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Sample records for acute aneurysmal subarachnoid

  1. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  2. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  3. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  4. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  5. Soluble Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Hydrocephalus following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sokół, Bartosz; Jankowski, Roman; Hołysz, Marcin; Więckowska, Barbara; Jagodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling begins early in subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and plays a key role in inflammation following cerebral aneurysm rupture. Available studies suggest significance of endogenous first-line blockers of a TLR pathway—soluble TLR2 and 4. Methods Eighteen patients with SAH and acute hydrocephalus underwent endovascular coiling and ventriculostomy; sTLR2 and 4 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected on post-SAH days 0–3, 5, and 10–12. Release kinetics were defined. CSF levels of sTLR2 and 4 were compared with a control group and correlated with the clinical status on admission, the findings on imaging, the degree of systemic inflammation and the outcome following treatment. Results None of study group showed detectable levels of sTLR2 and 4 on post-SAH day 0–3. 13 patients showed increased levels in subsequent samples. In five SAH patients sTLR2 and 4 levels remained undetectable; no distinctive features of this group were found. On post-SAH day 5 the strongest correlation was found between sTLR2 level and haemoglobin level on admission (cc = -0.498, P = 0.037). On post-SAH day 10–12 the strongest correlation was revealed between sTLR2 and treatment outcome (cc = -0.501, P = 0.076). Remaining correlations with treatment outcome, status at admission, imaging findings and inflammatory markers on post-SAH day 5 and 10–12 were negligible or low (-0.5 ≤ cc ≤ 0.5). Conclusions In the majority of cases, rupture of a cerebral aneurysm leads to delayed release of soluble TLR forms into CSF. sTLR2 and 4 seem to have minor role in human post-SAH inflammation due to delayed release kinetics and low levels of these protein. PMID:27223696

  6. Isolated spinal artery aneurysm: a rare culprit of subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tony H T; Leung, Warren K W; Lai, Bill M H; Khoo, Jennifer L S

    2015-04-01

    Isolated spinal artery aneurysm is a rare lesion which could be accountable for spontaneous spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We describe the case of a 74-year-old man presenting with sudden onset of chest pain radiating to the neck and back, with subsequent headache and confusion. Initial computed tomography aortogram revealed incidental finding of subtle acute spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A set of computed tomography scans of the brain showed further acute intracranial subarachnoid haemorrhage with posterior predominance, small amount of intraventricular haemorrhage, and absence of intracranial vascular lesions. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a thrombosed intradural spinal aneurysm with surrounding sentinel clot, which was trapped and excised during surgical exploration. High level of clinical alertness is required in order not to miss this rare but detrimental entity. Its relevant aetiopathological features and implications for clinical management are discussed.

  7. Follow-up of Large Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization at an Acute Stage in Patients with Poor-Grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S.; Tanaka, N.; Tani, S.; Nakamura, S.; Ohbuchi, H.; Hirota, K.; Iwabuchi, S.; Kasuya, H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the clinical and angiographic outcome of large aneurysms treated with coil embolization at an acute stage in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2004, eight consecutive WFNS grade 5 patients with large aneurysms (15~23mm) were treated with endovascular coil embolization within two days and followed for at least 30 months. There were three middle cerebral and five internal carotid artery aneurysms. No patients were treated by craniotomy and none survived without treatment. Two patients died of primary brain damage or cerebral vasospasm within one month. One patient died of pneumonia at 24 months. Four patients were alive with good recovery or moderate disability at the time of final follow-up (30~66 months). Angiography immediately after the procedure showed complete occlusion in three, neck remnant in four, and body filling in one patient. No complication was seen related to the procedure. Three aneurysms that were initially neck remnant developed body filling due to coil compaction. Two were re-treated with coils at six and 12 months and resulted in neck remnant. One patient refused re-treatment and died of re-bleeding. Endovascular coil embolization can be selected at an acute stage for the treatment of aneurysms in patients with poor-grade SAH without intraparenchymal hematoma even if the aneurysm is large. Serial follow up by MRA/angiography is necessary for at least 12 months. PMID:20465928

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karakama, Jun; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maehara, Taketoshi; Ohno, Kikuo

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with an extremely rare case of intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of an anterior spinal artery aneurysm manifesting as disturbance of consciousness following sudden onset of neck pain and numbness of the extremities. Cranial computed tomography revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage, mainly in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography studies on admission and on the 4th day demonstrated no definite abnormality as a bleeding source. A ventricular catheter was inserted to treat the acute hydrocephalus, and conservative management was continued during the acute period. Third angiography on the 18th day demonstrated an anterior spinal artery aneurysm at the C1 level which was considered to be the bleeding site. After conservative treatment, the patient was discharged without neurological deficits. Fourth angiography on the 108 th day disclosed spontaneous disappearance of the aneurysm, which was confirmed by the fifth angiography on the 269 th day. If subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown etiology is encountered, spinal artery aneurysm should be considered as the bleeding source. Despite the controversy concerning the treatment strategy, ruptured spinal artery aneurysms can be treated conservatively because of the possibility of spontaneous regression. Follow-up angiography is required to evaluate the natural course of the lesion.

  9. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  10. Is the circulating plasma volume sufficiently maintained? Fluid management of an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuro; Katayama, Yoichi; Igarashi, Takahiro; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Jun; Hirayama, Teruyasu

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known cause of mortality and morbidity following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Prevention of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm is the basic management after SAH. Numerous pharmaceutical therapies and endovascular treatments are available against cerebral vasospasm, but none of them have so far proven to improve the outcome. We have focused on maintaining the circulation volume in order to prevent cerebral vasospasm. But to maintain the central venous pressure, huge infusion volume was required, and hyponatremia was frequently observed due to natriuresis and osmotic diuresis. Excessive natriuresis and diuresis cannot be managed through sodium and water replacement, since sodium replacement induces further natriuresis and diuresis (desalination), and water replacement induces hyponatremia. We therefore administered fludrocortisone and hydrocortisone to inhibit excessive natriuresis and diuresis. The efficacy of sodium reabsorption therapy is extremely high to maintain the circulation volume that might have a therapeutic effect to prevent cerebral vasospasm. In this article, we review our institution's experience regarding the management of patients with aneurysmal SAH and also discuss the importance of water and sodium balance when managing such patients.

  11. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  12. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  13. Current strategies for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E

    1987-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm represents a major health issue. Although most people who experience an aneurysmal SAH survive to be admitted to a hospital, less than one third of these patients ever return to their premorbid status. Clearly, morbidity of this magnitude demands reevaluation of the clinical approach to this problem. This article reviews the natural history of aneurysmal SAH, and examines the current therapeutic strategies that have been suggested to improve the outcome. Careful evaluation of the existing data suggests that early aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative volume expansion therapy constitute the best presently available approach to patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. PMID:3297009

  14. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C.; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simard, J. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  15. Cardiovascular and pulmonary complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Nicolas; Rabinstein, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage negatively affect overall morbidity and mortality. An electronic literature search was performed for English-language articles focused on cardiopulmonary complications with subarachnoid hemorrhage published through October 2010. A total of 278 citations were identified, including 72 clinical studies. In most cases, study quality was low or very low. Cardiac injury, evidenced by an elevation in troponin levels, is reported in about one-third of patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Arrhythmias also occur in about one-third of patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of pulmonary complications, especially neurogenic pulmonary edema, is more difficult to establish from available literature. Cardiopulmonary complications have been linked to worsened clinical outcome, suggesting a role for cardiac monitoring and interventions. PMID:21761273

  16. A Case of Cerebral Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Fabry's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Youn Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrage (SAH) with Fabry's disease. A 42-year-old woman presented with aneurysmal SAH originated from a saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The patient was treated by an endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm. Postoperatively the patient recovered favorably without any neurological deficit. During her admission, the patient had a sign of proteinuria in urine analysis. The pathologic findings of kidney needle biopsy implied nephrosialidosis (mucolipidosis of lysosomal stroage disease), which is consistent with a Fabry's disease. It is uncommon that Fabry's disease is presented with aneurysmal SAH, especially in middle-aged patients, but could be a clinical concern. Further investigations are needed to reveal risk factors, vascular anatomy, and causative mechanisms of Fabry's disease with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:23634271

  17. Prediction of outcomes in young adults with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Ahn, Sung-Yong; Moon, Hong-Joo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Heung-Seob; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kwon, Taek-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is rare in young adults and little is known about aneurysms in this subgroup. The effect of clinical and prognostic factors on the outcome based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores and the predictors of unfavorable outcomes were analyzed in young adults with aneurysmal SAH. A retrospective review of the clinical parameters, including age, sex, hypertension, smoking status, hyperlipidemia, location of the cerebral aneurysm, size of the aneurysm, multiplicity, perioperative complication such as hydrocephalus, vasospasm, and hematoma, and Hunt and Hess and Fisher grading on presentation, was conducted in 108 young adults (mean age 34.8 years) managed at our institute. The outcome was classified based on GOS grading into unfavorable (GOS scores 1-3) or favorable (GOS scores 4 or 5). The overall mortality rate was 3.7% (4/108 patients). Univariate regression analysis for the outcomes at discharge found that age at the time of presentation, male sex, size of aneurysm, multiple aneurysms, hyperlipidemia, and poor Hunt and Hess and Fischer grades were associated with unfavorable outcome. Multivariate regression analysis found independent effects of sex, multiple aneurysms, size of aneurysm, and Hunt and Hess grade on the outcome at discharge. Size of aneurysm, presence of multiple aneurysms, Hunt and Hess grade, and hypertension were the predictors of outcome at mean 2-year follow up based on multivariate exact regression analysis. The multimodal approach with aggressive medical management, early intervention, and surgical treatment might contribute to favorable long-term outcomes in patients with poor expected outcomes.

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  19. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  20. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused by polyarteritis nodosa. Case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun C; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Iihara, Koji; Sakai, Hideki; Higashi, Toshio; Kogure, Shuji; Taniguchi, Ayumi; Ueda, Hatsue I; Nagata, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing arteritis that involves small- and medium-sized arteries in various organs. Although aneurysm formation in visceral arteries is a typical finding in PAN, intracranial aneurysms are much less common, and only a few cases of aneurysm rupture associated with this disease have been documented. In this paper, the authors report on a ruptured PAN aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery; the lesion was trapped and resected. On histological examination, extensive fibrinoid necrosis and an inflammatory infiltration of leukocytes were seen in the aneurysm wall. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a histologically confirmed PAN aneurysm.

  1. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroharu; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Neki, Reiko; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Iihara, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and is responsible for important morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. This study reviewed reports of ruptured IA during pregnancy and the puerperium, and our own cases of ruptured IA in pregnant women. Hemorrhage occurred predominantly during the third trimester of pregnancy, when maternal cardiac output and blood volume increase and reach maximum. Physiological and hormonal changes in pregnancy are likely to affect the risk of IA rupture. Ruptured IAs during pregnancy should be managed based on neurosurgical considerations, and the obstetrical management of women with ruptured IAs should be decided according to the severity of SAH and the gestational age. Emergent cesarean section followed by clipping or coiling of aneurysms is indicated if the maternal condition and the gestational age allow such interventions. Although SAH during pregnancy can result in disastrous outcomes, the necessity of intracranial screening for high-risk pregnant women is still controversial. PMID:23979051

  3. To Look Beyond Vasospasm in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Messerer, Mahmoud; Oddo, Mauro; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm has classically been considered the most important and treatable cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Secondary ischemia (or delayed ischemic neurological deficit, DIND) has been shown to be the leading determinant of poor clinical outcome in patients with aSAH surviving the early phase and cerebral vasospasm has been attributed to being primarily responsible. Recently, various clinical trials aimed at treating vasospasm have produced disappointing results. DIND seems to have a multifactorial etiology and vasospasm may simply represent one contributing factor and not the major determinant. Increasing evidence shows that a series of early secondary cerebral insults may occur following aneurysm rupture (the so-called early brain injury). This further aggravates the initial insult and actually determines the functional outcome. A better understanding of these mechanisms and their prevention in the very early phase is needed to improve the prognosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on this topic and so to illustrate how the presence of cerebral vasospasm may not necessarily be a prerequisite for DIND development. The various factors determining DIND that worsen functional outcome and prognosis are then discussed. PMID:24967389

  4. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study. PMID:27660569

  5. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study.

  6. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552–632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500–2,500 m (5,000–8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient’s acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  7. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel.

    PubMed

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552-632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500-2,500 m (5,000-8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient's acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  8. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  9. Free recall memory performance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Signy; Macdonald, R Loch; Schweizer, Tom A

    2012-03-01

    Memory deficits for survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common, however, the nature of these deficits is not well understood. In this study, 24 patients with SAH and matched control participants were asked to study six lists containing words from four different categories. For half the lists, the categories were presented together (organized lists). For the remaining lists, the related words were presented randomly to maximize the use of executive processes such as strategy and organization (unorganized lists). Across adjoining lists, there was overlap in the types of categories given, done to promote intrusions. Compared to control participants, SAH patients recalled a similar number of words for the organized lists, but significantly fewer words for the unorganized lists. SAH patients also reported more intrusions than their matched counterparts. Separating patients into anterior communicating artery ruptures (ACoA) and ruptures in other regions, there was a recall deficit only for the unorganized list for those with ACoA ruptures and deficits across both list types for other rupture locations. These results suggest that memory impairment following SAH is likely driven by impairment in the executive components of memory, particularly for those with ACoA ruptures. Such findings may help direct future cognitive-therapeutic programs.

  10. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT. In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824–0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Hyponatremia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Marupudi, Neena I.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common, clinically-significant electrolyte abnormality seen in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controversy continues to exist regarding both the cause and treatment of hyponatremia in this patient population. Lack of timely diagnosis and/or providing inadequate or inappropriate treatment can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. We review recent literature on hyponatremia in subarachnoid hemorrhage and present currently recommended protocols for diagnosis and management. PMID:25937938

  12. Life satisfaction and return to work after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Passier, Patricia E C A; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141) living at home 2-4 years after the SAH responded to a mailed questionnaire. Outcomes were life satisfaction, as measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire 9 (LiSat-9), and employment status. Determinants in multiple regression analysis were demographic and SAH characteristics, subjective complaints (eg, mood disorder, fatigue, cognitive complaints), and personality characteristics (eg, neuroticism, passive coping style). Of the 141 subjects, 64 (46.7%) had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of V (good outcome) at discharge. Mean subject age was 51.4 ± 12.3 years, and mean time after SAH was 36.1 ± 7.9 months. Of the 88 subjects who were working at the time of the SAH, 54 (61.4%) returned to work, but only 31 (35.2%) resumed their work completely. The subjects were least satisfied with their vocational situation (51.9% satisfied) and sexual life (51.7%) and were most satisfied with their relationships (75.2%-88.7%) and self-care ability (88.6%). Age (β value = 0.17), return to work after SAH (0.19), disability at hospital discharge (0.25), worsened mood (-0.37), and passive coping (-0.25) together accounted for 47.2% of the life satisfaction scores. Our data indicate that return to work is a major issue for individuals who survive an SAH. Not returning to work, disability, depression, and passive coping are associated with reduced life satisfaction. Thus, vocational reintegration after SAH merits more attention during rehabilitation. PMID:20656515

  13. A 54-year-old man with 12 intracranial aneurysms and familial subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Hosainey, Sayied Abdol Mohieb; Meling, Torstein R

    2016-10-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in 1-3 % of the general population, and the risk of rupture is generally considered to be low. However, patients with multiple aneurysms and familial predisposition carry a particular risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 54-year-old hypertensive man underwent screening with a head CT angiography (CTA) because of his comorbidities. CTA revealed multiple bilateral aneurysms around the circle of Willis. At first surgery, seven aneurysms were clipped (BA, ACOM, ICA ×2, and MCA ×3), two of which were detected intraoperatively only. During the second surgery, another three aneurysms were surgically clipped (PCOM and MCA ×2), one of which was detected intraoperatively. Follow-up angiography revealed another two aneurysms. A PCOM aneurysm was treated by coil embolization and a VA aneurysm clipped surgically during a third admission. The patient made an uneventful recovery. However, 4 months after his second surgery, his daughter underwent surgical clipping of a right-sided ICA aneurysm. This case report highlights both the importance of screening of high risk patients with family history of SAH, as well as its limitations, as our patient developed two de novo aneurysms during 6-month follow-up and CTA preoperatively missed three small aneurysms. PMID:27452953

  14. A 54-year-old man with 12 intracranial aneurysms and familial subarachnoid hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Hosainey, Sayied Abdol Mohieb; Meling, Torstein R

    2016-10-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms occur in 1-3 % of the general population, and the risk of rupture is generally considered to be low. However, patients with multiple aneurysms and familial predisposition carry a particular risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 54-year-old hypertensive man underwent screening with a head CT angiography (CTA) because of his comorbidities. CTA revealed multiple bilateral aneurysms around the circle of Willis. At first surgery, seven aneurysms were clipped (BA, ACOM, ICA ×2, and MCA ×3), two of which were detected intraoperatively only. During the second surgery, another three aneurysms were surgically clipped (PCOM and MCA ×2), one of which was detected intraoperatively. Follow-up angiography revealed another two aneurysms. A PCOM aneurysm was treated by coil embolization and a VA aneurysm clipped surgically during a third admission. The patient made an uneventful recovery. However, 4 months after his second surgery, his daughter underwent surgical clipping of a right-sided ICA aneurysm. This case report highlights both the importance of screening of high risk patients with family history of SAH, as well as its limitations, as our patient developed two de novo aneurysms during 6-month follow-up and CTA preoperatively missed three small aneurysms.

  15. Postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage from an intracranial aneurysm after craniotomy for astrocytoma--case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Taomoto, K

    1989-09-01

    The authors present the first reported case of a glioma associated with a right posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. A 37-year-old male underwent craniotomy and total removal of the glioma, which appeared, according to encephalographic findings, to be responsible for the initial symptom of loss of consciousness. The risk of craniotomy-induced bleeding from the aneurysm was thought to be low, since it was unruptured and was packed with coagulum. However, subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of the PCA aneurysm occurred just after craniotomy, and clipping was performed 15 days after the first operation. PMID:2480546

  16. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus. PMID:27277584

  17. Neuroimaging characteristics of ruptured aneurysm as predictors of outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: pooled analyses of the SAHIT cohort.

    PubMed

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Lingsma, Hester; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Schweizer, Tom A; Thorpe, Kevin E; Macdonald, R Loch

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Neuroimaging characteristics of ruptured aneurysms are important to guide treatment selection, and they have been studied for their value as outcome predictors following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Despite multiple studies, the prognostic value of aneurysm diameter, location, and extravasated SAH clot on computed tomography scan remains debatable. The authors aimed to more precisely ascertain the relation of these factors to outcome. METHODS The data sets of studies included in the Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) repository were analyzed including data on ruptured aneurysm location and diameter (7 studies, n = 9125) and on subarachnoid clot graded on the Fisher scale (8 studies; n = 9452) for the relation to outcome on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 3 months. Prognostic strength was quantified by fitting proportional odds logistic regression models. Univariable odds ratios (ORs) were pooled across studies using random effects models. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for fixed effect of study, age, neurological status on admission, other neuroimaging factors, and treatment modality. The neuroimaging predictors were assessed for their added incremental predictive value measured as partial R(2). RESULTS Spline plots indicated outcomes were worse at extremes of aneurysm size, i.e., less than 4 or greater than 9 mm. In between, aneurysm size had no effect on outcome (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98-1.09 for 9 mm vs 4 mm, i.e., 75th vs 25th percentile), except in those who were treated conservatively (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.35). Compared with anterior cerebral artery aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms tended to result in slightly poorer outcome in patients who underwent endovascular coil embolization (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.82-1.57) or surgical clipping (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.10-1.57); the relation was statistically significant only in the latter. Fisher CT subarachnoid clot burden was related to outcome in a gradient manner. Each

  18. Impact of electrolyte imbalances on the outcome of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alimohamadi, Maysam; Saghafinia, Masoud; Alikhani, Fariba; Danial, Zohreh; Shirani, Mohamad; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrolyte disturbances are frequently observed during the acute and subacute period after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may potentially worsen therapeutic outcome. This study was conducted to determine the pattern of electrolyte disturbance in the acute and subacute phase after SAH and their effect on the long-term outcome of the patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three patients were prospectively enrolled. The standards of care for all patients were uniformly performed. The serum levels of electrolytes (sodium, potassium and magnesium) were determined with measurements obtained on admission, 3–5 and 7–10 days after SAH. Radiographic intensity of hemorrhage (Fisher's scale), and the clinical grading (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade) were documented in the first visit. The outcomes were evaluated using Glasgow outcome scale at 3 months after discharge. Results: Hyponatremia was the most common electrolyte imbalance among the patients but did not worsen the outcome. Although less common, hypernatremia in the subacute phase was significantly associated with poor outcome. Both hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia were predictive of poor outcomes. Conclusions: Because electrolyte abnormalities can adversely affect the outcome, the serum levels of electrolytes should be closely monitored with serial measurements and treated properly in patients with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:26889275

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Associated with Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Tanabe, T.; Muraoka, K.; Terada, K.; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cases of aneurysm associated with the occlusion of both common carotid arteries are very rare. We present a case of ruptured aneurysms of the basilar bifurcation and posterior cerebral artery coexisting with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, successfully treated by endovascular coil embolization with a double-balloon remodeling technique. Finally, we review the literature. A 62-year-old woman presented with severe headache; a computed tomography scan demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed that the bilateral common carotid arteries were occluded. The muscle branches of the vertebral arteries had anastomosed to the bilateral external carotid arteries. Bilateral posterior communicating arteries had developed and supplied the bilateral internal carotid arteries. Two aneurysms (a saccular aneurysm of the P1 portion of the left posterior cerebral artery and a wide-necked aneurysm of the basilar bifurcation) were also observed. Endovascular embolization of the aneurysms was successfully performed using a double-balloon remodeling technique. The patient made a full recovery after treatment, and the aneurysms remained obliterated 12 months after embolization. We believe that this is the first report of ruptured aneurysms associated with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion successfully treated by endovascular coiling. The double-balloon remodeling technique was useful for treatment of wide-necked basilar bifurcation aneurysm. PMID:20557745

  20. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in

  1. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27442399

  2. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another. PMID:27695237

  3. Determining rural risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: A structural equation modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Linda Jayne; Gall, Seana; Stirling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) carries a high disability burden. The true impact of rurality as a predictor of outcome severity is unknown. Our aim is to clarify the relationship between the proposed explanations of regional and rural health disparities linked to severity of outcome following an aSAH. An initial literature search identified limited data directly linking geographical location, rurality, rural vulnerability, and aSAH. A further search noting parallels with ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct literature presented a number of diverse and interrelated predictors. This a priori knowledge informed the development of a conceptual framework that proposes the relationship between rurality and severity of outcome following an aSAH utilizing structural equation modeling. The presented conceptual framework explores a number of system, environmental, and modifiable risk factors. Socioeconomic characteristics, modifiable risk factors, and timely treatment that were identified as predictors of severity of outcome following an aSAH and within each of these defined predictors a number of contributing specific individual predictors are proposed. There are considerable gaps in the current knowledge pertaining to the impact of rurality on the severity of outcome following an aSAH. Absent from the literature is any investigation of the cumulative impact and multiplicity of risk factors associated with rurality. The proposed conceptual framework hypothesizes a number of relationships between both individual level and system level predictors, acknowledging that intervening predictors may mediate the effect of one variable on another.

  4. Summary of evidence on immediate statins therapy following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tseng, M Y

    2011-09-01

    Statins were shown to have neuroprotective effects, with reduced vasospasm and delayed ischemic deficits in statin-treated patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in two small, randomized, controlled clinical trials published in 2005. This review consolidated data from available published studies evaluating statin treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage. A literature search was conducted to identify original research studies published through October 2010 testing immediate treatment with a statin in statin-naïve patients following aneurysmal SAH. Six randomized controlled clinical trials and four observational studies were identified. Despite inconsistent results among studies, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled data showed a significant reduction in delayed ischemic deficits with statins. Effect on vasospasm was more difficult to determine, due to differences in definitions used among studies. Interpretations from observational studies were limited by the use of relatively small sample sizes, historical controls, and treatment variability. PMID:21826581

  5. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (<3 days from ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  6. Cytokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid and delayed ischemic deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, K. Y.; Jeon, B. C.

    2001-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces an inflammatory reaction and may lead to ischemic brain damage. The pathogenesis of brain dysfunction and delayed ischemic symptoms remain difficult to understand despite extensive surveys of such reactions. Cytokine production in the central nervous system following SAH and its relation with clinical outcome have hardly been studied. This study was aimed to determine whether the levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the initial cerebrospinal fluid would increase following aneurysmal SAH, and be related with development of delayed ischemic deficit and clinical outcome. Nineteen patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH and 12 control volunteers were the subjects in this study. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained on admission and the levels of each cytokine were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage showed elevated levels of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha on admission. The patients with poor neurological status showed high levels of IL-1 beta, and IL-6. The patients who developed delayed ischemic deficit had high level of IL-6. We suggest that elevated level of IL-6 in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal SAH on admission can predict the high risk of delayed ischemic deficit. PMID:11748361

  7. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured inflammatory aneurysm: a possible manifestation of neurocysticercosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Soto-Hernandez, J L; Gomez-Llata Andrade, S; Rojas-Echeverri, L A; Texeira, F; Romero, V

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. As revealed by lumbar puncture, the cerebrospinal fluid had low glucose, high protein levels, and pleocytosis with 5% of eosinophils. Cultures were negative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and complement fixation reactions for cysticercosis in cerebrospinal fluid were positive. An angiogram revealed an aneurysm of the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by thickened leptomeninges, which histologically presented dense inflammation and remains of Cysticercus. The aneurysm could not be clipped, and it was wrapped. Postoperatively, the patient had dizziness and right ear tinnitus. He received prednisone therapy on alternate days and subsequently received albendazole for subarachnoid cysticerci. At the 4-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Although we cannot rule out a congenital aneurysm, its location inside an area of severe arachnoiditis around a cysticercus suggests an inflammatory origin. This type of vascular lesion not reported before should be suspected in patients with chronic cysticercotic meningitis.

  9. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Takamasa; Kashimura, Hiroshi; Saura, Hiroaki; Takeda, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features. PMID:27365964

  10. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in

  11. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HORIO, Yoshinobu; KATSUTA, Toshiro; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; WAKUTA, Naoki; FUKUDA, Kenji; HIGASHI, Toshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10–11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  12. Personalized Medicine in Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery: Precision Neurosurgical Management of Cerebral Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Achrol, Achal Singh; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are common vascular lesions. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these lesions and the process by which they destabilize and progress to rupture. Treatment decisions are motivated by a desire to prevent rupture and the devastating morbidity and mortality associated with resulting subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For patients presenting with SAH, urgent intervention is required to stabilize the lesion and prevent re-rupture. Those patients fortunate enough to survive a presenting SAH and subsequent securing of their aneurysm must still face a spectrum of secondary sequelae, which can include cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemia, seizures, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and endocrinologic and catecholamine-induced systemic dysfunction in cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems. Increased focus on understanding the pathophysiology and molecular characteristics of these secondary processes will enable the development of targeted therapeutics and novel diagnostics for improved patient selection in personalized medicine trials for SAH. In unruptured cerebral aneurysms, treatment decisions are less clear and currently based solely on treating larger lesions, using rigid aneurysm size cutoffs generalized from recent studies that are the subject of ongoing controversy. Further compounding this controversy is the fact that the vast majority of aneurysms that come to clinical attention at the time of a hemorrhagic presentation are of smaller size, suggesting that small aneurysms are indeed not benign lesions. As such, patient-specific biomarkers that better predict which aneurysms represent high-risk lesions that warrant clinical intervention are of vital importance. Recent advancements in genomic and proteomic technologies have enabled the identification of molecular characteristics that may prove useful in tracking aneurysm growth and progression and identifying targets for prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Novel quantitative neuroimaging

  13. [Systemic complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage from spontaneous rupture of a cerebral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Fàbregas Julià, N; Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Hernández-Palazón, J

    2010-12-01

    Systemic complications secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm are common (40%) and the mortality attributable to them (23%) is comparable to mortality from the primary lesion, rebleeding, or vasospasm. Although nonneurologic medical complications are avoidable, they worsen the prognosis, lengthen the hospital stay, and generate additional costs. The prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment of systemic complications will be essential for managing the individual patient's case. Treatment should cover major symptoms (headache, nausea, and dizziness) and ambient noise should be reduced, all with the aim of achieving excellence and improving the patient's perception of quality of care.

  14. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  15. Continuous Monitoring of Spreading Depolarization and Cerebrovascular Autoregulation after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Shirao, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Takao; Oka, Fumiaki; Maruta, Yuichi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Oku, Takayuki; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a prominent complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although vasospasm of proximal cerebral arteries has been regarded as the main cause of DCI, vasospasm of distal arteries, microthrombosis, impaired autoregulation, cortical spreading depolarization (CSD), and spreading ischemia are thought to be involved in DCI after aSAH. Here, we describe a patient with aSAH in whom CSD and cerebrovascular autoregulation were evaluated using simultaneous electrocorticography and monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx) after surgical clipping of a ruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm. In this patient, a prolonged duration of CSD and elevation of PRx preceded delayed neurological deficit. Based on this observation, we propose a relationship between these factors and DCI. Assessment of cerebrovascular autoregulation may permit detection of the inverse hemodynamic response to cortical depolarization. Detection of DCI may be achieved through simultaneous monitoring of CSD and PRx in patients with aSAH. PMID:27492947

  16. Continuous Monitoring of Spreading Depolarization and Cerebrovascular Autoregulation after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Shirao, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Takao; Oka, Fumiaki; Maruta, Yuichi; Suehiro, Eiichi; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Oku, Takayuki; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a prominent complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although vasospasm of proximal cerebral arteries has been regarded as the main cause of DCI, vasospasm of distal arteries, microthrombosis, impaired autoregulation, cortical spreading depolarization (CSD), and spreading ischemia are thought to be involved in DCI after aSAH. Here, we describe a patient with aSAH in whom CSD and cerebrovascular autoregulation were evaluated using simultaneous electrocorticography and monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx) after surgical clipping of a ruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm. In this patient, a prolonged duration of CSD and elevation of PRx preceded delayed neurological deficit. Based on this observation, we propose a relationship between these factors and DCI. Assessment of cerebrovascular autoregulation may permit detection of the inverse hemodynamic response to cortical depolarization. Detection of DCI may be achieved through simultaneous monitoring of CSD and PRx in patients with aSAH.

  17. Clinical and Predictive Significance of Hyponatremia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Vrsajkov, Vladimir; Javanović, Gordana; Stanisavljević, Snežana; Uvelin, Arsen; Vrsajkov, Jelena Panti

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Hyponatremia after SAH was the object of several studies with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to determine a predictive correlation of hyponatremia with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and poor clinical outcome. Material and Methods: We have used a retrospective hospital chart review of 82 patients with SAH treated from August 2008 to August 2010. Patients were divided into hyponatremia and normonatremia groups. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/l. Information compared and analyzed included demographics, preoperative neurological status, aneurysm characteristics, postoperative intensive care, duration of stay, DCI and clinical outcome at hospital discharge. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Thirty-two patients with SAH (39%) developed hyponatremia. In that group we had a significantly higher WFNS score at admission (p=0.03) and longer duration of stay in intensive care (p=0.001). DCI with transit or definitive deficit included 20 patients (62%) in the hyponatremia group, and 19 patients (38%) in the normonatremia group (p=0.03). Binary enter logistic regression revealed a significant correlation of hyponatremia with DCI (p=0.03) and poor clinical outcome (p=0.001). Conclusion: This result revealed a possible use of hyponatremia as an additional predictor of developing DCI and poor clinical outcome. PMID:25207008

  18. [HYPOTHERMIA INFLUENCES ON OXYGEN TENSION IN THE BRAIN PARENCHYMA IN PATIENTS WITH ANEURYSMAL SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Abudeev, S A; Popugaev, K A; Kruglyakov, N M; Belousova, K A; Terekhov, D A; Leushin, K Yu; Aronov, M S; Karpova, O V; Zelenkov, A V; Kiselev, K V; Fedin, A B; Zabelin, M V; Samoylov, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a serious medical and social problem. The main physiological mechanisms that determine secondary brain damage in this patients are intracranial hypertension, cerebral vasospasm, dysfunction of autoregulation mechanisms, violation of liquorodynamics and delayed cerebral ischemia. The multimodal neuromonitoring for prevention and timely correction ofsecondary brain injury factors has become routine practice in neuroICU. Measurement of oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma is one of neuromonitoring options. During the years of intensive use of this method in clinical practice the reasons for reducing the oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma were revealed, as well as developed and clinically validated algorithms for correction of such conditions. However, there are clinical situations that are difficult to interpret and even more difficult to make the right tactical and therapeutic solutions. We present the clinical observation of the patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, who had dramatically reduced brain intraparenchymal oxygen pressure although prolonged hypothermia were used. Despite this, the outcome was favorable. The analysis allowed to assume that the reason for this decrease in oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma could be hypothermia itself PMID:27468510

  19. Current concepts of pathophysiology and management of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Findlay, J M; Macdonald, R L; Weir, B K

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 10 in 100,000 persons suffer rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm annually, and roughly 60% of these will survive the initial catastrophe in reasonable neurological condition. Of the many ensuing complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most frustrating continues to be a form of delayed-onset cerebral arterial narrowing known as vasospasm. Because it is caused by thick subarachnoid blood clots coating the adventitial surface of cerebral arteries, the distribution and severity of vasospasm correlates closely with location and volume of subarachnoid hematoma as visualized on computed tomography (CT). Critical vasospasm causes cerebral ischemia and infarction: the "second stroke." It is now know that vasospasm represents sustained arterial contraction rather than structural thickening of the vessel wall with lumen encroachment. A large body of evidence points to oxyhemoglobin, released from lysing erythrocytes, as the principal component of blood clot responsible for this contraction. The precise mechanism by which oxyhemoglobin causes prolonged vascular smooth muscle cell constriction has not yet been established, but possibilities include secondary generation of vasoactive free radicals, lipid peroxides, eicosanoids, bilirubin, and endothelin. Vasospasm treatments are directed at preventing or reversing arterial narrowing, or at preventing or reversing cerebral ischemia. Several treatments from the latter category, namely, hypertensive, hypervolemic hemodilutional therapy and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, have proven moderately effective and are in widespread clinical use. It has also been possible to mechanically dilate vasospastic vessels with transluminal angioplasty improving cerebral blood flow to ischemic brain. However we are still in need of an effective agent to prevent arterial narrowing, and several hopeful candidates in this category of treatment are clot lytic agent tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and

  20. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Replacement Reduces Delayed Cerebral Vasospasm After Embolization of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Liming; Ma, Fei; Liu, Yun; Mu, Yanchun; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a leading cause of poor prognosis and death in SAH patients. Effective management to reduce DCVS is needed. A prospective controlled trial was conducted to determine if massive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement (CR) could reduce DCVS occurrence and improve the clinical outcome after aneurysmal SAH treated with endovascular coiling. Material/Methods Patients treated with endovascular coiling after aneurysmal SAH were randomly divided into a control group receiving regular therapy alone (C group, n=42) and a CSF replacement group receiving an additional massive CSF replacement with saline (CR group, n=45). CSF examination, head CT, DCVS occurrence, cerebral infarction incidence, Glasgow Outcome Scale prognostic score, and 1-month mortality were recorded. Results The occurrence of DCVS was 30.9% in the C group and 4.4% in the CR group (P<0.005). The cerebral infarction incidences in the C and CR groups were 19.0% and 2.2% (P<0.05), respectively, 1 month after the treatments. Mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups during the follow-up period. Conclusions Massive CR after embolization surgery for aneurysmal SAH can significantly reduce DCVS occurrence and effectively improve the outcomes. PMID:27394187

  1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following hemodynamic treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Awori, Jonathan; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Thompson, B Gregory; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an uncommon but significant complication of hemodynamic therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH)-induced vasospasm. We performed a PubMed literature search for the period January 1999 to January 2015 using the search terms "posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome", "subarachnoid hemorrhage", "vasospasm", and "hypertensive encephalopathy", and identified nine cases of PRES after aSAH-induced vasospasm in the literature. We also present a 63-year-old man with aSAH complicated by vasospasm treated with hemodynamic augmentation who subsequently developed PRES. Imaging following development of PRES symptoms shows vasogenic edema in the white matter of the parietal and occipital lobes. Age, sex, history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure were variable among patients in the literature review. In all cases, patients improved both from a radiological and clinical perspective following blood pressure reduction. To summarize, PRES is a rare complication of hemodynamic therapy for vasospasm following aSAH. The literature at the time of writing demonstrates no common pattern with regard to patient demographics, medical history, or mode of treatment for symptomatic vasospasm. Given its sporadic and unpredictable nature, considering PRES in the differential diagnosis is important when addressing neurological decline following hemodynamic treatment of vasospasm related to aSAH. PMID:26755456

