, such as vasoconstriction, may contribute to the conferred protection. PMID:18586397

  17. A novel analgesic Isolated from a Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chaoran; Wang, Lien; Parks, Gregory Scott; Zhang, Xiuli; Guo, Zhimou; Ke, Yanxiong; Li, Kang-Wu; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Vo, Benjamin; Borrelli, Emiliana; Ge, Guangbo; Yang, Ling; Wang, Zhiwei; Garcia-Fuster, M. Julia; Luo, Z. David; Liang, Xinmiao; Civelli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Current pain management is limited, in particular, with regard to chronic pain. In an attempt to discover novel analgesics, we combined the approach developed to characterize traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), as part of the “herbalome” project, with the reverse pharmacology approach aimed at discovering new endogenous transmitters and hormones. Results In a plant used for centuries for its analgesic properties, we identify a compound, dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB) that is effective at alleviating thermally induced acute pain. We synthesize DHCB and show that it displays moderate dopamine receptor antagonist activities. By using selective pharmacological compounds and dopamine receptor knockout (KO) mice, we show that DHCB antinociceptive effect is primarily due to its interaction with D2 receptors, at least at low doses. We further show that DHCB is effective against inflammatory pain and injury-induced neuropathic pain and furthermore causes no antinociceptive tolerance. Conclusion Our study casts DHCB as a different type of analgesic compound and as a promising lead in pain management. PMID:24388848

  18. Tolerance development to Morris water maze test impairments induced by acute allopregnanolone.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, S; Löfgren, M; Birzniece, V; Bäckström, T; Johansson, I-M

    2006-05-12

    The progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, like benzodiazepines, reduces learning and impairs memory in rats. Both substances act as GABA agonists at the GABA-A receptor and impair the performance in the Morris water maze test. Women are during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and during hormone replacement therapy exposed to allopregnanolone or allopregnanolone-like substances for extended periods. Long-term benzodiazepine treatment can cause tolerance against benzodiazepine-induced learning impairments. In this study we evaluated whether a corresponding allopregnanolone tolerance develops in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were pretreated for 3 days with i.v. allopregnanolone injections (2 mg/kg) one or two times a day, or for 7 days with allopregnanolone injections 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally, twice a day. Thereafter the rats were tested in the Morris water maze for 5 days and compared with relevant controls. Rats pretreated with allopregnanolone twice a day had decreased escape latency, path length and thigmotaxis compared with the acute allopregnanolone group that was pretreated with vehicle. Pretreatment for 7 days resulted in learning of the platform position. However, the memory of the platform position was in these tolerant rats not as strong as in controls only given vehicle. Allopregnanolone treatment was therefore seen to induce a partial tolerance against acute allopregnanolone effects in the Morris water maze.

  19. Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented.

  20. [Chronic use of analgesics].

    PubMed

    Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Pommer, W; Molzahn, M

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of longterm analgesic intake are presented, based on a case-control-study on the relation between regular analgesic intake and endstage renal failure in the area of West Berlin (1984-86). Lifetime analgesic consumption of more than 1000 persons were investigated. A total of 285 longterm analgesic users (185 cases = 35.8%; 100 controls = 19.3%) were detected. An odd ratio of 2.44 (95% CI: 1.77-3.39) was computed. Regular analgesic intake was defined as an intake of at least 15 analgesic doses per month continuously over a period of at least 12 months. 90% of the regular users preferred mixed analgesics compounds, in most cases with the psychotropic additive caffeine. PMID:2238838

  1. Effects of Acute Alcohol Tolerance on Perceptions of Danger and Willingness to Drive after Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Amlung, Michael T.; Morris, David H.; McCarthy, Denis M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Drinking and driving is associated with elevated rates of motor vehicle accidents and fatalities. Previous research suggests that alcohol impairs judgments about the dangers of risky behaviors; however, how alcohol affects driving-related judgments is less clear. Impairments have also been shown to differ across limbs of the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) curve, which is known as acute tolerance. Objectives Examine whether perceptions about the dangerousness of driving after drinking and willingness to drive differed across ascending and descending limbs of the BAC curve. Test whether reductions in perceived danger were associated with willingness to drive on the descending limb. Methods Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate dose of alcohol (peak BAC = 0.10 g%) or placebo. We assessed perceived dangerousness and willingness to drive at matched BACs (~0.067-0.068 g%) on the ascending and descending limbs. Results Both perceived danger and willingness to drive showed acute tolerance in the alcohol group. Participants judged driving to be significantly less dangerous and were more willing to drive on the descending limb compared to the ascending limb. The magnitude of change in perceived danger significantly predicted willingness to drive on the descending limb. Conclusions Decreased impairment associated with acute tolerance may lead individuals to underestimate the dangerousness of driving after drinking and in turn make poor decisions regarding driving. This study further emphasizes the descending limb as a period of increased risk and offers support for enhancing prevention efforts by targeting drivers at declining BAC levels. PMID:24752657

  2. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic.

  3. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, J. G.; van Wel, J. H.; Spronk, D. B.; Toennes, S. W.; Kuypers, K. P. C.; Theunissen, E. L.; Verkes, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  4. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  5. Inter- and intra-species variation in acute zinc tolerance of field-collected cladoceran populations.

    PubMed

    Muyssen, Brita T A; Bossuyt, Bart T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2005-12-01

    Acute zinc toxicity was assessed for 10 freshwater cladoceran species collected in six different ecosystems across Europe and for two standard laboratory-reared species (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia). The collected organisms belonged to five different genera: Daphnia (subgenus Daphnia and Ctenodaphnia), Ceriodaphnia, Simocephalus, Acroperus and Chydorus. The 48-h EC50 of the field-collected organisms tested in standard laboratory water ranged from 375+/-141 to 4314+/-1513 microg Znl(-1). The laboratory clone of D. magna was less sensitive than the majority of the field-collected species, while our laboratory Ceriodaphnia dubia was the second most sensitive. Considerable inter-species variation was found within the genus of Ceriodaphnia (factor 6) and within the genus Daphnia (factor 8). Among the different (sub)genera tested, Chydorus and Ctenodaphnia were significantly more tolerant than the others (up to a factor 3 difference). A significant positive relationship (r2=0.67, p<0.05) between the mean cladoceran 48-h EC50 and the ambient zinc concentration of the different aquatic systems was demonstrated, suggesting a role of acclimation and/or adaptation. No significant correlation between the acute zinc tolerance and the length of the organisms was found. PMID:16263385

  6. Profile of dependence symptoms among extramedical opioid analgesic users.

    PubMed

    Martins, Silvia S; Ghandour, Lilian A; Chilcoat, Howard D

    2007-10-01

    Little is known about the extent of problems due to extramedical opioid analgesic use ('analgesic misuse') in the US general population. This study explores the distribution of the seven DSM-IV-defined past-year dependence symptoms in a total household sample of 7,810 past-year extramedical opioid analgesic users using the 2002-2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). We tested for differences in opioid analgesic dependence symptom profiles across four subgroups of opioid analgesic users, different levels of deviant behaviors, and presence/absence of serious mental health problems quantified by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form (CIDI-sf). Generalized Estimated Equations (GEE) models were used to analyze the data. The most common opioid analgesic dependence symptoms were 'tolerance' (17.0%) and 'salience' (13.3%). Opioid analgesic dependence symptom profiles were 'parallel' across the groups of past-year opioid analgesic users, across deviant behavior groups and across presence/absence of serious mental health problems. Extramedical use of opioid analgesics associated with prescription drug use, having high levels of deviant behaviors, and having serious mental health problems were more strongly associated with endorsement of opioid analgesics dependence symptoms.

  7. Tolerance of acute hypoxia while performing operator activity and after a prolonged period under altered gas environment conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloshchinskiy, P.; Golets, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Sergiyenko, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Human and animal studies on physiological factors in resistance to acute hypoxia are elaborated. Results show that tolerance of acute hypoxia depends on gas composition and temperature in a sealed cabin, on the length of the stay and motive regime, and on the kind of operator and professional activity. After preliminary adaptation to hypoxia, resistance of the body increases not only to insufficiency of oxygen in inspired air, but also to the effects of other extremum factors of manned space flight.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanna; Gubbay, Anthony; Branford, Ruth; Sato, Hiroe

    2013-01-01

    Summary points • Individual variability in pain perception and differences in the efficacy of analgesic drugs are complex phenomena and are partly genetically predetermined. • Analgesics act in various ways on the peripheral and central pain pathways and are regarded as one of the most valuable but equally dangerous groups of medications. • While pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, metabolism in particular, have been scrutinised by genotype–phenotype correlation studies, the clinical significance of inherited variants in genes governing pharmacodynamics of analgesics remains largely unexplored (apart from the µ-opioid receptor). • Lack of replication of the findings from one study to another makes meaningful personalised analgesic regime still a distant future. • This narrative review will focus on findings related to pharmacogenetics of commonly used analgesic medications and highlight authors’ views on future clinical implications of pharmacogenetics in the context of pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26516523

  9. Acute pain management in opioid-tolerant patients: a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, C A; Roberts, L J; Somogyi, A A; MacIntyre, P E

    2011-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, in parallel with other developed countries, the number of patients prescribed opioids on a long-term basis has grown rapidly over the last decade. The burden of chronic pain is more widely recognised and there has been an increase in the use of opioids for both cancer and non-cancer indications. While the prevalence of illicit opioid use has remained relatively stable, the diversion and abuse of prescription opioids has escalated, as has the number of individuals receiving methadone or buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. As a result, the proportion of opioid-tolerant patients requiring acute pain management has increased, often presenting clinicians with greater challenges than those faced when treating the opioid-naïve. Treatment aims include effective relief of acute pain, prevention of drug withdrawal, assistance with any related social, psychiatric and behavioural issues, and ensuring continuity of long-term care. Pharmacological approaches incorporate the continuation of usual medications (or equivalent), short-term use of sometimes much higher than average doses of additional opioid, and prescription of non-opioid and adjuvant drugs, aiming to improve pain relief and attenuate opioid tolerance and/or opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Discharge planning should commence at an early stage and may involve the use of a 'Reverse Pain Ladder' aiming to limit duration of additional opioid use. Legislative requirements may restrict which drugs can be prescribed at the time of hospital discharge. At all stages, there should be appropriate and regular consultation and liaison with the patient, other treating teams and specialist services. PMID:21970125

  10. Application of acute maximal exercise to protect orthostatic tolerance after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Crandall, C. G.; Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed at the conclusion of prolonged simulated microgravity would improve blood pressure stability during an orthostatic challenge. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cardiac output (Q), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and changes in leg volume were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope in seven subjects immediately prior to reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) under two experimental conditions: 1) after maximal supine cycle ergometry performed 24 h before returning to the upright posture (exercise) and 2) without exercise (control). After HDT, the reduction of LBNP tolerance time from pre-HDT levels was greater (P = 0.041) in the control condition (-2.0 +/- 0.2 min) compared with the exercise condition (-0.4 +/- 0.2 min). At presyncope after HDT, FVR and NE were higher (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with control, whereas MAP, HR, E, AVP, PRA, ANP, and leg volume were similar in both conditions. Plasma volume (PV) and carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were reduced after control HDT, but were restored by the exercise treatment. Maintenance of orthostatic tolerance by application of acute intense exercise after 16 days of simulated microgravity was associated with greater circulating levels of NE, vasoconstriction, Q, baroreflex sensitivity, and PV.

  11. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  12. Electroencephalography and analgesics.

    PubMed

    Malver, Lasse Paludan; Brokjaer, Anne; Staahl, Camilla; Graversen, Carina; Andresen, Trine; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    To assess centrally mediated analgesic mechanisms in clinical trials with pain patients, objective standardized methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) has many advantages. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of present findings in analgesics assessed with spontaneous EEG and evoked brain potentials (EPs) in humans. Furthermore, EEG methodologies will be discussed with respect to translation from animals to humans and future perspectives in predicting analgesic efficacy. We searched PubMed with MeSH terms 'analgesics', 'electroencephalography' and 'evoked potentials' for relevant articles. Combined with a search in their reference lists 15 articles on spontaneous EEG and 55 papers on EPs were identified. Overall, opioids produced increased activity in the delta band in the spontaneous EEG, but increases in higher frequency bands were also seen. The EP amplitudes decreased in the majority of studies. Anticonvulsants used as analgesics showed inconsistent results. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine showed an increase in the theta band in spontaneous EEG and decreases in EP amplitudes. Tricyclic antidepressants increased the activity in the delta, theta and beta bands in the spontaneous EEG while EPs were inconsistently affected. Weak analgesics were mainly investigated with EPs and a decrease in amplitudes was generally observed. This review reveals that both spontaneous EEG and EPs are widely used as biomarkers for analgesic drug effects. Methodological differences are common and a more uniform approach will further enhance the value of such biomarkers for drug development and prediction of treatment response in individual patients.

  13. Evaluating the therapeutic efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and acute tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsh, Zainab A.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Al-Muhayawi, Saad M.; ElAssouli, Sufian M.; Elfiky, Iman A.; Mourad, Samiha A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of an aqueous extract of Costus speciosus (C. speciosus) rhizome in pediatric and adult patients suffering from acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis as an alternative to antibiotics use. Methods: This pilot cohort trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014, among 15 patients with acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis who were administered nasal drops of aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome at a dose of 15-30 drops every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measure was the clinical improvement and remission rate within the first 5 days. Results: The administration of C. speciosus resulted in an improvement in acute symptoms in 60% of the patients treated within the first 24 hours, and remission rate of 93% by day 5, without any recorded adverse effects. Conclusion: This study revealed a significant efficacy of the aqueous extract of C. speciosus rhizome in acute pharyngitis and tonsillitis. PMID:26219454

  14. Building a Better Analgesic: Multifunctional Compounds that Address Injury-Induced Pathology to Enhance Analgesic Efficacy while Eliminating Unwanted Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, T. M.; Brookshire, S. W.; Skinner, D. P.; Hanlon, K. E.; Giuvelis, D.; Yamamoto, T.; Davis, P.; Campos, C. R.; Nair, P.; Deekonda, S.; Bilsky, E. J.; Porreca, F.; Hruby, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain. PMID:23860305

  15. Nonnarcotic analgesics and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gaziano, J Michael

    2006-05-01

    In 2004, individuals in the United States spent >$2.5 billion on over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and filled >100 million NSAID prescriptions. The most commonly used OTC analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, and nonaspirin NSAIDs. Nonnarcotic analgesics are generally considered safe when used as directed but do have the potential to increase blood pressure in patients with hypertension treated with antihypertensives. This is important because hypertension alone has been correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Small increases in blood pressure in patients with hypertension also have been shown to increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, when nonnarcotic analgesics are taken by patients with hypertension, there may be important implications. This review explores the potential connection among analgesic agents, blood pressure, and hypertension, and discusses possible mechanisms by which analgesics might cause increases in blood pressure. This is followed by a summary of data on the relation between analgesics and blood pressure from both observational and randomized trials.

  16. Efficacy and tolerability studies evaluating a sleep aid and analgesic combination of naproxen sodium and diphenhydramine in the dental impaction pain model in subjects with induced transient insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Laurora, I; Wang, Y; Venkataraman, P; An, R; Roth, T

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of novel combination naproxen sodium (NS) and diphenhydramine (DPH) in subjects with postoperative dental pain along with transient insomnia induced by 5 h sleep phase advance. The present studies aimed to demonstrate the added benefit and optimal dosages of the combination product over individual ingredients alone in improving sleep and pain. Methods Each of the two studies was a two-centre, randomised, double-blind and double-dummy trial. In the first study, subjects were randomised into one of the following treatment arms: NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 220 mg/DPH 50 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. In the second study, subjects received either NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg, NS 440 mg or DPH 50 mg. The co-primary end-points in both studies were wake time after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency (SL) measured by actigraphy. Other secondary sleep and pain end-points were also assessed. Results The intent-to-treat population included 712 and 267 subjects from studies one and two, respectively. In the first study, only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination showed significant improvements in both WASO vs. NS alone (−70.3 min p = 0.0002) and SL vs. DPH alone (25.50 and 41.50 min respectively, p < 0.0001). In the second study, the NS 440 mg/DPH 25 mg combination failed to show any significant improvements vs. either component alone. Conclusions Only the NS 440 mg/DPH 50 mg combination demonstrated improvement in both sleep latency vs. DPH 50 mg and sleep maintenance (WASO) vs. NS 440 mg. There were no serious or unexpected adverse events reported in either study. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01280591 (study 1); NCT01495858 (study 2) PMID:25996289

  17. Total body irradiation of donors can alter the course of tolerance and induce acute rejection in a spontaneous tolerance rat liver transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YeWei; Zhao, HeWei; Bo, Lin; Yang, YinXue; Lu, Xiang; Sun, JingFeng; Wen, JianFei; He, Xia; Yin, GuoWen

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is an established therapy for end-stage liver diseases. Graft rejection occurs unless the recipient receives immunosuppression after transplantation. This study aimed to explore the mechanism of acute rejection of liver allografts in rats pre-treated with total body irradiation to eliminate passenger lymphocytes and to define the role of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in the induction of immunotolerance in the recipient. Male Lewis rats were used as donors and male DA rats were recipients. Rats were randomly assigned to the following four groups: control group, homogeneity liver transplantation group, idio-immunotolerance group and acute rejection group. After transplantation, the survival time of each group, serum alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin levels, number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, expression of glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor on T cell subgroups, histopathology of the hepatic graft and spleen cytotoxic T lymphocyte lytic activity were measured. In the acute rejection group, where donors were preconditioned with total body irradiation before liver transplantation, all recipients died between day 17 and day 21. On day 14, serum alanine aminotransferase increased significantly to (459.2±76.9) U L(-1), total bilirubin increased to (124.1±33.7) μmol L(-1) (P<0.05) and the ratio of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells decreased significantly to 1.50%±0.50% (P<0.05) compared with the other groups. Analysis of the T cell subpopulations in the acute rejection group varied from the other groups. Histological analysis showed typical changes of acute rejection in the acute rejection group only. Preconditioning of the donors with total body irradiation eliminated passenger lymphocytes of the liver graft, and thus affected the course of tolerance and induced acute rejection after liver transplantation.

  18. Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Tomas A; Ekblom, Björn; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Larsen, Filip J

    2014-10-01

    The maximum power principle dictates that open biological systems tend to self-organize to a level of efficiency that allows maximal power production. Applying this principle to cellular energetics and whole-body physiology would suggest that for every metabolic challenge, an optimal efficiency exists that maximizes power production. On exposure to hypoxia, it would be favorable if metabolic efficiency would rapidly adjust so as to better preserve work performance. We tested this idea in humans by measuring metabolic efficiency and exercise tolerance under normoxic (Fio2=20.9%) and hypoxic (Fio2=16%) conditions, where Fio2 is fraction of inhaled oxygen. The results were compared with respirometric analyses of skeletal muscle mitochondria from the same individuals. We found that among healthy trained subjects (n=14) with a wide range of metabolic efficiency (ME), those with a high ME during normoxic exercise were able to better maintain exercise capacity (Wmax) in hypoxia. On hypoxic exposure, these subjects acutely decreased their efficiency from 19.2 to 17.4%, thereby likely shifting it closer to a degree of efficiency where maximal power production is achieved. In addition, mitochondria from these subjects had a lower intrinsic respiration compared to subjects that showed a large drop in Wmax in hypoxia An acute shift in efficiency was also demonstrated in isolated mitochondria exposed to physiological levels of hypoxia as P/O ratio increased from 0.9 to 1.3 with hypoxic exposure. These findings suggest the existence of a physiological adaptive response by which metabolic efficiency is dynamically optimized to maximize power production.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of new analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lötsch, Jörn; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Patient phenotypes in pharmacological pain treatment varies between individuals, which could be partly assigned to their genotypes regarding the targets of classical analgesics (OPRM1, PTGS2) or associated signalling pathways (KCNJ6). Translational and genetic research have identified new targets, for which new analgesics are being developed. This addresses voltage-gated sodium, calcium and potassium channels, for which SCN9A, CACNA1B, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, respectively, are primary gene candidates because they code for the subunits of the respective channels targeted by analgesics currently in clinical development. Mutations in voltage gated transient receptor potential (TRPV) channels are known from genetic pain research and may modulate the effects of analgesics under development targeting TRPV1 or TRPV3. To this add ligand-gated ion channels including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, ionotropic glutamate-gated receptors and ATP-gated purinergic P2X receptors with most important subunits coded by CHRNA4, GRIN2B and P2RX7. Among G protein coupled receptors, δ-opioid receptors (coded by OPRD1), cannabinoid receptors (CNR1 and CNR2), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5 coded by GRM5), bradykinin B1 (BDKRB1) and 5-HT1A (HTR1A) receptors are targeted by new analgesic substances. Finally, nerve growth factor (NGFB), its tyrosine kinase receptor (NTRK1) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) have become targets of interest. For most of these genes, functional variants have been associated with neuro-psychiatric disorders and not yet with analgesia. However, research on the genetic modulation of pain has already identified variants in these genes, relative to pain, which may facilitate the pharmacogenetic assessments of new analgesics. The increased number of candidate pharmacogenetic modulators of analgesic actions may open opportunities for the broader clinical implementation of genotyping information. PMID:20942817

  20. Analgesic Efficacy and Safety of DALDA Peptide Analog Delivery to the Brain using Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsion Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Lipa; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to develop and evaluate therapeutic efficacy and safety following systemic delivery of a peptide analgesic into the CNS using an oil-in-water nanoemulsion system. Methods We have formulated a safe and effective, omega-3 rich polyunsaturated fatty acid containing oil-in-water nanoemulsion formulation, for encapsulating and delivering chemically-modified DALDA, a potent mu-opioid peptide analogue, to the CNS. Another challenge with CNS delivery is the lack of a non-invasive bioanalytical technique to confirm CNS uptake and therapeutic efficacy. Using blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magenetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we provide quantitative evidence of nanoemulsion-based delivery and analgesic activity of DALDA analogue in capsaicin-induced awake rat model of pain. Results Nanoemulsion formulation effectively encapsulated the modified analgesic peptide and demonstrated efficacy in the capsaicin- pain induced functional magnetic resonance imaging model in rodents. Preliminary safety evaluations show that the nanoemulsion system was well tolerated and did not cause any acute negative effects. Conclusions Overall, these results show tremendous opportunity for the development of modified peptide analgesic-encapsulated nanoemulsion formulations for CNS delivery and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:24792826

  1. Effect of an Acute Bout of Kettlebell Exercise on Glucose Tolerance in Sedentary Men: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    GREENWALD, SAMANTHA; SEGER, EDWARD; NICHOLS, DAVID; RAY, ANDREW D.; RIDEOUT, TODD C.; GOSSELIN, LUC E.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance can have significant health consequences. The purposes of this preliminary study were to examine whether a single session of kettlebell exercise improves acute post-exercise glucose tolerance in sedentary individuals, and whether it was as effective as high-intensity interval running. Six sedentary male subjects underwent a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test following three different conditions: 1) control (no exercise); 2) kettlebell exercise (2 sets of 7 exercises, 15 repetitions per exercise with 30 seconds rest between each exercise); or 3) high-intensity interval running (10 one-minute intervals at a workload corresponding to 90% VO2max interspersed with one-minute active recovery periods). Blood glucose and insulin levels were measured before (0 minutes), and 60 and 120 minutes after glucose ingestion. Both kettlebell and high-intensity interval running exercise significantly lowered blood glucose 60 minutes after glucose ingestion compared with control. However, there was no significant difference in blood glucose between the two exercise conditions at any time point. In addition, there were no significant differences in insulin concentration between high intensity interval running, kettlebell, and control conditions at all time points. Results indicate that an acute bout of kettlebell exercise is as effective as high intensity interval running at improving glucose tolerance in sedentary young men. PMID:27766136

  2. Clinical analgesic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, G E; McAnally, J F; Winchester, J F

    1981-02-23

    Analgesic nephropathy is recognized worldwide, but the differences in incidence in various countries, or regions, remain unexplained. Analgesic compounds may cause both functional and structural renal damage. This damage may be related to depletion of glutathione and renal vasoconstriction (probably mediated through prostaglandin depletion) and to the fact that the concentrations of glutathione and prostaglandins and their metabolites in the kidneys are manyfold their concentrations in plasma. Most patients with analgesic nephropathy are middle-aged women with histories of peptic ulcer, anemia, psychiatric disorders, headaches, and arthralgias. Investigations often show pyuria, some bacteriuria, and impaired concentrating ability, as well as other abnormalities of tubular function; caliceal abnormalities on intravenous pyelography are also frequent. It is important to discover these patients; evidence exists that with cessation of drug ingestion, renal function may stabilize and, in some cases, may improve. PMID:7469625

  3. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  4. Acute and long-term safety and tolerability of risperidone in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Aman, Michael G; Arnold, L Eugene; McDougle, Christopher J; Vitiello, Benedetto; Scahill, Lawrence; Davies, Mark; McCracken, James T; Tierney, Elaine; Nash, Patricia L; Posey, David J; Chuang, Shirley; Martin, Andres; Shah, Bhavik; Gonzalez, Nilda M; Swiezy, Naomi B; Ritz, Louise; Koenig, Kathleen; McGough, James; Ghuman, Jaswinder K; Lindsay, Ronald L

    2005-12-01

    Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were monitored during an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of risperidone (0.5-3.5 mg/day) in 101 children and adolescents with a lifetime diagnosis of autistic disorder. In addition, 37 placebo nonresponders received open-label risperidone for another 8 weeks. Of all the risperidone responders (n=65), 63 entered an open extension of another 16 weeks (6 months total risperidone exposure), and 32 of them were rerandomized to either continued risperidone therapy (n=16) or gradual replacement with placebo (n=16) over 8 weeks. We collected the following measures of safety and tolerability: (1) laboratory blood assessments (CBC with differential, electrolytes, and liver function tests) and urinalyses, (2) vital signs, (3) Side Effects Review of AEs thought to be associated with risperidone, (4) sleep records, (5) Simpson Angus Neurological Rating Scale (SARS), (6) Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS), and (7) height and weight. No clinically significant changes were found on the lab tests. During the 8-week acute trial, the most common AEs on the Side Effects Review, scored as moderate or higher, were as follows (placebo and risperidone, respectively): Somnolence (12% and 37%), enuresis (29% and 33%), excessive appetite (10% and 33%), rhinitis (8% and 16%), difficulty waking (8% and 12%), and constipation (12% and 10%). "Difficulty falling asleep" and anxiety actually favored the risperidone condition at statistically significant levels. The same AEs tended to recur through 6 months of treatment, although often at reduced levels. Using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) standardized scores, both weight and body mass index (BMI) increased with risperidone during the acute trial (0.5 and 0.6 SDs, respectively, for risperidone; 0.0 and 0.1 SDs, respectively, for placebo) and into open-label extension (0.19 and 0.16 SDs, respectively), although the amount of gain decelerated with time. Extrapyramidal symptoms, as

  5. Central nervous system effects of meclizine and dimenhydrinate: evidence of acute tolerance to antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Manning, C; Scandale, L; Manning, E J; Gengo, F M

    1992-11-01

    Relative daytime drowsiness and performance impairment produced by meclizine and dimenhydrinate was assessed in 24 healthy male volunteers. Subjects received either dimenhydrinate, 100 mg, at 8:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 4:00 PM; meclizine, 50 mg, at 8:00 AM, with placebo at 12:00 PM and 4:00 PM; or placebo at all three times in this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Impairment of mental performance was assessed by choice reaction time testing and digit symbol substitution scores. Drowsiness was self-assessed on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and on a visual analog scale. Both antihistamines produced changes in digit symbol substitution, recognition time, and subjective assessments of sleepiness different from placebo. Expressed as change from baseline, the greatest reductions in digit symbol substitution scores after dimenhydrinate occurred 3 hours after the first dose (6.6 +/- 7) and were not different from the greatest measured change after meclizine (5.8 +/- 8), which occurred 9 hours after the dose was administered. Similar results were obtained with the other psychometric test scores. Self-rated sleepiness after dimenhydrinate was greatest 1 hour after the first dose, and was significantly greater than the largest degree of sleepiness after meclizine, which occurred at 7 hours after the dose. The effects of the first dose of dimenhydrinate on psychometric test scores were compared with the magnitude of the effects produced by subsequent doses. The magnitude of effect of the first dose of dimenhydrinate was significantly greater than the magnitude of effect produced by subsequent doses. The data suggest the possibility that acute tolerance to central nervous system impairment develops with multiple doses of dimenhydrinate. PMID:1474173

  6. A Comprehensive Comparison of the Efficacy and Tolerability of Racecadotril with Other Treatments of Acute Diarrhea in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Wolfgang; Andresen, Viola; Eberlin, Marion; Mueck, Tobias; Layer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril is a guideline-recommended treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea. A systematic review of randomized studies was performed comparing efficacy and safety of treatment with racecadotril to that with placebo or active treatments in adults. In five double-blind studies, racecadotril and placebo had comparable tolerability, but racecadotril was more effective. This was consistent across multiple efficacy parameters including duration of diarrhea, number of diarrheic stools, abdominal pain, and meteorism; it was also consistent across countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. In six randomized studies in outpatients comparing racecadotril to loperamide, resolution of symptoms occurred with similar speed and efficacy; however, racecadotril treatment was associated with less rebound constipation and less abdominal discomfort. The seventh comparative study performed in geriatric nursing home residents reported a superior efficacy of racecadotril. In direct comparison with Saccharomyces boulardii treatment, racecadotril exhibited similar tolerability but was more efficacious. One study compared racecadotril to octreotide in patients with acute diarrhea requiring hospitalization, rehydration, and antibiotic treatment; in this cohort, octreotide was more efficacious than racecadotril. In conclusion, in adults with acute diarrhea, racecadotril is more efficacious than placebo or S. boulardii, similarly efficacious as loperamide and, in patients with moderate to severe disease as add-on to antibiotics, less than octreotide. The tolerability of racecadotril is similar to that of placebo or S. boulardii and better than that of loperamide, particularly with regard to risk of rebound constipation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that racecadotril is a suitable treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea in adults. PMID:27790616

  7. The offset of morphine tolerance in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, B M; Ginsburg, M; Willis, J

    1975-03-01

    1. In rats and mice made tolerant to morphine by pretreatment with the drug, the shift to the right of the log dose/analgesic response line for in naive animals occurs without significant change in slope provided that sufficient time is allowed for elimination of pretreatment drug. 2. Responsiveness to the analgesic effects of morphine, given together with cycloheximide to prevent reinforcement of tolerance, was measured in rats (paw pressure method) and mice (hot plate method) at intervals during 1-23 days following cessation of a variety of regimens of tolerance-inducing drug treatments. 3. A biphasic pattern of recovery of responsiveness was observed, which was independent of the regimen or the drug (morphine, methadone or diamorphine) used to induce tolerance. Estimates of the rates of the first, fast phase are imprecise but the rate of the second phase of offset, from 4th day after cessation of pretreatment had, in rats, a mean half-time of 13.2 plus or minus 0.53 days-for all pretreatments combined, there being no significant differences between the various pretreatment regimens employed. In mice, similarly, a biphasic recovery of analgesic responsiveness was seen after morphine pretreatment, the mean half-time of the slower phase being 17.4 days. 4. Precipitation of an acute withdrawal syndrome in rats by naloxone HCl given 6 h after the final injection of a tolerance-inducing treatment with morphine did not affect the subsequent rate of recovery from tolerance. 5. During the period following a tolerance-inducing pretreatment with morphine in mice, the rate of attenuation of the naloxone-evoked jumping response was faster than the rate of offset of tolerance. PMID:1169082

  8. Three Newly Approved Analgesics: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Saraghi, Mana; Hersh, Elliot V.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, three new analgesic entities, tapentadol immediate release (Nucynta) diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules (Zipsor), and bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL) were granted US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to treat acute pain. Tapentadol immediate-release is a both a mu-opioid agonist and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules are a novel formulation of diclofenac potassium, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and its putative mechanism of action is through inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. This novel formulation of diclofenac allows for improved absorption at lower doses. Liposomal bupivacaine is a new formulation of bupivacaine intended for single-dose infiltration at the surgical site for postoperative analgesia. Bupivacaine is slowly released from this liposomal vehicle and can provide prolonged analgesia at the surgical site. By utilizing NSAIDs and local anesthetics to decrease the transmission of afferent pain signals, less opioid analgesics are needed to achieve analgesia. Since drug-related adverse events are frequently dose related, lower doses from different drug classes may be employed to reduce the incidence of adverse effects, while producing synergistic analgesia as part of a multimodal analgesic approach to acute pain. PMID:24423420

  9. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care.

  10. Acute cross-tolerance to opioids in heroin delta-opioid-responding Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Rady, J J; Fujimoto, J M

    2000-01-01

    It is generally thought that the mu receptor actions of metabolites, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM) and morphine, account for the pharmacological actions of heroin. However, upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration in Swiss Webster mice, heroin and 6MAM act on delta receptors while morphine acts on mu receptors. Swiss Webster mice made tolerant to subcutaneous (s.c.) morphine by morphine pellet were not cross-tolerant to s.c. heroin (at 20 min in the tail flick test). Now, opioids were given in combination, s.c. (6.5 h) and i.c.v. (3 h) preceding testing the challenging agonist i.c.v. (at 10 min in the tail flick test). The combination (s.c. + i.c.v.) morphine pretreatment induced tolerance to the mu action of morphine but no cross-tolerance to the delta action of heroin, 6MAM and DPDPE and explained why morphine pelleting did not produce cross-tolerance to s.c. heroin above. Heroin plus heroin produced tolerance to delta agonists but not to mu agonists. Surprisingly, all combinations of morphine with the delta agonists produced tolerance to morphine which now acted through delta receptors (inhibited by i.c.v. naltrindole), an unusual change in receptor selectivity for morphine.

  11. Acute hyperglycemia alters von Willebrand factor but not the fibrinolytic system in elderly subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Ludovico; Coppola, Antonino; Grassia, Antonio; Mastrolorenzo, Luigia; Lettieri, Biagio; De Lucia, Domenico; De Nanzio, Annarita; Gombos, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    To assess whether acute hyperglycemia affects fibrinolytic balance in elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 40 non-obese elderly subjects (20 NGT, age 68 +/- 8 years; and 20 IGT, age 69 +/- 11 years) were studied. On two experimental days, randomly allocated and spaced 1 week apart, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were measured in each subject at baseline (0) and 30, 60, 90, 120 min after the ingestion of 75 g glucose or a similarly sweet dose of aspartame (250 mg) (control test). In both NGT and IGT elderly subjects, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and fibrinogen plasma levels did not significantly change after both oral aspartame and glucose load. In IGT subjects, vWF plasmatic levels decreased after glucose (not aspartame) oral load, reaching the minimum level at 90 min after load (82.7 +/- 7.8 versus 93.7 +/- 10.2, P <0.01). These results demonstrate that acute hyperglycemia does not modify plasma fibrinolysis in elderly subjects. The decrease of plasma concentration of vWF in IGT elderly subjects requires cautious interpretation and further extensive investigations.

  12. Rational use of analgesic combinations.

    PubMed

    Phero, James C; Becker, Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Careful selection of an effective analgesic regimen based on the amount and type of pain the patient is expected to have can prevent the stress and anxiety associated with breakthrough pain. When analgesics fail, it is not unusual for patients to go to desperate lengths to seek relief. The clinician can and should develop a variety of effective, safe analgesic regimens based on estimates of anticipated pain intensity that apply sound pharmacologic principles.

  13. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Javier; de la Torre-Madrid, Elena; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Vicente-Sánchez, Ana; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than 2 weeks, and it also

  14. Analgesic profile of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from Marrubium vulgare.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M M; de Jesus, R A; Cechinel-Filho, V; Schlemper, V

    1998-04-01

    Marrubium vulgare L. is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to cure a variety of diseases. Recently we have demonstrated that a hydroalcoholic extract of this plant showed significant, nonspecific antispasmodic effects on isolated smooth muscle. In this report, we have investigated the possible analgesic effects of the same hydroalcoholic extract in different models of pain in mice. The results suggest that this extract exhibits significant analgesic activity, antagonizing chemically-induced acute pain. Such effects may be related to the presence of steroids and terpenes, which were detected by TLC analysis.

  15. Cyanine dyes as contrast agents for near-infrared imaging in vivo: acute tolerance, pharmacokinetics, and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Riefke, Björn; Sukowski, Uwe; Licha, Kai

    2011-06-01

    We compare pharmacokinetic, tolerance, and imaging properties of two near-IR contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and 1,1'-bis-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid diglucamide monosodium salt (SIDAG). ICG is a clinically approved imaging agent, and its derivative SIDAG is a more hydrophilic counterpart that has recently shown promising imaging properties in preclinical studies. The rather lipophilic ICG has a very short plasma half-life, thus limiting the time available to image body regions during its vascular circulation (e.g., the breast in optical mammography where scanning over several minutes is required). In order to change the physicochemical properties of the indotricarbocyanine dye backbone, several derivatives were synthesized with increasing hydrophilicity. The most hydrophilic dye SIDAG is selected for further biological characterization. The acute tolerance of SIDAG in mice is increased up to 60-fold compared to ICG. Contrary to ICG, the pharmacokinetic properties of SIDAG are shifted toward renal elimination, caused by the high hydrophilicity of the molecule. N-Nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-induced rat breast carcinomas are clearly demarcated, both immediately and 24 h after intravenous administration of SIDAG, whereas ICG shows a weak tumor contrast under the same conditions. Our findings demonstrate that SIDAG is a high potential contrast agent for optical imaging, which could increase the sensitivity for detection of inflamed regions and tumors.

  16. Acute Effects of Decaffeinated Coffee and the Major Coffee Components Chlorogenic Acid and Trigonelline on Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aimée E.; Olthof, Margreet R.; Meeuse, Joke C.; Seebus, Elin; Heine, Rob J.; van Dam, Rob M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Coffee consumption has been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a randomized crossover trial of the effects of 12 g decaffeinated coffee, 1 g chlorogenic acid, 500 mg trigonelline, and placebo (1 g mannitol) on glucose and insulin concentrations during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 15 overweight men. RESULTS Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline ingestion significantly reduced glucose (−0.7 mmol/l, P = 0.007, and −0.5 mmol/l, P = 0.024, respectively) and insulin (−73 pmol/l, P = 0.038, and −117 pmol/l, P = 0.007) concentrations 15 min following an OGTT compared with placebo. None of the treatments affected insulin or glucose area under the curve values during the OGTT compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline reduced early glucose and insulin responses during an OGTT. PMID:19324944

  17. Clinical Comparative Study: Efficacy and Tolerability of Tolperisone and Thiocolchicoside in Acute Low Back Pain and Spinal Muscle Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajeev; Panghate, Atul; Chandanwale, Ajay; Sardar, Indrajeet; Ghosh, Mriganka; Roy, Modan; Banerjee, Bireswar; Goswami, Ankur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design We performed a multicentric, randomized, comparative clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive 150 mg of Tolperisone thrice daily or 8 mg of Thiocolchicoside twice daily for 7 days. Purpose To assess the efficacy and tolerability of Tolperisone in comparison with Thiocolchicoside in the treatment of acute low back pain with spasm of spinal muscles. Overview of Literature No head on clinical trial of Tolperisone with Thiocolchicoside is available and so this study is done. Methods The assessment of muscle spasm was made by measuring the finger-to-floor distance (FFD), articular excursion in degrees on performing Lasegue's maneuver and modified Schober's test. Assessment of pain on movement and spontaneous pain (pain at rest) of the lumbar spine was made with the help of visual analogue scale score. Results The improvement in articular excursion on Lasegue's maneuver was significantly greater on day 3 (p = 0.017) and day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone as compared to Thiocolchicoside. The reduction in FFD score was greater on day 7 (p = 0.0001) with Tolperisone. However there was no significant difference in improvement in Schober's test score on day 3 (p = 0.664) and day 7 (p = 0.192). The improvement in pain score at rest and on movement was significantly greater with Tolperisone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Tolperisone is an effective and well tolerated option for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle spasm associated with pain. PMID:22708015

  18. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  19. Moderate ingestion of ethanol induces development of tolerance to the acute positive chronotropic effect of ethanol in the rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo-Carpentier, A.; Carpentier, R.G.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of moderate ingestion of ethanol (E) on the acute cardiac effects of E, carbachol (CBL), and isoproterenol (ISOP) was studied in rat litter-mates pair-fed a liquid diet for 24 weeks. The rats on E (E-R) received 14% of total caloric intake as E. The normal rats (N-%) received the same diet except for isocaloric substitution of carbohydrates for E. Sinoatrial (SA) preparations were superfused with Tyrode (36/sup 0/C) and intracellular microelectrodes were used to monitor (1) SA automatically, and (2) atrial action potentials (AAP). E 40-80 mg% increased SA rate in N-R, but in E-R this action was evident only with E 240 mg%. E ingestion did not modify the effects of CBL or ISOP on SA rate. E 240 mg% shortened the AAP in N-R and E-R. E ingestion did not modify the effects of CBL or ISOP on AAP. In summary: (a) Small doses of E enhance SA automaticity in vitro. (b) Moderate ingestion of E induces development of tolerance to the positive chronotropic effect of E without changing (1) the acute effects of CBL or ISOP on SA rate and AAP, or (2) the shortening effect of ETOH on AP.

  20. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dhirender; Kumar, Ajay; Kaushik, Pawan; Rana, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae) is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models. PMID:22761611

  1. Integrating metabolic performance, thermal tolerance, and plasticity enables for more accurate predictions on species vulnerability to acute and chronic effects of global warming.

    PubMed

    Magozzi, Sarah; Calosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Predicting species vulnerability to global warming requires a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of sublethal and lethal thermal tolerances. To date, however, most studies investigating species physiological responses to increasing temperature have focused on the underlying physiological traits of either acute or chronic tolerance in isolation. Here we propose an integrative, synthetic approach including the investigation of multiple physiological traits (metabolic performance and thermal tolerance), and their plasticity, to provide more accurate and balanced predictions on species and assemblage vulnerability to both acute and chronic effects of global warming. We applied this approach to more accurately elucidate relative species vulnerability to warming within an assemblage of six caridean prawns occurring in the same geographic, hence macroclimatic, region, but living in different thermal habitats. Prawns were exposed to four incubation temperatures (10, 15, 20 and 25 °C) for 7 days, their metabolic rates and upper thermal limits were measured, and plasticity was calculated according to the concept of Reaction Norms, as well as Q10 for metabolism. Compared to species occupying narrower/more stable thermal niches, species inhabiting broader/more variable thermal environments (including the invasive Palaemon macrodactylus) are likely to be less vulnerable to extreme acute thermal events as a result of their higher upper thermal limits. Nevertheless, they may be at greater risk from chronic exposure to warming due to the greater metabolic costs they incur. Indeed, a trade-off between acute and chronic tolerance was apparent in the assemblage investigated. However, the invasive species P. macrodactylus represents an exception to this pattern, showing elevated thermal limits and plasticity of these limits, as well as a high metabolic control. In general, integrating multiple proxies for species physiological acute and chronic responses to increasing

  2. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Corey, Ralph; Naderer, Odin J; O'Riordan, William D; Dumont, Etienne; Jones, Lori S; Kurtinecz, Milena; Zhu, John Z

    2014-11-01

    GSK1322322 represents a new class of antibiotics that targets an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation, peptide deformylase. This multicenter, randomized, phase IIa study compared the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 at 1,500 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with that of linezolid at 600 mg b.i.d. in patients suspected of having Gram-positive acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). The primary endpoint was assessment of the safety of GSK1322322, and a key secondary endpoint was the number of subjects with a ≥20% decrease in lesion area from the baseline at 48 and 72 h after treatment initiation. GSK1322322 administration was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events, most commonly, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Adverse events (86% versus 74%) and withdrawals (28% versus 11%) were more frequent in the GSK1322322-treated group. Treatment with GSK1322322 and linezolid was associated with ≥20% decreases from the baseline in the lesion area in 73% (36/49) and 92% (24/26) of the patients, respectively, at the 48-h assessment and in 96% (44/46) and 100% (25/25) of the patients, respectively, at the 72-h assessment. Reductions in exudate/pus, pain, and skin infection scores were comparable between the GSK1322322 and linezolid treatments. The clinical success rates within the intent-to-treat population and the per-protocol population that completed this study were 67 and 91%, respectively, in the GSK1322322-treated group and 89 and 100%, respectively, in the linezolid-treated group. These results will be used to guide dose selection in future studies with GSK1322322 to optimize its tolerability and efficacy in patients with ABSSSIs. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01209078 and at http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com [PDF113414].). PMID:25136015

  3. Effects of acute NH3 air pollution on N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichen species.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Maslaňáková, Ivana; Grassi, Alice; Bačkor, Martin; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Lichens are sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) in the environment. However, in order to use them as reliable indicators in biomonitoring studies, it is necessary to establish unequivocally the occurrence of certain symptoms following the exposure to NH3 in the environment. In this paper, we simulated an episode of acute air pollution due to the release of NH3. The biological effects of acute air pollution by atmospheric NH3 have been investigated using N-sensitive (Flavoparmelia caperata) and N-tolerant (Xanthoria parietina) species. Lichen samples were exposed to ecologically relevant NH3 concentrations for 8 weeks, simulating three areas of impact: a control area (2 μg/m(3)), an area of intermediate impact (2-35 μg/m(3)) and an area of high impact (10-315 μg/m(3)), with a peak of pollution reached between the fourth and fifth week. Ammonia affected both the photobiont and the mycobiont in F. caperata, while in X. parietina only the photosynthetic performance of the photobiont was altered after exposure to the highest concentration. In the photobiont of F. caperata we recorded chlorophyll degradation as indicated by OD435/415 ratio, decrease of the photosynthetic performance (as reflected by the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry FV/FM and the performance index PIABS); in the mycobiont, ergosterol reduction, membrane lipid peroxidation (as reflected by the increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), alteration (decrease) of the secondary metabolite usnic acid. No effects were detected on caperatic acid and dehydrogenase activity. In X. parietina, the only signal determined by NH3 was the alteration of FV/FM and the performance index PIABS. The results suggest that physiological parameters in N-sensitive lichens well reflect the effects of NH3 exposure and can be applied as early indicators in monitoring studies. PMID:26342688

  4. Effects of acute NH3 air pollution on N-sensitive and N-tolerant lichen species.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Maslaňáková, Ivana; Grassi, Alice; Bačkor, Martin; Loppi, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Lichens are sensitive to the presence of ammonia (NH3) in the environment. However, in order to use them as reliable indicators in biomonitoring studies, it is necessary to establish unequivocally the occurrence of certain symptoms following the exposure to NH3 in the environment. In this paper, we simulated an episode of acute air pollution due to the release of NH3. The biological effects of acute air pollution by atmospheric NH3 have been investigated using N-sensitive (Flavoparmelia caperata) and N-tolerant (Xanthoria parietina) species. Lichen samples were exposed to ecologically relevant NH3 concentrations for 8 weeks, simulating three areas of impact: a control area (2 μg/m(3)), an area of intermediate impact (2-35 μg/m(3)) and an area of high impact (10-315 μg/m(3)), with a peak of pollution reached between the fourth and fifth week. Ammonia affected both the photobiont and the mycobiont in F. caperata, while in X. parietina only the photosynthetic performance of the photobiont was altered after exposure to the highest concentration. In the photobiont of F. caperata we recorded chlorophyll degradation as indicated by OD435/415 ratio, decrease of the photosynthetic performance (as reflected by the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry FV/FM and the performance index PIABS); in the mycobiont, ergosterol reduction, membrane lipid peroxidation (as reflected by the increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), alteration (decrease) of the secondary metabolite usnic acid. No effects were detected on caperatic acid and dehydrogenase activity. In X. parietina, the only signal determined by NH3 was the alteration of FV/FM and the performance index PIABS. The results suggest that physiological parameters in N-sensitive lichens well reflect the effects of NH3 exposure and can be applied as early indicators in monitoring studies.

  5. Effect of Bacopasides on acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Khalid; Subhan, Fazal; Abbas, Muzaffar; Badshah, Amir; Ullah, Ihsan; Ullah, Sami

    2011-07-15

    Opioids are extensively used for the management of both chronic malignant and non malignant pains. One major serious limitation associated with chronic use of opioids is the development of tolerance to its analgesic effect. The effect of Bacopa monnieri, a renowned ayurvedic medicine for acquisition and expression of morphine tolerance in mice, was investigated. Bacopa monnieri, n-Butanol fraction was analyzed on High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), for Bacopaside A major components i.e. Bacoside A(3), Bacopaside ll and Bacosaponin C. Antinociceptive effect of n-Butanol extract of Bacopa monnieri (n Bt-ext BM) (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) was assessed on hot plate. Effect of different doses of n Bt-ext BM on morphine antinociception was also assessed. n Bt-ext BM was also screened for development of tolerance to antinociceptive effect of Bacopa monnieri by administering 15 mg/kg n Bt-ext BM for seven days. Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in mice by administering intraperitoneally (I.P.) 20 mg/kg morphine twice daily for five days. Acute and Chronic administration of 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg n Bt-ext BM significantly reduced both expression and development of tolerance to morphine analgesia in mice. Additionally, Bacopa monnieri was found to enhance antinociceptive effect of morphine in intolerant animals. However, no tolerance to Bacopa monnieri antinociceptive effect was observed in seven days treatment schedule. These findings indicate effectiveness of Bacopa monnieri for management of morphine tolerance.

  6. Evaluation of a novel topical essential oxygen oil for the treatment of pain in acute tendinopathy and sprains.

    PubMed

    Pappagallo, Marco; Leslie, John B; Raffa, Robert B; Kash, Peter; Fleischer, Charles; Sinclair, Nicholas; Labhestwar, Sumedha; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Tabor, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Topical analgesics may play an increasingly important role in managing acute and chronic pain as acetaminophen, NSAIDs, and opioid drugs come under heightened scrutiny. This article reviews studies about essential oxygen oil, a topical over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic new to the American market but available for many years in Europe. Prospective studies evaluating the oil's safety and efficacy in acute and chronic pain patients, a dermatological study in which healthy subjects served as their own controls, and a post-marketing surveillance study were considered. These studies found the novel essential oxygen oil to be safe and effective in a variety of acute and chronic pain syndromes as well as being well tolerated with few side effects. Its mechanism of action is not understood and further study is warranted. Essential oxygen oil is safe and effective for the treatment of pain associated with many common conditions, including tendinopathy, arthritis, sprains, and others.

  7. Acute hypoxia up-regulates HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels in Amazon hypoxia-tolerant Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Baptista, R B; Souza-Castro, N; Almeida-Val, V M F

    2016-10-01

    Amazon fish maintain oxygen uptake through a variety of strategies considered evolutionary and adaptive responses to the low water oxygen saturation, commonly found in Amazon waters. Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is among the most hypoxia-tolerant fish in Amazon, considering its intriguing anaerobic capacity and ability to depress oxidative metabolism. Previous studies in hypoxia-tolerant and non-tolerant fish have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) gene expression is positively regulated during low oxygen exposure, affecting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription and fish development or tolerance in different manners. However, whether similar isoforms exists in tolerant Amazon fish and whether they are affected similarly to others physiological responses to improve hypoxia tolerance remain unknown. Here we evaluate the hepatic HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels after 3 h of acute hypoxia exposure (0.5 mgO2/l) and 3 h of post-hypoxia recovery. Additionally, hematological parameters and oxidative enzyme activities of citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were analyzed in muscle and liver tissues. Overall, three sets of responses were detected: (1) as expected, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and blood glucose increased, improving oxygen carrying capacity and glycolysis potential; (2) oxidative enzymes from liver decreased, corroborating the tendency to a widespread metabolic suppression; and (3) HIF-1α and VEGF increased mRNA levels in liver, revealing their role in the oxygen homeostasis through, respectively, activation of target genes and vascularization. This is the first study to investigate a hypoxia-related transcription factor in a representative Amazon hypoxia-tolerant fish and suggests that HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA regulation have an important role in enhancing hypoxia tolerance in extreme tolerant species. PMID:26994906

  8. Acute hypoxia up-regulates HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels in Amazon hypoxia-tolerant Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Baptista, R B; Souza-Castro, N; Almeida-Val, V M F

    2016-10-01

    Amazon fish maintain oxygen uptake through a variety of strategies considered evolutionary and adaptive responses to the low water oxygen saturation, commonly found in Amazon waters. Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is among the most hypoxia-tolerant fish in Amazon, considering its intriguing anaerobic capacity and ability to depress oxidative metabolism. Previous studies in hypoxia-tolerant and non-tolerant fish have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) gene expression is positively regulated during low oxygen exposure, affecting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription and fish development or tolerance in different manners. However, whether similar isoforms exists in tolerant Amazon fish and whether they are affected similarly to others physiological responses to improve hypoxia tolerance remain unknown. Here we evaluate the hepatic HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels after 3 h of acute hypoxia exposure (0.5 mgO2/l) and 3 h of post-hypoxia recovery. Additionally, hematological parameters and oxidative enzyme activities of citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were analyzed in muscle and liver tissues. Overall, three sets of responses were detected: (1) as expected, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and blood glucose increased, improving oxygen carrying capacity and glycolysis potential; (2) oxidative enzymes from liver decreased, corroborating the tendency to a widespread metabolic suppression; and (3) HIF-1α and VEGF increased mRNA levels in liver, revealing their role in the oxygen homeostasis through, respectively, activation of target genes and vascularization. This is the first study to investigate a hypoxia-related transcription factor in a representative Amazon hypoxia-tolerant fish and suggests that HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA regulation have an important role in enhancing hypoxia tolerance in extreme tolerant species.

  9. CO2-O2 Interactions in Extension of Tolerance to Acute Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Gelfand, R.

    1996-01-01

    Advantageous and/or detrimental influences associated with purposeful deviations from atmospheric levels of O2 and CO2 are studied. Specific goals have been directed to simulating situations of emergency or accidental exposure to hypoxic (10% O2) environments. They included establishing dynamic effects of hypoxia with and without CO2 (rate of acute adaptation), and stable-state (equilibrium) effects on blood and brain oxygenation. They also included effects on the physiological parameters of respiration and blood gas composition which underlie brain oxygenation. For 10% O2, a complete experiment consisted of three identical rest-exercise phases of 32 minutes duration. Following a five minute air control period, each inspired gas was administered over the next 27 minutes. The test gases were room air control, 10% +/- 0.1% O2 with 4% +/- 0.1% CO2, and 10% +/- 0.1% O2. A minimum of 45 minutes separated each phase. Relative to inspiration of 10% O2, brain oxygenation is enhanced by addition of 4% CO2. This is accomplished by increasing the rate at which O2 in arterial blood is supplied to the brain circulation (well above even the normoxic level), and on relative improvement in the arterial pressure of O2.

  10. CO2-O2 interactions in extension of tolerance to acute hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    Objectives and results of experimental projects a re summarized. The scope of information desired included (1) physiological and performance consequences of exposures to simulated microgravity, in rest and graded physical activity, (2) separate influences of graded degrees of atmospheric hypercapnia and hypoxia, and (3) composite effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia. The research objectives were selected for close relevance to existing quantitative information concerning interactions of hypercapnia and hypoxia on respiratory and brain circulatory control. They include: (1) to determine influences of normoxic immersion on interrelations of pulmonary ventilation, arterial PCO2 and PO2, and brain blood flow, in rest and physical work; (2) to determine influence of normoxic immersion on respiratory reactivity to atmospheric hypercapnia at rest; (3) to determine influence of atmospheric hypoxia on respiratory reactivity to hypercapnia at rest and in work; and (4) to provide physiological baselines of data concerning adaptations in acute exposures to aid in investigation of rates of adaptation or deteriorations in physiological or performance capability during subsequent multi-day exposures. A list of publications related to the present grant period is included along with an appendix describing the Performance Measurement System (human perceptual, cognitive and psychomotor functions).

  11. Acute and chronic hypoxia: implications for cerebral function and exercise tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; Twomey, Rosie; Amann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To outline how hypoxia profoundly affects neuronal functionality and thus compromise exercise-performance. Methods Investigations using electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) detecting neuronal changes at rest and those studying fatiguing effects on whole-body exercise performance in acute (AH) and chronic hypoxia (CH) were evaluated. Results At rest during very early hypoxia (<1-h), slowing of cerebral neuronal activity is evident despite no change in corticospinal excitability. As time in hypoxia progresses (3-h), increased corticospinal excitability becomes evident; however, changes in neuronal activity are unknown. Prolonged exposure (3–5 d) causes a respiratory alkalosis which modulates Na+ channels, potentially explaining reduced neuronal excitability. Locomotor exercise in AH exacerbates the development of peripheral-fatigue; as the severity of hypoxia increases, mechanisms of peripheral-fatigue become less dominant and CNS hypoxia becomes the predominant factor. The greatest central-fatigue in AH occurs when SaO2 is ≤75%, a level that coincides with increasing impairments in neuronal activity. CH does not improve the level of peripheral-fatigue observed in AH; however, it attenuates the development of central-fatigue paralleling increases in cerebral O2 availability and corticospinal excitability. Conclusions The attenuated development of central-fatigue in CH might explain, the improvements in locomotor exercise-performance commonly observed after acclimatisation to high altitude. PMID:25593787

  12. Does acute lead (Pb) contamination influence membrane fatty acid composition and freeze tolerance in intertidal blue mussels in arctic Greenland?

    PubMed

    Thyrring, Jakob; Juhl, Bodil Klein; Holmstrup, Martin; Blicher, Martin E; Sejr, Mikael K

    2015-11-01

    In their natural habitats, organisms are exposed to multiple stressors. Heavy metal contamination stresses the cell membrane due to increased peroxidation of lipids. Likewise, sub-zero air temperatures potentially reduce membrane functionality in ectothermal animals. We tested if acute lead (Pb) exposure for 7 days would influence survival in intertidal blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) after exposure to realistic sub-zero air temperatures. A full factorial experiment with five tissue Pb concentrations between 0 and 3500 μg Pb/g and six sub-zero temperatures from 0 to -17 °C were used to test the hypothesis that sub-lethal effects of Pb may increase the lethality caused by freezing in blue mussels exposed to temperatures simulating Greenland winter conditions. We found a significant effect of temperature on mortality. However, the short-term exposure to Pb did not result in any effects of Pb, nor did we find interactions between Pb and temperature. We analysed the relative abundance of major phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the gill tissue, but we found no significant effect of Pb tissue concentration on PLFA composition. Results suggest that Pb accumulation has limited effects on freeze tolerance and does not induce membrane damage in terms of persistent lipid peroxidation.

  13. Estimation of maximum tolerated dose for long-term bioassays from acute lethal dose and structure by QSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gombar, V.K.; Enslein, K.; Hart, J.B.; Blake, B.W.; Borgstedt, H.H.

    1991-09-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been developed to estimate maximum tolerated doses (MTD) from structural features of chemicals and the corresponding oral acute lethal doses (LD50) as determined in male rats. The model is based on a set of 269 diverse chemicals which have been tested under the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) protocols. The rat oral LD50 value was the strongest predictor. Additionally, 22 structural descriptors comprising nine substructural MOLSTAC(c) keys, three molecular connectivity indices, and sigma charges on 10 molecular fragments were identified as endpoint predictors. The model explains 76% of the variance and is significant (F = 35.7) at p less than 0.0001 with a standard error of the estimate of 0.40 in the log (1/mol) units used in Hansch-type equations. Cross-validation showed that the difference between the average deleted residual square (0.179) and the model residual square (0.160) was not significant (t = 0.98).

  14. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  15. Renal and related cardiovascular effects of conventional and COX-2-specific NSAIDs and non-NSAID analgesics.

    PubMed

    Whelton, A

    2000-03-01

    On a daily basis it appears that as many as one in five adults in the United States may consume an analgesic compound either on a prescription basis or by over-the-counter (OTC) purchase. This high profile of intermittent or repetitive analgesic use appears to be relatively similar throughout the developed world. Although analgesics generally have a good renal safety profile, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) analgesics may produce mild renal side effects, such as the generation of peripheral edema in up to 5% of the general population. Other more serious renal and related cardiovascular side effects tend to be more apparent in lesser numbers of clinically "at risk" NSAID analgesic users. In contrast, non-NSAID analgesics, such as paracetamol or tramadol, have essentially no renal or related cardiovascular side effects when used at recommended dosing schedules. This review characterizes the renal syndromes associated with the use of NSAID analgesics, identifies the risks inherent in the use of these compounds in treated patients with hypertension and congestive heart failure, summarizes the early comparable data available for the new COX-2-specific inhibitors, and profiles the scant acute and long-term clinical concerns attendant with the use of non-NSAID nonnarcotic analgesics. It is important that healthcare providers and practitioners are aware of the relative renal risks of different analgesics and that they use this knowledge to counsel the analgesic-consuming population appropriately.

  16. Demonstration of the analgesic efficacy and dose-response of acetylsalicylic acid with pseudoephedrine.

    PubMed

    Schachtel, Bernard P; Voelker, Michael; Sanner, Kathleen M; Gagney, Diana; Bey, Mary; Schachtel, Emily J; Becka, Michael

    2010-12-01

    To determine acute analgesia by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) when combined with pseudoephedrine (PSE) in patients with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), we used the sore throat pain model to measure single-dose effects of ASA 500 mg/PSE 30 mg, ASA 1000 mg/PSE 60 mg, and acetaminophen (APAP) 1000 mg/PSE 60 mg (serving as a positive control). Under double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled conditions, 640 adult patients with confirmed acute pharyngitis and rhinosinusitis associated with URTI rated throat pain intensity and relief at intervals over 6 hours. Efficacy was demonstrated for both doses of ASA/PSE compared with placebo for all end points, including total pain relief and summed pain intensity differences, beginning at 20 minutes on both scales (all P < .05), and the efficacy of APAP/PSE compared with placebo was confirmed (P < .01). Greater differences in pain relief and intensity were also demonstrated between the higher and lower doses of ASA/PSE (P < .05), in particular, among 329 patients with severe pain, as well as between ASA 1000 mg/PSE 60 mg and APAP 1000 mg/PSE 60 mg (P < .05). No serious adverse events were reported. This study demonstrates that ASA is a well-tolerated and effective analgesic in 500- and 1000-mg doses when combined with pseudoephedrine.

  17. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  18. Blockade of tolerance to morphine analgesia by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-07-01

    Tolerance to morphine analgesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by s.c. implantation of a morphine base pellet (75 mg) on the first and second day and determining the magnitude of tolerance 72 h after the first implant by s.c. injection of a test dose of morphine (5 mg/kg). Implantation of a cocaine hydrochloride pellet (25 mg), concurrently with morphine pellets or of a cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellet after the development of tolerance, blocked both the development and expression of morphine analgesic tolerance. In morphine-pelleted animals pretreatment for 3 days with desipramine or zimelidine or phenoxybenzamine but not haloperidol produced no significant morphine tolerance. Pretreatment with a combination of desipramine and zimelidine, however, was as effective as cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance. Alpha-Methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester counteracted the effect of cocaine in blocking morphine tolerance and potentiated the tolerance development. Blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine was reinforced and facilitated by pretreatment with fenfluramine or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester and to a lesser extent by clonidine and haloperidol. Acute administration of fenfluramine or zimelidine or a combination of desipramine and zimelidine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester or p-chlorophenylalanine ethyl ester did not significantly affect morphine analgesia. The study suggests an important role of the concomitant depletion of both central noradrenaline and serotonin in the blockade of morphine tolerance by cocaine and stresses the importance of the counter-balancing functional relationship between these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. PMID:2780065

  19. III. Evidence for the nephrotoxicity of analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Gault, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Analgesic nephropathy in man is a definite but complex and probably multifactorial disorder, which largely follows long-term abuse of mixed analgesics. In North America the disorder has been almost entirely associated with heavy ingestion of the combination acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), phenacetin and caffeine. There is less clinical and experimental evidence for the nephrotoxicity of single analgesics; however, evidence for the nephrotoxicity of ASA alone is greater than that for phenacetin. In view of the evidence for nephrotoxicity of most mild analgesics, removal of phenacetin from the market would be unlikely to eliminate the problem of analgesic nephropathy. PMID:4638851

  20. A novel orvinol analog, BU08028, as a safe opioid analgesic without abuse liability in primates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huiping; Czoty, Paul W; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sukhtankar, Devki D; Nader, Michael A; Husbands, Stephen M; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2016-09-13

    Despite the critical need, no previous research has substantiated safe opioid analgesics without abuse liability in primates. Recent advances in medicinal chemistry have led to the development of ligands with mixed mu opioid peptide (MOP)/nociceptin-orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor agonist activity to achieve this objective. BU08028 is a novel orvinol analog that displays a similar binding profile to buprenorphine with improved affinity and efficacy at NOP receptors. The aim of this preclinical study was to establish the functional profile of BU08028 in monkeys using clinically used MOP receptor agonists for side-by-side comparisons in various well-honed behavioral and physiological assays. Systemic BU08028 (0.001-0.01 mg/kg) produced potent long-lasting (i.e., >24 h) antinociceptive and antiallodynic effects, which were blocked by MOP or NOP receptor antagonists. More importantly, the reinforcing strength of BU08028 was significantly lower than that of cocaine, remifentanil, or buprenorphine in monkeys responding under a progressive-ratio schedule of drug self-administration. Unlike MOP receptor agonists, BU08028 at antinociceptive doses and ∼10- to 30-fold higher doses did not cause respiratory depression or cardiovascular adverse events as measured by telemetry devices. After repeated administration, the monkeys developed acute physical dependence on morphine, as manifested by precipitated withdrawal signs, such as increased respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure. In contrast, monkeys did not show physical dependence on BU08028. These in vivo findings in primates not only document the efficacy and tolerability profile of bifunctional MOP/NOP receptor agonists, but also provide a means of translating such ligands into therapies as safe and potentially abuse-free opioid analgesics. PMID:27573832

  1. Experimental evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster mushroom Pleurotus florida

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Rai, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Edible mushrooms have been used as flavorful foods and as health nutritional supplements for several centuries. A number of bioactive molecules have been identified in numerous mushroom species Objective: To evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus florida using various experimental models in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity studies were performed whereby dose of 250 mg/ kg and 500 mg/kg was selected for present study, Analgesic activity was determined using hot plate method, tail flick method, acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced pain in rats, while carrageenan was used to induce inflammation and anti-inflammatory studies were performed. Results: HEE showed significant (P < 0.01) analgesic and anti-inflammatory response against all experimental models. Conclusion: These studies conclude that Pleurotus florida possesses analgesic and anti- inflammatory potential which might be due to presence of myochemicals like flavonoids, phenolics and polysaccharides. PMID:23543896

  2. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health.

  3. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments.

    PubMed

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, J M; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence.

  4. Adverse Selection? A Multi-Dimensional Profile of People Dispensed Opioid Analgesics for Persistent Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Kris D.; Kemp, Anna; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Blyth, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates utilisation patterns for prescription opioid analgesics in the Australian community and how these are associated with a framework of individual-level factors related to healthcare use. Methods Self-reported demographic and health information from participants in the 45 and Up Study cohort were linked to pharmaceutical claims from 2006–2009. Participants comprised 19,816 people with ≥1 opioid analgesic dispensing in the 12-months after recruitment to the cohort and 79,882 people not dispensed opioid analgesics. All participants were aged ≥45 years, were social security pharmaceutical beneficiaries, with no history of cancer. People dispensed opioid analgesics were classified as having acute (dispensing period <90 days), episodic (≥90 days and <3 ‘authority’ prescriptions for increased quantity supply) or long-term treatment (≥90 days and ≥3 authority prescriptions). Results Of participants dispensed opioid analgesic 52% received acute treatment, 25% episodic treatment and 23% long-term treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics long-term had an average of 14.9 opioid analgesic prescriptions/year from 2.0 doctors compared with 1.5 prescriptions from 1.1 doctors for people receiving acute treatment. People dispensed opioid analgesics reported more need-related factors such as poorer physical functioning and higher psychological distress. Long-term users were more likely to have access-related factors such as low-income and living outside major cities. After simultaneous adjustment, association with predisposing health factors and access diminished, but indicators of need such as osteoarthritis treatment, paracetamol use, and poor physical function were the strongest predictors for all opioid analgesic users. Conclusions People dispensed opioid analgesics were in poorer health, reported higher levels of distress and poorer functioning than people not receiving opioid analgesics. Varying dispensing profiles were

  5. Modeling nociception in zebrafish: a way forward for unbiased analgesic discovery.

    PubMed

    Curtright, Andrew; Rosser, Micaela; Goh, Shamii; Keown, Bailey; Wagner, Erinn; Sharifi, Jasmine; Raible, David W; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain conditions are often debilitating, inflicting severe physiological, emotional and economic costs and affect a large percentage of the global population. However, the development of therapeutic analgesic agents based primarily on targeted drug development has been largely ineffective. An alternative approach to analgesic development would be to develop low cost, high throughput, untargeted animal based behavioral screens that model complex nociceptive behaviors in which to screen for analgesic compounds. Here we describe the development of a behavioral based assay in zebrafish larvae that is effective in identifying small molecule compounds with analgesic properties. In a place aversion assay, which likely utilizes supraspinal neuronal circuitry, individually arrayed zebrafish larvae show temperature-dependent aversion to increasing and decreasing temperatures deviating from rearing temperature. Modeling thermal hyperalgesia, the addition of the noxious inflammatory compound and TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate sensitized heat aversion and reversed cool aversion leading larvae to avoid rearing temperature in favor of otherwise acutely aversive cooler temperatures. We show that small molecules with known analgesic properties are able to inhibit acute and/or sensitized temperature aversion.

  6. [Analgesic properties of morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative RU-1205].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Grechko, O Iu; Shtareva, D M; Anisimova, V A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the analgesic activity of a morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative (RU-1205) in comparison to butorphanol. It is established that the test compound exhibits a pronounced analgesic activity, which exceeded that ofbutorphanol six times in the hot-plate test and was comparable to the reference drug effect in the tail-flick and acetic acid-induced writhing tests. It is established that the analgesic action of RU-1205 is based on the kappa-opioidergic mechanism. PMID:24432563

  7. [Effect of complications in the acute period of myocardial infarction on physical exertion tolerance at the hospital stage of rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Al'khimovich, V M; Golubev, V G; Rudina, M D; Rusetskaia, V G

    1988-11-01

    Physical stress tolerance and its hemodynamic support were examined in 95 patients with early myocardial infarction, 50 normal subjects and 25 coronary patients. It is suggested that the stress tolerance test is advisable at an early stage of complicated macrofocal myocardial infarction. The safety of the test improves considerably where it is performed under continuous electrocardiographic and chest-rheographic control. An abnormal diastolic impedance wave, emerging during exercise, may serve an additional diagnostic indicator of stress intolerance.

  8. Next generation of everyday analgesics.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kay

    2002-01-01

    Pain is the leading symptom of most diseases. Humans have always tried to overcome pain using physical and chemical means, and it is believed that opioids and salicylates present in natural products have been used since prehistoric times. The development of the sciences, in particular chemistry and medicine, in the 19th century led to the discovery of the active ingredients of poppy and willow bark (morphine and salicylic acid). Shortly after, synthetic chemistry provided substitutes produced from coal tar (ie, acetaminophen, aspirin, phenazone, and pethidine). These represent the two main types of analgesics commonly used to treat mild and serious pain: the opioids (pethidine) and the antipyretic analgesics, which may be further divided into the aspirin-derived (acidic) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (eg, ibuprofen) and the phenazone and acetaminophen-like (nonacidic) antipyretic analgesics (which have little anti-inflammatory activity). Chemical modifications and broad-spectrum screening provided medicine with thousands of pharmacologic analogs that broadened the therapeutic spectrum but did not supplant the original compounds developed in the 19th and early 20th century. Recently, molecular biology and genomics have led to the development of new target-selective chemical entities for use in pain relief. These include selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, substance P, blockers or agonists of cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors, inhibitors of tetradotoxin-resistant Na channels, and many more. Most of these selective compounds did not succeed in everyday pain treatment. Some look promising, including the COX-2 selective inhibitors, but doubts remain about the superiority of these new compounds in everyday use. This is particularly the case with the generation of selective COX-2 inhibitors currently in clinical use.

  9. Options in topical therapies in the management of patients with acute pain.

    PubMed

    McCarberg, Bill; D'Arcy, Yvonne

    2013-07-01

    The traditional cornerstones of analgesic therapy for patients with acute pain have been oral therapies; however, all oral agents exhibit a variety of potentially dose-limiting or intolerable adverse effects in patients. Elderly patients and those with concomitant conditions already being managed with multiple systemic drugs may be particularly susceptible to systemic toxicities with oral analgesic therapies. Topical agents offer an alternative to oral modalities and can effectively treat patients with acute pain while offering lower systemic absorption and conferring little risk of systemic toxicity. The objective of this article is to review the therapeutic usefulness of available topical therapies in their most thoroughly investigated applications, the treatment of patients with acute musculoskeletal and herpetic pain. For example, although heating pads/wraps and cold packs are widely used to alleviate pain associated with sprains, strains, and contusions, evidence of the effectiveness of these methods is lacking. However, there are sufficient data supporting the use of various topical formulations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for these indications (ketoprofen gel or patch, ibuprofen gel or cream, and diclofenac gel or patch), and demonstrating markedly less patient risk of systemic toxicity than is associated with oral NSAID therapy. A ketoprofen patch was shown to be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with tendinopathies. In the treatment of acute neck or low back pain, cold and heat therapies have demonstrated limited effectiveness for patients, and the efficacy of topical NSAIDs has not been established. Use of topical NSAID therapy has been useful in reducing acute-phase herpes zoster pain, and the lidocaine 5% patch has been shown to reduce acute herpetic pain intensity once lesions have healed (the patch cannot be applied to open skin lesions). Topical analgesics represent an alternative treatment modality for

  10. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Sarmento-Neto, José Ferreira; do Nascimento, Lázaro Gomes; Felipe, Cícero Francisco Bezerra; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-12-23

    Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  11. Analgesic principle from Abutilon indicum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Amin, S; Islam, M; Takahashi, M; Okuyama, E; Hossain, C F

    2000-04-01

    Bioactivity guided isolation of Abutilon indicum yielded eugenol [4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol], which was found to possess significant analgesic activity. At doses of 10, 30, and 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol exhibited 21.30 (p < 0.05), 42.25 (p < 0.01) and 92.96% (p < 0.001) inhibition of acetic acid induced writhing in mice. At a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, eugenol showed 33.40% (p < 0.05) prolongation of tail flicking time determined by the radiant heat method. PMID:10798248

  12. Repeated Applications of Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation do not Lead to Tolerance in Patients Presenting with Acute Mechanical Neck Pain: A Secondary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-De-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Huijbregts, Peter; Palomeque-Del-Cerro, Luis; González-Iglesias, Javier

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients receiving mobilization techniques do not exhibit tolerance to repeated applications. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated for thoracic manipulation. Our aim was to determine if patients receiving thoracic thrust manipulation exhibit tolerance to repeated applications in acute mechanical neck pain. Forty-five patients were randomly assigned to two groups. The control group received electro- and thermotherapy for 5 sessions, and the experimental group received the same program and also received a thoracic thrust manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain and cervical mobility. Within-session change scores for pain and mobility during treatment sessions #1, 3, and 5 were examined with a one-way repeated measured ANOVA. A 2-way ANOVA with session as within-subject variable and group as between-subject variable was used to compare change scores for each visit between groups to ascertain if there were significant between-group differences in within-session changes for the experimental versus the control group. The ANOVA showed that for either group the 3 within-session change scores were not significantly different (P > 0.1). The 2-way ANOVA revealed significant differences between groups for both pain and neck mobility in within-session change scores (all, P < 0.001). Change scores in each session were superior in the experimental group as compared to those in the control group. The results suggest that patients receiving thoracic manipulation do not exhibit tolerance to repeated applications with regard to pain and mobility measures in acute mechanical neck pain. Further studies should investigate the dose-response relationship of thoracic thrust manipulation in this population. PMID:20046622

  13. Analgesics as Reinforcers with Chronic Pain: Evidence from Operant Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Eric E.; Martin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously preclinical pain research has focused on simple behavioral endpoints to assess the efficacy of analgesics in acute and chronic pain models, primarily reflexive withdrawal from an applied mechanical or thermal stimulus. However recent research has been aimed at investigating other behavioral states in the presence of pain, including spontaneous, non-elicited pain. One approach is to investigate the reinforcing effects of analgesics in animals with experimental pain, which should serve as reinforcers by virtue of their ability to alleviate the relevant subjective states induced by pain. The gold standard for assessing drug reinforcement is generally accepted to be drug self-administration, and this review highlights the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in animals with experimental neuropathic pain, and the extent to which this behavior is altered in chronic pain states. Additionally, intracranial self-stimulation is an operant procedure that has been used extensively to study drug reinforcement mechanisms and the manner in which neuropathic pain alters the ability of drugs to serve as reinforcers in this paradigm will also be discussed. Drug self-administration and intracranial self-stimulation have promise as tools to investigate behavioral effects of analgesics in animals with chronic pain, particularly regarding the mechanisms through which these drugs motivate consumption in a chronic pain state. PMID:23973302

  14. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum.

  15. siRNA capsulated brain-targeted nanoparticles specifically knock down OATP2B1 in mice: a mechanism for acute morphine tolerance suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zi-Zhao; Li, Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ming-Cheng; An, Sai; Jiang, Chen; Gu, Jing-Kai; Wang, Zai-Jie Jim; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Regulating main brain-uptake transporter of morphine may restrict its tolerance generation, then modify its antinociception. In this study, more than 2 fold higher intracellular uptake concentrations for morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were observed in stable expression cells, HEK293-hOATP2B1 than HEK293-MOCK. Specifically, the Km value of morphine to OATP2B1 (57.58 ± 8.90 μM) is 1.4-time more than that of M6G (80.31 ± 21.75 μM); Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of OATP2B1, can inhibit their intracellular accumulations with IC50 = 3.90 ± 0.50 μM for morphine and IC50 = 6.04 ± 0.86 μM for M6G, respectively. To further investigate the role of OATP2B1 in morphine brain transport and tolerance, the novel nanoparticles of DGL-PEG/dermorphin capsulated siRNA (OATP2B1) were applied to deliver siRNA into mouse brain. Along with OATP2B1 depressed, a main reduction was found for each of morphine or M6G in cerebrums or epencephalons of acute morphine tolerance mice. Furthermore, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) in mouse prefrontal cortex (mPFC) underwent dephosphorylation at Thr286. In conclusion, OATP2B1 downregulation in mouse brain can suppress tolerance via blocking morphine and M6G brain transport. These findings might help to improve the pharmacological effects of morphine. PMID:27629937

  16. siRNA capsulated brain-targeted nanoparticles specifically knock down OATP2B1 in mice: a mechanism for acute morphine tolerance suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zi-Zhao; Li, Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ming-Cheng; An, Sai; Jiang, Chen; Gu, Jing-Kai; Wang, Zai-Jie Jim; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-15

    Regulating main brain-uptake transporter of morphine may restrict its tolerance generation, then modify its antinociception. In this study, more than 2 fold higher intracellular uptake concentrations for morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were observed in stable expression cells, HEK293-hOATP2B1 than HEK293-MOCK. Specifically, the Km value of morphine to OATP2B1 (57.58 ± 8.90 μM) is 1.4-time more than that of M6G (80.31 ± 21.75 μM); Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of OATP2B1, can inhibit their intracellular accumulations with IC50 = 3.90 ± 0.50 μM for morphine and IC50 = 6.04 ± 0.86 μM for M6G, respectively. To further investigate the role of OATP2B1 in morphine brain transport and tolerance, the novel nanoparticles of DGL-PEG/dermorphin capsulated siRNA (OATP2B1) were applied to deliver siRNA into mouse brain. Along with OATP2B1 depressed, a main reduction was found for each of morphine or M6G in cerebrums or epencephalons of acute morphine tolerance mice. Furthermore, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) in mouse prefrontal cortex (mPFC) underwent dephosphorylation at Thr286. In conclusion, OATP2B1 downregulation in mouse brain can suppress tolerance via blocking morphine and M6G brain transport. These findings might help to improve the pharmacological effects of morphine.

  17. siRNA capsulated brain-targeted nanoparticles specifically knock down OATP2B1 in mice: a mechanism for acute morphine tolerance suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zi-Zhao; Li, Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ming-Cheng; An, Sai; Jiang, Chen; Gu, Jing-Kai; Wang, Zai-Jie Jim; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2016-01-01

    Regulating main brain-uptake transporter of morphine may restrict its tolerance generation, then modify its antinociception. In this study, more than 2 fold higher intracellular uptake concentrations for morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were observed in stable expression cells, HEK293-hOATP2B1 than HEK293-MOCK. Specifically, the Km value of morphine to OATP2B1 (57.58 ± 8.90 μM) is 1.4-time more than that of M6G (80.31 ± 21.75 μM); Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of OATP2B1, can inhibit their intracellular accumulations with IC50 = 3.90 ± 0.50 μM for morphine and IC50 = 6.04 ± 0.86 μM for M6G, respectively. To further investigate the role of OATP2B1 in morphine brain transport and tolerance, the novel nanoparticles of DGL-PEG/dermorphin capsulated siRNA (OATP2B1) were applied to deliver siRNA into mouse brain. Along with OATP2B1 depressed, a main reduction was found for each of morphine or M6G in cerebrums or epencephalons of acute morphine tolerance mice. Furthermore, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) in mouse prefrontal cortex (mPFC) underwent dephosphorylation at Thr286. In conclusion, OATP2B1 downregulation in mouse brain can suppress tolerance via blocking morphine and M6G brain transport. These findings might help to improve the pharmacological effects of morphine. PMID:27629937

  18. Pain: novel analgesics from traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Susan L

    2014-02-01

    The search for analgesics with fewer side effects and less abuse potential has had limited success. A recent study identifies an analgesic alkaloid compound from Corydalis yanhusuo, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb that has a surprising mechanism of action. PMID:24502784

  19. Safety issues of current analgesics: an update

    PubMed Central

    CAZACU, IRINA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Pain represents a complex experience which can be approached by various medicines. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics are the most common drugs used to manage different types of pain. The increased attention nowadays to pain management entailed concomitantly more frequent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to analgesic use. Drug-drug interactions can be sometimes responsible for the adverse effects. However, a significant proportion of analgesic ADRs are preventable, which would avoid patient suffering. In order to draw the attention to analgesics risks and to minimize the negative consequences related to their use, the present review comprises a synthesis of the most important safety issues described in the scientific literature. It highlights the potential risks of the most frequently used analgesic medicines: non-opioid (paracetamol, metamizole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and opioid analgesics. Even if there is a wide experience in their use, they continue to capture attention with safety concerns and with potential risks recently revealed. Acknowledging potential safety problems represents the first step for health professionals in assuring a safe and efficient analgesic treatment with minimum risks to patients. Taking into consideration all medical and environmental factors and carefully monitoring the patients are also essential in preventing and early detecting analgesic ADRs. PMID:26528060

  20. Analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic activities of the venom prepared from the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Forsskal, 1775)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxins derived from jellyfishes have been exploited as a model for the development of new drug promising applications to treat neurodegenerative diseases. The present work is aimed to evaluate the acute toxicity of crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca and then to screen the analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic (anti-BuChE) activities of the crude venom and its fractions. Methods Sephadex G75 gel was used to separate crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca, which led to some fractions. In addition, in vivo analgesic and in vitro plasma antibutyrylcholinestrasic activities were carried out with Pelagia crude venom and its fractions respectively. Results The crude venom and its fractions displayed analgesic and anti-BuChE activities at different doses without inducing acute toxicity. Fraction 2 possesses the highest analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic properties. The crude venom and fraction 1 had shown to possess less significant inhibitory activity against analgesic and antibutyrylcholinestrasic models. Conclusions Based on this study, the crude venom of Pelagia noctiluca is found to be a useful tool for probing pharmacological activity. The purification and the determination of chemical structures of compounds of active fractions of the venom are under investigation. PMID:22691546

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidine derivatives as potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

    PubMed

    El-Tombary, Alaa A; El-Hawash, Soad A M; Habib, Nargues S; Soliman, Raafat; El-Ashmawy, Ibrahim M; Shaaban, Omaima G

    2013-12-01

    A novel series of thienopyrimidine derivatives bearing various substituents or linked to various heterocyclic moieties through atoms spacers were prepared starting from 5-methyl-4-oxo-3,4-dihydrothieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6- carboxamide potassium salt 3. Twelve out of the prepared compounds were selected and evaluated for their antiinflammatory activity using the formalin-induced paw edema and the turpentine oil-induced granuloma pouch bioassays using diclofenac sodium as a reference standard. The ulcerogenic effects and acute toxicity (ALD50) values of these compounds were also determined. In addition, the analgesic activity of the same compounds was evaluated using the rat tail withdrawal technique. The results revealed that compounds 5a, 13, 14b, 15a, 16a and 16b had high anti-inflammatory effect comparable to diclofenac sodium, whereas compounds 5a, 14a, 15a and 16a revealed pronounced analgesic activity that is equal or higher than that of the reference. All of the tested compounds revealed high GI safety profile and were well tolerated by the experimental animals with high safety margin (ALD50 > 3.0g/Kg). PMID:23628080

  2. PREDICTING THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TOLUENE INHALED FOR 24 HRS IN RATS: DOSE METRICS, METABOLISM AND BEHAVIORAL TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose: Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) is improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration ( Br[ToI)] instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a...

  3. Comparison of Conorphone, A Mixed Agonist-Antagonist Analgesic, to Codeine for Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Wirdezk, Peggy R.; Butler, Donald P.; Fox, Philip C.

    1984-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of two doses of conorphone (20 and 40 mg), a mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic, were compared to two doses of codeine for postoperative pain in the oral surgery model. Each subject received 2 of the 4 possible treatment at two separate sessions in an incomplete block, single crossover design. Both doses of conorphone and the 60 mg dose of codeine were superior to 30 mg of codeine for the various indices of analgesic activity. The 40 mg dose of conorphone resulted in a high incidence of side effects (25/30 subjects) such as drowsiness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. The low dose of conorphone resulted in side effects similar to 60 mg of codeine with the exception of a greater incidence of drowsiness. These data suggest that while 40 mg of conorphone may not be well tolerated clinically, 20 mg of conorphone may be an alternative to 60 mg of codeine for postoperative pain. PMID:6597688

  4. Clinical pharmacology of analgesic drugs in cattle.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matthew L; Coetzee, Johann F

    2015-03-01

    Providing pain relief in cattle is challenging. In the absence of labeled drugs, the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act regulates the extralabel drug use of analgesics in cattle within the United States. Given the variety of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pain-relieving drugs, evidence needs to drive the development of analgesic protocols for cattle during pain-related events. This article reviews the commonly used analgesics investigated in cattle including local anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, α2-agonists, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, and gabapentin. These compounds are examined with respect to evidence of analgesia in cattle during pain states. PMID:25578387

  5. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO.

  6. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO. PMID:20645831

  7. Atorvastatin attenuates the antinociceptive tolerance of morphine via nitric oxide dependent pathway in male mice.

    PubMed

    Hassanipour, Mahsa; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Shirzadian, Armin; Rahimi, Nastaran; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi; Dehpour, Ahmadreza

    2016-07-01

    The development of morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance limits its therapeutic efficacy in pain management. Atorvastatin, or competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, is mainstay agent in hypercholesterolemia treatment. Beyond the cholesterol-lowering activity, exploration of neuroprotective properties of this statin indicates its potential benefit in central nervous disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of atorvastatin in development and expression of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance in male mice and probable involvement of nitric oxide. Chronic and acute treatment with atorvastatin 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, could alleviate morphine tolerance in development and expression phases. Chronic co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors including L-NAME (non selective NOS inhibitor; 2mg/kg), aminoguanidine (selective inducible NOS inhibitor; 50mg/kg) and 7-NI (selective neuronal NOS inhibitor; 15mg/kg) with atorvastatin blocked the protective effect of atorvastatin in tolerance reversal. Moreover, reversing the atorvastatin effect was also observed in acute simultaneous treatment of L-NAME (5mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg) with atorvastatin. Co-treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (chronic dose: 10mg/kg and acute dose: 20mg/kg) was associated with prevention of atorvastatin anti-tolerance properties. Our results revealed that the atorvastatin modulating role in morphine antinociceptive tolerance is mediated at least in part via nitric oxide in animal pain models of hot plate and tail flick. PMID:27381980

  8. Pharmacologic Characterization in the Rat of a Potent Analgesic Lacking Respiratory Depression, IBNtxA

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, Steven G.; Majumdar, Susruta; Narayan, Ankita; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John E.

    2014-01-01

    IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) is a potent analgesic in mice lacking many traditional opioid side effects. In mice, it displays no respiratory depression, does not produce physical dependence with chronic administration, and shows no cross-tolerance to morphine. It has limited effects on gastrointestinal transit and shows no reward behavior. Biochemical studies indicate its actions are mediated through a set of μ-opioid receptor clone MOR-1 splice variants associated with exon 11 that lack exon 1 and contain only six transmembrane domains. Like the mouse and human, rats express exon 11–associated splice variants that also contain only six transmembrane domains, raising the question of whether IBNtxA would have a similar pharmacologic profile in rats. When given systemically, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats, with an ED50 value of 0.89 mg/kg s.c., approximately 4-fold more potent than morphine. It shows no analgesic cross-tolerance in morphine-pelleted rats. IBNtxA displays no respiratory depression as measured by blood oxygen saturation. In contrast, oximetry shows that an equianalgesic dose of morphine lowers blood oxygen saturation values by 30%. IBNtxA binding is present in a number of brain regions, with the thalamus standing out with very high levels and the cerebellum with low levels. As in mice, IBNtxA is a potent analgesic in rats with a favorable pharmacologic profile and reduced side effects. PMID:24970924

  9. Association between KCNJ6 (GIRK2) Gene Polymorphisms and Postoperative Analgesic Requirements after Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Daisuke; Nagashima, Makoto; Katoh, Ryoji; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi; Kasai, Shinya; Ogai, Yasukazu; Han, Wenhua; Hasegawa, Junko; Shimoyama, Naohito; Sora, Ichiro; Hayashida, Masakazu; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2009-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. However, considerable individual differences have been widely observed in sensitivity to opioid analgesics. We focused on a G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel subunit, GIRK2, that is an important molecule in opioid transmission. In our initial polymorphism search, a total of nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the whole exon, 5′-flanking, and exon-intron boundary regions of the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2. Among them, G-1250A and A1032G were selected as representative SNPs for further association studies. In an association study of 129 subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery, the A/A genotype in the A1032G SNP and -1250G/1032A haplotype were significantly associated with increased postoperative analgesic requirements compared with other genotypes and haplotypes. The total dose (mean±SEM) of rescue analgesics converted to equivalent oral morphine doses was 20.45±9.27 mg, 10.84±2.24 mg, and 13.07±2.39 mg for the A/A, A/G, and G/G genotypes in the A1032G SNP, respectively. Additionally, KCNJ6 gene expression levels in the 1032A/A subjects were significantly decreased compared with the 1032A/G and 1032G/G subjects in a real-time quantitative PCR analysis using human brain tissues, suggesting that the 1032A/A subjects required more analgesics because of lower KCNJ6 gene expression levels and consequently insufficient analgesic effects. The results indicate that the A1032G SNP and G-1250A/A1032G haplotype could serve as markers that predict increased analgesic requirements. Our findings will provide valuable information for achieving satisfactory pain control and open new avenues for personalized pain treatment. PMID:19756153

  10. Patterns of analgesic adherence predict health care utilization among outpatients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Meghani, Salimah H; Knafl, George J

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies in chronic noncancer pain settings have found that opioid use increases health care utilization. Despite the key role of analgesics, specifically opioids, in the setting of cancer pain, there is no literature to our knowledge about the relationship between adherence to prescribed around-the-clock (ATC) analgesics and acute health care utilization (hospitalization) among patients with cancer pain. Purpose To identify adherence patterns over time for cancer patients taking ATC analgesics for pain, cluster these patterns into adherence types, combine the types into an adherence risk factor for hospitalization, identify other risk factors for hospitalization, and identify risk factors for inconsistent analgesic adherence. Materials and methods Data from a 3-month prospective observational study of patients diagnosed with solid tumors or multiple myeloma, having cancer-related pain, and having at least one prescription of oral ATC analgesics were collected. Adherence data were collected electronically using the medication event-monitoring system. Analyses were conducted using adaptive modeling methods based on heuristic search through alternative models controlled by likelihood cross-validation scores. Results Six adherence types were identified and combined into the risk factor for hospitalization of inconsistent versus consistent adherence over time. Twenty other individually significant risk factors for hospitalization were identified, but inconsistent analgesic adherence was the strongest of these predictors (ie, generating the largest likelihood cross-validation score). These risk factors were adaptively combined into a model for hospitalization based on six pairwise interaction risk factors with exceptional discrimination (ie, area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.91). Patients had from zero to five of these risk factors, with an odds ratio of 5.44 (95% confidence interval 3.09–9.58) for hospitalization, with a unit

  11. Prescription Analgesic Use Among Young Adults: Adherence to Physician Instructions and Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Arria, Amelia M.; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To understand the extent to which medication adherence was related to diversion of prescription analgesics. Design Cross-sectional analyses of data from the College Life Study, a prospective study of young adults. Setting Participants were originally sampled as incoming first-time first-year college students from one large public university in the mid-Atlantic U.S. Participants 192 young adults aged 21 to 26 who were prescribed an analgesic to treat acute pain in the past year. Outcome Measure Diversion of prescription analgesics. The study tested two competing hypotheses: 1) individuals who skip doses (Under-Users) are at greatest risk for diversion because they have leftover medication; and 2) individuals who over-use their prescriptions (Over-Users) are at greatest risk for diversion, perhaps because of a general propensity to engage in deviant behavior. Results 58% followed physician’s instructions regarding their prescription analgesic medication;27% under-used and 16% over-used their prescribed medication. Twenty-seven percent of the total sample diverted their medication, with Over-Users being the most likely to divert (63%). Holding constant demographic characteristics and perceived harmfulness of nonmedical use, Over-Users were almost five times as likely as Adherent Users to divert analgesic medications (P<.05). Conclusions Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between adherence and diversion. If these findings are replicated, physicians who are involved in pain management for acute conditions among young adults should take steps to monitor adherence and reduce diversion of prescription analgesics. PMID:21539698

  12. Evaluation of the analgesic properties of zomepirac.

    PubMed

    Pruss, T P; Gardocki, J F; Taylor, R J; Muschek, L D

    1980-04-01

    Zomepirac, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, was evaluated for analgesic activity in a number of pharmacological screens. In the acetylcholine writhing test, zomepirac was found to be more potent than codeine, pentazocine, aspirin, and acetaminophen and equivalent in potency to morphine. Zomepirac was inactive in a number of tests that detect narcotic agents, suggesting that the drug will not induce physical dependence. The possibility of a central nonnarcotic as well as a peripheral analgesic mechanism merits consideration.

  13. Analgesic principles from Aralia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, E; Nishimura, S; Yamazaki, M

    1991-02-01

    The analgesic principles from Aralia cordata Thunb, were identified with (ent)-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA) and (ent)-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (PA), respectively. Both compounds were significantly effective regarding analgesics, hypothermia, duration of pentobarbital-induced anesthesia, and depression of locomotor activity enhanced by methamphetamine at doses of 300 mg/kg (KA) and 500 mg/kg (PA) by oral administration.

  14. Hope against the cold: individual differences in trait hope and acute pain tolerance on the cold pressor task.

    PubMed

    Snyder, C R; Berg, Carla; Woodward, Julia T; Gum, Amber; Rand, Kevin L; Wrobleski, Kristin K; Brown, Jill; Hackman, Ashley

    2005-04-01

    Hope theory (see Snyder, 1994) is presented as a useful framework for understanding reactions to pain. In Study 1, persons scoring higher on the trait Hope Scale (Snyder, Harris et al., 1991) kept their hands in the freezing water (of a cold pressor task) for significantly longer. In Study 2, the higher-hope males, and not females, as measured by both trait and state hope (Snyder, Sympson et al., 1996), recognized the onset of the pain threshold significantly later. Moreover, in Study 2, results showed that individual differences measures of optimism, self-efficacy, depression, and positive and negative affects did not relate to the pain onset and tolerance variables. The implications of hope as related to the pain process and related research are discussed.