  2. Remote Ischemic Conditioning Alters Methylation and Expression of Cell Cycle Genes in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nikkola, Elina; Laiwalla, Azim; Ko, Arthur; Alvarez, Marcus; Connolly, Mark; Ooi, Yinn Cher; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex; Pajukanta, Päivi; Gonzalez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is a phenomenon in which short periods of non-fatal ischemia in one tissue confers protection to distant tissues. Here we performed a longitudinal human pilot study in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) undergoing RIC by limb ischemia to compare changes in DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles before and after RIC. Methods Thirteen patients underwent 4 RIC sessions over 2–12 days after rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. We analyzed whole blood transcriptomes using RNA sequencing and genome-wide DNA methylomes using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, both before and after RIC. We tested differential expression (DE) and differential methylation (DM) using an intra-individual paired study design, and then overlapped the DE and DM results for analyses of functional categories and protein-protein interactions. Results We observed 164 DE genes and 3,493 DM CpG sites after RIC, of which 204 CpG sites overlapped with 103 genes, enriched for pathways of cell cycle (P<3.8×10−4) and inflammatory responses (P<1.4×10−4). The cell cycle pathway genes form a significant protein-protein interaction network of tightly co-expressed genes (P<0.00001). Conclusions Gene expression and DNA methylation changes in aSAH patients undergoing RIC are involved in coordinated cell cycle and inflammatory responses. PMID:26251247

  3. Anti-fibrinolytic treatment in the pre-operative management of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Ameen, A A; Illingworth, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients treated with epsilon aminocaproic acid 24 grams daily prior to surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysms have been compared with the previous 100 patients managed similarly but without anti-fibrinolytic drugs. No other alterations in management were made and the two series are closely comparable in all other respects. Fewer episodes of recurrent haemorrhage and deaths from this cause occurred in the treated patients, but more cases of cerebral ischaemia occurred. Neither difference is statistically significant and overall more deaths occurred in the patients treated with antifibrinolytic drugs. The value of this method of treatment in the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage is questioned. PMID:7229645

  4. Non-aneurysmal spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage: perimesencephalic versus non-perimesencephalic

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Luís Guilherme Bastos Silva Aguiar; Costa, José Manuel Dias; Silva, Elsa Irene Peixoto Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical evolution of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods The study was conducted retrospectively in a tertiary hospital center in the north region of Portugal. Included patients had no identifiable cause for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several epidemiologic, clinical and imaging aspects were statistically analyzed, taking into account the differences in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results Sixty-two patients met the inclusion criteria (46.8% - perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage; 53.2% - non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage). Demographic and clinical background characteristics were similar in both groups. Complications were more frequent in patients with non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage - 84.8% of the patients had at least one complication versus 48.3% in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm, infection and hydrocephaly were the most common complications (each was detected more frequently in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group than in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group). Two patients died, both had a non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. The median inpatient time was longer in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group (21 versus 14 days). No incidents of rebleeding were reported during the follow-up period (mean time of 15 ± 10.3 months). Conclusion Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage are two different entities that have different clinical outcomes, namely in terms of complication rate and median inpatient time. The management of these patients should respect this difference to improve treatment and optimize health care resources. PMID:27410409

  5. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ≥40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  6. Idiopathic subvalvular aortic aneurysm masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Balaji; Ramanathan, Sundar; Subramaniam, Natarajan; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Subvalvular aneurysms are the least common type of left ventricular (LV) aneurysms and can be fatal. Subaortic LV aneurysms are much rarer than submitral LV aneurysms and mostly reported in infancy. They can be congenital or acquired secondary to infections, cardiac surgery or trauma. Here, we report a unique presentation of a large, idiopathic subaortic aneurysm in an adult masquerading as an acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis was made with the help of a CT aortography. Aneurysm was surgically resected with good results. This case highlights the clinical presentation and management of subaortic aneurysms, an important differential for congenital aortic malformations. PMID:27591034

  7. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, François-Xavier; Duprez, Thierry; van Pesch, Vincent; Giglioli, Simone

    2016-01-01

    We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri. PMID:27418987

  8. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Monica; Churchill, Nathan W.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Graham, Simon J.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into “impaired” and “unimpaired” groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life). In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes. PMID:26172281

  9. Possible overlap between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and symptomatic vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Forget, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; van de Wyngaert, Françoise; Raftopoulos, Christian; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a previous history of severe headache ("thunderclap") was admitted with a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient developed symptomatic vasospasm on day 5 that resolved rapidly after having increased arterial blood pressure. She experienced also short-lasting excruciating headache. On day 12, while velocities had normalised, as revealed by transcranial Doppler (TCD), for more than 48 h, she developed aphasia and right hemiplegia associated with diffuse segmental vasospasm on the left middle cerebral artery. Intra-arterial infusion of vasodilatory agents was required. Recurrence of symptomatic vasospasm was noted on day 25, with a great number of territories involved as shown in the cerebral angiogram. A second intra-arterial treatment was needed. The patient complained of multiple episodes of extremely severe headache ("thunderclap"), with also transient dysarthria and hemiparesia on day 30. She was discharged on day 38 after full recovery. The clinical and TCD/radiological findings were consistent with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome overlapping SAH related symptomatic vasospasm. PMID:19381433

  10. Effect of fasudil hydrochloride, a protein kinase inhibitor, on cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemic symptoms after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jizong; Zhou, Dingbiao; Guo, Jing; Ren, Zyuan; Zhou, Liangfu; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Bainan; Wang, Renzhi

    2006-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of fasudil hydrochloride, a novel protein kinase inhibitor, were evaluated for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm and associated cerebral ischemic symptoms in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysm. This randomized open trial with nimodipine as the control included 72 patients who underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery for ruptured cerebral aneurysm of Hunt and Hess grades I to IV. For 14 days following surgery, patients were administered either 30 mg of fasudil hydrochloride by intravenous injection over a period of 30 minutes three times a day or 1 mg/hr of nimodipine by continuous intravenous infusion. Fasudil hydrochloride and nimodipine both showed inhibitory effects on cerebral vasospasm. The incidence of symptomatic vasospasm was five of 33 patients in the fasudil group and nine of 32 patients in the nimodipine group. Good recovery evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale was achieved by 23 of 33 patients in the fasudil group and 19 of 34 patients in the nimodipine group. Both drugs significantly improved consciousness levels and neurological deficits such as aphasia. However, fasudil hydrochloride improved motor disturbance more than nimodipine. Adverse reactions occurred in 13 of 37 patients receiving fasudil hydrochloride and 15 of 35 patients receiving nimodipine. There were no serious adverse events in the fasudil group. The results of this clinical trial indicate that fasudil hydrochloride is a safe and efficient agent for suppressing cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery for ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  11. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  12. From multidimensional neuropsychological outcomes to a cognitive complication rate: The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Richard B; Eccles, Fiona; Lloyd, Andrew; Carpenter, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Background The neuropsychological arm of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (N-ISAT) evaluated the cognitive outcome of 573 patients at 12 months following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The assessment included 29 psychometric measures, yielding a substantial and complex body of data. We have explored alternative and optimal methodologies for analysing and summarising these data to enable the estimation of a cognitive complication rate (CCR). Any differences in cognitive outcome between the two arms of the trial are not however reported here. Methods All individual test scores were transformed into z-scores and a 5th percentile cut-off for impairment was established. A principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to these data to mathematically transform correlated test scores into a smaller number of uncorrelated principal components, or cognitive 'domains'. These domains formed the basis for grouping and weighting individual patients' impaired scores on individual measures. In order to increase the sample size, a series of methods for handling missing data were applied. Results We estimated a 34.1% CCR in all those patients seen face-to-face, rising to 37.4% CCR with the inclusion of patients who were unable to attend assessment for reason related to the index SAH. This group demonstrated significantly more self and carer/relative rated disability on a Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire, than patients classified as having no functionally significant cognitive deficits. Conclusion Evaluating neuropsychological outcome in a large RCT involves unique methodological and organizational challenges. We have demonstrated how these problems may be addressed by re-classifying interval data from 29 measures into a dichotomous CCR. We have presented a 'sliding scale' of undifferentiated individual cognitive impairments, and then on the basis of PCA-derived cognitive 'domains', included consideration of the distribution of impairments in these terms

  13. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  14. In-hospital outcomes of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with cocaine use in the USA.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Santosh B; Moradiya, Yogesh; Shah, Shreyansh; Naval, Neeraj S

    2014-12-01

    Cocaine use is associated with higher mortality in small retrospective studies of brain-injured patients. We aimed to explore in-hospital outcomes in a large population based study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) with cocaine use. aSAH patients were identified from the 2007-2010 USA Nationwide Inpatient Sample using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision codes. Demographics, comorbidities and surgical procedures were compared between cocaine users and non-users. The primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and home discharge/self-care. Secondary outcomes were vasospasm treated with angioplasty, hydrocephalus, gastrostomy and tracheostomy. There were 103,876 patients with aSAH. The cocaine group were younger (45.8 ± 9.8 versus 58.4 ± 15.8, p<0.001), predominantly male (53.3% versus 38.5%, p<0.001) and had a higher proportion of black patients (36.9% versus 11.5%, p<0.001). The incidence of seizures was higher among cocaine users (16.2% versus 11.1%, p<0.001). Endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysms (24% versus 18.5%, p<0.001) was more frequent in cocaine users. The univariate analysis showed higher rates of in-hospital mortality and vasospasm treated with angioplasty, but lower home discharge in the cocaine group. In the multivariate analysis, the cocaine cohort had higher in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-1.61, p<0.001) and lower home discharge rates (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69-0.87, p<0.001) after adjusting for confounders. Rates of vasospasm treated with angioplasty however were similar between the two groups. Cocaine use was found to be independently associated with poor outcomes, particularly higher mortality and lower home discharge rates. Cocaine use however, was not associated with vasospasm that required treatment with angioplasty. Prospective confirmation is warranted.

  15. Kallikrein 6 as a Serum Prognostic Marker in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Diamandis, Anastasia; Romaschin, Alexander D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating condition that frequently causes death or significant disabilities. Blood tests to predict possible early complications could be very useful aids for therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze serum levels of kallikrein 6 (KLK6) in individuals with aSAH to determine the relevance of this protease with the outcome of these patients. Methodology/Principal Findings A reference interval for KLK6 was established by using serum samples (n = 136) from an adult population. Additionally, serum samples (n = 326) from patients with aSAH (n = 13) were collected for 5 to 14 days, to study the concentration of KLK6 in this disease. The correlation between KLK6 and S100B, an existing brain damage biomarker, was analyzed in 8 of 13 patients. The reference interval for KLK6 was established to be 1.04 to 3.93 ng/mL. The mean levels in patients with aSAH within the first 56 hours ranged from 0.27 to 1.44 ng/mL, with lowest levels found in patients with worse outcome. There were significant differences between patients with good recovery or moderate disability (n = 8) and patients with severe disability or death (n = 5) (mean values of 1.03 ng/mL versus 0.47 ng/mL, respectively) (p<0.01). There was no significant correlation between KLK6 and S100B. Conclusions/Significance Decreased serum concentrations of KLK6 are found in patients with aSAH, with the lowest levels in patients who died. PMID:23049835

  16. Intrathecal application of the nimodipine slow-release microparticle system eg-1962 for prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia and improvement of outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Etminan, Nima; Macdonald, R Loch; Davis, Cara; Burton, Kevin; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The effective reduction of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), a main contributor for poor outcome following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), remains challenging. Previous clinical trials on systemic pharmaceutical treatment of SAH mostly failed to improve outcome, probably because of insensitive pharmaceutical targets and outcome measures, small sample size, insufficient subarachnoid drug concentrations and also detrimental, systemic effects of the experimental treatment per se. Interestingly, in studies that are more recent, intrathecal administration of nicardipine pellets following surgical aneurysm repair was suggested to have a beneficial effect on DCI and neurological outcome. However, this positive effect remained restricted to patients who were treated surgically for a ruptured aneurysm. Because of the favorable results of the preclinical data on DCI and neurological outcome in the absence of neurotoxicity or systemic side effects, we are initiating clinical trials. The PROMISE (Prolonged Release nimOdipine MIcro particles after Subarachnoid hemorrhage) trial is designed as an unblinded, nonrandomized, single-center, single-dose, dose-escalation safety and tolerability phase 1 study in patients surgically treated for aSAH and will investigate the effect of intracisternal EG-1962 administration. The NEWTON (Nimodipine microparticles to Enhance recovery While reducing TOxicity after subarachNoid hemorrhage) trial is a phase 1/2a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label, dose-escalation, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study comparing EG-1962 and nimodipine in patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  17. Prediction of two month modified Rankin Scale with an ordinal prediction model in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating event with a frequently disabling outcome. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model to predict an ordinal clinical outcome at two months in patients with aSAH. Methods We studied patients enrolled in the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), a randomized multicentre trial to compare coiling and clipping in aSAH patients. Several models were explored to estimate a patient's outcome according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at two months after aSAH. Our final model was validated internally with bootstrapping techniques. Results The study population comprised of 2,128 patients of whom 159 patients died within 2 months (8%). Multivariable proportional odds analysis identified World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade as the most important predictor, followed by age, sex, lumen size of the aneurysm, Fisher grade, vasospasm on angiography, and treatment modality. The model discriminated moderately between those with poor and good mRS scores (c statistic = 0.65), with minor optimism according to bootstrap re-sampling (optimism corrected c statistic = 0.64). Conclusion We presented a calibrated and internally validated ordinal prognostic model to predict two month mRS in aSAH patients who survived the early stage up till a treatment decision. Although generalizability of the model is limited due to the selected population in which it was developed, this model could eventually be used to support clinical decision making after external validation. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, Number ISRCTN49866681 PMID:20920243

  18. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  19. Elevated relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with colder weather in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Lara, Lucia; Kowalski, Robert G; Schneider, Eric B; Tamargo, Rafael J; Nyquist, Paul

    2015-10-01

    We have previously reported an increase of 0.6% in the relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in response to every 1°F decrease in the maximum daily temperature (Tmax) in colder seasons from patients presenting to our regional tertiary care center. We hypothesized that this relationship would also be observed in the warmer summer months with ambient temperatures greater than 70°F. From prospectively collected incidence data for aSAH patients, we investigated absolute Tmax, average daily temperatures, intraday temperature ranges, and the variation of daily Tmax relative to 70°F to assess associations with aSAH incidence for patients admitted to our institution between 1991 and 2009 during the hottest months and days on which Tmax>70°F. For all days treated as a group, the mean Tmax (± standard deviation) was lower when aSAH occurred than when it did not (64.4±18.2°F versus 65.8±18.3°F; p=0.016). During summer months, the odds ratio (OR) of aSAH incidence increased with lower mean Tmax (OR 1.019; 95% confidence interval 1.001-1.037; p=0.043). The proportion of days with aSAH admissions was lower on hotter days than the proportion of days with no aSAH (96% versus 98%; p=0.006). aSAH were more likely to occur during the summer and on days with a temperature fluctuation less than 10°F (8% versus 4%; p=0.002). During the hottest months of the year in the mid-Atlantic region, colder maximum daily temperatures, a smaller heat burden above 70°F, and smaller intraday temperature fluctuations are associated with increased aSAH admissions in a similar manner to colder months. These findings support the hypothesis that aSAH incidence is more likely with drops in temperature, even in the warmer months.

  20. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Mangieri, Paola; Naves, Luciana A; Suzuki, Kunio; Ferreira, Moema; Domingues, Lucilia

    2004-03-01

    We have previously reported that subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm (SH) is associated with changes in the hormonal profile in the first 24 hours after the event. We proposed that the hormonal changes observed are due to the intense stress to which the patients are exposed. However, the thyroidal hormonal profile is indicative of the presence of a nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In this paper, we examined whether the change in the thyroid hormone profile is compatible with a NTIS. Two groups of patients were included in the study: A) 30 patients with SH (21 females and 9 males; 41.7+/-11.4 years) and B) a control group including 25 patients with benign diseases of the spine (BDS) (lumbar disc hernia or stable spinal trauma) (8 females and 17 males; 41.3+/-14.2 years). In a subgroup of eight patients of each group serum triiodothyronine (T3) and reverse T3 levels were measured. The blood samples were obtained between 8:00 and 9:00 AM. The following results were obtained: The SH group had smaller serum T3 and free T4 levels than the BDS group (p<0.05): T3 (ng/mL): SH = 58.7+/-1.1 and BDS = 74.5+/-13.9; free T4 (ng/dL): SH = 0.9+/-0.2 and BDS = 1.1+/-0.3. There was no significant difference in the serum levels of total thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between the two groups: T4 ( microg/dL): SH = 6.9+/-1.1 and BDS = 7.4+/-2.1; TSH ( microUI/mL): SH = 1.5+/-0.8 and BDS = 1.8+/-1,0. In the sample of eight patients of each group we had the following results: T3 (ng/mL): SH = 66.8+/-3.8 and BDS = 77.2+/-1.1 (p <0.05); reverse T3 (ng/dL): SH = 32.8+/-8 and BDS = 24.7+/-2.2 (NS); T3/ reverse T3 ratio: SH = 2.6+/-0.3 and BDS = 3.3+/-0.4 (NS). Thyreoglobulin and microsomal antibodies were not detectable, except in one patient in the SH group. In conclusion, the SH patients present serum levels of T3 and free T4 significantly lower than that of BDS patients; the thyroidal hormone profile suggests that SH patients have

  1. Effect of dietary β carotene on cerebral aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage in the brain apo E-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Gopal, K; Nagarajan, P; Raj, T Avinash; Jahan, P; Ganapathy, H S; Mahesh Kumar, M J

    2011-10-01

    Atherosclerosis will lead to stenosis/occlusion in the lumen of various arteries of living body. This can lead various conditions including myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction/aneurysm and peripheral artery disease. Ang II is believed to be an important regulatory peptide involved in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. Matrix metalloproteinase's (MMPs), adhesion molecules and plasminogen systems are involved in the inflammatory reaction of various blood vessels as well as pathogenesis of cerebro vasuclar disease in apo E(-/-) mice during angiotensin II injection. The present study analyses the role of ang II in development of cerebral aneurysm and also evaluated the mRNA levels of MMPs, adhesion molecules, plasminogen systems and peroxisome proliferators-associated receptors in the brain of apo E(-/-) mouse during the progression of cerebral aneurysm and ischemic conditions. Also, this study evaluates the role of dietary β carotene on cerebrovascular disease. Serum total cholesterol (TC), Low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly increased in angiotensin II treated animals and further β carotene supplementation reduces TC but does not affect the triglyceride and LDL levels. Circulating levels of macrophages were significantly increased in angiotensin treated animals and further beta carotene supplementation significantly reduced the circulating macrophages. Cerebro meningeous aneurysm, subarachnoid haemorrhage, multiple foci of infarction, necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed in the cerebral hemispheres of ang II treated animals, however, infarction size were reduced and no aneurysm, inflammatory foci was observed in β carotene treated animals. Real time analysis showed down regulation of mRNA levels of MMP 2, uPA, PAI, PPAR-A, MCSF1 and up regulation of tPA and MCP-1 in the brain during the progression of cerebral aneurysm and β carotene

  2. A higher aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage incidence in women prior to menopause: a retrospective analysis of 4,895 cases from eight hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yao; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Heng; Yang, Lin; Zeng, Xian Jun; Yang, Jian; Peng, Guang Ming; Ahuja, Anil; Yang, Zheng Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disease. Despite the risk factors, including hypertension, cigarette smoking and alcohol use, are more common in men, aneurysmal SAH belongs to a few diseases which the incidence is higher in women than in men. Sex hormones, especially estrogen, might be protective against this condition. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) seems to be associated with a reduced risk for aneurysmal SAH. This study aims to know the prevalence of aneurysmal SAH of men and women at different ages. Methods The age and gender information of 4,895 case of aneurysmal SAH (3,016 females, 1,879 males) were collected retrospectively from eight institutions in mainland China. The prevalence of aneurysmal SAH of men and women at different ages was analyzed. Results The data showed women had a higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH than men starting at late thirties, and men might have a higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH than women only before 37-year-old. Conclusions Menopause may not be the only dominant factor causing higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH in women than in men. PMID:27190767

  3. Methodology of neuropsychological research in multicentre randomized clinical trials: a model derived from the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial.

    PubMed

    Scott, Richard B; Farmer, Elly; Smiton, Amanda; Tovey, Caroline; Clarke, Mike; Carpenter, Katherine

    2004-02-01

    As advances in medicine and surgery lead to reductions in mortality rates for life-threatening conditions, it has become increasingly important to refine the methodology of auditing long-term morbidity. The inclusion of appropriate neuropsychological outcomes in a large multicentre randomized clinical trial poses considerable methodological and logistical difficulties. This paper presents a model developed to implement such a multicentre neuropsychological and quality of life audit for a subset of patients within the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), the largest ever randomized trial in the treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage. Based on our experience of collecting quality of life and neuropsychological outcomes from more than 550 patients, data are presented on the relative cost and efficacy of different organizational strategies, methods of canvassing patients and associated response rates. On the basis of this experience, we estimate a potential recruitment pool of 135 cases would be required to obtain some neuropsychological data on 100 cases. The design of any similar trial would therefore need to accommodate a loss to follow-up of approximately one third of the sample. In addition, our experience suggests that for a trial of this size and complexity, the deployment of centrally-based co-ordinators travelling to satellite centres is more cost-effective than employing co-ordinators based at those centres. Extrapolations from the observations and calculations reported here can be employed as an evidence base to inform the design of neuropsychological outcome studies in large multicentre trials.

  4. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in elderly patients: long-term outcome and prognostic factors in an interdisciplinary treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Schöller, Karsten; Massmann, Maike; Markl, Gertraud; Kunz, Mathias; Fesl, Gunther; Brückmann, Hartmut; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The number of elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is increasing with the aging of the population. However, management recommendations based on long-term outcome data and analyses of prognostic factors are scarce. Our study focused exclusively on elderly patients aged ≥ 60 years at the onset of SAH. Patients were selected from an in-house database and compared in cohorts of age 60-69, 70-79, and ≥ 80, regarding pre-existing medical conditions, treatment, clinical course including complications, and outcome. A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify prognostic factors for death and disability. A total of 256 patients (138 aged 60-69, 93 aged 70-79, 25 aged ≥ 80) with putative aneurysmal SAH who had been admitted to our hospital between January 1, 1996 and June 30, 2007 were extracted. The median follow-up of our total cohort was 35.5 months (range <1-154 months). Endovascular or conservative aneurysm treatment was applied more often with increasing age (p < 0.006). The 1-year survival rate was 78, 65, and 38 % in the three age groups, respectively (p = 0.0002); most of the patients died from the initial hemorrhage or from medical complications. Patients aged <70 with an initial World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) score of I-III showed the best clinical recovery. WFNS score, age, and clipping/coiling were extracted as prognostic factors from the Cox model. Elderly patients who get admitted with a good WFNS score (I-III) seem to benefit from aggressive treatment whereas caution seems to be warranted particularly in patients ≥ 70 years of age who get admitted in a WFNS score of IV and V because of their limited short- and long-term prognosis.

  5. Haptoglobin phenotype predicts the development of focal and global cerebral vasospasm and may influence outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jenna L; Blackburn, Spiros; Neal, Dan; Mendez, Nicholas V; Wharton, Jeffrey A; Waters, Michael F; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-27

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) and the resulting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) significantly contribute to poor outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Free hemoglobin (Hb) within the subarachnoid space has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CV. Haptoglobin (Hp) binds free pro-oxidant Hb, thereby modulating its harmful effects. Humans can be of three Hp phenotypes: Hp1-1, Hp2-1, or Hp2-2. In several disease states, the Hp2-2 protein has been associated with reduced ability to protect against toxic free Hb. We hypothesized that individuals with the Hp2-2 phenotype would have more CV, DCI, mortality, and worse functional outcomes after aSAH. In a sample of 74 aSAH patients, Hp2-2 phenotype was significantly associated with increased focal moderate (P = 0.014) and severe (P = 0.008) CV and more global CV (P = 0.014) after controlling for covariates. Strong trends toward increased mortality (P = 0.079) and worse functional outcomes were seen for the Hp2-2 patients with modified Rankin scale at 6 wk (P = 0.076) and at 1 y (P = 0.051) and with Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended at discharge (P = 0.091) and at 1 y (P = 0.055). In conclusion, Hp2-2 phenotype is an independent risk factor for the development of both focal and global CV and also predicts poor functional outcomes and mortality after aSAH. Hp phenotyping may serve as a clinically useful tool in the critical care management of aSAH patients by allowing for early prediction of those patients who require increased vigilance due to their inherent genetic risk for the development of CV and resulting DCI and poor outcomes.

  6. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  7. Medical Management of Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Review of Current and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Peter; He, Shuhan; Amar, Arun Paul; Mack, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Evidence suggests a multifactorial etiology and this concept remains supported by the assortment of therapeutic modalities under investigation. The authors provide an updated review of the literature for previous and recent clinical trials evaluating medical treatments in patients with cerebral vasospasm secondary to aSAH. Currently, the strongest evidence supports use of prophylactic oral nimodipine and initiation of triple-H therapy for patients in cerebral vasospasm. Other agents presented in this report include magnesium, statins, endothelin receptor antagonists, nitric oxide promoters, free radical scavengers, thromboxane inhibitors, thrombolysis, anti-inflammatory agents and neuroprotectants. Although promising data is beginning to emerge for several treatments, few prospective randomized clinical trials are presently available. Additionally, future investigational efforts will need to resolve discrepant definitions and outcome measures for cerebral vasospasm in order to permit adequate study comparisons. Until then, definitive recommendations cannot be made regarding the safety and efficacy for each of these therapeutic strategies and medical management practices will continue to be implemented in a wide-ranging manner.

  8. [Increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as a predictor of cerebral salt wasting syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Shinichiro; Takayama, Katsutoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is considered to correlate with delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) induced by cerebral vasospasm; however, its exact mechanism is still not well-known. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between hyponatremia caused by CSWS and the increase of the urinary sodium excretion in early phase following SAH. Fifty-four patients with SAH were divided into 2 groups, normonatremia group and hyponatremia group which suffered hyponatremia after SAH. The hyponatremia group comprise 14 patients (26%) in whom the hyponatremia developed of the SAH. In this group, the serum level of sodium significantly decreased 7 days after SAH and then gradually normalised. Further, excretion of sodium in the urine tended to increase 3 days after SAH and significantly increased 7 days after SAH. In conclusion, the increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of SAH would serve as a predictive factor for CSWS after SAH. We consider that it is important to start sodium and fluid supplementation and inhibit natriuresis by fludrocortisone acetate administration before hyponatremia occurs in order to prevention delayed ischemic neurological deficits in SAH patients.

  9. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH.

  10. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk

  11. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy presenting with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and interval development of neurological deficits: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Bai, Harrison X; Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Yanqiao; Tan, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA) is a cerebrovascular disease that occurs during the postpartum period. It is characterized by reversible multifocal vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. We report a patient with PCA proven by cerebral angiography that revealed multifocal, segmental narrowing of the cerebral arteries and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient suddenly deteriorated with focal neurological deficits on the 5 th day of hospitalization. She was treated with calcium-channel blockers and monitored with daily transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Her symptoms gradually improved and she was discharged on the 11 th day of hospitalization. At 1-month follow-up, patient was completely symptom-free with no neurological deficits.

  12. Aneurysm Formation After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Type A Dissection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lai; Wang, Jiaping

    2016-08-01

    Recently, reports have described successful endovascular stent graft (ESG) treatment of patients with acute type A aortic dissection. We report 1 ESG treatment for this condition and the complication of a new aneurysm formation during a 6-month follow-up. PMID:27630269

  13. Intracranial blister aneurysms: clip reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo; McCracken, D Jay

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial blister aneurysms are difficult to treat cerebrovascular lesions that typically affect the anterior circulation. These rare aneurysms can lead to acute rupture which usually cannot be treated via endovascular methods, but still require urgent surgical intervention. Surgical options are limited given their unique pathology and often require a combination of wrapping and clip reconstruction. In this video we present two patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured blister aneurysms. We demonstrate several surgical techniques for repairing the vascular defect with and without intraoperative rupture. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/nz-JM45uKQU.

  14. Clinical outcome prediction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage – Alterations in brain–body interface

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Benjamin W. Y.; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Angle, Mark; Teitelbaum, Jeanne; Macdonald, R. Loch; Farrokhyar, Forough; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mitchell A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain–body associations are essential in influencing outcome in patients with ruptured brain aneurysms. Thus far, there is scarce literature on such important relationships. Methods: The multicenter Tirilazad database (3551 patients) was used to create this clinical outcome prediction model in order to elucidate significant brain–body associations. Traditional binary logistic regression models were used. Results: Binary logistic regression main effects model included four statistically significant single prognostic variables, namely, neurological grade, age, stroke, and time to surgery. Logistic regression models demonstrated the significance of hypertension and liver disease in development of brain swelling, as well as the negative consequences of seizures in patients with a history of myocardial infarction and post-admission fever worsening neurological outcome. Conclusions: Using the aforementioned results generated from binary logistic regression models, we can identify potential patients who are in the high risk group of neurological deterioration. Specific therapies can be tailored to prevent these detriments, including treatment of hypertension, seizures, early detection and treatment of myocardial infarction, and prevention of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27583179

  15. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Avinash; Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  16. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  17. Critical care management of patients following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: recommendations from the Neurocritical Care Society's Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N; Bleck, Thomas P; Claude Hemphill, J; Menon, David; Shutter, Lori; Vespa, Paul; Bruder, Nicolas; Connolly, E Sander; Citerio, Giuseppe; Gress, Daryl; Hänggi, Daniel; Hoh, Brian L; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Le Roux, Peter; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Schmutzhard, Erich; Stocchetti, Nino; Suarez, Jose I; Treggiari, Miriam; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wolf, Stefan; Zipfel, Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an acute cerebrovascular event which can have devastating effects on the central nervous system as well as a profound impact on several other organs. SAH patients are routinely admitted to an intensive care unit and are cared for by a multidisciplinary team. A lack of high quality data has led to numerous approaches to management and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of rebleeding, but provide limited discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in the care of SAH patients. The Neurocritical Care Society organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of SAH to address this need. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. A jury of four experienced neurointensivists was selected for their experience in clinical investigations and development of practice guidelines. Recommendations were developed based on literature review using the GRADE system, discussion integrating the literature with the collective experience of the participants and critical review by an impartial jury. Recommendations were developed using the GRADE system. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based not only on the quality of the data but also tradeoffs and translation into practice. Strong consideration was given to providing guidance and recommendations for all issues faced in the daily management of SAH patients, even in the absence of high quality data. PMID:21773873

  18. High-Dose Simvastatin Is Effective in Preventing Cerebral Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Woong; Kang, Hee In; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Moon, Byung Gwan; Kim, Joo Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to assess the effect of high-dose simvastatin on cerebral vasospasm and its clinical outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Korean patients. Methods This study was designed as a prospective observational cohort study. Its subjects were aneurysmal SAH patients who had undergone aneurysm clipping or coiling. They were assigned to 1 of 3 groups : the 20 mg, 40 mg, and 80 mg simvastatin groups. The primary end-point was the occurrence of symptomatic vasospasm. The clinical outcome was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score after 1 month and 3 months. The risk factors of the development of vasospasm were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Results Ninety nine patients with aneurysmal SAH were treated and screened. They were sequentially assigned to the 20 mg (n=22), 40 mg (n=34), and 80 mg (n=31) simvastatin groups. Symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 36.4% of the 20 mg group, 8.8% of the 40 mg group, and 3.2% of the 80 mg group (p=0.003). The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that poor Hunt-Hess grades (OR=5.4 and 95% CI=1.09-26.62) and high-dose (80 mg) simvastatin (OR=0.09 and 95% CI=0.1-0.85) were independent factors of symptomatic vasospasm. The clinical outcomes did not show a significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion This study demonstrated that 80 mg simvastatin treatment was effective in preventing cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH, but did not improve the clinical outcome in Korean patients. PMID:26587185

  19. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  20. [Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on cerebral oxygenation, metabolism and oxidative stress in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Solodov, A A; Petrikov, S S; Klychnikova, E V; Tazina, E V; Krylov, V V; Godkov, M A; Khamidova, L T

    2013-01-01

    The development of cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to cerebral aneurysms rupture results in cerebral circulation disturbances. Application of normobaric hyperoxia can be an effective way for improving of oxygen delivery to injured brain tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess of normobaric hyperoxia influence on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and metabolism, oxidative stress and endogenous factors of vascular regulation in II critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture. Increase of FiO2 from 0.3 to 0.5 and 1.0 was accompanied with brain oxygen tension (PbrO2) increase and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen (O2ER) decrease. Application of normobaric hyperoxia had no effect on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial blood pressure and cerebral metabolism. The results obtained from patients with nontraumatic SAH showed an evident increase of oxidative stress which had a significant effect on vascular endothelial function, causing an imbalance in the endogenous regulation of vascular tone. Application of normobaric hyperoxia was not accompanied by an increase of free-radical processes in critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture.

  1. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  2. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  3. The AGTR1 gene A1166C polymorphism as a risk factor and outcome predictor of primary intracerebral and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Mateusz G; Golenia, Aleksandra; Turaj, Wojciech; Baird, Alison E; Moskala, Marek; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Slowik, Agnieszka; Pera, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Associations between the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene A1166C polymorphism and hypertension, aortic abdominal aneurysms (as a risk factor) as well as cardiovascular disorders (as a risk factor and an outcome predictor) have been demonstrated. We aimed to investigate the role of this polymorphism as risk factors and outcome predictors in primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). We have prospectively recruited 1078 Polish participants to the study: 261 PICH patients, 392 aSAH patients, and 425 unrelated control subjects. The A1166C AGTR1 gene polymorphism was studied using the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared with other ethnically different populations. The A1166C polymorphism was not associated with the risk of PICH or aSAH. Among the aSAH patients the AA genotype was associated with a good outcome, defined by a Glasgow Outcome Scale of 4 or 5 (p<0.02). The distribution of A1166C genotypes in our cohort did not differ from other white or other populations of European descent. In conclusion, we found an association between the A1166C AGTR1 polymorphism and outcome of aSAH patients, but not with the risk of PICH or aSAH. PMID:25168322

  4. Unilateral Acute Closed-Angle Glaucoma After Elective Lumbar Surgery Reveals Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms. A Case Report and Discussion on Workup of Differential Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Storey, Christopher; Menger, Richard; Hefner, Matthew; Keating, Patrick; Ahmed, Osama; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of our paper is to present a case of a rare complication of posterior lumbar surgery. Our patient presented for elective lumbar decompression, which was complicated by durotomy. She then developed sudden headache and right eye pain once upright on postoperative day 2. Then on postoperative day 3, she developed a dilated nonreactive pupil with extraocular movements intact. A computed tomography scan of the head was negative for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a possible right posterior communicating artery aneurysm. She was transferred to a tertiary center with a severe headache and a nonreactive pupil, raising concern for evolving third nerve palsy due to aneurysm. A cerebral angiogram was performed and showed multiple aneurysms. Aneurysm location did not explain the patient's symptoms, and ophthalmology was consulted. Elevated intraocular pressure was noted, and the patient was diagnosed with acute angle-closure glaucoma (AACG). Our patient was medically treated and subsequently underwent laser peripheral iridotomy. She has had improved vision and pupillary function at 1 month follow-up. The diagnosis is complicated by a durotomy, which led to cascade in the differential diagnosis to rule out intracranial pathology. Her age and home medications, which had sympathomimetic effects, placed her at increased risk, but lying prone in the dark under the drapes was likely the lead causative factor. In conclusion, a postoperative posterior spine patient with eye pain and changes in vision and pupils should be evaluated with AACG in mind due to the devastating consequences if left untreated or treatment is delayed.

  5. Risk of Hemorrhage in Combined Neuroform Stenting and Coil Embolization of Acutely Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jankowitz, B.; Thomas, A.J.; Vora, N.; Gupta, R.; Levy, E.; Yamamoto, J.; Kassam, A.; Gologorsky, Y.; Panapitiya, N.; Sandhu, E.; Crago, E.; Hricik, A.; Lee, K.; Gallek, M.; Jovin, T.; Horowitz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Stenting as adjuvant therapy for the coiling of acutely ruptured aneurysms remains controversial due to the necessity of anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications. We report our experience using the Neuroform stent in the management of 41 aneurysms in 40 patients over a period of three years. For aneurysms whose open surgical risk remains excessive with a morphology that would preclude complete embolization, the risks of stenting may be warranted. PMID:20557738

  6. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Aneurysms Basic Facts & Information Fill a balloon too full ... of what can happen when you have an aneurysm. Medically, when an artery “balloons,” or widens, it ...

  7. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/μL; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/μL; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/μL). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous

  8. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  9. Haemoglobin scavenging after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Durnford, A; Dunbar, J; Galea, J; Bulters, D; Nicoll, J A R; Boche, D; Galea, I

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and effective clearance of cell-free haemoglobin after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is important to prevent vasospasm and neurotoxicity and improve long-term outcome. Haemoglobin is avidly bound by haptoglobin, and the complex is cleared by CD163 expressed on the membrane surface of macrophages. We studied the kinetics of haemoglobin and haptoglobin in cerebrospinal fluid after SAH. We show that haemoglobin levels rise gradually after SAH. Haptoglobin levels rise acutely with aneurysmal rupture as a result of injection of blood into the subarachnoid space. Although levels decline as haemoglobin scavenging occurs, complete depletion of haptoglobin does not occur and levels start rising again, indicating saturation of CD163 sites available for haptoglobin-haemoglobin clearance. In a preliminary neuropathological study we demonstrate that meningeal CD163 expression is upregulated after SAH, in keeping with a proinflammatory state. However, loss of CD163 occurs in meningeal areas with overlying blood compared with areas without overlying blood. Becauses ADAM17 is the enzyme responsible for shedding membrane-bound CD163, its inhibition may be a potential therapeutic strategy after SAH.

  10. New clinical decision rule to exclude subarachnoid haemorrhage for acute headache: a prospective multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Akio; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Takeshi; Harada, Masahiro; Honda, Hideki; Mori, Yoshio; Hirose, Keika; Tanaka, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ensure good outcomes in the management of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), accurate prediction is crucial for initial assessment of patients presenting with acute headache. We conducted this study to develop a new clinical decision rule using only objectively measurable predictors to exclude SAH, offering higher specificity than the previous Ottawa SAH Rule while maintaining comparable sensitivity. Design Multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary-care emergency departments of five general hospitals in Japan from April 2011 to March 2014. Participants Eligible patients comprised 1781 patients aged >15 years with acute headache, excluding trauma or toxic causes and patients who presented in an unconscious state. Main outcome measures Definitive diagnosis of SAH was based on confirmation of SAH on head CT or lumbar puncture findings of non-traumatic red blood cells or xanthochromia. Results A total of 1561 patients were enrolled in this study, of whom 277 showed SAH. Using these enrolled patients, we reached a rule with mainly categorical predictors used in previous reports, called the ‘Ottawa-like rule’, offering 100% sensitivity when using any of age ≥40 years, neck pain or stiffness, altered level of consciousness or onset during exertion. Using the 1317 patients from whom blood samples were obtained, a new rule using any of systolic blood pressure >150 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure >90 mm Hg, blood sugar >115 mg/dL or serum potassium <3.9 mEq/L offered 100% sensitivity (95% CI 98.6% to 100%) and 14.5% specificity (12.5% to 16.9%), while the Ottawa-like rule showed the same sensitivity with a lower specificity of 8.8% (7.2% to 10.7%). Conclusions While maintaining equal sensitivity, our new rule seemed to offer higher specificity than the previous rules proposed by the Ottawa group. Despite the need for blood sampling, this method can reduce unnecessary head CT in patients with acute headache. Trial registration

  11. Microcatheter Looping Facilitates Access to Both the Acutely Angled Parent Artery and Cerebral Aneurysms for Effective Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Hui; Ye, Jian-Ya; Su, Xian-Hui; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Er-Wei; Han, Yong-Feng; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms with an acutely angled parent artery are difficult to access for coiling. This study aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of microcatheter looping for embolization of cerebral aneurysms with access difficulty. Ten patients (male:female=5:5) with cerebral aneurysms treated with the microcatheter looping technique were analyzed retrospectively. The parent artery formed an acute angle with the major artery in five aneurysms. The microcatheter was looped into a “α” loop for treatment in the anterior temporal artery aneurysm and a “U” loop in the remaining nine aneurysms. All ten aneurysms were successfully treated with the microcatheter looping technique. The microcatheter tip was successfully navigated into the aneurysm sac and remained stable throughout the embolization process. All aneurysms were occluded with total occlusion in five and near-total occlusion in five, and the parent artery remained patent in all cases. No complications occurred peri-procedurally. The Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in all patients before discharge. Follow-up angiography six to 12 months later revealed a good occlusion status of the aneurysms. The microcatheter looping technique is effective when the conventional embolization technique fails to treat cerebral aneurysms with difficult access especially when the parent artery forming an acute angle with the major artery exacerbates difficult access to the aneurysms. PMID:25496676

  12. [The relationship between aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and meteorological parameters based on a series of 236 French patients].

    PubMed

    Rué, M; Camiade, E; Jecko, V; Bauduer, F; Vignes, J-R

    2014-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a sudden and potentially severe event with mortality rates ranging between 24 and 30 % depending on the initial clinical condition. Studies have attempted to assess the possible influence of meteorological parameters on the occurrence of SAH. However, this idea remains very controversial and the results vary widely from one study to another. Our study is the second largest French series, and first performed in a homogeneous series of patients. The aim of our study was to attempt to establish a relationship between the weather (i.e.) temperature variations and daily variations of atmospheric pressure in the days before the onset of SAH and the same day and the occurrence of non-traumatic SAH in a homogeneous population of 236 patients from a single center, over a period of 7 years (2002 to 2008). This retrospective study does not suggest any relationship between the occurrence of SAH and meteorological data studied. Moreover, no relationship was observed between mean changes in temperature or pressure and the occurrence of SAH, that the day of the bleeding or the days preceding the SAH. However, a female predominance was observed and a relatively high mortality rate of 18.3 %. The distribution of the occurrence of an SAH was random. As it seems impossible to provide logistics and organization of care for non-traumatic SAH, the care system must remain vigilant throughout the year.

  13. Association between S100B Levels and Long-Term Outcome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pui Man Rosalind; Du, Rose

    2016-01-01

    S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), a well-studied marker for neurologic injury, has been suggested as a candidate for predicting outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. We performed a pooled analysis summarizing the associations between S100B protein in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with radiographic vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurologic deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) outcome. A literature search using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the EMBASE databases was performed to identify relevant studies published up to May 2015. The weighted Stouffer's Z method was used to perform a pooled analysis of outcome measures with greater than three studies. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. Higher serum S100B level was found to be associated with cerebral infarction as diagnosed by CT (padj = 3.1 x 10(-4)) and worse GOS outcome (padj = 5.5 x 10(-11)). There was no association found between serum and CSF S100B with radiographic vasospasm or DIND. S100B is a potential prognostic marker for aSAH outcome.

  14. Persistent Aneurysm Growth Following Pipeline Embolization Device Assisted Coiling of a Fusiform Vertebral Artery Aneurysm: A Word of Caution!

    PubMed Central

    Kerolus, Mena; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2015-01-01

    The complex morphology of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms makes them one of the most challenging lesions treated by neurointerventionists. Different management strategies in the past included parent vessel occlusion with or without extra-intracranial bypass surgery and endovascular reconstruction by conventional stents. Use of flow diversion has emerged as a promising alternative option with various studies documenting its efficacy and safety. However, there are various caveats associated with use of flow diversion in patients with fusiform vertibrobasilar aneurysms especially in patients presenting with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report a rare case of persistent aneurysmal growth after coiling and placement of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) for SAH from a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. As consequences of aneurysm rupture can be devastating especially in patients with a prior SAH, the clinical relevance of recognizing and understanding such patterns of failure cannot be overemphasized as highlighted in the present case. PMID:25763295

  15. Preventive effect of continuous cisternal irrigation with magnesium sulfate solution on angiographic cerebral vasospasms associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro; Esaki, Takanori; Nakao, Yasuaki; Tokugawa, Joji; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Although cerebral vasospasm (CV) is one of the most important predictors for the outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), no treatment has yet been established for this condition. This study investigated the efficacy of continuous direct infusion of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solution into the intrathecal cistern in patients with an aneurysmal SAH. METHODS An SAH caused by a ruptured aneurysm was identified on CT scans within 72 hours after SAH onset. All patients were treated by surgical clipping and randomized into 2 groups: a control group of patients undergoing a standard treatment and a magnesium (Mg) group of patients additionally undergoing continuous infusion of 5 mmol/L MgSO4 solution for 14 days. The Mg(2+) concentrations in serum and CSF were recorded daily. Neurological examinations were performed by intensive care clinicians. Delayed cerebral ischemia was monitored by CT or MRI. To assess the effect of the Mg treatment on CV, the CVs were graded on the basis of the relative degree of constriction visible on cerebral angiograms taken on Day 10 after the SAH, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed daily to measure blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Neurological outcomes and mortality rates were evaluated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Scale at 3 months after SAH onset. RESULTS Seventy-three patients admitted during the period of April 2008 to March 2013 were eligible and enrolled in this study. Three patients were excluded because of violation of protocol requirements. The 2 groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, or Fisher grade. In the Mg group, the Mg(2+) concentration in CSF gradually increased from Day 4 after initiation of the continuous MgSO4 intrathecal administration. No such increase was observed in the control group. No significant changes in the serum Mg(2+) levels were observed for 14 days, and no

  16. Endocrine function following acute SAH.

    PubMed

    Vespa, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes may occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in hypopituitarism. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify articles with English-language abstracts published between 1980 and March 2011, which addressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis insufficiency and hormone replacement. A total of 18 observational and prospective, randomized studies were selected for this review. Limited data are available, evaluating pituitary effects during the acute stage after subarachnoid hemorrhage, with inconsistent results being reported. Overall, after acute subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortisol levels may initially be supranormal, decreasing toward normal levels over time. During the months to years after subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary deficiency may occur in one out of three patients. Limited data suggest modest outcome benefits with fludrocortisone and no benefit or harm from corticosteroids. PMID:21809154

  17. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  18. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  19. Vernet's syndrome caused by large mycotic aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery after acute otitis media--case report.

    PubMed

    Amano, Mizuki; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Shunji; Ashizawa, Kei; Oguni, Eiichi; Saito, Atsushi; Nakai, Yasunobu; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Abe, Takashi; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    An 85-year-old man presented with a rare large aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) due to acute otitis media manifesting as Vernet's syndrome 2 weeks after the diagnosis of right acute otitis media. Angiography of the right extracranial ICA demonstrated an irregularly shaped large aneurysm with partial thrombosis. The aneurysm was treated by proximal ICA occlusion using endovascular coils. The ICA mycotic aneurysm was triggered by acute otitis media, and induced Vernet's syndrome as a result of direct compression to the jugular foramen. Extracranial ICA aneurysms due to focal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lower cranial nerve palsy, although the incidence is thought to be very low.

  20. [Ruptured fenestrated aneurysm of vertebral artery union successfully treated by endovascular surgery with GDC].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Mitsuhisa; Sugiu, Kenji; Ohmoto, Takashi; Saijyo, Toshikazu; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki

    2002-08-01

    It is difficult to operate on ruptured basilar artery aneurysms in the acute phase because of the anatomical complexity, brain swelling, patients' medical condition, etc., but because there is some risk of rebleeding and/or vasospasm if surgery is delayed, early surgery is recommended. We encountered a rare case of ruptured fenestrated aneurysm of the vertebral artery (VA) union, treated it safely by endovascular surgery with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) in the acute phase, and obtained a good outcome after intensive care. We therefore conclude that endovascular surgery with GDCs is a first-line therapy for fenestrated aneurysms of the VA union in the acute phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fenestrated aneurysms of the VA union are very rare, and long-term follow-up is mandatory.

  1. Pure subdural haematoma caused by rupture of middle cerebral artery aneurysm: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie; Sun, Hu; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Liu, Wei-Xian; Shen, Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Pure subdural haematoma (occurring without detectable subarachnoid haemorrhage) caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture is uncommon and is usually associated with delayed diagnosis and treatment. We describe the case of a 43-year-old man who presented with ongoing headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed subdural haematoma in the left fronto-temporo-parietal region, without subarachnoid haemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography showed an aneurysm measuring ≤ 5 mm in diameter, arising from the distal region of the left middle cerebral artery. During hospitalization, an acute change in mental status accompanied by slurred speech and narcolepsy prompted an emergency CT scan. This revealed an enlargement of the subdural haematoma. The patient underwent an emergency craniotomy, during which a large amount of bloody fluid was evacuated, and the aneurysm was coagulated and resected. The patient had a good outcome without neurological deficit. The incidence, mechanisms and treatment of this condition are discussed.

  2. An Unusual Aneurysm of the Main Pulmonary Artery Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kholeif, Mona A.; El Tahir, Mohamed Kholeif, Yasser A.; El Watidy, Ahmed

    2006-10-15

    A 70-year old man presented with retrosternal chest pain. His electrocardiogram showed nonspecific T wave changes. Cardiac-specific troponin I (cTnI) was elevated. His condition was managed as acute coronary syndrome, following which he had two minor episodes of hemoptysis. A CT pulmonary angiogram showed no evidence of pulmonary embolism, but a large mass lesion was seen in the mediastinum. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI demonstrated a large solid mass, arising from the right ventricular outflow tract and causing compression of the main pulmonary artery (MPA). The differential diagnosis included pericardial and myocardial tumors and clotted aneurysm of the MPA. At surgery, a clotted aneurysmal sac was identified originating from the MPA and the defect was healed. Aneurysms of the MPA are rare. They most commonly present with dyspnea and chest pain. Compression of surrounding structures produces protean manifestations. A high index of suspicion coupled with imaging modalities establishes the diagnosis. Blunt trauma to the chest, at the time of an accident 4 years previously, may explain this aneurysm. The patient's presentation with chest pain was probably due to compression and/or stretching of surrounding structures. Coronary artery compression simulating acute coronary syndrome has been documented in the literature. The rise in cTnI may have been due to right ventricular strain, as a result of right ventricular outflow obstruction by the aneurysm. This has not been reported previously in the literature. The saccular morphology and narrow neck of the aneurysm predisposed to stagnation leading to clotting of the lumen and healing of the tear, which caused the diagnostic difficulty.

  3. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  4. Microsurgical anatomy of the infratentorial trabecular membranes and subarachnoid cisterns.

    PubMed

    Vinas, F C; Dujovny, M; Fandino, R; Chavez, V

    1996-04-01

    The understanding of the anatomy of the subarachnoid cisterns and trabecular membranes is of paramount importance in the surgical treatment of pathology of the posterior fossa. Aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and some tumors should be approached through the subarachnoid space. The subarachnoid cisterns provide natural pathways to approach neurovascular and cranial nerve structures. The microsurgical anatomy of the infratentorial subarachnoid cisterns was studied in twenty adult brains, using the 'immersion technique'. Air was injected into the subarachnoid cisterns and brains were dissected under the operative microscope. Six main compartmental trabecular membranes were identified in the infratentorial level. They divide the subarachnoid space into six cisterns. Cisternal divisions and the disposition of the trabecular membranes were closely related to the vascular divisional patterns of the principal arteries. Thorough knowledge of the microsurgical anatomy of the subarachnoid space will aid neurosurgeons during the surgical approach of many vascular and tumoral lesions located in the posterior fossa.

  5. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  6. Urea for treatment of acute SIADH in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia occurring as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The efficacy and safety of urea as treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia has not been reported in this population. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to our department for nontraumatic SAH between January 2003 and December 2008 (n = 368). All patients with SIADH-induced hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 135 mEq/L, urine sodium > 20 mEq/L, and osmolality > 200 mOsm/kg; absence of overt dehydration or hypovolemia; no peripheral edema or renal failure; no history of adrenal or thyroid disease) routinely received urea per os when hyponatremia was associated with clinical deterioration or remained less than 130 mEq/L despite saline solution administration. Results Forty-two patients developed SIADH and were treated with urea. Urea was started after a median of 7 (IQR, 5–10) days and given orally at doses of 15–30 g tid or qid for a median of 5 (IQR, 3–7) days. The median plasma sodium increase over the first day of treatment was 3 (IQR, 1–6) mEq/L. Hyponatremia was corrected in all patients, with median times to Na+ >130 and >135 mEq/L of 1 (IQR, 1–2) and 3 (IQR, 2–4) days, respectively. Urea was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were reported. Conclusions Oral urea is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia in SAH patients. PMID:22647340

  7. Bilingual aphasia due to spontaneous acute subdural haematoma from a ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Vajramani, Girish V; Akrawi, Hawar; McCarthy, Rosaleen A; Gray, William P

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of spontaneous subdural haematoma due to ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm, presenting with bilingual aphasia and illustrating differential language recovery. A 62-year-old right-handed bilingual gentleman, with a diagnosis of infective endocarditis, developed headache and became expressively aphasic in the English language. Three days later he was receptively and expressively aphasic in both English and Arabic. Cranial MRI scans showed a left-sided acute subdural haematoma with mass effect and midline shift. Contrast CT brain scans showed an enhancing speck adjacent to the clot and cerebral angiogram confirmed a distal middle cerebral artery aneurysm. He underwent image-guided craniotomy, evacuation of the subdural haematoma and excision of the aneurysm. Histopathological examination was consistent with an infectious intracranial aneurysm. Postoperatively his aphasia did not improve immediately. He had widened pulse pressure due to severe aortic regurgitation, confirmed on echocardiography. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair, following which his aphasia recovered gradually. Initially the recovery of his language was limited to Arabic. About a week later he recovered his English language as well. At 3-year follow-up he is doing well and has no neurological deficits. His aphasia has recovered completely. The present case is unique because of (a) presence of pure subdural haematoma, and (b) the differential susceptibility and recovery of native (L1) and acquired language (L2) in presence of a common pathology. The neurology of language in a bilingual is analysed and possible mechanisms discussed.

  8. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  9. [A Case of Ruptured Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Associated with Acute Subdural Hematoma, Extending from the Interhemispheric Space to the Posterior Fossa].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Yuhtaka; Yoshimura, Shouta; Somagawa, Chika; Hiu, Takeshi; Ono, Tomonori; Ushijima, Ryujirou; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a sudden severe headache without a history of head trauma. CT and MRI revealed an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) extending from the right interhemispheric space to the posterior fossa bilaterally, with a small amount of subarachnoid hemorrhage that was predominantly localized to the left side of the basal cistern. CT angiogram demonstrated a long protruding ruptured aneurysm at the junction of the right internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries (IC/PC AN) with a posteroinferior projection, associated with a small bleb located near the tentorial edge close to the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process, for which she received clipping surgery. Though rare, IC/PC AN could cause pure or nearly pure ASDH in the above-mentioned distribution. Therefore, in patients with such ASDH, especially without a history of head injury or precise information regarding the situation at the time of onset, urgent imaging evaluation and early intervention are essential to prevent devastating re-rupture events. PMID:27270151

  10. Endovascular coiling of a ruptured basilar apex aneurysm with associated pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yanamadala, Vijay; Lin, Ning; Zarzour, Hekmat; Frerichs, Kai U; Walcott, Brian P; Thomas, Ajith J; Puri, Ajit S

    2014-09-01

    Acute intracranial pseudoaneurysms secondary to aneurysmal rupture are a rare entity with no clear evidence-based guidelines for treatment to our knowledge. There are numerous examples of successful treatment of pseudoaneurysms both surgically and endovascularly, the latter mainly within the anterior circulation. Risk of pseudoaneurysm rupture in the acute state during endovascular procedures with subsequent difficulty in controlling the bleeding without sacrificing the feeder artery has led to some reservation in using endovascular treatments more broadly. We report a rare case of a 52-year-old-woman who presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage and was found to have a ruptured 5 mm × 8 mm bi-lobulated basilar apex aneurysm on CT angiography. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated an associated anterior pseudoaneurysm that was formed secondary to the aneurysm rupture. The true aneurysm was successfully coiled with careful avoidance of the pseudoaneurysmal sac. Pseudoaneurysms are frequently identified for the first time during digital subtraction angiography. Recognizing their presence is essential for treatment planning. Acute pseudoaneurysms associated with true aneurysmal rupture can be safely and successfully treated by endovascular coiling of the true aneurysm. Care must be taken to avoid manipulation of the pseudoaneurysmal sac during the embolization.

  11. Acute coronary syndrome in Behcet’s disease caused by a coronary artery aneurysm and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Bahar; Özen, Gülsen; Tekayev, Nazar; Gerçek, Şeyma; Direskeneli, Haner

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multisystemic vasculitis that can involve vessels of all sizes and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers with variable manifestations affecting the skin, eyes, and central nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Vascular involvement in BD is reported to be up to 40% in different series. The abdominal and thoracic aorta and pulmonary and femoral arteries are the most commonly involved arteries. However coronary arteries are rarely affected. Herein, we present a 29-year-old man who was consulted with progressive severe chest pain of 3 days in duration to our clinic. The patient was diagnosed with BD with mucocutaneous symptoms and a positive pathergy test 1 year ago and was in clinical remission for the last 6 months. At the first evaluation in the emergency department, the patient’s vital signs were stable, whereas he had elevated troponin T levels with a normal electrocardiogram and hypokinetic areas in the apex of the heart in the echocardiography. Conventional and computed tomography coronary angiography revealed aneurysms and intramural thrombosis in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. Although ischemic symptoms and signs improved with anticoagulant and antiaggregant therapies, coronary aneurysms were observed to increase in size. Immunosuppressive (IS) treatment was started with pulse intravenous corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Because of the high re-stenosis risk, stents were not applied to the affected vessels during the acute thrombosis period. During routine investigations, an in situ pulmonary thrombosis was also detected bilaterally in the peripheral pulmonary arteries. In conclusion, coronary artery aneurysm is a rare and poor prognostic manifestation of BD. The treatment protocol for these aneurysms is not well clarified. IS therapies are definitely indicated, but the role of anticoagulants and invasive vascular interventions is controversial.

  12. Usefulness of Motor-Evoked Potentials Monitoring for Neurosurgical Treatment of an Unusual Distal Anterior Choroidal Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jecko, Vincent; Eimer, Sandrine; Penchet, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    A 35 years old woman presented with an acute meningeal syndrome following an intra ventricular haemorrhage without subarachnoid haemorrhage. The angiography demonstrated a 6 mm partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm at the plexal point of the right anterior choroidal artery (AChoA). It was surgically approached inside the ventricle through a trans-temporal corticotomy. The aneurysm was excised after distal exclusion of the feeding artery under motor-evoked potentials monitoring. Of the 19 cases of distal AChoA aneurysm neurosurgical treatment, this is the only one performed under electrophysiology monitoring, a simple and safe method to detect and prevent motor tract ischemia. We discuss this rare case, along with a comprehensible review of the literature of the previous surgical cases of distal AChoA aneurysms. PMID:27446526

  13. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with giant coronary aneurysm due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Mongiovì, Maurizio; Alaimo, Annalisa; Vernuccio, Federica; Pieri, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of acute myocardial infarction in an 8-year-old boy with a history of Kawasaki disease and giant coronary aneurysms in the right and left coronary arteries. We performed coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention 4 hours after the onset of symptoms. This case suggests that primary percutaneous coronary intervention might be safe and effective in the long-term treatment of acute myocardial infarction due to coronary sequelae of Kawasaki.

  14. A hypothesis on possible neurochemical mechanisms of action of cervical spinal cord stimulation in prevention and treatment of cerebral arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, D; Slavin, K V

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with the high incidence of development of cerebral vasospasm that results in morbidity and mortality due to delayed cerebral ischemia. So far there are no consistently effective therapies for treatment of vasospasm in patients suffering from SAH. It is well known that cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can induce vasodilatation and increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). Based on the experiments in animals and the studies in humans, we have proposed the possibility to use SCS as a therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. However, the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS in this regard are poorly understood. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of vasospasm after SAH may provide insight into the role of SCS in such conditions. We hypothesize that effect of SCS on vasodilatation may be related to modulation of activity of phosphodiesterases 5 (PDE-5) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), resulting in enhancement of nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, which may help prevent and/or treat vasospasm after SAH. Further investigations on the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS would be necessary to support this hypothesis. PMID:26141634

  15. Expanding Endovascular Therapy of Very Small Ruptured Aneurysms with the 1.5-mm Coil

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh N.; Masoud, Hesham; Tarlov, Nicholas; Holsapple, James; Chin, Lawrence S.; Norbash, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Very small ruptured aneurysms (≤3 mm) demonstrate a significant risk for procedural rupture with endovascular therapy. Since 2007, 1.5-mm-diameter coils have been available (Micrus, Microvention, and ev3), allowing neurointerventionalists the opportunity to offer patients with very small aneurysms endovascular treatment. In this study, we review the clinical and angiographic outcome of patients with very small ruptured aneurysms treated with the 1.5-mm coil. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study in which we examined consecutive ruptured very small aneurysms treated with coil embolization at a single institution. The longest linear aneurysm was recorded, even if the first coil was sized to a smaller transverse diameter. Very small aneurysms were defined as ≤3 mm. Descriptive results are presented. Results From July 2007 to March 2015, 81 aneurysms were treated acutely with coils in 78 patients presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. There were 5 patients with 3-mm aneurysms, of which the transverse diameter was ≤2 mm in 3 patients. In all 5 patients, a balloon was placed for hemostatic prophylaxis in case of rupture, and a single 1.5-mm coil was inserted for aneurysm treatment without complication. Complete aneurysm occlusion was achieved in 1 patient, residual neck in 2, and residual aneurysm in 2 patients. Aneurysm recanalization was present in 2 patients with an anterior communicating artery aneurysm; a recoiling attempt was unsuccessful in 1 of these 2 patients due to inadvertent displacement and distal coil embolization, but subsequent surgical clipping was successful. Another patient was retreated by surgical clipping for a residual wide-neck carotid terminus aneurysm. One patient died of ventriculitis 3 weeks after presentation; all 4 other patients had an excellent outcome with no rebleed at follow-up (mean 21 months, range 1-62). Conclusion The advent of the 1.5-mm coil may be used in the endovascular treatment of patients with very

  16. Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis in Venous Aneurysm following Closure of the Chronic Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) commonly results from an unrecognized vascular injury. In this report, there were two cases of chronic traumatic AVF of the legs with a long history of stab (case 1) and shotgun wounds (case 2). Both cases presented with varicose veins together with hyperpigmentation around the ankle of the affected leg. Angiograms showed a single large AVF in case 1, whereas, in case 2, there was a single large AVF together with multiple small AVFs. In both cases large venous aneurysm was found next to a large AVF. An open surgical AVF closure for the large AVF was performed in case 1 successfully, but patient developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in a large venous aneurysm. In the second case, in order to prevent DVT, only closure of the large AVF was performed, which preserved arterial flow into the venous aneurysm. Case 2 did not have acute DVT. This report raised the concern about acute DVTs in venous aneurysms following the closure of chronic traumatic AVF in terms of prevention. Also chronic traumatic AVF is commonly due to misdiagnosis in the initial treatment, so complete and serial physical examinations in penetrating vascular injury patients are of paramount importance. PMID:27293948

  17. [Giant intracranial aneurysm in three years old boy: case report].

    PubMed

    de Tella, Osvaldo Inácio; Crosera, João Francisco; Herculano, Marco Antonio; de Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio

    2006-06-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are rare in the pediatric age group and differ from adults' aneurysms in size, localization and incidence. We report a 3-year-old boy with giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was submitted to surgical treatment and the postoperative period was uneventful.

  18. Roller coaster-associated subarachnoid hemorrhage--report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Rutsch, Sebastian; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Meckel, Stephan; Reinhard, Matthias

    2012-04-15

    The most common neurological injuries associated with roller coaster rides are subdural hematoma and cervical artery dissection. We report two cases of roller-coaster associated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 40-year-old healthy man developed a strong, holocephalic headache during a roller coaster ride. SAH Hunt & Hess grade II and Fisher grade 3 was diagnosed. An underlying aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 41-year-old female (smoker, otherwise healthy) experienced a sudden, strong headache and diplopia during a roller coaster ride. A perimesencephalic SAH (Hunt & Hess grade II, Fisher grade 3) was disclosed by a CT scan. No aneurysm was detected on angiography. Both patients were discharged without neurological disability. In conclusion, SAH is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis in cases of acute headache during roller coaster rides. Both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal perimesencephalic SAH can occur. A combination of mechanical factors and excessive blood pressure rises in vulnerable persons is discussed. PMID:22177088

  19. Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Thomas, Cheddhi; Engler, John; Shapiro, Maksim; Becske, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms is a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that presents unique diagnostic challenges owing to a nuanced clinical presentation. Here, we report on the diagnosis and management of the first known case of an isolated PSA aneurysm in the context of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. A 53-year-old male presented to an outside institution with acute bilateral lower extremity paralysis 9 days after admission for recurrent cellulitis. Early magnetic resonance imaging was read as negative and repeat imaging 15 days after presentation revealed SAH and a compressive spinal subdural hematoma. Angiography identified a PSA aneurysm at T9, as well as other areas suspicious for inflammatory or post-hemorrhagic reactive changes. The patient underwent a multilevel laminectomy for clot evacuation and aneurysm resection to prevent future hemorrhage and to establish a diagnosis. The postoperative course was complicated by medical issues and led to the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis that may have predisposed the patient to aneurysm development. Literature review reveals greater mortality for cervical lesions than thoracolumbar lesions and that the presence of meningitic symptoms portents better functional outcome than symptoms of cord compression. The outcome obtained in this case is consistent with outcomes reported in the literature. PMID:27114966

  20. Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage with a positive angiographic finding: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Ahmad; Numminen, Jussi; Rahul, Raj; Järveläinen, Juha; Niemelä, Mika

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage cases are reported as negative-finding etiologies. Recently, high-resolution images allowed us to overcome the previous difficulty of finding the source of bleeding, which underlies the concept of a "negative finding". We discovered a venous etiology, hidden behind the tip of the basilar artery; namely, the lateral pontine vein. Here, we review the literature on perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and on venous aneurysm. We highlight this type of aneurysm as a candidate source of perimesencephalic hemorrhage. This case may change our way of dealing with what we have termed a negative finding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27106848

  1. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  2. Controversies in epidemiology of intracranial aneurysms and SAH.

    PubMed

    Korja, Miikka; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is the most common cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which is a life-threatening acute cerebrovascular event that typically affects working-age people. The exact prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is unknown, but at least one in 20 to 30 adults is likely to carry an asymptomatic UIA. Approximately one quarter of these UIAs rupture in a lifetime. Complex methodological challenges in conducting studies of epidemiology and risk factors for UIAs and SAH might have led to conclusions being drawn on the basis of epidemiological data of variable quality. We believe that, as a result, misconceptions about UIAs and SAH may have arisen. In this Perspectives article, we discuss three possible misconceptions about the epidemiology of UIAs and SAH, and suggest how the quality of future research could be improved. PMID:26670298

  3. Expanding giant right coronary artery aneurysm: an acute need for new management strategies.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Anurag; Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sethi, Ankur; Pancholy, Samir B

    2014-01-01

    Angiography use has become increasingly common worldwide. Coronary artery aneurysm may be an incidental finding during angiography. Occasionally it might be symptomatic or may become symptomatic over the course of time. Rupture of aneurysm may lead to disastrous complications. Here we present a case in which aneurysm was asymptomatic but surgical intervention was done because of rapid increase in the size of aneurysm. This is to drive home the point that timely surgical intervention is instrumental in preventing complications associated with possible rupture of the aneurysm.

  4. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25355741

  5. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25361560

  6. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: epidemiology, social impact and a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Fàbregas Julià, N; Rama-Maceiras, P; Hernández-Palazón, J; Rubio Romero, R; Carmona Aurioles, J

    2010-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, is a worldwide problem, representing personal tragedy, great social and economic consequences, and a heavy burden on the health care system. Estimated to be responsible for up to 10% of mortality in industrialized countries, cerebrovascular disease also affects individuals who are still in the workforce, with consequent loss of productive years. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a type of cerebrovascular accident that leads to around 5% of all strokes. SAH is most often due to trauma but may also be spontaneous, in which case the cause may be a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (80%) or arteriovenous malformation or any other abnormality of the blood or vessels (20%). Although both the diagnosis and treatment of aneurysmal SAH has improved in recent years, related morbidity and mortality remains high: 50% of patients die from the initial hemorrhage or later complications. If patients whose brain function is permanently damaged are added to the count, the percentage of cases leading to severe consequences rises to 70%. The burden of care of patients who are left incapacitated by SAH falls to the family or to private and public institutions. The economic cost is considerable and the loss of quality of life for both the patient and the family is great. Given the magnitude of this problem, the provision of adequate prophylaxis is essential; also needed are organizational models that aim to reduce mortality as well as related complications. Aneurysmal SAH is a condition which must be approached in a coordinated, multidisciplinary way both during the acute phase and throughout rehabilitation in order to lower the risk of unwanted outcomes.

  7. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  8. Complicated Azygos Vein Aneurysm in an Infant Presenting with Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Song, Jinyoung; Huh, June; Kang, I-Seok; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2016-03-01

    Azygos vein aneurysm is a rare cause of mediastinal mass. Most cases present as an incidental finding on imaging modalities, but in few cases the thrombosis in the aneurysm leads to pulmonary thromboembolism, which may require surgical resection. We present a case where, for the first time, a case of a complicated azygos vein aneurysm was diagnosed in infancy, which required surgical resection. PMID:27014359

  9. Successful coil embolization of a ruptured basilar artery aneurysm in a child with leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shihori; Maehara, Taketoshi; Mukawa, Maki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Nemoto, Shigeru; Ono, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kikuo

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population compared to adults. This has incited considerable discussion on how to treat children with this condition. Here, we report a child with a ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 12-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and accompanying abdominal candidiasis after chemotherapy suddenly complained of a severe headache and suffered consciousness disturbance moments later. Computed tomography scans and cerebral angiography demonstrated acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by saccular basilar artery aneurysm rupture. External ventricular drainage was performed immediately. Because the patient was in severe condition and did not show remarkable signs of central nervous system infection in cerebrospinal fluid studies, we applied endovascular treatment for the ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm, which was successfully occluded with coils. The patient recovered without new neurological deficits after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Recent reports indicate that both endovascular and microsurgical techniques can be used to effectively treat ruptured cerebral aneurysms in pediatric patients. A minimally invasive endovascular treatment was effective in the present case, but long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm the efficiency of endovascular treatment for children with ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysms.