  15. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  16. Tolerability and Clinical Activity of Post-Transplantation Azacitidine in Patients Allografted for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated on the RICAZA Trial.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Charles; Jilani, Nadira; Siddique, Shamyla; Yap, Christina; Khan, Josephine; Nagra, Sandeep; Ward, Janice; Ferguson, Paul; Hazlewood, Peter; Buka, Richard; Vyas, Paresh; Goodyear, Oliver; Tholouli, Eleni; Crawley, Charles; Russell, Nigel; Byrne, Jenny; Malladi, Ram; Snowden, John; Dennis, Mike

    2016-02-01

    Disease relapse is the major causes of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). As well as demonstrating significant clinical activity in AML, azacitidine (AZA) upregulates putative tumor antigens, inducing a CD8(+) T cell response with the potential to augment a graft-versus-leukemia effect. We, therefore, studied the feasibility and clinical sequelae of the administration of AZA during the first year after transplantation in 51 patients with AML undergoing allogeneic SCT. Fourteen patients did not commence AZA either because of transplantation complications or withdrawal of consent. Thirty-seven patients commenced AZA at a median of 54 days (range, 40 to 194 days) after transplantation, which was well tolerated in the majority of patients. Thirty-one patients completed 3 or more cycles of AZA. Sixteen patients relapsed at a median time of 8 months after transplantation. No patient developed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. The induction of a post-transplantation CD8(+) T cell response to 1 or more tumor-specific peptides was studied in 28 patients. Induction of a CD8(+) T cell response was associated with a reduced risk of disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR], .30; 95% confidence interval [CI], .10 to .85; P = .02) and improved relapse-free survival (HR, .29; 95% CI, .10 to .83; P = .02) taking into account death as a competing risk. In conclusion, AZA is well tolerated after transplantation and appears to have the capacity to reduce the relapse risk in patients who demonstrate a CD8(+) T cell response to tumor antigens. These observations require confirmation in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26363443

  17. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  18. Allopregnanolone Preclinical Acute Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies to Predict Tolerability and Efficacy for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Rodgers, Kathleen E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Rogawski, Michael A.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer’s disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal), intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios) at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) and maximally tolerated doses (MTD) in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg/kg. The

  19. Antioedematous and Analgesic Properties of Fertile Fronds of Drynaria quercifolia

    PubMed Central

    Anuja, G. I.; Latha, P. G.; Shine, V. J.; Suja, S. R.; Shikha, P.; Satheesh Kumar, K.; Rajasekharan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissue cells to harmful stimuli including trauma, tissue necrosis, and infections which plays a key role in the pathophysiology of many deadly diseases. In ethnomedicine Drynaria quercifolia fronds are used to treat inflammation as poultice on swellings and as antibacterial, hepatoprotective, and antipyretic agent. Herein, we have evaluated the antioedematous, antiproliferative, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic extract of fertile fronds of D. quercifolia (FF) by standard procedures. Oral administration of FF produced significant inhibition of carrageenan and histamine induced paw oedema in Wistar rats. FF significantly reduced both wet weight and dry weight of granuloma tissue which shows the inhibitory effect on exudative and proliferative phases of inflammation. FF significantly attenuated acute and delayed phases of formalin induced pain, acetic acid-induced writhing, capsaicin-induced nociception, and hot plate test in mice. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of coumarins, flavonoids, glycosides, phenolics, saponins, steroids, tannins, and terpenoids. Total phenolic content was 186 mg/g equivalent of gallic acid. The HPLC estimation showed flavanone glycoside naringin (1.2%) and its aglycone naringenin (0.02%). The presence of potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic principles in FF and their synergistic action may be the reason for the proposed therapeutic effects. PMID:24575313

  20. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  1. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  2. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question “which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?”. Materials and Methods A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Results Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 – 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study. PMID:26053953

  3. Splenic CD11c(low)CD45RB(high) dendritic cells derived from endotoxin-tolerant mice attenuate experimental acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai-Nan; Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Dong, Jin-Zhong; Shi, Chun-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sheng-Guo; Tang, Xin-Yue; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is suggested to attenuate the severity of acute liver failure (ALF) in mice, possibly through both innate and adaptive immunity. However, the involvement of regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) in ET has not been fully elucidated. In this study, their effect on ALF in mice was investigated. Splenic DCregs from ET-exposed mice (ET-DCregs) showed lower expression levels of CD40, CD80, and MHC-II markers and stronger inhibition of allogenic T cells and regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 secretion than splenic DCregs from normal mice (nDCregs). Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and P65 in splenic ET-DCregs were significantly lower than those in the splenic nDCregs. The survival rate was significantly increased and liver injury was mitigated in mice with ALF treated with splenic ET-DCregs. In addition, A20 expression was decreased in the liver of ALF mice, but elevated after infusion of splenic nDCregs and ET-DCregs, and a much higher elevation was observed after infusing the latter cells. The functionality of splenic DCregs was altered after ET exposure, contributing to protection of the livers against D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. PMID:27625297

  4. Splenic CD11clowCD45RBhigh dendritic cells derived from endotoxin-tolerant mice attenuate experimental acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sai-Nan; Yang, Nai-Bin; Ni, Shun-Lan; Dong, Jin-Zhong; Shi, Chun-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Sheng-Guo; Tang, Xin-Yue; Lu, Ming-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is suggested to attenuate the severity of acute liver failure (ALF) in mice, possibly through both innate and adaptive immunity. However, the involvement of regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) in ET has not been fully elucidated. In this study, their effect on ALF in mice was investigated. Splenic DCregs from ET-exposed mice (ET-DCregs) showed lower expression levels of CD40, CD80, and MHC-II markers and stronger inhibition of allogenic T cells and regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 secretion than splenic DCregs from normal mice (nDCregs). Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and P65 in splenic ET-DCregs were significantly lower than those in the splenic nDCregs. The survival rate was significantly increased and liver injury was mitigated in mice with ALF treated with splenic ET-DCregs. In addition, A20 expression was decreased in the liver of ALF mice, but elevated after infusion of splenic nDCregs and ET-DCregs, and a much higher elevation was observed after infusing the latter cells. The functionality of splenic DCregs was altered after ET exposure, contributing to protection of the livers against D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. PMID:27625297

  5. Analgesics, sedatives, anticonvulsant drugs, and the cooled brain.

    PubMed

    Wassink, Guido; Lear, Christopher A; Gunn, Katherine C; Dean, Justin M; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-04-01

    Multiple randomized controlled trials have shown that prolonged, moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated within a few hours after severe hypoxia-ischemia and continued until resolution of the acute phase of delayed cell death reduces mortality and improves neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants. The challenge is now to find ways to further improve outcomes. In the present review, we critically examine the evidence that conventional analgesic, sedative, or anticonvulsant agents might improve outcomes, in relation to the known window of opportunity for effective protection with hypothermia. This review strongly indicates that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of these agents during therapeutic hypothermia. Further systematic research into the effects of pain and stress on the injured brain, and their treatment during hypothermia, is essential to guide the rational development of clinical treatment protocols. PMID:25457080

  6. Heat-tolerant versus heat-sensitive Bos taurus cattle: influence of air temperature and breed on the acute phase response to a provocative immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J A; Burdick Sanchez, N C; Chaffin, R; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Spiers, D E

    2013-10-01

    The difference in the acute phase response of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive Bos taurus breed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge when housed at different air temperatures (Ta) was studied. Angus (ANG; heat-sensitive; n = 11; 306 ± 26 kg BW) and Romosinuano (RO; heat-tolerant; n = 10; 313 ± 32 kg BW) heifers were transported from the USDA Agricultural Research Service SubTropical Agricultural Research Station in Florida to the Brody Environmental Chambers at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Heifers were housed in stanchions in 4 temperature-controlled environmental chambers. Initially, Ta in the 4 chambers was cycling at thermoneutrality (TN; 18.5°C-23.5°C) for a 1-wk adjustment period, followed by an increase in 2 of the 4 chambers to cycling heat stress (HS; 24°C-38°C) for 2 wk. On day 19, heifers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording devices. On day 20, heifers were challenged with LPS (0.5 μg/kg BW; 0 h), sickness behavior scores (SBSs) were recorded, and blood samples were collected at 0.5-h intervals from -2 to 8 h and again at 24 h relative to LPS challenge at 0 h. Serum was isolated and stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol and cytokine concentrations. A breed by Ta interaction (P < 0.001) was observed for RT such that the post-LPS average RT in RO heifers housed at TN was lower than the RT of all other treatment groups (P < 0.001), whereas ANG heifers housed at HS had greater post-LPS average RT than all other treatment groups (P < 0.001). In response to LPS, HS increased SBS after LPS in RO heifers compared to RO heifers housed at TN (P < 0.001), whereas HS decreased SBS after LPS in ANG heifers compared to ANG heifers housed at TN (P = 0.014). The cortisol response to LPS was greater in TN than in HS heifers (P < 0.01) and was also greater in RO than in ANG heifers (P = 0.03). A breed by Ta interaction (P < 0.01) was observed for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentration such that HS

  7. Fentanyl Iontophoretic Transdermal System: A Review in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-04-01

    Fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS) [Ionsys(®)] is indicated for the management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital setting. This article reviews the clinical use of fentanyl ITS for postoperative pain management, and summarizes the pharmacology of fentanyl and the characteristics of the two-component fentanyl ITS (Ionsys(®)) device. In well-designed, multicentre clinical trials, fentanyl ITS was an effective and generally well tolerated method for managing acute postoperative pain in inpatients who had undergone major abdominal, thoracic or orthopaedic surgery. Overall, fentanyl ITS provided equivalent analgesic efficacy to that with morphine patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA), but was perceived to be more convenient/easier to use than morphine PCIA by patients, nurses and physical therapists. Patients receiving fentanyl ITS also had a greater ability to mobilize after surgery than patients receiving morphine PCIA. In addition, relative to morphine PCIA, fentanyl ITS offers advantages in terms of the noninvasive administrative route (i.e. transdermal needle-free administration), pre-programmed delivery (no risk of programming errors/incorrect dosing) and improved tolerability with regard to the overall incidence of opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs) and some individual ORAEs. Hence, fentanyl ITS is a useful option for the management of acute postoperative pain in adults requiring opioid analgesia in the hospital setting.

  8. Analgesic activity of Calotropis gigantea flower.

    PubMed

    Pathak, A K; Argal, A

    2007-01-01

    The alcoholic extract of the flowers of Calotropis gigantea was administered orally and explored for its analgesic activity in chemical and thermal models in mice. In acetic acid induced writhing test, an inhibition of 20.97% and 43.0% in the number of writhes was observed at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In the hot plate method the paw licking time was delayed. The analgesic effect was observed after 30 min of dose administration which reached its maximum after 90 min.

  9. [A comparative study of the effectiveness of the analgesic effect of electropuncture stimulation and nonnarcotic analgesics in therapy patients in an emergency dental care office].

    PubMed

    Moroz, B T; Kalinin, V I; Emel'ianova, M V; Rozin, I Ia; Trebich, I Ia

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of patients' subjective sensations, of rheography and electro-odontometry data has lead the authors to a conclusion that the analgesic effect of rengasil was higher than that of ibuprofen and that rengasil combination with electropuncture was still more effective. The analgesic effect was the most marked in alveolitis and periodontitis, less so in inflammations of the pulp, and no effect could be achieved in acute purulent pulpitis. The authors suppose that pain syndrome alleviation after electropuncture stimulation and after administration of anti-inflammatory drugs is explained mainly by changed hemodynamics at the site of inflammation, this resulting in reduction of the edema and in diminished effects of biochemical substances released in the course of inflammation.

  10. Noninterventional study of transdermal fentanyl (fentavera) matrix patches in chronic pain patients: analgesic and quality of life effects.

    PubMed

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P < 0.0001) decreases in patients' ratings of pain intensity, and impairment of walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  11. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds. PMID:26713106

  12. Cross Acclimation between Heat and Hypoxia: Heat Acclimation Improves Cellular Tolerance and Exercise Performance in Acute Normobaric Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ben J.; Miller, Amanda; James, Rob S.; Thake, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The potential for cross acclimation between environmental stressors is not well understood. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of fixed-workload heat or hypoxic acclimation on cellular, physiological, and performance responses during post acclimation hypoxic exercise in humans. Method: Twenty-one males (age 22 ± 5 years; stature 1.76 ± 0.07 m; mass 71.8 ± 7.9 kg; V˙O2 peak 51 ± 7 mL.kg−1.min−1) completed a cycling hypoxic stress test (HST) and self-paced 16.1 km time trial (TT) before (HST1, TT1), and after (HST2, TT2) a series of 10 daily 60 min training sessions (50% N V˙O2 peak) in control (CON, n = 7; 18°C, 35% RH), hypoxic (HYP, n = 7; fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.14, 18°C, 35% RH), or hot (HOT, n = 7; 40°C, 25% RH) conditions. Results: TT performance in hypoxia was improved following both acclimation treatments, HYP (−3:16 ± 3:10 min:s; p = 0.0006) and HOT (−2:02 ± 1:02 min:s; p = 0.005), but unchanged after CON (+0:31 ± 1:42 min:s). Resting monocyte heat shock protein 72 (mHSP72) increased prior to HST2 in HOT (62 ± 46%) and HYP (58 ± 52%), but was unchanged after CON (9 ± 46%), leading to an attenuated mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise in HOT and HYP HST2 compared to HST1 (p < 0.01). Changes in extracellular hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α followed a similar pattern to those of mHSP72. Physiological strain index (PSI) was attenuated in HOT (HST1 = 4.12 ± 0.58, HST2 = 3.60 ± 0.42; p = 0.007) as a result of a reduced HR (HST1 = 140 ± 14 b.min−1; HST2 131 ± 9 b.min−1 p = 0.0006) and Trectal (HST1 = 37.55 ± 0.18°C; HST2 37.45 ± 0.14°C; p = 0.018) during exercise. Whereas PSI did not change in HYP (HST1 = 4.82 ± 0.64, HST2 4.83 ± 0.63). Conclusion: Heat acclimation improved cellular and systemic physiological tolerance to steady state exercise in moderate hypoxia. Additionally we show, for the first time, that heat acclimation improved cycling time trial performance to a magnitude

  13. Synthesis of conolidine, a potent non-opioid analgesic for tonic and persistent pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarselli, Michael A.; Raehal, Kirsten M.; Brasher, Alex K.; Streicher, John M.; Groer, Chad E.; Cameron, Michael D.; Bohn, Laura M.; Micalizio, Glenn C.

    2011-06-01

    Management of chronic pain continues to represent an area of great unmet biomedical need. Although opioid analgesics are typically embraced as the mainstay of pharmaceutical interventions in this area, they suffer from substantial liabilities that include addiction and tolerance, as well as depression of breathing, nausea and chronic constipation. Because of their suboptimal therapeutic profile, the search for non-opioid analgesics to replace these well-established therapeutics is an important pursuit. Conolidine is a rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product recently isolated from the stem bark of Tabernaemontana divaricata (a tropical flowering plant used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic and Thai medicine). Although structurally related alkaloids have been described as opioid analgesics, no therapeutically relevant properties of conolidine have previously been reported. Here, we describe the first de novo synthetic pathway to this exceptionally rare C5-nor stemmadenine natural product, the first asymmetric synthesis of any member of this natural product class, and the discovery that (±)-, (+)- and (-)-conolidine are potent and efficacious non-opioid analgesics in an in vivo model of tonic and persistent pain.

  14. Activation of P2X7 receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray of rats facilitates morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhi; Li, You-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Opiates such as morphine exhibit analgesic effect in various pain models, but repeated and chronic morphine administration may develop resistance to antinociception. The purinergic signaling system is involved in the mechanisms of pain modulation and morphine tolerance. This study aimed to determine whether the P2X7 receptor in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is involved in morphine tolerance. Development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine was induced in normal adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds (MWTs) in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The expression levels and distribution of the P2X7 receptor in the vlPAG was evaluated through Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The acute effects of intra-vlPAG injection of the selective P2X7 receptor agonist Bz-ATP, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist A-740003, or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting the P2X7 receptor on morphine-treated rats were also observed. Results demonstrated that repeated morphine administration decreased the mechanical pain thresholds. By contrast, the expression of the P2X7 receptor protein was up-regulated in the vlPAG in morphine tolerant rats. The percent changes in MWT were markedly but only transiently attenuated by intra-vlPAG injection of Bz-ATP (9nmol/0.3μL) but elevated by A-740003 at doses of 10 and 100nmol/0.3μL. AS ODN (15nmol/0.3μL) against the P2X7 receptor reduced the development of chronic morphine tolerance in rats. These results suggest that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially mediated by activating the vlPAG P2X7 receptors. The present data also suggest that the P2X7 receptors may be a therapeutic target for improving the analgesic effect of morphine in treatments of pain when morphine tolerance

  15. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  16. Tolerance develops to the antiallodynic effects of the peripherally acting opioid loperamide hydrochloride in nerve-injured rats.

    PubMed

    He, Shao-Qiu; Yang, Fei; Perez, Federico M; Xu, Qian; Shechter, Ronen; Cheong, Yong-Kwan; Carteret, Alene F; Dong, Xinzhong; Sweitzer, Sarah M; Raja, Srinivasa N; Guan, Yun

    2013-11-01

    Peripherally acting opioids are potentially attractive drugs for the clinical management of certain chronic pain states due to the lack of centrally mediated adverse effects. However, it remains unclear whether tolerance develops to peripheral opioid analgesic effects under neuropathic pain conditions. We subjected rats to L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) and examined the analgesic effects of repetitive systemic and local administration of loperamide hydrochloride, a peripherally acting opioid agonist. We found that the inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity, an important manifestation of neuropathic pain, by systemic loperamide (1.5mg/kg subcutaneously) decreased after repetitive drug treatment (tolerance-inducing dose: 0.75 to 6.0mg/kg subcutaneously). Similarly, repeated intraplantar injection of loperamide (150 μg/50 μL intraplantarly) and D-Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Glyol(5) enkephalin (300 μg/50 μL), a highly selective mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, also resulted in decreased inhibition of mechanical hypersensitivity. Pretreatment with naltrexone hydrochloride (5mg/kg intraperitoneally) and MK-801 (0.2mg/kg intraperitoneally) attenuated systemic loperamide tolerance. Western blot analysis showed that repetitive systemic administration of morphine (3mg/kg subcutaneously), but not loperamide (3mg/kg subcutaneously) or saline, significantly increased MOR phosphorylation in the spinal cord of SNL rats. In cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, loperamide dose-dependently inhibited KCl-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]i. However, this drug effect significantly decreased in cells pretreated with loperamide (3 μM, 72 hours). Intriguingly, in loperamide-tolerant cells, the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole restored loperamide's inhibition of KCl-elicited [Ca(2+)]i increase. Our findings indicate that animals with neuropathic pain may develop acute tolerance to the antiallodynic effects of peripherally acting opioids after repetitive systemic and local drug

  17. Spinal cord effects of antipyretic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Brune, K

    1994-01-01

    Tissue damage results in the release of inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandins, which sensitive fine nerve endings in the periphery to mechanical and thermal changes. Sensitisation of these nerve endings, or nociceptors, contributes to the phenomenon of hyperalgesia, which routinely accompanies tissue damage. It has been shown that the acidic antipyretic analgesics reduce or down-regulate the enhanced nociceptor sensitivity in damaged tissue, an effect probably attributable to inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Recent studies suggest that these drugs may have an additional mechanism of action in the spinal cord or higher centres. When enantiomers of flurbiprofen were used in the rat, it was shown that S- and R-flurbiprofen exert differential antinociceptive effects. The R-enantiomer, which is practically devoid of peripheral cyclo-oxygenase inhibitory activity in vitro, showed comparable analgesic potency to the S-enantiomer, which does inhibit cyclo-oxygenase activity, in experimental models of nociception. It is possible that the antinociceptive action of the R-enantiomer is related to a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis in the CNS rather than at the site of tissue damage, although other mechanisms may also contribute to its antinociceptive action. In contrast to earlier indications, it would appear that a significant part of the antinociceptive action of the antipyretic analgesics is exerted in the spinal cord. The observed accumulation of acidic antipyretic analgesics in inflamed tissue may account for the superior anti-inflammatory activity of these latter compounds.

  18. Clinical consequences of nonnarcotic analgesic use.

    PubMed

    Matzke, G R

    1997-02-01

    The accuracy of the economic analysis of the selected adverse events evaluated by McGoldrick and Bailie is questionable. The quantitative perspective on the economics of the adverse events associated with nonnarcotic analgesic use proposed by these authors is limited by the fact that they have combined data on over 30 different NSAIDs into a single value for comparison with two single-entity agents: acetaminophen and aspirin. The relative prevalence of major organ system toxicities varies markedly among the NSAIDs, and this variance invalidates the use of a class conclusion approach. Their conservative incidence estimates, the lack of data in some areas (i.e., hepatic injury), and the exclusion of combination analgesics further limit the utility of their conclusions. However, it is difficult to argue authoritatively that the relative costs of toxicities associated with the three analgesic classes they reviewed are not representative. The ultimate question is, "What is the optimal analgesic for a given patient?" This question can be addressed only if one considers the underlying cause of pain, its chronicity/acuity, the patient's concurrent disease states, if any, and the potential for drug interactions with the patient's concomitant medications. McGoldrick and Bailie concluded on an economic basis that acetaminophen is the analgesic of choice for most patients, including those with impaired renal function. This recommendation is in agreement with those of the Analgesics and the Kidney Ad Hoc Committee of the National Kidney Foundation. It also would seem prudent to use acetaminophen as the first-line agent for those patients in whom aspirin and NSAID use should be avoided or used only with caution along with frequent monitoring of renal function, blood pressure, electrolytes, and/or coagulation status. Thus, there is little to no controversy in their recommendation to initiate treatment with acetaminophen. The authors, however, also suggested that switching

  19. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health. PMID:22931048

  20. In vivo anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of a medicinal plant, Caesalpinia bonducella F.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Mehta, Archana

    2015-07-01

    This research examined antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities of ethanolic extract of C. bonducella whole seeds in experimental albino rats. Three doses, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of the whole seed ethanolic extract prepared as a suspension in 2 ml of 2% gum acacia were used. Acute inflammatory and antipyretic activities were evaluated in experimental animals by carrageenan induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia models, respectively. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in paw volumes, and pyrexia was noted in experimental animals when compared with control animals. The ethanol see extract (400 mg/kg) displayed in vivo anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic in terms of reduction in paw edema, % writhes inhibition and rectal temperature by (0.24±0.03), (31.38%) and (36.2±0.1), respectively. Overall the whole ethanolic seed extract at all tested concentrations produced significant (p<0.05) anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic activities. The results obtained in this study clearly indicated the ethno-medicinal potential of C. bonducella in curing pain and inflammation related disorders, supporting its efficacy as a natural analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:26431663

  1. The oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in patients during acute coronary syndrome hospitalization: a meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The appropriateness of the routine performance of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to screen for diabetes mellitus (DM) during acute coronary syndrome hospitalization is still under debate. Methods A systematic search of databases (MEDLINE [1985 to March 2012], EMBASE [1985 to March 2012]) was conducted. All prospective cohort studies assessing the accuracy or reproducibility of an OGTT in ACS or non-ACS individuals were included. A bivariate model was used to calculate the pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Heterogeneity was explored using subgroup analysis and meta-regression. Results Fifteen studies with 8,027 participants were included (10 ACS and 5 non-ACS studies). The pooled results on SEN, SPE, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 0.70 (95% CI, 0.60-0.78), 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.94), 7.6 (95% CI, 4.9-11.7), 0.33 (95% CI, 0.25-0.45), and 23 (95% CI, 12–41), respectively. The OGTT has a slightly lower SPE in diagnosing DM in ACS than in non-ACS patients (0.86 [95% CI 0.81-0.92] versus 0.95 [95% CI 0.93-0.98], p<0.01), while the SEN values are comparable (0.71 [95% CI 0.60-0.82] versus 0.67 [95% CI 0.54-0.81], p=0.43). After adjusting the interval between repeated tests and age, the meta-regression did not show a difference in DOR between ACS and non-ACS studies. Conclusions Despite the discrepancy in the interval between the two OGTTs, performing an OGTT in patients with ACS provides accuracy that is similar to that in in non-ACS patients. It is reasonable to screen patients hospitalized for ACS for previously undiagnosed DM using an OGTT. PMID:23270530

  2. [Caffeine as adjuvant analgeticum for treating acute pain].

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2013-10-14

    Based on 19 studies (7,238 participants) a Cochrane review concludes that the addition of caffeine to an analgesic drug provides superior analgesia compared with the analgesic drug alone. The benefit is small, with a number needed to treat of approx. 16. The use of analgesics containing caffeine is associated with an increased risk of the development of physical dependence, overuse headache, and withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation. Combination analgesics with caffeine should only be used temporarily and exclusively for the treatment of acute pain conditions. PMID:24629115

  3. The Analgesic Effect of the Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 in Pancreatic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, Maximilian; Reinelt, Leonard; Neumann, Jens; Holdt, Lesca; Ilmer, Matthias; Renz, Bernhard; Hartwig, Werner; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; D'Haese, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic pancreatitis is one of the main risk factors for pancreatic cancer. In acute and chronic pancreatitis, oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. In this respect, the recently described mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 effectively scavenges reactive oxygen species at nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the influence of SkQ1 on tissue injury and pain in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Methods. Both acute and chronic pancreatitis were induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal cerulein injections and treatment with SkQ1 was carried out by peroral applications. Hyperalgesia was assessed by behavioral observation and measurement of abdominal mechanical sensitivity. Blood serum and pancreatic tissue were harvested for analysis of lipase and histology. Results. SkQ1 did not influence pain, serological, or histological parameters of tissue injury in acute pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis, a highly significant reduction of pain-related behavior (p < 0.0001) was evident, but histological grading revealed increased tissue injury in SkQ1-treated animals (p = 0.03). Conclusion. After SkQ1 treatment, tissue injury is not ameliorated in acute pancreatitis and increased in chronic pancreatitis. However, we show an analgesic effect in chronic pancreatitis. Further studies will need to elucidate the risks and benefits of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as an analgesic. PMID:27274778

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of an ectoine mouth and throat spray compared with those of saline lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis: a prospective, controlled, observational clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dörte; Lindemann, Torben; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Scherner, Olaf; Knop, Markus; Bilstein, Andreas; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this observational trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a mouth and throat spray containing ectoine in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis. The outcome was compared with control treatment using saline lozenges. This study was designed as a prospective, controlled, non-randomized, observational multicenter clinical trial and was conducted in Germany. The study population consisted of 95 patients. The decision for treatment with either spray or lozenges was based on the patients' preference for pharyngeal or oral application. Investigators assessed symptoms specific to acute pharyngitis/laryngitis and determined the pharyngitis symptom score. Both patients and investigators evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of the treatment applied. Treatment with the spray showed higher efficacy, 1.95 ± 0.81 versus 1.68 ± 0.67 (investigators) and 1.97 ± 0.88 versus 1.57 ± 0.69 (patients, p < 0.05). Treatment with the spray resulted in significantly greater reduction of cervical lymph node swelling (p < 0.05), ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.62, ∆ lozenges = 0.21 ± 0.62. The lozenges showed some advantage in relieving cough, ∆ lozenges = 0.62 ± 0.94 versus ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.85. Both patients and investigators rated the tolerability of both medical devices as "good" to "very good". Adverse events of mild to moderate severity were either possibly related or not related to the medical devices used. No serious adverse events occurred. Taken together, while the tolerability was consistent in both treatment groups, the ectoine-based spray showed superior efficacy in treating acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis. PMID:27126336

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of an ectoine mouth and throat spray compared with those of saline lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis: a prospective, controlled, observational clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dörte; Lindemann, Torben; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Scherner, Olaf; Knop, Markus; Bilstein, Andreas; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this observational trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a mouth and throat spray containing ectoine in the treatment of acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis. The outcome was compared with control treatment using saline lozenges. This study was designed as a prospective, controlled, non-randomized, observational multicenter clinical trial and was conducted in Germany. The study population consisted of 95 patients. The decision for treatment with either spray or lozenges was based on the patients' preference for pharyngeal or oral application. Investigators assessed symptoms specific to acute pharyngitis/laryngitis and determined the pharyngitis symptom score. Both patients and investigators evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of the treatment applied. Treatment with the spray showed higher efficacy, 1.95 ± 0.81 versus 1.68 ± 0.67 (investigators) and 1.97 ± 0.88 versus 1.57 ± 0.69 (patients, p < 0.05). Treatment with the spray resulted in significantly greater reduction of cervical lymph node swelling (p < 0.05), ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.62, ∆ lozenges = 0.21 ± 0.62. The lozenges showed some advantage in relieving cough, ∆ lozenges = 0.62 ± 0.94 versus ∆ spray = 0.44 ± 0.85. Both patients and investigators rated the tolerability of both medical devices as "good" to "very good". Adverse events of mild to moderate severity were either possibly related or not related to the medical devices used. No serious adverse events occurred. Taken together, while the tolerability was consistent in both treatment groups, the ectoine-based spray showed superior efficacy in treating acute pharyngitis and/or laryngitis.

  6. Levetiracetam synergises with common analgesics in producing antinociception in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Micov, Ana; Tomić, Maja; Pecikoza, Uroš; Ugrešić, Nenad; Stepanović-Petrović, Radica

    2015-07-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is difficult to treat. Single analgesics often have insufficient efficacy and poor tolerability. Combination therapy may therefore be of particular benefit, because it might provide optimal analgesia with fewer adverse effects. This study aimed to examine the type of interaction between levetiracetam, a novel anticonvulsant with analgesic properties, and commonly used analgesics (ibuprofen, aspirin and paracetamol) in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6 mice with a single high dose of streptozotocin, applied intraperitoneally (150 mg/kg). Thermal (tail-flick test) and mechanical (electronic von Frey test) nociceptive thresholds were measured before and three weeks after diabetes induction. The antinociceptive effects of orally administered levetiracetam, analgesics, and their combinations were examined in diabetic mice that developed thermal/mechanical hypersensitivity. In combination experiments, the drugs were co-administered in fixed-dose fractions of single drug ED50 and the type of interaction was determined by isobolographic analysis. Levetiracetam (10-100 mg/kg), ibuprofen (2-50 mg/kg), aspirin (5-75 mg/kg), paracetamol (5-100 mg/kg), and levetiracetam-analgesic combinations produced significant, dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in diabetic mice in both tests. In the tail-flick test, isobolographic analysis revealed 15-, and 19-fold reduction of doses of both drugs in the combination of levetiracetam with aspirin/ibuprofen, and paracetamol, respectively. In the von Frey test, approximately 7- and 9-fold reduction of doses of both drugs was detected in levetiracetam-ibuprofen and levetiracetam-aspirin/levetiracetam-paracetamol combinations, respectively. These results show synergism between levetiracetam and ibuprofen/aspirin/paracetamol in a model of painful diabetic neuropathy and might provide a useful approach to the treatment of patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Pain and Poppies: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Salvemini, Daniela; Salter, Michael W.; Gutstein, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Treating pain is one of the most difficult challenges in medicine and a key facet of disease management. The isolation of morphine by Friedrich Sertürner in 1804 added an essential pharmacological tool in the treatment of pain and spawned the discovery of a new class of drugs known collectively as opioid analgesics. Revered for their potent pain-relieving effects, even Morpheus the god of dreams could not have dreamt that his opium tincture would be both a gift and a burden to humankind. To date, morphine and other opioids remain essential analgesics for alleviating pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as analgesic tolerance (diminished pain-relieving effects), hyperalgesia (increased pain sensitivity), and drug dependence. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the effect of chronic pain on opioid reward. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is pervasive and afflicts >100 million Americans. Treating pain in these individuals is notoriously difficult and often requires opioids, one of the most powerful and effective classes of drugs used for controlling pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as a loss of pain-relieving effects (analgesic tolerance), paradoxical pain (hyperalgesia), and addiction. Despite the potential side effects, opioids remain the pharmacological cornerstone of modern pain therapy. This review highlights recent breakthroughs in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the cellular control of opioid systems in reward and aversion. The findings will challenge traditional views of the good, the bad, and the ugly of opioids. PMID:26468188

  8. Additive effect of combined application of magnesium and MK-801 on analgesic action of morphine.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Duda, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    As previously reported, magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) administered in relatively low doses markedly potentiated opioid analgesia in neuropathic pain, in which the effectiveness of opioids is limited. Considering that Mg(2+) behaves like an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, the effect of this ion on the analgesic action of morphine was compared with that of MK-801. Acute pain was evoked by mechanical or thermal stimuli, whereas neuropathic hyperalgesia was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) administration. Magnesium sulphate (40 mg/kg i.p.) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) administered alone did not modify the nociceptive threshold to acute stimuli or the streptozotocin hyperalgesia but significantly augmented the analgesic action of morphine (5 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, if these drugs (i.e. magnesium sulphate and MK-801) were applied concomitantly, a clear additive effect on the analgesic action of morphine occurred in both models of pain. Possible explanations of these observations are discussed. PMID:24577345

  9. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  10. Valproate attenuates the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Tamae; Tanabe, Serabi; Jin, Hisayo; Nishino, Takashi; Aoe, Tomohiko

    2010-11-19

    Morphine is a potent opioid analgesic. Repeated administration of morphine induces tolerance, thus reducing the effectiveness of analgesic treatment. Although some adjuvant analgesics can increase morphine analgesia, the precise molecular mechanism behind their effects remains unclear. Opioids bind to the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Morphine tolerance may be derived from alterations in the intracellular signal transduction after MOR activation. Chronic morphine treatment activates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), whose inhibition diminishes morphine tolerance. Valproate is widely prescribed as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorders because it increases the amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the central nervous system. Although the activation of GABAergic neurons may be responsible for the chief pharmacologic effect of valproate, recent studies have shown that valproate also suppresses GSK3β activity. We examined the effect of valproate on the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance in a mouse model of thermal injury. Mice were treated with morphine alone or with morphine and valproate twice daily for 5 days. The resulting antinociceptive effects were assessed using a hot plate test. While mice treated with morphine developed tolerance, co-administration of valproate attenuated the development of tolerance and impaired the activation of GSK3β in mice brains. Valproate alone did not show analgesic effects; nevertheless, it functioned as an adjuvant analgesic to prevent the development of morphine tolerance. These results suggest that the modulation of GSK3β activity by valproate may be useful and may play a role in the prevention of morphine tolerance. PMID:20816918

  11. Biomedicine of Enkephalin-Derived Glycopeptide Analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polt, Robin

    The incorporation of glycosides into peptide neurotransmitters imparts drug-like character to the neurotransmitter "message" via "membrane hopping". The importance of the glycopeptide-membrane interaction is emphasized, and the biousian theory is briefly explained. Application of this approach to enkephalins, the endogenous opioid peptides, leads to potent analgesic compounds capable of systemic delivery. The clinical applications of these compounds are advocated by the author.

  12. Pharmacogenomics and Opioid Analgesics: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Variation exists in patient response on analgesic treatment in terms of efficacy and safety. This variation may be in part explained by pharmacogenomics. This paper aimed to review data on pharmacogenomics of opioid analgesics focusing on the effect of genetic variation on the efficacy and safety of these agents. Current evidence suggests that pharmacogenomics contribute to variation in efficacy and safety of opioids. However, most data come from case control studies and case reports. In addition, a recognized drawback in the field of pharmacogenomics is the common occurrence of false positive association between polymorphisms and the investigated outcome. Prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the clinical implications of available data as well as to define the guidelines for the clinical application of pharmacogenomic data. Furthermore, basic research should focus on the identification of biologically meaningful polymorphisms enabling a hypothesis with biological plausibility driven research in the field of pharmacogenomics of analgesics. Moreover, the publication of relevant negative results should be favoured. PMID:26075211

  13. Recent pharmacological advances in paediatric analgesics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Palmer, G M

    2006-08-01

    Growth and development are two linked processes that distinguish children from adults. The use of size as the primary covariate during pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses allows exploration of the effects of age. Allometric scaling models have assisted understanding of the developmental clearance changes in common analgesic drugs such as paracetamol, morphine, tramadol and local anaesthetics agents. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (pharmacogenomics [PG]) and their impact on hepatic drug metabolism for opioids, tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and drug receptor responses are increasingly reported. Altered chemical structure or formulations of common analgesics alter pharmacodynamic (PD) effects enhancing safety and efficacy for NSAIDs by stereoselectivity and the addition of nitric oxide, for intravenous paracetamol by formulation and structural difference from propacetamol and for local anaesthetics through stereoselectivity. This article focuses upon recent data for analgesics used in paediatric pain management including paracetamol, NSAIDs, morphine, tramadol, amide local anaesthetics and ketamine. It centres on PK and clinical studies in neonates, infants and children. PG studies are acknowledged as potentially allowing individual drug therapy tailoring through a decrease in between-patient population variability, although the impact of PG in the very young is less certain. There are few data describing age-related PD changes in children despite recognition that the number, affinity and type of receptors or the availability of natural ligands changes with age. PMID:16854558

  14. Analgesic, antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (Roscoe) rhizomes (Zingiberaceae) in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, John A O

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic, antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of Zingiber officinale dried rhizomes ethanol extract (ZOE) in mice and rats. The analgesic effect of ZOE was evaluated by 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' analgesic test methods in mice; while the antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of the plant extract were investigated in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus models. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg) and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs for comparison. ZOE (50-800 mg/kg i.p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally and chemically induced nociceptive pain in mice. The plant extract (ZOE, 50-800 mg/kg p.o.) also significantly (p < 0.05-0.001) inhibited fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation, and caused dose-related, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) hypoglycaemia in normal (normoglycaemic) and diabetic rats. The findings of this experimental animal study indicate that Zingiber officinale rhizomes ethanol extract possesses analgesic, antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties; and thus lend pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of ginger in the treatment and/or management of painful, arthritic inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in some rural Africa communities. PMID:16807883

  15. Heat-tolerant versus heat-sensitive Bos taurus cattle: Influence of air temperature and breed on the acute phase response to a provocative immune challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The difference in the response of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive Bos taurus breed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge when housed at different air temperatures (Ta) was studied. Angus (ANG; heat-sensitive; n = 11; 306 ± 26 kilograms body weight) and Romosinuano (RO; heat-tolerant; n = 10; 31...

  16. Analgesic efficacy and safety of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP) in minor soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, K; Carr, W; Yanchick, J; Magelli, M; Rovati, S

    2011-08-01

    The diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% was designed to deliver analgesic concentrations of diclofenac to an underlying soft tissue injury site, while limiting systemic exposure to diclofenac. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the safety and efficacy of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch for the treatment of acute pain due to minor soft tissue injury. Patients (18-65 years, inclusive) with clinically significant minor soft tissue injuries (mild or moderate sprain, strain, or contusion) incurred within 7 days of study entry and having pain scores ≥ 5 on a Visual Analog Scale of 0-10 were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive the diclofenac epolamine topical patch (n=207) or placebo patch (n=211) application twice daily for 14 days or until pain resolution. Patients recorded pain scores every 12 h at the time of patch removal using the Visual Analog Scale. Investigator-assessed global response to therapy was also evaluated. Safety data were collected throughout the study. Twice-daily treatment with diclofenac epolamine topical patch produced a statistically significant reduction in mean pain score relative to baseline by an additional 18.2% in the diclofenac epolamine topical patch group (0.435 ± 0.268) compared with the placebo group (0.532 ± 0.293) (p=0.002; overall) beginning after application of the second patch. Consistent with this treatment effect, median time to pain resolution was shortened by 2 days in the diclofenac epolamine topical patch group relative to the placebo group (p=0.007). These results were reinforced independently by investigators who reported treatment as good or excellent for 58% of diclofenac epolamine topical patch-treated patients compared with 49% in the placebo patch group (p=0.008). The most common adverse events were treatment site related (n=16, 7.9% diclofenac epolamine topical patch; n=12, 5.8% placebo patch). Most (80%) patients reported tolerability as excellent or good. In

  17. Comparison of the analgesic effects of dronabinol and smoked marijuana in daily marijuana smokers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Comer, Sandra D; Haney, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids to treat pain, yet none have compared the analgesic effectiveness of smoked marijuana to orally administered Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol). This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-dummy, double-blind study compared the magnitude and duration of analgesic effects of smoked marijuana and dronabinol under well-controlled conditions using a validated experimental model of pain. Healthy male (N=15) and female (N=15) daily marijuana smokers participated in this outpatient study comparing the analgesic, subjective, and physiological effects of marijuana (0.00, 1.98, or 3.56% THC) to dronabinol (0, 10, or 20 mg). Pain response was assessed using the cold-pressor test (CPT): participants immersed their left hand in cold water (4 °C), and the time to report pain (pain sensitivity) and withdraw the hand from the water (pain tolerance) were recorded. Subjective pain and drug effect ratings were also measured as well as cardiovascular effects. Compared with placebo, marijuana and dronabinol decreased pain sensitivity (3.56%; 20 mg), increased pain tolerance (1.98%; 20 mg), and decreased subjective ratings of pain intensity (1.98, 3.56%; 20 mg). The magnitude of peak change in pain sensitivity and tolerance did not differ between marijuana and dronabinol, although dronabinol produced analgesia that was of a longer duration. Marijuana (1.98, 3.56%) and dronabinol (20 mg) also increased abuse-related subjective ratings relative to placebo; these ratings were greater with marijuana. These data indicate that under controlled conditions, marijuana and dronabinol decreased pain, with dronabinol producing longer-lasting decreases in pain sensitivity and lower ratings of abuse-related subjective effects than marijuana.

  18. Hydromorphone efficacy and treatment protocol impact on tolerance and mu-opioid receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2008-11-12

    This study examined the antinociceptive (analgesic) efficacy of hydromorphone and hydromorphone-induced tolerance and regulation of mu-opioid receptor density. Initially s.c. hydromorphone's time of peak analgesic (tail-flick) effect (45 min) and ED50 using standard and cumulative dosing protocols (0.22 mg/kg, 0.37 mg/kg, respectively) were determined. The apparent analgesic efficacy (tau) of hydromorphone was then estimated using the operational model of agonism and the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox. Mice were injected with clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p.) and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of hydromorphone was determined. The tau value for hydromorphone was 35, which suggested that hydromorphone is a lower analgesic efficacy opioid agonist. To examine hydromorphone-induced tolerance, mice were continuously infused s.c. with hydromorphone (2.1-31.5 mg/kg/day) for 7 days and then morphine cumulative dose response studies were performed. Other groups of mice were injected with hydromorphone (2.2-22 mg/kg/day) once, or intermittently every 24 h for 7 days. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, mice were tested using morphine cumulative dosing studies. There was more tolerance with infusion treatments compared to intermittent treatment. When compared to higher analgesic efficacy opioids, hydromorphone infusions induced substantially more tolerance. Finally, the effect of chronic infusion (31.5 mg/kg/day) and 7 day intermittent (22 mg/kg/day) hydromorphone treatment on spinal cord mu-opioid receptor density was determined. Hydromorphone did not produce any change in mu-opioid receptor density following either treatment. These results support suggestions that analgesic efficacy is correlated with tolerance magnitude and regulation of mu-opioid receptors when opioid agonists are continuously administered. Taken together, these studies indicate that analgesic efficacy and treatment protocol are important in determining tolerance and

  19. Modulation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence by co-administration of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Tabatabaee, Amirhossein; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Naghizadeh, Bahareh

    2015-10-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, are widely used in the management of different diseases beyond their primary indication for lowering cholesterol. Previous studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of simvastatin in different animal models. In the present study, we examined the effects of simvastatin (30, 60, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o.) on the development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence in mice. For the induction of morphine tolerance and dependence, mice were twice daily treated with morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 consecutive days. Tolerance was evaluated by the hot-plate test and physical dependence by naloxone challenge, on the sixth day. The results showed that oral administration of simvastatin produced antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent way. Co-administration of simvastatin with morphine did not affect the acute morphine-induced analgesia (10mg/kg, s.c.). However, repeated co-administration of simvastatin with morphine significantly attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine and inhibited the naloxone (5mg/kg, s.c.)-precipitated withdrawal signs (jumping and body weight loss). Also, simvastatin at doses of 100 and 300mg/kg attenuated the expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence. These data indicated that, while simvastatin can alleviate both development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance, it cannot enhance morphine-induced antinociception. Taken together, simvastatin may be used as an adjutant therapeutic agent in combination with morphine and or other opioids in patients with severe chronic pain.

  20. Behavioral effects of cannabinoids show differential sensitivity to cannabinoid receptor blockade and tolerance development.

    PubMed

    De Vry, J; Jentzsch, K R; Kuhl, E; Eckel, G

    2004-02-01

    This study compared the potency and efficacy of the cannabinoids delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-THC), HU-210, WIN 55,212-2 and CP 55,940 in suppressing food-reinforced operant behavior, increasing reaction latency in a hot-plate test and inducing hypothermia, and tested whether these behavioral effects induced by CP 55,940 showed differential sensitivity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A, and to tolerance development. After acute i.p. administration to rats, operant behavior was more potently affected than reaction latency and body temperature, but the order of potency of the different drugs was similar across the tests: HU-210analgesic effects more potently/efficiently than the response-rate suppressive effect of CP 55,940. After repeated administration of CP 55,940, the extent and speed of tolerance development was most pronounced in the hypothermia test, and least pronounced in the operant test. It is concluded that the more the behavioral effect induced by a cannabinoid receptor agonist is situated at the left-hand side of the dose-spectrum, the more the effect is resistant to blockade by a cannabinoid receptor antagonist and to the development of tolerance. The possible consequence of this observation for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids is discussed.

  1. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Freya; Naunton, Mark; Thomas, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of analgesics. Phenacetin was subsequently exclusively blamed for this disease. However, the role of a single analgesic as a sole cause of analgesic nephropathy was challenged, and a number of researchers have since attempted to determine the extent of involvement of other analgesics including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, and paracetamol. Case presentation We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of NSAID-induced nephropathy with poor pain control and reluctance to use paracetamol. We attempt to briefly review the evidence of paracetamol being implicated in the development of analgesic-induced nephropathy. Conclusion There is a lack of concrete data regarding causative analgesics, including paracetamol. Patients should therefore not be withheld paracetamol, an effective and commonly recommended agent, for fear of worsening renal function. PMID:25548527

  2. Impact of Internet Pharmacy Regulation on Opioid Analgesic Availability*

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Edward W.; Wines, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Access to prescription opioid analgesics has made Internet pharmacies the object of increased regulatory scrutiny, but the effectiveness of regulatory changes in curtailing availability of opioid analgesics from online sources has been not assessed. As part of an ongoing investigation into the relationship between the Internet and substance abuse, we examined the availability of prescription opioid analgesics from online pharmacies. Method: From a pharmacy watch Web site, we constructed a data set of postings entered every 3 months beginning November 1, 2005, that were related to the purchase of prescription opioid analgesics. Trained examiners assessed whether the final post described accessibility of pain medications that was increasing or decreasing. Results: We identified 45 threads related to the availability of opioid analgesics from Internet pharmacies. Of the 41 (91%) threads describing the declining availability of opioid analgesic agents from Internet pharmacies, 34 (82%) received posts on November 1, 2007. Despite the subjective nature of the research question, there was high interobserver agreement between coders (κ = .845) that availability of opioid analgesics from online pharmacies had decreased. This finding was supported by a dramatic rise in the number of pageviews (an accepted measure of Web site visitor interest in a page's content) of Web pages describing decreased availability of opioid analgesics. Conclusions: These data suggest striking decreases in the availability of prescription opioid analgesic pharmaceuticals. This self-reported change in drug availability may be related to increased regulation of and law enforcement operations directed against Internet pharmacies. PMID:18781245

  3. Analgesic medication errors in North Carolina nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charrlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Caprio, Anthony J; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize analgesic medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individual medication error incidents reported by North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Bivariate associations between analgesic medication errors with patient factors, error-related factors, and impact on patients were tested with chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between type of analgesic medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors. A total of 32,176 individual medication error incidents were reported over a 2-year period in North Carolina nursing homes, 12.3% (n = 3949) of which were analgesic medication errors. Of these analgesic medication errors, opioid and nonopioid analgesics were involved in 3105 and 844 errors, respectively. Opioid errors were more likely to be wrong drug errors, wrong dose errors, and administration errors compared with nonopioid errors (P < .0001 for all comparisons). In the multivariate model, opioid errors were found to have higher odds of patient harm compared with nonopioid errors (odds ratio [OR] = 3, 95% confodence interval [CI]: 1.1-7.8). The authors conclude that opioid analgesics represent the majority of analgesic error reports, and these error reports reflect an increased likelihood of patient harm compared with nonopioid analgesics. PMID:23458096

  4. The cannabinoid CB₂ receptor-selective phytocannabinoid beta-caryophyllene exerts analgesic effects in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Klauke, A-L; Racz, I; Pradier, B; Markert, A; Zimmer, A M; Gertsch, J; Zimmer, A

    2014-04-01

    The widespread plant volatile beta-caryophyllene (BCP) was recently identified as a natural selective agonist of the peripherally expressed cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB₂). It is found in relatively high concentrations in many spices and food plants. A number of studies have shown that CB₂ is critically involved in the modulation of inflammatory and neuropathic pain responses. In this study, we have investigated the analgesic effects of BCP in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that orally administered BCP reduced inflammatory (late phase) pain responses in the formalin test in a CB₂ receptor-dependent manner, while it had no effect on acute (early phase) responses. In a neuropathic pain model the chronic oral administration of BCP attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, and reduced spinal neuroinflammation. Importantly, we found no signs of tolerance to the anti-hyperalgesic effects of BCP after prolonged treatment. Oral BCP was more effective than the subcutaneously injected synthetic CB₂ agonist JWH-133. Thus, the natural plant product BCP may be highly effective in the treatment of long lasting, debilitating pain states. Our results have important implications for the role of dietary factors in the development and modulation of chronic pain conditions.

  5. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  6. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  7. Pregnancy, maternal exposure to analgesic medicines, and leukemia in Brazilian children below 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Couto, Arnaldo C; Ferreira, Jeniffer D; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Koifman, Sérgio

    2015-05-01

    Childhood leukemia etiology, and mainly the interactions of genetic and environmental risk factors, remains largely unexplored. This national hospital-based case-control study was carried out in Brazil among children aged 0-23 months who were recruited at cancer and general hospitals in 13 states. Maternal medicine intake during pregnancy, including analgesic intake, was assessed by face-to-face interviews with the mothers of 231 leukemia patients and 411 controls. Unconditional logistic regression was used to ascertain crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs), and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between maternal analgesic use during pregnancy and early age leukemia. Acetaminophen use during the first trimester of pregnancy showed an OR=0.39 (95% CI 0.17-0.93) for acute lymphocytic leukemia and an OR=0.37 (95% CI 0.16-0.88) for use in the second trimester. For acute myeloid leukemia, an OR=0.11 (95% CI 0.02-0.97) was found following acetaminophen use in the second trimester. For acute lymphocytic leukemia, the exclusive use of dipyrone during preconception showed an OR=1.63 (95% CI 1.06-2.53) and dipyrone intake during lactation showed an OR=2.00 (95% CI 1.18-3.39). These results suggest that acetaminophen use during pregnancy may protect against development of early age leukemia in the offspring, whereas dipyrone use may act as a risk factor for such an outcome.

  8. Use of Nonopioid Analgesics and the Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sanzone, Anthony G

    2016-05-01

    Although opioids are widely used for the management of pain in patients with hip fracture, these medications are known to have a wide range of adverse effects that can result in suboptimal outcomes or serious life-threatening complications. Common opioid-related adverse events include gastrointestinal effects, central nervous system effects, and respiratory depression. Hip fractures occur most frequently among the elderly-the very population that is most susceptible to the adverse effects of opioids and the risks of serious physiological complications. There has been much interest during recent years in identifying alternative analgesic approaches that are less opioid-dependent. There is good evidence to show that nerve blocks can be effective in managing the acute pain associated with hip fracture. However, sciatic and femoral nerve blocks seem to increase the risk of several clinically significant adverse events. A retrospective cohort study that examined the effectiveness of scheduled intravenous acetaminophen as part of the pain management protocol for hip fracture patients revealed significant improvement in pain scores, narcotic use, length of stay, and missed physical therapy sessions. Limited data exist in patients with hip fracture on the effects of infiltration of the surgical site with the local anesthetic agent, bupivacaine. However, extensive use of bupivacaine in hip arthroplasty surgery suggests that it may be highly beneficial in the patient with hip fracture. PMID:27101320

  9. A preliminary evaluation of antihyperglycemic and analgesic activity of Alternanthera sessilis aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alternanthera sessilis is used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for alleviation of severe pain. The objective of this study was to scientifically analyze the analgesic (non-narcotic) property of aerial parts of the plant along with antihyperglycemic activity. Methods Antihyperglycemic activity was measured by oral glucose tolerance tests. Analgesic (non-narcotic) activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal writhings in intraperitoneally administered acetic acid-induced pain model in mice. Results Administration of methanol extract of aerial parts led to dose-dependent and significant reductions in blood glucose levels in glucose-loaded mice. At doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, the extract reduced blood sugar levels by 22.9, 30.7, 45.4 and 46.1%, respectively compared to control animals. By comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, reduced blood glucose level by 48.9%. In analgesic activity tests, the extract at the above four doses reduced the number of abdominal writhings by 27.6, 37.9, 41.4, and 44.8%, respectively. A standard analgesic drug, aspirin, reduced the number of writhings by 31.0 and 51.7%, respectively, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight. Conclusion The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant to alleviate pain. At the same time, the antihyperglycemic activity result suggests that the plant may be a potential source for blood sugar lowering drug(s). PMID:24885344

  10. Analgesic Effect of Recombinant GABAergic Cells in a Model of Peripheral Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jergova, Stanislava; Gajavelli, Shyam; Varghese, Mathew S; Shekane, Paul; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain represents a clinically challenging state with a poor response to current treatment options. Long-term management of chronic pain is often associated with the development of tolerance, addiction, and other side effects, reducing the therapeutic value of treatment. Alternative strategies based on cell therapy and gene manipulation, balancing the inhibitory and excitatory events in the spinal cord, may provide sustained pain relief in the long term. Transplantation of GABAergic cells has been successfully used to enhance inhibition and to restore physiological spinal pain processing. However, since the underlying mechanism of chronic pain development involves changes in several pain-signaling pathways, it is essential to develop an approach that targets several components of pain signaling. Recombinant cell therapy offers the possibility to deliver additional analgesic substances to the restricted area in the nervous system. The current study explores the analgesic potential of genetically modified rat embryonic GABAergic cells releasing a peptidergic NMDA receptor antagonist, Serine(1)-histogranin (SHG). Overactivation of glutamate NMDA receptors contributes to the hyperexcitability of spinal neurons observed in chronic pain models. Our approach allows us to simultaneously target spinal hyperexcitability and reduced inhibitory processes. Transplantable cells were transduced by viral vectors encoding either one or six copies of SHG cDNAs. The analgesic potential of recombinant cells after their intraspinal transplantation was evaluated in a model of peripheral nerve injury. Enhanced reduction of hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli was observed in animals treated by recombinant cells compared to the nonrecombinant group. The recombinant peptide was detected in the spinal tissue, suggesting its successful production by transplanted cells. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using recombinant cells releasing adjunct

  11. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    PubMed

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05). Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05). We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain.

  12. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    PubMed

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05). Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05). We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain. PMID:26274819

  13. Bak Foong Pills induce an analgesic effect by inhibiting nociception via the somatostatin pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Cui, Yu Gui; So, Siu Cheung; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Dysmenorrhoea, defined as cramping pain in the lower abdomen occurring before or during menstruation, affects, to varying degrees, up to 90% of women of child-bearing age. We investigated whether BFP (Bak Foong Pills), a traditional Chinese medicine treatment for dysmenorrhoea, possesses analgesic properties. Results showed that BFP was able to significantly reduce pain responses following subchronic treatment for 3 days, but not following acute (1 h) treatment in response to acetic acid-induced writhing in C57/B6 mice. The analgesic effect was not due to inhibition of COX (cyclo-oxygenase) activity, evidenced by the lack of inhibition of prostacyclin and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) production. Molecular analysis revealed that BFP treatment modulated the expression of a number of genes in the spinal cord of mice subjected to acetic acid writhing. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis of spinal cord samples showed that both sst4 (somatostatin receptor 4) and sst2 receptor mRNA, but not μOR (μ-opiate receptor) and NK1 (neurokinin-1) receptor mRNA, were down-regulated following BFP treatment, thus implicating somatostatin involvement in BFP-induced analgesia. Administration of c-som (cyclo-somatostatin), a somatostatin antagonist, prior to acetic acid-induced writhing inhibited the analgesic effect. Thus subchronic treatment with BFP has anti-nociceptive qualities mediated via the somatostatin pathway. PMID:21980955

  14. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-oedematous effects of Lafoensia pacari extract and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Rogerio, Alexandre P; Fontanari, Caroline; Melo, Mirian C C; Ambrosio, Sérgio R; de Souza, Glória E P; Pereira, Paulo S; França, Suzelei C; da Costa, Fernando B; Albuquerque, Deijanira A; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2006-09-01

    Lafoensia pacari St. Hil. (Lythraceae) is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that the ethanolic extract of L. pacari has in Toxocara canis infection (a model of systemic eosinophilia). In this study, we tested the anti-inflammatory activity of the same L. pacari extract in mice injected intraperitoneally with beta-glucan present in fraction 1 (F1) of the Histoplasma capsulatum cell wall (a model of acute eosinophilic inflammation). We also determined the anti-oedematous, analgesic and anti-pyretic effects of L. pacari extract in carrageenan-induced paw oedema, acetic acid writhing and LPS-induced fever, respectively. L. pacari extract significantly inhibited leucocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity induced by beta-glucan. In addition, the L. pacari extract presented significant analgesic, anti-oedematous and anti-pyretic effects. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the L. pacari extract in the F1 model led us to identify ellagic acid. As did the extract, ellagic acid presented anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and analgesic effects. However, ellagic acid had no anti-pyretic effect, suggesting that other compounds present in the plant stem are responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate potential therapeutic effects of L. pacari extract and ellagic acid, providing new prospects for the development of drugs to treat pain, oedema and inflammation. PMID:16945186

  15. Combined cannabis/methaqualone withdrawal treated with psychotropic analgesic nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Mark A; Harker, Nadine; Lichtigfeld, Frederick J

    2006-07-01

    This article reports the first single-blind study using psychotropic analgesic nitrous oxide (PAN) for treating acute withdrawal states following the abuse of methaqualone combined and smoked with cannabis. Smoked methaqualone combined with cannabis is called "white pipe" (WP). South Africa is the only country in the world where WP is a major form of substance abuse. This article demonstrates in 101 consecutively treated patients given placebo (100% oxygen) followed by PAN that this therapy produced a measurable therapeutic effect (more than 50% improvement) in 87 patients. This study confirms that WP is a form of substance abuse confined mainly to young adult male subjects.

  16. Genetic toxicology of remifentanil, an opiate analgesic.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jane S; Campbell, James A; Cariello, Neal F; Kutz, Stephen A; Thilagar, Arul; Xu, Jing; Ham, Andrea L; Mitchell, Ann D

    2003-01-01

    Compounds that interact with opioid receptors are commonly used as analgesics. Opioid agonists vary in their potency and pharmacokinetic properties as well as in their affinity for distinct opioid receptors. The fentanyl opiate analogues are an important group of analgesics that interact with the mu opioid receptor. Remifentanil (GI87084) is a particularly interesting member of this group of opioids because its action is especially short in duration. This report examines the genetic toxicology of remifentanil. Remifentanil was not genotoxic in an Ames test, an in vitro chromosome aberration assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells, an in vivo micronucleus assay in rat erythrocytes, or an in vivo/in vitro unscheduled DNA synthesis assay in rat hepatocytes. In the in vitro L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma assay, remifentanil produced a genotoxic response at dose levels >or=308 microg/mL only in the presence of rat liver S9 metabolic activation; primarily tiny and small mutant colonies were produced. This pattern of activity in a battery of genetic toxicology assays is not unique to remifentanil, but has also been observed for other pharmaceuticals, including the opioid fentanyl. A weight-of-evidence analysis, taking into consideration genotoxic mechanisms, in vivo results, and the conditions of clinical use, suggests remifentanil does not pose a genotoxic risk to patients.

  17. The analgesic effect of apelin-13 and its mechanism of action within the nitric oxide and serotonin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Turtay, MG; Karabas, M; Parlakpinar, H; Colak, C; Sagir, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apelin has various effects on a lot of systems such as central nervous system and cardiovascular system. This study investigated the possible analgesic effects of apelin-13 using the hot-plate and the tail-flick thermal analgesia tests in rats. We also evaluated the mechanism underlying the analgesic effects of apelin-13 by pretreating with Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or ondansetron. Material & Methods: Forty male rats were used. The rats were randomly assigned to five groups according to the treatment received: Group I: Control; Group II: Morphine; Group III: Apelin-13; Group IV: Apelin-13+L-NAME; Group V: Apelin-13+Ondansetron. Acute thermal pain was modeled using the hot-plate and the tail-flick tests. Results: During the hot-plate test, i.p. Morphine and apelin-13 administered at zero- and 30 min produced significantly greater analgesic effects compared to the control. When the nitric oxide pathway was inhibited by administration of L-NAME with apelin-13, the analgesic effect continued. When apelin-13 and ondansetron were co-administered, the analgesic effect of apelin-13 disappeared at zero- and 30 min. During the tail-flick test, at 30 min, significantly higher levels of analgesia were observed in both the morphine and apelin group (which did not differ from each other) compared to the control group. L-NAME co-administered with apelin-13 did not affect the degree of analgesia, but apelin-13 co-administered with ondansetron was associated with a greater reduction in analgesia compared to the other groups. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that apelin-13 exerts an analgesic effect; co-administration of apelin-13 and ondansetron inhibits antinociception, an effect apparently mediated by five-hydroxytryptamine-three (5-HT3) receptors. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 319-323. PMID:27688696

  18. Evaluation of Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activity of the Extract and Fractions of Astragalus hamosus in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Shojaii, Asie; Motaghinejad, Majid; Norouzi, Sima; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the hydro-alcoholic extract of the pods of Astragalus hamosus (HAAH), a plant used in Iranian traditional medicine, and antinociceptive effects of different fractions in animal models. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by the rat paw edema induced by formalin. Also the analgesic effect was examined by the acetic-acid-induced writhing response and hot plate test. The analgesic effects of chloroform, hexane, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions were evaluated by the hot-plate method. The hydroalcoholic extract of Astragalus hamosus could reduce the edema in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). In the acute phase, the result of 1000 mg/Kg and in the chronic phase, the result of 100 and 300 mg/Kg of the extract were more significant and comparable with the effect of sodium salicylate. Also application of different doses of HAAH had significant anti-nociceptive effects on both animal models. The findings showed that HAAH at doses of 700 and 1000 mg/Kg produced analgesic effects comparable to sodium salicylate. The hexane and ethyl acetate (but not the other fractions) showed significant analgesic activity in hot plate test, when compared to morphine. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of HAAH extract and hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of the extract in animal models and justify traditional use of this plant in the treatment of pain and inflammatory conditions. More studies to clarify the active components are necessary. PMID:25561932

  19. The analgesic effect of apelin-13 and its mechanism of action within the nitric oxide and serotonin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Turtay, MG; Karabas, M; Parlakpinar, H; Colak, C; Sagir, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apelin has various effects on a lot of systems such as central nervous system and cardiovascular system. This study investigated the possible analgesic effects of apelin-13 using the hot-plate and the tail-flick thermal analgesia tests in rats. We also evaluated the mechanism underlying the analgesic effects of apelin-13 by pretreating with Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or ondansetron. Material & Methods: Forty male rats were used. The rats were randomly assigned to five groups according to the treatment received: Group I: Control; Group II: Morphine; Group III: Apelin-13; Group IV: Apelin-13+L-NAME; Group V: Apelin-13+Ondansetron. Acute thermal pain was modeled using the hot-plate and the tail-flick tests. Results: During the hot-plate test, i.p. Morphine and apelin-13 administered at zero- and 30 min produced significantly greater analgesic effects compared to the control. When the nitric oxide pathway was inhibited by administration of L-NAME with apelin-13, the analgesic effect continued. When apelin-13 and ondansetron were co-administered, the analgesic effect of apelin-13 disappeared at zero- and 30 min. During the tail-flick test, at 30 min, significantly higher levels of analgesia were observed in both the morphine and apelin group (which did not differ from each other) compared to the control group. L-NAME co-administered with apelin-13 did not affect the degree of analgesia, but apelin-13 co-administered with ondansetron was associated with a greater reduction in analgesia compared to the other groups. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that apelin-13 exerts an analgesic effect; co-administration of apelin-13 and ondansetron inhibits antinociception, an effect apparently mediated by five-hydroxytryptamine-three (5-HT3) receptors. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 319-323.

  20. Analgesic, antiinflammatory and antidiabetic properties of Harpagophytum procumbens DC (Pedaliaceae) secondary root aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, Ismail M; Ojewole, John A O

    2004-12-01

    South Africa is blessed with a rich floral biodiversity of medicinally useful plants. One such plant is Harpagophytum procumbens DC (Family: Pedaliaceae). H. procumbens is widely used in South African traditional medicine for the treatment, management and/or control of a variety of human ailments. In the present study, the analgesic effect of H. procumbens secondary root aqueous extract was evaluated in mice, using the 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' test methods; while the antiinflammatory and antidiabetic effects of the plant's secondary root extract were investigated in rats. Fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus were used as experimental test models of inflammation and diabetes Diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg i.p.) was used as a reference analgesic and antiinflammatory agent for comparison. Chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg p.o.) was used as a reference hypoglycaemic agent for comparison. H. procumbens root aqueous extract (HPE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally and chemically induced nociceptive pain stimuli in mice. H. procumbens root extract (HPE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) also produced dose-related, significant reductions (p < 0.05-0.001) of the fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation of the rat hind paw oedema. Furthermore, the plant extract (HPE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) produced dose-dependent, significant reductions (p < 0.05-0.001) in the blood glucose concentrations of both fasted normal and fasted diabetic rats. The results of this experimental animal study indicate that H. procumbens root aqueous extract possesses analgesic, antiinflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties, and lend pharmacological support to the suggested folklore uses of Harpagophytum procumbens root in the management and/or control of painful, arthritic and other inflammatory conditions, as well as for adult-onset, type-2 diabetes mellitus in some communities of South Africa.

  1. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling.

  2. [Interindividual variation of pharmacokinetic disposition of and clinical responses to opioid analgesics in cancer pain patients].

    PubMed

    Naito, Takafumi; Kawakami, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Use of prescription opioids for cancer pain according to the World Health Organization analgesic ladder has been accepted in Japan. Although oxycodone and fentanyl are commonly used as first-line analgesics, a few clinical reports have been published on interindividual variations in their pharmacokinetics and clinical responses in cancer patients. (1) Some factors relating to CYP2D6, CYP3A, ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1), and opioid receptor mu 1 (OPRM1) involve oxycodone pharmacokinetics and sensitivity in humans. The relations between their genetic variations and clinical responses to oxycodone are being revealed in limited groups. In our study, the impact of genetic variants and pharmacokinetics on clinical responses to oxycodone were evaluated in Japanese populations. (2) Opioid switching improves the opioid tolerance related to the balance between analgesia and adverse effects. Some patients have difficulty in obtaining better opioid tolerance in recommended conversion ratios. The activities of CYP3A, ABCB1, and OPRM1 contribute to the interindividual variations in clinical responses to fentanyl in cancer patients. However, the variations in opioid switching remain to be clarified in clinical settings. In our study, genetic factors related to interindividual variations in clinical responses in opioid switching to fentanyl were revealed in Japanese populations. In this symposium review, the possibility of approaches to personalized palliative care using opioids based on genetic variants of CYP2D6, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and OPRM1 is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the Analgesic Activity of Standardized Aqueous Extract of Terminalia chebula in Healthy Human Participants Using Hot Air Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pokuri, Venkata Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain affects millions of people worldwide, opioid analgesics have been used for chronic painful conditions. Due to their adverse effects, safer alternatives would be beneficial. Terminalia chebula, with proven analgesic action has been evaluated in the hot air pain model for its analgesic activity. Aim To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose of Terminalia chebula using hot air pain model in healthy human participants. Setting and Design Randomized, Double blind, Placebo controlled, Cross over study. Materials and Methods After taking written informed consent to IEC approved protocol, 12 healthy human participants were randomized to receive either single oral dose of two capsules of Terminalia chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double blinded manner. Thermal pain was assessed using hot air analgesiometer, to deliver thermal pain stimulus. Mean Pain Threshold time and Mean Pain Tolerance time measured in seconds at baseline and 180 minutes post drug. A washout period of two weeks was given for cross-over between the two treatments. Results Terminalia chebula significantly increased mean pain threshold and tolerance time compared to baseline and placebo. Mean pain threshold time increased from 34.06±2.63 seconds to 41.00±2.99 seconds (p<0.001) and mean pain tolerance time increased from 49.67± 3.72 seconds to 57.30±3.07 seconds (p<0.001). The increase in mean percentage change for pain threshold time is 20.42% (p<0.001) and for pain tolerance time is 17.50% (p<0.001). Conclusion In the present study, Terminalia chebula significantly increased Pain Threshold time and Pain Tolerance time compared to Placebo. Study medications were well tolerated. PMID:26155489

  4. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic profile of 6,11-dihydrodibenzo-[b.e.]-thiepin-11-one-3-acetic acid (tiopinac).

    PubMed

    Rooks, W H; Tomolonis, A J; Maloney, P J; Roszkowski, A; Wallach, M B

    1980-06-01

    Tiopinac displayed marked anti-inflammatory activity when given p.o. in rat models of acute and chronic inflammation. It inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema (40 x phenylbutazone), and cotton-pellet-induced granuloma (0.8 x indomethacin). In an 18-day test, tiopinac prevented the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis (10-15 x naproxen) and had similar activity versus pre-induced arthritis. Tiopinac exhibited antiphlogistic activity in adrenalectomized rats. It did not have corticosteroid activity. Depending upon the type of analgesic test used, the potency of tiopinac varied. When given p.o. it inhibited phenylquinone-induced writhing in the mouse and rat (respectively 16 and 10 x aspirin). In contrast, tiopinac had approximately 10 times the potency of indomethacin in increasing the pain threshold when yeast-inflamed paws were compressed. The pain threshold of the noninflamed paw was not increased. Tiopinac was highly active versus pain induced by flexing the adjuvant arthritic-inflamed paw (greater than or equal to 1000 x aspirin). It was inactive in the mouse hot-plate test in which opiate-like agents are active. Tiopinac, p.o., lowered yeast-induced pyrexia (130 x aspirin). Tiopinac did not have significant cardiovascular or CNS activity. Whereas the Ed50 versus adjuvant arthritis in rats was 0.1 mg/kg/day p.o., rats tolerated up to 20 mg/kg/day p.o. in the 8-day cotton-pellet test. Lack of anorexia and emesis in dogs with up to 30 mg/kg p.o. and mild oral activity in producing gastric erosion in acute and subacute studies in rats suggests that tiopinac may have relatively little gastrointestinal irritating activity. PMID:6967686

  5. Compounded Topical Analgesics for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail E; Turrentine, Jake E

    2016-01-01

    Analgesic medications compounded for topical use are gaining popularity for the management of chronic pain. The advantages of topical pain medications include reduction of systemic adverse effects, improved patient acceptance, few drug interactions, ease of dose determination, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, and direct access to the target site. Compounded topical medications typically use a mixture of 3 or more single medications to achieve multiple complementary effects at lower doses of each individual medication. Herein, we review the mechanisms, adverse effects, and evidence for some of the most commonly used medications in topical compounds for pain management. Because more topical medications are used for chronic pain, dermatologists can expect an increase in irritant and allergic contact dermatitis related to these medications. PMID:27649348

  6. Warmth is Analgesic in Healthy Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Colleen W.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies a behavioral and nonpharmacologic means of preventing and reducing newborn pain. Our objective was to determine whether warmth is analgesic in newborn infants undergoing vaccination—a routine painful hospital procedure. We used a prospective randomized controlled trial of 47 healthy full-term newborn infants. Infants were randomized into one of three conditions prior to vaccination: warmth exposure, pacifier suckling, or sucrose taste. Crying, grimacing, and heart rate differences were analyzed between groups before, during, and after vaccination as outcome measures. Warmer infants cried significantly less than sucrose taste or pacifier suckling after vaccination. Heart rate patterns reflected this analgesia. Core temperature did not differ between study groups. Providing natural warmth to newborn infants during a painful procedure decreases the crying and grimacing on par with the “gold” standard treatments of sucrose or pacifier. PMID:22424877

  7. Analgesic Effect of Oral Glucose in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Jatana, S K; Dalal, S S; Wilson, C G

    2003-04-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain, has defined pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience connected with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage". It was thought that the newborn baby does not experience pain because of incompletely developed nervous system. However, it has been shown that neurological system known to be associated with pain transmission and modulation, is intact and functional. A study was conducted in our center to study the analgesic effect of administration of oral glucose in various concentrations, in neonates undergoing heel punctures, for collection of blood for investigations. This was compared with the analgesic effects of breast milk (which contains lactose). 125 full term normal neonates with no history of birth asphyxia or underlying neurological abnormality, requiring heel punctures for collection of blood for various investigations were selected for the study. They were matched for gestational age, birth weight and sex distribution and divided into 5 groups of 25 each. One group comprised control subjects and was administered sterile water. 3 groups were administered 1 ml of varying strengths of glucose solutions i.e. 10%, 25% and 50% respectively. The last group was given 1 ml of expressed breast milk (EBM). Prior to heel pricks, state of arousal, baseline heart rate (HR) and transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded by pulse oximeter in each neonate. Autolet, a mechanical device for capillary sampling, was used for heel pricks to give equal strength of painful stimulus in each procedure. Audio tape recorder was used to record the cry. The oral solution was administered slowly over 30 seconds by means of a syringe placed in the mouth. Heel puncture was done after 2 minutes, taking all aseptic precautions. HR and SpO2 were monitored using pulse oximeter. Pain response was assessed, by recording duration of crying, change in HR, change in SpO2 and facial action

  8. Pain treatment after tonsillectomy: advantages of analgesics regularly given compared with analgesics on demand.

    PubMed

    Thorneman, G; Akervall, J

    2000-10-01

    The aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate pain treatment during the first postoperative 24 h for 40 patients (age over 18) undergoing tonsillectomy. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (n = 20) received analgesics on demand and group B (n = 20) on a regular basis. Basic pain treatment consisted of paracetamol 750 mg x 6 and diclofenac 50 mg x 3. Pain measurement was performed using a visual analogue scale (VAS): a 10 cm line with 0 cm equalling no pain and 10 cm equalling the worst pain ever felt. The following parameters were studied: VAS values, the need for rescue analgesics, intra- and postoperative bleeding, nausea and vomiting, postoperative food intake and hospital time. Only 4 of 20 (20%) patients in group B needed rescue analgesics in the postoperative ward compared with 15 of 20 (75%) in group A (p < 0.01, chi2 test). In group B, 13 of 20 (65%) patients could eat solid food before they were discharged from the ward, compared with 7 of 19 (37%) monitored patients in group A (p < 0.01, chi2 test). The observed VAS values were generally rather low in both groups. The mean value for all observed VAS values was less than 4 in both study groups. However, no significant difference in VAS values was observed between the two study groups. Our results suggest that regularly given postoperative pain treatment after tonsillectomy, starting intraoperatively with paracetamol and diclofenac, has significant advantages compared with a regimen in which patients receive analgesics only on demand.

  9. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and GC-MS Studies on Castanospermum australe A. Cunn. & C. Fraser ex Hook.

    PubMed Central

    Sajeesh, Thankarajan; Parimelazhagan, Thangaraj

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Castanospermum australe and to profile phytochemicals by GC-MS. The ethanolic extracts were prepared by successive solvent extraction using Soxhlet apparatus. The analgesic activity was analyzed by hot plate method and acetic acid-induced writhing test whereas anti-inflammatory study was done by carrageenan induced paw oedema model. The acute toxicity study revealed that ethanol extracts of leaf and bark of C. australe were safe even at a higher dose of 2000 mg/kg whereas ethanol extract of seed was toxic at the same dose. In both hot plate method (5.85 s) and acetic acid-induced writhing test (57%), the leaf ethanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity (P < 0.001) at a dose of 400 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extract was exhibited by the reduction in paw linear diameter by 64.76% at 400 mg/kg in carrageenan induced paw oedema. The GC-MS analysis of the ethanol extract of leaf revealed sixteen major compounds of which 1,7-dimethyl-4,10-dioxa-1,7-diazacyclododecane, (+)-N-methylephedrine, and permethylspermine were found to be pharmaceutically and the most important. These findings justify that C. australe can be a valuable natural analgesic and anti-inflammatory source which seemed to provide potential phytotherapeutics against various ailments. PMID:24672339

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Enhanced Analgesic Effect of Oxycodone Compared to Morphine in Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B.; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  11. The TRPA1 channel mediates the analgesic action of dipyrone and pyrazolone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Nassini, Romina; Fusi, Camilla; Materazzi, Serena; Coppi, Elisabetta; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Marone, Ilaria M; De Logu, Francesco; Preti, Delia; Tonello, Raquel; Chiarugi, Alberto; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Benemei, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although still used by hundreds of millions of people worldwide, the mechanism of the analgesic action of the pyrazolone derivatives (PDs), dipyrone, propyphenazone and antipyrine remains unknown. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, expressed by nociceptors, is emerging as a major pain transduction pathway. We hypothesized that PDs target the TRPA1 channel and by this mechanism produce their analgesic effect. Experimental Approach Calcium responses and currents were studied in cultured TRPA1-expressing rodent dorsal root ganglion neurons and human cells. Acute nociception and mechanical hypersensitivity were investigated in naïve and genetically manipulated mice. Key Results Pyrazolone and PDs selectively inhibited calcium responses and currents in TRPA1-expressing cells and acute nocifensor responses in mice evoked by reactive channel agonists (allyl isothiocyanate, acrolein and H2O2). In line with recent results obtained with TRPA1 antagonists and TRPA1 gene deletion, the two most largely used PDs, dipyrone and propyphenazone, attenuated TRPA1-mediated nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain (formalin, carrageenan, partial sciatic nerve ligation and the chemotherapeutic drug, bortezomib). Notably, dipyrone and propyphenazone attenuated carrageenan-evoked mechanical allodynia, without affecting PGE2 levels. The main metabolites of PDs did not target TRPA1 and did not affect TRPA1-dependent nociception and allodynia. Conclusions and Implications Evidence that in rodents the nociceptive/hyperalgesic effect produced by TRPA1 activation is blocked by PDs suggests that a similar pathway is attenuated by PDs in humans and that TRPA1 antagonists could be novel analgesics, devoid of the adverse haematological effects of PDs. PMID:25765567

  12. Study on analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Cordia myxa fruit hydro-alcoholic extract.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammadmehdi; Varzi, Hossein Najafzadeh; Sabbagh, Atefeh; Bolooki, Adeleh; Sazmand, Alireza

    2013-12-15

    Cordia myxa is a plant which is used in tropical regions of the world. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect of fruit of this medicinal plant was investigated in mice. Hydro-alcoholic extract of it was prepared by maceration method. Formalin test was conducted in six groups of mice (6 animals in each group) and acetic acid test in another six groups (6 mice). Groups one to six in each test were administered normal saline, oral indomethacin, intraperitoneal tramadol, 100 mg kg(-1) oral extract, 200 mg kg(-1) oral extract and 100 mg kg(-1) intraperitoneal extract, respectively. The duration of foot lickings were calculated in formalin- administered (1st) group within min 0 to 5 (acute phase) and 15 to 25 (chronic phase). Acetic acid-induced writhings were counted within 10 min in the 2nd group. The results showed that hydro-alcoholic extract of Cordia myxa fruit was considerably effective in formalin test. Also, analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of this plant's fruit in both acute and chronic phase are somewhat similar to these properties in the study on animal model of experimental colitis.

  13. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  14. Analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of highest analgesic demand after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bierylo, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Swietlana; Szymusik, Iwona; Kolacz, Marcin; Dabrowski, Michal J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures in female patients. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of greatest postoperative analgesic demand after CS. This period was defined by detailed analysis of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) usage. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized trial included 60 parturients who were scheduled for elective CS. Participants received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine supplemented with normal saline (control group) or with fentanyl 25 μg (fentanyl group). To evaluate primary endpoints, we measured total pethidine consumption over the period of greatest PCA pethidine requirement. For verification of secondary endpoints, we recorded intravenous PCA requirement in other time windows, duration of effective analgesia, pain scores assessed by visual analog scale, opioid side effects, hemodynamic changes, neonatal Apgar scores, and intraoperative pain. Detailed analysis of hour-by-hour PCA opioid requirements showed that the greatest demand for analgesics among patients in the control group occurred during the first 12 hours after surgery. Patients in the fentanyl group had significantly reduced opioid consumption compared with the controls during this period and had a prolonged duration of effective analgesia. The groups were similar in visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related side effects (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, oversedation, and respiratory depression), and neonatal Apgar scores. Mild respiratory depression occurred in 1 patient in each group. Fewer patients experienced intraoperative pain in the fentanyl group (3% vs 23%; relative risk 6.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9–51.6). The requirement for postoperative analgesics is greatest during the first 12 hours after induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CS. The addition of intrathecal fentanyl to spinal anesthesia is effective for

  15. Extrapolating the Acute Behavioral Effects of Toluene from 1-Hour to 24-Hour Exposures in Rats: Roles of Dose Metric, and Metabolic and Behavioral Tolerance.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research on the acute effects of volatile organic compounds (VQCs) suggests that extrapolation from short (~ 1 h) to long durations (up to 4 h) may be improved by using estimates of brain toluene concentration (Br[Tol]) instead of cumulative inhaled dose (C x t) as a metri...

  16. Selecting against S1P3 enhances the acute cardiovascular tolerability of 3-(N-benzyl)aminopropylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jeffrey J; Doherty, George; Toth, Leslie; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Forrest, Michael; Sun, Shu-Yu; West, Sarah; Xie, Huijuan; Nomura, Naomi; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne

    2004-07-01

    Structurally modified 3-(N-benzylamino)propylphosphonic acid S1P receptor agonists that maintain affinity for S1P1, and have decreased affinity for S1P3 are efficacious, but exhibit decreased acute cardiovascular toxicity in rodents than do nonselective agonists.

  17. Acute paraquat exposure determines dose-dependent oxidative injury of multiple organs and metabolic dysfunction in rats: impact on exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo D; Gonçalves, Reggiani V; Cupertino, Marli C; Santos, Eliziária C; Bigonha, Solange M; Fernandes, Geraldo J M; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Natali, Antônio J

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the pathological morphofunctional adaptations related to the imbalance of exercise tolerance triggered by paraquat (PQ) exposure in rats. The rats were randomized into four groups with eight animals each: (a) SAL (control): 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution; (b) PQ10: PQ 10 mg/kg; (c) PQ20: PQ 20 mg/kg; and (d) PQ30: PQ 30 mg/kg. Each group received a single injection of PQ. After 72 hours, the animals were subjected to an incremental aerobic running test until fatigue in order to determine exercise tolerance, blood glucose and lactate levels. After the next 24 h, lung, liver and skeletal muscle were collected for biometric, biochemical and morphological analyses. The animals exposed to PQ exhibited a significant anticipation of anaerobic metabolism during the incremental aerobic running test, a reduction in exercise tolerance and blood glucose levels as well as increased blood lactate levels during exercise compared to control animals. PQ exposure increased serum transaminase levels and reduced the glycogen contents in liver tissue and skeletal muscles. In the lung, the liver and the skeletal muscle, PQ exposure also increased the contents of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, superoxide dismutase and catalase, as well as a structural remodelling compared to the control group. All these changes were dose-dependent. Reduced exercise tolerance after PQ exposure was potentially influenced by pathological remodelling of multiple organs, in which glycogen depletion in the liver and skeletal muscle and the imbalance of glucose metabolism coexist with the induction of lipid, protein and DNA oxidation, a destructive process not counteracted by the upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27277193

  18. Analgesic activity and safety of ash of silver used in Indian system of medicine in mice: A reverse pharmacological study

    PubMed Central

    Inder, Deep; Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Bajaj, Vijay Kumar; Kumar, Pawan; Gupta, Navin; Singh, Jasbir

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the analgesic activity of ash of silver used in Indian system of medicine and to explore its safety. Materials and Methods: Albino mice of either sex (20-30 gm) were used to investigate the role of ash of silver against noxious stimuli: thermal (Eddy's hot plate and analgesiometer), mechanical (tail clip), and chemical (0.6% acetic acid induced writhing). An effort was made to find nature and site of action of ash of silver following naloxone pre-treatment. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and lethal dosage 50 (LD50) were also studied along with toxicological aspects of ash of silver. Results: Test drug (ash of silver) at a dose of 50 mg/kg p.o exhibited analgesic activity against thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli. Analgesic effects were compared with the standard drug, morphine, in thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli and to aspirin in chemical stimulus. Analgesic activity of the test drug was reduced following naloxone pre-treatment. MTD was found out to be greater than 1.5 g/kg p.o. LD50 was 2 g/kg p.o. Fraction of mice showed symptoms of argyria as explained by autopsy reports. Conclusion: Test drug exhibited moderate analgesic activity at 50 mg/kg p.o against all type of noxious stimuli, also suggesting a role of opioidergic system. The ash of silver was been found to be safe upto a dose of 1.5 g/kg p.o. in mice without any untoward toxicity. Further studies are required to explore the effect of ash of silver on pain mediators and excitatory neurotransmitters like glutamate, aspartate, or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). PMID:22345869

  19. Analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of Sideritis lotsyi var. Mascaensis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Margarita; Rabanal Gallego, Rosa M

    2002-05-01

    The antiinflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of crude ethanol extracts of Sideritis lotsyi var. mascaensis (Lamiaceae), and chloroform and aqueous fractions were evaluated in mice using paw and ear oedema induced by carrageenan and 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-acetate (TPA), respectively, as inflammation models, the writhing test induced by acetic acid for evaluating analgesic activity and the disk-diffusion method for testing antimicrobial actions. The results obtained demonstrated significant topical antiinflammatory and analgesic activities for the ethanol extract and chloroform fraction, but no relevant antimicrobial activity against the microorganisms tested.

  20. Acute toxic effects of the herbicide formulation and the active ingredient used in cycloxydim-tolerant maize cultivation on embryos and larvae of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Lötters, Stefan; Veith, Michael; Viertel, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Most genetically engineered herbicide-tolerant crops are still awaiting approval in Europe. There is, however, a recent trend for the cultivation of cycloxydim-tolerant maize hybrids for use in maize production. We studied the acute toxic effects of the complementary herbicide Focus(®) Ultra and its active ingredient cycloxydim on embryos and early-stage larvae of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). The results indicate that the herbicide formulation is significantly more toxic than the active ingredient alone. Therefore, it is suggested that the added substances either solely or in a synergistic action with the active ingredient are responsible for adverse effects. The formulation was found to be moderately toxic to embryos but highly toxic to early larvae. Based on calculated teratogenic indices, both cycloxydim and Focus(®) Ultra seem to be non-teratogenic and also the minimum Focus(®) Ultra concentration to inhibit growth in embryos and larvae was close to the LC50 values. The data suggest that tests with the rainbow trout are not in all cases appropriate to assess the risk in aquatically developing anurans. This is demonstrated by 96-h LC50 values, which are for rainbow trout more than 50- to 20-fold higher than for early X. laevis larvae. However, based on worst-case predicted environmental concentrations for surface waters, there is apparently a large safety margin in field use of Focus(®) Ultra if buffer strips between the farm land and the amphibian habitats are regarded. PMID:25634323

  1. Synthesis and analgesic effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Jianguang; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xun, Xiaohong; Tang, Dongfang; Peng, Dezheng; Yi, Jianming; Liu, Zhonghua; Shi, Xiaoliu

    2014-08-01

    μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV) is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design. PMID:25123556

  2. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Jianguang; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xun, Xiaohong; Tang, Dongfang; Peng, Dezheng; Yi, Jianming; Liu, Zhonghua; Shi, Xiaoliu

    2014-01-01

    μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV) is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design. PMID:25123556

  3. Acute liver failure following cleft palate repair: a case of therapeutic acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Matthew L; Cheerharan, Meera; Kaufman, Stuart S; Reece-Stremtan, Sarah; Boyajian, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Background : Acetaminophen is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent in the pediatric population. While the hepatotoxic effects of the drug have been well recognized in cases of acute overdose and chronic supratherapeutic doses, the toxic effects of acetaminophen are rarely documented in cases where therapeutic guidelines are followed. Case : An 8-month-old boy underwent cleft palate repair and placement of bilateral myringotomy tubes. His anesthetic course was uneventful, consisting of maintenance with desflurane and fentanyl. He received acetaminophen for routine postoperative pain management and was tolerating liquids and discharged home on postoperative day 1. On day 3, the child was profoundly lethargic with multiple episodes of emesis and was taken to the emergency department. He suffered a 45-second tonic-clonic seizure in transport to the regional children's medical center, and initial laboratory results demonstrated acute hepatitis with AST 24,424 U/L, ALT 12,885 U/L, total bilirubin 3.1 mg/dL, and a serum acetaminophen level of 83 μg/mL. Aggressive supportive measures including blood products and periprocedural fresh frozen plasma, piperacillin/tazobactam, and intravenous infusions of N-acetylcysteine, sodium phenylacetate and sodium benzoate, carnitine, and citrulline were administered. His metabolic acidosis and acute hepatitis began to correct by day 4, and he was discharged home without further surgical intervention on day 15. Conclusion : Although acetaminophen is an effective and commonly used analgesic in pediatric practice, hepatotoxicity is a potentially devastating complication. This report challenges the appropriateness of existing guidelines for acetaminophen administration and emphasizes the importance of close follow-up and hydration after even relatively minor surgery.

  4. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) [Polygalaceae] root-bark aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A O

    2008-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) in mice and rats. The analgesic effect of SLE was evaluated by 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' analgesic test methods in mice; while its anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects were examined in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus models. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg) and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs for comparison. SLE (50-800 mg/kg i. p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally- and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. The plant's extract (SLE, 50-800 mg/kg p. o.) also dose-dependently and significantly inhibited (p < 0.05-0.001) fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation, and caused significant hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05-0.001) in normal (normoglycaemic) and STZ-treated diabetic (hyperglycaemic) rats. The results of this experimental animal study indicate that S. longepedunculata root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties. These findings lend pharmacological credence to the anecdotal, folkloric and ethnomedical uses of S. longepedunculata root-bark in the treatment, management and/or control of painful, arthritic, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in some rural communities of South Africa. PMID:18046514

  5. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E; Chan, Philip K; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2011-02-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥ 300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD.

  6. Can Acute Pain Treatment Reduce Postsurgical Comorbidity after Breast Cancer Surgery? A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Hosokawa, Toyoshi; Okamoto, Akiko; Matsuda, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Yosuke; Yamakita, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Sawa, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Regional analgesia, opioids, and several oral analgesics are commonly used for the treatment of acute pain after breast cancer surgery. While all of these treatments can suppress the acute postsurgical pain, there is growing evidence that suggests that the postsurgical comorbidity will differ in accordance with the type of analgesic used during the surgery. Our current study reviewed the effect of analgesics used for acute pain treatments on the major comorbidities that occur after breast cancer surgery. A considerable number of clinical studies have been performed to investigate the relationship between the acute analgesic regimen and common comorbidities, including inadequate quality of recovery after the surgery, persistent postsurgical pain, and cancer recurrence. Previous studies have shown that the choice of the analgesic modality does affect the postsurgical comorbidity. In general, the use of regional analgesics has a beneficial effect on the occurrence of comorbidity. In order to determine the best analgesic choice after breast cancer surgery, prospective studies that are based on a clear definition of the comorbidity state will need to be undertaken in the future. PMID:26495309

  7. [A novel analgesics made from Cannabis].

    PubMed

    Szendrei, Kálmán

    2004-01-20

    Bayer AG has recently announced that it acquired exclusive rights for the marketing of GW Pharmaceuticals' new medicine Sativex in Europe and in other regions. Sativex is a sublingual spray on Cannabis extract basis, and is equipped with an electronic tool to facilitate accurate dosing and to prevent misuses. It is standardized for the THC and CBD. The new analgesic is proposed for the treatment of muscle spasticity and pains accompanying multiple sclerosis and as an efficient analgetic for neurogenic pain not responding well to opioids and to other therapies available. The entirely new mechanism of action through the recently discovered cannabinoid receptor system may offer a real therapeutic potential to the drug. Although the Government of Netherlands has authorized the sale of pharmaceutical grade Cannabis herb by pharmacies in the Netherlands, the availability on the pharmaceutical market of the registered preparation may render requests for the authorization of the smoking of Cannabis herb (marihuana) by individuals suffering of multiple sclerosis, neurogenic pain, AIDS wasting syndrome unnecessary. Nevertheless, the "old chameleon" plant Cannabis appears to gradually regain its previous status in mainstream therapy and pharmacy. As long as the plant Cannabis and its products continue to be classified as narcotic drugs, medical use of the new preparation will need close supervision. PMID:15042867

  8. Catastrophizing delays the analgesic effect of distraction.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Witmer, Kenny; Simango, Mpepera; Carteret, Alene; Loggia, Marco L; Campbell, James N; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R

    2010-05-01

    Behavioral analgesic techniques such as distraction reduce pain in both clinical and experimental settings. Individuals differ in the magnitude of distraction-induced analgesia, and additional study is needed to identify the factors that influence the pain relieving effects of distraction. Catastrophizing, a set of negative emotional and cognitive processes, is widely recognized to be associated with increased reports of pain. We sought to evaluate the relationship between catastrophizing and distraction analgesia. Healthy participants completed three sessions in a randomized order. In one session (Pain Alone), pain was induced by topical application of a 10% capsaicin cream and simultaneous administration of a tonic heat stimulus. In another session (Pain+Distraction), identical capsaicin+heat application procedures were followed, but subjects played video games that required a high level of attention. During both sessions, verbal ratings of pain were obtained and participants rated their degree of catastrophizing. During the other session (Distraction Alone) subjects played the video games in the absence of any pain stimulus. Pain was rated significantly lower during the distraction session compared to the "Pain Alone" session. In addition, high catastrophizers rated pain significantly higher regardless of whether the subjects were distracted. Catastrophizing did not influence the overall degree of distraction analgesia; however, early in the session high catastrophizers had little distraction analgesia, though later in the session low and high catastrophizers rated pain similarly. These results suggest that both distraction and catastrophizing have substantial effects on experimental pain in normal subjects and these variables interact as a function of time.

  9. Analgesic activity of the lignans from Lychnophora ericoides.

    PubMed

    Borsato, M L; Grael, C F; Souza, G E; Lopes, N P

    2000-12-01

    Lychnophora ericoides is a Brazilian medicinal plant that is commercially available as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. The extract from roots, which yielded 10 lignans, showed analgesic activity in the mouse writhing test and the lignan, cubebin, was one of the most active. Anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activities from cubebin (10 mg/kg) revealed no significant effects. In addition two previously unknown methyl clusin derivatives are reported. PMID:11190401

  10. Use and abuse of over-the-counter analgesic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, F V; Fraser, M I

    1998-01-01

    Pain and discomfort in everyday life are often treated with over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic medications. These drugs are remarkably safe, but serious side effects can occur. Up to 70% of the population in Western countries uses analgesics regularly, primarily for headaches, other specific pains and febrile illness. It is not known whether the patterns of use are consistent with good pain management practices. OTC analgesics are also widely used to treat dysphoric mood states and sleep disturbances, and high levels of OTC analgesic medication use are associated with psychiatric illness, particularly depressive symptoms, and the use of alcohol, nicotine and caffeine. More than 4 g per day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or acetaminophen over long periods is considered abuse. People using excessive amounts of OTC analgesics may need more effective treatments for chronic pain, depression or dysthymia. The possibility that these drugs have subtle reinforcing properties needs to be investigated. Certainly phenacetin, which was taken off the market in the 1970s, had intoxicating effects. A better understanding of patterns of use is needed to determine the extent of problem use of OTC analgesics, and whether health could be improved by educating people about the appropriate use of these drugs. PMID:9505057

  11. [Dextromethorphan enhances analgesic activity of propacetamol--experimental study].

    PubMed

    Dobrogowski, Jan; Wordliczek, Jerzy; Przewłocka, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    While many pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that the addition of N-methyl-d--aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as dextromethorphan, to opioid analgesics, such as morphine may enhance the analgesic effects. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of non-competitive NMDA antagonists and paracetamol (propacetamol) on pain threshold and analgesic potency of this drugs and their combinations in formalin model for pain in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of paracetamol only in doses of 100 g/kg or higher resulted in increase of pain threshold in tail flick and paw pressure tests. The results of our study suggest that there was no significant difference in pain threshold between separate administration of dextromethorphan and in combination with paracetamol. In a formalin model for pain we have shown that paracetamol in non-analgesic doses (10 mg/kg) administered in combination with dextrometorphan, ketamine and mamantine was more effective than those drugs given separately but the best analgesic effect was obtained when combination of paracetamol and dextromethorphan was applied. The addition of higher doses of these combined drugs, that is paracetamol and all three NMDA antagonists did not result in enhancement of dose-dependant analgesia. In conclusion it should be stated that NMDA antagonists improve analgesic effect of paracetamol in the formalin model for pain. although only to a limited extend. PMID:17037292

  12. Testing and comparison of non-opioid analgesics in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C W; MacIver, D N; Newman, L C

    2001-07-01

    Because of the lack of information about effective analgesics in non-mammalian vertebrates, the potency of various non-opioid agents were tested in a model of analgesia by using Northern grass frogs (Rana pipiens). This alternative model has been used widely for investigating opioid analgesic action. Potential non-opioid analgesics tested included antipsychotic, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, antihistamine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID), and partial opioid agents. Northern grass frogs were acclimated to lab conditions in individual cages. Drugs were administered systemically through the dorsal lymph sac, and analgesic effects were estimated by using the acetic acid test (AAT). The AAT is done by placing logarithmic dilutions of acid dropwise on the dorsum of the animal's thigh until a wiping response is obtained. At various doses, chlorpromazine and haloperidol (antipsychotics), chlordiazepoxide (a benzodiazepine), buprenorphine (a partial opioid agonist), and diphenhydramine (a histamine antagonist) produced moderate to strong analgesic effects. Indomethacin and ketorolac (NSAIDs), butorphanol (a partial opioid agonist), and pentobarbital (a barbiturate) produced weaker but noticeable analgesic effects. Our results are the first to document the effectiveness of a wide array of pharmacologically active agents in a novel amphibian model for analgesia. These findings provide needed data regarding the use of alternative, non-opioid agents for the treatment of pain in amphibians and other poikilothermic species. PMID:11451391

  13. Pharmacological evaluation of Mallotus philippinensis (Lam.) Muell.-Arg. fruit hair extract for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Ghildiyal, Shivani; Nath, Gopal; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently, we observed wound healing activity of 50% ethanol extract of Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP) fruit hairs extract (MPE). In several intestinal infections, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we evaluated the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE in different rat experimental models. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan (acute) and turpentine oil induced formalin (subacute) induced paw edema and while granuloma pouch (subacute) in rats. Analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE was undertaken by tail-flick, hot-plate, and acetic acid-induced writhing tests while pentobarbitone-induced hypnotic potentiation in rats. Results: MPE at a dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h after their administration showed inhibition of formalin-induced paw edema by 41.60% (P < 0.001) and carrageenan-induced paw edema by 55.30% (P < 0.001). After 7 days of treatments, MPE showed 38.0% (P < 0.001) inhibition against formalin-induced paw edema and reduced weight of turpentine-induced granuloma pouch by 29.6% (P < 0.01) and volume of exudates by 26.1% (P < 0.01), respectively. MPE (200 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 120 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail flick method and increased reaction time in the hot-plate test while the reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 45.7% (P < 0.001). The pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis model showed potentiation, as defined by increased duration of sleep in treated group rats as compared to control. Conclusion: Thus, the study revealed MPE is effective in reducing acute and subacute inflammation and showed effective and similar analgesic activity. This seemed to be safe in the treatment of pain and inflammation. PMID:27069718

  14. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  15. Intracuff alkalized lidocaine reduces sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of intracuff alkalized lidocaine on sedative/analgesic requirements for mechanically ventilated patients and its consequence on patient-ventilator interaction. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 patients who expected to require ventilatory support for a period of more than 48 h were randomly assigned to groups S and L. In group S, the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs were inflated with normal saline. In group L, the ETT cuffs were inflated with lidocaine 2% and sodium bicarbonate 8.4%. The investigator and the surgical intensive care unit staff were blinded to the nature of cuff-filled solutions. Sedation was maintained with propofol and fentanyl infusions. The total requirements for propofol and fentanyl, frequency and severity of cough and number of ineffective triggering during the first 24 h of mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: There was a significant reduction (about 30%) in the requirements for propofol and fentanyl in patients who received intracuff alkalinized lidocaine; P < 0.001. The frequency and severity of cough were significantly lower in group L compared with group S and the frequency of ineffective triggering was significantly lower in group L; P < 0.001 for both comparisons. Conclusion: Intracuff alkalized lidocaine increases ETT tolerance and hence, decreases sedatives/analgesics requirements for mechanically ventilated patients. This results in improved patient-ventilator synchronization. PMID:25422600

  16. Randomized comparison of the efficacies and tolerabilities of three artemisinin-based combination treatments for children with acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Onyamboko, M A; Fanello, C I; Wongsaen, K; Tarning, J; Cheah, P Y; Tshefu, K A; Dondorp, A M; Nosten, F; White, N J; Day, N P J

    2014-09-01

    An open-label, randomized controlled trial was carried out in 2011-2012 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to test the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the artemisinin-based combination treatments dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, amodiaquine-artesunate, and artemether-lumefantrine. Six hundred eighty-four children aged 3 to 59 months with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were randomly allocated to each study arm. Children were hospitalized for 3 days, given supervised treatment, and followed up weekly for 42 days. All regimens were well tolerated and rapidly effective. The median parasitemia clearance half-life was 2.2 h, and half-lives were similar between arms (P=0.19). The PCR-uncorrected cure rates by day 42 were 73.0% for amodiaquine-artesunate, 70.2% for artemether-lumefantrine, and 86.3% for dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (P=0.001). Early treatment failure occurred in three patients (0.5%), one in each arm. The PCR-corrected cure rates were 93.4% for amodiaquine-artesunate, 92.7% for artemether-lumefantrine, and 94.3% for dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (P=0.78). The last provided a longer posttreatment prophylactic effect than did the other two treatments. The day 7 plasma concentration of piperaquine was below 30 ng/ml in 47% of the children treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and the day 7 lumefantrine concentration was below 280 ng/ml in 37.0% of children who received artemether-lumefantrine. Thus, although cure rates were all satisfactory, they could be improved by increasing the dose. (This study has been registered with the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register [www.isrctn.org] under registration no. ISRCTN20984426.).