  10. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  11. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  12. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    about $7,500 higher than surgical clipping. Assuming that the total number of intracranial aneurysm repairs in Ontario increases to 750 in the fiscal year of 2007, and assuming that up to 60% (450 cases) of these will be repaired by coil embolization, the difference in device costs for the 450 cases (including a 15% recurrence rate) would be approximately $3.8 million. This figure does not include capital costs (e.g. $3 million for an angiosuite), additional human resources required, or costs of follow-up. The increase in expenditures associated with coil embolization may be offset partially, by shorter operating room times and hospitalization stays for endovascular repair of unruptured aneurysms; however, the impact of these cost savings is probably not likely to be greater than 25% of the total outlay since the majority of cases involve ruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, the recent growth in aneurysm repair has predominantly been in the area of coil embolization presumably for patients for whom surgical clipping would not be advised; therefore, no offset of surgical clipping costs could be applied in such cases. For ruptured aneurysms, downstream cost savings from endovascular repair are likely to be minimal even though the savings for individual cases may be substantial due to lower perioperative complications for endovascular aneurysm repair. Guidelines The two Guidance documents issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (UK) in 2005 support the use of coil embolization for both unruptured and ruptured (SAH) intracranial aneurysms, provided that procedures are in place for informed consent, audit, and clinical governance, and that the procedure is performed in specialist units with expertise in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Conclusion For people in good clinical condition following subarachnoid hemorrhage from an acute ruptured intracranial aneurysm suitable for either surgical clipping or endovascular repair, coil embolization

  13. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  14. True mycotic aneurysm in a patient with gonadotropinoma after trans-sphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Radotra, Bishan Das; Salunke, Praveen; Parthan, Girish; Dutta, Pinaki; Vyas, Sameer; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged antibiotic use, and intrathecal injections are known risk factors for the development of invasive aspergillosis. Central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis can manifest in many forms, including mycotic aneurysm formation. The majority of the mycotic aneurysms presents with subarachnoid hemorrhage after rupture and are associated with high mortality. Only 3 cases of true mycotic aneurysms have been reported following trans-sphenoidal surgery. Case Description: A 38-year-old man was admitted with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma for which he underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery. Three weeks later, he presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and meningitis. He was treated with intrathecal and intravenous antibiotics, stress dose of glucocorticoids, and lumbar drain. The defect in the sphenoid bone was closed endoscopically. After 3 weeks of therapy, he suddenly became unresponsive, and computed tomography of the head showed subarachnoid hemorrhage. He succumbed to illness on the next day, and a limited autopsy of the brain was performed. The autopsy revealed extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysmal dilatation, thrombosis of the basilar artery (BA), multiple hemorrhagic infarcts in the midbrain, and pons. Histopathology of the BA revealed the loss of internal elastic lamina and septate hyphae with an acute angle branching on Grocott's methenamine silver stain, conforming to the morphology of Aspergillus. Conclusion: The possibility of intracranial fungal infection should be strongly considered in any patient receiving intrathecal antibiotics who fails to improve in 1–2 weeks, and frequent CSF culture for fungi should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Since CSF culture has poor sensitivity in the diagnosis of fungal infections of CNS; empirical institution of antifungal therapy may be considered in this scenario. PMID:26759738

  15. Outcomes of Stent-assisted Coil Embolization of Wide-necked Intracranial Aneurysms Using the Solitaire™ AB Neurovascular Remodeling Device

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study presents our experience with respect to the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients treated with stent-assisted coil embolization using Solitaire™ AB stents. Materials and Methods From March 2011 to December 2014, 50 patients with 55 wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms were evaluated. Four patients presented with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. Stent deployment was performed with a standard coiling procedure in 49 aneurysms. Three patients underwent bailout stenting, 2 patients were treated by temporary stenting and one patient was treated only by stenting without coiling for dissecting aneurysm. Results Successful placement of the Solitaire AB stent was achieved in all the cases. Based on the postprocedural angiographic results, a Raymond 1 was obtained in 32 (59%) of 54 aneurysms, excluded by one case of dissecting aneurysm, and a Raymond 2 in 13 (24%), and a Raymond 3 in 9 (17%). There was one thromboembolic (2%) and three hemorrhagic complications (6%). However, procedure-related morbidity or mortality was not found. Annual follow-up angiographic results from the embolization were obtained in 40 (74.1%) of 54 cases. These results were represented as Raymond 1 in 27 (67.5%), class 2 in 9 (22.5%), and class 3 in 4 (10%) cases. Angiographic improvement associated with progressive thrombosis of the aneurysm was obtained in 10 aneurysms. Four aneurysms were recanalized without requiring additional treatment. In-stent stenosis was found in one aneurysm, but stent migration was not seen on follow-up angiography. Conclusion Stent-assisted coil embolization using the Solitaire AB stent for treating wide-necked and/or complex intracranial aneurysms was found to be safe and effective immediately post-embolization and after follow-up. Long-term follow-up will be required to identify the effect of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rates. PMID:27066440

  16. Intrasplenic Arterial Aneurysms during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abu-khalaf, Mahmoud M. S.; Al-Ameer, Sokiyna M.; Smadi, Moath M.; Qatawneh, Ayman; Smara, Osama A.; Hadidy, Azmy T.

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms account for about 60% of all visceral aneurysms. Pregnancy is a risk factor for splenic artery aneurysms rupture with high maternal mortality and fetal loss. Intrasplenic arterial aneurysms are extremely rare and have not been reported to be associated with pregnancy. This report presents a 34-year-old woman during the second trimester, admitted with severe left upper quadrant and left shoulder pain. She had two uncomplicated intrasplenic aneurysms. Splenectomy was done. She delivered a full term healthy girl. This is the first report of acute abdomen during pregnancy caused by intrasplenic artery aneurysms with maternal and fetal survival. PMID:25810934

  17. Influence of Acute Jugular Vein Compression on the Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, Pial Artery Pulsation and Width of Subarachnoid Space in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Winklewski, Pawel J.; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. Methods Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19–30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO2 was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT) and swayed to the back (initial) position. Results In the first group (n = 10) during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP) decreased (−17.6% and −17.9%, respectively) and CBFV increased (+35.0%), while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%). In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22) cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively), while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (−15.5% and −9.0%, respectively). End-tidal CO2 remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = −0.74). Conclusions Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH.

  19. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from a Thoracic Radicular Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Methamphetamine and Synthetic Cannabinoid Abuse: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Krisht, Khaled M.; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid “Spice.” He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2–3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH. PMID:24436861

  20. [Pathology of the cerebrospinal fluid tract after subarachnoid hemorrhages (the x-ray and radiological aspect)].

    PubMed

    Filatov, Iu M; Torbotrias, N L; Shcherbakova, E Ia; Snigirev, V S; Kulakova, S V

    1993-01-01

    The authors examined the semiotics of hydrocephalus occurring after subarachnoidal hemorrhages (SAH) from arterial aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations to provide pathogenetic evidence for surgical or conservative hydrocephalus. The spinal fluid tract was examined in 44 patients after SAH by computed tomography and radionuclide cysternomyelography using 99mTc. Variability was found in the radiological semiotics of open internal hydrocephalus. Radiological studies revealed frequently open internal hydrocephalus in patients with arterial aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations without subarachnoidal hemorrhages. The radiological semiotics of open hydrocephalus after SAH determines both morphological changes of the spinal fluid tract and liquorodynamic disturbances.

  1. Coil embolization of ruptured frontopolar artery aneurysm: case report.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Cicuendez, Marta; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Navia, Pedro; Lagares, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysms are infrequent. The most common location is at the bifurcation of the pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. Cerebral artery anomalies can sometimes, at least partially, explain aneurysm formation in less common locations in relation to hemodynamic stress caused on the vascular wall. We report a very rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured frontopolar artery aneurysm as a part of an anomalous anterior cerebral artery complex that was, for the first time, treated with endovascular coiling.

  2. Comprehensive Overview of Contemporary Management Strategies for Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Amitoz; Nimjee, Shahid M; Agrawal, Abhishek; Zhang, Jonathan; Diaz, Orlando; Zomorodi, Ali R; Smith, Tony; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric; Klucznik, Richard P; Ferrell, Andrew; Golshani, Kiarash; Stieg, Philip E; Britz, Gavin W

    2015-10-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains an important health issue in the United States. Despite recent improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral aneurysms, the mortality rate following aneurysm rupture. In those patients who survive, up to 50% are left severely disabled. The goal of preventing the hemorrhage or re-hemorrhage can only be achieved by successfully excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. This article is a comprehensive review by contemporary vascular neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiolgists on the modern management of cerebral aneurysms.

  3. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Raz, Guy M; Stamou, Sotiris C

    2014-06-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her echo showed ejection fraction improvement from a preoperative 25% to a postoperative 35%. She was discharged home on postoperative day 7. PMID:26798728

  4. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery presenting subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, K; Sakata, K; Gondo, G; Kanno, H; Yamamoto, I

    2001-04-01

    A case is reported of anterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. A 50-year-old man presented with sudden onset of weakness of the left lower limb was admitted to our hospital. CT scan on admission showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and CT on the 6th day demonstrated a cerebral infarction on the right medial frontal lobe. A carotid angiogram 12 hours after the onset showed no aneurysmal lesion, but, the angiogram repeated 11 days after the onset revealed an aneurysmal dilatation with distal narrowing at the right A2-A3 segment. To prevent rebleeding, we performed a wrapping procedure through the interhemispheric route on the 18th day after onset. The postoperative course was uneventful. We reviewed 27 previously reported cases with symptomatic dissecting aneurysm confined to the anterior cerebral artery.

  5. Comparison between nitroglycerin and remifentanil in acute hypervolemic hemodilution combined with controlled hypotension during intracranial aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuekang; Hu, Qian; Liu, Zhiyi; Huang, Haijin; Zhang, Qin; Dai, Hanying

    2015-01-01

    Allogenetic transfusion has long been considered to be a relatively safe and extremely effective blood transfusion treatment. However, acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH) combined with the remifentanil-induced controlled hypotension (CH) have rarely been examined. Herein, 40 intracranial aneurysm surgery patients were randomly divided into nitroglycerin group (A group, n=20) and remifentanil group (B group, n=20). During intracranial aneurysm surgery, MAP, HR, Hb, and Hct were recorded. SjvO2, PjvO2, SaO2, PaO2 were measured, and CaO2, Da-jvO2, CjvO2, CERO2, VADL were calculated. In addition, The venous blood samples were collected for determining PT, TT, APTT, FBG, VIII, VWF and electrolytes. The results show that HR in nitroglycerin group dramatically accelerated and HR in remifentanil group slowed at 30 minutes after hypotension and 5 minutes after aneurysm occlusion (P<0.01) after hypotension. Compared with A group, the SjvO2 and CjvO2 of B group increased significantly and the Da-jvO2 and CERO2 decreased significantly at T3, T4. In addition, There were no significant differences between after AHH and before AHH in two groups (P>0.05) on TT, PT, APTT, FIB, VIII, VWF, Na+, Cl-, K+, Ca2+. These results suggest that AHH combined with remifentanil-based CH significantly lowered cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and had effects on blood coagulation without clinical hemorrhagic signs increased and had important clinical significance for blood conservation. PMID:26770575

  6. Dissecting aneurysm at the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery presenting as visual loss and visual field defect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Wen; Chiu, Tsung-Lang

    2013-12-01

    Intracranial dissecting aneurysms mainly occur in the territory of the vertebrobasilar system. Dissecting aneurysms confined to the anterior cerebral artery are rare, and the presentations are usually of either subarachnoid hemorrhage or cerebral infarction. Here, we report a unique case of a dissecting aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery presenting as a visual field defect. After surgical decompression, visual symptoms recovered. PMID:23647077

  7. Feasibility and methodology of optical coherence tomography imaging of human intracranial aneurysms: ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Barry; Sun, Cuiru; Khiel, Tim-Rasmus; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Standish, Beau A.; da Costa, Leodante; de Morais, Josaphat; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysm is a common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. An aneurysm may undergo microscopic morphological changes or remodeling of the vessel wall prior to rupture, which could potentially be imaged. In this study we present methods of tissue sample preparation of intracranial aneurysms and correlation between optical coherence tomography imaging and routine histology. OCT has a potential future in the assessment of microscopic features of aneurysms, which may correlate to the risk of rupture.

  8. Surgery of intracranial aneurysms at Yonsei University: 780 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C

    1991-03-01

    Seven hundred and eighty patients with intracranial aneurysm, which were surgically treated by the author since 1976, were analyzed. Strategies important for intracranial aneurysm surgery were the timing of surgery, preoperative preparation and intraoperative management. The best management outcome could be achieved by early operation, removal of subarachnoid blood clot, maintenance of circulating blood volume, administration of nimodipine, and meticulous surgical tactics to avoid pitfalls. Indications for aneurysm surgery in the acute phase were determined by intracerebral hematoma, angiographic findings, clinical grade, general physical status and readiness of the surgical team. Important goals to be considered during the operation were obtaining a slack brain, preparation of proximal control, protection of the brain, awareness of microsurgical anatomy, and complete dissection of the sac. The morbidity and mortality were 2.7% and 4.0%, respectively. The mortality was attributed to intracranial causes in 20 cases (poor grade, delayed ischemic deficits, rebleeding, postoperative infarction, and postoperative epidural hematoma), extracranial causes in 7 cases (pulmonary embolism, heparin induced intracerebral hemorrhage, hepatic failure, myocardial infarction, and gastrointestinal bleeding), and unknown problems in 5 cases. The postoperative intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 16 cases and seemed to be caused by one or more of the following events: cerebral infarction developed during the preoperative period, occlusion of the cerebral veins during the Sylvian dissection, cerebral retraction and/or sudden change of intracranial hemodynamics. Hydrocephalus, almost always a communicating type as confirmed by isotope cisternography, was managed by lumboperitoneal shunt.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2046205

  9. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  10. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  11. Parent Artery Occlusion for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lishan; Peng, Qiang; Ha, Wenbo; Zhou, Dexiang; Xu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peripheral cerebral aneurysms are difficult to treat with preservation of the parent arteries. We report the clinical and angiographic outcome of 12 patients with cerebral aneurysms located peripherally. In the past five years, 12 patients, six females and six males, presented at our institution with intracranial aneurysms distal to the circle of Willis and were treated endovascularly. The age of our patients ranged from four to 58 years with a mean age of 37 years. Seven of the 12 patients had subarachnoid and/or intracerebral hemorrhage upon presentation. Two patients with P2 dissecting aneurysms presented with mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia, one patient with a large dissecting aneurysm complained of headaches and two patients with M3 dissecting aneurysms had mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia of the right arm. Locations of the aneurysms were as follows: posterior cerebral artery in seven patients, anterior inferior cerebellar artery in two, posterior inferior cerebellar artery in one, middle cerebral artery in two. Twelve patients with peripheral cerebral aneurysms underwent parent artery occlusion (PAO). PAO was performed with detachable coils. No patient developed neurologic deficits. Distally located cerebral aneurysms can be treated with parent artery occlusion when selective embolization of the aneurysmal sac with detachable platinum coils or surgical clipping cannot be achieved. PMID:20465914

  12. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other parts of the body (the aorta). Aortic aneurysms can occur in the area below the stomach ( ... or in the chest (thoracic aneurysms). An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually located below the kidneys. In ...

  13. Simultaneous presentation of two cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kazuto; Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman experienced sudden onset of severe headache. Computed tomography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hematoma in the right frontal lobe. Digital subtraction angiography revealed three aneurysms in the anterior communicating artery (AcomA), the right posterior communicating artery (PcomA), and the right middle cerebral artery. The AcomA aneurysm was treated with endovascular coiling. However, her oculomotor nerve palsy was aggravated after the procedure. Embolization of the right PcomA aneurysm was conducted immediately and her oculomotor nerve palsy recovered completely 3 months later. Simultaneous presentation of multiple aneurysms with separate symptoms is rare. We speculate that the progressive oculomotor nerve palsy was caused by tiny enlargement or morphological change of the aneurysm caused by elevated blood pressure and pulsatile effect after SAH.

  14. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hemorrhage Mimicking an Aneurysm: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashish; Vyas, Sameer; Sanghvi, Ankur; Salunke, Pravin; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background A sudden onset of neurological symptoms in patients is conventionally thought to be due to vascular phenomenon, with one common differential diagnosis being subarachnoid hemorrhage. Another important differential diagnosis is ischemic stroke. An uncommon cause of such acute symptoms can be hemorrhage in a pre-existing tumor, that is, intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH). Purpose ITH is an important, though uncommon differential diagnosis in cases of sudden onset of neurological deterioration. Methods and Result A 60-year-old male presented with seizures and loss of consciousness 12 h prior to admission. The episode was sudden in onset. After detailed clinical and radiological investigations, the patient was diagnosed with glioma with bleed and was successfully operated upon. Conclusion The combination of hemorrhage and ischemic stroke pointed more towards an aneurysm rather than a tumor bleed. There were pointers both in favor of and against both the diagnosis. Therefore, a complex hemorrhagic cerebral tumor with acute presentation and discordant finding on CT or CT angiography should be characterized preoperatively. A large thrombosed aneurysm remains an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27780994

  15. [Aorto-caval fistula as a results of abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture imitating acute renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Zaniewski, Maciej; Ludyga, Tomasz; Kazibudzki, Marek; Kowalewska-Twardela, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Aorto-caval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm. It occurs in 1-6% of cases. The classic diagnostic signs of an ACF (pulsatile abdominal mass with bruit and right ventricular failure) are present only in a half of the patients. The most common diagnostic imaging procedures like ultrasound and computed tomography often are not sufficient enough. This leads to the delay in diagnosis, which has a great impact on the results of operation. We report a case of a patient, who was treated before admission to the Clinic because of azotemia and oliguria suggesting renal failure.

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  17. Arterial fenestrations and their association with cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mira A; Caplan, Justin M; Yang, Wuyang; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2014-12-01

    Fenestrations of intracranial arteries and associated aneurysms are rare. The significance of these fenestrations in relation to aneurysms remains unclear. We present four patients with fenestration-associated aneurysms and a comprehensive review of associations with aneurysms and other vascular lesions. A PubMed search of the literature was conducted from 1970-2012 reporting cases of intracranial aneurysms associated with arterial fenestration or duplications. Data were collected on patient presentation, sex, age, aneurysm and fenestration location, aneurysm treatment, and presence of other vascular lesions. We performed a retrospective review of four patients with intracranial fenestrations associated with aneurysms at our institution from 2012-2013. There were 59 cases of fenestrations and associated aneurysms in the literature. Aneurysms were reported as either arising from (n=50) or adjacent to but distinct from (n=13) fenestrations. The most common single fenestration location was at the basilar artery (n=23, 36.5%); however the majority of fenestrations were in the carotid circulation (n=34, 54.0%). The majority of patients with aneurysms and fenestrations at all locations except those at the anterior communicating artery (70.5%) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with aneurysms arising from a fenestration or adjacent to a fenestration presented with an additional intracranial vascular lesion in 38% and 31% of cases, respectively. The majority of all aneurysms were treated with microsurgical clipping. Aneurysms associated with cerebral arterial fenestrations are most commonly discovered after subarachnoid hemorrhage and are most often located in the carotid circulation. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for an associated vascular lesion if an intracranial fenestration is discovered.

  18. Small Intracranial Aneurysm Treatment Using Target ® Ultrasoft ™ Coils

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gaurav; Miller, Timothy; Iyohe, Moronke; Shivashankar, Ravi; Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The introduction of small, soft, complex-shaped microcoils has helped facilitate the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms (IAs) over the last several years. Here, we evaluate the initial safety and efficacy of treating small IAs using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils. Materials and methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database at a single, high volume, teaching hospital was performed from September 2011 to May 2015. IAs smaller than or equal to 5.0 mm in maximal dimension treated with only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils were included. Results A total of 50 patients with 50 intracranial aneurysms were included. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from index aneurysm rupture was the indication for treatment in 23 of 50 (46%) cases, and prior subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from another aneurysm was the indication for treatment in eight of 50 (16%) cases. The complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 70% (35/50), the minimal residual aneurysm rate was 14% (7/50), and residual aneurysm rate was 16% (8/50). One intraoperative aneurysm rupture occurred. Three patients died during hospitalization from clinical sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Follow-up at a mean of 13.6 months demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 75% (30/40) of cases, near complete occlusion in 15% (6/40) of cases, and residual aneurysm in 10% (4/40) of cases, all four of which were retreated. Conclusion Our initial results using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils for the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms demonstrate initial excellent safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:27403224

  19. Pathomechanisms and treatment of pediatric aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krings, Timo; Geibprasert, Sasikhan; terBrugge, Karel G

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are rare diseases distinct from classical adult aneurysms and therefore require different treatment strategies. Apart from saccular aneurysms that are more commonly found in older children, three major pathomechanisms may be encountered: trauma, infection, and dissection. The posterior circulation and more distal locations are more commonly encountered in children compared to adults, and there is an overall male predominance. Clinical findings are not only confined to subarachnoid hemorrhage but may also comprise mass effects, headaches or neurological deficits. In traumatic aneurysms, the skull base and distal anterior communicating artery are commonly affected, and the hemorrhage occurs often delayed (2-4 weeks following the initial trauma). Infectious aneurysms are mostly bacterial in origin, and hemorrhage occurs early after a septic embolic shower. Dissecting aneurysms are the most often encountered aneurysm type in children and can lead to mass effect, hemorrhage, or ischemia depending on the fate of the intramural hematoma. Treatment strategies in pediatric aneurysms include endosaccular coil treatment only for the "classical berry-type" aneurysms; in the other instances, parent vessel occlusion, flow reversal, surgical options, or a combined treatment with bypass and parent vessel occlusion have to be contemplated.

  20. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES IN SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE LINK INFLAMMATION AND OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Albers, David; Schmidt, J. Michael; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Falo, Christina Maria; Mayer, Stephan A.; Cremers, Serge; Agarwal, Sachin; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Connolly, E. Sander; Dukic, Vanja; Hripcsak, George; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) are frequent following acute brain injury and have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury but mechanisms that cause NCSz are controversial. Pro-inflammatory states are common after many brain injuries and inflammatory mediated changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability have experimentally been linked to seizures. Methods In this prospective observational study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients we explored the link between the inflammatory response following SAH and in-hospital NCSz studying clinical (systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS) and laboratory markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1,TNF-R1; high sensitivity C-reactive protein,hsCRP). Logistic regression, cox proportional hazards regression, and mediation analyses were performed to investigate temporal and causal relationships. Results Among 479 SAH patients, 53(11%) had in-hospital NCSz. Patients with in-hospital NCSz had a more pronounced SIRS response (OR1.9 per point increase in SIRS; 95%-CI1.3-2.9), inflammatory surges were more likely immediately preceding NCSz onset, and the negative impact of SIRS on functional outcome at 3 months was mediated in part through in-hospital NCSz. In a subset with inflammatory serum biomarkers we confirmed these findings linking higher serum TNF-R1 and hsCRP to in-hospital NCSz (OR1.2 per 20 point hsCRP increase [95%-CI1.1-1.4]; OR2.5 per 100 point TNF-R1 increase [95%-CI2.1-2.9]). The association of inflammatory biomarkers with poor outcome was mediated in part through NCSz. Interpretation In-hospital NCSz were independently associated with a pro-inflammatory state following SAH reflected in clinical symptoms and serum biomarkers of inflammation. Our findings suggest that inflammation following SAH is associated with poor outcome and this effect is at least in part mediated through in-hospital NCSz. PMID:24771589

  1. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms. PMID:27384117

  2. [Application of intraoperative microvascular dopplerography in surgical treatment of arterial aneurysm of the brain].

    PubMed

    Hloba, M V; Lytvak, S O

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities and results of the intraoperative microvascular dopplerography application in microsurgical exclusion of the brain arterial aneurysm (BAA) were estimated. The investigation was conducted during operative intervention in 30 patients, suffering hemorrhagic type of the brain acute blood flow disorder as a consequence of the BAA rupture. In an acute period (the first-14th day) 23 patients were operated, in the early restoration period (after 30th day)--7. Intraoperative express estimation of the blood flow have permitted to diagnose and to correct timely some typical technical complications, in particular, noncomplete BAA exclusion from the blood flow, the arterial lumen, containing the clipped aneurysm, stenosing; to reveal the arterial segments vasospasm objectively in the patients, operated on in an acute period of hemorrhage, and to diagnose a reactive spasm during manipulations on the arteries. All the patients, operated on in the early restoration period and 82.6% of patients, operated on in an acute period of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, have had reconvalesced. Application of the microvascular dopplerography secures objectivization, simplifies intraoperative estimation of the BAA radicality and the according arterial segments passability in the operative intervention zone, what promotes reduction of the ischemic complications rate and positively impacts the results of treatment.

  3. Growth and subsequent disappearance of a ruptured small saccular intracranial aneurysm: A morphometric and flow-dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Peruvumba, Jayakumar Narayan; Paul, Divyan; Verghese, Renjan

    2016-10-01

    The growth of a ruptured small saccular aneurysm has rarely been documented. Also rare are reports of spontaneous thrombosis of ruptured small intracranial saccular aneurysms. However, there are no reported instances of ruptured small saccular aneurysms that have demonstrated an increase in size after rupture, subsequently thrombosed and disappeared from circulation. We report one such aneurysm in a patient who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured small saccular aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The possible reasons for the initial growth and subsequent thrombosis of the aneurysm from morphometric and flow dynamic points of view are discussed. PMID:27470928

  4. Recurrent Gain-of-Function Mutation in PRKG1 Causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S. Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S.; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17–51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  5. [Intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages after administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemicstroke due to anterior cerebral artery dissection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Ken; Koyama, Seigo; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2011-06-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of right hemiparesis. At admission, he was alert and well oriented. His verbal comprehension seemed good, but his speech was not fluent. He could not stand or walk owing to the right hemiparesis, which was severe in the lower extremity. Computed tomographic (CT) scans on admission showed no abnormality. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed after the CT showed a high-intensity lesion in the left cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed occlusion and irregularity of the left A2 portion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). At 1 h 50 min after the onset of the hemiparesis, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 0.6 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. At 1 h after the administration of rt-PA, he became drowsy and his right hemiparesis deteriorated. CT scans performed again showed a hematoma in the left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. He was treated conservatively. MRA performed on the 18th day after admission showed recanalization of the left ACA and abnormal dilatation of the left A2 segment. The abnormal dilatation was also depicted by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) performed on the 26th day after admission and even on the 33rd and 77th days. As seen in our case, the definite diagnosis of dissection confined to the ACA frequently needs serial angiographies; therefore, its diagnosis immediately after the onset is often difficult. Thrombolytic therapy by intravenous administration of rt-PA for cerebral infarction caused by dissection of the ACA may recanalize the occluded site and facilitate the progression of the dissection, resulting in intracerebral and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages. In patients with cerebral infarction due to ACA dissection, strict control of blood pressure and careful observation are necessary after thrombolytic therapy by rt-PA.

  6. Dissecting Aneurysm of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Initially Presenting with Nonhemorrhagic Symptom.

    PubMed

    Sasame, Jo; Nomura, Motohiro

    2015-08-01

    We report a patient with a probable dissecting aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) initially presenting with a nonhemorrhagic symptom, which resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 61-year-old woman suddenly experienced nausea. Computed tomography (CT) on admission showed a high-density mass with a double lumen in the right cerebellopontine angle without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Five days after the onset, she suddenly lost consciousness. CT demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage. Emergency angiography revealed a probable dissecting aneurysm at the lateral pontomedullary segment of the right AICA. Although the initial symptom is not hemorrhage, an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA may have a high risk of rupture. Immediate radical treatment to prevent subsequent rupture is necessary for even an unruptured dissecting aneurysm of the AICA.

  7. Aneurysms of the fenestrated basilar artery treated with Gulielmi Detachabe Coils: case report.

    PubMed

    Luo, C B; Chang, F C; Teng, M M; Liring, J F; Chen, S S

    2001-01-01

    Multiple aneurysms at the site of a basilar artery fenestration (BAF) are extremely rare. We report a case of BAF in association with two aneurysms successfully treated with Guglielmi Detachable Coils (GDCs). A 42-year-old male presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and consciousness change. Angiograms of the vertebrobasilar artery demonstrated fenestration of the proximal basilar artery associated with two aneurysms. Embolization of aneurysms was done by using GDCs. Aneurysms were almost completely obliterated with preservation of the flow and lumen of the vertebrobasilar system. The patient remains asymptomatic at clinical follow-up of 18 months.

  8. The Role of Matricellular Proteins in Brain Edema after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Fujimoto, Masashi; Shiba, Masato; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Liu, Lei; Ichikawa, Naoki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption or brain edema is an important pathologic manifestation for poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Many molecules may be involved, acting simultaneously or at different stages during blood-brain barrier disruption via multiple independent or interconnected signaling pathways. Matricellular protein is a class of nonstructural, secreted, and multifunctional extracellular matrix proteins, which potentially mediates brain edema formation. This study reviews the role of osteopontin and tenascin-C, representatives of matricellular proteins, in the context of brain edema formation after subarachnoid hemorrhage in both clinical and experimental settings.

  9. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  10. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  11. Embolisation of recently ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J V; Molyneux, A J; Brennan, R P; Renowden, S A

    1995-01-01

    Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of aneurysms unsuitable for craniotomy and clipping have been treated by coil embolisation within three weeks. Sixty nine of 75 consecutive patients were successfully treated. Procedure related complications occurred in 10 patients, resulting in permanent neurological deficits in three and one death (4.8%). The Glasgow outcome scores at six weeks were 53 grade 1, seven grade 2, four grade 3, and five grade 5. These results are comparable with surgical series despite a high proportion of aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation. Images PMID:7500100

  12. Innovative approach for prevention and treatment of post subarachnoid hemorrhage vasospasm: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Venkataramana, Neelam K; Rao, Shailesh A V; Naik, Arun L; Shetty, Kishore; Murthy, Paparaja; Bansal, Abhilash; Panotopoulos, Christos

    2012-04-01

    More than one third of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) develop clinically significant vasospasm, as a leading morbidity and mortality factor for these patients. It is widely accepted that a) Degradation products of blood are the causative factors of vasospasm b) The amount of subarachnoid blood seen on admission CT is correlated to the risk of vasospasm c) Reducing the subarachnoid clot burden at the time of surgery reduces the risk of vasospasm. But there is no existing method to clear the blood from subarachnoid spaces satisfactorily. We have evaluated safety and feasibility of fluid exchange catheter system in SAH, to achieve this goal. We were successful in clearing cisternal blood in three patients with aneurysmal rupture with fluid exchange catheter system. Baseline CT scan of brain was performed immediately after the surgery and then at the end of irrigation. The amount of subarachnoid blood was evaluated. This innovative, fluid exchange catheter system infuses and aspirates micro volumes of drug solution in a cyclic mode, ensuring isobaric exchange of fluids. The result is good clearance of blood in subarachnoid spaces were seen in all the patients. Also, significant improvement in neurological deficits secondary to vasospasm was seen. We conclude that the fluid exchange catheter system is safe and adoptable in neurosurgical practice. PMID:22870156

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Kashmir: Causes, risk factors, and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; AfzalWani, Mohammed; Kirmani, Altaf R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Kashmir, a snow bound and mountain locked valley, is populated by about 7 million ethnic and non-migratory Kashmiris who have specific dietary and social habits than rest of the world. The neurological disorders are common in Kashmiri population. Aims: To study the prevalence and outcome of spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Kashmir compared withother parts of the world. Settings and Design: A retrospective and hospital based study from 1982 to 2010 in the single and only Neurosurgical Centre of the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Materials and Methods: A hospital based study, in which, information concerning all Kashmiri patients was collected from the case sheets, patient files, discharge certificates, death certificates, and telephonic conversations with the help of Medical Records Department and Central Admission Register of Sher–i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir India. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance and students T-test were used at occasions. Results: Incidence of SAH in Kashmiris is about 13/100,000 persons per year. SAH comprises 31.02% of total strokes and aneurysmal ruptures are cause of 54.35% SAHs. The female suffers 1.78 times more than the male. Total mortality of 36.60% was recorded against a good recovery of 14.99%. The familial SAHs and multiple aneurysms were also common. Intra-operative finding of larger aneurysmal size than recorded on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) angiogram of same patients was noteworthy. In 493 patients of SAH, the angiography revealed 705 aneurysms. Conclusion: Spontaneous intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage, due to aneurysmal rupture, is common in Kashmir, with worst outcome. Food habits like “salt-tea twice a day”, group-smoking of wet tobacco like “Jejeer”, winter season, female gender, hypertension, and inhalation of “Kangri” smoke are special risk factorsof SAH, in Kashmiris. The plain CT brain and CT angiography are best diagnostic tools. The

  14. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  15. Juxtarenal Mycotic Aneurysm as a Complication of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Cholecystitis Treated by Resection and Replacement by a Fresh Allograft.

    PubMed

    Grus, Tomáš; Lambert, Lukáš; Rohn, Vilém; Klika, Tomáš; Grusová, Gabriela; Michálek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a female patient with infectious (mycotic) juxtarenal abdominal aneurysm with atypical symptoms beginning as acute exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis. Apart from common antibiotic treatment, the patient successfully underwent resection of the diseased segment and replacement by a fresh allograft in order to reduce the risk of infection of the graft, but with the need of subsequent life-long immunosuppressive therapy. Perioperative monitoring of the spinal cord by near infrared spectroscopy was used to identify possible spinal ischemia. The choice of the fresh allograft was based on our experience supported by review of the literature. PMID:26995203

  16. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  17. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  18. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  19. Endovascular coil embolization of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Hakma, Zakaria; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2014-07-01

    The patient is a 60-year-old woman who presented to her primary care physician with new onset of headache. She was neurologically intact without cranial nerve deficit. An outpatient CT angiogram (CTA) revealed no subarachnoid hemorrhage, but showed a right-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm measuring 11 mm by 10 mm. Digitally subtracted cerebral angiography confirmed these measurements and showed that the aneurysm was amenable to endovascular coil embolization. The patient underwent aneurysm coiling without complication and was discharged to home on postoperative Day 1. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/MjOc3Zpv2K8 . PMID:24983726

  20. Luminal platelet aggregates in functional deficits in parenchymal vessels after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Victor; Flores, Rowena; Muller, Artur; Sehba, Fatima A.

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of early ischemic injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not understood. This study examined the acute effect of endovascular puncture-induced SAH on parenchymal vessel function in rat, using intravascular fluorescent tracers to assess flow and vascular permeability and immunostaining to assess structural integrity and to visualize platelet aggregates. In sham-operated animals, vessels were well filled with tracer administered 10 seconds before sacrifice, and parenchymal escape of tracer was rare. At ten minutes and 3 hours after hemorrhage, patches of poor vascular filling were distributed throughout the forebrain. Close examination of these regions revealed short segments of narrowed diameter along many profiles. Most vascular profiles with reduced perfusion contained platelet aggregates and in addition showed focal loss of collagen IV, a principal component of basal lamina. In contrast, vessels were well filled at 24 hours post-hemorrhage, indicating that vascular perfusion had recovered. Parenchymal escape of intravascular tracer was detected at 10 minutes post-hemorrhage and later as plumes of fluorescence emanating into parenchyma from restricted microvascular foci. These data demonstrate that parenchymal microvessels are compromised in function by 10 minutes after SAH and identify focal microvascular constriction and local accumulation of luminal platelet aggregates as potential initiators of that compromise. PMID:20654597

  1. Treatment of ruptured intracranial dissecting aneurysms in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Tang, Hoi Bun; Poon, Wai Sang; Yu, Simon Chun Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data suggests that hemorrhagic presentations occur in 20% of internal carotid artery dissections and 50% of vertebral artery dissections. A Finnish study has reported favorable outcomes in only 32% of patients. We aimed to review the epidemiology and management outcomes in a Chinese population. Methods: We reviewed the aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage registry of patients who presented with intracranial dissecting aneurysms at a neurosurgical center in Hong Kong over a five-year period. Results: A total of 23 patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms were identified, accounting for 8% of all spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Forty-eight percent of the patients identified were treated by main trunk occlusion and 39% were treated by embolization or stent-assisted embolization or stent alone. Thirteen percent were managed by craniotomy and trapping or wrapping. Favorable outcomes at six months were achieved in 67%. Conclusions: Patients with intracranial dissecting aneurysms account for a significant proportion of the cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in our population. Carefully selected endovascular and microsurgical treatments can lead to management outcomes similar to patients with saccular aneurysms. PMID:21206536

  2. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the African-American population: a cooperative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, G. C.; Welch, B.; Cole, A. N.; Mendoza, R.; Morgan, J.; Epps, J.; Bernard, E.; St Louis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage is complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia and contributing factors such as hypertension. To observe the impact of hypertension and delayed cerebral ischemia on the outcome of a predominantly African-American cohort following subarachnoid hemorrhage, both retrospective (n = 42) and prospective (n = 21) studies were conducted. In the total pool (n = 63), the mean age was 49.7 years (range: 17 to 80) with a preponderance of female patients (70%). Aneurysm formation was significant in the region of the posterior communicating artery. Of the patients reviewed, 73.8% had preexisting hypertension and 45.9% developed delayed cerebral ischemia. Approximately 89% of the patients who suffered from delayed cerebral ischemia had hypertension. Results failed to display any significant beneficial association between the use of the calcium channel blocker nimodipine and delayed cerebral ischemia. Use of the antifibrinolytic drug aminocaproic acid demonstrated a worse patient outcome. It is not recommended that aminocaproic acid be used in this population. Subsequently, due to the proportional occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in hypertensive patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage, it is suggested that prophylactic surgical management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms be considered in hypertensive patients. Further study is needed to discern the association between hypertension, delayed cerebral ischemia, and stroke in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:9046763

  4. [A case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage without xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid--usefulness of emergent MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogami, Ryo; Ikawa, Fusao; Ohbayashi, Naohiko; Imada, Yasutaka; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Inagawa, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    We reported a case of subacute subarachnoid hemorrhage with watery clear cerebrospinal fluid. Emergent magnetic resonance image was useful not only for diagnosis by fluid attenuated inversion recovery image but also for evaluation of cerebral ischemia and vasospasm by magnetic resonance angiography, diffusion weighted image and perfusion weighted image. A 50-year-old man presented disturbance of consciousness and dysarthria. Neither computed tomographic scan nor cerebrospinal fluid study could diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage clearly. However, emergent fluid attenuated inversion recovery image showed the show subarachnoid hemorrhage as high signal intensity. Diffusion weighted image showed multiple, round hypersignals both in the white and gray matter. In the area with diffusion hypersignal, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was 0.57 x 10(3) mm2/sec. Perfusion weighted image showed normal cerebral blood volume but prolonged mean transit time in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed an aneurysm at the anterior communicating artery and severe vasospasm on the bilateral anterior cerebral artery, the right middle cerebral artery. Thus we are able to diagnose subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The hyperintensity of the diffusion weighted image and the fluid attenuated inversion recovery image was caused by cerebral ischemia from vasospasm. After conservative therapy during the period of vasospasm, successful surgical clipping was performed with full clinical recovery. PMID:12833876

  5. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  6. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision.