  17. The Diversion of Prescription Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Lugo, Yamilka; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drug diversion involves the unlawful channeling of regulated pharmaceuticals from legal sources to the illicit marketplace, and can occur along all points in the drug delivery process -- from the original manufacturing site, to the wholesale distributor, the physician's office, the retail pharmacy, or the patient. Although a number of recent scientific papers have discussed the problems associated with diversion, empirical data on the scope and magnitude of diversion are limited in the literature. This paper presents findings from a national diversion survey being conducted as part of risk management initiatives supported by Denver Health and Hospital Authority, designed to monitor the abuse and diversion of a variety of prescription opioid analgesics. On a quarterly basis, diversion investigators in 300 jurisdictions distributed throughout the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are sent short questionnaires designed to elicit data on the extent of drug diversion in their areas. During the 20-quarter survey period reported in this paper, a total of 64,655 cases of prescription drug diversion were reported from all of the participating sites. The most widely diverted opioid was hydrocodone, in that it was mentioned in 38.2% of the cases, followed by oxycodone, mentioned in 24.3% of the cases. By contrast, the proportions of cases in which other opioids were mentioned were significantly smaller. The diversion of opioids appears in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, with especially high concentrations in rural areas. How all of these prescription opioids are being diverted to the street, however, is not altogether clear, and in many ways, diversion is a “black box” requiring concentrated systematic study. PMID:25267926

  18. Analgesic effect of tianeptine in mice.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, I T; Cinar, M G; Aytemir, M; Tuglular, I

    1999-01-01

    The effects of tianeptine, a novel and unusual tricyclic antidepressant drug, on tail-flick and hot-plate tests, which are two thermal analgesia evaluating methods, have been investigated in mice. Tianeptine (5 and 10 mg/kg), para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (100 mg/kg) and a combination of pCPA and tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or saline were injected to mice intraperitoneally. pCPA (100 mg/kg) was injected 24 h before tianeptine or saline treatment when it was combined with tinaeptine (10 mg/kg) or tested alone. The tail-flick latencies and hot-plate reaction times of the mice were measured between 15th and 180th minutes following injections. Tianeptine (10 mg/kg) exhibited a significant antinociceptive activity that could be measured by both tests as compared to groups which were treated with saline or pCPA alone between 15th and 180th min of the observation period. The lower dose of tianeptine (5 mg/kg) or pCPA (100 mg/kg) did not produce any significant changes on tail-flick latency or hot-plate reaction time of the mice. However, pretreatment with pCPA completely blocked the antinociceptive effect induced by tianeptine (10 mg/kg) in both tests used in the present study. Furthermore, tianeptine (10 mg/kg) did not cause any significant impairment effects on rotarod performance of the mice. Our results suggested that tianeptine has a prominent thermal antinociceptive activity in mice and that increased serotonergic activity may be responsible for the analgesic effect of tianeptine.

  19. Topical and peripheral ketamine as an analgesic.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana

    2014-07-01

    Ketamine, in subanesthetic doses, produces systemic analgesia in chronic pain settings, an action largely attributed to block of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the spinal cord and inhibition of central sensitization processes. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors also are located peripherally on sensory afferent nerve endings, and this provided the initial impetus for exploring peripheral applications of ketamine. Ketamine also produces several other pharmacological actions (block of ion channels and receptors, modulation of transporters, anti-inflammatory effects), and while these may require higher concentrations, after topical (e.g., as gels, creams) and peripheral application (e.g., localized injections), local tissue concentrations are higher than those after systemic administration and can engage lower affinity mechanisms. Peripheral administration of ketamine by localized injection produced some alterations in sensory thresholds in experimental trials in volunteers and in complex regional pain syndrome subjects in experimental settings, but many variables were unaltered. There are several case reports of analgesia after topical application of ketamine given alone in neuropathic pain, but controlled trials have not confirmed such effects. A combination of topical ketamine with several other agents produced pain relief in case, and case series, reports with response rates of 40% to 75% in retrospective analyses. In controlled trials of neuropathic pain with topical ketamine combinations, there were improvements in some outcomes, but optimal dosing and drug combinations were not clear. Given orally (as a gargle, throat swab, localized peritonsillar injections), ketamine produced significant oral/throat analgesia in controlled trials in postoperative settings. Topical analgesics are likely more effective in particular conditions (patient factors, disease factors), and future trials of topical ketamine should include a consideration of factors that could predispose

  20. A pilot study into the problematic use of opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David T; Allan, Laurie; Griffiths, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the use of strong opioid analgesic drugs for chronic non-cancer pain. Specialists have concluded that fears of problematic drug use are often unfounded. In contrast, others claim the existence of significant problems.'Problematic drug use' includes the following definitions; addiction, abuse, physiological dependence and tolerance.We present a case study and the results of a pilot, longitudinal, cohort study, via a pilot questionnaire, of 22 chronic pain clinic patients following a trial of opioid drugs. The results suggest that chronic non-cancer pain patients can be maintained on opioids with few problems, and likewise can withdraw with minimal adverse effects, other than a return of pain.

  1. Analgesic effect of Harpagophytum procumbens on postoperative and neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jae Goo; Han, Daeseok; Kim, Yun Tai

    2014-01-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens, also known as Devil's Claw, has historically been used to treat a wide range of conditions, including pain and arthritis. The study was designed to investigate whether H. procumbens extracts exhibit analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI) rats. The whole procedure was performed on male SD rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) test measured by von Frey filaments. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization (USVs). The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with 300 mg/kg H. procumbens extract increased significantly; on the contrary, the number of 22-27 kHz USVs of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation. After 21 days of continuous treatment with H. procumbens extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity responses by MWT, compared with the control group. These results suggest that H. procumbens extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of acute postoperative pain and chronic neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:24441655

  2. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2013-01-01

    Background. In folk medicine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is used as a remedy for a variety of diseases. This study investigates the in vivo antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of EVOO on mice and rats. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests in mice, the analgesic effect of EVOO was evaluated. Acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used as standard drugs, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by means of the carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats using acetylsalicylic acid and dexamethasone as standard drugs. Last, the xenograft model in athymic mice was used to evaluate the anticancer effect in vivo. Results. EVOO significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes and reduces acute and inflammatory pain in the two phases of the formalin test. It has also a better effect than Dexamethasone in the anti-inflammatory test. Finally, the intraperitoneal administration of EVOO affects the growth of HCT 116 tumours xenografted in athymic mice. Conclusion. EVOO has a significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. However, further detailed studies are required to determine the active component responsible for these effects and mechanism pathway. PMID:24455277

  3. Analgesic effects of Huwentoxin-IV on animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhe; Tang, Dongfang; Xun, Xiaohong; Liu, Lichao; Li, Xianlei; Nie, Dongsong; Xiang, Yang; Yi, Jianming; Yi, Jizu

    2014-01-01

    Huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), a peptide with 35 amino acid residues, was discovered in the venom of spider Ornithoctonus huwena. The peptide had an inhibitory effect on a tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channel with highly sensitive to Nav1.7, an attractive target for pain release therapy. In this study we further demonstrated the analgesic effects of HWTX-IV using mouse and rat as an inflammatory pain model and/or a neuropathic pain models. In the both cases, the analgesic effects of the peptide were dose-dependent, and statistically significant. In the inflammatory model, 100 µg/kg of HWTX-IV produced an efficient reversal of hyperalgesia up to 63.6% after injection of formalin in rats with the efficiency equivalent to that of morphine at 50 µg/kg, and 200 µg/kg of HWTX-IV produced protective effect up to 55.6% after injection of acetic acid with the efficiency equivalent to that of morphine at 100 µg/kg. In the spinal nerve model, the peptide produced the longer and higher reversal effect on allodynia than Mexiletine. These results demonstrated that HWTX-IV released efficiently the acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in these animals, suggesting that HWTX-IV was a potential and efficient candidate for further clinical drug development against inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:24188048

  4. Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of RBP-7000 Once-Monthly Risperidone for the Treatment of Acute Schizophrenia: An 8-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase 3 Study.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Azmi F; Henderson, David C; Fava, Maurizio; Fudala, Paul J; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Kouassi, Alex; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    RBP-7000 is a sustained-release formulation of risperidone for the treatment of schizophrenia, designed to be administered by once-monthly subcutaneous injection using the ATRIGEL delivery system. This study assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of RBP-7000 compared with placebo in subjects with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia. Inpatients were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of double-blind treatment with subcutaneous 90 or 120 mg of RBP-7000 or placebo. Efficacy was evaluated using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of the change from baseline (the last nonmissing value before the first dose of RBP-7000 or placebo on day 1) to end of the study in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (primary efficacy measure) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity score (secondary efficacy measure). The least-squares means from the repeated-measures analysis for the change from baseline in the PANSS total scores for placebo was -9.219 (SE, 1.2162). RBP-7000 produced statistically and clinically significant differences in mean reductions from baseline in PANSS total scores (90-mg RBP-7000 compared with placebo, -6.148 [-9.982 to -2.314], P = 0.0004; 120-mg RBP-7000 compared with placebo, -7.237 [-11.045 to -3.429], P < 0.0001) and significantly improved Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores (90-mg RBP-7000 compared with placebo, -0.350 [-0.557 to -0.143], P = 0.0002; 120-mg RBP-7000 compared with placebo, -0.396 [-0.602 to -0.190], P < 0.0001). Both RBP-7000 dosages were generally well tolerated. The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events in RBP-7000 groups compared with placebo were somnolence, weight gain, and akathisia. The overall incidence of extrapyramidal syndrome-related effects was low and similar across groups. RBP-7000 may provide a new, long-acting alternative treatment for use in adults with acute schizophrenia.

  5. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705].

    PubMed

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). METHODS/DESIGN: This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. CONCLUSION: We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  6. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

    PubMed Central

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain. PMID:11716789

  7. [Fast-dissolving sublingual tablets of piroxicam versus naproxen in the treatment of recurrent acute osteoarthrosis. Multicenter clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Consoli, G; Covelli, M; Di Matteo, L; Marcolongo, R; Tirri, G; La Montagna, G; Pipitone, V

    1994-03-01

    An open comparative study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of piroxicam FDDF, for sublingual administration, versus naproxen in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Sixty-one patients with acute-phase osteoarthritis involving various joints are reported. They were treated with 20 mg/day piroxicam FDDF or with 1000 mg/day naproxen for a total of 4 weeks. Drug efficacy was evaluated on the base of the variation of spontaneous pain, pain on motion, functional limitation and capacity to perform a specific activity. The intensity of spontaneous pain on the first day showed a statistically significant improvement with both drugs, but the onset of analgesia was only after 15 minutes with piroxicam and after 1 hour with naproxen. The improvement in pain intensity increased on the first day and until the 7th day with both drugs, but the comparative analysis between the analgesic efficacy of the two treatments proved to be favourable to piroxicam. On the 7th day, pain on motion and the capacity to perform a specific activity showed a statistically significant improvement with both drugs, but the comparative analysis between the two treatments proved to be favourable to piroxicam. The two drugs showed the same efficacy in functional restriction. The local and systemic tolerability of piroxicam was good. Only 5 patients experienced 6 systemic side-effects, and 1 patients showed local side-effects, but 11 patients of the naproxen group showed 12 systemic side-effects. Thus piroxicam showed a better analgesic and anti-inflammatory efficacy than naproxen. Piroxicam proved to have a better systemic tolerability than naproxen. The local tolerability of piroxicam FDDF was good.

  8. [Acute effects of transdermal administration of nitroglycerin on effort tolerance and myocardial perfusion, evaluated by Tl-201 scintigraphy, in patients with stable effort angina].

    PubMed

    Novo, S; Liquori, M; Abrignani, M G; Giuliano, F; Panno, V; Fazio, M; Adamo, L; Corda, M; Indovina, A; di Maria, G

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the transdermal application of nitroglycerin (NGT) on exercise tolerated and regional myocardial perfusion, as evaluated by 201 thallium stress scintigraphy, in patients with stable effort angina. We studied 20 patients, 15 men and 5 women, aged between 43 and 68 years, with average age of 55 +/- 8 years, suffering from effort angina, whose angina threshold was stable in 3 stress testing performed in the week before the study started. The patients, after a pharmacological washout of 1 week, underwent 2 exercise testing 20 hours after the application of a patch containing placebo or 10 mg NGT, with an interval of 7 days. 60-90 s before stress testing was interrupted, 2 mCi of thallium 201 were injected in an antecubital vein of the arm. The scintigraphic images were obtained soon in the 0, 45 and 90 degree views and after 4 hours reperfusion. Under placebo patch all patients interrupted ergometer test for angina, while under the patch containing active NGT angina was present in 11/20 patients and 9 patients stopped the test because of muscular exhaustion. NGT induced an increase of the ergometer test duration (+26%); this difference was statistically significant. The ST segment downsloping decreased significantly both at maximal common work and at exercise peak after NGT application in comparison with placebo. The perfusional defects observed on the scintigraphic images obtained soon after the exercise (and reversible after 4 hours of reperfusion) on placebo patch, diminished significantly after NGT and the captation index lung/heart decreased also significantly (from 49 to 41%), showing so an improvement of cardiac performance. In conclusion the transdermal application of NGT, in patients with effort angina, demonstrated to have antianginal and antiischemic effect, reducing the number of patients interrupting the stress testing for angina, increasing the exercise tolerated and diminishing the ST segment

  9. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to evaluate analgesic activity of Terminalia chebula in healthy human volunteers using a mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Pokuri, Venkata Kishan; Kumar, Chiranjeevi Uday; Pingali, Usharani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate analgesic activity and safety of single oral dose (1000 mg) of Terminalia chebula using a mechanical pain model in healthy human volunteers. Material and Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either single oral dose of 2 capsules of T. chebula 500 mg each or identical placebo capsules in a double-blinded manner. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesy meter (Randall–Selitto test) before and 3 h after administration of test drug. The parameters evaluated were pain threshold force and time; pain tolerance force and time. A washout period of 1-week was given for crossover between active drug and placebo. Results: Terminalia chebula significantly increased the mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time, and pain tolerance force and time compared to placebo (P < 0.001). The mean percentage change for pain threshold force and time (20.8% and 21.0%) was increased more than that of pain tolerance force and time (13.4% and 13.4%). No adverse drug reaction was reported with either of the study medications during the study period. Conclusion: T. chebula significantly increased pain threshold and pain tolerance compared to placebo. Both the study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug in patients suffering from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other painful conditions. PMID:27625480

  10. Consequences associated with nonnarcotic analgesics in the fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R G

    1985-04-01

    Nonnarcotic analgesics include well-known, widely used substances such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and acetaminophen. ASA is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, and this mechanism is responsible for many potential toxicities in the fetus and newborn. These may include bleeding, altered renal function, and constriction of the ductus arteriosus in addition to analgesia. As such, ASA is frequently avoided during gestation and the immediate neonatal period. Acetaminophen is less well recognized as an agent with activity outside the central nervous system. It does not possess antiinflammatory activity like other substances that inhibit prostaglandins but has been shown to be an analgesic with potency comparable to ASA. This is believed to be by inhibition of brain prostaglandin synthetase. We have determined by using the chronically catheterized sheep fetus that acetaminophen has potent activity on the ductus arteriosus and produces a constriction, in therapeutic analgesic quantities, comparable to ASA. Thus, acetaminophen may be a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin function in the fetus.

  11. Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study.

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, M.; Hunter, K. M.; Baker, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients. PMID:10323113

  12. Effect of antipyretic analgesics on immune responses to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ezzeldin; Moody, M Anthony; Walter, Emmanuel B

    2016-09-01

    While antipyretic analgesics are widely used to ameliorate vaccine adverse reactions, their use has been associated with blunted vaccine immune responses. Our objective was to review literature evaluating the effect of antipyretic analgesics on vaccine immune responses and to highlight potential underlying mechanisms. Observational studies reporting on antipyretic use around the time of immunization concluded that their use did not affect antibody responses. Only few randomized clinical trials demonstrated blunted antibody response of unknown clinical significance. This effect has only been noted following primary vaccination with novel antigens and disappears following booster immunization. The mechanism by which antipyretic analgesics reduce antibody response remains unclear and not fully explained by COX enzyme inhibition. Recent work has focused on the involvement of nuclear and subcellular signaling pathways. More detailed immunological investigations and a systems biology approach are needed to precisely define the impact and mechanism of antipyretic effects on vaccine immune responses. PMID:27246296

  13. Analgesic use and sex steroid hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Margaret A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Missmer, Stacey A.; Hankinson, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Prior epidemiologic studies suggest that regular use of analgesics may decrease risk of breast and ovarian cancer. We explored possible hormone-mediated mechanisms for these associations by examining the relationship between use of aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen and sex steroid hormone concentrations among 740 postmenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study. All women reported their analgesic use in 1988 or 1990 and provided a blood sample in 1989-90. We calculated adjusted geometric mean estrogen and androgen levels for each category of analgesic use, and calculated the p-value for trend with increasing frequency of use. There was no association between days of use per month of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, or acetaminophen in 1990 and hormone levels (all p-trend≥0.09). However, we observed significant inverse trends between the estimated number of aspirin tablets per month in 1988 and concentrations of estrone (p-trend=0.04) and estrone sulfate (p-trend=0.03). In analyses of total (aspirin and non-aspirin) NSAID use in 1990, women who used NSAIDs at least 15 days per month had significantly lower levels of estradiol compared to women with no NSAID use (p-trend=0.03). Frequency of use of all analgesics (aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen) in 1990 was inversely associated with concentrations of estradiol (p-trend=0.001), free estradiol (p-trend=0.01), estrone sulfate (p-trend=0.03), and the ratio of estradiol to testosterone (p-trend=0.04). Among postmenopausal women, regular users of aspirin and other analgesics may have lower estrogen levels than non-users, which could contribute to a decreased risk of breast or ovarian cancer among analgesic users. PMID:20332258

  14. International renal-cell cancer study. II. Analgesics.

    PubMed

    McCredie, M; Pommer, W; McLaughlin, J K; Stewart, J H; Lindblad, P; Mandel, J S; Mellemgaard, A; Schlehofer, B; Niwa, S

    1995-01-27

    There has been concern about the role of analgesics in the development of renal-cell cancer, although a few studies have reported moderately elevated risks with regular or long-term use. In a large international case-control study of renal-cell cancer we examined, among other hypotheses, the effect of phenacetin-containing and of other types of analgesics: paracetamol (acetaminophen), salicylates (mainly aspirin) and pyrazolones (e.g., antipyrine or phenazone). Relative risks, adjusted for the effects of age, sex, body-mass index, tobacco smoking and study centre, were not significantly increased with intake of phenacetin, either when lifetime consumption was categorized at the level of > or = 0.1 kg or when subjects were subdivided further by amount. Nor were paracetamol, salicylates or pyrazolones linked with renal-cell cancer. No consistently increasing risks with consumption level was found. The lack of association was not altered by restricting analgesic use to that which occurred 5 or 10 years before the defined "cut-off" date or when analysis was restricted to exclusive users of a particular type of analgesic. Neither was the risk influenced by the rate of consumption or whether the consumption had occurred at a young age. Our study provides clear evidence that aspirin is unrelated to renal-cell cancer risk, and our findings do not support the hypothesis that analgesics containing phenacetin or paracetamol increase the risk, although the number of "regular" users and the amount of these types of analgesic consumed were too small to confidently rule out a minor carcinogenic effect of phenacetin and paracetamol.

  15. [Opioid tolerance and dependence--pharmacological aspects].

    PubMed

    Jaba, I M; Luncanu, I; Mungiu, O C

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged opioids administration leads inevitably to tolerance and dependence, a phenomenon we meet more often in healthy people than in ill patients. Tolerance means a hypersensibility of neuronal membranes as well as changes in the number and affinity of opioid receptors, which implies intake of larger doses to obtain the initial effect. Physical dependence, quite different of the psychological one, is the appearance of abstinence syndrome on sudden interruption of opioid administration or on administration of an antagonist. There is usually cross-tolerance in opioids, but it can also be incomplete, when the initial opioid can be replaced with another one that produces a milder abstinence syndrome. Classically, metadone is used in long time therapy, after detoxification with an antagonist is performed (naloxon, naltrexon). Modern pharmacological alternatives are levo-alpha-acetyl-methadol (LAAM) and agonists-antagonists (butorphanol, buprenorphine, pentazocine, nalbuphine). An antagonist can also be used if associated with an alpha--stimulant (clonidine), in order to remove noradrenergic manifestations of abstinence syndrome. Now other therapeutical principles are being studied: enkephalinaze inhibitors to reduce the abstinence syndrome, NMDA receptor antagonists, NO sintetasis inhibitors, that facilitates opioid analgesia and hinders tolerance development; colecystokinin-receptors agonists or antagonists to reduce tolerance on morphine. A recent study showed that the concomitant administration of an opioid agonist (sufentanil) and a calcium channels blocker (nimodipine) not only prevents from tolerance development but also triggers hypersensibility to analgesic effects of the opioid. PMID:12092171

  16. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  17. Opioid Analgesics and Depressive Symptoms in Burn Patients: What Is the Real Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Narei; Jung, Myung Hun; Kim, Jee Wook; Chun, Wook; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kee, Baik Seok; Lee, Boung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Major burn injuries are strongly associated with both psychological trauma and severe pain, and opioids are the mainstay analgesics for the treatment of severe burn pain. The objectives of this study are to find the complex relationship between opioid dose, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms during the acute management of pain in burn patients. Methods The symptoms of depression and PTSD were assessed in 43 burn patients immediately following wound stabilization and 2 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Total opioid doses and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores obtained during the second evaluation were positively but weakly correlated after controlling for age and total burn surface area (R=0.33, p=0.03). Moreover, pain management with opioids was significantly more common in burn patients with low Clinician Administered PTSD Scale scores (evaluation 1) and high HAMD scores (evaluation 2) (F=6.66, p=0.001). Conclusion High opioid dose following acute burn trauma might have correlation with depressive symptoms. Monitoring of depressive symptoms may be important following acute burn trauma and consequent opioids pain management, particularly when PTSD symptoms appear minimal during the early stabilization of patients. PMID:27489384

  18. [Pregnancy and lactation period: Which local anesthetics and analgesics?].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show relevant aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. Common medication used in dental offices should be highlighted in special regard to the pregnant patient during dental treatment. The reader should gain more security in the election of the proper drugs for local anesthesia and oral analgesics. Local anaesthetics such as articain with adrenalin in a dilution of 1 : 200 000 can be used for dental treatment at any time. Paracetamol should be used as first line oral analgesic. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period. PMID:27142442

  19. Nonmedical use of opioid analgesics among Ontario students

    PubMed Central

    Brands, Bruna; Paglia-Boak, Angela; Sproule, Beth A.; Leslie, Karen; Adlaf, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the prevalence and the demographic predictors of nonmedical use of opioid analgesics in the Canadian adolescent population. DESIGN Data are based on self-reports derived from the 2007 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey, which is an anonymous, in-school, cross-sectional survey. SETTING Schools in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS A total of 2914 students in grades 7 to 12. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic predictors of nonmedical use of opioid analgesics during the past year and the sources of opioid analgesics. RESULTS Students ranged in age from 12 to 19 years (mean 15.0, SD 1.9) and 52% were male. Of the students surveyed, 20.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18.9% to 22.3%) reported using opioid analgesics at least once nonmedically during the past year, with 6.2% using exclusively nonmedically and 14.4% using nonmedically and medically. Female students (16.6%, CI 14.1% to 19.6%) were more likely than male students (12.0%, CI 10.0% to 14.2%) to have used opioid analgesics both nonmedically and medically in the past year, although exclusive nonmedical use was similar between female (6.7%, CI 5.3% to 8.5%) and male (5.8%, CI 4.5% to 7.3%) students. Among students who reported using opioid analgesics nonmedically, 72% reported obtaining them from home and only 6% reported obtaining them from friends. Nonmedical opioid analgesic users had higher past-year prevalences for alcohol use, daily smoking, and other illicit drug use compared with nonusers. CONCLUSION Nonmedical use of opioids is common among Ontario students. The motivation for using these medications without prescriptions or without medical supervision is not known. Students might have used these medications recreationally or for pain relief. Regardless of motivation, these medications are being used without medical supervision. It is important to note that the home is the main source for opioid analgesics in the absence of a prescription. Parents should be vigilant and educate

  20. Ethical Considerations for Analgesic Use in Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Matava, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of commonly used analgesics in athletes and the ethical implications of their use in athletic settings. Given the highly competitive nature of modern-day sports and the economic impact of athletic performance at elite levels, athletes feel more compelled than ever to play with injury, which has led to the widespread use of a variety of analgesic agents. An ethical dilemma often ensues for team physicians who must balance the medical implications of these drugs with pressure from players, coaches, and management. The most commonly used agents and their ethical and rational use are discussed. PMID:26832973

  1. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  2. Transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emma M; Game, David S; Lechler, Robert I

    2014-12-01

    Although transplantation has been a standard medical practice for decades, marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs and poor long-term graft survival remain important limitations in the field. Since the first solid organ transplant between the Herrick twins in 1954, transplantation immunology has sought to move away from harmful, broad-spectrum immunosuppressive regimens that carry with them the long-term risk of potentially life-threatening opportunistic infections, cardiovascular disease, and malignancy, as well as graft toxicity and loss, towards tolerogenic strategies that promote long-term graft survival. Reports of "transplant tolerance" in kidney and liver allograft recipients whose immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued for medical or non-compliant reasons, together with results from experimental models of transplantation, provide the proof-of-principle that achieving tolerance in organ transplantation is fundamentally possible. However, translating the reconstitution of immune tolerance into the clinical setting is a daunting challenge fraught with the complexities of multiple interacting mechanisms overlaid on a background of variation in disease. In this article, we explore the basic science underlying mechanisms of tolerance and review the latest clinical advances in the quest for transplantation tolerance. PMID:24213880

  3. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, a flaxseed lignan, exerts analgesic effects in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes: Engagement of antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pei; Mei, Qi-Yong; Ma, Li; Cui, Wu-Geng; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Dong-Ying; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Qin; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG), a predominant lignan in flaxseed, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential analgesic efficacy of SDG against diabetic neuropathic pain in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg), and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic instead of acute SDG treatment (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for three weeks) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice, and these analgesic actions persisted about three days when SDG treatment was terminated. Although chronic treatment of SDG to diabetic mice did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia, it greatly attenuated excessive oxidative stress in sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissues, and partially counteracted the condition of weight decrease. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of SDG were abolished by co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). These findings indicate that chronic SDG treatment can correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the analgesic actions of SDG in diabetic mice may be associated with its antioxidant activity. PMID:26494631

  4. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, a flaxseed lignan, exerts analgesic effects in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes: Engagement of antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pei; Mei, Qi-Yong; Ma, Li; Cui, Wu-Geng; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Dong-Ying; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Qin; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG), a predominant lignan in flaxseed, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential analgesic efficacy of SDG against diabetic neuropathic pain in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg), and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic instead of acute SDG treatment (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for three weeks) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice, and these analgesic actions persisted about three days when SDG treatment was terminated. Although chronic treatment of SDG to diabetic mice did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia, it greatly attenuated excessive oxidative stress in sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissues, and partially counteracted the condition of weight decrease. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of SDG were abolished by co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). These findings indicate that chronic SDG treatment can correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the analgesic actions of SDG in diabetic mice may be associated with its antioxidant activity.

  5. Assessing efficacy of non-opioid analgesics in experimental pain models in healthy volunteers: an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Staahl, Camilla; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    AIM Experimental pain models may help to evaluate the mechanisms of analgesics and target the clinical indications for their use. This review, the second in a series of two, addresses how the efficacy of non-opioid analgesics have been assessed in human volunteers using experimental pain models. METHODS A literature search was completed for randomized controlled studies that included human experimental pain models, healthy volunteers and non-opioid analgesics. RESULTS Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs worked against various types of acute pain as well as in hyperalgesia. Analgesia from paracetamol was difficult to detect in experimental pain and the pain needed to be assessed with very sensitive methods like evoked brain potentials. The N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists exemplified by ketamine generally needed strong, long-lasting or repeated pain in the skin for detectable analgesia, whereas pain in muscle and viscera generally was more easily attenuated. Gabapentin worked well in several models, particularly those inducing hyperalgesia, whereas lamotrigine was weak in modulation of experimental pain. Imipramine attenuated pain in most experimental models, whereas amitriptyline had weaker effects. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol attenuated pain in only a few models. CONCLUSIONS Pain induction and assessment are very important for the sensitivity of the pain models. Generally, experimental pain models need to be designed with careful consideration of the pharmacological mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of analgesics. The drawback with the different study designs is also discussed. This knowledge can aid the decisions that need to be taken when designing experimental pain studies for compounds entering Phase I and II trials. PMID:19740390

  6. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies.

  7. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  8. Analgesic use and the risk of primary adult brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kathleen M; Nabors, Louis B; Thompson, Zachary J; Rozmeski, Carrie M; Anic, Gabriella A; Olson, Jeffrey J; LaRocca, Renato V; Chowdhary, Sajeel A; Forsyth, Peter A; Thompson, Reid C

    2016-09-01

    Glioma and meningioma are uncommon tumors of the brain with few known risk factors. Regular use of aspirin has been linked to a lower risk of gastrointestinal and other cancers, though evidence for an association with brain tumors is mixed. We examined the association of aspirin and other analgesics with the risk of glioma and meningioma in a large US case-control study. Cases were persons recently diagnosed with glioma or meningioma and treated at medical centers in the southeastern US. Controls were persons sampled from the same communities as the cases combined with friends and other associates of the cases. Information on past use of analgesics (aspirin, other anti-inflammatory agents, and acetaminophen) was collected in structured interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for analgesic use adjusted for potential confounders. All associations were considered according to indication for use. A total of 1123 glioma cases, 310 meningioma cases and 1296 controls were included in the analysis. For indications other than headache, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report regular use of aspirin (OR 0.69; CI 0.56, 0.87), in a dose-dependent manner (P trend < 0.001). No significant associations were observed with other analgesics for glioma, or any class of pain reliever for meningioma. Results suggest that regular aspirin use may reduce incidence of glioma. PMID:26894804

  9. Antiinflammatory and analgesic effects of Eurycoma longifolia extracts.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Min; Woo, Sang-Uk; Choi, Min Sun; Park, Yu Na; Kim, Seung Hyun; Yim, Hyungshin; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Eurycoma longifolia is one of the most popular herbal medicines in Southeast Asia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the methanolic extract of E. longifolia roots (TA) in vivo and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. TA was tested for analgesic activity by the hot plate test and acetic acid test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of TA was observed in carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The in vitro molecular study using macrophage cells was performed to elucidate the relevant mechanism. The analgesic activity of 400 mg/kg TA was higher than that of aspirin in the hot plate test. TA also showed analgesic effects in the acetic acid test in a dose-dependent manner. In carrageenan-induced edema in mice, TA showed an anti-inflammatory effect comparable to that of diclofenac. Further in vitro molecular study using macrophage cells revealed that TA suppressed NF-κB translocation to the nucleus, leading to inactivation of the NF-κB signaling pathway and reduction in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results exhibited the beneficial effects of TA for alleviating pain and inflammation, which were exerted through inactivation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26832325

  10. Analysis of Analgesic Mixtures: An Organic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ned H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an experiment to analyze commercial analgesic preparations (pain relievers) by silica gel thin layer chromatography, followed by preparative (thick) layer chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analysis. Key difference from similar experiments is that students are responsible for devising suitable solvent systems for the thin layer…

  11. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Leonurus sibiricus.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Amirul; Ahmed, Firoj; Das, A K; Bachar, S C

    2005-06-01

    The methanolic extract of Leonurus sibiricus aerial parts injected intraperitoneally at dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg showed a significant analgesic effect in acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. Moreover, when given orally to rats at dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg, it showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenin induced rat paw edema in rats.

  12. Letter: The clinical course of patients with analgesic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Gault, M. H.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with analgesic nephropathy were followed at intervals of 1 to 3 months with measurements of creatinine clearance and serum concentration of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for a total of 105 patient-years. Diagnostic criteria included total consumption of at least 2 kg of phenacetin and 3 kg of ASA, compatible tissue abnormality on biopsy and evidence of papillary necrosis on an intravenous pyelogram. Nephropathy was induced by the same compound analgesic containing ASA, pehnacetin, caffeine and codeine (APC&C) in 30. Phenacetin was removed from this preparation in 1970 and replaced by an approximately equal amount of ASA (ACC). Creatinine clearance remained unchanged or improved in 11 of 15 patients who stopped taking analgesics containing phenacetin or ASA and in 10 of 11 of those who continued to take the ACC preparation. In contrast, renal function deteriorated in seven of eight patients who continued to abuse APC&C analgesics. The results suggest that phenacetin is necessary for the major nephrotoxic effect of this APC&C combination, but that ASA is not absolved of some nephrotoxicity. PMID:1139519

  13. Opiate analgesics' dual role in firefly luciferase activity.

    PubMed

    Sudhaharan, T; Reddy, A R

    1998-03-31

    The effects of three opiate analgesics, isolated from opium, on the firefly luciferase enzyme have been studied. Morphine (MN), 6-acetylmorphine (MAM), and diacetylmorphine (DAM) inhibited the enzyme activity at different levels. At lower concentrations, MN and MAM enhanced enzyme activity, effecting inhibition at higher concentrations. However, DAM inhibited the enzyme activity at all concentrations investigated. The stimulating activity of MN and MAM is attributed to the hydrophilic interaction of the proton donor-acceptor type with the polar regions of the luciferase located outside the binding pocket of the active site. The inhibition at higher concentrations of MN and MAM and at all concentrations of DAM is found to be competitive in nature, with the analgesics competing for the binding of the enzyme's natural substrate luciferin. The binding site of the luciferase could accommodate only one analgesic molecule. Binding constants determined from bioluminescence studies showed that the inhibitor binding site is hydrophobic in nature. The inhibition constants of analgesics are in the order MN > MAM > DAM. The greater binding of DAM to luciferase is attributed to its ability to form a ground state complex with ATP and greater hydrophobicity. At higher concentrations of ATP, the binding constants increased. The results obtained are explained assuming that the firefly luciferase acts as a subtype mu-opioid receptor model.

  14. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient.

  15. Intolerant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  16. Analgesic use and patterns of estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Oh, Hannah; Daugherty, Sarah E; Xu, Xia; Hankinson, Susan E; Ziegler, Regina G; Eliassen, A Heather

    2014-04-01

    Analgesic use has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of some cancers, with inverse associations between analgesics and colon cancer, and suggestive inverse associations for breast cancer. Estrogen metabolites (EM) have genotoxic and estrogenic potential; genotoxicity may differ by hydroxylation pathway. Analgesic use may impact patterns of estrogen metabolism; effects of analgesics on disease risk could be mediated through these patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 603 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II. Frequency of aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen use was reported via questionnaire; average frequency in 1997 and 1999 was calculated. Women provided urine samples between 1996 and 1999, collected during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Urinary EM were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We observed no association between analgesic use and estradiol, estrone, or specific pathways of estrogen metabolism. Women reporting more frequent aspirin use had lower methylated 2-catechols (e.g., 2-hydroxyestrone-3-methyl ether, 2+ days/week vs. non-use: 0.95 vs. 1.21 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.07). Non-aspirin NSAID use was positively associated with 17-epiestriol (4+ days/week vs. non-use: 2.48 vs. 1.52 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.11). Acetaminophen use was positively associated with total EM (2+ days/week vs. non-use: 236 vs. 198 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.02, p trend = 0.11), 2-hydroxyestrone-3-methyl ether (1.6 vs. 1.1 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference < 0.01, p trend = 0.02), and 16α-hydroxyestrone (17 vs. 12 pmol/mg creatinine; p difference = 0.01, p trend = 0.05). This study provides the first assessment of analgesic use and patterns of estrogen metabolism in women. While we observed some associations between analgesics and

  17. RUBY-1: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the safety and tolerability of the novel oral factor Xa inhibitor darexaban (YM150) following acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Mehta, Shamir R.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Gibson, C. Michael; Kovar, Frantisek; Kala, Petr; Garcia-Hernandez, Alberto; Renfurm, Ronny W.; Granger, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To establish the safety, tolerability and most promising regimen of darexaban (YM150), a novel, oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor, for prevention of ischaemic events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods In a 26-week, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 1279 patients with recent high-risk non-ST-segment or ST-segment elevation ACS received one of six darexaban regimens: 5 mg b.i.d., 10 mg o.d., 15 mg b.i.d., 30 mg o.d., 30 mg b.i.d., or 60 mg o.d. or placebo, on top of dual antiplatelet treatment. Primary outcome was incidence of major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding events. The main efficacy outcome was a composite of death, stroke, myocardial infarction, systemic thromboembolism, and severe recurrent ischaemia. Results Bleeding rates were numerically higher in all darexaban arms vs. placebo (pooled HR: 2.275; 95% CI: 1.13–4.60, P = 0.022). Using placebo as reference (bleeding rate 3.1%), there was a dose–response relationship (P = 0.009) for increased bleeding with increasing darexaban dose (6.2, 6.5, and 9.3% for 10, 30, and 60 mg daily, respectively), which was statistically significant for 30 mg b.i.d. (P = 0.002). There was no decrease (indeed a numerical increase in the 30 and 60 mg dose arms) in efficacy event rates with darexaban, but the study was underpowered for efficacy. Darexaban showed good tolerability without signs of liver toxicity. Conclusions Darexaban when added to dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS produces an expected dose-related two- to four-fold increase in bleeding, with no other safety concerns but no signal of efficacy. Establishing the potential of low-dose darexaban in preventing major cardiac events after ACS requires a large phase III trial. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00994292 PMID:21878434

  18. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa BA

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  19. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, I A; Pivac, N; Alhumayyd, M S; Mahesar, A L; Gilani, A H

    2013-12-01

    Piperine, is the major active principal of black pepper. In traditional medicine, black pepper has been used as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory agent and in the treatment of epilepsy. This study was conducted to evaluate the in vivo analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine were studied in mice using acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick assay, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PIC)-induced seizures models. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg) significantly inhibited (P<0.01) the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice, similar to the effect of indomethacin (20 mg/kg i.p.). In the tail flick assay, piperine (30 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a significant increase (P<0.01) in the reaction time of mice. Pre-treatment of animals with naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.), reversed the analgesic effects of both piperine and morphine in the tail flick assay. Piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg, i.p.) and standard drugs, valproic acid (200 mg/kg, i.p.), carbamazepine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P<0.01) delayed the onset of PTZ-and PIC-induced seizures in mice. These findings indicate that piperine exhibits analgesic and anticonvulsant effects possibly mediated via opioid and GABA-ergic pathways respectively. Moreover, piperine being the main constituent of black pepper, may be contributing factor in the medicinal uses of black pepper in pain and epilepsy.

  20. A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over study to evaluate the analgesic activity of Boswellia serrata in healthy volunteers using mechanical pain model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavathi, K.; Chandra, U. Shobha Jagdish; Soanker, Radhika; Rani, P. Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Experimental pain models in human healthy volunteers are advantageous for early evaluation of analgesics. All efforts to develop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which are devoid of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system effects are still far from achieving a breakthrough. Hence we evaluated the analgesic activity of an ayurvedic drug, Boswellia serrata by using validated human pain models which has shown its analgesic activity both in-vitro and preclinical studies to evaluate the analgesic activity of single oral dose (125 mg, 2 capsules) of Boswellia serrata compared to placebo using mechanical pain model in healthy human subjects. Materials and Methods: After taking written informed consent, twelve healthy subjects were randomized (1:1) to receive single oral dose of Boswellia serrata (Shallaki®) 125 mg, 2 capsules or identical placebo in a crossover design. Mechanical pain was assessed using Ugo basile analgesymeter (by Randall Selitto test) at baseline and at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs after test drug administration. Pain Threshold force and time and Pain Tolerance force and time were evaluated. Statistical analysis was done by paired t-test. Results: Twelve healthy volunteers have completed the study. Mean percentage change from baseline in Pain Threshold force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly increased [Force: 9.7 ± 11.0 vs 2.9 ± 3.4 (P = 0.05) and time: 9.7 ± 10.7 vs 2.8 ± 3.4 (P = 0.04)] at third hr. Mean Percentage change from baseline in Pain Tolerance force and time with Boswellia serrata when compared to placebo had significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased at 1 hr, 2 hrs and 3 hrs. Conclusion: In the present study, Boswellia serrata significantly increased the Pain Threshold and Pain Tolerance force and time compared to placebo. Both study medications were well tolerated. Further multiple dose studies may be needed to establish the analgesic efficacy of the drug. PMID:25298573

  1. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  2. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10), and perceived analgesic needs (0–10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = −0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2 = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2 = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  3. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  4. Infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, S; Waldmann, H

    1998-10-01

    Infectious tolerance can be induced in many ways, does not require a thymus or clonal deletion and can spread to third-party antigens linked on the same antigen-presenting cell-the process being variously described as linked-, bystanderor epitope-suppression. We here review the evidence concerning the mechanisms involved and attempt to make a consistent hypothesis, that during tolerance induction in the Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and transplantation systems there would seem to be a phase of immune deviation towards Th2 cytokines, like IL-4 and IL-10; however, this may lead to an IL-10-induced form of anergy or nonresponsiveness and generation of the recently characterized Th3/T-regulatory-1 CD4+ T cell subset which is thought to downregulate the antigen-presenting cell, possibly via transforming growth factor beta. PMID:9794831

  5. Mitragynine/Corynantheidine Pseudoindoxyls As Opioid Analgesics with Mu Agonism and Delta Antagonism, Which Do Not Recruit β-Arrestin-2.

    PubMed

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Palmer, Travis C; Narayan, Ankita; Szabó, Márton R; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Grinnell, Steven G; Subrath, Joan J; Warner, Evelyn; Kalra, Sanjay; Hunkele, Amanda; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Eans, Shainnel O; Medina, Jessica M; Xu, Jin; Pan, Ying-Xian; Borics, Attila; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2016-09-22

    Natural products found in Mitragyna speciosa, commonly known as kratom, represent diverse scaffolds (indole, indolenine, and spiro pseudoindoxyl) with opioid activity, providing opportunities to better understand opioid pharmacology. Herein, we report the pharmacology and SAR studies both in vitro and in vivo of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl (3), an oxidative rearrangement product of the corynanthe alkaloid mitragynine. 3 and its corresponding corynantheidine analogs show promise as potent analgesics with a mechanism of action that includes mu opioid receptor agonism/delta opioid receptor antagonism. In vitro, 3 and its analogs were potent agonists in [(35)S]GTPγS assays at the mu opioid receptor but failed to recruit β-arrestin-2, which is associated with opioid side effects. Additionally, 3 developed analgesic tolerance more slowly than morphine, showed limited physical dependence, respiratory depression, constipation, and displayed no reward or aversion in CPP/CPA assays, suggesting that analogs might represent a promising new generation of novel pain relievers. PMID:27556704

  6. Mitragynine/Corynantheidine Pseudoindoxyls As Opioid Analgesics with Mu Agonism and Delta Antagonism, Which Do Not Recruit β-Arrestin-2.

    PubMed

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Palmer, Travis C; Narayan, Ankita; Szabó, Márton R; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Grinnell, Steven G; Subrath, Joan J; Warner, Evelyn; Kalra, Sanjay; Hunkele, Amanda; Pagirsky, Jeremy; Eans, Shainnel O; Medina, Jessica M; Xu, Jin; Pan, Ying-Xian; Borics, Attila; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2016-09-22

    Natural products found in Mitragyna speciosa, commonly known as kratom, represent diverse scaffolds (indole, indolenine, and spiro pseudoindoxyl) with opioid activity, providing opportunities to better understand opioid pharmacology. Herein, we report the pharmacology and SAR studies both in vitro and in vivo of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl (3), an oxidative rearrangement product of the corynanthe alkaloid mitragynine. 3 and its corresponding corynantheidine analogs show promise as potent analgesics with a mechanism of action that includes mu opioid receptor agonism/delta opioid receptor antagonism. In vitro, 3 and its analogs were potent agonists in [(35)S]GTPγS assays at the mu opioid receptor but failed to recruit β-arrestin-2, which is associated with opioid side effects. Additionally, 3 developed analgesic tolerance more slowly than morphine, showed limited physical dependence, respiratory depression, constipation, and displayed no reward or aversion in CPP/CPA assays, suggesting that analogs might represent a promising new generation of novel pain relievers.

  7. [Parental perception of their child's pain tolerance and abdominal postoperative analgesic requirements].

    PubMed

    Larragoiti-Correa, Eugenio; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: determinar si la tolerabilidad al dolor percibida por los padres de un menor pudiera predecir la dificultad para su control. Métodos: estudio de cohorte de niños (de 3 a 16 años) percibidos por sus padres como tolerantes (TD) y no tolerantes al dolor (NoTD), sometidos a una cirugía abdominal. El plan analgésico fue decidido por sus cirujanos tratantes. Se analizó el nivel de dolor (escala facial de Wong-Baker) y los requerimientos analgésicos (medicamento, dosis y modificaciones) a la recuperación anestésica, 24 y 48 horas después. Resultados: fueron evaluados 62 pacientes (34 percibidos como TD y 28 como NoTD). Desde la recuperación, los niños NoTD solicitaron más analgésicos (42.9 % frente a 2.9 %, p < 0.001), y en dosis altas. A las 24 horas, aunque el 87 % recibía analgesia, los NoTD requirieron más dosis extras (50 % frente a 23.5 % TD, p = 0.03). A las 48 horas, el 83 % (TD) y el 72 % (NoTD) recibían analgesia (p = 0.36), pero los NoTD aún solicitaron más dosis de rescate (46.7 % frente a 14.7 %, p = 0.01). Conclusiones: es importante detectar a los niños percibidos como NoTD antes de un procedimiento doloroso, a fin de planear una estrategia eficiente de control.