  7. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  8. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-07-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision.

  9. Aneurysm and Neurocysticercosis: Casual or Causal Relationship? Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Agapejev, Svetlana; Parra-Marinello, João Luiz; Bazan, Rodrigo; Ueda, Anete Kinumi; Zanini, Marco Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Four cases of suggestive inflammatory aneurysms in patients with neurocysticercosis have been described. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage from a right middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm and had a casual relationship with neurocysticercosis. At surgery, a viable cysticercus without signs of inflammation or thickened leptomeninges was found in the distal position of the aneurysm. Postoperatively, the patient received albendazole and dextrochlorpheniramine. In the subsequent three years, the patient was asymptomatic and took drugs to prevent convulsion and arterial hypertension. The relationship between NCC and the presence of cerebral aneurysm is discussed. PMID:22110518

  10. Aneurysm and neurocysticercosis: casual or causal relationship? Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Agapejev, Svetlana; Parra-Marinello, João Luiz; Bazan, Rodrigo; Ueda, Anete Kinumi; Zanini, Marco Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Four cases of suggestive inflammatory aneurysms in patients with neurocysticercosis have been described. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage from a right middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm and had a casual relationship with neurocysticercosis. At surgery, a viable cysticercus without signs of inflammation or thickened leptomeninges was found in the distal position of the aneurysm. Postoperatively, the patient received albendazole and dextrochlorpheniramine. In the subsequent three years, the patient was asymptomatic and took drugs to prevent convulsion and arterial hypertension. The relationship between NCC and the presence of cerebral aneurysm is discussed.

  11. Fatal rupture of a brain arteriovenous malformation flow-related aneurysm during microcatheter removal: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, Joseph; Clarençon, Frédéric; Di Maria, Federico; Fahed, Robert; Boch, Anne-Laure; Degos, Vincent; Chiras, Jacques; Sourour, Nader-Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are relatively frequently encountered in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs). They may be located on the circle of Willis, on arterial feeders, or even inside the nidus. Because BAVM-associated aneurysms represent a risk factor of bleeding, the question of the timing and modality of their management remains a matter of debate in unruptured BAVMs. The authors present a case of fatal periprocedural rupture of a flow-related aneurysm (FRA) during the removal of the microcatheter after injection of a liquid embolic agent. A 40-year-old man was treated at the authors' institution for the management of a Spetzler-Martin Grade III left unruptured frontal BAVM, revealed by seizures and a focal neurological deficit attributed to flow steal phenomenon. After a multidisciplinary meeting, endovascular treatment was considered to reduce the flow of the BAVM. A proximal FRA located on the feeding internal carotid artery (ICA) was purposely left untreated because it did not meet the criteria of the authors' institution for preventative treatment (i.e., small size [2.5 mm]). During embolization, at the time of microcatheter retrieval, and after glue injection, the aneurysm unexpectedly ruptured. The aneurysm's rupture was attributed to the stress (torsion/flexion) on the ICA caused by the microcatheter removal. Despite the attempts to manage the bleeding, the patient eventually died of the acute increase of intracranial pressure related to the massive subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case highlights a previously unreported mechanism of FRA rupture during BAVM embolization: the stress transmitted to the parent artery during the removal of the microcatheter.

  12. Fatal rupture of a brain arteriovenous malformation flow-related aneurysm during microcatheter removal: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Gabrieli, Joseph; Clarençon, Frédéric; Di Maria, Federico; Fahed, Robert; Boch, Anne-Laure; Degos, Vincent; Chiras, Jacques; Sourour, Nader-Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are relatively frequently encountered in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs). They may be located on the circle of Willis, on arterial feeders, or even inside the nidus. Because BAVM-associated aneurysms represent a risk factor of bleeding, the question of the timing and modality of their management remains a matter of debate in unruptured BAVMs. The authors present a case of fatal periprocedural rupture of a flow-related aneurysm (FRA) during the removal of the microcatheter after injection of a liquid embolic agent. A 40-year-old man was treated at the authors' institution for the management of a Spetzler-Martin Grade III left unruptured frontal BAVM, revealed by seizures and a focal neurological deficit attributed to flow steal phenomenon. After a multidisciplinary meeting, endovascular treatment was considered to reduce the flow of the BAVM. A proximal FRA located on the feeding internal carotid artery (ICA) was purposely left untreated because it did not meet the criteria of the authors' institution for preventative treatment (i.e., small size [2.5 mm]). During embolization, at the time of microcatheter retrieval, and after glue injection, the aneurysm unexpectedly ruptured. The aneurysm's rupture was attributed to the stress (torsion/flexion) on the ICA caused by the microcatheter removal. Despite the attempts to manage the bleeding, the patient eventually died of the acute increase of intracranial pressure related to the massive subarachnoid hemorrhage. This case highlights a previously unreported mechanism of FRA rupture during BAVM embolization: the stress transmitted to the parent artery during the removal of the microcatheter. PMID:25574569

  13. Reconstruction of Saccular and Dissected Intracranial Aneurysms Using Solitaire™ AB Stents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Huang, Qing-Hai; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety, efficacy, and predictors for outcome of reconstructive treatment with Solitaire™ AB stent(s) based on 54 cases of saccular aneurysms and 14 of acute symptomatic dissecting aneurysms. Methods Fifty-eight consecutive patients (M/F = 28/30; median age, 53 years) harbouring 68 aneurysms (ruptured/unruptured = 12/56) underwent treatment with Solitaire™ AB stent(s) implantation between April 2010 and August 2011 in our institution. The data were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Results The technical success rate of Solitaire™ AB stenting was 100%. The rates of the overall and the treatment-related adverse events were 9% (6/68) and 6% (4/68), respectively, and the recurrent rate was 1% (1/68). All of the adverse events (n = 6) occurred in tiny (n = 1, ≤3 mm) or small (n = 5, >3 to ≤10 mm) aneurysms. The majority (75%, 3/4) of thromboembolic events (thrombus, n = 2; infarction, n = 2) occurred in ruptured lesions, and 2 intraprocedural aneurysm ruptures occurred in the course of coiling when the stent(s) was/were applied within 6 months. Subarachnoid haemorrhages (SAH, p<0.05) and immediate occlusion grades (p<0.05) were predictors for overall adverse events by univariate analysis. Compared with the immediate post-treatment angiographic results, the follow-up angiographic imaging (mean, 13 months; range, 6–25 months) revealed that stent(s) implantation enhanced the rate of class I occlusion from 34% (23/68) to 93% (63/68). SAH was the only predictor for unfavourable outcomes (the modified Rankin Scale score [mRS], 2–6) during the mean 19-month (range, 12–27 months) of clinical follow-ups (p<0.05). Conclusions Although the complete obliteration of tiny and small aneurysms without complications remains a challenge, stent(s) implantation could lead to further occlusion of incompletely coiled aneurysms. SAH and the occlusion grade were the primary predictors for adverse

  14. Deficiency of endogenous acute phase serum amyloid A protects apoE−/− mice from angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Webb, NR; De Beer, MC; Wroblewski, JM; Ji, A; Bailey, W; Shridas, P; Charnigo, RJ; Noffsinger, VP; Witta, J; Howatt, DA; Balakrishnan, A; Rateri, DL; Daugherty, A; De Beer, FC

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a major cause of death in the aged population, is characterized by vascular inflammation and matrix degradation. Serum amyloid A (SAA), an acute phase reactant linked to inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase induction, correlates with aortic dimensions before aneurysm formation in humans. We investigated whether SAA deficiency in mice impacts AAA formation during angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Approach and Results Plasma SAA increased ~60-fold in apoE−/− mice 24 hours after i.p. AngII injection (100 μg/kg; n = 4) and ~15-fold after chronic 28-day AngII infusion (1,000 ng/kg/min; n = 9). AAA incidence and severity after 28-day AngII infusion was significantly reduced in apoE−/− mice lacking both acute phase SAA isoforms (SAAKO; n = 20) compared to apoE−/− mice (SAAWT; n = 20) as assessed by in vivo ultrasound and ex vivo morphometric analyses, despite a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after AngII infusion. Atherosclerotic lesion area of the aortic arch was similar in SAAKO and SAAWT mice after 28-day AngII infusion. Immunostaining detected SAA in AAA tissues of AngII-infused SAAWT mice that co-localized with macrophages, elastin breaks, and enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. MMP-2 activity was significantly lower in aortas of SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after 10-day AngII infusion. Conclusion Lack of endogenous acute phase SAA protects against experimental AAA through a mechanism that may involve reduced MMP-2 activity. PMID:25745063

  15. [Rapid 3-Dimensional Models of Cerebral Aneurysm for Emergency Surgical Clipping].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takehiko; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Oguma, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Naoki; Otani, Keisuke; Watanabe, Eiju

    2016-08-01

    We developed a method for manufacturing solid models of cerebral aneurysms, with a shorter printing time than that involved in conventional methods, using a compact 3D printer with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene(ABS)resin. We further investigated the application and utility of this printing system in emergency clipping surgery. A total of 16 patients diagnosed with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from cerebral aneurysm rupture were enrolled in the present study. Emergency clipping was performed on the day of hospitalization. Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine(DICOM)data obtained from computed tomography angiography(CTA)scans were edited and converted to stereolithography(STL)file formats, followed by the production of 3D models of the cerebral aneurysm by using the 3D printer. The mean time from hospitalization to the commencement of surgery was 242 min, whereas the mean time required for manufacturing the 3D model was 67 min. The average cost of each 3D model was 194 Japanese Yen. The time required for manufacturing the 3D models shortened to approximately 1 hour with increasing experience of producing 3D models. Favorable impressions for the use of the 3D models in clipping were reported by almost all neurosurgeons included in this study. Although 3D printing is often considered to involve huge costs and long manufacturing time, the method used in the present study requires shorter time and lower costs than conventional methods for manufacturing 3D cerebral aneurysm models, thus making it suitable for use in emergency clipping. PMID:27506842

  16. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Terrance T; Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Brody, David L

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury-axonal injury-is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage, raising

  17. Experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage results in multifocal axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Magnoni, Sandra; MacDonald, Christine L.; Dikranian, Krikor; Milner, Eric; Sorrell, James; Conte, Valeria; Benetatos, Joey J.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The great majority of acute brain injury results from trauma or from disorders of the cerebrovasculature, i.e. ischaemic stroke or haemorrhage. These injuries are characterized by an initial insult that triggers a cascade of injurious cellular processes. The nature of these processes in spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage is poorly understood. Subarachnoid haemorrhage, a particularly deadly form of intracranial haemorrhage, shares key pathophysiological features with traumatic brain injury including exposure to a sudden pressure pulse. Here we provide evidence that axonal injury, a signature characteristic of traumatic brain injury, is also a prominent feature of experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage. Using histological markers of membrane disruption and cytoskeletal injury validated in analyses of traumatic brain injury, we show that axonal injury also occurs following subarachnoid haemorrhage in an animal model. Consistent with the higher prevalence of global as opposed to focal deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in humans, axonal injury in this model is observed in a multifocal pattern not limited to the immediate vicinity of the ruptured artery. Ultrastructural analysis further reveals characteristic axonal membrane and cytoskeletal changes similar to those associated with traumatic axonal injury. Diffusion tensor imaging, a translational imaging technique previously validated in traumatic axonal injury, from these same specimens demonstrates decrements in anisotropy that correlate with histological axonal injury and functional outcomes. These radiological indicators identify a fibre orientation-dependent gradient of axonal injury consistent with a barotraumatic mechanism. Although traumatic and haemorrhagic acute brain injury are generally considered separately, these data suggest that a signature pathology of traumatic brain injury—axonal injury—is also a functionally significant feature of subarachnoid haemorrhage

  18. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms.

  19. Unilateral supraorbital keyhole approach in patients with middle cerebral artery (M1-M2 segment) symmetrical aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Martellotta, N; Gigante, N; Toscano, S; Maddalena, G F; Tripodi, M; Settembrini, G; Stroscio, C; Distefano, G; Citro, E

    2003-08-01

    A left middle cerebral artery aneurysm at the bifurcation (M1-M2 segment) and a right smaller aneurysm, symmetrical to the previous one were diagnosed in a 69-year-old female after angiographic examination for subarachnoid hemorrhage. The preoperative radiological study did not enable us to identify the bleeding aneurysm so a left supraorbital keyhole approach was performed to operate on the bigger aneurysm. In the same surgical session, using the same way of approach, we decided to attack also the right aneurysm which then revealed itself as being responsible for bleeding. The postoperative angiograms confirmed the complete exclusion of both aneurysms and the patient was discharged after good recovery. Although there are remarkable controversies about the surgical strategies for multiple aneurysms, our experience gives us the opportunity to emphasize the supraorbital keyhole approach and to reconsider the "timing" of multiple/bilateral aneurysms.

  20. A Patient with Eight Intracranial Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Onan, Hasan Bilen; Balli, Huseyin Tugsan; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of multiple intracranial aneurysms seen in patients with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage is high. The advancement of the endovascular technique and devices has ensured that endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms is the first choice in most cases, especially in unruptured ones. Different combinations of treatment modalities and techniques can be used in the management of multiple aneurysms. But in selected patients without subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment of all aneurysms in one or more sessions with endovascular techniques is less traumatic than that with surgery. In the literature, the maximum number of aneurysms in one patient treated endovascularly and/or surgically is seven. In this case report, we present, with a review of the literature, a patient with eight intracranial aneurysms, all of which were treated in two sessions with various endovascular techniques. A 40-year-old female patient was admitted due to headache. Angiography showed eight aneurysms in the posterior circulation and, bilaterally, in the anterior circulation. All aneurysms were treated endovascularly in two sessions. In the treatment of the aneurysms, different endovascular techniques were used including flow diverters stents, stent-assisted coiling, Y-stent-assisted coiling, and coiling alone. PMID:27668108

  1. A Patient with Eight Intracranial Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Onan, Hasan Bilen; Balli, Huseyin Tugsan; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of multiple intracranial aneurysms seen in patients with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage is high. The advancement of the endovascular technique and devices has ensured that endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms is the first choice in most cases, especially in unruptured ones. Different combinations of treatment modalities and techniques can be used in the management of multiple aneurysms. But in selected patients without subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment of all aneurysms in one or more sessions with endovascular techniques is less traumatic than that with surgery. In the literature, the maximum number of aneurysms in one patient treated endovascularly and/or surgically is seven. In this case report, we present, with a review of the literature, a patient with eight intracranial aneurysms, all of which were treated in two sessions with various endovascular techniques. A 40-year-old female patient was admitted due to headache. Angiography showed eight aneurysms in the posterior circulation and, bilaterally, in the anterior circulation. All aneurysms were treated endovascularly in two sessions. In the treatment of the aneurysms, different endovascular techniques were used including flow diverters stents, stent-assisted coiling, Y-stent-assisted coiling, and coiling alone.

  2. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm.

  3. [Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke 2015: overview of the chapter on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    After an interval of 6 years, the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke were revised in 2015 in accordance with recent advances in clinical knowledge. The chapter on subarachnoid hemorrhage includes new and revised recommendations for diagnosis, treatment selection, and management of vasospasm. The chapter on diagnosis recommends re-examination of vascular images at regular intervals in cases in which cerebral aneurysm was not detected on the first examination. The section dealing with treatment selection for cerebral aneurysmal emphasizes that the method for aneurysm obliteration should be selected based on consultation with both surgical and endovascular specialists. The role of triple-H therapy(i.e., induced hypertension, hypervolemia, and hemodilution) has changed from a preventive measure to a treatment option for symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. PMID:27333759

  4. Evolution of Giant P2-Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm over 16 Years: Saccular to Serpentine. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2009-12-14

    Giant intracranial aneurysms account for only about 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Giant intradural aneurysms are associated with severe natural history, yet remain potentially curable. These aneurysms cause symptoms due to their mass effect, and only 14-35% of cases present with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The present case report is an imaging evolution of a giant posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm in a patient who was lost on follow-up from 1992 to 2008 giving insight into the natural history and morphologic evolution of giant serpentine aneurysms. Attempted surgery 16 years previously for a saccular PCA aneurysm produced encephalomalacia and created a more spacious perianeurysmal environment, preventing any mass effect on vital structures in its vicinity. This allowed the patient to have a long symptom-free period and also allowed the aneurysm to follow a morphologic evolution over a long period without causing symptoms which would have called for intervention. This unusual development gave a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a gaint serpentine aneurysm from a saccular aneurysm and also the clinical and morphologic changes in an aneurysm if it can be prevented from producing mass effect. The Coanda effect, or boundary wall effect, has been considered responsible for the development of the serpentine channel in the original globular aneurysm . However many Authors conclude that giant serpentine aneurysms are not derived from saccular aneurysms. PMID:24209407

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  6. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  7. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Aneurysm? An aneurysm (AN-u-rism) is a balloon-like bulge ... the weakened or injured walls can cause an aneurysm. An aneurysm can grow large and rupture (burst) ...

  8. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  9. Ruptured Isolated Spinal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Romero, Diego; Batista, Andre Lima; Gentric, Jean Christoph; Raymond, Jean; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolated spinal artery aneurysms are exceedingly rare vascular lesions thought to be related to dissection of the arterial wall. We describe two cases presenting with spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage that underwent conservative management. In the first patient the radiculomedullary branch involved was feeding the anterior spinal artery at the level of D3 and thus, neither endovascular nor surgical approach was employed. Control angiography was performed at seven days and at three months, demonstrating complete resolution of the lesion. In our second case, neither the anterior spinal artery or the artery of Adamkiewicz could be identified during angiography, thus endovascular management was deemed contraindicated. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a stable lesion in the second patient. No rebleeding or other complications were seen. In comparison to intracranial aneurysms, spinal artery aneurysms tend to display a fusiform appearance and lack a clear neck in relation to the likely dissecting nature of the lesions. Due to the small number of cases reported, the natural history of these lesions is not well known making it difficult to establish the optimal treatment approach. Various management strategies may be supported, including surgical and endovascular treatment, but It would seem that a wait and see approach is also viable, with control angiogram and treatment decisions based on the evolution of the lesion. PMID:25496690

  10. Erythropoietin for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Feasible Ingredient for a Successful Medical Recipe

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Noto, Marcello; Alafaci, Concetta; Cappello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following aneurysm bleeding accounts for 6% to 8% of all cerebrovascular accidents. Although an aneurysm can be effectively managed by surgery or endovascular therapy, delayed cerebral ischemia is diagnosed in a high percentage of patients resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Cerebral vasospasm occurs in more than half of all patients after aneurysm rupture and is recognized as the leading cause of delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. Hemodynamic strategies and endovascular procedures may be considered for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. In recent years, the mechanisms contributing to the development of vasospasm, abnormal reactivity of cerebral arteries and cerebral ischemia following SAH, have been investigated intensively. A number of pathological processes have been identified in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, including endothelial injury, smooth muscle cell contraction from spasmogenic substances produced by the subarachnoid blood clots, changes in vascular responsiveness and inflammatory response of the vascular endothelium. To date, the current therapeutic interventions remain ineffective as they are limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, variation of blood volume and viscosity and control of arterial carbon dioxide tension. In this scenario, the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has been found to exert neuroprotective action during experimental SAH when its recombinant form (rHuEPO) is administered systemically. However, recent translation of experimental data into clinical trials has suggested an unclear role of recombinant human EPO in the setting of SAH. In this context, the aim of the current review is to present current evidence on the potential role of EPO in cerebrovascular dysfunction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26581085

  11. Treatment of Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Osamu; Ikawa, Fusao; Hidaka, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Yonezawa, Ushio

    2014-01-01

    Summary We evaluated the outcomes of endovascular or surgical treatment of ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), and investigated the relations between treatment complications and the development and location of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated 14 patients (12 men, two women; mean age, 56.2 years) with ruptured VADAs between March 1999 and June 2012 at our hospital. Six and eight patients had Hunt and Hess grades 1-3 and 4-5, respectively. Twelve patients underwent internal endovascular trapping, one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion alone, and one underwent proximal endovascular occlusion in the acute stage and occipital artery (OA)-PICA anastomosis and surgical trapping in the chronic stage. The types of VADA based on their location relative to the ipsilateral PICA were distal, PICA-involved, and non-PICA in nine, two, and three patients, respectively. The types of PICA based on their development and location were bilateral anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-PICA, ipsilateral AICA-PICA, extradural, and intradural type in one, two, two, and nine patients, respectively. Two patients with high anatomical risk developed medullary infarction, but their midterm outcomes were better than in previous reports. The modified Rankin scale indicated grades 0-2, 3-5, and 6 in eight, three, and three patients, respectively. A good outcome is often obtained in the treatment of ruptured VADA using internal endovascular trapping, except in the PICA-involved type, even with high-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of the PICA-involved type is controversial. The anatomical location and development of PICA may be predicted by complications with postoperative medullary infarction. PMID:24976093

  12. Harvey W. Cushing and cerebrovascular surgery: Part I, Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spencer, Dennis D

    2004-09-01

    The development of surgical techniques for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms has paralleled the evolution of the specialty of neurological surgery. During the Cushing era, intracranial aneurysms were considered inoperable and only ligation of the carotid artery was performed. Cushing understood the limitations of this approach and advised the need for a more thorough understanding of aneurysm pathology before further consideration could be given to the surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Despite his focus on brain tumors, Cushing's contributions to the discipline of neurovascular surgery are of great importance. With the assistance of Sir Charles Symonds, Cushing described the syndrome of subarachnoid hemorrhage. He considered inserting muscle strips into cerebral aneurysms to promote aneurysm sac thrombosis and designed the "silver clip," which was modified by McKenzie and later used by Dandy to clip the first intracranial aneurysm. Cushing was the first surgeon to wrap aneurysms in muscle fragments to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. He established the foundation on which pioneers such as Norman Dott and Walter Dandy launched the modern era of neurovascular surgery.

  13. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  14. The Harmful Effects of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Extracerebral Organs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Qian; Wu, Haijian; Krafft, Paul R.; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating neurological disorder. Patients with aneurysmal SAH develop secondary complications that are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Aside from secondary neurological injuries, SAH has been associated with nonneurologic medical complications, such as neurocardiogenic injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, hyperglycemia, and electrolyte imbalance, of which cardiac and pulmonary complications are most common. The related mechanisms include activation of the sympathetic nervous system, release of catecholamines and other hormones, and inflammatory responses. Extracerebral complications are directly related to the severity of SAH-induced brain injury and indicate the clinical outcome in patients. This review provides an overview of the extracerebral complications after SAH. We also aim to describe the manifestations, underlying mechanisms, and the effects of those extracerebral complications on outcome following SAH. PMID:25110700

  15. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  16. Surgical clipping of a recurrent small saccular aneurysm after repeated coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazumichi; Wataya, Takafumi; Hojo, Masato; Doi, Daisuke; Yamagata, Sen

    2005-07-01

    A 59-year-old healthy woman presented with sudden onset of severe headache. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) demonstrated subarachnoid hemorrhage (grade I according to the Hunt and Hess classification) due to a ruptured small right posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. The ruptured PCA aneurysm was completely embolized with three Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). However, follow-up DSA 3 months after the initial coiling confirmed refilling of the aneurysm. The aneurysm was successfully re-embolized with two GDCs. Follow-up DSA 10 months later revealed regrowth of the aneurysm. Surgical clipping was performed without compromising the parent vessels. Long-term angiographic follow up is necessary even in patients with small saccular aneurysms which are apparently completely embolized by endovascular coil treatment.

  17. Endovascular repair of ruptured aneurysm arising from fenestration of the horizontal segment of the anterior cerebral artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kazuto; Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with an aneurysm arising from a fenestration of horizontal portion (A(1)) of the anterior cerebral artery manifesting as subarachnoid hemorrhage. Coil embolization was conducted and the aneurysm was occluded easily. Most reported cases of these types of aneurysms underwent direct surgery. Aneurysm arising from the A(1) fenestration is rare, but the present case shows that coil embolization can be an effective treatment modality. Three-dimensional rotational angiography and aneurysmography were helpful to characterize this complicated vascular structure.

  18. Ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm from a herniated cervical disc. A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Jonathan; Nasser, Rani; Yassari, Reza; Pasquale, David; Altschul, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by a ruptured cervical anterior spinal artery aneurysm is extremely rare and in the setting of cervical spondylosis. This case presentation reviews the diagnosis, management, and treatment of such aneurysms. Case Presentation: An 88-year-old female presented with the worst headache of her life without focal deficits. She was found to have diffuse SAH in the basal cisterns extending inferiorly down the spinal canal. Review of the neurodiagnostic images revealed an anterior spinal artery aneurysm in the setting of cervical spondylosis. Conclusions: Clinicians should be suspicious of cervical spondylosis as a rare etiology for an SAH when cerebral angiograms prove negative for intracranial aneurysms. PMID:26862449

  19. Clipping of ipsilateral posterior communicating and superior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Welch, Babu G

    2015-01-01

    The case is a 55-year-old female who presented with dizziness as the chief complaint. She has a family history of two relatives with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed the presence of a left-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an ipsilateral superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysm. Due to the smaller nature of the SCA, a decision was made to proceed with surgical clipping of both lesions through a pterional approach. A narrated video with illustrations depicts the intraoperative management of these lesions with postoperative angiography results. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/HCHToSsXv-4 . PMID:25554845

  20. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  2. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  3. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography in cerebral aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, R.; Pietila, T.; Al, H; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Outcome of surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms may be severely compromised by local cerebral ischaemia or infarction resulting from the inadvertent occlusion of an adjacent vessel by the aneurysm clip, or by incomplete aneurysm closure. It is therefore mandatory to optimise clip placement in situ to reduce the complication rate. The present study was performed to investigate the reliability of intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) in cerebral aneurysm surgery, and to assess the impact of this method on the surgical procedure itself.
METHODS—Seventy five patients (19 men, 56 women, mean age 54.8 years, range 22-84 years) with 90 saccular cerebral aneurysms were evaluated. Blood flow velocities in the aneurysmal sac and in the adjacent vessels were determined by MDU before and after aneurysm clipping. The findings of MDU were analysed and compared with those of visual inspection of the surgical site and of postoperative angiography. Analysis was also made of the cases in which the clip was repositioned due to MDU findings.
RESULTS—A relevant stenosis of an adjacent vessel induced by clip positioning that had escaped detection by visual inspection was identified by Doppler ultrasonography in 17 out of 90 (18.9%) aneurysms. In addition, Doppler ultrasound demonstrated a primarily unoccluded aneurysm in 11 out of 90 (12.2%) patients. The aneurysm clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU findings in 26 out of 90 (28.8%) cases. In middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, the MDU results were relevant to the surgical procedure in 17out of 44 (38.6%) cases. Whereas with aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery significant findings occurred in only five of 32cases (15.6%; p<0.05). The clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU results in 18 out of 50 (36%) aneurysms in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) grade I-V compared with only eight out of 40 (20%) aneurysms in patients without SAH (p<0.05).

  4. The burden of the systemic inflammatory response predicts vasospasm and outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Rajat; Diringer, Michael N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can trigger immune activation sufficient to induce the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This may promote both extra-cerebral organ dysfunction and delayed cerebral ischemia, contributing to worse outcome. We ascertained the frequency and predictors of SIRS after spontaneous SAH, and determined whether degree of early systemic inflammation predicted the occurrence of vasospasm and clinical outcome. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 276 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosciences intensive care unit with acute, non-traumatic SAH between 2002 and 2005. A daily SIRS score was derived by summing the number of variables meeting standard criteria (HR >90, RR >20, Temperature >38°C or <36°C, WBC count <4,000 or >12,000). SIRS was considered present if two or more criteria were met, while SIRS burden over the first four days was calculated by averaging daily scores. Regression modeling was used to determine the relationship between SIRS burden (after controlling for confounders including infection, surgery, and corticosteroid use), symptomatic vasospasm, and outcome, determined by hospital disposition. Results: SIRS was present in over half the patients on admission and developed in 85% within the first four days. Factors associated with SIRS included poor clinical grade, thick cisternal blood, larger aneurysm size, higher admission blood pressure, and surgery for aneurysm clipping. Higher SIRS burden was independently associated with death or discharge to nursing home (OR 2.20/point, 95% CI 1.27-3.81). All of those developing clinical vasospasm had evidence of SIRS, with greater SIRS burden predicting increased risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (OR 1.77/point, 95% CI 1.12-2.80). Conclusions: Systemic inflammatory activation is common after SAH even in the absence of infection; it is more frequent in those with more severe hemorrhage and in those who undergo

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage admissions retrospectively identified using a prediction model

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Fergusson, Dean; Turgeon, Alexis; dos Santos, Marlise P.; Lum, Cheemun; Chassé, Michaël; Sinclair, John; Forster, Alan; van Walraven, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To create an accurate prediction model using variables collected in widely available health administrative data records to identify hospitalizations for primary subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: A previously established complete cohort of consecutive primary SAH patients was combined with a random sample of control hospitalizations. Chi-square recursive partitioning was used to derive and internally validate a model to predict the probability that a patient had primary SAH (due to aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation) using health administrative data. Results: A total of 10,322 hospitalizations with 631 having primary SAH (6.1%) were included in the study (5,122 derivation, 5,200 validation). In the validation patients, our recursive partitioning algorithm had a sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 93.9–98.0), a specificity of 99.8% (95% CI 99.6–99.9), and a positive likelihood ratio of 483 (95% CI 254–879). In this population, patients meeting criteria for the algorithm had a probability of 45% of truly having primary SAH. Conclusions: Routinely collected health administrative data can be used to accurately identify hospitalized patients with a high probability of having a primary SAH. This algorithm may allow, upon validation, an easy and accurate method to create validated cohorts of primary SAH from either ruptured aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation. PMID:27629096

  6. Prophylactic volume expansion therapy for the prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia after early aneurysm surgery. Results of a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E; Lennihan, L

    1988-03-01

    From June 1986 to June 1987, 47 consecutive patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were treated with immediate aneurysm surgery and prophylactic volume expansion therapy for ten to 14 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty-four patients were admitted within three days of SAH. Twenty-three of these patients had an excellent result, and one patient died. There were no cases of delayed cerebral infarction. In 18 of 23 patients admitted more than three days after SAH, there was an excellent result. The other five patients had permanent morbidity related to the original SAH. These preliminary data suggest that immediate aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative prophylactic volume expansion in all patients can substantially reduce rebleeding and delayed cerebral ischemia, potential causes of morbidity, after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A more extensive prospective trial of this approach will be required to test this hypothesis. PMID:3277601

  7. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction in a pediatric patient with coronary aneurysm and stenosis due to Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Drossner, David M; Chappell, Clay; Rab, Tanveer; Kim, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We report the case of an acutely ill 3-year-old female, with a previous medical history of Kawasaki disease, who presented to care with an acute myocardial infarction. We describe the coordinated therapies employed by pediatric and adult cardiologists aimed to establish coronary revascularization.

  8. SAHIT Investigators--on the outcome of some subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, R Loch; Jaja, Blessing; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C; Singh, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has improved over the last decades. Yet, case fatality remains nearly 40% and survivors often have permanent neurological, cognitive and/or behavioural sequelae. Other than nimodipine drug or clinical trials have not consistently improved outcome. We formed a collaboration of SAH investigators to create a resource for prognostic analysis and for studies aimed at optimizing the design and analysis of phase 3 trials in aneurysmal SAH. We identified investigators with data from randomized, clinical trials of patients with aneurysmal SAH or prospectively collected single- or multicentre databases of aneurysmal SAH patients. Data are being collected and proposals to use the data and to design future phase 3 clinical trials are being discussed. This paper reviews some issues discussed at the first meeting of the SAH international trialists (SAHIT) repository meeting. Investigators contributed or have agreed to contribute data from several phase 3 trials including the tirilazad trials, intraoperative hypothermia for aneurysmal SAH trial, nicardipine clinical trials, international subarachnoid aneurysm trial, intravenous magnesium sulphate for aneurysmal SAH, magnesium for aneurysmal SAH and from prospectively-collected data from four institutions. The number of patients should reach 15,000. Some industry investigators refused to provide data and others reported that their institutional research ethics boards would not permit even deidentified or anonymized data to be included. Others reported conflict of interest that prevented them from submitting data. The problems with merging data were related to lack of common definitions and coding of variables, differences in outcome scales used, and times of assessment. Some questions for investigation that arose are discussed. SAHIT demonstrates the possibility of SAH investigators to contribute data for collaborative research. The problems are similar to those

  9. Unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting as depression: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Cikotas, Paulius; Steibliene, Vesta; Deltuva, Vytenis P.; Tamsauskas, Arimantas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial aneurysms most commonly present following rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. Mental disorders are common among patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms and in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage survivors. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no published report of unruptured intracranial aneurysm presenting as a mental disorder. Case Description: A 69-year-old male without a past history of mental disorders and neurological symptoms presented with a 2-month history of anxiety, sadness, lack of pleasure in usual activities, fatigue, difficulties falling asleep and waking up early in the morning, reduced appetite, and weight loss. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment was initiated. Subsequent non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated hypointense oval-shaped lesion within the projection of the anterior communicating artery. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis of a 0.8 × 0.6 cm saccular aneurysm originating from the anterior communicating artery and anterior cerebral artery. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping of the aneurysm. On psychiatric assessment 1 month after the surgery, there were no signs of depressive disorder and antidepressive treatment was discontinued. On follow-up visit 1 year after the surgery, the patient did not have any mood symptoms. Conclusions: The case indicates that organic brain lesions, including intracranial aneurysms, should be suspected in elderly patients presenting with their first episode of mental disorder. PMID:27583172

  10. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  11. Endovascular treatment for ruptured distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm -case report-.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daizo; Takechi, Akihiko; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Sogabe, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured left distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Computed tomography showed a thin subarachnoid hemorrhage in the ambient cistern, and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm arising from the lateral branch of the left AICA, which was separate from the meatal loop. Endovascular treatment was performed to achieve parent artery occlusion using two Guglielmi detachable coils. Postoperatively, the patient had no complications except for left hearing disturbance, and she was independent in daily life. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for distal AICA aneurysm, especially distal from the meatal loop, can avoid sacrificing the internal auditory artery if the lateral branch of the AICA could be occluded more distally from the meatal loop. Sufficient collateral circulation prevents major infarction, and this strategy may be the first-line treatment choice. PMID:20505296

  12. Microsurgical management of a complicated aneurysmal endovascular embolisation with GDC coil: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pogády, P; Mustafa, H; Wies, W; Lungenschmid, K; Wurm, G; Tomancok, B; Holl, K; Fischer, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a case involving a microsurgical approach to solving the problem of a medial cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion occurring after GDC coiling of an internal cerebral artery (ICA) bifurcation aneurysm in a 40 year old woman. We describe the clinical course of the case and discuss technical possibilities and risks of clipping a coiled aneurysm. One key to success is awareness of changes in the aneurysm's properties after coiling. With loss of elasticity the aneurysm had the effect of a tumor fixed on the vessel. The apposition of the aneurysm to the wall of the vessel, as well as the aneurysm's rigidity and increase of intracranial pressure after subarachnoideal hemorrhage (SAH), may lead to occlusion of the vessel. In cases of an mandatory operation due to the occlusion of a main arterial stem after coiling, it is primarily crucial to perforate the aneurysm's fundus, remove the coils, and, finally, to clip the slack neck of the aneurysm. An attempt to precisely prepare and clip the aneurysmal neck without removing the coils could result in the rupture of the aneurysm's neck. PMID:9795964

  13. The establishment of endovascular aneurysm coiling at a neurovascular unit: report of experience during early years.

    PubMed

    Norbäck, O; Gál, G; Johansson, M; Solander, S; Tovi, M; Persson, L; Ronne-Engström, E; Enblad, P

    2005-02-01

    The treatment of cerebral aneurysms is changing from surgical clipping to endovascular coiling (EVC) in many neurovascular centres. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical results and clinical outcome at 6 months in a consecutive series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients treated with EVC, in a situation when the EVC had been established very rapidly as the first line of treatment at a neurovascular centre. The patient material comprised 239 SAH patients (155 women and 84 men, mean age 55 years, age range 16-81) allocated to EVC as the first line of treatment in the acute stage (within 3 weeks of rupture) between September 1996 and December 2000. Clinical grade on admission was Hunt & Hess (H&H) I and II in 42%, H&H III in 25% and H&H grade IV and V in 33% of the patients. The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 82% of the cases. EVC was performed on days 0-3 in 77% of the cases. EVC of the target aneurysm was able to be completed in 222 patients (93%). Complete occlusion was achieved in 126 patients (53%). Procedural complications occurred in 39 patients (16%). Favourable clinical outcome was observed in 57%, severe disability in 28% and poor outcome in 14% of the patients. Favourable outcome was achieved in 77% of H&H I and II patients and in 43% of H&H III-V patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, good neurological grade on admission, absence of intracerebral hematoma and intraventricular hematoma respectively, ICA-PcomA aneurysm location, later treatment and absence of complications were significant predictors of favourable outcome. After interventional training and installation of the X-ray system, the introduction and establishment of EVC at a neurovascular unit can be done in a short period of time and with favourable results. Future studies must concentrate on identifying factors of importance for the choice of interventional or surgical therapy. The results of this study indicate

  14. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  15. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  16. [Distal Aortic Arch Aneurysm, Acute type B Aortic Dissection, and Acute Bilateral Limb Ischemia Treated by Two-stage Total Arch Replacement;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazunori; Itoh, Satoshi; Tajima, Yasushi; Kimura, Naoyuki; Yuri, Kohichi; Matumoto, Harunobu; Adachi, Kohichi; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2015-05-01

    A 74-year-old female patient experienced sudden and severe pain in her lower back and both legs. Upon examination, her femoral pulses were weak, and her legs were pale. Computed tomography revealed a 66-mm thoracic aneurysm in the distal arch and type B aortic dissection. Stenosis was present from the terminal aorta to the iliac arteries. The left common iliac artery was occluded at its bifurcation, and both lower limbs were ischemic. We performed bilateral axillary-femoral artery bypass, which improved blood flow to both limbs. The next day, it was apparent that compartment syndrome had developed in the patient's left leg. Rehabilitation therapy was effective for the compartment syndrome, the patient's symptoms resolved, and she was discharged. We later performed two-stage total arch replacement, and the subsequent clinical course has been without incident.

  17. In Vitro Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in a Shaken Basal Cistern after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kertzscher, Ulrich; Schneider, Torsten; Goubergrits, Leonid; Affeld, Klaus; Hänggi, Daniel; Spuler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies) on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force. Conclusions/Significance From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. PMID:22870243

  18. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  19. Treatment of a giant arteriovenous malformation associated with intracranial aneurysm rupture during pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Wang, Yuhai; Li, Peipei; Chen, Weiliang; Zhou, Jingxu; Hu, Xu; Zhu, Jie; Jiang, Bingjie

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) associated with aneurysm have rarely been reported in the literature. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old pregnant female patient who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage and an intracranial hematoma located in the anterior end of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, an anterior cerebral aneurysm and an AVM were identified by digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. The aneurysm was clipped and the AVM was successfully removed by microsurgery. The diagnosis of AVM associated with an aneurysm was confirmed via intraoperative and postoperative pathological examinations. By performing a review of the current literature, issues and surgical considerations associated with AVM associated with aneurysm were analyzed. PMID:27588055

  20. Spontaneous healing and complete disappearance of a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsung-Ming; Cheng, Ching-Hsiao; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2014-05-01

    A 7-month-old baby presented with a 4-day history of drowsiness and vomiting after a falling accident. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and variable stages of subdural hematoma in bilateral occipital and left temporal subdural spaces. A partially thrombosed aneurysm was noted in the right craniocervical junction. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral retinal petechial hemorrhages. Conventional cerebral angiography revealed a dissecting aneurysm in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Endovascular embolization was suggested, but the family refused. After conservative treatment, follow-up MRI revealed that the PICA aneurysm had remodeled and ultimately disappeared completely at the 10th month. This case illustrates the relatively plastic nature of intracranial aneurysms in pediatric patients. More studies are necessary to clarify the natural history of spontaneously thrombosed aneurysms to assist in their overall management.

  1. Stent-assisted Coiling for Ruptured Basilar Artery Dissecting Aneurysms: An Initial Experience of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    KOIZUMI, Satoshi; SHOJIMA, Masaaki; IIJIMA, Akira; OYA, Soichi; MATSUI, Toru; YOSHIKAWA, Gakushi; TSUTSUMI, Kazuo; NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    No treatment strategy has been established for subarachnoid hemorrhages due to basilar artery (BA) trunk dissecting aneurysms. Our aim was to report our initial experience performing stent-assisted coiling (SAC) for ruptured BA dissecting aneurysms to validate the effectiveness of this treatment. We experienced four consecutive cases of ruptured dissecting BA trunk aneurysm treated with SAC between 2008 and 2014 at three institutions. Aneurysm rebleeding was prevented without causing severe brainstem ischemia in all cases. In our opinion, both the blockage of the inflow to aneurysms and the preservation of the antegrade flow of the BA can be achieved by SAC, although controversies regarding long-term stability and appropriate antiplatelet therapy remain. PMID:26667082

  2. Traumatic Aneurysm of the Callosomarginal Artery-Cortical Artery Junction from Penetrating Injury by Scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms (TICAs) are rare and are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. TICAs usually result from head injuries caused by traffic accidents, industrial accidents, or gunshots. We report a traumatic aneurysm of the callosomarginal artery-cortical artery junction arising from a penetrating injury by scissors. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after suffering a penetrating injury caused by scissors. Computed tomography (CT) and CT-angiography demonstrated a right orbital roof fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage, frontal lobe hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and a traumatic aneurysm of the right callosomarginal artery-cortical artery junction. We trapped the traumatic aneurysm and repositioned a galeal flap. Postoperative CT showed a small infarction in the left frontal lobe. Follow-up angiography two months later showed no residual aneurysm. We suggest that an aggressive surgical intervention be performed whenever TICA is diagnosed. PMID:25024829

  3. Traumatic aneurysm of the callosomarginal artery-cortical artery junction from penetrating injury by scissors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Sim, Sook Young

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms (TICAs) are rare and are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. TICAs usually result from head injuries caused by traffic accidents, industrial accidents, or gunshots. We report a traumatic aneurysm of the callosomarginal artery-cortical artery junction arising from a penetrating injury by scissors. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after suffering a penetrating injury caused by scissors. Computed tomography (CT) and CT-angiography demonstrated a right orbital roof fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage, frontal lobe hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and a traumatic aneurysm of the right callosomarginal artery-cortical artery junction. We trapped the traumatic aneurysm and repositioned a galeal flap. Postoperative CT showed a small infarction in the left frontal lobe. Follow-up angiography two months later showed no residual aneurysm. We suggest that an aggressive surgical intervention be performed whenever TICA is diagnosed.

  4. A p1 aneurysm and diabetes insipidus caused by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lv, M; Lv, X; Jiang, C; Wu, Z

    2010-12-01

    We describe a patient with a P1 aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) with diabetes insipidus (DI) caused by traumatic brain injury. A 21-year-old woman presented with epidural hematoma, left temporal contusion and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by head trauma. DI occurred with normal anterior hypophyseal function on the second day after admission and cerebral angiography demonstrated an aneurysm at the right P1 portion after one month. DI was treated with administration of desmopressin and the aneurysm and P1 portion of the right PCA were occluded completely. After three months, her DI recovered and decompressin was discontinued. The six month follow-up angiogram confirmed cure of the P1 aneurysm. P1 aneurysm and DI can be caused by traumatic brain injury. Cranial DI caused by head injury with perturbations in water balance may be transitory and resolve.

  5. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  6. [Seizures caused by subarachnoid haemorrhage in a pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Shim, Susy; Christiansen, Ulla Birgitte; Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard

    2016-07-25

    This case report describes a pregnant woman of gestational week 37 + 2 days who was admitted to the hospital with first-time seizures. The patient was stabilized, and an acute caesarian section was performed due to the possible aetiology of eclampsia and the advanced gestational age. Because of the atypical clinical history and normal maternal blood samples a computed tomography of the cerebrum was performed demonstrating a subarachnoid haemorrhage. A computed tomography-angiography revealed an aneurism at the anterior communicating artery. The aneurism was coiled the following day to reduce the risk of rebleeding. PMID:27460576

  7. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding.

  8. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:26974558

  9. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage from the anterior communication artery in a sex offender. Considerations regarding liability].

    PubMed

    Mielke, U; Donauer, E; Luthe, R

    1996-09-01

    A 32-year-old man was accused of attempted rape. While urinating at the side of the road he felt an erection. He approached a 9-year-old girl who happened to be coming along and pressed his penis between her legs until ejaculation. Shortly afterwards he was arrested. He confessed, but claimed partial amnesia and had no explanation for the offence, which he normally would never have thought of. Shortly before the event a witness had seen him nearby in a poor state of orientation. Three months later in prison he suffered massive subarachnoidal hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The evaluation of his legal responsibility must take account of a putative psychomotor seizure at the time of the offence. With regard to the aneurysm diagnosed later, a pathogenetic connection, in terms of a preceding warning leak, might be assumed.

  10. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage from the anterior communication artery in a sex offender. Considerations regarding liability].

    PubMed

    Mielke, U; Donauer, E; Luthe, R

    1996-09-01

    A 32-year-old man was accused of attempted rape. While urinating at the side of the road he felt an erection. He approached a 9-year-old girl who happened to be coming along and pressed his penis between her legs until ejaculation. Shortly afterwards he was arrested. He confessed, but claimed partial amnesia and had no explanation for the offence, which he normally would never have thought of. Shortly before the event a witness had seen him nearby in a poor state of orientation. Three months later in prison he suffered massive subarachnoidal hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. The evaluation of his legal responsibility must take account of a putative psychomotor seizure at the time of the offence. With regard to the aneurysm diagnosed later, a pathogenetic connection, in terms of a preceding warning leak, might be assumed. PMID:8992376

  11. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  13. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  14. [Subarachnoid hematoma and spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Dupeyrat, A; Dequiré, P M; Mérouani, A; Moullier, P; Eid, G

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of spinal subarachnoid haematoma occurring after spinal anaesthesia are reported. In the first case, lumbar puncture was attempted three times in a 81-year-old man; spinal anaesthesia trial was than abandoned, and the patient given a general anaesthetic. He was given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth day, the patient became paraparetic. Radioculography revealed a blockage between T10 and L3. Laminectomy was performed to remove the haematoma, but the patient recovered motor activity only very partially. The second case was a 67-year-old man, in whom spinal anaesthesia was easily carried out. He was also given prophylactic calcium heparinate soon after surgery. On the fourth postoperative day, pulmonary embolism was suspected. Heparin treatment was then started. Twelve hours later, lumbar and bilateral buttock pain occurred, which later spread to the neck. On the eighth day, the patient had neck stiffness and two seizures. Emergency laminectomy was carried out, which revealed a subarachnoid haematoma spreading to a level higher than T6 and below L1, with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid, and a non pulsatile spinal cord. Surgery was stopped. The patient died on the following day. Both these cases are similar to those previously reported and point out the role played by anticoagulants. Because early diagnosis of spinal cord compression is difficult, the prognosis is poor, especially in case of paraplegia. PMID:2278424

  15. Anomalous Right Subclavian Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Gordon C.; Codd, John E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past 2 years, 3 anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms have been encountered at the St. Louis Heart Institute. The 1st patient, a 72-year-old woman, was found to have an asymptomatic 5-cm-diameter anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysm after surgery for suspected rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Resection was not attempted because of her poor cardiopulmonary and renal condition. One year later, the patient remains alive with marked cardiopulmonary limitations. The 2nd patient, a 77-year-old man, experienced dysphagia and severe weight loss because of a 14-cm-diameter aneurysm. Three days after undergoing surgical repair, he required reoperation for graft occlusion with right upper-extremity ischemia. Six months after hospital discharge, he died of pulmonary insufficiency and metastatic colon cancer. The 3rd patient, a 73-year-old woman, required emergency surgical intervention because of acute rupture and hypovolemic shock. Thirteen days later, she died of aspiration, asphyxia, and cardiac arrest. On the basis of our experience and a review of the literature, we conclude that symptomatic anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms are rare, and that surgical intervention entails a relatively high morbidity and mortality rate. If long-term survival is anticipated, associated medical illnesses should be considered before surgery is undertaken. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:209-18) Images PMID:15227483

  16. Interleukin-6 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, was found to surge in the cerebral spinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized that the plasma level of IL-6 could be an independent biomarker in predicting clinical outcome of patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Methods We prospectively included 53 consecutive patients treated with platinum coil embolization of the ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Plasma IL-6 levels were measured in the blood samples at the orifices of the aneurysms and from peripheral veins. The outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale one month after SAH. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between the plasma IL-6 levels and the neurological outcome. Results Significant risk factors for the poor outcome were old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on day 0, high Fisher grades, and high aneurysmal and venous IL-6 levels in univariate analyses. Aneurysmal IL-6 levels showed modest to moderate correlations with GCS on day 0, vasospasm grade and Fisher grade. A strong correlation was found between the aneurysmal and the corresponding venous IL-6 levels (ρ = 0.721; P<0.001). In the multiple logistic regression models, the poor 30-day mRS was significantly associated with high aneurysmal IL-6 level (OR, 17.97; 95% CI, 1.51–214.33; P = 0.022) and marginally associated with high venous IL-6 level (OR, 12.71; 95% CI, 0.90–180.35; P = 0.022) after adjusting for dichotomized age, GCS on day 0, and vasospasm and Fisher grades. Conclusions The plasma level of IL-6 is an independent prognostic biomarker that could be used to aid in the identification of patients at high-risk of poor neurological outcome after rupture of the intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26176774

  17. Optical coherence tomography: a new method to assess aneurysm healing

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, William E.; Chow, Michael M.; Prayson, Richard A.; Shure, Mark A.; Jeon, Sung W.; Huang, David; Zeynalov, Emil; Woo, Henry H.; Rasmussen, Peter A.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Masaryk, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Object Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage affects approximately 10/100,000 people per year. Endovascular coil embolization is used increasingly to treat cerebral aneurysms and its safety and durability is rapidly developing. The long-term durability of coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms remains in question; patients treated using this modality require multiple follow-up angiography studies and occasional repeated treatments. Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that uses backscattered light to produce high-resolution tomography of optically accessible biological tissues such as the eye, luminal surface of blood vessels, and gastrointestinal tract. Vascular OCT probes in the form of imaging microwires are presently available—although not Food and Drug Administration–approved—and may be adapted for use in the cerebral circulation. In this study the authors describe the initial use of OCT to make visible the neck of aneurysms created in a canine model and treated with coil embolization. Optical coherence tomography images demonstrate changes that correlate with the histological findings of healing at the aneurysm neck and thus may be capable of demonstrating human cerebral aneurysm healing. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography may obviate the need for subsequent follow-up angiography studies as well as aid in the understanding of endovascular tissue healing. Data in this study demonstrate that further investigation of in vivo imaging with such probes is warranted. PMID:15739565

  18. Radio aneurysm coils for noninvasive detection of cerebral embolization failures: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza Rashidi; Chen, Keqin; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Takahata, Kenichi

    2011-12-15

    The rupture of a cerebral aneurysm is the most common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular embolization of the aneurysms by implantation of Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) has become a major treatment approach in the prevention of a rupture. Implantation of the coils induces formation of tissues over the coils, embolizing the aneurysm. However, blood entry into the coiled aneurysm often occurs due to failures in the embolization process. Current diagnostic methods used for aneurysms, such as X-ray angiography and computer tomography, are ineffective for continuous monitoring of the disease and require extremely expensive equipment. Here we present a novel technique for wireless monitoring of cerebral aneurysms using implanted embolization coils as radiofrequency resonant sensors that detect the blood entry. The experiments show that commonly used embolization coils could be utilized as electrical inductors or antennas. As the blood flows into a coil-implanted aneurysm, parasitic capacitance of the coil is modified because of the difference in permittivity between the blood and the tissues grown around the coil, resulting in a change in the coil's resonant frequency. The resonances of platinum GDC-like coils embedded in aneurysm models are detected to show average responses of 224-819 MHz/ml to saline injected into the models. This preliminary demonstration indicates a new possibility in the use of implanted GDC as a wireless sensor for embolization failures, the first step toward realizing long-term, noninvasive, and cost-effective remote monitoring of cerebral aneurysms treated with coil embolization.

  19. Selective treatment of an anterior spinal artery aneurysm with endosaccular coil therapy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Pascale; Raymond, Jean; Roy, Daniel; Guilbert, François; Weill, Alain

    2007-05-01

    The authors report the case of a 12-year-old boy with spinal cord arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and an associated anterior spinal artery (ASA) aneurysm treated with selective coil placement in the context of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient presented with headache. Head computed tomography scanning revealed no abnormal findings. The cerebrospinal fluid was sampled and analyzed and a diagnosis of SAH was established. Investigation, including magnetic resonance imaging of the cord as well as cerebral and spinal angiography, revealed a conus medullaris AVM and a saccular aneurysm located on the ASA at the T-11 level. The aneurysm was thought to be responsible for the bleeding. Superselective ASA angiography showed that the aneurysm was at the bifurcation between a large coronal artery supplying the AVM and the ASA. The relation of the aneurysm's neck to the main spinal axis and the aneurysm's morphological features indicated that the lesion was suited for endosaccular coil therapy. The aneurysm was selectively occluded, using electrodetachable bare platinum coils. Follow-up angiography immediately after surgery and at 6 months thereafter demonstrated complete occlusion of the aneurysm and a perfectly patent anterior spinal axis. On clinical follow-up examination, the patient remained neurologically intact. When the morphological features of a spinal aneurysm and its relation with the anterior spinal axis are favorable, selective endosaccular coil placement can successfully be achieved. PMID:17542515

  20. [Anterior Communicating Artery Dissection Presenting with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Cerebral Infarction].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takahiro; Sato, Yuiko; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-03-01

    We describe the case of subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction that developed simultaneously and was caused by suspected dissection of the anterior communicating artery. A 65-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache and nausea. Head computed tomography(CT)and magnetic resonance imaging revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and a spotty ischemic lesion in the right frontal cortex. Both, CT angiography and angiography with arterial catheterization showed an aneurysmal dilatation of the anterior communicating artery. A repeated CT angiography nine days later demonstrated enlargement of the aneurysmal dilatation. The patient underwent craniotomy under general anesthesia. Under the microscope, a thick hematoma was seen infero-dorsally from the anterior communicating artery. Two fenestrations of the anterior communicating artery were identified. After removal of the hematoma, a fusiform dilatation of the anterior communicating artery with a firm and reddish wall was confirmed. The lesion was coated with a teflon sponge and fibrin glue. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. A follow-up CT angiography two months after surgery revealed shrinkage of the lesion, when compared with preoperative images.

  1. Progressive Deconstruction of a Distal Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Competitive Flow Diversion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew K; Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-03-01

    Progressive deconstruction is an endovascular technique for aneurysm treatment that utilizes flow diverting stents to promote progressive thrombosis by diverting blood flow away from the aneurysm's parent vessel. While the aneurysm thromboses, collateral blood vessels develop over time to avoid infarction that can often accompany acute parent vessel occlusion. We report a 37-year-old woman with a left distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with this strategy. The concept and rationale of progressive deconstruction are discussed in detail.

  2. Does electrothrombosis occur immediately after embolization of an aneurysm with Guglielmi detachable coils?

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Samson, D; Purdy, P

    1997-03-01

    Current options for treating cerebral aneurysms include surgical clipping and placement of Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). The latter system is reported to induce acute aneurysmal occlusion by a mechanism of electrothrombosis. We report our observations in the case of a ruptured aneurysm treated with GDCs and then surgically exposed 2 hours later. The lack of thrombus within the aneurysm and around the coils led us to question the mechanism of action of GDCs.

  3. Emergency endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Dixon, Hannah; Saratzis, Nikolaos

    2010-12-01

    Popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA), despite being rare, is the most common peripheral aneurysm. It can present as acute thrombosis and occlusion of the aneurysmal segment, and distal embolization, causing either chronic or acute limb ischemia. It has traditionally been treated with open surgical reconstruction. Endovascular repair of PAAs has recently been applied electively with a favourable early and mid-term outcome; however there is a lack of reports on the endovascular treatment of PAAs presenting with acute complications. This report describes the treatment of a thrombosed PAA in a 58 year old male using an endovascular stent-graft and also provides a systematic review of the literature on the emergency endovascular treatment of PAAs.

  4. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  5. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T

    2016-07-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  6. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  7. Aneurysm of the pulmonary vein: an unusual cause of stroke.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Alexander; Jebran, Ahmad Fawad; Schmidt, Karsten; Hinterthaner, Marc; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Bähr, Mathias; Schöndube, Friedrich A; Danner, Bernhard C

    2014-11-01

    This clinical report deals with a giant true pulmonary venous aneurysm, which was partially thrombosed. The overall incidence of pulmonary venous aneurysms is unknown, and they are reported only occasionally. We present the case of a previously healthy man with acute onset of ischemic cerebral stroke. The cause was a thrombus in a huge aneurysm of the left superior pulmonary vein. The patient subsequently underwent uncomplicated therapy for stroke, including thrombolysis followed by excision of the giant pulmonary venous aneurysm. As curative therapy we recommend complete resection of this rare entity.

  8. How Is an Aneurysm Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Treated? Aortic aneurysms are treated with medicines and surgery. Small aneurysms ... doing your normal daily activities Treatment for an aortic aneurysm is based on its size. Your doctor may ...

  9. Technical challenges to surgical clipping of aneurysmal regrowth with coil herniation following endovascular treatment – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Promod; Karim, Aftab; Nanda, Anil

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, technical developments have made endovascular procedures attractive therapeutic options and enabled the endovascular surgeon to redefine the management of cerebral aneurysms. However, as the number of aneurysms undergoing endovascular therapy has grown, so has the number of patients with incompletely treated aneurysms who are presenting for further management. In cases of failure of endovascular treatment caused by either incomplete occlusion or regrowth of the aneurysm, a complementary treatment is often necessary. Surgical treatment of these patients is challenging. We present a case of a ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm treated initially with endovascular coiling that left behind significant residual aneurysmal sac. Regrowth of the aneurysm documented on follow-up was treated surgically. At surgery, the coil was found to have herniated through the aneurysmal sac into the subarachnoid space, and the aneurysm was successfully clipped without removing the coils. We review the regrowth of aneurysms following endovascular therapy and potential problems and challenges of surgically managing these lesions. PMID:18053204

  10. Dissecting aneurysm of the anterior temporal artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Umeoka, Katsuya; Shirokane, Kazutaka; Mizunari, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented a rare dissecting aneurysm of the anterior temporal artery (ATA) manifesting as headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mixed-density mass in the horizontal segment of the middle cerebral artery. Emergent angiography demonstrated aneurysmal dilatation and a thrombosed mass in the sylvian fissure. Infectious aneurysm was excluded. She underwent emergent surgery to reduce the risk of repeated infarction and hemorrhage. The distal side of the ATA manifested occlusive changes suggestive of arterial dissection. The proximal side of the ATA was ligated and the lesion was excised. Histological examination confirmed that the aneurysmal dilatation was attributable to arterial dissection due to disruption of the internal elastic lamina. Distal dissecting aneurysms may occur in the absence of infectious disease. We recommend that ruptured distal dissecting aneurysms be treated surgically in the acute stage immediately after detection.

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of a ruptured basilar top aneurysm autopsied 22 years after embolization with Guglielmi detachable coils

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Ichiro; Spitzer, Daniel; Guglielmi, Guido; Duckwiler, Gary; Fujimoto, Motoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Murayama, Yuichi; Vinuela, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The authors report on the histologic and immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebral aneurysm embolized with platinum coils and with the longest observation period. A 58-year-old woman presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured basilar top aneurysm was treated with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) 22 years ago. She was the 15th case since the GDC was introduced. After she died of unrelated causes, an autopsy and thorough histologic examination were performed. Gross examination revealed no adhesion between the aneurysm wall and the surrounding brain tissue. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the cavity of the aneurysm was filled with homogeneous collagenous fibrous tissue, while the neck was completely covered by a dense collagenous neointima and a smooth muscle cell layer. The unique histologic results of this case may contribute to a better understanding of the long-term evolution of the healing process in intracranial aneurysms successfully treated with the GDC. PMID:25056301

  12. Immunohistochemical analysis of a ruptured basilar top aneurysm autopsied 22 years after embolization with Guglielmi detachable coils.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Ichiro; Spitzer, Daniel; Guglielmi, Guido; Duckwiler, Gary; Fujimoto, Motoaki; Takao, Hiroyuki; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Murayama, Yuichi; Vinuela, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The authors report on the histologic and immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebral aneurysm embolized with platinum coils and with the longest observation period. A 58-year-old woman presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured basilar top aneurysm was treated with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) 22 years ago. She was the 15th case since the GDC was introduced. After she died of unrelated causes, an autopsy and thorough histologic examination were performed. Gross examination revealed no adhesion between the aneurysm wall and the surrounding brain tissue. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the cavity of the aneurysm was filled with homogeneous collagenous fibrous tissue, while the neck was completely covered by a dense collagenous neointima and a smooth muscle cell layer. The unique histologic results of this case may contribute to a better understanding of the long-term evolution of the healing process in intracranial aneurysms successfully treated with the GDC.

  13. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  14. Treatment of large and giant fusiform intracranial aneurysms with Guglielmi detachable coils.

    PubMed

    Gobin, Y P; Viñuela, F; Gurian, J H; Guglielmi, G; Duckwiler, G R; Massoud, T F; Martin, N A

    1996-01-01

    Results in nine patients with large or giant fusiform intracranial aneurysms that were treated with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) are reported. There were six males and three females between the ages of 12 and 63. Four patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and four with mass effect; in one patient the aneurysm was asymptomatic and located in an arterial feeder of an arteriovenous malformation. Five aneurysms were supratentorial and four were in the posterior fossa. Five were giant and four were large. Selective occlusion with preservation of the parent artery was attempted in three cases, and complete occlusion of the aneurysm and the parent artery was performed in six patients. The tolerance to parent artery occlusion was assessed by angiography, balloon test occlusion, and amytal testing. Six aneurysms were permanently occluded and two partially recanalized. In one case, GDC embolization was not possible. The four patients who presented with SAH made an excellent clinical recovery. Three of the four patients presenting with mass effect recovered completely and one remained unchanged. The patient with an incidental aneurysm remained asymptomatic. There were no permanent complications. In conclusion, GDCs were useful for the occlusion of large and giant intradural fusiform aneurysms. Occlusion of the aneurysm and the parent artery afforded the greatest opportunity for a complete cure. Advantages of GDCs compared to balloons include: occlusion of a shorter segment of normal artery, no traction on the parent vessel, and safer and easier catheterization techniques.

  15. Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms: A role for conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Sayal; Arif, Zafar; Chittoor, Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy-related intracranial aneurysms are a recognized but rare phenomenon and often present following rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment poses a particular dilemma and both endovascular, and surgical approaches have been used with varied success. We present the case of a radiotherapy-related aneurysm treated conservatively with a favorable outcome. Case Description: A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with a left temporal lobe mass for which he underwent an uneventful craniotomy and debulking. Histology revealed Grade III anaplastic astrocytoma following which he received radiotherapy. Three years later, he presented with subacute headache and transient dysphasia. Computed tomography and catheter angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the supramarginal branch of the left middle cerebral artery with probable intra-aneurysmal thrombus. Adjacent vessels also showed mild vasculitic changes. Trial balloon occlusion of the parent vessel resulted in profound dysphasia and was therefore abandoned. Bypass surgery or stent placement was deemed to have too high a risk of neurological deficit, and keeping in mind, the diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma, conservative management was pursued with partial thrombosis noted on serial imaging and stable appearances subsequently at 42 months’ follow-up. Conclusion: Conservative management can be pursued in selective cases of radiotherapy-related aneurysms, particularly if the risk of treating is too high and in the context of intracranial malignancy with limited lifespan. PMID:27313964

  16. Fatal traumatic aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery with delayed rupture.

    PubMed

    Purgina, Bibianna; Milroy, Christopher Mark

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic aneurysms of intracranial arteries are rare, forming less than 1% of all intracranial arteries. They may be associated with penetrating and non-penetrating trauma. Most cases are associated with fracturing of the skull. Rupture of traumatic aneurysms occur in up to 50% of cases and are typically delayed from days to weeks following the initiating trauma. We report a case of a 22-year-old man who was punched to the head. He was rendered unconscious but recovered and had a GCS of 14 on admission. CT scans showed subarachnoid hemorrhage. An initial angiogram was negative but on day 7 following the incident he was noted to have a 1 mm aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery on CT angiogram. On day 9 he collapsed and was found to have new subarachnoid hemorrhage and to have a 4.0 mm × 3.7 mm. He did not recover and was declared brain dead on day 12. At autopsy, there was a 4.0 mm aneurysm of the left PICA just after the origin of the artery. Histological examination confirmed the presence of a traumatic false aneurysm in the left PICA. This case study shows sequential radiological imaging with pathologiocal correlation.

  17. Intracranial hemorrhage from undetected aneurysmal rupture complicating transphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Uy, Edilfavia Mae; Rai, Mridula; Kannan, Subramanian; Senatus, Patrick

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old man who presented with a nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma which extended into the suprasellar region. He underwent a transcranial resection of the tumor followed eight months later by transsphenoidal surgery for the residual tumor. Postoperatively he developed massive subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. A cerebral angiogram revealed a leaking anterior communicating artery aneurysm which was not seen on the computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography before the surgery. Complications of transsphenoidal surgery, particularly vascular hemorrhagic complications, and risk of rupture of undetected aneurysms are discussed.

  18. Novel role for endogenous hepatocyte growth factor in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Peña-Silva, Ricardo A; Chalouhi, Nohra; Wegman-Points, Lauren; Ali, Muhammad; Mitchell, Ian; Pierce, Gary L; Chu, Yi; Ballas, Zuhair K; Heistad, Donald; Hasan, David

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Because hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) protects against vascular inflammation, we sought to assess the role of endogenous HGF in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms. Circulating HGF concentrations in blood samples drawn from the lumen of human intracranial aneurysms or femoral arteries were compared in 16 patients. Tissue from superficial temporal arteries and ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms collected from patients undergoing clipping (n=10) were immunostained with antibodies to HGF and its receptor c-Met. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in mice treated with PF-04217903 (a c-Met antagonist) or vehicle. Expression of inflammatory molecules was also measured in cultured human endothelial, smooth muscle cells and monocytes treated with lipopolysaccharides in presence or absence of HGF and PF-04217903. We found that HGF concentrations were significantly higher in blood collected from human intracranial aneurysms (1076±656 pg/mL) than in femoral arteries (196±436 pg/mL; P<0.001). HGF and c-Met were detected by immunostaining in superficial temporal arteries and in both ruptured and unruptured human intracranial aneurysms. A c-Met antagonist did not alter the formation of intracranial aneurysms (P>0.05), but significantly increased the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and decreased survival in mice (P<0.05). HGF attenuated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (P<0.05) and E-Selectin (P<0.05) in human aortic endothelial cells. In conclusion, plasma HGF concentrations are elevated in intracranial aneurysms. HGF and c-Met are expressed in superficial temporal arteries and in intracranial aneurysms. HGF signaling through c-Met may decrease inflammation in endothelial cells and protect against intracranial aneurysm rupture. PMID:25510828

  19. Utility of Balloon-Assisted Guglielmi Detachable Coiling in the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Nistri, M.; Pandolfo, C.; Ammannati, F.; Mennonna, P.; Giordano, GP.

    2002-01-01

    Summary Balloon-assisted Guglielmi detachable coiling (BAGDC) is a new technical option developed to allow endovascular treatment of wide-necked aneurysms. Aim of the following work is to report a single center experience of BADGC of aneurysms with assessment of its efficacy and safety. BAGDC of wide-necked aneurysms (SNR close to 1) was retrospectively evaluated in 37 patients (28 females, nine males, mean age: 56.6 yrs, range: 27-81 yrs) who underwent the procedure between january 1999 and january 2002 for a total of 45 procedures on 41 aneurysms. Twenty-nine patients presented with SAH from an acutely ruptured aneurysm. In two patients BAGDC failed whereas 35 patients successfully underwent BADGC (39 aneurysms). Twenty-nine patients (31 aneurysms) were available for angiographic follow-up (mean: 10 mo, range: 3-24 mo). At the last angiographic follow-up 29/33 aneurysms (87%) resulted stable and occluded (22 aneurysms with dense and seven with loose packing of the sac and the neck), two aneurysms showed regrowth, one aneurysm showed a neck remnant and another one a sac and neck remnant. Complications directly related to the procedure occurred in five patients (three perforations, one thromboembolism, one femoral AV) with a mortality and morbility rate of 2.7 and 5.4 respectively. BAGDC is a promising adjunct to treatment of wide-necked aneurysms broadening the spectrum of indications for endovascular treament of challenging aneurysms. PMID:20594481

  20. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia: rare consequence of sexual stimulation in a paraplegic].

    PubMed

    Galiart, E; Baumberger, M; Pannek, J

    2013-11-01

    Nearly all men with spinal cord injury suffer from neurogenic sexual dysfunction which is often treated with phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors. We describe a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia (AD) caused by sexual stimulation. Nitrates are frequently used for acute treatment of AD; however, the use of these drugs in combination with PDE5 inhibitors is contraindicated. Therefore, meticulous information from patients and relatives on the risk of AD and possible drug interactions is of vital importance. PMID:23784679

  1. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  2. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  3. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  4. Impaired neurovascular coupling to ictal epileptic activity and spreading depolarization in a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Possible link to blood–brain barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Maren K. L.; Chassidim, Yoash; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Revankar, Gajanan S.; Major, Sebastian; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Oliveira-Ferreira, Ana I.; Woitzik, Johannes; Sandow, Nora; Scheel, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Dreier, Jens P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spreading depolarization describes a sustained neuronal and astroglial depolarization with abrupt ion translocation between intraneuronal and extracellular space leading to a cytotoxic edema and silencing of spontaneous activity. Spreading depolarizations occur abundantly in acutely injured human brain and are assumed to facilitate neuronal death through toxic effects, increased metabolic demand, and inverse neurovascular coupling. Inverse coupling describes severe hypoperfusion in response to spreading depolarization. Ictal epileptic events are less frequent than spreading depolarizations in acutely injured human brain but may also contribute to lesion progression through increased metabolic demand. Whether abnormal neurovascular coupling can occur with ictal epileptic events is unknown. Herein we describe a patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in whom spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events were measured using subdural opto-electrodes for direct current electrocorticography and regional cerebral blood flow recordings with laser-Doppler flowmetry. Simultaneously, changes in tissue partial pressure of oxygen were recorded with an intraparenchymal oxygen sensor. Isolated spreading depolarizations and clusters of recurrent spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity were recorded over several days followed by a status epilepticus. Both spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events where accompanied by hyperemic blood flow responses at one optode but mildly hypoemic blood flow responses at another. Of note, quantitative analysis of Gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging detected impaired blood–brain barrier integrity in the region where the optode had recorded the mildly hypoemic flow responses. The data suggest that abnormal flow responses to spreading depolarizations and ictal epileptic events, respectively, may be associated with blood

  5. Mechanics of left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, S; Ghista, D N; Jayaraman, G

    1986-01-01

    When a coronary artery is significantly occluded, the left ventricular myocardial segment, which is perfused by that coronary artery, will become ischaemic and even irreversibly infarcted. An acute infarct has very low stiffness and if it involves the entire wall there is a risk of rupture; however, in the absence of such a critical situation, fibrous tissue is laid into the infarcted myocardial segment. Such an infarcted fibrotic myocardial segment will not be able to contract, and so generate tensile stress. The surrounding intact myocardium will contract and generate wall stress, thereby developing a high intra-chamber systolic pressure; the chronically infarcted and fibrotic segment will have to sustain this high chamber pressure. Its loss of contractility and the resulting reduced systolic stiffness relative to the intact segment, will cause it to deform into a bulge; this is an aneurysm. When a left ventricular chamber with an aneurysm contracts during the systolic phase, some blood also goes into the aneurysm, and this decreases the stroke volume; since the aneurysm wall is passive, stagnant blood flow prevails in the aneurysm itself, which in turn can give rise to the formation of a mural thrombus. These serious consequences provide a justification for the analysis of an infarcted left ventricular chamber, in order to predict the size of the aneurysmic bulge. Such an analysis is presented in this paper. To determine the left ventricular wall deformation, and the stress arising from infarction of a wall segment (which leads to a ventricular aneurysm) the left ventricle is modelled here as a pressurized ellipsoidal shell. Deformations of infarcted wall segments are computed for several damaged wall-thicknesses in left ventricles of different shapes. The analysis involves a derivation of equations for wall-stress equilibrium with the chamber pressure, and myocardial incompressibility before and after infarct formation. The equations are solved by the Newton

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are present in a least 2% of the elderly population of the Western world and their number is increasing. Without treatment 30% of patients with asymptomatic aneurysms live for 5 years, although the risk of rupture becomes greater as the size of the aneurysm increases. Of those with untreated symptomatic aneurysms 80% are dead within a year. Elective repair of aneurysms has a low mortality, and 50% of the patients live for at least 5 years. Symptomatic aneurysms all cause pain and may produce other symptoms from pressure on adjacent structures, distal embolism, acute thrombosis or rupture. In 88% of cases an aneurysm can be diagnosed by physical examination alone; confirmatory tests include soft-tissue roentgenography of the abdomen, ultrasonography, computer-assisted tomography and aortography. Repair is indicated for symptomatic or ruptured aortic aneurysms and for asymptomatic aneurysms over 5 cm in diameter. Early diagnosis and referral for repair is essential for optimum treatment of this common condition. PMID:7004617

  7. Idiopathic subarachnoid hemorrhage: a multicentre series of 220 patients.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, R; Lagares, A; Fernández-Alén, J A; Arikan, F; Vilalta, J; Ibáñez, J; Maillo, A; Gabarros, A; Domínguez, J; Horcajadas, A; Ballenilla, F; Rodríguez-Boto, G; Llacer, J L; Arrese, I; de la Lama, A; Santamarta, D; Delgado, P; Muñoz, M F

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND. The Spanish neurosurgical society created a multicentre data base on spontaneous SAH to analyze the real problematic of this disease in our country. This paper focuses on the group of patients with idiopathic SAH (ISAH). METHODS. 16 participant hospitals collect their spontaneous SAH cases in a common data base shared in the internet through a secured web page, considering clinical, radiological, evolution and outcome variables. The 220 ISAH cases collected from November 2004 to November 2007 were statistically analyzed as a whole and divided into 3 subgroups depending on the CT blood pattern (aneurysmal, perimesencephalic, or normal). RESULTS. The 220 ISAH patients constitute 19% of all 1149 spontaneous SAH collected in the study period. In 46,8% of ISAH the blood CT pattern was aneurysmal, which was related to older age, worse clinical condition, higher Fisher grade, more hydrocephalus and worse outcome, compared to perimesencephalic (42.7%) or normal CT (10.4%) pattern. Once surpassed the acute phase, outcome of ISAH patients is similarly good in all 3 ISAH subgroups, significantly better as a whole compared to aneurysmal SAH patients. The only variable related to outcome in ISAH after a logistic regression analysis was the admission clinical grade. CONCLUSIONS. ISAH percentage of spontaneous SAH is diminishing in Spain. Classification of ISAH cases depending on the blood CT pattern is important to differentiate higher risk groups although complications are not negligible in any of the ISAH subgroups. Neurological status on admission is the single most valuable prognostic factor for outcome in ISAH patients.