  8. Perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians in 2001

    PubMed Central

    Hewson, Caroline J.; Dohoo, Ian R.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A random sample of 652 Canadian veterinarians was surveyed to determine perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following common surgeries. The response rate was 57.8%. With the exception of taildocking in puppies, at least 85% of animals received preincisional analgesics, and 30% to 98.1% received postincisional analgesics. A similar survey was conducted in 1994; since then, analgesic usage has increased markedly, as have ratings of the pain caused by different surgeries. In 2001 most veterinarians (62%) used at least 2 classes of analgesic perioperatively. However, strong opioids, local anesthetics, and alpha-2 agonists were underused, and there was an overreliance on weak opioids (butorphanol, meperidine). Up to 12% of veterinarians did not use any analgesics. Nationally, this may have affected many animals monthly; for example, approximately 6000 dogs or cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Continuing education (provincial level) and review articles were considered effective ways to inform veterinarians about optimal analgesic practices. PMID:16642874

  9. Perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians in 2001.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Caroline J; Dohoo, Ian R; Lemke, Kip A

    2006-04-01

    A random sample of 652 Canadian veterinarians was surveyed to determine perioperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following common surgeries. The response rate was 57.8%. With the exception of taildocking in puppies, at least 85% of animals received preincisional analgesics, and 30% to 98.1% received postincisional analgesics. A similar survey was conducted in 1994; since then, analgesic usage has increased markedly, as have ratings of the pain caused by different surgeries. In 2001 most veterinarians (62%) used at least 2 classes of analgesic perioperatively. However, strong opioids, local anesthetics, and alpha-2 agonists were underused, and there was an overreliance on weak opioids (butorphanol, meperidine). Up to 12% of veterinarians did not use any analgesics. Nationally, this may have affected many animals monthly; for example, approximately 6000 dogs or cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Continuing education (provincial level) and review articles were considered effective ways to inform veterinarians about optimal analgesic practices. PMID:16642874

  10. Analgesic effects of an ethanol extract of the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich (Annonaceae) and the major constituent, xylopic acid in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Boakye-Gyasi, Eric; Abotsi, Wonder K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders including rheumatism, headache, colic pain, and neuralgia. Little pharmacological data exists in scientific literature of the effect of the fruit extract and its major diterpene, xylopic acid, on pain. The present study evaluated the analgesic properties of the ethanol extract of X. aethiopica (XAE) and xylopic acid (XA), in murine models. Materials and Methods: XAE and XA were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (Tail-flick and Hargreaves thermal hyperalgesia tests), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. Results: XAE and XA exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used. XAE (30-300 mg kg-1, p.o.) and XA (10-100 mg kg-1, p.o.) inhibited acetic acid-induced visceral nociception, formalin- induced paw pain (both neurogenic and inflammatory), thermal pain as well as carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in animals. Morphine (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and diclofenac (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.), used as controls, exhibited similar anti-nociceptive activities. XAE and XA did not induce tolerance to their respective anti-nociceptive effects in the formalin test after chronic administration. Morphine tolerance did not also cross-generalize to the analgesic effects of XAE or XA. Conclusions: These findings establish the analgesic properties of the ethanol fruit extract of X. aethiopica and its major diterpene, xylopic acid. PMID:23248562

  11. Evaluation of the analgesic effects of ammoxetine, a novel potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Xue, Rui; Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Fan, Qiong-yin; Zhong, Bo-hua; Li, Yun-feng; Ye, Cai-ying; Zhang, You-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are commonly used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Ammoxetine ((±)-3-(benzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-N-methyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-amine) has been identified as a novel potent SNRI. In this study, we evaluated the acute analgesic properties of ammoxetine in different animal models of pain, and examined the involvement of monoamines in its analgesic actions. Methods: The analgesic effects of ammoxetine were assayed using models of acetic acid- and formalin-induced pain in mice, neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury (CCI) and reserpine-induced fibromyalgia pain in rats. The contents of 5-HT and NE in brain regions of fibromyalgia rats were measured using HPLC-ECD. In all the experiments, duloxetine was used as a positive control drug. Results: Oral administration of ammoxetine (0.625–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (2.5–40 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced first phase and second phase paw licking time in mice. Oral administration of ammoxetine (2.5–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (10 mg/kg) alleviated mechanical allodynia in SNI and CCI rats and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. The antiallodynic effect of ammoxetine in CCI rats was abolished by pretreatment with para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor) or α-methyl-para-tyrosine methylester (AMPT, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor). Oral administration of ammoxetine (30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuated tactile allodynia in rats with reserpine-induced fibromyalgia. In the fibromyalgia rats, administration of ammoxetine (10, 30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (30, 50 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased the levels of 5-HT and NE, and decreased the metabolite ratio of 5-HT (5-HIAA/5-HT) in the spinal cord, hypothalamus, thalamus and prefrontal cortex

  12. Tenidap, a structurally novel drug for the treatment of arthritis: antiinflammatory and analgesic properties.

    PubMed

    Moore, P F; Larson, D L; Otterness, I G; Weissman, A; Kadin, S B; Sweeney, F J; Eskra, J D; Nagahisa, A; Sakakibara, M; Carty, T J

    1996-02-01

    Tenidap is a new anti-rheumatic agent which has clinical properties characteristic of a disease modifying drug combined with acute antiinflammatory and analgesic activity. This paper details tenidap's cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity and the resulting pharmacological properties in experimental animals. Tenidap inhibited calcium ionophore-stimulated prostaglandin D2 synthesis by rat basophilic leukemia cells (COX-1) with an IC50 of 20 nM. In two different in vitro human test systems, tenidap inhibited COX-1 activity more potently than COX-2, although the relative potency ratio (COX-1/COX-2) differed markedly between the two systems. Tenidap inhibited the COX pathway when added to human blood in vitro (IC50, 7.8 mu M) and when administered orally to monkeys, rats and dogs (at 5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg p.o., respectively) and COX activity measured ex vivo in blood collected 2 to 4 hours post dose. After oral administration to rats, tenidap inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema with an ED50 of 14 mg/kg and inhibited the glucocorticoid-resistant UV erythema in guinea pigs with an ED50 of 1.4 mg/kg. It retained antiinflammatory activity in adrenalectomized rats indicating that this property is independent of adrenal stimulation. Oral administration of tenidap inhibited the development of adjuvant-induced polyarthritis in the rat and exhibited antinociceptive activity in the murine phenylbenzoquinone and rat acetic acid abdominal constriction tests. These data indicate that tenidap is an effective antiinflammatory and analgesic agent in animal models. These cyclooxygenase-dependent pharmacologic activities do not explain tenidap's disease modifying anti-arthritic properties but add a useful symptom modifying component to its clinical profile. PMID:8907585

  13. Using anesthetics and analgesics in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Rachel K; Harrison, Jordan L; Thomas, Theresa C; Pauly, James R; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Valid modeling of traumatic brain injury (TBI) requires accurate replication of both the mechanical forces that cause the primary injury and the conditions that lead to secondary injuries observed in human patients. The use of animals in TBI research is justified by the lack of in vitro or computer models that can sufficiently replicate the complex pathological processes involved. Measures to reduce nociception and distress must be implemented, but the administration of anesthetics and analgesics can influence TBI outcomes, threatening the validity of the research. In this review, the authors present evidence for the interference of anesthetics and analgesics in the natural course of brain injury in animal models of TBI. They suggest that drugs should be selected for or excluded from experimental TBI protocols on the basis of IACUC-approved experimental objectives in order to protect animal welfare and preserve the validity of TBI models. PMID:23877609

  14. Analgesic use - prevalence, biomonitoring and endocrine and reproductive effects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, David M; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Gaudriault, Pierre; Lesné, Laurianne; Serrano, Tania; Main, Katharina M; Jégou, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Paracetamol and NSAIDs, in particular acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ibuprofen, are among the most used and environmentally released pharmaceutical drugs. The differences in international trends in the sale and consumption of mild analgesics reflect differences in marketing, governmental policies, habits, accessibility, disease patterns and the age distribution of each population. Biomonitoring indicates ubiquitous and high human exposure to paracetamol and to salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that analgesics can have endocrine disruptive properties capable of altering animal and human reproductive function from fetal life to adulthood in both sexes. Medical and public awareness about these health concerns should be increased, particularly among pregnant women. PMID:27150289

  15. Analgesic and cardiovascular effects of centrally administered substance P.

    PubMed

    Clint, B D; Lipton, J M; Giesecke, A H

    1988-01-01

    Substance P (SP) injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into rabbits caused dose-related thermal analgesia with the maximum effect after 2 micrograms. The analgesia was measured by timing the withdrawal of the rabbit's ear from an infrared beam. Equimolar amounts of the related peptides physalaemin and eledoisin-related peptide also caused analgesia, but the SP N-terminal fragment (1-9) was inactive. This suggests that the analgesic message of SP resides within the C-terminal fragment. The analgesia caused by each peptide developed more rapidly but did not last as long as that after central injection of beta-endorphin. In separate experiments, 2 micrograms SP injected ICV increased blood pressure and decreased heart rate. The analgesic, bradycardic and pressor responses to central administration of SP were opposite to effects of peripherally administered SP, described previously. These results indicate that the effect induced by SP depends upon its specific neuroanatomical site of action.

  16. Monoterpenes with analgesic activity--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Adriana G; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Quintans, Lucindo J

    2013-01-01

    There is still the need for efficacious therapies for pain. In the search for new therapeutic options, plants are a major source of novel biomolecules. Monoterpenes constitute 90% of essential oils, and there is a growing interest in understanding the mechanisms underlying their pharmacological activity. This systematic review reports what is so far known about the analgesic activity of monoterpenes and also provides an overview of their mechanisms of action. The search terms analgesia, anti-inflammatory, anaesthetic and antioxidant were used to retrieve English language articles in SCOPUS, PUBMED and EMBASE published between 1990 and 2012. Forty-five papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 27 monoterpenes. The data reviewed here suggest these compounds are possible candidates for the treatment of painful conditions. PMID:23296806

  17. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  18. Oxytocin – A Multifunctional Analgesic for Chronic Deep Tissue Pain

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Ness, Timothy J.; Robbins, Meredith T.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain arising from deep tissues is currently inadequate and there is need for new pharmacological agents to provide analgesia. The endogenous paracrine hormone/neurotransmitter oxytocin is intimately involved in the modulation of multiple physiological and psychological functions. Recent experiments have given clear evidence for a role of oxytocin in the modulation of nociception. The present article reviews the existent human and basic science data related to the direct and indirect effects of oxytocin on pain. Due to its analgesic, anxiolytic, antidepressant and other central nervous system effects, there is strong evidence that oxytocin and other drugs acting through the oxytocin receptor could act as multifunctional analgesics with unique therapeutic value. PMID:25345612

  19. Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high

  20. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  1. Analgesic Effects of Paracetamol and Morphine After Elective Laparotomy Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Alimian, Mahzad; Pournajafian, Alireza; Kholdebarin, Alireza; Ghodraty, Mohammadreza; Rokhtabnak, Faranak; Yazdkhasti, Payman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids have been traditionally used for postoperative pain control, but they have some unpleasant side effects such as respiratory depression or nausea. Some other analgesic drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also being used for pain management due to their fewer side effects. Objectives: The aim of our study was to compare the analgesic effects of paracetamol, an intravenous non-opioid analgesic and morphine infusion after elective laparotomy surgeries. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical study was performed on 157 ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) I-II patients, who were scheduled for elective laparotomy. These patients were managed by general anesthesia with TIVA technique in both groups and 150 patients were analyzed. Paracetamol (4 g/24 hours) in group 1 and morphine (20 mg/24 hours) in group 2 were administered by infusion pump after surgery. Postoperative pain evaluation was performed by visual analog scale (VAS) during several hours postoperatively. Meperidine was administered for patients complaining of pain with VAS > 3 and repeated if essential. Total doses of infused analgesics, were recorded following the surgery and compared. Analysis was performed on the basis of VAS findings and meperidine consumption. Results: There were no differences in demographic data between two groups. Significant difference in pain score was found between the two groups, in the first eight hours following operation (P value = 0.00), but not after 12 hours (P = 0.14) .The total dose of rescue drug (meperidine) and number of doses injected showed a meaningful difference between the two groups (P = 0.00). Also nausea, vomiting and itching showed a significant difference between the two groups and patients in morphine group, experienced higher levels of them. Conclusions: Paracetamol is not enough for postoperative pain relief in the first eight hour postoperatively, but it can reduce postoperative opioid need and is

  2. Mechanisms of Non-Opioid Analgesics Beyond Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, May; Dionne, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Non-opioid analgesics including both selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors and acetaminophen are the most widely used treatments for pain. Inhibition of COX is thought to be largely responsible for both the therapeutic and adverse effects of this class of drugs. Accumulating evidence over the past two decades has demonstrated effects of non-opioids beyond the inhibition of COX and prostaglandin synthesis that might also explain their therapeutic and adverse effects. These include their interaction with endocannabinoids, nitric oxide, monoaminergic, and cholinergic systems. Moreover, the recent development of microarray technology that allows the study of human gene expression suggests multiple pathways that may be related to the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of non-opioids. The present review will discuss the multiple actions of non-opioids and their interactions with these systems during inflammation and pain, suggesting that COX inhibition is an incomplete explanation for the actions of non-opioids and proposes the involvement of multiple selective targets for their analgesic, as well as, their adverse effects. PMID:19779578

  3. Analgesic effects of branding in treatment of headaches.

    PubMed Central

    Branthwaite, A; Cooper, P

    1981-01-01

    The effect of branding--that is, the labelling and marketing--of a well-known proprietary analgesic used to treat headaches was studied in a sample of women given a branded or unbranded form with either an inert or an active formulation. The sample was also divided according to whether the subjects were regular users of the brand or users of other brands. The findings showed that branded tablets were overall significantly more effective than unbranded tablets in relieving headaches. Differential effects were observed: the effects of branding were more noticeable one hour after the tablets were taken compared with 30 minutes; in the women given the placebo; and in the users of the brand compared with the users of other brands. It is hypothesised that these effects are due to increased confidence in obtaining relief with a well-known brand, and that branding has an analgesic effect that interacts with the analgesic effects of placebos and active ingredients. PMID:6786566

  4. Analgesic drug use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Charlotte G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2008-06-15

    Analgesic use may reduce ovarian cancer risk, possibly through antiinflammatory or antigonadotropic effects. The authors conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State that included 812 women aged 35-74 years who were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005 and 1,313 controls. Use of analgesics, excluding use within the previous year, was assessed via in-person interviews. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, acetaminophen and aspirin were associated with weakly increased risks of ovarian cancer. These associations were stronger after more than 10 years of use (acetaminophen: odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.6; aspirin: OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.2) and were present for indications of headache, menstrual pain, and other pain/injury. Reduced risk was observed among aspirin users who began regular use within the previous 5 years (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 1.0) or used this drug for prevention of heart disease (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0). These results, in the context of prior findings, do not provide compelling evidence of a true increase in risk of ovarian cancer among women who use these drugs. However, they add to the weight of evidence that, in the aggregate, provides little support for the use of analgesic drugs as chemoprevention for this disease.

  5. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  6. Cerebral analgesic response to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Hodkinson, Duncan J; Khawaja, Nadine; OʼDaly, Owen; Thacker, Michael A; Zelaya, Fernando O; Wooldridge, Caroline L; Renton, Tara F; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    Nonopioid agents, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), are the most commonly used class of analgesics. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition at both peripheral and central sites can contribute to the antihyperalgesic effects of NSAIDs, with the predominant clinical effect being mediated centrally. In this study, we examined the cerebral response to ibuprofen in presurgical and postsurgical states and looked at the analgesic interaction between surgical state and treatment. We used an established clinical pain model involving third molar extraction, and quantitative arterial spin labelling (ASL) imaging to measure changes in tonic/ongoing neural activity. Concurrent to the ASL scans, we presented visual analogue scales inside the scanner to evaluate the subjective experience of pain. This novel methodology was incorporated into a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, with an open method of drug administration. We found that independent of its antinociceptive action, ibuprofen has no effect on regional cerebral blood flow under pain-free conditions (presurgery). However, in the postsurgical state, we observed increased activation of top-down modulatory circuits, which was accompanied by decreases in the areas engaged because of ongoing pain. Our findings demonstrate that ibuprofen has a measurable analgesic response in the human brain, with the subjective effects of pain relief reflected in two distinct brain networks. The observed activation of descending modulatory circuits warrants further investigation, as this may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanisms of analgesia that might be exploited to improve safety and efficacy in pain management.

  7. [Has ketamine preemptive analgesic effect in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy?].

    PubMed

    Karaman, Semra; Kocabaş, Seden; Zincircioğlu, Ciler; Firat, Vicdan

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if preemptive use of the NMDA receptor antogonist ketamine decreases postoperative pain in patients undergoing abdominal hystrectomy. A total of 60 patients admitted for total abdominal hysterectomy were included in this study after the approval of the ethic committee, and the patients were randomly classified into three groups. After standart general anaesthesia, before or after incision patients received bolus saline or ketamine. Group S received only saline while Group Kpre received ketamine 0.4 mg/kg before incision and saline after incision, and Group Kpost received saline before incision and 0.4 mg/kg ketamine after incision. Postoperatif analgesia was maintained with i.v. PCA morphine. Pain scores were assessed with Vizüal Analog Scale (VAS), Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at 1., 2, 3., 4., 8., 12. ve 24. hours postoperatively. First analgesic requirement time, morphine consumption and side effects were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to VAS / VRS scores, the time for first analgesic dose, and morphine consumption ( p>0.05). Patients in Group S had significantly lower sedation scores than either of the ketamine treated groups ( p<0.05). In conclusion, a single dose of ketamin had no preemptive analgesic effect in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy, but further investigation is needed for different operation types and dose regimens.

  8. Topical methadone and meperidine analgesic synergy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikov, Yuri A.; Oksman, Galina; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2010-01-01

    Topical analgesics have many potential advantages over systemic administration. Prior work has shown potent analgesic activity of a number of topical opioids in the radiant heat tailflick assay. The current study confirms the analgesic activity of morphine and extends it to two other mu opioids, methadone and meperidine. Combinations of topical morphine and lidocaine are synergistic. Similarly, the combination of methadone and lidocaine is synergistic. While there appeared to be some potentiation with the combination of meperidine and lidocaine, it did not achieve significance. Systemically, prior studies have shown that co-administration of morphine and methadone was synergistic. The combination of morphine and methadone was also synergistic when given topically. In contrast, the combination of morphine and meperidine was not synergistic systemically and it was not synergistic topically. Thus, the pharmacology of topical opioids mimics that seen with systemic administration. Their activity in the topical model supports their potential utility while the local limitation of their actions offers the possibility of a reduced side-effect profile. PMID:20433826

  9. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  10. [Experimental study of the use of piritramide as intrathecal analgesic].

    PubMed

    Tica, V I; Neştianu, V; Tica, A A; Beghim, M; Serbanescu, L; Beghim, Esra; Bafani, S

    2007-01-01

    Opioids proved their advantages as general and intrathecal (i.t.) analgesics. Piritramide (P), a largely used analgesic opioid today, has not been studied in i.t. administration. Our experimental research aimed in determining the efficiency, security and optimal dose of i.t. P. In 9 adult mongrel dogs equally randomized in 3 groups we injected i.t. P 1.3 mg x kg-l (group 1), P 0.8 mg x kg-l (group 2) and sodium chloride 0,9% (group 3) and we registered the motility, the pain reaction to electrical and mechanical nociceptive stimuli, the respiratory rate and amplitude, electrocardiogram, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure electroencephalogram and, for 2 subjects from group 1, electromyogram. The P-induced analgesia was strong, dose-dependent, and segmental, with a time of onset of 5-8 min, duration of 1h 45 min-2h 30 min, and prolonged residual analgesic level for 5-6 h. The dogs from the 1st group presented moderate side effects: bradypnea, tachycardia and arterial hypotension at 5 min, reduction in the posterior limbs motility, sleep. We could conclude that i.t. piritramide 0.8 mg x kg-l provides a solid, segmental, long-lasting analgesia, without marked adverse effects.

  11. A randomized, phase 2 study investigating TRV130, a biased ligand of the μ-opioid receptor, for the intravenous treatment of acute pain.

    PubMed

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Webster, Lynn; Kuss, Michael; Daniels, Stephen; Bolognese, James A; Zuckerman, Seth; Soergel, David G; Subach, Ruth Ann; Cook, Emily; Skobieranda, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy of conventional opioids can be limited by adverse events (AEs). TRV130 is a structurally novel biased ligand of the μ-opioid receptor that activates G protein signaling with little β-arrestin recruitment. In this phase 2, randomized, placebo- and active-controlled study, we investigated the efficacy and tolerability of TRV130 in acute pain after bunionectomy. We used an adaptive study design in which 144 patients experiencing moderate-to-severe acute pain after bunionectomy were randomized to receive double-blind TRV130, placebo, or morphine in a pilot phase. After pilot phase analysis, 195 patients were randomized to receive double-dummy TRV130 0.5, 1, 2, or 3 mg every 3 hours (q3h); placebo; or morphine 4 mg q4h intravenously. The primary end point was the time-weighted average change in numeric rating scale pain intensity over the 48-hour treatment period. Secondary end points included stopwatch and categorical assessments of pain relief. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. TRV130 2 and 3 mg q3h, and morphine 4 mg q4h produced statistically greater mean reductions in pain intensity than placebo over 48 hours (P < 0.005). TRV130 at 2 and 3 mg produced significantly greater categorical pain relief than morphine (P < 0.005) after the first dose, with meaningful pain relief occurring in under 5 minutes. TRV130 produced no serious AEs, with tolerability similar to morphine. These results demonstrate that TRV130 rapidly produces profound analgesia in moderate-to-severe acute pain, suggesting that G-protein-biased μ-opioid receptor activation is a promising target for development of novel analgesics.

  12. Shanzhiside methylester, the principle effective iridoid glycoside from the analgesic herb Lamiophlomis rotata, reduces neuropathic pain by stimulating spinal microglial β-endorphin expression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Lamiophlomis rotata (L. rotata, Duyiwei) is an orally available Tibetan analgesic herb widely prescribed in China. Shanzhiside methylester (SM) is a principle effective iridoid glycoside of L. rotata and serves as a small molecule glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist. This study aims to evaluate the signal mechanisms underlying SM anti-allodynia, determine the ability of SM to induce anti-allodynic tolerance, and illustrate the interactions between SM and morphine, or SM and β-endorphin, in anti-allodynia and anti-allodynic tolerance. Intrathecal SM exerted dose-dependent and long-lasting (>4 h) anti-allodynic effects in spinal nerve injury-induced neuropathic rats, with a maximal inhibition of 49% and a projected ED50 of 40.4 μg. SM and the peptidic GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide treatments over 7 days did not induce self-tolerance to anti-allodynia or cross-tolerance to morphine or β-endorphin. In contrast, morphine and β-endorphin induced self-tolerance and cross-tolerance to SM and exenatide. In the spinal dorsal horn and primary microglia, SM significantly evoked β-endorphin expression, which was completely prevented by the microglial inhibitor minocycline and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB203580. SM anti-allodynia was totally inhibited by the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39), minocycline, β-endorphin antiserum, μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP, and SB203580. SM and exenatide specifically activated spinal p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These results indicate that SM reduces neuropathic pain by activating spinal GLP-1 receptors and subsequently stimulating microglial β-endorphin expression via the p38 MAPK signaling. Stimulation of the endogenous β-endorphin expression may be a novel and effective strategy for the discovery and development of analgesics for the long-term treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26363192

  13. Efficacy of Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic of Superpulsed Low Level Laser Therapy After Impacted Mandibular Third Molars Extractions.

    PubMed

    Pol, Renato; Ruggiero, Tiziana; Gallesio, Giorgia; Riso, Massimo; Bergamasco, Laura; Mortellaro, Carmen; Mozzati, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of superpulsed low level laser therapy (SLLLT) after bilateral extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. Many studies in the literature show the anti-inflammatory and analgesic efficacy of laser therapy after oral surgery.The authors report the preliminary results of 25 patients who underwent bilateral extraction of mandibular eighths included in a single surgery. This is a split-mouth study, a site was randomized chosen to be treated with SLLLT at T0, 24 hours and 48 hours with a GaAs laser diode, whereas the other surgical site was evaluated as control. The suture was removed at 7 days and healing was controlled at 14 days. During the sessions were monitored and recorded the pain, using visual analog scale, and oedema with the visual analog scale and cephalometric measurements of cutaneous points (TR-GO, GO-CA, GO-SP, GO-PO). Each patient received only antibiotic prophylaxis and analgesic therapy as needed.Results indicate that in the treated site SLLLT determines a reduction in pain and swelling statistically significant compared with the control site (P < 0.05). The authors found that the effectiveness of laser therapy is in the first 5 days after surgery, showing a significant reduction of pain and swelling in the treated site than the control site.This study suggests that the SLLLT has a potential in reducing the postoperative discomfort after impacted third molar extractions, due to a reduction in postoperative pain and swelling. Superpulsed low level laser therapy has no side effects and is well tolerated by patients. It also seems to have a role in reducing the intake of drugs. PMID:27159857

  14. Aspirin-sensitive asthma: significance of the cyclooxygenase-inhibiting and protein-binding properties of analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Williams, W R; Pawlowicz, A; Davies, B H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro release of endogenous and exogenous PgF2 alpha from plasma and serum proteins by aspirin and other analgesic drugs has been studied by RIA and equilibrium-dialysis techniques, respectively. Before aspirin addition, the mean plasma level of PgF2 alpha measured by RIA was significantly lower in aspirin-sensitive asthma (ASA) patients (11.3 +/- 6.5 pg/ml; n = 8) than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA) patients (25.0 +/- 11.4 pg/ml; n = 21). After aspirin addition (50 micrograms/ml) the mean PgF2 alpha level detected in plasma by RIA was higher in ASA patients (97.6 +/- 5.5 pg/ml) than in ATA patients (66.9 +/- 4.5). The binding of [3H]PgF2 alpha to serum protein was significantly inhibited by NSAIDs but not by paracetamol (0.2-1.0 mM). These results implicate PgF2 alpha and the protein-binding property of analgesic drugs in the pathogenesis of aspirin-sensitive asthma. PMID:1959973

  15. DDD-028: a potent potential non-opioid, non-cannabinoid analgesic for neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Parthasarathi; Tracey, Heather; Chen, Zhoumou; Bandyopadhyaya, Acintya; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Rajagopalan, Desikan R; Salvemini, Daniela; McPhee, Ian; Viswanadha, Srikant; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2014-07-15

    DDD-028 (4), a novel pentacyclic pyridoindolobenzazepine derivative was evaluated in vitro for receptor binding affinity and in vivo for analgesic activity using rodent models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. DDD-028 does not bind to opioid, cannabinoid, dopamine, or histamine receptors. DDD-028 is very active even at the low oral dose of 1-5 mg/kg in both neuropathic, (spinal nerve ligation and chronic constriction injury) and inflammatory (Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced) models of pain. DDD-028 appears to be about 6-fold more potent than pregabalin and indomethacin. Visual observation of all the animals used in these studies indicated that DDD-028 is well tolerated without any sedation. Thus, DDD-028 seems to be a promising candidate for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain without the possible side effects or abuse potential associated with opioid or cannabinoid activities.

  16. Aconitine-induced writhing as a method for assessing aspirin-like analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, T N; Bhargava, K P

    1980-01-01

    A painful writhing syndrome is produced by aconitine when given intraperitoneally. It is similar to that induced by other chemical agent viz. phenylquinone, acetic acid, and bradykinin. Aconitine writhing is quick to appear, shows greater frequency and longer duration than that induced by other agents. The nonnarcotic analgesics more selectively antagonize the aconitine writhing than orally-administered narcotic analgesics. Thus the aconitine writhing method is a very suitable method for the selective screening of the aspirin type of analgesic agent.

  17. Analgesic activity of diflunisal [MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] in rats with hyperalgesia induced by Freund's adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Winter, C A; Kling, P J; Tocco, D J; Tanabe, K

    1979-12-01

    A method is described for testing analgesia for narcotic or nonnarcotic drugs in rats injected with Freund's adjuvant in the tail, by manipulation of the tail the day after injection, or of the feet after the development of adjuvant arthritis. The method is responsive to a behavioral depressant or an anti-inflammatory steroid. Diflunisal (MK-647; 5-(2,4-difluorophenyl)salicylic acid] exhibited activity in this assay after oral administration with potency about 25 times greater than that of aspirin, about 3 times that of glafenine and twice that of zomepirac. The onset of activity was within a 1/2 hour for narcotic analgesics but required about an hour for non-narcotic compounds. With the latter, the peak of activity was not attained until 2 to 4 hr, depending on the compound. The peak for diflunisal was delayed until the 3rd or 4th hour, but the onset of action was more prompt and the duration greater as the dose was increased. [14C]Diflunisal was concentrated to some extent in the inflamed tissue after adjuvant injection. Peak levels both in plasma and tissue appeared about 2 hr before peak analgesic effect. Repeated administration of large doses produced neither tolerance nor sensitization to the analgesic action of diflunisal. Naloxone and naltrexone did not antagonize the action of the compound, but when morphine and diflunisal were given together, the overall effect was enhanced.

  18. Identification and functional characterization of a stable, centrally active derivative of the neurotensin (8-13) fragment as a potential first-in-class analgesic.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Shaner, Brooke E; May, Lisa A; Zotian, Lyndsay; Brower, Justin O; Woods, R Jeremy; Cash, Michael; Morrow, Dustin; Massa, Fabienne; Mazella, Jean; Dix, Thomas A

    2010-06-24

    The neurotensin hexapapetide fragment NT(8-13) is a potent analgesic when administered directly to the central nervous system but does not cross the blood-brain barrier. A total of 43 novel derivatives of NT(8-13) were evaluated, with one, ABS212 (1), being most active in four rat models of pain when administered peripherally. Compound 1 binds to human neurotensin receptors 1 and 2 with IC(50) of 10.6 and 54.2 nM, respectively, and tolerance to the compound in a rat pain model did not develop after 12 days of daily administration. When it was administered peripherally, serum levels and neurotensin receptor binding potency of 1 peaked within 5 min and returned to baseline within 90-120 min; however, analgesic activity remained near maximum for >240 min. This could be due to its metabolism into an active fragment; however, all 4- and 5-mer hydrolysis products were inactive. This pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic dichotomy is discussed. Compound 1 is a candidate for development as a first-in-class analgesic.

  19. A G protein-biased ligand at the μ-opioid receptor is potently analgesic with reduced gastrointestinal and respiratory dysfunction compared with morphine.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Yamashita, Dennis S; Rominger, David H; Liu, Guodong; Cowan, Conrad L; Graczyk, Thomas M; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Pitis, Philip M; Gotchev, Dimitar; Yuan, Catherine; Koblish, Michael; Lark, Michael W; Violin, Jonathan D

    2013-03-01

    The concept of ligand bias at G protein-coupled receptors broadens the possibilities for agonist activities and provides the opportunity to develop safer, more selective therapeutics. Morphine pharmacology in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice suggested that a ligand that promotes coupling of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) to G proteins, but not β-arrestins, would result in higher analgesic efficacy, less gastrointestinal dysfunction, and less respiratory suppression than morphine. Here we report the discovery of TRV130 ([(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine), a novel MOR G protein-biased ligand. In cell-based assays, TRV130 elicits robust G protein signaling, with potency and efficacy similar to morphine, but with far less β-arrestin recruitment and receptor internalization. In mice and rats, TRV130 is potently analgesic while causing less gastrointestinal dysfunction and respiratory suppression than morphine at equianalgesic doses. TRV130 successfully translates evidence that analgesic and adverse MOR signaling pathways are distinct into a biased ligand with differentiated pharmacology. These preclinical data suggest that TRV130 may be a safer and more tolerable therapeutic for treating severe pain.

  20. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khadem; Ashraf, Ayesha; Nath Biswas, Nripendra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of ethanolic leaf extract of Typhonium trilobatum L. Schott in treating diarrhea, pain and inflammation using experimental models. Methods In the present study, acetic acid-induced writhing, xylene-induced ear edema and castor oil-induced diarrheal model were used to evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities, respectively. Acute toxicity test was carried out to fix the safe doses of the plant extract. Results The plant extract demonstrated a significant inhibition of writhing (P<0.01) compared with the control group in acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. The extract also significantly inhibited the xylene induced ear edema formation (P<0.05). In anti-diarrheal test, the extract significantly decreased the frequency of defecation and increased the mean latent period (P<0.01) in castor oil-induced diarrheal model mice at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Conclusions These results suggest that the extract possesses significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheal activities that support to the ethnopharmacological uses of this plant. PMID:23570002

  1. 77 FR 3621 - Rimsulfuron; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ...) 305-5805. II. Summary of Petitioned-for Tolerance In the Federal Register of February 25, 2011 (76 FR... were observed. In the subchronic study in dogs, diuresis was indicated by urinary volume, platelet...). FQPA SF = Food Quality Protection Act Safety Factor. PAD = population adjusted dose (a = acute,...

  2. 76 FR 18906 - Mancozeb; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...) 305-5805. II. Summary of Petitioned-For Tolerance In the Federal Register of November 30, 2005 (70 FR... the Federal Register of April 16, 2010, (75 FR 19967) (FRL-8822- 2) the voluntary cancellation of the... loss of muscle mass. An acute neurotoxicity study with mancozeb has been completed and reviewed...

  3. Studies on the antioxidant and analgesic activities of Aztec marigold (Tagetes erecta) flowers.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Samra; Gilani, Anwar H

    2008-12-01

    Commercially available Aztec marigold (Tagetes erecta) flower extract (Af.Cr) was evaluated for the in vitro antioxidant activity and in vivo analgesic effect on acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhing. The results revealed the presence of pronounced antioxidant potential in Aztec marigold flowers and a dose-dependent (100 and 300 mg/kg) analgesic effect. The antioxidant and analgesic activities obtained seem to be in good accordance with the medicinal uses of Aztec marigold as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic. PMID:18814202

  4. A comparison of the newer COX-2 drugs and older nonnarcotic oral analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A

    2000-09-01

    The newer COX-2 drugs are safer analgesics than the older NSAIDs. At the usual dose used in osteoarthritis, they have less analgesic effect than the older NSAIDs. The non-narcotic analgesics such as acetaminophen, salicylate, NSAIDs, and the newer COX-2 drugs seem to have distinctly different mechanisms of action. In limited clinical trials, some of these drugs in combination give additive analgesia. Consideration should be given to using these drugs in combination, after suitable clinical trials, to enhance the efficacy of this category of analgesics.

  5. Analgesic Use and the Risk of Hearing Loss in Men

    PubMed Central

    Curhan, Sharon G.; Eavey, Roland; Shargorodsky, Josef; Curhan, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hearing loss is a common sensory disorder, yet prospective data on potentially modifiable risk factors are limited. Regularly used analgesics, the most commonly used drugs in the US, may be ototoxic and contribute to hearing loss. Methods We examined the independent association between self-reported professionally diagnosed hearing loss and regular use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen in 26,917 men aged 40–74 years at baseline in 1986. Study participants completed detailed questionnaires at baseline and every two years thereafter. Incident cases of new onset hearing loss were defined as those diagnosed after 1986. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to adjust for potential confounding factors. Results During 369,079 person-years of follow-up, 3488 incident cases of hearing loss were reported. Regular use of each analgesic was independently associated with an increased risk of hearing loss. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of hearing loss in regular users (2+ times/week) compared with men who used the specified analgesic <2 times/week were 1.12 (95% CI, 1.04–1.20) for aspirin, 1.21 (95% CI, 1.11–1.33) for NSAIDs, and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.07–1.39) for acetaminophen. For NSAIDs and acetaminophen, the risk increased with longer duration of regular use. The magnitude of the association was substantially higher in younger men. For men younger than age 50, the hazard ratio for hearing loss was 1.33 for regular aspirin use, 1.61 for NSAIDs, and 1.99 for acetaminophen. Conclusions Regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, or acetaminophen increases the risk of hearing loss in men and the impact is larger on younger individuals. PMID:20193831

  6. Pharmacokinetics of sustained-release analgesics in mice.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Lon V; Hansen, Ryan J; Dorsey, Kathryn; Kang, Sooah; Lunghofer, Paul J; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine and carprofen, 2 of the most commonly used analgesics in mice, must be administered every 8 to 12 h to provide sustained analgesia. Sustained-release (SR) formulations of analgesics maintain plasma levels that should be sufficient to provide sustained analgesia yet require less frequent dosing and thus less handling of and stress to the animals. The pharmacokinetics of SR formulations of buprenorphine (Bup-SR), butorphanol (Butp-SR), fentanyl (Fent-SR), carprofen (Carp-SR), and meloxicam (Melox-SR) were evaluated in mice over 72 h and compared with those of traditional, nonSR formulations. Bup-SR provided plasma drug levels greater than the therapeutic level for the first 24 to 48 h after administration, but plasma levels of Bup-HCl fell below the therapeutic level by 4 h. Fent-SR maintained plasma levels greater than reported therapeutic levels for 12 h. Therapeutic levels of the remaining drugs are unknown, but Carp-SR provided plasma drug levels similar to those of Carp for the first 24 h after administration, whereas Melox-SR had greater plasma levels than did Melox for the first 8 h. Butp-SR provided detectable plasma drug levels for the first 24 h, with a dramatic decrease over the first 4 h. These results indicate that Bup-SR provides a stable plasma drug level adequate for analgesia for 24 to 48 h after administration, whereas Carp-SR, Melox-SR, Fent-SR, and Butp-SR would require additional doses to provide analgesic plasma levels beyond 24 h in mice. PMID:25255070

  7. Correlation between membrane translocation and analgesic efficacy in kyotorphin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Isa D; Ramu, Vasanthakumar G; Pinto, Antónia R T; Freire, João M; Tavares, Isaura; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-01-01

    Amidated kyotorphin (L-Tyr-L-Arg-NH2; KTP-NH2) causes analgesia when systemically administered. The lipophilic ibuprofen-conjugated derivative of KTP-NH2 has improved analgesic efficacy. However, fast degradation by peptidases impacts negatively in the pharmacodynamics of these drugs. In this work, selected derivatives of KTP and KTP-NH2 were synthesized to combine lipophilicity and resistance to enzymatic degradation. Eight novel structural modifications were tested for the potential to transverse lipid membranes and to evaluate their efficacy in vivo. The rationale behind the design of the pool of the eight selected molecules consisted in the addition of individual group at the N-terminus, namely the tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), acetyl, butanoyl, and propanoyl or in the substitution of the tyrosine residue by an indole moiety and in the replacement of the peptidic bond by a urea-like bond in some cases. All the drugs used in the study are intrinsically fluorescent, which enables the use of spectrofluorimetry to sample the drugs in the permeation assays. The results show that the BOC and indolyl derivatives of KTP-NH2 have maximal ability to permeate membranes with concomitant maximal analgesic power. Overall, the results demonstrate that membrane permeation is correlated with analgesic efficacy. However, this is not the only factor accounting for analgesia. KTP-NH2 for instance has low passive permeation but is known to have central action. In this case, hypothetical transcytosis over the blood-brain barrier seems to depend on dipeptide transporters. PMID:25363470

  8. Pharmacokinetics of sustained-release analgesics in mice.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Lon V; Hansen, Ryan J; Dorsey, Kathryn; Kang, Sooah; Lunghofer, Paul J; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine and carprofen, 2 of the most commonly used analgesics in mice, must be administered every 8 to 12 h to provide sustained analgesia. Sustained-release (SR) formulations of analgesics maintain plasma levels that should be sufficient to provide sustained analgesia yet require less frequent dosing and thus less handling of and stress to the animals. The pharmacokinetics of SR formulations of buprenorphine (Bup-SR), butorphanol (Butp-SR), fentanyl (Fent-SR), carprofen (Carp-SR), and meloxicam (Melox-SR) were evaluated in mice over 72 h and compared with those of traditional, nonSR formulations. Bup-SR provided plasma drug levels greater than the therapeutic level for the first 24 to 48 h after administration, but plasma levels of Bup-HCl fell below the therapeutic level by 4 h. Fent-SR maintained plasma levels greater than reported therapeutic levels for 12 h. Therapeutic levels of the remaining drugs are unknown, but Carp-SR provided plasma drug levels similar to those of Carp for the first 24 h after administration, whereas Melox-SR had greater plasma levels than did Melox for the first 8 h. Butp-SR provided detectable plasma drug levels for the first 24 h, with a dramatic decrease over the first 4 h. These results indicate that Bup-SR provides a stable plasma drug level adequate for analgesia for 24 to 48 h after administration, whereas Carp-SR, Melox-SR, Fent-SR, and Butp-SR would require additional doses to provide analgesic plasma levels beyond 24 h in mice.

  9. Aerosolized Surfactants, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F

    2015-06-01

    Drug delivery by aerosol may have several advantages over other modes, particularly if the lung is the target organ. Aerosol delivery may allow achievement of higher concentrations while minimizing systemic effects and offers convenience, rapid onset of action, and avoidance of the needles and sterile technique necessary with intravenous drug administration. Aerosol delivery may change the pharmacokinetics of many drugs, however, and an awareness of the caveats of aerosolized drug delivery is mandatory to ensure both safety and adequate drug delivery. This paper discusses the administration of surfactants, anti-inflammatory agents, and analgesics by the aerosol route.

  10. Case-control study on analgesics and nephropathy (SAN): protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lewis, Michael; van der Woude, Fokko; Graf, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background The association between intake of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure is still controversially discussed. A new epidemiologic study was planned and conducted in Germany and Austria. Methods/design The objective of the international, multicenter case-control study was to evaluate the association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and use of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics with particular emphasis on combined formulations. A targeted sample of 1000 new (incident) dialysis patients, aged less than 50 years, was planned to recruit between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004. The age limit was chosen to avoid contamination of the study population with phenacetin-containing analgesics to the extent possible. Four control subjects per ESRD case, matched by age, sex, and region were selected from the population living in the region the case came from. Lifetime exposure to analgesics and potential renal risk factors were recorded in a single face-to-face interview. A set of aids was introduced to reinforce the memory of study participants. A standardized, pre-tested interview questionnaire (participants), a medical documentation sheet (physicians in dialysis centres), a logbook for all activities (dialysis centres) were used to collect the necessary data. Quality management consisted of the standardized procedures, (re-) training and supervision of interviewers, regular checks of all incoming data for completeness and plausibility. The study is scientifically independent and governed by a international Scientific Advisory Committee that bridged the gap between the sponsoring companies and the investigators. Also other advisory groups assisted the managing committee of the study. All relevant German and Austrian nephrological associations supported the study, and the study design was carefully reviewed and approved by the Kidney Foundation of Germany. Discussion The study is expected to answer the main

  11. mGlu2 metabotropic glutamate receptors restrain inflammatory pain and mediate the analgesic activity of dual mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Zammataro, Magda; Chiechio, Santina; Montana, Michael C; Traficante, Anna; Copani, Agata; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Gereau, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) couple to the inhibitory G-protein Gi. The group II mGluRs include two subtypes, mGlu2 and mGlu3, and their pharmacological activation produces analgesic effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. However, the specific contribution of each one of the two subtypes has not been clarified due to the lack of selective orthosteric ligands that can discriminate between mGlu2 and mGlu3 subtypes.In this study we used mGlu2 or mGlu3 knock-out mice to dissect the specific role for these two receptors in the endogenous control of inflammatory pain and their specific contribution to the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 receptor agonists.Our results showed that mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice display a significantly greater pain response compared to their wild type littermates. Interestingly the increased pain sensitivity in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice occurred only in the second phase of the formalin test. No differences were observed in the first phase. In contrast, mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice did not significantly differ from their wild type littermates in either phase of the formalin test.When systemically injected, a single administration of the mGlu2/3 agonist, LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip), showed a significant reduction of both phases in wild-type mice and in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ but not in mGlu2⁻(/)⁻ mice. However tolerance to the analgesic effect of LY379268 (3 mg/kg, ip) in mGlu3⁻(/)⁻ mice developed following 5 consecutive days of injection.Taken together, these results demonstrate that: (i) mGlu2 receptors play a predominant role over mGlu3 receptors in the control of inflammatory pain in mice; (ii) the analgesic activity of mixed mGlu2/3 agonists is entirely mediated by the activation of the mGlu2 subtype and (iii) the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of mGlu2/3 agonists develops despite the lack of mGlu3 receptors. PMID:21235748

  12. Transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Yannick D; Seebach, Jörg D; Bühler, Leo H; Pascual, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge in transplantation medicine remains long-term allograft acceptance, with preserved allograft function under minimal chronic immunosuppression. To safely achieve the goal of sustained donor-specific T and B cell non-responsiveness, research efforts are now focusing on therapies based on cell subsets with regulatory properties. In particular the transfusion of human regulatory T cells (Treg) is currently being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of graft versus host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is also under consideration for solid organ transplantation. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate current knowledge on naturally occurring as well as induced human Treg, with emphasis on their specific phenotype, suppressive function and how these cells can be manipulated in vitro and/or in vivo for therapeutic purposes in transplantation medicine. We highlight the potential but also possible limitations of Treg-based strategies to promote long-term allograft survival. It is evident that the bench-to-beside translation of these protocols still requires further understanding of Treg biology. Nevertheless, current data already suggest that Treg therapy alone will not be sufficient and needs to be combined with other immunomodulatory approaches in order to induce allograft tolerance. PMID:21776332

  13. Analgesic effects of adenosine in syndrome X are counteracted by theophylline: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, B E; Sadigh, B; Svedenhag, J; Sylvén, C

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine mediates ischaemic pain in humans. Patients with cardiac Syndrome X are hypersensitive to potential pain stimuli, including adenosine. On the other hand, recent findings suggest that low-dose adenosine infusion may have analgesic effects. Our aim was to test two hypotheses: (1) that the analgesic effect of adenosine is peripheral in origin, and (2) that part of the hypersensitivity to pain of patients with cardiac Syndrome X results from a disturbed mechanism of adenosine analgesia. A total of 12 female Syndrome X patients and eight healthy age-matched female controls were studied in a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Adenosine (70 microg/min) or placebo was infused into the forearm via an intra-arterial catheter. After 15 min of infusion, a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to 225 mmHg to ensure arterial occlusion. The patient then carried out dynamic handgrip work at 60 Hz. Pain or discomfort in the forearm was estimated continuously according to the Borg CR-10 scale. After the first test, theophylline was infused for 10 min intravenously at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. The ischaemic forearm test was then repeated. On a second occasion, the procedure was repeated with the opposite treatment (adenosine/placebo). Only six of 12 Syndrome X patients completed the protocol because of pain during the catheterization procedure or an inability to establish an intra-arterial line. The time to onset of pain in the working, ischaemic forearm was greater for subjects treated with adenosine than for those treated with placebo, both in those Syndrome X patients who tolerated catheterization (49+/-27 s compared with 32+/-18 s; P<0.03) and in healthy controls (40+/-19 s compared with 16+/-8 s; P<0.02). The time to maximum pain, limiting ischaemic work, was also greater with adenosine pretreatment both in Syndrome X patients (137+/-28 s compared with 106+/-28 s; P<0.03) and in healthy controls (109+/-31 compared

  14. A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, single-dose study assessing the efficacy of AMC/DCBA Warm lozenge or AMC/DCBA Cool lozenge in the relief of acute sore throat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinically proven over-the-counter (OTC) treatment options are becoming increasingly important in the self-management of acute sore throat. The aim of this study was to determine the analgesic and sensorial benefits of two different amylmetacresol/2,4-dichlorobenzyl alcohol (AMC/DCBA) throat lozenge formulation variants, AMC/DCBA Warm lozenge and AMC/DCBA Cool lozenge, compared with an unflavoured, non-medicated placebo lozenge in the relief of acute sore throat due to upper respiratory tract infections. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, single-dose study, 225 adult patients with acute sore throat were randomly assigned to receive either one AMC/DCBA Warm lozenge (n = 77), one AMC/DCBA Cool lozenge (n = 74) or one unflavoured, non-medicated lozenge (matched for size, shape and demulcency; n = 74). After baseline assessments, patients received their assigned lozenge and completed four rating assessments at 11 timepoints from 1 to 120 minutes post dose. Analgesic properties were assessed by comparing severity of throat soreness and sore throat relief ratings. Difficulty in swallowing, throat numbness, functional, sensorial and emotional benefits were also assessed. Results Both the AMC/DCBA Warm and AMC/DCBA Cool lozenge induced significant analgesic, functional, sensorial and emotional effects compared with the unflavoured, non-medicated lozenge. Sore throat relief, improvements in throat soreness and difficulty in swallowing, and throat numbness were observed as early as 1-5 minutes, and lasted up to 2 hours post dose. Sensorial benefits of warming and cooling associated with the AMC/DCBA Warm and AMC/DCBA Cool lozenge, respectively, were experienced soon after first dose, and in the case of the latter, it lasted long after the lozenge had dissolved. Emotional benefits of feeling better, happier, less distracted and less frustrated were reported in those taking either of the AMC/DCBA throat lozenge variants, with no differences in

  15. A forensic toxicological dilemma: the interpretation of post-mortem concentrations of central acting analgesics.

    PubMed

    Daldrup, Th

    2004-06-10

    Dora V., a 88-year-old pensioner suffering from a hiatus hernia, died at the home of an orthopaedist and his wife, an anaesthetist, immediately after she had received a dose of 300 mg pethidine via intravenous infusion in a timeframe of about 90 min. One day before her death a befriended notary of the couple visited Dora V. and obtained a blank signature. After her death, a will was forged using this signature, rendering the couple sole heirs of Dora V.'s estate with a value of several million euros. Post-mortem toxicology was performed in three different institutes of legal medicine. The concentrations of pethidine in peripheral venous blood were between 6.1 and 6.5mg/l and 9.5 and 17.2mg/kg in brain. Pharmacokinetic calculation confirms the given dose. There was no doubt that the cause of death was acute pethidine intoxication. The accused couple claimed that this dose of pethidine was indicated to relief pain, and as the pathologists said in their expert opinions that the hiatus hernia could explain her death, the court had to acquit the accused. This very special case demonstrates that preconceived murder of a sick person with suitable analgesics cannot be proven--at least not with the methods available to forensic toxicology and pathology. This has to be taken into consideration if euthanasia will be legalised under special circumstances.