  8. Derivative spectrophotometric analysis of cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, P. R.; Majumder, A.; Morgan, C. J.; Pyne, G. J.; Zuccarello, M.; Jauch, E.; Wagner, K. R.; Clark, J. F.; Caffery, J., Jr.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2003-11-01

    A cerebral aneurysm is a weakened portion of an artery in the brain. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, a specific type of bleeding known as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs. No test exists currently to screen people for the presence of an aneurysm. The diagnosis of a SAH is made after an aneurysm ruptures, and the literature indicates that nearly one-third of patients with a SAH are initially misdiagnosed and subjected to the risks associated with aneurysm re-rupture. For those individuals with a suspected SAH, a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain usually demonstrates evidence of the bleeding. However, in a considerable portion of people, the CT scan is unable to detect the blood that has escaped from the blood vessel. For circumstances when a SAH is suspected despite a normal CT scan, physicians make the diagnosis of SAH by performing a spinal tap. A spinal tap uses a needle to sample the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the patient"s back; CSF is tainted with blood after the aneurysm ruptures. To distinguish between a common headache and a SAH, a fast and an effective solution is required. We describe the development of an effective detection system integrating hardware and a powerful software interface solution. Briefly, CSF from the patient is aspirated and excited with an appropriate wavelength of light. The software employs spectrophotometric analysis of the output spectra and lays the foundation for the development of portable and user-friendly equipment for detection of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  9. Primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysm: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Bozbuga, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The primary brain tumors associated with cerebral aneurysms are rare in neurosurgical practice. The present article constitutes an evaluation of the management of coexistent primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm. A retrospective study of three cases of primary brain tumor with cerebral aneurysm was performed. We evaluated the complications and clinic outcomes by assessing the clinical and imaging findings. Case 1 presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, with an incidental left frontal oligodendroglioma. Case 2 presented with chronic headache due to left frontal convexity meningioma, with proximal internal carotid artery aneurysm which was found incidentally during preoperative magnetic resonance angiography. Case 3 was admitted to our hospital complaining of headache, memory disturbance, and weakness in her left lower extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and an unruptured aneurysm at the left middle cerebral artery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed right frontal lymphoma and unruptured left middle cerebral artery. The frequency of primary brain tumor and cerebral aneurysm coexistence is increasing due to improvements in high-resolution imaging. In these complicated cases, the management will differ according to each pathology present, and this is an important problem for a neurosurgeon.

  10. Ruptured intrameatal aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery accompanying an arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Joo; Koh, Jun Seok; Ryu, Chang Woo; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2012-09-01

    The distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms located inside the internal auditory canal are rare. The association of the distal AICA aneurysms and an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) on the same arterial trunk is exceptional. Eight reports of a total of ten cases have been published and all of the reported aneurysms were located in the meatal or postmeatal segment of the AICA. Herein, we report a case of ruptured aneurysm in the intrameatal portion of the AICA accompanying an AVM fed by the same artery. A 55-year-old man suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured intrameatal aneurysm with a small AVM underwent surgical trapping of the meatal loop, resulting in uneventful recovery. Follow-up angiography demonstrated neither aneurysm nor residual AVM nidus. We propose that trapping of the meatal loop could be a safe and feasible alternative to unroofing followed by neck clipping in selected patients with an intrameatal aneurysm of the AICA. We also review here the relevant literature.

  11. [Peroperative risks in cerebral aneurysm surgery].

    PubMed

    Mustaki, J P; Bissonnette, B; Archer, D; Boulard, G; Ravussin, P

    1996-01-01

    The perioperative complications associated with cerebral aneurysm surgery require a specific anaesthetic management. Four major perioperative accidents are discussed in this review. The anaesthetic and surgical management in case of rebleeding subsequent to the re-rupture of the aneurysm is mainly prophylactic. It includes haemodynamic stability assurance, maintenance of mean arterial pressure (MAP) between 80-90 mmHg during stimulation of the patient such as endotracheal intubation, application of the skull-pin head-holder, incision, and craniotomy. The aneurysmal transmural pressure should be adequately maintained by avoiding an aggressive decrease of intracranial pressure. Once the skull is open, the brain must be kept slack in order to decrease pressure under the retractors and avoid the risks of stretching and tearing of the adjacent vessels. If, despite these precautions, the aneurysm ruptures again. MAP should be decreased to 60 mmHg and the brain rendered more slack, in order to allow direct clipping of the aneurysm, or temporary clipping of the adjacent vessels. The optimal agents in this situation are isoflurane (which decreases CMRO2), intravenous anaesthetic agents (inspite their negative inotropic effect, they may potentially protect the brain) and sodium nitroprusside. Vasospasm occurs usually between the 3rd and the 7th day after subarachnoid haemorrhage. It may be seen peroperatively. The optimal treatment, as well as prophylaxis, is moderate controlled hypertension (MAP > 100 mmHg), associated with hypervolaemia and haemodilution, the so-called triple H therapy, with strict control of the filling pressures. Other beneficial therapies are calcium antagonists (nimodipine and nicardipine), the removal of the blood accumulated around the brain and in the cisternae, and possibly local administration of papaverine. Abrupt MAP increases are controlled in order to maintain adequate aneurysmal transmural pressure. Beta-blockers, local anaesthetics

  12. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  13. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain aneurysms ... Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and arteriovenous ...

  14. Surgical treatment of mesenteric infarction, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, and proper hepatic aneurysm in a middle-aged woman with Takayasu's arteritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, M; Tanaka, M; Shimizu, M; Nomura, S; Kako, N; Suzuki, S; Koie, H

    1995-08-01

    Although Takayasu's arteritis may present a wide variety of signs and symptoms depending on the vessel affected, it is rarely associated with acute abdomen requiring emergency laparotomy. We report a case of Takayasu's arteritis that required several surgical interventions for mesenteric infarction, thoracoabdominal aneurysm, and proper hepatic artery aneurysm, all of which were noted in succession within a 1-year period. This is also the first report, to our knowledge, of a hepatic artery aneurysm caused by Takayasu's arteritis.

  15. Timing of retreatment for patients with previously coiled or clipped intracranial aneurysms: Analysis of 156 patients with multiple treatments

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some patients require a second surgical intervention for recurrence of treated aneurysms, untreated aneurysms in patients with multiple lesions, or de novo aneurysm. This retrospective review of the data was undertaken to evaluate when retreatment is necessary after initial aneurysm treatment. Methods: Cerebral aneurysms in 1755 patients were treated via clipping or coiling between January 1995 and September 2012. Postoperative follow-up was performed at 6 months after treatment and was repeated every 12 months (or longer) after treatment using three-dimensional computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography. Results: A cumulative total of 156 patients (8.9%) (117 women, 39 men; mean age: 55.0 years; range: 25–79 years) needed retreatment for rupture or regrowth of aneurysm (n = 31; ruptured (R)/remaining unruptured (U), 26/5), formation of de novo aneurysm (n = 45; R/U, 23/22), known untreated aneurysm in patients with multiple lesions (n = 78; R/U, 5/73), and hemorrhage from undetected aneurysm (n = 2). The regrowth risk is higher after endovascular treatment than after craniotomy and clipping. Median time to retreatment was 187 months (range: 11–280 months) for regrowth, 165 months (range: 22–330 months) for de novo, and 24 months (range: 2.8–417 months) for known untreated aneurysm. Regrowth or known with subarachnoid hemorrhage were frequently treated within 2 years from initial treatment. Conclusions: Aneurysms with residua or untreated aneurysms in patients with multiple lesions carry a risk of bleeding during a relatively short period, whereas there is a small but significant risk of de novo formation and subsequent hemorrhage at over 10 years after previous treatment. PMID:26862460

  16. Intracranial Stenting in the Treatment of Wide-Necked Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, M.; Dall'olio, M.; Cenni, P.; Raffi, L.; Simonetti, L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We positioned the following self-expanding stents certified for intracranial application: 16 Neuro form (Boston Scientific), three INX (Medtronic), one Leo (Balt). 6F calibre femoral introducers and guiding catheters were used for stent placement changing to 5F calibre introducers and guiding catheters (Envoy, Cordis) for the Neuroform 2 and 3 stents. All procedures were carried out under general anaesthesia and heparinization. Our pharmacological protocol consisted of adjunctive treatment with anti-aggregants during the interventional procedure and for the following six months, without premedication. From November 2000 to August 2006 we treated 28 patients (27 F/1M) with giant wide-necked aneurysms and one dissecting basilar artery aneurysm requiring the placement of 29 stents. We successfully positioned 20 stents: 11 stents combined with coils (8 immediate; 3 late) with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in seven cases and subtotal exclusion in four; nine stents not followed by embolization with complete exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation in six cases and subtotal exclusion in three. Stenting was not possible in nine cases due to extreme vessel tortuosity and the poor flexibility of release systems for the first stents. No late stent occlusion or subarachnoid haemorrhage were encountered after treatment. PMID:20566126

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction after return of spontaneous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Injune; Kim, Youn Jung; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram changes in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been described as ST-T changes that mimic acute coronary syndrome and even acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Elevation of cardiac enzymes and abnormality of regional myocardial wall motion have been reported frequently for SAH. We report a case of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivor with high suspicion of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction based on the electrocardiogram and bedside echocardiography, who had normal coronary arteries on emergent coronary angiography. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with SAH as a cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:27752607

  18. [Ruptured aneurysm at the anterior wall of the internal carotid artery in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Fujimura, Miki; Inoue, Takashi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-07-01

    A 60 year-old woman, who had a 45-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome, presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm at the anterior wall of the non-branching site of the right internal carotid artery. She underwent radical surgery on the day of onset. In light of the possibility of arterial dissection, we performed extracranial-intracranial bypass prior to careful exploration of the aneurysm. Based on the finding of saccular aneurysm, she ultimately underwent neck clipping of the aneurysm without complication. Postoperative course was uneventful, and she did not suffer from cerebral vasospasm. We recommend early surgical intervention in patients with aneurysmal SAH associated with SLE, while intrinsic pathologies of SLE such as fragile vascular structure and the risk for ischemic complication should be considered.

  19. Assessment of Basilar Artery Reactivity in Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Wire Myograph.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Crystal M; Azrak, Zeina; Rahman, Farah Abdel; Itani, Hana A; Zeidan, Asad

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow regulation of normal cerebral arteries is a critical and important factor to supply the brain tissue with nutrients and oxygen. Stroke insult results in a disruption or reduction in cerebral arteries' blood flow with subsequent brain tissue damage. Hemorrhagic stroke is one type of stroke and accounts for about 13 % of all of stroke insults. In this type of stroke, the cerebral artery breaks open and causes bleeding in or surrounding the brain. Subsequently, this bleeding causes blood vessels to constrict in a process called vasospasm, in which the vessels narrow and impede the blood flow to brain tissue. Hemorrhagic stroke is the major cause of prolonged constriction of cerebral arteries. This leads to partial brain damage and sometimes death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the key delicate techniques to assess small blood vessel functionality is the wire myograph, which can be utilized in several cerebral injury models including stroke. The wire myograph is a device that provides information about the reactivity, stiffness, and elasticity of small blood vessels under isometric conditions. In this book chapter, we describe the techniques involved in wire myography assessment and the different measures and parameters recorded; we describe the utility of this technique in evaluating the effects of subarachnoid hemorrhage on basilar artery sensitivity to different agonists. PMID:27604742

  20. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  1. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  2. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  3. Multimodality Monitoring, Inflammation, and Neuroregeneration in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ariel B.; Esteves Veiga, José C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The mortality rate of poor-grade SAH ranges from 34% to 52%. In an attempt to improve SAH outcomes, clinical research on multimodality monitoring has been performed, as has basic science research on inflammation and neuroregeneration (which can occur due to injury-induced neurogenesis). Nevertheless, the current literature does not focus on the integrated study of these fields. Multimodality monitoring corresponds to physiological data obtained during clinical management by both noninvasive and invasive methods. Regarding inflammation and neuroregeneration, evidence suggests that, in all types of stroke, a proinflammatory phase and an anti-inflammatory phase occur consecutively; these phases affect neurogenesis, which is also influenced by other pathophysiological features of stroke, such as ischemia, seizures, and spreading depression. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether injury-induced neurogenesis is a prognostic factor in poor-grade SAH that can be monitored and modulated. METHODS: We propose a protocol for multimodality monitoring-guided hypothermia in poor-grade SAH in which cellular and molecular markers of inflammation and neuroregeneration can be monitored in parallel with clinical and multimodal data. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: This study may reveal correlations between markers of inflammation and neurogenesis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, based on clinical and multimodality monitoring parameters. DISCUSSION: This protocol has the potential to lead to new therapies for acute, diffuse, and severe brain diseases. ABBREVIATIONS: BBB, blood-brain barrier CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure EEG, electroencephalography ICP, intracranial pressure IL, interleukin MCA, middle cerebral artery SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage SD, spreading depression SGZ, subgranular zone SVZ, subventricular zone TCD, transcranial Doppler PMID:25050583

  4. Far-lateral approach for surgical treatment of fusiform PICA aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Neil, Jayson A

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured fusiform posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms can be technically challenging lesions. Surgeons must be ready to employ a variety of strategies in the successful treatment of these aneurysms. Strategies include complex clip techniques including clip-wrapping or trapping and revascularization. The case presented here is of a man with subarachnoid hemorrhage from a fusiform ruptured PICA aneurysm. The technique demonstrated is a far-lateral approach and a clip-wrap technique using muslin gauze. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively in preparation for possible occipital-PICA bypass if direct repair was not feasible. It is the authors' preference to perform direct vessel repair as a primary goal and use bypass techniques when this is not possible. Vessel patency was evaluated after clip-wrapping using intraoperative Doppler. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is used in such cases. The patient recovered well. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/iwLqufH47Ds .

  5. Anesthetic management during surgery for left ventricular aneurysm and false aneurysm occurring in stage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Hun; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) and false aneurysm are complications of acute myocardial infarction, trauma, and cardiac surgery. Left ventricular false aneurysm (LVFA) is a particularly catastrophic complication owing to its high propensity for rupture. Surgical resection should be considered for LVFA occurring within three months after myocardial infarction or development of congestive heart failure. In this report, we describe a case of acute heart failure with LVA and LVFA occurring in stage as a complication of myocardial infarction in a 55-year-old man. The patient was also at risk of brain ischemia due to abnormal vessel status and a previous cerebrovascular accident with left-sided weakness. Successful perioperative anesthetic management was achieved by focusing on maintaining marginal upper normal blood pressure to ensure cerebral perfusion and to reduce the risk of false aneurysm rupture. PMID:27703635

  6. Aneurysm resection and vascular reconstruction for true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Xi; Han, Li-Na; Liang, Fa-Qi; Chu, Fu-Tao; Jia, Xin

    2015-06-01

    The aneurysms at the initial segment of splenic artery are rare. This paper aimed to investigate the methods to treat the true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery by aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction. Retrospectively reviewed were 11 cases of true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery who were treated in our hospital from January 2000 to June 2013. All cases were diagnosed by color ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT) and angiography. Upon resection of the aneurysm, the auto-vein transplantation was performed in situ between the hepatic artery and the distal part of the splenic artery in 1 case; the artificial vessel bypass was done between the infra-renal aorta and distal portion of the splenic artery in 7 cases; the splenectomy was done in 2 cases; the splenectomy in combination with ligation of multiple small aneurysms were performed in 1 case. All cases were cured and discharged from the hospital 10-14 days after operation. A 1-14 year follow-up showed that 9 cases survived, and 2 cases died, including 1 case who died of acute myocardial infarction 2 years after aorta-splenic artery bypass operation and 1 case who died of acute cerebral hemorrhage 5 years after aneurysm resection and the splenectomy. Among 6 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass, 1 gradually developed stenosis at anatomosed site, which eventually progressed to complete occlusion 2 years to 6 years after operation, without suffering from splenic infarction because the spleen was supplied by the short gastric vessel and its collaterals. The other 5 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass and 1 case undergoing autologous vascular transplantation did not develop stricture or pseudoaneurysm at the stoma. Our study showed that the aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction is a better treatment for aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery.

  7. The False Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Baird, R. J.; Doran, M. L.

    1964-01-01

    The clinical course of 18 patients with 25 false aneurysms is reviewed. In recent years false aneurysm has been most commonly seen as a complication of arterioplastic procedures in which prosthetic arterial grafts were used. The use of indwelling needles or cannulae, particularly in patients with a wide arterial pulse pressure, can also lead to the formation of false aneurysms. In the groin, a false aneurysm is frequently mistaken for an abscess. Early diagnosis and operative repair are essential to reduce the incidence of further complications. PMID:14180533

  8. Cephalic vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Walid; Selmo, Francesca; Hindi, Mia; Haddad, Fadi; Khalil, Ismail

    2007-11-01

    Cephalic vein aneurysms are rare malformations that may develop in any part of the vascular system, and their history, presentation, and management vary depending on their site. The etiology of venous aneurysms remains unclear, although several theories have been elaborated. Venous aneurysms are unusual vascular malformations that occur equally between the sexes and are seen at any age; they can present as either a painful or a painless subcutaneous mass. No serious complications have been reported from upper extremity venous aneurysms. Surgical excision is the definitive management for most of these. The case reported here presented with a painless and mobile, soft, subcutaneous mass that caused only cosmetic concern.

  9. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the

  10. Fusiform superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with STA-SCA bypass and trapping

    PubMed Central

    Lamis, Fabricio C.; De Paiva Neto, Manoel A.; Cavalheiro, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fusiform aneurysms of cerebellar arteries are rare. Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it. Case Description: The authors reported a case of a fusiform aneurysm located in the lateral pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) in a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery. Conclusions: Although only a few cases of fusiform aneurysms in the supracerebellar artery have been reported in the literature, the treatment strategies adopted were diverse. In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered. A review of the current treatment modalities of this pathology is also presented. PMID:25071936

  11. Deaths from cerebrovascular diseases correlated to month of birth: elevated risk of death from subarachnoid hemorrhage among summer-born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, K.; Imaizumi, Y.

    It has been suggested that maternal nutrition, and fetal and infant growth have an important effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. We investigated the population-based distribution of deaths from cerebrovascular diseases (ICD9 codes 430, 431, or 434) in Japan in 1986-1994 as a function of birth month, by examining death-certificate records. For a total of 853 981 people born in the years 1900-1959, the distribution of the number of deaths according to the month of birth was compared with the distribution expected from the monthly numbers of all births for each sex and for the corresponding birth decade. For those born between 1920 and 1949, there were significant discrepancies between the actual numbers of deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (ICD9 430) and the numbers expected, and these differences were related to the month of birth. Those born in summer, June-September, consistently had an elevated risk of death, particularly men, where the excess risk was 8%-23%. This tendency was also observed, less distinctly but significantly, for deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICD9 431), but was not observed for those dying from occlusion of the cerebral arteries (ICD9 434). The observation that the risk of dying from subarachnoid hemorrhage was more than 10% higher among those born in the summer implies that at least one in ten deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage has its origin at a perinatal stage. Although variations in hypertension in later life, which could possibly be ''programmed'' during the intra-uterine stages, could be an explanation for this observation, the disease-specific nature of the observation suggests the involvement of aneurysm formation, which is a predominant cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  12. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  13. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  14. Differential effects of activity and climate on onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Nonaka, K; Suzuki, H; Kirino, T; Tamura, A

    2001-05-01

    Conflicting findings of the effect of climate on onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may result from the influence of strenuous activities which can trigger aneurysmal rupture independent of climatological factors. The effect of climate and patient activities on onset of SAH were analyzed. The clinical records of 786 consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH admitted to our hospital for 10 years were reviewed. Activities at onset were categorized according to the intensity of strain at onset. Seasonal variation, circannual cyclic trend, and association with 90 meteorological factors were examined in each category and the results were compared between categories. Bimonthly occurrence in the light strain group showed a significant seasonal variation and cyclic trend with two peaks in early spring and fall, whereas no significant trend was detected in the overall patients and in the heavy strain group. The significant meteorological factors were global solar radiation, sunshine hours, changes in mean and minimum temperature and mean vapor pressure from the previous day, and minimum pressure in the previous 7 days. Lower global solar radiation in the light strain group was associated with onset with the lowest p value (p = 0.0046). No factors were significant in the heavy strain group. There is some evidence of the possible influence of climatological factors on onset of SAH without strenuous activity. Strenuous activity seems to affect onset more strongly, which masks any effect of climate. PMID:11396302

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and negative angiography: clinical course and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Marco; Rainero, Innocenzo; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Benevello, Chiara; Garbossa, Diego; Carlino, Christian; Valfrè, Walter; Griva, Federico; Bradac, Gianni Boris; Ducati, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term natural history of nontraumatic angiogram-negative subarachnoid hemorrhage with typical pretruncal (P-SAH) and diffuse (D-SAH) pattern of hemorrhage. A retrospective review of 102 patients who experienced angiographically negative SAH at our institution was undertaken (11.6% of 882 spontaneous SAH). Follow-ups were obtained at 7.9 to 16 years. In the D-SAH group, 11 patients (13.9%) out of 79 had an aneurysm, and four (5.1%) had rebleeding episodes. In the P-SAH group, the second angiography was negative in all of the 23 cases, and no rebleeding episodes were recorded. The long-term follow-up confirms that P-SAH is a benign disease. A second angiography could not be necessary. D-SAH is probably due to an aneurysm that thrombose early after the bleeding. At short-term follow-up, the sack could frequently recanalize and rebleed, whereas a late follow-up shows that rebleeding is very rare.

  16. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E; Hanafy, Khalid A

    2015-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  18. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months.

  19. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months. PMID:27610126

  20. Angiotensin 1-7 reduces mortality and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice.

    PubMed

    Peña Silva, Ricardo A; Kung, David K; Mitchell, Ian J; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A S; Faraci, Frank M; Heistad, Donald D; Hasan, David M

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice. Because Ang 1-7 acts on Mas receptors and generally counteracts deleterious effects of Ang II, we tested the hypothesis that Ang 1-7 attenuates formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in wild-type and Mas receptor-deficient mice using a combination of Ang II-induced hypertension and intracranial injection of elastase in the basal cistern. Mice received elastase+Ang II alone or a combination of elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7. Aneurysm formation, prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, mortality, and expression of molecules involved in vascular injury were assessed. Systolic blood pressure was similar in mice receiving elastase+Ang II (mean±SE, 148±5 mm Hg) or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 (144±5 mm Hg). Aneurysm formation was also similar in mice receiving elastase+Ang II (89%) or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 (84%). However, mice that received elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 had reduced mortality (from 64% to 36%; P<0.05) and prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (from 75% to 48%; P<0.05). In cerebral arteries, expression of the inflammatory markers, Nox2 and catalase increased similarly in elastase+Ang II or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7 groups. Ang 1-7 increased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 induced by elastase+Ang II (P<0.05). In Mas receptor-deficient mice, systolic blood pressure, mortality, and prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage were similar (P>0.05) in groups treated with elastase+Ang II or elastase+Ang II+Ang 1-7. The expression of Mas receptor was detected by immunohistochemistry in samples of human intracranial arteries and aneurysms. In conclusion, without attenuating Ang II-induced hypertension, Ang 1-7 decreased mortality and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in mice through a Mas receptor-dependent pathway.

  1. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → ... You had a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that bulges or balloons out. Once it reaches a certain size, it ...

  2. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm may be found when an MRI or CT scan of the brain is done for another reason. A brain aneurysm ... and determine the cause of bleeding in the brain: Cerebral angiography or spiral CT scan angiography of the head to show the location ...

  3. [Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Coiling in a Patient with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion via the Posterior Communicating Artery].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Noriaki; Saitoh, Minoru; Fujita, Atsushi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Background:De novo aneurysms after internal carotid artery(ICA)occlusion occur in the contralateral ICA or anterior communicating artery. Hemodynamic changes with increased blood flow to the contralateral carotid circulation were considered the main factor for the formation of these aneurysms. We report a rare case of ruptured ICA aneurysm associated with ipsilateral ICA occlusion treated with coil embolization via the vertebrobasilar and posterior communicating arteries. Case Presentation:An 82-year-old woman presented with sudden-onset disturbance of consciousness at our outpatient clinic and went into cardiopulmonary arrest. Computed tomography(CT)performed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation revealed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Three-dimensional CT angiography revealed a right ICA aneurysm associated with the ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Considering that the patient showed clinical improvement with the critical care for neurogenic pulmonary edema, the aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery. With this technique, complete obliteration was attained without perioperative complication. Conclusion:Endovascular coil embolization via the posterior communicating artery was proven effective as a treatment method for ruptured ICA aneurysms with ipsilateral ICA occlusion. Hemodynamic stress due to increased blood flow in the posterior communicating artery may play an important role in the growth and rupture of ICA aneurysms. PMID:27605482

  4. Moyamoya disease associated with arteriovenous malformation and anterior communicating artery aneurysm: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINLU; YUAN, YONGJIE; ZHANG, DUODUO; XU, KAN

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) can be associated with an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM). However, no case of MMD simultaneously associated with both intracranial aneurysm and AVM has been previously reported. The present study reports the case of a patient with MMD simultaneously associated with both aneurysm and AVM. The patient was a 46-year-old woman presenting with a subarachnoid hemorrhage whose imaging diagnosis of MMD was associated with an aneurysm and AVM. The aneurysm was located in the anterior communicating artery, which was similar to a berry aneurysm caused by hemodynamics. The AVM was located in the posterior circulation. Beyond the presentation of the posterior cerebral artery, the appearance of an artery supplying blood from the middle cerebral artery supported the view that the AVM was congenital and unruptured. Conservative treatment was provided and examination of the patient at follow-up showed good recovery. In addition to the case report, the present study also reviewed the relevant literature in order to compile information on MMD associated with both an aneurysm and AVM. PMID:27347048

  5. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  6. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  7. Surgical treatment of a giant left ventricular aneurysm- a case report.

    PubMed

    Schaitza, Gustavo Alves; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Baena, Cristiana Pellegrino; Giffhorn, Helcio; Olandoski, Bruna; Meira, Leanderson Franco de; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César

    2014-01-01

    An aneurysm of the left ventricle is a complication of acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the left ventricle after myocardial infarction in a 59 year-old male patient. The surgery to correct the aneurysm was performed with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass under normothermia. A bovine pericardial patch was used for the geometric reconstruction of the ventricular wall affected by the aneurysm. After the procedure, echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction and volume reduction.

  8. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  9. A system to detect cerebral aneurysms in multimodality angiographic data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschke, Clemens M. Tönnies, Klaus D.; Beuing, Oliver; Paukisch, Harald; Scherlach, Cordula; Skalej, Martin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The early detection of cerebral aneurysms plays a major role in preventing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors present a system to automatically detect cerebral aneurysms in multimodal 3D angiographic data sets. The authors’ system is parametrizable for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA), and computed tomography angiography (CTA). Methods: Initial volumes of interest are found by applying a multiscale sphere-enhancing filter. Several features are combined in a linear discriminant function (LDF) to distinguish between true aneurysms and false positives. The features include shape information, spatial information, and probability information. The LDF can either be parametrized by domain experts or automatically by training. Vessel segmentation is avoided as it could heavily influence the detection algorithm. Results: The authors tested their method with 151 clinical angiographic data sets containing 112 aneurysms. The authors reach a sensitivity of 95% with CE-MRA data sets at an average false positive rate per data set (FP{sub DS}) of 8.2. For TOF-MRA, we achieve 95% sensitivity at 11.3 FP{sub DS}. For CTA, we reach a sensitivity of 95% at 22.8 FP{sub DS}. For all modalities, the expert parametrization led to similar or better results than the trained parametrization eliminating the need for training. 93% of aneurysms that were smaller than 5 mm were found. The authors also showed that their algorithm is capable of detecting aneurysms that were previously overlooked by radiologists. Conclusions: The authors present an automatic system to detect cerebral aneurysms in multimodal angiographic data sets. The system proved as a suitable computer-aided detection tool to help radiologists find cerebral aneurysms.

  10. [Splenic artery aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Davidović, L; Bilanović, D; Krivokapić, Z; Grubor, N; Cvetković, S; Radak, V; Marković, M

    2006-01-01

    Although the third most frequent aneurysm in the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, and most frequent aneurisms of visceral arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not very rare. Thanks to the new imaging techniques, first of all ultrasonography, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. We present a series of 9 splenic artery aneurysms. Seven patients were female and two male of average age 49 years (ranging from 28 to 75 years). The majority of afected women were multiparae, with average 3 children (ranging from 1 to 6). One patient had a subacute rupture, and 2 had ruptures into the splenic vein causing portal hypertension. The spleen was enlarged in 7 out of 9 patients. The average size of aneurysms was 3,2 cm (ranging from 2 to 8 cm). The preoperative diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm was established in 6 patients while in 3 patients aneurism was accidentally found during other operations, during splenectomy in 2, and during the excision of a retroperitoneal tumour in 1 patient. Aneurysmectomy was carried out in 7 patients, while a ligation of the incoming and outcoming wessels was performed in 2 patients with arteriovenous fistula. Splenectomy was performed in 6 patients, while pancreatic tail resection, cholecystectomy and excision of the retroperitoneal tumor were performed in 3 patients. Additional resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with reconstruction of aortoiliac segment was performed in 2 patients. There were no mortality and the postoperative recovery was uneventful in all patients. PMID:16989145

  11. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  12. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  13. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  14. [The clinical grading of subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ducati, A

    1998-04-01

    Clinical grading scales for subarachnoid haemorrhages are exposed and discussed. These have been introduced by Botterell, in the middle fifties, to allow a better clinical evaluation, a more correct prognosis and, as a consequence, a more effective therapy. The most popular grading scale is, up to now, the one proposed by Hunt and Hess in 1968. The H-H scale divides patients in 5 groups or levels, whose severity is progressively increasing. A clinical study based on the H-H scale demonstrated that low grade patients (I-II) take advantage from early surgery; at the opposite, high grade patients (III-IV-V) achieve better results when treated with late surgery. To leave behind several difficulties in interpreting the clinical signs and therefore in using the H-H scale, in 1988 Drake, on behalf of the World Federation of Neuro-logical Surgeons, published an "universal" grading scale for subarachnoid haemorrhage, based upon the well known Glasgow Come Scale score and on the finding of a motor focal deficit. The WFNS Scale is nowadays recommended for universal use, being easy and compatible with formerly employed scales.

  15. Quality of life and cognitive deficits after subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hütter, B O; Gilsbach, J M; Kreitschmann, I

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 58 patients after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) with a late result either good (GOS = I) or fair (GOS = II), patients were examined 1-5 years after the acute event for their quality of life including a neuropsychological examination. Cognitive deficits were found in visual short-term memory (46%) and in the three parameters of a reaction-time task ranging from 31 to 65%. Further deficits were found in verbal long-term memory (28%), concentration (5-13%) and language (11%). The quality of life was reduced in the SAH patients according to a self-rating scale in motivation (50%), interests (47%), mental capacity (47%), free-time activities (52%), social relationships (39%), concentration (70%), fine motor co-ordination (25%) and sleep (47%). A further 77% of the patients reported more frequent headaches since their SAH. Depression was found in 30% of the SAH patients. Life-satisfaction was significantly reduced in 37%, whereas 48% of the SAH patients suffered from increased emotional lability and in 41% motivation was significantly reduced. Negative job consequences like loss of job or demotion were reported by 16% of the patients investigated and an additional 15% had been retired. PMID:7576273

  16. Endovascular management of a carotid aneurysm into the sphenoid sinus presenting with epistaxis.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Mohamed; Gascou, Grégory; Trévillot, Vincent; Bonafé, Alain; Crampette, Louis; Machi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Non-traumatic cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms are rare, and favour the occurrence of massive recurrent epistaxis, which is associated with a high mortality rate. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman presenting a ruptured ICA aneurysm extending into the sphenoid sinus, revealed by epistaxis. Selective coil embolization of the aneurysm was performed. Flow-diverter stents were deployed in order to utterly exclude the aneurysm and prevent revascularization. Anti-platelet treatment was provided to lower the risk of in-stent thrombosis. A left frontal hematoma associated with a subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred at day 2. Outcome was favourable with no neurological sequelae, and no clinical recurrence of epistaxis occurred. A 4 months follow-up digital subtraction angiography showed a complete exclusion of the aneurysm. In addition, a magnetic resonance cerebral angiography at 16 months showed stable results. Thus, this two-stage endovascular procedure has proven its effectiveness in preventing epistaxis recurrence while preserving the ICA patency. PMID:26494406

  17. Beware of the aneurysm in stealth mode!

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Amar; Ramaswamy, Raghu; Padalino, David J; Deshaies, Eric M

    2015-02-01

    Endovascular treatment is one of the treatment options considered for acute stroke in many primary stroke centers. Outcome from such treatment can be very successful and gratifying if the intervention is timely and patient selection is appropriate. There are however certain pitfalls that need to be kept in mind which, if the interventionalist is not careful, can adversely affect the outcome. We describe such a case where the patient presented with acute stroke due to basilar artery thrombosis but also had an aneurysm in the affected vessel. We also make certain recommendations to reduce the chances of complications arising during treatment of patients with such a condition.

  18. Corticosteroid therapy of experimental hydrocephalus after intraventricular-subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, H. A.; Wilson, Rene B.; Patel, P. P.; Esmaili, M.

    1974-01-01

    Symptomatic hydrocephalus after subarachnoid haemorrhage seems to result both from mechanical obstruction of arachnoid villi and basilar cisterns and from an inflammatory cellular reaction in the villi. Subarachnoid haemorrhage was induced in rabbits using whole blood injected through an implanted intraventricular needle. Control rabbits receiving intraventricular methyl prednisolone acetate but no blood, developed ventricular dilation significantly more often than untreated controls. Eighty-three per cent of rabbits with untreated experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage developed moderate to severe hydrocephalus. Intramuscular steroid therapy significantly reduced the incidence of hydrocephalus. Images PMID:4406223

  19. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant.