  16. Some biological properties of flurbiprofen, an anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic agent.

    PubMed

    Adams, S S; McCullough, K F; Nicholson, J S

    1975-11-01

    2-(2-Fluoro-4-biphenyl)propionic acid (flurbiprofen) possesses peripheral analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties. It does not possess glucocorticoid or adrenocortical-stimulating properties. It is a highly potent agent which in acute pharmacological test systems produced a significant pharmacological effect in single oral doses varying from 0.04 to 0.47 mg/kg. The peak plasma concentrations attained after these doses were generally of the order of 1 to 3 mug/ml. Doses of 0.33 mg/kg/day, which gave peak plasma concentrations of 0.6 mug/ml, produced a significant inhibition of rat adjuvant arthritis, both developing and established. The very shallow dose-response curves for flurbiprofen compared with acetylsalicylic acid, especially in the mouse and the rat test systems, are not due to an unreliable or abnormal absorption, which suggests that in these species the mode of action of flurbiprofen is not identical with that of acetylsalicylic acid.

  17. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  18. Public Health Detailing—A Successful Strategy to Promote Judicious Opioid Analgesic Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Tuazon, Ellenie; Paone, Denise; Dowell, Deborah; Vo, Linda; Starrels, Joanna L.; Jones, Christopher M.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate knowledge and prescribing changes following a 2-month public health detailing campaign (one-to-one educational visits) about judicious opioid analgesic prescribing conducted among health care providers in Staten Island, New York City, in 2013. Methods. Three detailing campaign recommendations were (1) a 3-day supply of opioids is usually sufficient for acute pain, (2) avoid prescribing opioids for chronic noncancer pain, and (3) avoid high-dose opioid prescriptions. Evaluation consisted of a knowledge survey, and assessing prescribing rates and median day supply per prescription. Prescribing data from the 3-month period before the campaign were compared with 2 sequential 3-month periods after the campaign. Results. Among 866 health care providers visited, knowledge increased for all 3 recommendations (P < .01). After the campaign, the overall prescribing rate decreased similarly in Staten Island and other New York City counties (boroughs), but the high-dose prescribing rate decreased more in Staten Island than in other boroughs (P < .01). Median day supply remained stable in Staten Island and increased in other boroughs. Conclusions. The public health detailing campaign improved knowledge and likely prescribing practices and could be considered by other jurisdictions to promote judicious opioid prescribing. PMID:27400353

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  20. Can Analgesic-abuse Nephropathy is a Fertile Groundfor for Rare Collecting Duct (Bellini Duct) Renal Cell Carcinoma or Merely a Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Jhorawat, R.; Beniwal, P.; Malhotra, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs have been implicated as nephrotoxic drugs, causing both acute and chronic adverse effects that range from reversible ischemia to chronic kidney disease and urothelial tumors to renal cell carcinoma specially papillary subtype. We report one case of collecting duct (Bellini duct) renal cell carcinoma in patient with analgesic-abuse nephropathy. This young individual was suffering from ankylosing spondylitis since the age of 16 years and was consuming diclofenac and paracetamol (acetaminophen) combination for >15 years. He developed hypertension, secondary glomerulopathy, chronic kidney disease and collecting duct renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27168695

  1. Analgesics use in competitive triathletes: its relationship to doping and on predicting its usage.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Pavel; Dalaker, Robert; Letzel, Stephan; Ulrich, Rolf; Simon, Perikles

    2016-10-01

    The two major objectives of this study were (i) to assess variables that predict the use of analgesics in competitive athletes and (ii) to test whether the use of analgesics is associated with the use of doping. A questionnaire primarily addressing the use of analgesics and doping was distributed among 2,997 triathletes. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the use of analgesics. Moreover, the randomised response technique (RRT) was used to estimate the prevalence of doping in order to assess whether users of analgesics have a higher potential risk for doping than non-users. Statistical power analyses were performed to determine sample size. The bootstrap method was used to assess the statistical significance of the prevalence difference for doping between users and non-users of analgesics. Four variables from a pool of 16 variables were identified that predict the use of analgesics. These were: "version of questionnaire (English)", "gender (female)", "behaviour in case of pain (continue training)", and "hours of training per week (>12 h/week)". The 12-month prevalence estimate for the use of doping substances (overall estimate 13.0%) was significantly higher in athletes that used analgesics (20.4%) than in those athletes who did not use analgesics (12.4%). The results of this study revealed that athletes who use analgesics prior to competition may be especially prone to using doping substances. The predictors of analgesic use found in the study may be of importance to prepare education material and prevention models against the misuse of drugs in athletes. PMID:26911564

  2. Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antiulcer properties of Porphyra vietnamensis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Sharma, Kiran; Sharma, Ajay; Nagpal, Kalpana; Bera, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the present work was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer effects of red seaweed Porphyra vietnamensis (P. vietnamenis). Materials and Methods: Aqueous (POR) and alcoholic (PE) fractions were successfully isolated from P. vietnamenis. Further biological investigations were performed using a classic test of paw edema induced by carrageenan, writhing induced by acetic acid, hot plate method and naproxen induced gastro-duodenal ulcer. Results: Among the fractions POR showed better activity. POR and PE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema in a dose dependent manner. In the writhing test POR significantly (p < 0.05) reduced abdominal writhes than PE. In hot plate method POR showed better analgesic activity than PE. POR showed comparable ulcers reducing potential (p<0.01) to that of omeprazole, and has more ulcer reducing potential then PE. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that P. vietnamenis aqueous fraction possesses biological activity that is close to the standards taken for the treatment of peripheral painful or/and inflammatory and ulcer conditions. PMID:25767759

  3. Clinical correlates of prescription opioid analgesic use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan V; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2015-03-01

    A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Six percent (n = 165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16 vs. 8 % for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18 vs. 9 % for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11 vs. 4 % for non users) and panic disorder (6 vs. 4 % for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4 and 23 %, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5 and 8 %). The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users.

  4. Analgesic effect of butorphanol and levomethadone in detomidine sedated horses.

    PubMed

    Schatzman, U; Armbruster, S; Stucki, F; Busato, A; Kohler, I

    2001-08-01

    The analgesic potency of butorphanol 25 microg/kg bodyweight (BW) and levomethadone 100 microg/kg BW, administered together with detomidine 10 microg/kg BW, was measured in twelve Warmblood horses in a randomized, blinded cross-over study. Detomidine with saline 10 ml 0.9% was used as placebo. The nociceptive threshold was determined using a constant current and a pneumatic pressure model for somatic pair Detomidine alone and in combination with butorphanol or levomethadone caused a significant temporary increase (P < 0.05) of the nociceptive threshold with a maximum effect within 15 min and a return to baseline levels within 90 min. Butorphanol and levomethadone increased the nociceptive threshold and prolonged the duration of anti-nociception significantly from 15 to 75 min (P < 0.05) after drug administration compared with detomidine alone to both test methods. No significant difference between butorphanol and levomethadone was registered. It is concluded that the addition of butorphanol or levomethadone to detomidine increases the nociceptive threshold to somatic pain and prolongs the analgesic effect of detomidine in the horse. PMID:11554491

  5. Structure-activity relationships and discovery of a G protein biased μ opioid receptor ligand, [(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro-[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (TRV130), for the treatment of acute severe pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Tao; Pitis, Philip; Liu, Guodong; Yuan, Catherine; Gotchev, Dimitar; Cowan, Conrad L; Rominger, David H; Koblish, Michael; Dewire, Scott M; Crombie, Aimee L; Violin, Jonathan D; Yamashita, Dennis S

    2013-10-24

    The concept of "ligand bias" at G protein coupled receptors has been introduced to describe ligands which preferentially stimulate one intracellular signaling pathway over another. There is growing interest in developing biased G protein coupled receptor ligands to yield safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs. The classical μ opioid morphine elicited increased efficacy and duration of analgesic response with reduced side effects in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, suggesting that G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonists would be more efficacious with reduced adverse events. Here we describe our efforts to identify a potent, selective, and G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonist, TRV130 ((R)-30). This novel molecule demonstrated an improved therapeutic index (analgesia vs adverse effects) in rodent models and characteristics appropriate for clinical development. It is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of acute severe pain.

  6. Structure-activity relationships and discovery of a G protein biased μ opioid receptor ligand, [(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro-[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (TRV130), for the treatment of acute severe pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Tao; Pitis, Philip; Liu, Guodong; Yuan, Catherine; Gotchev, Dimitar; Cowan, Conrad L; Rominger, David H; Koblish, Michael; Dewire, Scott M; Crombie, Aimee L; Violin, Jonathan D; Yamashita, Dennis S

    2013-10-24

    The concept of "ligand bias" at G protein coupled receptors has been introduced to describe ligands which preferentially stimulate one intracellular signaling pathway over another. There is growing interest in developing biased G protein coupled receptor ligands to yield safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs. The classical μ opioid morphine elicited increased efficacy and duration of analgesic response with reduced side effects in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, suggesting that G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonists would be more efficacious with reduced adverse events. Here we describe our efforts to identify a potent, selective, and G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonist, TRV130 ((R)-30). This novel molecule demonstrated an improved therapeutic index (analgesia vs adverse effects) in rodent models and characteristics appropriate for clinical development. It is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of acute severe pain. PMID:24063433

  7. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  8. Comparison of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of meloxicam gel with diclofenac and piroxicam gels in animal models: pharmacokinetic parameters after topical application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Bansal, P; Bhardwaj, R K; Jaiswal, J; Velpandian, T

    2002-01-01

    Meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is a preferential inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 and has demonstrated potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity after oral administration. The present work was carried out to elucidate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of a newer topical gel formulation of meloxicam (1% w/w gel) and compare it with 0.5% w/w piroxicam and 1% w/w diclofenac gels in experimental animal models. The study was also extended to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a newer formulation of meloxicam gel after topical application on depilated skin of rats. The anti-inflammatory activities of meloxicam, piroxicam and diclofenac gels were compared using carrageenan-induced acute paw oedema and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced chronic paw oedema in rats. Meloxicam gel showed increased protection against inflammation as compared to piroxicam and diclofenac gels. Acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced phase I and phase II pain models were used to compare their analgesic activity. Meloxicam gel showed significant protection in formalin-induced phase II pain whereas its analgesic activity was less as compared to diclofenac and piroxicam gels in writhing test and formalin-induced phase I pain. The pharmacokinetic studies showed peak plasma drug concentration (C(max)) of 48.48 +/- 6.57 microg/ml at 2 h (T(max)) after topical application of 500 mg of meloxicam gel formulation. The area under the curve as calculated from 0 to 6 h was found to be 114.18 +/- 4.23 and 194.13 +/- 3.78 microg x h/ml for 0 to infinity. The results indicate that topical preparation of meloxicam could be an effective alternative to diclofenac and piroxicam gels in inflammatory conditions and its associated pain with the possibility of less systemic side-effects.

  9. Preclinical screening of phyllanthus amarus ethanolic extract for its analgesic and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, S. Sham; Hegde, K. Sundeep; Chandrashekhar, Sharath; Rao, S. N.; Manikkoth, Shyamjith

    2015-01-01

    Background: To discover a new agent which possesses dual property of analgesic and antimicrobial activity, thereby reducing the burden of polypharmacy. Phyllanthus amarus was screened for its analgesic and antimicrobial activities. Objectives: The objective was to evaluate the analgesic and antimicrobial activity, of P. amarus ethanolic extract (PAEE). Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extract of P. amarus was prepared using Soxhlet apparatus. An in vivo study using Swiss albino mice was done to screen the central and peripheral analgesic activity of P. amarus extract. The extract was administered at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight orally. The peripheral analgesic activity was assessed using acetic acid induced writhing test. The central analgesic activity was assessed using Eddy's hot plate apparatus. An in vitro study was carried out to study the antimicrobial activity of the above extract using selected species of Streptococcus mutans, and S. salivarius. The antimicrobial activities were determined using the agar well method. Results: The ethanolic extract of P. amarus showed significant (P < 0.05) peripheral and central analgesic activity. In vitro antimicrobial screening indicated that the ethanolic extract had shown a zone of inhibition against S. mutans and S. salivarius in the agar wells. Conclusion: This study showed that PAEE exhibited significant analgesic and antimicrobial activities. PMID:26692753

  10. Comparison of chronic analgesic drugs prevalence in Parkinson's disease, other chronic diseases and the general population.

    PubMed

    Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Grolleau, Sabrina; Thalamas, Claire; Bourrel, Robert; Allaria-Lapierre, Valérie; Loï, Robert; Micallef-Roll, Joelle; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently experienced pain. Nevertheless, there are no epidemiological data about frequency of pain in PD. We compare pain prevalence using analgesic prescription in PD patients, in the general population and in two samples of painful patients: diabetics and osteoarthritis patients in France. Data were obtained from the French System of Health Insurance for the year 2005. Medications (antiparkinsonian, antidiabetics drugs and osteoarthritis drugs) were used for identification of PD, diabetic and osteoarthritis patients. We estimated the prevalence of analgesic drugs prescription (at least one analgesic drug) and the prevalence of chronic analgesic drugs prescription (more than 90 DDD of analgesic drug). The study included 11,466 PD patients. PD patients significantly received more prescription of analgesics than the general population (82% versus 77%,) and fewer than patients with osteoarthritis (82% versus 90%). No significant difference was found between PD and diabetic patients. The chronic prescription of analgesic drugs was more prevalent in PD patients (33%) than in the general population (20%) and in diabetic patients (26%) and similar to that in osteoarthritis patients. PD patients were more exposed than the general population and diabetics to opiates, acetaminophen, and adjuvant analgesics chronic use.

  11. 78 FR 29142 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  12. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  13. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  14. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  15. 77 FR 67380 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  16. 78 FR 27405 - Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory...

  17. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  18. Regular analgesic intake and the risk of end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pommer, W; Bronder, E; Greiser, E; Helmert, U; Jesdinsky, H J; Klimpel, A; Borner, K; Molzahn, M

    1989-01-01

    The strength of the association between regular analgesic intake (RAI) and end-stage renal failure (EF) has been insufficiently established until now. A case-control study was conducted to estimate the relative risks (RR) of EF after RAI (defined as consumption of 15 or more analgesic doses per month for a continuous period of at least 1 year) for cumulative drug intake, single-ingredient analgesics, combinations, and specific compounds. The case group included all patients with EF undergoing renal replacement therapy in the area of West Berlin (1984-1986, n = 921). Control subjects, matched to cases by sex, age, and nationality, were selected from a group of patients in outpatient clinics. Matching was possible for 517 cases. The RR of EF after RAI of any analgesic was 2.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.77-3.39) and after RAI of combination drugs 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.91-3.67). No significant increase was found, however, after RAI of single-ingredient analgesics. The RR after RAI of combination drugs and for the most preferred analgesic ingredients (phenacetin, paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid, phenazones, caffeine) increased with dose. Furthermore, a dose-time-related RR after RAI of the longest used preparation was found. Thus, the results clearly show an increased RR of EF after RAI related to both dose and exposure time of mixed analgesic compounds, but not for the use of only single-ingredient analgesics. PMID:2801788

  19. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  20. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  1. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  2. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  3. 21 CFR 346.16 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 346.16 Section 346.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ingredients § 346.16 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The active ingredient of...

  4. 21 CFR 348.10 - Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. 348.10 Section 348.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Active Ingredients § 348.10 Analgesic, anesthetic, and antipruritic active ingredients. The...

  5. Regular analgesic intake and the risk of end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pommer, W; Bronder, E; Greiser, E; Helmert, U; Jesdinsky, H J; Klimpel, A; Borner, K; Molzahn, M

    1989-01-01

    The strength of the association between regular analgesic intake (RAI) and end-stage renal failure (EF) has been insufficiently established until now. A case-control study was conducted to estimate the relative risks (RR) of EF after RAI (defined as consumption of 15 or more analgesic doses per month for a continuous period of at least 1 year) for cumulative drug intake, single-ingredient analgesics, combinations, and specific compounds. The case group included all patients with EF undergoing renal replacement therapy in the area of West Berlin (1984-1986, n = 921). Control subjects, matched to cases by sex, age, and nationality, were selected from a group of patients in outpatient clinics. Matching was possible for 517 cases. The RR of EF after RAI of any analgesic was 2.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.77-3.39) and after RAI of combination drugs 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.91-3.67). No significant increase was found, however, after RAI of single-ingredient analgesics. The RR after RAI of combination drugs and for the most preferred analgesic ingredients (phenacetin, paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid, phenazones, caffeine) increased with dose. Furthermore, a dose-time-related RR after RAI of the longest used preparation was found. Thus, the results clearly show an increased RR of EF after RAI related to both dose and exposure time of mixed analgesic compounds, but not for the use of only single-ingredient analgesics.

  6. The analgesic properties of sub-anaesthetic doses of anaesthetics in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Neal, M. J.; Robson, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    Trichlorethylene in a sub-anaesthetic concentration (0.5% v/v in oxygen) has an analgesic effect on mice, which develops slowly and reaches a maximum roughly equivalent to that produced by 5 mg/kg of methadone hydrochloride given by intraperitoneal injection. Ethyl chloride causes analgesia in sub-anaesthetic concentrations (3%) but is much less potent than trichlorethylene. Halothane (0.75%) produces slight but definite analgesia. Cyclopropane and diethyl ether have no appreciable analgesic effect. Concentrations of nitrous oxide (up to 90%) in oxygen lack any observable analgesic action on the mouse. Trichlorethylene is considerably potentiated by nitrous oxide, its anaesthetic rather than its analgesic action being affected. Nitrous oxide (40%) potentiates the analgesic rather than the anaesthetic action of halothane (0.75%). However, increasing the concentration of nitrous oxide to 60% causes the anaesthetic action of halothane to predominate. PMID:14211690

  7. An in vitro investigation of the effect of some analgesics on human enamel.

    PubMed

    McNally, L M; Barbour, M E; O'Sullivan, D J; Jagger, D C

    2006-07-01

    The sale of over-the-counter pain relief medication has increased dramatically in recent years, and typically amounts to several hundred thousands of pounds per year in the UK. Many soluble analgesic preparations contain citric acid, and it has been suggested that these formulations may cause dental erosion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of some over-the-counter analgesics on tooth surface loss from human enamel. Six commonly available analgesics were chosen for this study and the effect of immersing unerupted human enamel was examined using non-contact optical profilometry. Two of the six analgesics investigated caused no detectable erosion (Boots soluble aspirin and Anadin Extra). Three caused statistically significant enamel erosion, but this was very slight and is thought to be clinically insignificant (Alka Seltzer, Panadol and Solpadeine). Only one analgesic caused possible potentially clinical significant enamel erosion. Further studies are needed to determine whether Aspro causes clinically significant enamel erosion. PMID:16774512

  8. Evaluation of anti-pyretic and analgesic activity of Emblica officinalis Gaertn.

    PubMed

    Perianayagam, James B; Sharma, S K; Joseph, Aney; Christina, A J M

    2004-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the anti-pyretic and analgesic activity of ethanol (EEO) and aqueous (AEO) extracts of Emblica officinalis fruits in several experimental models. A single oral dose of EEO and AEO (500 mg/kg, i.p.) showed significant reduction in brewer's yeast induced hyperthermia in rats. EEO and AEO also elicited pronounced inhibitory effect on acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice in the analgesic test. Both, EEO and AEO did not show any significant analgesic activity in the tail-immersion test. These findings suggest that extracts of Emblica officinalis fruits possessed potent anti-pyretic and analgesic activity. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolic compounds, carbohydrates and amino acids, which may be responsible for anti-pyretic and analgesic activities. PMID:15374611

  9. Autophagy activation by novel inducers prevents BECN2-mediated drug tolerance to cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kenta; Wang, Nan; Fan, Yuying; Zhang, Weiran; Schoenen, Frank J; Frankowski, Kevin J; Marugan, Juan; Zhou, Yifa; Huang, Sui; He, Congcong

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids and related drugs generate profound behavioral effects (such as analgesic effects) through activating CNR1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 [brain]). However, repeated cannabinoid administration triggers lysosomal degradation of the receptor and rapid development of drug tolerance, limiting the medical use of marijuana in chronic diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms of cannabinoid tolerance are not fully understood, and little is known about its prevention. Here we show that a protein involved in macroautophagy/autophagy (a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway), BECN2 (beclin 2), mediates cannabinoid tolerance by preventing CNR1 recycling and resensitization after prolonged agonist exposure, and deletion of Becn2 rescues CNR1 activity in mouse brain and conveys resistance to analgesic tolerance to chronic cannabinoids. To target BECN2 therapeutically, we established a competitive recruitment model of BECN2 and identified novel synthetic, natural or physiological stimuli of autophagy that sequester BECN2 from its binding with GPRASP1, a receptor protein for CNR1 degradation. Co-administration of these autophagy inducers effectively restores the level and signaling of brain CNR1 and protects mice from developing tolerance to repeated cannabinoid usage. Overall, our findings demonstrate the functional link among autophagy, receptor signaling and animal behavior regulated by psychoactive drugs, and develop a new strategy to prevent tolerance and improve medical efficacy of cannabinoids by modulating the BECN2 interactome and autophagy activity. PMID:27305347

  10. Diclofenac Sodium Bolus Injection (Dyloject(TM)): A Review in Acute Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-08-01

    An intravenous bolus formulation of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium has been developed using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) as a solubility enhancer. HPβCD diclofenac (Dyloject(TM)) is available for use in adults in the USA for the management of mild to moderate pain, and as monotherapy or in combination with opioid analgesics for the management of moderate to severe pain. In two multicentre, phase III studies in adults with acute moderate to severe postoperative pain, HPβCD diclofenac significantly reduced pain intensity and the need for rescue medication compared with placebo. In these studies, the tolerability profile of HPβCD diclofenac was generally similar to that of placebo and adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity. Constipation, infusion-site pain and dizziness were the most frequently reported adverse reactions occurring numerically more frequently with HPβCD diclofenac than placebo. Therapy with HPβCD diclofenac does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular, renal or bleeding-related adverse events versus placebo. Thus, HPβCD diclofenac extends the treatment options currently available for the management of moderate to severe postoperative pain in adults. PMID:27447189

  11. Virtual Reality as an Adjunctive Non-pharmacologic Analgesic for Acute Burn Pain During Medical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Gloria T.; Meyer, Walter J.; Arceneaux, Lisa L.; Russell, William J.; Seibel, Eric J.; Richards, Todd L.; Sharar, Sam R.; Patterson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Excessive pain during medical procedures is a widespread problem but is especially problematic during daily wound care of patients with severe burn injuries. Methods Burn patients report 35–50% reductions in procedural pain while in a distracting immersive virtual reality, and fMRI brain scans show associated reductions in pain-related brain activity during VR. VR distraction appears to be most effective for patients with the highest pain intensity levels. VR is thought to reduce pain by directing patients’ attention into the virtual world, leaving less attention available to process incoming neural signals from pain receptors. Conclusions We review evidence from clinical and laboratory research studies exploring Virtual Reality analgesia, concentrating primarily on the work ongoing within our group. We briefly describe how VR pain distraction systems have been tailored to the unique needs of burn patients to date, and speculate about how VR systems could be tailored to the needs of other patient populations in the future. PMID:21264690

  12. Analgesic and antipyretic activities of Momordica charantia Linn. fruits

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Roshan; Mahobia, Naveen; Upwar, Nitin; Waseem, Naheed; Talaviya, Hetal; Patel, Zalak

    2010-01-01

    Plant Momordica charantia Linn. belongs to family Cucurbitaceae. It is known as bitter gourd in English and karela in Hindi. Earlier claims show that the plant is used in stomachic ailments as a carminative tonic; as an antipyretic and antidiabetic agent; and in rheumatoid arthritis and gout. The fruit has been claimed to contain charantin, steroidal saponin, momordium, carbohydrates, mineral matters, ascorbic acid, alkaloids, glucosides, etc. The ethanolic extract of the fruit showed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, glycosides, steroids, proteins, and carbohydrates. The present study was carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing and tail-immersion tests in mice, while yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The ethanolic extracts (250 and 500 mg/kg, po.) showed an analgesic and antipyretic effect, which was significantly higher than that in the control rats. The observed pharmacological activities provide the scientific basis to support traditional claims as well as explore some new and promising leads. PMID:22247882

  13. The search for novel analgesics: targets and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Woller, Sarah A.; Ramachandran, Roshni; Sorkin, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of the pain state is of great therapeutic relevance to virtually every medical specialty. Failure to manage its expression has deleterious consequence to the well-being of the organism. An understanding of the complex biology of the mechanisms underlying the processing of nociceptive information provides an important pathway towards development of novel and robust therapeutics. Importantly, preclinical models have been of considerable use in determining the linkage between mechanism and the associated behaviorally defined pain state. This review seeks to provide an overview of current thinking targeting pain biology, the use of preclinical models and the development of novel pain therapeutics. Issues pertinent to the strengths and weaknesses of current development strategies for analgesics are considered. PMID:26097729

  14. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient.

  15. Analgesic efficacy of orally administered buprenorphine in rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, L B; Thompson, A C; Martin, T; Kristal, M B

    2001-02-01

    The analgesic effect of orally administered buprenorphine was compared with that induced by a standard therapeutic injected dose (0.05 mg/kg of body weight, s.c.) in male Long-Evans rats. Analgesia was assessed by measuring pain threshold, using the hot-water tail-flick assay before and after administration of buprenorphine. The results suggest that a commonly used formula for oral buprenorphine in flavored gelatin, at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, does not increase pain threshold in rats. Instead, oral buprenorphine doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg were necessary to induce significant increases in pain threshold. However, these doses had to be administered by orogastric infusion because the rats would not voluntarily eat flavored gelatin containing this much buprenorphine. The depth of analgesia induced by these infused doses was comparable to that induced by the clinically effective s.c. treatment (0.05 mg/kg).

  16. Clinical Correlates of Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Megan V.; Costello, Darce; Yonkers, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A 2012 committee opinion from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists highlights the considerable increase in opioid addiction in recent years, yet little is known about clinical correlates of prescribed opioids among pregnant women. This study examines clinical and demographic factors associated with the use of opioid analgesics in pregnancy. Methods Data were derived from a prospective cohort study of pregnant women. Participants were administered the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to identify depressive and anxiety disorders and data on medication use were gathered at three assessment points and classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code (ATC) classification system ATC group N02A. Participants included 2,748 English or Spanish speaking pregnant women. Results Six percent (n=165) of women used opioid analgesics at any point in pregnancy. More pregnant women using opioids met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (16% vs. 8% for non users), generalized anxiety disorder (18% vs. 9% for non users), post-traumatic stress disorder (11% vs. 4% for non users) and panic disorder (6% vs. 4% for non users). Women who reported opioid use were also significantly more likely than non users to report using illicit drugs and almost three times as likely to report smoking cigarettes in the second or third trimester of pregnancy (4% and 23%, respectively) as compared to non-opioid users (0.5% and 8%). Conclusion The use of opioids in pregnancy was associated with higher levels of psychiatric comorbidity and use of other substances as compared to non-opioid users. PMID:24951127

  17. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Pierik, Jorien G J; Berben, Sivera A; IJzerman, Maarten J; Gaakeer, Menno I; van Eenennaam, Fred L; van Vugt, Arie B; Doggen, Carine J M

    2016-07-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre-post intervention study was performed as part of the prospective PROTACT follow-up study. During the pre- (15 months, n = 504) and post-period (6 months, n = 156) patients' self-reported pain intensity and pain treatment were registered. Analgesic provision in patients with moderate to severe pain (NRS ≥4) improved from 46.8% to 68.0%. Over 10% of the patients refused analgesics, resulting into an actual analgesic administration increase from 36.3% to 46.1%. Median time to analgesic decreased from 10 to 7 min (P < 0.05), whereas time to opioids decreased from 37 to 15 min (P < 0.01). Mean pain relief significantly increased to 1.56 NRS-points, in patients who received analgesic treatment even up to 2.02 points. The protocol appeared to lead to an increase in analgesic administration, shorter time to analgesics and a higher clinically relevant pain relief. Despite improvements, suffering moderate to severe pain at ED discharge was still common. Protocol adherence needs to be studied in order to optimize pain management. PMID:26968352

  18. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae), medicinal plants of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae) are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. Method For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. Results For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease) according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p <0.05) and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed. Conclusion The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia . PMID:22883637

  19. [(35)S]GTPγS binding and opioid tolerance and efficacy in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Madia, Priyanka A; Navani, Dipesh M; Yoburn, Byron C

    2012-03-01

    The present study examined efficacy of a series of opioid agonists and then using chronic in vivo treatment protocols, determined tolerance to opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S] thio)triphosphate) binding in mouse spinal cord membranes and compared it directly to spinal analgesic tolerance. The [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay was used to estimate efficacy (E(max) and τ; Operational Model of Agonism) of a series of opioid agonists for G-protein activation in mouse spinal cord. The rank order of opioid agonist efficacy determined in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay using the Operational Model and E(max) was similar. These efficacy estimates correlated with historical analgesic efficacy estimates. For tolerance studies, mice were continuously treated s.c. for 7days with morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, etorphine or fentanyl and [(35)S]GTPγS studies were conducted in spinal cord membranes. Other mice were tested in i.t. analgesia dose response studies (tailflick). Tolerance to DAMGO ([D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin) or morphine stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding (decrease in E(max)) was observed following etorphine and fentanyl treatment only. These treatment protocols downregulate μ-opioid receptor density whereas morphine, oxycodone and hydromorphone do not. Spinal analgesic tolerance was observed following all treatment protocols examined (morphine, oxycodone and etorphine). Opioid antagonist treatment that specifically upregulates (chronic naltrexone) or downregulates (clocinnamox) μ-opioid receptor density produced a corresponding change in opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. Although receptor downregulation and G-protein uncoupling are among potential mechanisms of opioid tolerance, the present results suggest that uncoupling in mouse spinal cord plays a minor role and that the [(35)S]GTPγS assay is particularly responsive to changes in μ-opioid receptor density. PMID:22108651

  20. [(35)S]GTPγS binding and opioid tolerance and efficacy in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Madia, Priyanka A; Navani, Dipesh M; Yoburn, Byron C

    2012-03-01

    The present study examined efficacy of a series of opioid agonists and then using chronic in vivo treatment protocols, determined tolerance to opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S] thio)triphosphate) binding in mouse spinal cord membranes and compared it directly to spinal analgesic tolerance. The [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay was used to estimate efficacy (E(max) and τ; Operational Model of Agonism) of a series of opioid agonists for G-protein activation in mouse spinal cord. The rank order of opioid agonist efficacy determined in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay using the Operational Model and E(max) was similar. These efficacy estimates correlated with historical analgesic efficacy estimates. For tolerance studies, mice were continuously treated s.c. for 7days with morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, etorphine or fentanyl and [(35)S]GTPγS studies were conducted in spinal cord membranes. Other mice were tested in i.t. analgesia dose response studies (tailflick). Tolerance to DAMGO ([D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin) or morphine stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding (decrease in E(max)) was observed following etorphine and fentanyl treatment only. These treatment protocols downregulate μ-opioid receptor density whereas morphine, oxycodone and hydromorphone do not. Spinal analgesic tolerance was observed following all treatment protocols examined (morphine, oxycodone and etorphine). Opioid antagonist treatment that specifically upregulates (chronic naltrexone) or downregulates (clocinnamox) μ-opioid receptor density produced a corresponding change in opioid agonist stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. Although receptor downregulation and G-protein uncoupling are among potential mechanisms of opioid tolerance, the present results suggest that uncoupling in mouse spinal cord plays a minor role and that the [(35)S]GTPγS assay is particularly responsive to changes in μ-opioid receptor density.

  1. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose–response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:26817983

  2. [The influence of GABAA receptor on the analgesic action of intrathecally injected oxysophoridine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Gao, Jin-xian; Yi, Zheng-hong; Yan, Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Xu

    2011-05-01

    .This study is to investigate the analgesic effect produced by intrathecal injection (ith) of oxysophoridine (OSR) and the mechanism of GABAA receptor. Warm water tail-flick test was used to detect the analgesic effect of OSR (12.5, 6.25, and 3.13 mg.kg-1 ith) and to observe the influence of GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid) agonist or antagonist on the analgesic effect of OSR in mice. Immunohistochemistry method were used to detect the influence of OSR (12.5 mg.kg-1, ith) on the GABAARalpha1 protein expression in spinal cord. The results obtained covers that OSR (12.5 and 6.25 mg.kg-, ith) alleviates pain significantly with the warm water tail-flick test (P<0.05, P<0.01), the rate of pain threshold increases by 68.45%; GABA and muscimol (MUS) produces analgesic synergism together with the OSR, picrotoxin (PTX) and bicuculline (BIC) antagonize the analgesic effect of OSR; OSR (12.5 mg.kg-1, ith) significantly increase the positive number of GABAARalpha1 nerve cell in spinal cord (P<0.01) and significantly decrease the average grey levels (P<0.01). In conclusion, OSR intrathecal injection has significant analgesic effect. And GABAA receptor in spinal cord is involved in the analgesic mechanism.

  3. Clinical Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Guduchi (Tinospora Cordifolia) Using Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Nishant; Nim, Dwividendra Kumar; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Dixit, Rakesh Kumar; Chaurasia, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is a very well-known signal of ill health and analgesics are the drugs that are used to relieve pain. The main problem with these drugs remains that of side effects. Safer alternatives are natural herbs. Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) is one such plant with analgesic potential but few studies are there. Objective: To evaluate the analgesic activity of commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia). Materials and Methods: For this purpose commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia) by Himalaya Drug Company, Bangalore was used. Albino rats were divided randomly in three groups of six rats each. Group 1 (control) received distilled water orally, group 2 (test) received T. cordifolia extract in dose of 300 mg/kg orally and group 3(standard) received Pentazocine in dose 10mg/kg intraperitoneally. Analgesic activity was evaluated using hot plate and abdominal writhing method. All the observations were analysed statistically using student’s t-test. Observation and Results: T. cordifolia extract significantly (p<0.05) increased the response time and decreased the number of writhes in hot plate method and abdominal writhing method respectively, on comparison with the control group. Conclusions: The above findings suggest that this commercially available extract of Guduchi (T. cordifolia) possess analgesic activity. This analgesic activity probably involves peripheral as well as central mechanisms as the extract showed analgesic activity in both hot plate and abdominal writhing method. PMID:25302211

  4. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose-response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period.

  5. Out-of-pocket Prices of Opioid Analgesics in the United States, 1999-2004

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Strassels, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the out-of-pocket prices of common opioid analgesics by medication, drug coverage, region, and year. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study using 1999-2004 data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). SETTING United States civilian non-institutionalized population. PATIENTS Adults who filled prescriptions for opioid analgesics between 1999 and 2004 and who were not enrolled in Medicaid. OUTCOME MEASURES Prices of prescribed analgesics were collected from receipts, medication containers, patient recall, and administrative records (N = 20,026 and 31,500, respectively). RESULTS Average out-of-pocket price of an opioid analgesic prescription was around $10, but the estimate is misleading: a typical adult patient without drug coverage paid $12.86 to $61.60 to fill their analgesic prescription, depending on medication. The extended-release formulations cost more than double the “immediate release” prices. For the analgesics studied, drug coverage lowered out-of-pocket prices by 50% to 85%, but market prices increased at a rate of 5.7% to 9% per year with little regional variation. Data did not include prices for medications not prescribed or prescribed, but not acquired. CONCLUSIONS Independent of the diagnosis, patients’ out-of-pocket price for prescribed analgesics fluctuated freely in the United States across time, region, and coverage status. These fluctuations potentially distort the delivery of effective pain management and further burden an already afflicted population. PMID:20002589

  6. Analgesic exposure in pregnant rats affects fetal germ cell development with inter-generational reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Afshan; van den Driesche, Sander; Wang, Yili; McKinnell, Chris; Macpherson, Sheila; Eddie, Sharon L.; Kinnell, Hazel; Hurtado-Gonzalez, Pablo; Chambers, Tom J.; Stevenson, Kerrie; Wolfinger, Elke; Hrabalkova, Lenka; Calarrao, Ana; Bayne, Rosey AL; Hagen, Casper P.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics which affect prostaglandin (PG) pathways are used by most pregnant women. As germ cells (GC) undergo developmental and epigenetic changes in fetal life and are PG targets, we investigated if exposure of pregnant rats to analgesics (indomethacin or acetaminophen) affected GC development and reproductive function in resulting offspring (F1) or in the F2 generation. Exposure to either analgesic reduced F1 fetal GC number in both sexes and altered the tempo of fetal GC development sex-dependently, with delayed meiotic entry in oogonia but accelerated GC differentiation in males. These effects persisted in adult F1 females as reduced ovarian and litter size, whereas F1 males recovered normal GC numbers and fertility by adulthood. F2 offspring deriving from an analgesic-exposed F1 parent also exhibited sex-specific changes. F2 males exhibited normal reproductive development whereas F2 females had smaller ovaries and reduced follicle numbers during puberty/adulthood; as similar changes were found for F2 offspring of analgesic-exposed F1 fathers or mothers, we interpret this as potentially indicating an analgesic-induced change to GC in F1. Assuming our results are translatable to humans, they raise concerns that analgesic use in pregnancy could potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and grand-daughters. PMID:26813099

  7. Effects of epinephrine and cortisol on the analgesic activity of metyrosine in rats.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Yavuz; Saglam, Mustafa Bahadir; Yildirim, Kadir; Karatay, Saliha; Polat, Beyzagul; Uslu, Turan; Suleyman, Halis; Akcay, Fatih

    2011-09-01

    Some endogenous hormones (epinephrine and cortisol) can change an individual's pain threshold. Propranolol is a non-selective β adrenergic receptor blocker which antagonises the anti-inflammatory effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs via the β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors. The roles of epinephrine and cortisol were investigated in the analgesic activity of metyrosine in rats with reduced epinephrine levels induced by metyrosine. Pain threshold measurement was performed using an analgesimeter with different doses and the single or combined usage of metyrosine, prednisolone, metyrapone and propranolol in rats. Epinephrine and corticosterone levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in metyrosineadministered rats. Metyrosine reduces the epinephrine levels without affecting the corticosterone levels, thereby creating an analgesic effect. It was determined that prednisolone did not have an analgesic effect in rats with normal epinephrine levels, but its analgesic activity increased with a parallel decrease in the epinephrine levels. Similarly, the combined use of prednisolone and metyrosine provided a stronger analgesic effect than that rendered by metyrosine alone. The strongest analgesic effect, however, was observed in the group of rats with the lowest epinephrine level in whom the metyrosine + prednisolone combination was administered. The findings of this study may be useful in severe pain cases in which the available analgesics are unable to relieve the individual's pain.

  8. Acute otitis media in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common reason for primary care visits in children. Yet, there is considerable debate on the most effective treatment. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments (analgesics, antibiotics, and myringotomy) in children with AOM? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 17 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: analgesics, antibiotics, delayed antibiotics, immediate antibiotics, longer courses of antibiotics, and myringotomy. PMID:25229555

  9. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of stress analgesia: lack of cross-tolerance between stressors.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Lewis, J W; Liebeskind, J C

    1983-01-31

    Qualitatively different analgesic responses can be evoked in rats by exposure to prolonged, intermittent or brief, continuous footshock stress. These two forms of stress analgesia appear to be mediated by opioid and nonopioid pain-inhibitory substrates, respectively. The present study confirms our previous observation that tolerance develops to only the opioid form of stress analgesia and shows that cross-tolerance does not occur between the opioid and nonopioid forms. These data provide further evidence that independent mechanisms underlie opioid and nonopioid stress analgesia.

  10. Adamantyl Analogues of Paracetamol as Potent Analgesic Drugs via Inhibition of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry. PMID:25438056

  11. Use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Bauchner, H; May, A; Coates, E

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of analgesic agents for invasive medical procedures in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The directors of 38 pediatric units and 31 neonatal units reported that analgesics were infrequently used for intravenous cannulation (10%), suprapubic bladder aspiration (8%), urethral catheterization (2%), or venipuncture (2%). Analgesics were used significantly more regularly in pediatric than in neonatal intensive care units for arterial line placement, bone marrow aspiration, central line placement, chest tube insertion, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. PMID:1403404

  12. [Clinical and economical evaluation of new analgesics for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Ruggeri, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    The management of chronic pain still represent a challenge for physicians. Opioids are the main stem in the treatment of chronic severe pain, not only for their potency, but as they act as central drugs. The main limit to their utilization in clinical practice is the prevalence of side effects, in particular in the gastrointestinal tract, whose constipation represents the most common. Two new formulations are nowadays available on the market: tapentadol PR (TAP PR) and oxycodone/naloxone (OXN). A recent meta-analysis showed that both drugs have a better tolerability profile than a tradizional opioid, such as oxycodone CR (OXY CR), but TAP PR reduces by 47% (RR=0.53) the percentage of patients discontinuing treatment because of side effects, compared to 24% (RR=0.76) of OXN. A similar advantage has been reported in the reduction of the risk of developing nausea and/or vomiting: TAP PR reduces the risk by 47% (RR=0.53), while OXN reduces the risk by only by 10% (RR=0.90). Both drugs reduced by about 40% the risk of constipation (RR=0.61 for TAP PR and for OXN). These results have been recently confirmed by a direct comparison of the two formulations (TAP PR vs OXN) in patients with chronic low back pain with neuropathic component. Both drugs were reported to be effective in reducing pain intensity and neuropathic symptoms, however TAP PR resulted superior to OXN in terms of analgesic efficacy, quality of life, and tolerability, in particular regarding constipation and adherence to treatment. A pharmacoeconomic analysis can be useful to understand the costs of these clinical advantages, and can be done by using a probabilistic analisys and by populating a Markov model that simulates the transition in time of 100 patients through 4 different possible health states: 1) still on treatment; 2) presence of adverse events; 3) discontinuation; 4) death. Both treatments (TAP PR and OXN) have been shown to have an excellent cost-effectiveness profile. In the case of OXN, in

  13. [Clinical and economical evaluation of new analgesics for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Ruggeri, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    The management of chronic pain still represent a challenge for physicians. Opioids are the main stem in the treatment of chronic severe pain, not only for their potency, but as they act as central drugs. The main limit to their utilization in clinical practice is the prevalence of side effects, in particular in the gastrointestinal tract, whose constipation represents the most common. Two new formulations are nowadays available on the market: tapentadol PR (TAP PR) and oxycodone/naloxone (OXN). A recent meta-analysis showed that both drugs have a better tolerability profile than a tradizional opioid, such as oxycodone CR (OXY CR), but TAP PR reduces by 47% (RR=0.53) the percentage of patients discontinuing treatment because of side effects, compared to 24% (RR=0.76) of OXN. A similar advantage has been reported in the reduction of the risk of developing nausea and/or vomiting: TAP PR reduces the risk by 47% (RR=0.53), while OXN reduces the risk by only by 10% (RR=0.90). Both drugs reduced by about 40% the risk of constipation (RR=0.61 for TAP PR and for OXN). These results have been recently confirmed by a direct comparison of the two formulations (TAP PR vs OXN) in patients with chronic low back pain with neuropathic component. Both drugs were reported to be effective in reducing pain intensity and neuropathic symptoms, however TAP PR resulted superior to OXN in terms of analgesic efficacy, quality of life, and tolerability, in particular regarding constipation and adherence to treatment. A pharmacoeconomic analysis can be useful to understand the costs of these clinical advantages, and can be done by using a probabilistic analisys and by populating a Markov model that simulates the transition in time of 100 patients through 4 different possible health states: 1) still on treatment; 2) presence of adverse events; 3) discontinuation; 4) death. Both treatments (TAP PR and OXN) have been shown to have an excellent cost-effectiveness profile. In the case of OXN, in

  14. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  15. Superior Analgesic Effect of an Active Distraction versus Pleasant Unfamiliar Sounds and Music: The Influence of Emotion and Cognitive Style

    PubMed Central

    Garza Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception. PMID:22242169

  16. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music: the influence of emotion and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Eduardo A Garza; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception.

  17. Enhanced analgesic effects of propacetamol and tramadol combination in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyang; Du, Lili; Pan, He; Li, Li; Su, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Drug combinations have more potential advantage of greater analgesia than monotherapy. By the combination of analgesics with different mechanism, potency of analgesia can be maximized while the incidence of adverse effects is minimized. This study was aimed to assess a possible interaction in the antinociceptive effects between tramadol (T) and propacetamol (P) when administered in combination against nociceptive effects induced by physical or chemical injury in mice and rats. Three series of experiments were performed. The first was to determine effects of P and T alone or in combination in the acetic acid (AA)-induced writhing test in mice. Combination of T/P (3.9/67.5, 7.8/135, 15.6/271 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) elicited dose-dependent antinociception. The second determined whether the antinociceptive effects of the drugs observed in a test of persistent chemical pain could be seen in a test of acute thermal pain and the back-paw licking response was tested on the hot plate. The back-paw licking latency at different times after drugs obtained with the combination (16/270, 32/540 mg/kg, i.p. T/P) was longer than the respective values obtained with the individual agents. The third was designed to compare the antinociceptive effects between the drugs, either alone or in combination in the rat tail-flicks test. Combination of T/P (5.5/96, 11/192 mg/kg i.p.) both showed effects of higher potency than T and P, respectively. The data obtained confirmed that propacetamol is able to enhance the antinociceptive activity of tramadol. PMID:21372383

  18. Analgesic effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Kendall, David A; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-20

    Cannabinoid-based medicines have therapeutic potential for the treatment of pain. Augmentation of levels of endocannabinoids with inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is analgesic in models of acute and inflammatory pain states. The aim of this study was to determine whether local inhibition of FAAH alters nociceptive responses of spinal neurons in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. Electrophysiological studies were performed 14-18 d after spinal nerve ligation or sham surgery, and the effects of the FAAH inhibitor cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3-carbamoyl biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597) on mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons and levels of endocannabinoids were determined. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in sham-operated rats. Effects of URB597 were blocked by the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) antagonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] (30 microg in 50 microl) and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. URB597 treatment increased levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonyl glycerol, and oleoyl ethanolamide in the ipsilateral hindpaw of sham-operated rats. Intraplantar URB597 (25 microg in 50 microl) did not, however, alter mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats or hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Intraplantar injection of a higher dose of URB597 (100 microg in 50 microl) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons in SNL rats but did not alter hindpaw levels of endocannabinoids. Spinal administration of URB597 attenuated evoked responses of spinal neurons and elevated levels of endocannabinoids in sham-operated and SNL rats. These data suggest that peripheral FAAH activity may be altered or that alternative pathways of metabolism have greater importance in SNL rats.

  19. Pain tolerance predicts human social network size

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katerina V.-A.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal social network size exhibits considerable variation in the human population and is associated with both physical and mental health status. Much of this inter-individual variation in human sociality remains unexplained from a biological perspective. According to the brain opioid theory of social attachment, binding of the neuropeptide β-endorphin to μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) is a key neurochemical mechanism involved in social bonding, particularly amongst primates. We hypothesise that a positive association exists between activity of the μ-opioid system and the number of social relationships that an individual maintains. Given the powerful analgesic properties of β-endorphin, we tested this hypothesis using pain tolerance as an assay for activation of the endogenous μ-opioid system. We show that a simple measure of pain tolerance correlates with social network size in humans. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that μ-opioid receptor signalling has been elaborated beyond its basic function of pain modulation to play an important role in managing our social encounters. The neuroplasticity of the μ-opioid system is of future research interest, especially with respect to psychiatric disorders associated with symptoms of social withdrawal and anhedonia, both of which are strongly modulated by endogenous opioids. PMID:27121297

  20. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A(2) in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-06-29

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system.

  1. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  2. Expression of spinal cord GABA transporter 1 in morphine-tolerant male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Shokoofeh, Siroosi; Homa, Manaheji; Leila, Dargahi; Samira, Daniali

    2015-11-15

    Chronic morphine exposure produces morphine tolerance. One of the mechanisms of morphine tolerance involves γ-aminobutric acid (GABA), whose level is regulated by GABA transporter 1 (GAT-1). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of GAT-1 in the spinal cord during morphine treatment. Morphine was administrated to rats via drinking water for 21 days. On day 21, a single dose of morphine (10mg/kg) was injected, followed by the administration of 5% formalin after 30 min. Expression of GAT-1 in the lumbar spinal cord during morphine treatment was analyzed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry assay. In another set of experiments, a morphine-tolerant group was treated with a GAT-1 inhibitor, ethyl nipecotate (60 mg/kg), 5 min prior to the formalin test. To assess a possible analgesic effect of the GAT-1 inhibitor, a non-tolerant group was injected only with ethyl nipecotate 5 min prior to the formalin test. Our results indicated that a chronic consumption of morphine led to morphine tolerance. Morphine tolerance was also concomitant with GAT-1 up-regulation in the lumbar spinal cord. The GAT-1 inhibitor ethyl nipecotate improved the antinociceptive effect of morphine in the morphine-tolerant group. Ethyl nipecotate also had an antinociceptive effect on the non-tolerant group. Thus, our data suggest that GAT-1 overexpression in the spinal cord plays an important role in morphine tolerance.

  3. Synthesis and Analgesic Activity of Annelated Xanthine Derivatives in Experimental Models in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Sapa, Jacek; Drabczyńska, Anna; Karcz, Tadeusz; Müller, Christa; Köse, Meryem; Latacz, Gniewomir; Schabikowski, Jakub; Bednarski, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-10-01

    A series of annelated derivatives of xanthine were synthesized and assayed as potential analgesic agents. All synthesized xanthine derivatives were tested in the writhing test and hot-plate test. The pharmacological assays demonstrated that all the compounds prepared, without exception, displayed a significant activity in the mouse writhing assay. The analgesic action of the most active compounds, expressed as ED50 was found to be 1.4-4.3 times more potent than that of acetylsalicylic acid used as the reference compound. However, only some of the compounds demonstrated analgesic activity in the hot-plate test. The analgesic effect of some compounds is probably related to their agonistic, antagonistic, or partial agonistic activity at the adenosine receptors.

  4. Successive Relationships Between Maternal Attitudes During Pregnancy, Analgesic Medication During Labor and Delivery, and Newborn Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Raymond K.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses using maternal attitudes during pregnancy, obstetric analgesic medication, and labor variables as predictors did not yield impressive relationships to neonatal behavior as measured two days after delivery. (JMB)

  5. Analgesic potential of marrubiin derivatives, a bioactive diterpene present in Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Meyre-Silva, C; Yunes, R A; Schlemper, V; Campos-Buzzi, F; Cechinel-Filho, V

    2005-04-01

    Marrubiin, a furane labdane diterpene, is the main analgesic compound present in Marrubium vulgare, a medicinal plant used in Brazil and other countries to treat several ailments. Considering its important pharmacological action, as well as its high yield, some structural modifications were performed in order to obtain more active compounds. Success was obtained in reducing the lactonic function, in the formation of marrubiinic acid and two esterified derivatives, which exhibited significant analgesic effect against the writhing test in mice. Marrubiinic acid showed better activity and excellent yield, and its analgesic effect was confirmed in other experimental models of pain in mice, suggesting its possible use as a model to obtain new and potent analgesic agents.

  6. Analgesic activity of gold preparations used in Ayurveda & Unani-Tibb.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, S; Vohora, S B

    1998-09-01

    Calcined gold preparations, Ayurvedic Swarna Bhasma (SB) and Unani Kushta Tila Kalan (KTK) were investigated for analgesic effects in rats and mice using four types of noxious stimuli. Auranofin (AN) used in modern medicine was also studied for comparisons. The test drugs SB and KTK (25-50 mg/kg, p.o.) and AN (2.5-5.0 mg/kg, p.o.) exhibited analgesic activity against chemical (acetic acid induced writhing), electrical (pododolorimeter), thermal (Eddy's hot plate and analgesiometer) and mechanical (tail clip) test. While the analgesic effects of SB and KTK could be partly blocked by pretreatment with naloxone (1-5 mg/kg, i.p.,--15 min), such antagonism was not discernible with AN at the doses used. Involvement of opioidergic mechanism is suggested for the observed analgesic activity.

  7. Rhododendrin, an analgesic/anti-inflammatory arylbutanoid glycoside, from the leaves of Rhododendron aureum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hoe; Nugroho, Agung; Choi, Jongwon; Park, Jong Hee; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2011-06-01

    To identify an analgesic/anti-inflammatory component from the leaves of Rhododendron aureum (Ericaceae), phytochemical isolation and pharmacological assays (writhing assays and vascular permeability assay for analgesic action in mice; carrageenan-induced paw edemaand TPA-induced ear edema assays of anti-inflammatory action in rats) were performed. Four compounds were isolated from the active fraction (BuOH fraction) by silica gel column chromatography and identified as (-)-rhododendrol, (-)-rhododendrin, avicularin and hyperoside by spectroscopic methods. Rhododendrin, the main compound of the BuOH fraction, exhibited significant analgesic actions in mice and anti-inflammatory actions in rats. This compound accounted for 3.1% of the MeOH extract and 0.48% of dried leaves, respectively, on HPLC analysis. These results suggest that rhododendrin is the major biologically active substance in the leaves of R. aureum with analgesic/anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. A review of analgesic and emotive breathing: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Bordoni, Giovannni

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved in breathing and other non-primarily respiratory functions such as the maintenance of correct posture and lumbar and sacroiliac movement. It intervenes to facilitate cleaning of the upper airways through coughing, facilitates the evacuation of the intestines, and promotes the redistribution of the body's blood. The diaphragm also has the ability to affect the perception of pain and the emotional state of the patient, functions that are the subject of this article. The aim of this article is to gather for the first time, within a single text, information on the nonrespiratory functions of the diaphragm muscle and its analgesic and emotional response functions. It also aims to highlight and reflect on the fact that when the diaphragm is treated manually, a daily occurrence for manual operators, it is not just an area of musculature that is treated but the entire body, including the psyche. This reflection allows for a multidisciplinary approach to the diaphragm and the collaboration of various medical and nonmedical practitioners, with the ultimate goal of regaining or improving the patient's physical and mental well-being.

  9. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  10. The four-plates test: anxiolytic or analgesic paradigm?

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Nadège; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2006-07-01

    The four-plates test (FPT) is an animal model of anxiety in which the exploration of the novel surroundings is suppressed by the delivery of a mild electric foot shock. The anti-nociceptive system has been reported to be activated by a variety of stressful stimuli such as footshock. The present study was thus designed to compare effects of drugs in the FPT and in the hot-plate test (an animal model of pain), in order to disambiguate the drug-induced anti-punishment effects obtained in the FPT from alterations in pain sensitivity. Various compounds, known to be implicated in anxiety states as well as nociception, have been studied. Although morphine induced a strong anti-nociceptive effect, it did not modify the number of shocks received in the FPT. Alprazolam and diazepam induced an anxiolytic-like effect in the FPT, at doses that did not induce any effect in the hot-plate test. The antidepressants previously reported anxiogenic (desipramine, maprotiline) in the FPT were found to be analgesic at the same doses. Milnacipran, venlafaxine and paroxetine did not modify the pain threshold, whereas they have previously been shown to induce anxiolytic-like effects in the FPT. The dopaminergic antidepressant agent nomifensine was without effect on both tests. Our results suggest that the reported drug-induced anti-punishment effects in the FPT are not related to modifications of pain threshold but to a pure anxiolytic-like effect.

  11. A review of analgesic and emotive breathing: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Bordoni, Giovannni

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved in breathing and other non-primarily respiratory functions such as the maintenance of correct posture and lumbar and sacroiliac movement. It intervenes to facilitate cleaning of the upper airways through coughing, facilitates the evacuation of the intestines, and promotes the redistribution of the body’s blood. The diaphragm also has the ability to affect the perception of pain and the emotional state of the patient, functions that are the subject of this article. The aim of this article is to gather for the first time, within a single text, information on the nonrespiratory functions of the diaphragm muscle and its analgesic and emotional response functions. It also aims to highlight and reflect on the fact that when the diaphragm is treated manually, a daily occurrence for manual operators, it is not just an area of musculature that is treated but the entire body, including the psyche. This reflection allows for a multidisciplinary approach to the diaphragm and the collaboration of various medical and nonmedical practitioners, with the ultimate goal of regaining or improving the patient’s physical and mental well-being. PMID:27013884

  12. A review of analgesic and emotive breathing: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Bordoni, Giovannni

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved in breathing and other non-primarily respiratory functions such as the maintenance of correct posture and lumbar and sacroiliac movement. It intervenes to facilitate cleaning of the upper airways through coughing, facilitates the evacuation of the intestines, and promotes the redistribution of the body's blood. The diaphragm also has the ability to affect the perception of pain and the emotional state of the patient, functions that are the subject of this article. The aim of this article is to gather for the first time, within a single text, information on the nonrespiratory functions of the diaphragm muscle and its analgesic and emotional response functions. It also aims to highlight and reflect on the fact that when the diaphragm is treated manually, a daily occurrence for manual operators, it is not just an area of musculature that is treated but the entire body, including the psyche. This reflection allows for a multidisciplinary approach to the diaphragm and the collaboration of various medical and nonmedical practitioners, with the ultimate goal of regaining or improving the patient's physical and mental well-being. PMID:27013884

  13. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brian R; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities.

  14. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs. PMID:26375198

  15. Patterns of opioid analgesic prescription among patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Kelli L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Dudley, Tara K; Waters, Sandra J; Campbell, Lisa C; Keefe, Francis J

    2004-01-01

    This study describes patterns of opioid analgesic prescription during a one-year period among a sample of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The study sample included 3,061 patients with prior ICD-9 codes indicating a diagnosis of OA who were treated at a federal Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Specific opioid variables included: any opioid prescription, number of specific opioid drugs prescribed, total number of opioid prescriptions, total number of days supply of opioids, and daily opioid doses. We also examined relationships of demographic characteristics to opioid variables. Results revealed that 41% of patients received at least one opioid prescription. Opioids were prescribed significantly less frequently among African-Americans than Caucasians and the number of opioid prescriptions declined with increasing age. The mean annual supply of opioids was 104 days. Days' supply of opioids was also lower for African Americans and older patients. Daily opioid doses were, on average, below recommended daily doses for the treatment of OA. Findings of this study suggest that opioids are frequently prescribed to individuals with OA and that these drugs may be gaining acceptability for the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Additional research is needed to examine reasons for racial differences in opioid prescribing, as well as the prescription of these medications at fairly low doses.

  16. Persistent use of analgesic medications in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gallini, Adeline; Gardette, Virginie; Vellas, Bruno; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Andrieu, Sandrine; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Previous studies have reported a lower use of analgesics in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) than in non-AD elderly. To date, no study has focused on persistent analgesic use in patients with mild to moderate AD. Methods The REAL.FR cohort study enrolled community-dwelling patients with mild to moderate AD. Persistent analgesic use was defined as the consumption of at least one analgesic drug during two consecutive visits (6 months). Associated factors were identified in a nested case-control study. Results In REAL.FR, 595 patients were present during at least two consecutive visits (mean age= 77.5 ± 6.8 years, MMSE=20.1 ± 4.2). Prevalence of persistent analgesic use was 13.1% (95%CI=[10.4–15.9]). The incidence of persistent analgesic use was 5.9/100 patient-years (95%CI=[5.2–6.6]). Women (adjusted Odds Ratio OR=3.1, 95%CI=[1.2–8.2]), patients with musculoskeletal disorders (OR=3.4, 95%CI=[1.6–7.3]) and patients treated with numerous medications (OR=3.0, 95%CI=[1.5–85.8]) were more likely to use analgesics persistently. Statistically significant associations were found with disease duration and disease progression but not with AD severity at baseline. Conclusions Our results suggest a low use of analgesics in AD patients, which could vary with AD progression. PMID:23512718

  17. Clinical pharmacology of analgesics assessed with human experimental pain models: bridging basic and clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    The medical impact of pain is such that much effort is being applied to develop novel analgesic drugs directed towards new targets and to investigate the analgesic efficacy of known drugs. Ongoing research requires cost-saving tools to translate basic science knowledge into clinically effective analgesic compounds. In this review we have re-examined the prediction of clinical analgesia by human experimental pain models as a basis for model selection in phase I studies. The overall prediction of analgesic efficacy or failure of a drug correlated well between experimental and clinical settings. However, correct model selection requires more detailed information about which model predicts a particular clinical pain condition. We hypothesized that if an analgesic drug was effective in an experimental pain model and also a specific clinical pain condition, then that model might be predictive for that particular condition and should be selected for development as an analgesic for that condition. The validity of the prediction increases with an increase in the numbers of analgesic drug classes for which this agreement was shown. From available evidence, only five clinical pain conditions were correctly predicted by seven different pain models for at least three different drugs. Most of these models combine a sensitization method. The analysis also identified several models with low impact with respect to their clinical translation. Thus, the presently identified agreements and non-agreements between analgesic effects on experimental and on clinical pain may serve as a solid basis to identify complex sets of human pain models that bridge basic science with clinical pain research. PMID:23082949

  18. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sarahroodi, Shadi; Maleki-Jamshid, Ali; Sawalha, Ansam F.; Mikaili, Peyman; Safaeian, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The target population of this study was 564 students out of 10,000 students attending four medical and non-medical science universities in Qom state. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16, and analysis was conducted with descriptive analysis procedures. Results: 76.6% of the students had used analgesics in self-medication in the previous 3 months. The frequency of analgesic use in the study period was once in 19.2% of the participants, twice in 22.2%, three times in 16.3% and more than three times in 35.5% of the participants, although 6.8% of them were not sure when they were used. Of all the respondents, 49.8% reported headache as the problem. This was the most common problem, after which came Dysmenorrhea,headache and stomach ache. Bone and joint pains were other problems that led to the use of analgesics. The most commonly used source of information for self-medication with analgesics was advice from friends and family (54.7%), previously prescribed medications (30.1%), their medical knowledge (13.3%) and recommendation of a pharmacist (1.9%). Conclusion: Self-medication with analgesics is very high among Iranian students in Qom city. This could be an index for other parts of the Iranian community. Because the source of information about analgesics is inappropriate, we would recommend education courses about analgesics and self-medication on the radio and television for the entire population. PMID:22870417

  19. Acute Liver Failure and Hepatic Encephalopathy After Cleft Palate Repair.

    PubMed

    Kocaaslan, Nihal Durmuş; Tuncer, Fatma Betul; Tutar, Engin; Celebiler, Ozhan

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol is the most commonly used analgesic after cleft palate repair. It has rarely caused acute hepatic failure at therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses. Only one case of therapeutic paracetamol toxicity after cleft palate repair had been reported previously. Here, we present a similar patient who developed acute liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy after an uncomplicated cleft palate surgery. Lack of large prospective trials in young children due to ethical concerns increases the value of the case reports of acetaminophen toxicity at therapeutic doses. The dosing recommendations of paracetamol may need to be reconsidered after cleft palate surgery.

  20. Trifluoperazine, an orally available clinically used drug, disrupts opioid antinociceptive tolerance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Shukla, Pradeep K; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been shown to play an important role in the generation and maintenance of opioid tolerance. In this study, trifluoperazine was studied for its effect on morphine tolerance in mice. Acute treatment with trifluoperazine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) completely reversed the established antinociceptive tolerance to morphine. Pretreatment with trifluoperazine also significantly attenuated the development of antinociceptive tolerance (p<0.01). Morphine induced a significant up-regulation of supraspinal and spinal CaMKII activity in tolerant mice, which was abolished after the pretreatment or acute treatment with trifluoperazine. These data suggested that trifluoperazine was capable of suppressing opioid tolerance, possibly by the mechanism of inhibiting CaMKII. Since trifluoperazine has been safely used as an antipsychotic drug, we propose that the drug should be studied in humans for the prevention and treatment of opioid tolerance and addiction.

  1. Changing Paradigms for Acute Dental Pain: Prevention Is Better Than PRN.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Raymond A; Gordon, Sharon M

    2015-11-01

    A B S T R A C T The drugs available for the management of acute orofacial pain have changed very little since the introduction of ibuprofen into practice 40 years ago. Orally effective opioids, acetaminophen, aspirin and NSAIDs remain the mainstay of analgesic therapy. Increased recognition of the societal and personal impact of opioid diversion and abuse requires re-examination of the traditional approach of prescribing an opioid-containing analgesic combination to be administered by the patient "as needed" (PRN) starting postoperatively. PMID:26798882

  2. Clinical pharmacology of analgesic medicines in older people: impact of frailty and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Andrew J; Bath, Sally; Naganathan, Vasi; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G; Gibson, Stephen J; Blyth, Fiona M

    2011-01-01

    Pain is highly prevalent in frail older people who often have multiple co-morbidities and multiple medicines. Rational prescribing of analgesics in frail older people is complex due to heterogeneity in drug disposition, comorbid medical conditions, polypharmacy and variability in analgesic response in this population. A critical issue in managing older people with pain is the need for judicious choice of analgesics based on a comprehensive medical and medication history. Care is needed in the selection of analgesic medicine to avoid drug–drug or drug–disease interactions. People living with dementia and cognitive impairment have suboptimal pain relief which in part may be related to altered pharmacodynamics of analgesics and challenges in the systematic assessment of pain intensity in this patient group. In the absence of rigorously controlled trials in frail older people and those with cognitive impairment a pharmacologically-guided approach can be used to optimize pain management which requires a systematic understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of analgesics in frail older people with or without changes in cognition. PMID:21284694

  3. Sedatives and Analgesics Given to Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Kanecia O.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Ku, Lawrence; Watt, Kevin; Laughon, Matthew M.; Bidegain, Margarita; Clark, Reese H.; Smith, P. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the administration of sedatives and analgesics at the end of life in a large cohort of infants in North American neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Study design Data on mortality and sedative and analgesic administration were obtained from infants who died from 1997–2012 in 348 NICUs managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group. Sedatives and analgesics of interest included opioids (fentanyl, methadone, morphine), benzodiazepines (clonazepam, diazepam, lorazepam, midazolam), central alpha-2 agonists (clonidine, dexmedetomidine), ketamine, and pentobarbital. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between administration of these drugs on the day of death and infant demographics and illness severity. Results We identified 19,726 infants who died. Of these, 6188 (31%) received a sedative or analgesic on the day of death; opioids were most frequently administered, 5366/19,726 (27%). Administration of opioids and benzodiazepines increased during the study period, from 16/283 (6%) for both in 1997 to 523/1465 (36%) and 295/1465 (20%) in 2012, respectively. Increasing gestational age, increasing postnatal age, invasive procedure within 2 days of death, more recent year of death, mechanical ventilation, inotropic support, and antibiotics on the day of death were associated with exposure to sedatives or analgesics. Conclusions Administration of sedatives and analgesics increased over time. Infants of older gestational age and those more critically ill were more likely to receive these drugs on the day of death. These findings suggest that drug administration may be driven by severity of illness. PMID:26012893

  4. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  5. Screening of Alkaloidal Fraction of Conium maculatum L. Aerial Parts for Analgesic and Antiinflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Madaan, Reecha; Kumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Conium maculatum Linn. (Umbelliferae) has been traditionally used in the treatment of spasmodic disorders, and to relieve nervous excitation, rheumatic pains in the old and feeble, pain in stomach, pain of gastric ulcer, nervousness and restlessness. Alkaloids have long been considered as bioactive group of constituents present in C. maculatum. Despite a long tradition of use, C. maculatum has not been evaluated pharmacologically to validate its traditional claims for analgesic and antiinflammatory activities. Thus, the present investigations were undertaken with an objective to evaluate alkaloidal fraction of C. maculatum aerial parts for analgesic and antiinflammatory activities. Test doses (100 or 200 mg/kg, p.o.) of alkaloidal fraction were evaluated for analgesic activity using tail flick test and antiinflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced paw oedema test in rats. Morphine (5 mg/kg, p.o.) and indomethacin (5 mg/kg, p.o.) were used as standard analgesic and antiinflammatory drugs, respectively. Alkaloidal fraction of the plant exhibited significant analgesic activity at a dose of 200 mg/kg as it showed significant increase in tail flicking reaction time with respect to the control during 2 h intervals of observation. It also exhibited significant antiinflammatory activity at a dose of 200 mg/kg as it inhibited paw oedema in rats to 71% and reduced the paw volume one-fourth to the control during 1st h of the study. The present investigations suggest that alkaloids are responsible for analgesic and antiinflammatory activities of C. maculatum. PMID:23716876

  6. Consumption of analgesics before a marathon and the incidence of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal problems: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Michael; Renner, Bertold; Oppel, Pascal; Niederweis, Ursula; Brune, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To prevent pain inhibiting their performance, many athletes ingest over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics before competing. We aimed at defining the use of analgesics and the relation between OTC analgesic use/dose and adverse events (AEs) during and after the race, a relation that has not been investigated to date. Design Prospective (non-interventional) cohort study, using an online questionnaire. Setting The Bonn marathon 2010. Participants 3913 of 7048 participants in the Bonn marathon 2010 returned their questionnaires. Primary and secondary outcomes Intensity of analgesic consumption before sports; incidence of AEs in the cohort of analgesic users as compared to non-users. Results There was no significant difference between the premature race withdrawal rate in the analgesics cohort and the cohort who did not take analgesics (‘controls’). However, race withdrawal because of gastrointestinal AEs was significantly more frequent in the analgesics cohort than in the control. Conversely, withdrawal because of muscle cramps was rare, but it was significantly more frequent in controls. The analgesics cohort had an almost 5 times higher incidence of AEs (overall risk difference of 13%). This incidence increased significantly with increasing analgesic dose. Nine respondents reported temporary hospital admittance: three for temporary kidney failure (post-ibuprofen ingestion), four with bleeds (post-aspirin ingestion) and two cardiac infarctions (post-aspirin ingestion). None of the control reported hospital admittance. Conclusions The use of analgesics before participating in endurance sports may cause many potentially serious, unwanted AEs that increase with increasing analgesic dose. Analgesic use before endurance sports appears to pose an unrecognised medical problem as yet. If verifiable in other endurance sports, it requires the attention of physicians and regulatory authorities. PMID:23604350

  7. Analgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current on experimental ischemic pain models: frequencies of 50 hz and 100 hz.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the analgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential currents (IFC) on induced ischemic pain in healthy volunteers. [Subjects] The subjects were 36 volunteers (18 male, 18 female) without known pathology that could cause pain. Their mean age was 24.5±2.2 years. [Methods] A single-blind and parallel-group method was used. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive each 50 Hz TENS, 50 Hz IFC, 100 Hz TENS, and 100 Hz IFC. This study experimentally induced ischemic pain in otherwise pain-free subjects using a modified version of the submaximal effort tourniquet technique. Subjects completed twelve cycles of the ischemic-induced pain test. The primary outcome measure was the change in self-reported of pain intensity during one of four possible treatments. [Results] There were significant effects for Time, which were attributed to a significant reduction in pain intensity for all groups. There were no significant effects for groups or group-time interaction. The 50 Hz IFC treatment was more comfortable than the other treatments in the present study, and it is likely to be better accepted and tolerated by patients. [Conclusion] We conclude that there were no differences in the analgesic effects of the four treatments under the present experimental conditions. The 50 Hz IFC treatment is more comfortable than the other treatments.

  8. Nutrition support in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A

    2007-03-01

    The benefit of early enteral nutrition (EN) for the disease process and for patient outcome in severe acute pancreatitis is dramatic. A narrow window of opportunity exists during which there is potential for EN to decrease disease severity and reduce overall complications. Most patients with severe pancreatitis tolerate enteral feeds. Any signs of symptom exacerbation or increasing inflammation in response to EN may be ameliorated by subtle adjustments in the feeding strategy. In this manner, provision of EN represents primary therapy in the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis and is emerging as the gold standard of therapy in nutrition support for this disease process.

  9. Opioid receptor types in the brain of the Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens), a species which is naturally tolerant to morphine.

    PubMed

    Farges, R C; Puget, A; Moisand, C; Meunier, J C

    1988-01-01

    The rabbit is normally sensitive to morphine while another lagomorph, the Afghan pika Ochotona rufescens is naturally tolerant to the analgesic effects elicited by the opium alkaloid. In spite of the different responsiveness of the two species to morphine we find that the pika brain and the rabbit brain both contain a mixture of mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid sites in nearly the same proportions: 46-47% mu, 23% delta and 28-30% kappa. Moreover, apparent binding of morphine in pika and rabbit brain membranes is inhibited in the presence of Na+ ions and/or of 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate indicating that morphine should behave as an opiate agonist (analgesic) not only in rabbits, which it does but also in pikas, which it does not. Taken together these results suggest that the natural tolerance of the Afghan pika to morphine may not reside in modified opioid receptor types and that its origin should be sought elsewhere.

  10. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  11. A new pharmacological role for donepezil: attenuation of morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in rat central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioids is a pharmacological phenomenon that occurs after their prolonged administration. It has been shown that morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system and neuroprotective agents which prevented apoptosis signaling could attenuate tolerance to the analgesic effects. On the other hand donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. Therefore in this study, the effect of systemic administration of donepezil on morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord was evaluated. Various groups of rats received morphine (ip) and different doses of donepezil (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg/day). Nociception was assessed using tail flick apparatus. Tail flick latency was recorded when the rat shook its tail. For apoptosis assay other groups of rats received the above treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Results The results showed that administration of donepezil (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg, ip) delayed the morphine tolerance for 9, 12 and 17 days, respectively. Furthermore pretreatment injection of donepezil attenuated the number of apoptotic cells in the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord compared to the control group. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that systemic administration of donepezil attenuated morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord. PMID:24455992

  12. Predicting Neuroinflammation in Morphine Tolerance for Tolerance Therapy from Immunostaining Images of Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shinn-Long; Chang, Fang-Lin; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Wang, Kuan-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Long-term morphine treatment leads to tolerance which attenuates analgesic effect and hampers clinical utilization. Recent studies have sought to reveal the mechanism of opioid receptors and neuroinflammation by observing morphological changes of cells in the rat spinal cord. This work proposes a high-content screening (HCS) based computational method, HCS-Morph, for predicting neuroinflammation in morphine tolerance to facilitate the development of tolerance therapy using immunostaining images for astrocytes, microglia, and neurons in the spinal cord. HCS-Morph first extracts numerous HCS-based features of cellular phenotypes. Next, an inheritable bi-objective genetic algorithm is used to identify a minimal set of features by maximizing the prediction accuracy of neuroinflammation. Finally, a mathematic model using a support vector machine with the identified features is established to predict drug-treated images to assess the effects of tolerance therapy. The dataset consists of 15 saline controls (1 μl/h), 15 morphine-tolerant rats (15 μg/h), and 10 rats receiving a co-infusion of morphine (15 μg/h) and gabapentin (15 μg/h, Sigma). The three individual models of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons for predicting neuroinflammation yielded respective Jackknife test accuracies of 96.67%, 90.00%, and 86.67% on the 30 rats, and respective independent test accuracies of 100%, 90%, and 60% on the 10 co-infused rats. The experimental results suggest that neuroinflammation activity expresses more predominantly in astrocytes and microglia than in neuron cells. The set of features for predicting neuroinflammation from images of astrocytes comprises mean cell intensity, total cell area, and second-order geometric moment (relating to cell distribution), relevant to cell communication, cell extension, and cell migration, respectively. The present investigation provides the first evidence for the role of gabapentin in the attenuation of morphine tolerance from phenotypic

  13. Analgesic Use and the Risk of Hearing Loss in Women

    PubMed Central

    Curhan, Sharon G.; Shargorodsky, Josef; Eavey, Roland; Curhan, Gary C.

    2012-01-01

    Use of analgesics is common and is associated with increased risk of hearing loss in men; however, the relation has not been examined prospectively in women. The authors prospectively examined the relation between frequency of aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen use and risk of hearing loss among 62,261 women aged 31–48 years at baseline (1995) in Nurses' Health Study II. The outcome was self-reported hearing loss (n = 10,012), and the follow-up period was 1995–2009. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. During 764,247 person-years of follow-up, ibuprofen use and acetaminophen use were independently associated with increased risk of hearing loss, but aspirin use was not. For ibuprofen, the multivariate-adjusted relative risk of hearing loss was 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.19) for use 2–3 days/week, 1.21 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.32) for use 4–5 days/week, and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.35) for use ≥6 days/week (P-trend < 0.0001), compared with use less than once per week. For acetaminophen, the corresponding relative risks were 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.19), 1.21 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.37), and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.95, 1.22), respectively (P-trend = 0.0007). In this study, use of ibuprofen or acetaminophen (but not aspirin) 2 or more days per week was associated with an increased risk of hearing loss in women. PMID:22933387

  14. The animal pharmacology of buprenorphine, an oripavine analgesic agent.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A; Doxey, J C; Harry, E J

    1977-08-01

    1. The general pharmacology of buprenorphine, a potent analgesic agent derived from oripavine, is described. 2. After cute administration of buprenorphine, the spontaneous locomotor activity of mice was increased; rats displayed stereotyped licking and biting movements; behavioural depression was marked in guinea-pigs but mild in rhesus monkeys. The behaviour of cats was unchanged. 3. In general, buprenorphine reduced heart rate but had no significant effect on arterial blood pressure in conscious rats and dogs. 4. In anaesthetized, open-chest cats buprenorphine (0.10 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) caused no major haemodynamic changes. 5. Buprenorphine (0.01-10 mg/kg i.a.) and morphine (0.30-30 mg/kg, i.a.) increased arterial PCO2 values and reduced PO2 values in conscious rats. With doses of buprenorphine greater than 0.10 mg/kg (a) the duration of respiratory depression became less, (b) ceiling effects occurred such that the maximum effects produced were less than those obtained with morphine. 6. Buprenorphine was a potent and long-lasting antagonist of citric acid-induced coughing in guinea-pigs. 7. At a dose level 20 times greater than the ED50 for antinociception (tail pressure), morphine suppressed urine output to a greater extent than the corresponding dose of buprenorphine in rats. 8. Over the range 0.01-1.0 mg/kg (s.c.), buprenorphine slowed the passage of a charcoal meal along the gastrointestinal tract in rats. After doses in excess of 1 mg/kg, the meal travelled increasingly further such that the distances measured at 10 and 30 mg/kg did not differ significantly from control values. In contrast, the morphine dose-response relationship was linear. PMID:409449

  15. Preclinical evaluation of the abuse potential of the analgesic bicifadine.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; Golembiowska, Krystyna; Kowalska, Magdalena; Tizzano, Joseph P; Skolnick, Phil; Basile, Anthony S

    2009-07-01

    The abuse liability of the analgesic bicifadine was investigated in animal models used to predict the abuse potential of psychostimulants in humans. Bicifadine, cocaine, d-amphetamine, bupropion, and desipramine were evaluated for the production of cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects in rats. Cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion dose-dependently and fully substituted for cocaine. Bicifadine and desipramine produced a maximum mean cocaine-lever selection of 80 and 69%, respectively, but doses yielding peak substitution strongly suppressed response rates. Microdialysis studies in normal waking rats indicated that d-amphetamine increased dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and striatum to a much greater degree than bicifadine, but bicifadine increased 5-hydroxytryptamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and striatum more than d-amphetamine. Bicifadine was also tested for intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys experienced with cocaine administration. Reinforcing effects of bicifadine were observed in only two of four subjects, whereas cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion served as reinforcers in all four monkeys. When evaluated under a progressive ratio procedure, no dose of bicifadine maintained responding to the extent of cocaine, d-amphetamine, or bupropion. The discriminative stimulus effects associated with bicifadine were similar, but not identical, to those of psychostimulants. Although bicifadine maintained self-administration behavior in some subjects, its reinforcing efficacy was very low relative to cocaine, d-amphetamine, and bupropion. These results are consistent with the microdialysis findings of lower dopamine levels and higher 5-hydroxytryptamine levels after administration of bicifadine relative to d-amphetamine. Overall, the current findings support a low abuse potential of bicifadine, more resembling that of antidepressants than psychostimulants. PMID:19357320

  16. Differential analgesic effects of aspirin-like drugs.

    PubMed

    Brune, K; Menzel-Soglowek, S; Zeilhofer, H U

    1992-01-01

    Tissue damage, including that due to surgical manipulation, results in 2 distinct but connected changes in the pain perception pathway. Firstly, cells disintegrate at the site of tissue damage and release mediators, including prostaglandins. These mediators transform fine nerve endings, particularly high-threshold mechanoceptors, into nociceptors. In other words, fine nerve endings that are not normally activated by mechanical pressure or temperature changes become very sensitive and are depolarised after minor mechanical or thermal changes. Secondly, in the central nervous system (CNS) and, particularly, in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, reflex activity is increased, metabolic activity of the neuronal cells is enhanced and, chronically, major rearrangements of mediator production and electrical activity of the dorsal horn cells may be observed. Both types of change contribute to the well known phenomenon of hyperalgesia, which is regularly observed in connection with tissue damage, including that produced by surgical manipulation. It has been shown that aspirin-like drugs reduce the enhanced nociceptor activity in damaged tissue, probably as a result of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. Recently, there have been indications that these drugs may have an additional mechanism of action in the spinal cord or higher parts of the CNS. Using the pure enantiomers of flurbiprofen in pharmacodynamic experiments in the rat, we have observed that the R- and S-enantiomers may exert differential analgesic effects. The R-enantiomer, which does not inhibit cyclo-oxygenase in vitro, was almost as effective as the S-enantiomer, which does inhibit prostaglandin synthesis in different models of pain and nociception.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Prescription of Opioid and Non-opioid Analgesics for Dental Care in Emergency Departments: Findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    PubMed Central

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Xiang, Qun; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Szabo, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine trends and associated factors in the prescription of opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics by emergency physicians for nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related visits. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether race/ethnicity is a possible predictor of receiving a prescription for either type of medication for NTDC visits in emergency departments (EDs) after adjustment for potential covariates. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, and used multinomial multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of receiving a prescription for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, or a combination of both compared to receiving no analgesics for NTDC-related visits. Results During 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, prescription of opioid analgesics and combinations of opioid and non-opioid analgesics increased and that of no analgesics decreased over time. The prescription rates for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics for NTDC-related visits in EDs were 43%, 20%, 12% and 25% respectively. Majority of patients categorized as having severe pain received prescriptions for opioids for NTDC-related visits in EDs. After adjusting for covariates, patients with self-reported dental reasons for visit and severe pain had a significantly higher probability of receiving prescriptions for opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations. Conclusion Prescription of opioid analgesics increased over time. ED physicians were more likely to prescribe opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations for NTDC-related visits with reported severe pain. PMID:24863407

  18. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture. Analgesics may alleviate pain and inflammation associated with castration of beef cattle. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunom...

  19. Effect of surgical castration with or without oral meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  20. Effect of surgical castration with or without meloxicam on the acute inflammatory response in yearling beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pain management and welfare are increasingly prevalent concerns within animal agriculture and oral analgesics may alleviate the pain associated with castration. This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of surgical castration on the acute inflammatory response and immunomodulation and whethe...

  1. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  2. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  3. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Alexandra L.; Lymn, Kerry A.; Wallace, Georgia L.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8). Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg) and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg) in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg). Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001). Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:27463799

  4. Analgesic and Antioxidant Activities of Stem Bark Extract and Fractions of Petersianthus macrocarpus

    PubMed Central

    Orabueze, Celestina Ifeoma; Adesegun, Sunday Adeleke; Coker, Herbert Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: Petersianthus macrocarpus (Lecythidaceae) is widely used in the folk medicine in Nigeria to relieve pain and fever associated with malaria. This study evaluated the analgesic and antioxidant activities of the methanol extract and fractions of the stem bark of the plant. Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity was determined in mice using hotplate and acetic acid-induced writhing models. Morphine sulphate (5 mg/kg, i.p.) and aspirin (100 mg/ml, p.o.) were used as reference analgesic agents. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical; reducing power, iron chelating properties and determination of total phenolic content. Results: The extract at 200 and 500 mg/kg, produced an insignificant (P > 0.05) increase in pain threshold in hotplate but a significant (P < 0.05) increase at 1000 mg/kg. The extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the writhing induced by acetic acid in mice in a dose dependent manner. Fractionation increased the analgesic activities significantly (P < 0.05) in ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions (200 mg/kg). The extract demonstrated strong DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 0.05 mg/ml, good reducing power and weak iron chelating activities. The total phenol content was 142.32 mg/gin term of gallic acid. The antioxidant effects were more pronounced in ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggested that the extract has strong analgesic and antioxidant activities which reside mainly in the polar fractions thus confirming the traditional use of the plant to alleviate pains. SUMMARY Analgesic and antioxidant activities of extract and solvent fractions of Petersianthus macrocarpus investigated indicated that extract has analgesic and antioxidant properties that reside mainly in the polar fractions. Abbreviations Used: DMSO: Dimethyl sulphoxide, ANOVA: analysis of variance, EDTA: ethylene diamne tetraacetic acid, SDM: standard deviation of mean

  5. Regular use of analgesics is a risk factor for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gago-Dominguez, M; Yuan, J-M; Castelao, J E; Ross, R K; Yu, M C

    1999-01-01

    Phenacetin-based analgesics have been linked to the development of renal pelvis cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The relationship between non-phenacetin types of analgesics and kidney cancer is less clear, although laboratory evidence suggests that these drugs possess carcinogenic potential. A population-based case–control study involving 1204 non-Asian RCC patients aged 25–74 and an equal number of sex-, age- and race-matched neighbourhood controls was conducted in Los Angeles, California, to investigate the relationship between sustained use of analgesics and risk of RCC according to major formulation categories. Detailed information on medical and medication histories, and other lifestyle factors was collected through in-person interviews. Regular use of analgesics was a significant risk factor for RCC in both men and women (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4–1.9 for both sexes combined). Risks were elevated across all four major classes of analgesics (aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents other than aspirin, acetaminophen and phenacetin). Within each class of analgesics, there was statistically significant increasing risk with increasing level of exposure. Although there was some minor variability by major class of formulation, in general individuals in the highest exposure categories exhibited approximately 2.5-fold increase in risk relative to non- or irregular users of analgesics. Subjects who took one regular-strength (i.e. 325 mg) aspirin a day or less for cardiovascular disease prevention were not at an increased risk of RCC (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6–1.4). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10507783

  6. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  7. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  8. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  9. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and LP 211 elicit an analgesic effect on formalin-induced orofacial pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    DEMİRKAYA, Kadriye; AKGÜN, Özlem Martı; ŞENEL, Buğra; ÖNCEL TORUN, Zeynep; SEYREK, Melik; LACİVİTA, Enza; LEOPOLDO, Marcello; DOĞRUL, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most recently identified serotonin (5-HT) receptor is the 5-HT7 receptor. The antinociceptive effects of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist have been shown in neuropathic and inflammatory animal models of pain. A recent study demonstrated the functional expression of 5-HT7 receptors in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis, which receives and processes orofacial nociceptive inputs. Objective To investigate the antinociceptive effects of pharmacological activation of 5-HT7 receptors on orofacial pain in mice. Material and Methods Nociception was evaluated by using an orofacial formalin test in male Balb-C mice. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists, LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg), were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to a formalin injection. A bolus of 10 µl of 4% subcutaneous formalin was injected into the upper lip of mice and facial grooming behaviors were monitored. The behavioral responses consisted of two distinct periods, the early phase corresponding to acute pain (Phase I: 0–12 min) and the late phase (Phase II: 12–30 min). Results LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) produced an analgesic effect with reductions in face rubbing time in both Phase I and Phase II of the formalin test. Conclusion Our results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor agonists may be promising analgesic drugs in the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27383702

  10. Will abuse-deterrent formulations of opioid analgesics be successful in achieving their purpose?

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, Bernard

    2012-09-10

    During the last 2 decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of strong opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. This increase has been accompanied by a steep increase in abuse, misuse, and both fatal and non-fatal overdoses involving prescription opioids. The situation is already alarming in the US. Prescription opioid-related harm is a complex, multifactorial issue that requires a multifaceted solution. In this respect, formulations of opioid analgesics designed to resist or deter abuse may be a useful component of a comprehensive opioid risk minimization programme. Such formulations have or are being developed. Abuse-resistant opioids include those that use some kind of physical barrier to prevent tampering with the formulation. Abuse-deterrent opioids are not necessarily resistant to tampering, but contain substances that are designed to make the formulation less attractive to abusers. This article focuses on two products intended to deter abuse that were reviewed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The first (Embeda®) consists of extended-release morphine with sequestered naltrexone, an opioid antagonist that is released if the tablet is compromised by chewing or crushing. Although Embeda® exhibited abuse-deterrent features, its label warns that it can be abused in a manner similar to other opioid agonists. Furthermore, tampering with Embeda® will result in the release of naltrexone, which may precipitate withdrawal in opioid-tolerant individuals. In March 2011, all dosage forms of Embeda® were recalled because the product failed to meet routine stability standards, and its return date to the market is currently unknown. The second product (Acurox®) was intended to be both tamper resistant and abuse deterrent. It consisted of an immediate-release oxycodone tablet with subtherapeutic niacin as an aversive agent and used a gel-forming ingredient designed to inhibit inhalation and prevent extraction of the drug for injection. The new drug

  11. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities of an extract from Parkia biglobosa used in traditional medicine in the Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Kouadio, F; Kanko, C; Juge, M; Grimaud, N; Jean, A; N'Guessan, Y T; Petit, J Y

    2000-12-01

    In the Ivory coast, Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) is used in traditional medicine as an analgesic drug, especially against dental pain. Of the three extracts obtained from the plant bark, the hexane fraction was studied to determine its analgesic and/or antiinflammatory activities. The results show that this extract possesses a marked analgesic activity when evaluated with the abdominal writhing test in mice, but, like paracetamol, was ineffective with the hot-plate method, a feature suggesting a peripheral mechanism of action. This activity was accompanied by an antiinflammatory effect, somewhat weaker than the analgesic one.

  12. Revisiting the Role of the Urban Environment in Substance Use: The Case of Analgesic Overdose Fatalities

    PubMed Central

    Ransome, Yusuf; Keyes, Katherine M.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Tardiff, Kenneth; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether neighborhood social characteristics (income distribution and family fragmentation) and physical characteristics (clean sidewalks and dilapidated housing) were associated with the risk of fatalities caused by analgesic overdose. Methods. In a case-control study, we compared 447 unintentional analgesic opioid overdose fatalities (cases) with 3436 unintentional nonoverdose fatalities and 2530 heroin overdose fatalities (controls) occurring in 59 New York City neighborhoods between 2000 and 2006. Results. Analgesic overdose fatalities were less likely than nonoverdose unintentional fatalities to have occurred in higher-income neighborhoods (odds ratio [OR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70, 0.96) and more likely to have occurred in fragmented neighborhoods (OR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.05, 1.72). They were more likely than heroin overdose fatalities to have occurred in higher-income (OR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.12, 1.54) and less fragmented (OR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.55, 0.92) neighborhoods. Conclusions. Analgesic overdose fatalities exhibit spatial patterns that are distinct from those of heroin and nonoverdose unintentional fatalities. Whereas analgesic fatalities typically occur in lower-income, more fragmented neighborhoods than nonoverdose fatalities, they tend to occur in higher-income, less unequal, and less fragmented neighborhoods than heroin fatalities. PMID:24134362

  13. Trajectories of pain and analgesics in oncology outpatients with metastatic bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Dale J.; Tripathy, Debu; Paul, Steven M.; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin J.; Schumacher, Karen; Miaskowski, Christine

    2010-01-01

    A large proportion of oncology outpatients with bone metastasis report unrelieved pain that significantly interferes with daily functioning and quality of life. However, little is known about the longitudinal pattern of pain intensity and analgesic prescriptions or use. Moreover, despite considerable advantages, the use of sophisticated statistical techniques, such as hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) has not been applied to the study of pain and analgesic outcomes. In a prospective longitudinal study, HLM was used to explore predictors of pain intensity and analgesic prescription and intake at the time of enrollment into the study (intercept) and over the course of 6 weeks (trajectory) in a sample of oncology outpatients with bone metastasis who received standard care for pain. In addition to corroborating known predictors of pain intensity, previously unrecognized variables were found that appear to affect both pain and analgesic outcomes. Importantly, some of the predictors of the trajectories of pain intensity and analgesic use (i.e., pain-related distress and pain management index (PMI) scores) are particularly amenable to interventions. Findings from this study suggest that sophisticated statistical modeling can be used in pain research to identify individual risk factors and propose novel targets that can be used to improve pain management in oncology outpatients with bone metastasis. PMID:21310669

  14. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo

    2016-01-01

    TWIK-related K+ channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K+ (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K+ channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  15. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo; Kang, Dawon

    2016-07-01

    TWIK-related K(+) channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K(+) channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  16. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of the topical preparation of Glaucium grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Morteza-Semnani, K; Saeedi, M; Hamidian, M

    2004-03-01

    The species of Glaucium have been used in Iranian herbal medicine in the treatment of dermatitis. Due to anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of Glaucium grandiflorum methanolic extract in i.p. administration, these effects in topical administration were studied using carrageenan-induced edema and formalin test. Several formulations were prepared and the best cream was chosen as vehicle. Piroxicam gel and methyl salicylate ointment were studied as positive control for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity, respectively. The edema inhibition of preparations containing extract at the doses of 1-5% w/w were significantly different from control group. The anti-inflammatory effect of MS4-5% was similar to the effect of piroxicam gel at 3 h after carrageenan injection. Topical preparation containing G. grandiflorum methanolic extract showed analgesic effect in concentrations more than 4% w/w in early phase in formalin test. This activity was observed in concentrations more than 3% w/w in late phase. The topical analgesic activity of extract was less than the analgesic activity of methyl salicylate ointment. PMID:15030915

  18. [Screening of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in marines macroalgae from Mediterranean Sea].

    PubMed

    Chatter Riahi, R; Tarhouni, S; Kharrat, R

    2011-01-01

    Methanolic extracts of 13 seaweeds collected from the Mediterranean sea (Tunisian, Moroccan and Greek coasts) from different classes (Chlorophycae, Pheopbycae and Rhodophycae) are testedfor their analgesic and antiinflammatory effects. These activities were estimated in vivo, respectively by writhing test and carrageenan test. Nine species among 13 tested seaweeds showed an important analgesic activity. On the other hand only 5 seaweeds showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity (< 0.001 compared to control group). The percentage of inhibition reached 80% for the red algae Laurencia glandulifera but was only 50% for aspirin. The screening showed different pharmacological profiles. The red algae (Laurencia glandulfera and Hypnea musciformis) and brown algae (Cystoseira barbata and Sargassum vulgare) had endowed with the double analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. The red algae Geliduim sesquipedale have only anti-inflammatory activity and the other one endowed only with an analgesic activity (Enteromorpha compressa, Chaetomorpha linum, Cystoseira ericoidies, Sacchoriza bulbosa et Corralina officinalis). The simultaneous or individual presence of the analgesic and\\or anti-inflammatory activities of the various extracts can find its application in the therapeutic domain. PMID:23461139

  19. Nociceptive transmission to rat primary somatosensory cortex--comparison of sedative and analgesic effects.

    PubMed

    Granmo, Marcus; Jensen, Tanja; Schouenborg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    CO(2)-laser C-fibre evoked cortical potentials (LCEPs) is a potentially useful animal model for studies of pain mechanisms. A potential confounding factor when assessing analgesic effects of systemically administered drugs using LCEP is sedation. This study aims to clarify: 1) the relation between level of anaesthesia and magnitude of LCEP, 2) the effects of a sedative and an analgesic on LCEP and dominant EEG frequency 3) the effects of a sedative and analgesic on LCEP when dominant EEG frequency is kept stable. LCEP and EEG were recorded in isoflurane/nitrous-oxide anaesthetized rats. Increasing isoflurane level gradually reduced LCEPs and lowered dominant EEG frequencies. Systemic midazolam (10 μmol/kg) profoundly reduced LCEP (19% of control) and lowered dominant EEG frequency. Similarly, morphine 1 and 3 mg/kg reduced LCEP (39%, 12% of control, respectively) and decreased EEG frequency. When keeping the dominant EEG frequency stable, midazolam caused no significant change of LCEP. Under these premises, morphine at 3 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg, caused a significant LCEP reduction (26% of control). In conclusion, the present data indicate that the sedative effects should be accounted for when assessing the analgesic effects of drug. Furthermore, it is suggested that LCEP, given that changes in EEG induced by sedation are compensated for, can provide information about the analgesic properties of systemically administrated drugs. PMID:23320109

  20. Pharmacological and phytochemical evaluation of Ocimum sanctum root extracts for its antiinflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anant; Agarwal, Karishma; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Bushra, Umme; Tandon, Sudeep; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases risk of having a range of gastrointestinal problems. Therefore, new anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic drugs having lesser side effects are being searched all overthe world as alternatives to NSAIDs. Aims: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic profile of Ocimum sanctum root extracts. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory profile of hexane (STH), chloroform (STC), ethyl acetate (STE), butanol (STB) and water (STW) extracts of OS was carried out by using carrageenan induced paw edema. STE a most active extract was further validated in dose dependent manner for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity as well as oral toxicity profile in small laboratory animals. Identification of bioactives flux and chemical signature of most active fraction STE was developed by using the high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprinting. Results: An ethyl acetate fraction (STE) exhibit most potent anti-inflammatory activity followed by STB, STW, STC and STH. Dose response study of STE showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic potential in dose-dependent manner without any toxic effect at dose 2000 mg/kg. Chemical fingerprint revealed the presence of flavanoids. Conclusions: The present research revealed that STE possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic properties. However, future research is advocated to evaluate the pharmacological properties of isolated bioactive compounds. PMID:26109769