  20. In vitro investigation of contrast flow jet timing in patient-specific intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Virendra R.; Britz, Garvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The direction and magnitude of intra-aneurysmal flow jet are significant risk factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the change of flow jet during an endovascular procedure has been used for prediction of aneurysm occlusion or whether an additional flow diverter (FD) is warranted. However, evaluation of flow jets is often unreliable due to a large variation of flow jet on the digital subtraction angiograms, and this flow pattern variation may result in incorrect clinical diagnosis Therefore, factors contributing to the variation in flow jet are examined at an in vitro setting, and the findings can help us to understand the nature of flow jet and devise a better plan to quantify the aneurysmal hemodynamics accurately. Methods Intra-aneurysmal flows in three patient-specific aneurysms between 11 and 25 mm were investigated in vitro, and a FD was deployed in each aneurysm model. X-ray imaging of these models were performed at injection rates between 0.2 and 2 mL/s. Pulsatile blood pump and aneurysm model were imaged together to determine the timing of flow jet. Results The contrast bolus arrives at the aneurysm early at high contrast injection rates. The flow patterns with slow injection rates exhibit strong inertia that is associated with the systole flow. Flow jets arrive at the aneurysms at the peak systole when the bolus is injected at 0.2 mL/s. The contrast-to-signal ratio is the highest at the injection rate of 0.5 mL/s. Effect of flow diversion can only be assessed at an injection rate greater than 0.5 mL/s. Conclusions Intra-aneurysmal flow jet is highly dependent on the injection rate of the contrast agent. For the internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, the systolic flows can be visualized at slow injection rates (<0.5 mL/s), while the diastolic flow jets are visible at higher injection rates (>1 mL/s). Dependence of flow jet on the contrast injection rate has serious clinical implications and needs to be considered during diagnostic procedures

  1. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  2. Rasmussen's aneurysm: A forgotten scourge☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Colaco, Brendon; Colaco, Clinton; Hellman, Michael; Meena, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's aneurysm is an inflammatory pseudo-aneurysmal dilatation of a branch of pulmonary artery adjacent to a tuberculous cavity. Life threatening massive hemoptysis from the rupture of a Rasmussen's aneurysm is an uncommon yet life threatening complication of cavitary tuberculosis (TB). We present a case of a young woman who presented with low-grade fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed biapical cavitary lesions and actively bleeding aneurysms involving pulmonary artery, which successfully underwent glue embolization. PMID:26744661

  3. Inflammatory changes in the aneurysm wall: a review.

    PubMed

    Tulamo, Riikka; Frösen, Juhana; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika

    2010-06-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial artery aneurysm (IA) causes subarachnoid hemorrhage, a significant cause of stroke and death. The current treatment options, endovascular coiling and clipping, are invasive and somewhat risky. Since only some IAs rupture, those IAs at risk for rupture should be identified. However, to improve the imaging of rupture-prone IAs and improve IA treatment, IA wall pathobiology requires more thorough knowledge. Chronic inflammation has become understood as an important phenomenon in IA wall pathobiology, featuring inflammatory cell infiltration as well as proliferative and fibrotic remodulatory responses. We review the literature on what is known about inflammation in the IA wall and also review the probable mechanisms of how inflammation would result in the degenerative changes that ultimately lead to IA wall rupture. We also discuss current options in imaging inflammation and how knowledge of inflammation in IA walls may improve IA treatment. PMID:21990591

  4. Magnesium sulfate administration in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Jose I

    2011-09-01

    Magnesium offers theoretic vascular and neuroprotective benefits for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify original research studies describing intravenous magnesium treatment in patients with SAH published in English between January 1990 and October 2010. Seventeen articles were identified and reviewed, including one phase III randomized-controlled clinical trial and six phase II randomized-controlled trials. Study quality was low for most of the included studies, with the phase III trial considered to be of moderate quality. Due to inconsistently reported benefits and the occurrence of side effects, phase II data suggested that intravenous magnesium for SAH provided either no overall net benefit or uncertain trade-offs. Benefit was likewise not supported in the single phase III clinical trial. PMID:21748496

  5. [Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Takayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Endo, Shin; Kato, Syunichi

    2016-06-01

    The patient, a 79-year-old man, experienced a Hunt & Kosnik grade IV subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with sudden-onset coma and severe left hemiplegia. We performed cranial clipping surgery for a ruptured aneurysm on the right middle cerebral artery the same day. Post-operative recovery proceeded smoothly, with gradual improvements in disturbed consciousness and left hemiplegia. Three weeks post-operation, CT revealed low-density areas in the right frontal and temporal lobe, believed to be due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as hydrocephaly. We then performed a lumbo-peritoneal (L-P) shunt for the hydrocephaly. Two months later, the patient experienced shunt occlusion, and we performed a ventriculo-peritoneal (V-P) shunt revision (pressure: 6 cm H(2)O). Headaches, severe decline in cognitive function, and worsened left hemiplegia were observed seven weeks post-shunt revision. Cranial CT revealed widespread low-density areas in right posterior cerebral white matter. We suspected unilateral posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) after performing cranial MRI and cerebral angiography. Increasing the set pressure of the shunt improved the symptoms and radiographic findings. PRES is typically bilateral, and unilateral incidents are rare. This is the first report of unilateral PRES secondary to shunt operation. Its unilaterality appears to have been caused by unilateral brain damage or adhesions to the brain surface from the subarachnoid cerebral hemorrhage. Overdrainage post-shunt can also induce PRES. Diagnosis of PRES is more difficult in unilateral cases;practitioners must keep PRES in mind as a rare complication post-shunt operation. PMID:27270150

  6. Intracranial biodegradable silica-based nimodipine drug release implant for treating vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage in an experimental healthy pig and dog model.

    PubMed

    Koskimäki, Janne; Tarkia, Miikka; Ahtola-Sätilä, Tuula; Saloranta, Lasse; Simola, Outi; Forsback, Ari-Pekka; Laakso, Aki; Frantzén, Janek

    2015-01-01

    Nimodipine is a widely used medication for treating delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage. When administrated orally or intravenously, systemic hypotension is an undesirable side effect. Intracranial subarachnoid delivery of nimodipine during aneurysm clipping may be more efficient way of preventing vasospasm and DCI due to higher concentration of nimodipine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The risk of systemic hypotension may also be decreased with intracranial delivery. We used animal models to evaluate the feasibility of surgically implanting a silica-based nimodipine releasing implant into the subarachnoid space through a frontotemporal craniotomy. Concentrations of released nimodipine were measured from plasma samples and CSF samples. Implant degradation was followed using CT imaging. After completing the recovery period, full histological examination was performed on the brain and meninges. The in vitro characteristics of the implant were determined. Our results show that the biodegradable silica-based implant can be used for an intracranial drug delivery system and no major histopathological foreign body reactions were observed. CT imaging is a feasible method for determining the degradation of silica implants in vivo. The sustained release profiles of nimodipine in CSF were achieved. Compared to a traditional treatment, higher nimodipine CSF/plasma ratios can be obtained with the implant.

  7. Intracranial Biodegradable Silica-Based Nimodipine Drug Release Implant for Treating Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in an Experimental Healthy Pig and Dog Model

    PubMed Central

    Koskimäki, Janne; Tarkia, Miikka; Ahtola-Sätilä, Tuula; Saloranta, Lasse; Laakso, Aki; Frantzén, Janek

    2015-01-01

    Nimodipine is a widely used medication for treating delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage. When administrated orally or intravenously, systemic hypotension is an undesirable side effect. Intracranial subarachnoid delivery of nimodipine during aneurysm clipping may be more efficient way of preventing vasospasm and DCI due to higher concentration of nimodipine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The risk of systemic hypotension may also be decreased with intracranial delivery. We used animal models to evaluate the feasibility of surgically implanting a silica-based nimodipine releasing implant into the subarachnoid space through a frontotemporal craniotomy. Concentrations of released nimodipine were measured from plasma samples and CSF samples. Implant degradation was followed using CT imaging. After completing the recovery period, full histological examination was performed on the brain and meninges. The in vitro characteristics of the implant were determined. Our results show that the biodegradable silica-based implant can be used for an intracranial drug delivery system and no major histopathological foreign body reactions were observed. CT imaging is a feasible method for determining the degradation of silica implants in vivo. The sustained release profiles of nimodipine in CSF were achieved. Compared to a traditional treatment, higher nimodipine CSF/plasma ratios can be obtained with the implant. PMID:25685803

  8. [Endovascular treatment for cervical carotid artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yasuhiko; Sugiu, Kenji; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Tokunaga, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Date, Isao

    2013-06-01

    We report here a case of cervical carotid artery aneurysm. This 37-year-old male suffered from acute neck swelling when he was taking lunch after physical work. Ultrasonography demonstrated a cervical pseudoaneurysm and a jet flow, which was blowing into the dome from the carotid artery. Angiogram revealed an aneurysm with a diameter of 3 cm at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. Coil embolization using double-catheter technique was performed and complete occlusion of the aneurysm was obtained without any complications. The patient returned to his normal life. Cervical carotid artery aneurysms are rare and they induce pain by swelling in the neck, hoarseness, swallowing disturbance, hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to embolism. In case of a cervical carotid artery aneurysm, safe and effective treatments are required and endovascular treatment should be considered. Although stent-assisted coil embolization or covered-stent placement were reported as an effective treatment for cervical aneurysms, coil embolization without using a stent was performed in this particular patient who is a young, blue-collar worker because the avoidance of long-term anti-platelet therapy was desirable. Preoperative evaluation is important to select adequate treatment. PMID:23732763

  9. Stent-assisted coil embolization of a symptomatic middle cerebral artery aneurysm in an infant.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis E; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O; Pandey, Aditya S

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  10. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... a routine physical exam. More often, doctors find aneurysms during tests done for other reasons, such as ...

  11. Ruptured hepatic artery aneurysm: an unusual presentation of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Wicherts, D A; Bruntink, M M; Demirkiran, A; van Santvoort, H C; van Lienden, K P; Ambarus, C A; Besselink, M G H; van Gulik, T M

    2015-04-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with severe acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain and signs of intra-abdominal haemorrhage. CT and selective angiography revealed a ruptured right hepatic artery aneurysm and diffuse aneurysmatic disease involving most intra-abdominal organs, suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. Although treatment with high-dose steroids was initiated, the patient died of progressive bowel ischaemia.

  12. Treatment of Popliteal Artery Aneurysms with Uncovered Wallstents

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, Mariano de; Merino, Santiago; Ortiz, Francisco; Egana, Juan; Lobrano, Mary Beth; Lopera, Jorge; Gonzolez, Arturo; Maynar, Manuel

    1999-07-15

    We report two patients with acutely thrombosed popliteal artery aneurysms that were successfully treated with a combination of thrombolytic therapy and placement of noncovered Wallstents. RID='''' ID='''' Correspondence to: M.B. Lobrano, M.D.

  13. Sonographic findings in an isolated widened fetal subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Tongsong, Theera; Puntachai, Pongsun; Tongprasert, Fuanglada; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Luewan, Suchaya; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this series was to describe sonographic features of an isolated widened fetal subarachnoid space with a thin cerebral mantle and possible associations. Between January 2004 and December 2013, fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of a widened subarachnoid space were prospectively recruited and followed. Histories of medical and familial diseases, as well as other demographic data such as drug exposure and lifestyles, were assessed and prospectively recorded. The women were investigated for possible associated factors. Ten pregnant women were recruited. Their fetuses showed various degrees of a widened subarachnoid space, ranging from 5 to 20 mm. Nearly all were diagnosed in the second half of pregnancy. Four cases had normal brain structures documented at midpregnancy anomaly screening. Only 1 case had a prenatal diagnosis of a widened subarachnoid space at 20 weeks' gestation. Two fetuses had exposure to alcohol in utero; 2 were proven to have cytomegalovirus infection; 1 had subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to maternal use of warfarin; and 1 had a diagnosis of lissencephaly. Only 1 case in this series had normal postnatal development. A prenatal series of fetal widened subarachnoid spaces with possible associated factors is described. Although such relationships were not fully proven, they should be index cases for future studies.

  14. The International Cooperative Study on the Timing of Aneurysm Surgery. Part 1: Overall management results.

    PubMed

    Kassell, N F; Torner, J C; Haley, E C; Jane, J A; Adams, H P; Kongable, G L

    1990-07-01

    The International Cooperative Study on the Timing of Aneurysm Surgery evaluated the results of surgical and medical management in 3521 patients between December, 1980, and July, 1983. At admission, 75% of patients were in good neurological condition and surgery was performed in 83%. At the 6-month evaluation, 26% of the patients had died and 58% exhibited a complete recovery. Vasospasm and rebleeding were the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in addition to the initial bleed. Predictors for mortality included the patient's decreased level of consciousness and increased age, thickness of the subarachnoid hemorrhage clot on computerized tomography, elevated blood pressure, preexisting medical illnesses, and basilar aneurysms. The results presented here document the status of management in the 1980's.

  15. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  16. Comparison of Endovascular Treatments of Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysms of the Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery and Vertebral Artery with a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Choi, Kyu Sun; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by rupture of an internal carotid artery (ICA) or vertebral artery (VA) dissecting aneuryesm is rare. Various treatment strategies have been used for ruptured intracranial dissections. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and angiographic characteristics and outcomes of endovascular treatment for ruptured dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial ICA and VA. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with SAH caused by ruptured intracranial ICA and VA dissecting aneurysms from March 2009 to April 2014. The relevant demographic and angiographic data were collected, categorized and analyzed with respect to the outcome. Results Fifteen patients were identified (6 ICAs and 9 VAs). The percentage of patients showing unfavorable initial clinical condition and a history of hypertension was higher in the VA group. The initial aneurysm detection rate and the percentage of fusiform aneurysms were higher in the VA group. In the ICA group, all patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling, and showed favorable outcomes. In the VA group, 2 patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling and 7 with endovascular trapping. Two patients died and 1 patient developed severe disability. Conclusion Clinically, grave initial clinical condition and hypertension were more frequent in the VA group. Angiographically, bleb-like aneurysms were more frequent in the ICA group and fusiform aneurysms were more frequent in the VA group. Endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is feasible and the result is acceptable in most instances.

  17. Comparison of Endovascular Treatments of Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysms of the Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery and Vertebral Artery with a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Byoun, Hyoung Soo; Choi, Kyu Sun; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by rupture of an internal carotid artery (ICA) or vertebral artery (VA) dissecting aneuryesm is rare. Various treatment strategies have been used for ruptured intracranial dissections. The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and angiographic characteristics and outcomes of endovascular treatment for ruptured dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial ICA and VA. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with SAH caused by ruptured intracranial ICA and VA dissecting aneurysms from March 2009 to April 2014. The relevant demographic and angiographic data were collected, categorized and analyzed with respect to the outcome. Results Fifteen patients were identified (6 ICAs and 9 VAs). The percentage of patients showing unfavorable initial clinical condition and a history of hypertension was higher in the VA group. The initial aneurysm detection rate and the percentage of fusiform aneurysms were higher in the VA group. In the ICA group, all patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling, and showed favorable outcomes. In the VA group, 2 patients were treated with double stent-assisted coiling and 7 with endovascular trapping. Two patients died and 1 patient developed severe disability. Conclusion Clinically, grave initial clinical condition and hypertension were more frequent in the VA group. Angiographically, bleb-like aneurysms were more frequent in the ICA group and fusiform aneurysms were more frequent in the VA group. Endovascular treatment of these aneurysms is feasible and the result is acceptable in most instances. PMID:27651862

  18. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Mycotic Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Using a Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek; Jain, Vikash; Mathuria, SN; Khandelwal, N

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracavernous carotid artery mycotic aneurysms are rare and management is determined by clinical presentation. We describe the first documented proximal intracranial mycotic aneurysm treated by a balloon expandable Aneugraft PCS covered stent. An 11-year-old female child presented with acute onset fever, headache, chemosis followed by diplopia, right-sided ptosis with ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Subsequent work-up included serial computed tomographic arteriography and digital subtraction angiography which revealed a progressively enlarging intracavernous carotid aneurysm. An Aneugraft PCS covered stent was successfully deployed endovascularly, and complete exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. The use of covered stents in intracranial vasculature can be an effective and safe treatment modality for exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm in selected cases. PMID:24070080

  20. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Ruptured Occipital Arterial Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Tsuge, Yusuke; Kojima, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2011-02-15

    Two cases of ruptured aneurysms in the posterior cervical regions associated with type-1 neurofibromatosis treated by transcatheter embolization are reported. Patients presented with acute onset of swelling and pain in the affected areas. Emergently performed contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated aneurysms and large hematomas widespread in the posterior cervical regions. Angiography revealed aneurysms and extravasations of the occipital artery. Patients were successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter arterial microcoil embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization therapy was found to be an effective method for treating aneurysmal rupture in the posterior cervical regions occurring in association with type-1 neurofibromatosis. A literature review revealed that rupture of an occipital arterial aneurysm, in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1, has not been reported previously.

  1. Systemic Multiple Aneurysms Caused by Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xinyu; Li, Fangda; Wu, Lingeer; Zheng, Yuehong

    2016-07-01

    Systemic multiple aneurysms are rare and usually associated with collagen tissue disease, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) or Marfan syndrome. In the present case, we describe a 39-year-old male patient with systemic multiple aneurysms and acute intraperitoneal hemorrhage who was clinically diagnosed with vascular EDS. Coil embolization of the distal segment of the common hepatic artery was performed, which resolved the patient's symptoms. With this case presentation, we aim to increase the awareness of vascular EDS among clinicians and emphasize the extreme fragility of the arteries in patients with vascular EDS.

  2. Systemic Multiple Aneurysms Caused by Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xinyu; Li, Fangda; Wu, Lingeer; Zheng, Yuehong

    2016-07-01

    Systemic multiple aneurysms are rare and usually associated with collagen tissue disease, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) or Marfan syndrome. In the present case, we describe a 39-year-old male patient with systemic multiple aneurysms and acute intraperitoneal hemorrhage who was clinically diagnosed with vascular EDS. Coil embolization of the distal segment of the common hepatic artery was performed, which resolved the patient's symptoms. With this case presentation, we aim to increase the awareness of vascular EDS among clinicians and emphasize the extreme fragility of the arteries in patients with vascular EDS. PMID:27206743

  3. Endovascular aortic aneurysm operations.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Sasan; Terramani, Thomas T; Weiss, Victor J; Smith, Robert B; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-02-01

    Options for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms are in a state of evolutionary change. The development and continued refinement of the endoluminal approaches has decreased the need for open aortic aneurysm surgery. Endovascular stent graft technology is an area of active research in which both the delivery systems and the endografts are undergoing continued improvement so that patients with what was previously thought to be unfavorable anatomy may be treated by these means. The design and deployment techniques of the currently available endografts, as well as those in clinical trials, are presented. PMID:11822962

  4. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Mycotic Renal Artery Aneurysm by Use of a Self-Expanding Neurointerventional Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia-Nielsen, Luis; Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Llorens, Rafael; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, especially those located in visceral arteries. We present a case of a patient with two visceral mycotic aneurysms due to bacterial endocarditis, one located in right upper pole renal artery and the second in the splenic artery. Both aneurysms were treated as endovascular embolization using microcoils. In the aneurysm located at the renal artery, the technique of stent-assisted coils embolization was preferred to avoid coils migration due to its wide neck. The stent used was the Solitaire AB, which was designed for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and was used recently in acute stroke as a mechanical thrombectomy device. Complete embolization of the aneurysm was achieved, preserving all the arterial branches without nephrogram defects in the final angiogram.

  5. Induced hypertension for the treatment of cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Direct effect on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muizelaar, J.P.; Becker, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    The best treatment for symptomatic cerebral ischemia from presumed vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains a matter of controversy. A direct effect of any treatment modality on regional cerebral blood flow has never been documented. In a series of 43 patients operated on for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysms, five patients (11.6%) developed clinical signs of cerebral ischemia postoperatively. In four of those patients, the diagnosis of vasospasm was made with measurements of cerebral blood flow (133Xe inhalation or intravenous injection, 10-16 detectors, cerebral blood flow infinity). Treatment with induced arterial hypertension with phenylephrine was instituted. Hemodilution was instituted in one patient; the other three patients already had hematocrits in the range of 33. Within 1 hour, the cerebral blood flow measurement was repeated to document the effect of treatment. The average pretreatment hemispherical blood flow on the operated side was 18.8 mL/100 g per minute, on the contralateral side 21.0 mL/100 g per minute. With treatment these flows increased to 30.8 and 35.8 mL/100 g per minute, respectively. There was also an immediate and obvious positive clinical effect in all patients. The role of measurement of cerebral blood flow in the clinical management of vasospasm is discussed. We stress the theoretical and practical advances of measurements of cerebral blood flow over cerebral angiography, especially in comatose patients.

  6. Treatment of a Ruptured Vertebrobasilar Fusiform Aneurysm Using Pipeline Embolization Device

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lee A.; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options of ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms (VFA) are limited and often carry significant mortality and morbidity. We report the use of Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) to successfully treat a patient with a ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm (VFA) who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 73 year-old man with a history of cardiac stent placement seven days earlier presented with Hunt-Hess II SAH. He was taking aspirin and clopidogrel. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a large vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm. Microsurgical treatment options are technically challenging and carry high risk. He underwent endovascular treatment of the ruptured VFA using overlapping PEDs. Five PEDs were placed in a telescoping fashion to reconstruct the affected portions of the left vertebral and basilar arteries. An additional 2-mm blister aneurysm in the right vertebral artery was also discovered during the conventional cerebral angiography and was treated with one additional PED. The patient remained neurologically intact after the procedure. He was continued on aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging at three months demonstrated patency of the stents without any evidence of ischemic change. Follow-up conventional cerebral angiogram at six months demonstrated thrombosis of the VFA and reconstruction of the vertebrobasilar system. The patient remained clinically well. An endovascular approach using PEDs can be a safe and effective treatment option for ruptured VFA in selected cases. PMID:23593603

  7. Effect on management mortality of a deliberate policy of early operation on supratentorial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Disney, L; Weir, B; Petruk, K

    1987-05-01

    Of 736 patients with intracranial aneurysms seen at the University of Alberta from 1968 to 1985, 437 were admitted on the day of or the day after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a supratentorial aneurysm. Of these, 205 were managed from 1968 through 1977 and 232 were managed from 1978 through early 1985 after a policy of early aneurysm operation had been implemented. Postoperative and management mortality and morbidity rates were related to the grade of the patient at the time of admission and the time interval before operation. Overall management mortality (and postoperative mortality) rates for patients treated before 1978 were 47% (19%) for all grades, 17% (12%) for Grades 1 and 2, 51% (25%) for Grades 3 and 4, and 100% (100%) for Grade 5. Since 1978, mortality has been reduced to 38% (11%) for all grades, 10% (5%) for Grades 1 and 2, 39% (17%) for Grades 3 and 4, and 96% (60%) for Grade 5. Management mortality for patients operated on Day 0 to 3 was lower than for those operated later after SAH both before and after 1978. Postoperative mortality was lowered in all patients operated from 1978 to 1985 regardless of the interval from SAH to operation, and management mortality was reduced overall, as well as for patients operated on day 0 to 3, in those treated from 1978 to 1985. The authors conclude that a policy of early aneurysm operation has contributed to a reduction of both postoperative and management mortality.

  8. [Intracranial arterial aneurysm: from diagnosis to treatment. A retrospective study of 46 surgically treated cases].

    PubMed

    Samaha, E; Rizk, T; Nohra, G; Mohasseb, G; Okais, N

    1998-01-01

    The authors report a series of 46 patients operated for an intracranial aneurysm from January 92 to January 96 in Hôtel-Dieu de France. There were 28 males and 18 females ranging from 22 to 69 years. Forty-four patients presented a typical clinical pattern of subarachnoid haemorrhage. In 20 cases (45%), correct diagnosis was not made at the time of bleeding but at another outpatient visit or at a bleeding recurrence. Cerebral angiography was performed in all our patients. The most frequent aneurysmal location was at the anterior communicating artery (n = 20). Surgical total exclusion of the aneurysm was possible in 45 patients. Forty-one patients had a favourable outcome but three presented important neurological sequelae. We encountered 2 postoperative deaths due to irreversible arterial vasospasm. These results suggest that the preoperative neurological state and the occurrence of an arterial vasospasm are the main prognostic factors of the intracranial aneurysm. Early diagnosis and treatment allow to avoid rebleeding, mostly responsible of the poor neurological status, and to better manage the arterial vasospasm in order to improve the outcome.

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS-2) in subarachnoid hemorrhage: Regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Sana; Hayman, Erik G; Hong, Caron; Stokum, Jesse A; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) typically carries a poor prognosis. Growing evidence indicates that overabundant production of nitric oxide (NO) may be responsible for a large part of the secondary injury that follows SAH. Although SAH modulates the activity of all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the inducible isoform, NOS-2, accounts for a majority of NO-mediated secondary injuries after SAH. Here, we review the indispensable physiological roles of NO that must be preserved, even while attempting to downmodulate the pathophysiologic effects of NO that are induced by SAH. We examine the effects of SAH on the function of the various NOS isoforms, with a particular focus on the pathological effects of NOS-2 and on the mechanisms responsible for its transcriptional upregulation. Finally, we review interventions to block NOS-2 upregulation or to counteract its effects, with an emphasis on the potential therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in patients afflicted with SAH. There is still much to be learned regarding the apparently maladaptive response of NOS-2 and its harmful product NO in SAH. However, the available evidence points to crucial effects that, on balance, are adverse, making the NOS-2/NO/peroxynitrite axis an attractive therapeutic target in SAH. PMID:27774520

  10. Metamorphosis of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Research: from Delayed Vasospasm to Early Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delayed vasospasm that develops 3–7 days after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has traditionally been considered the most important determinant of delayed ischemic injury and poor outcome. Consequently, most therapies against delayed ischemic injury are directed towards reducing the incidence of vasospasm. The clinical trials based on this strategy, however, have so far claimed limited success; the incidence of vasospasm is reduced without reduction in delayed ischemic injury or improvement in the long-term outcome. This fact has shifted research interest to the early brain injury (first 72 h) evoked by SAH. In recent years, several pathological mechanisms that activate within minutes after the initial bleed and lead to early brain injury are identified. In addition, it is found that many of these mechanisms evolve with time and participate in the pathogenesis of delayed ischemic injury and poor outcome. Therefore, a therapy or therapies focused on these early mechanisms may not only prevent the early brain injury but may also help reduce the intensity of later developing neurological complications. This manuscript reviews the pathological mechanisms of early brain injury after SAH and summarizes the status of current therapies. PMID:21161614

  11. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm: an uncommon presentation].

    PubMed

    Taborda, Lúcia; Pereira, Laurinda; Amona, Eurides; Pinto, Erique Guedes; Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Most abdominal aortic aneurysms are asymptomatic, being accidentally found on physical examination or in routinely performed imaging studies. They only require surveillance (which is variable according to the aneurism size) and medical therapy in order to achieve risk factor reduction. However, in certain situations, according to the risk of aneurism rupture, elective surgery or endovascular procedure may be necessary. About 80% of the cases of aneurism rupture occur into the retroperitoneal space, with a high mortality rate. There are uncommon presentations of aneurism rupture as the aorto-caval fistula, which also require fast diagnosis and intervention. The authors present the case of a 71-year-old man, with the previous diagnosis of hypertension, acute myocardial infarction 2 months earlier (undergone primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) and tabagism, who was admitted at the emergency department with intense 24-hour-evolution epigastric pain. On physical examination, the Blood Pressure values measured at the lower limbs were about half the ones measured at the upper limbs and there was an abdominal pulsatile mass, with a high-intensity murmur. As the authors suspected aortic dissection, aneurysm, coarctation or thrombosis, it was done a Computed Tomography scanning with intravenous contrast, which revealed a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm with a mural thrombus. The doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a high debit aorto-caval fistula. The patient was immediately transferred to the Vascular Surgery. However he died 2 hours later, during surgery. PMID:22525642

  12. Comparative outcome analysis of anterior choroidal artery aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Takachika; Hirohata, Masaru; Noguchi, Kei; Komaki, Satoru; Orito, Kimihiko; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of anterior choroidal artery (AChA) aneurysms with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping may increase the risk of ischemic complications owing to the critical territory supplied by the AChA. We analyzed the surgical results of endovascular coiling and surgical clipping for AChA aneurysms performed in a single institution, as well as the role of indocyanine green-videoangiography (ICG-VAG) and motor-evoked potential (MEP). Methods: We analyzed 50 patients (51 aneurysms; 21 men, 29 women; mean age: 58 years) including 25 with subarachnoid hemorrhage treated with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping between April 1990 and October 2013. The complication rates and clinical outcomes of the coil group (mean follow-up: 61 months) and the clip group (mean follow-up: 121 months) were analyzed with a modified Rankin scale. Results: The overall clinical outcome of the coil group (95%) was better than that of the clip group (85%). Especially, the outcomes in the coil group were better in the first investigated period (1990–2007) (P < 0.05). However, after the introduction of ICG-VAG and MEP, the outcomes in the clip group improved significantly (P = 0.005), and treatment-related complications decreased from 20 to 4.7%. Eleven aneurysms (coil group: 8, clip group: 3) showed small neck remnants but no remarkable regrowth, except for 1 case during the mean follow-up period of 91 months. Conclusions: Surgical clipping of AChA aneurysms has become safer because of ICG-VAG and MEP monitoring. Coiling and clipping of AChA aneurysms showed good and comparable outcomes with these monitoring methods. PMID:27583175

  13. Endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms in patients 70 years of age and older

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Takao; Koyama, Shunichi; Ohashi, H. Tomoo; Okada, Hirohumi; Ichimasu, Norio; Kohno, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of elderly patients present with intracranial aneurysms. In addition to female gender, an older age is associated with a higher risk of developing a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and these patients often fare poorly in terms of long-term outcome. It is often thought that elderly patients would especially benefit from endovascular aneurysm treatment. We assessed the clinical outcomes in elderly patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) who were treated by endovascular procedures. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database of elderly patients treated with coil embolization for RIAs. The clinical outcomes were assessed using the modified Glasgow Outcome Scale. The rates of procedural complications and adverse events were also recorded. Results: During a period of 5 years, 162 patients with 183 intracranial aneurysms were treated in our hospital by means of an endovascular approach. Among them, 51 patients (31.5%) with a ruptured aneurysm were aged 70 years or older. These patients aged 70-91 years (mean age, 74 years) were treated by coil embolization for RIAs. Among them, seven had a Hunt and Hess (HH) grade of I or II, 42 had an HH grade of III or IV, and 2 had an HH grade of V. Endovascular treatment resulted in 32 complete occlusions (62.7%), 15 neck remnants (22%), and 4 body fillings (7.9%). Procedural complications occurred in five patients (9.8%). The outcomes were good or excellent in 17 patients (33.3%). Three patients (5.8%) who died had an HH grade of IV or V. Rebleeding occurred during follow-up in one patient (1.9%). Conclusions: Coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms is safe and effective in the elderly. However, the morbidity and mortality rates are higher in patients with high HH grades. This finding suggests that the timing of treatment should be based on the patient's initial clinical status. PMID:25101199

  14. The Importance of Cerebral Aneurysms in Childhood Hemorrhagic Stroke: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Lori C.; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Wu, Yvonne W.; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior population-based studies of pediatric hemorrhagic stroke (HS) had too few incident cases to assess predictors of cerebral aneurysms, a HS etiology that requires urgent intervention. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of HS (intracerebral [ICH], subarachnoid [SAH], and intraventricular hemorrhage [IVH]) using the population of all children <20 years of age enrolled in a large Northern Californian health care plan (1/1993–12/2003). Cases were identified through electronic searches and confirmed through independent chart review by two neurologists, with adjudication by a third; traumatic hemorrhages were excluded. Logistic regression was used to examine potential predictors of underlying aneurysm. Results Within a cohort of 2.3 million children followed for a mean of 3.5 years, we identified 116 cases of spontaneous HS (overall incidence, 1.4 per 100,000 person-years). Cerebral aneurysms were identified in 15 (13%) of HS cases. Among 21 children with pure SAH, 57% were found to have an underlying aneurysm, compared to only 2% of 58 children with pure ICH and 5% of 37 children with a mixed pattern of hemorrhage (ICH and SAH). Independent predictors of an underlying aneurysm included pure SAH (OR 76; 95% CI: 9–657, p<0.001) and late adolescent age (15–19 years vs. younger age groups; OR 6.4; 95% CI: 1.0–40, p=0.047). Conclusions Cerebral aneurysms cause the majority of spontaneous SAH in children, and account for more than 10% of childhood HS overall. Children, and particularly teenagers, presenting with spontaneous SAH should be promptly evaluated with cerebrovascular imaging. PMID:19023102

  15. Experimental Induction of Cerebral Aneurysms by Developmental Low Copper Diet.

    PubMed

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Shin, Yong-Won; Lee, Keon-Joo; Park, Dong-Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Suk; Kim, Soyun; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Optimal models are needed to understand the pathophysiology of human cerebral aneurysms (CA). We investigated the development of experimental CA by decreasing the activity of lysyl oxidases by dietary copper deficiency from the time of gestation and then augmenting vascular stress by angiotensin II infusion in adulthood. Rats were fed copper-free, low-copper, or normal diets at different time periods from gestation to adulthood. The incidences of CAs were evaluated and autopsies performed to determine the coexistence of cardiovascular diseases. A copper-free diet from gestation was associated with high mortality rates (79.1%) resulting from rupture of ascending aorta aneurysms; a low-copper diet led to acceptable mortality rates (13.6%) and produced CAs and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 46.4% and 3.6% of animals, respectively. Higher proportions of CAs (up to 33.3%) in the rats primed for copper deficiency from gestation ruptured following angiotensin II infusion from adulthood. Gene expression array analyses of the CAs indicated that genes involving extracellular matrix and vascular remodeling were altered in this model. This model enables future research to understand the entire pathogenetic basis of CA development and rupture in association with systemic vasculopathies.

  16. Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

  17. Multimodal MRI characterization of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Shen, Q; Watts, L T; Muir, E R; Huang, S; Yang, G-Y; Suarez, J I; Duong, T Q

    2016-03-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We implemented an in-scanner rat model of mild SAH in which blood or vehicle was injected into the cistern magna, and applied multimodal MRI to study the brain prior to, immediately after (5min to 4h), and upto 7days after SAH. Vehicle injection did not change arterial lumen diameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), T2, venous signal, vascular reactivity to hypercapnia, or foot-fault scores, but mildly reduce cerebral blood flow (CBF) up to 4h, and open-field activity up to 7days post injection. By contrast, blood injection caused: (i) vasospasm 30min after SAH but not thereafter, (ii) venous abnormalities at 3h and 2days, delayed relative to vasospasm, (iii) reduced basal CBF and to hypercapnia 1-4h but not thereafter, (iv) reduced ADC immediately after SAH but no ADC and T2 changes on days 2 and 7, and (v) reduced open-field activities in both SAH and vehicle animals, but no significant differences in open-field activities and foot-fault tests between groups. Mild SAH exhibited transient and mild hemodynamic disturbances and diffusion changes, but did not show apparent ischemic brain injury nor functional deficits. PMID:26708744

  18. Spreading Depolarizations: A Therapeutic Target Against Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, David Y; Oka, Fumiaki; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia is the most feared cause of secondary injury progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initially thought to be a direct consequence of large artery spasm and territorial ischemia, recent data suggests that delayed cerebral ischemia represents multiple concurrent and synergistic mechanisms, including microcirculatory dysfunction, inflammation, and microthrombosis. Among these mechanisms, spreading depolarizations (SDs) are arguably the most elusive and underappreciated in the clinical setting. Although SDs have been experimentally detected and examined since the late 1970s, their widespread occurrence in human brain was not unequivocally demonstrated until relatively recently. We now know that SDs occur with very high incidence in human brain after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and trauma, and worsen outcomes by increasing metabolic demand, decreasing blood supply, predisposing to seizure activity, and possibly worsening brain edema. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of SDs in injured brain. Although much of our mechanistic knowledge comes from experimental models of focal cerebral ischemia, clinical data suggest that the same principles apply regardless of the mode of injury (i.e., ischemia, hemorrhage, or trauma). The hope is that a better fundamental understanding of SDs will lead to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SD occurrence and its adverse consequences contributing to injury progression in subarachnoid hemorrhage and other forms of acute brain injury. PMID:27258442

  19. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  20. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography.

  1. Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Delayed Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, J.; Kesavabhotla, K.; Kallas, O.N.; Mir, D.; Baradaran, H.; Gupta, A.; Segal, A.Z.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Patients with SAH are at increased risk of delayed infarction. Early detection and treatment of delayed infarction remain challenging. We assessed blood-brain barrier permeability, measured as permeability surface area product, by using CTP in patients with SAH with delayed infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a retrospective study of patients with SAH with delayed infarction on follow-up NCCT. CTP was performed before the development of delayed infarction. CTP data were postprocessed into permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT maps. Coregistration was performed to align the infarcted region on the follow-up NCCT with the corresponding location on the CTP maps obtained before infarction. Permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT values were then obtained in the location of the subsequent infarction. The contralateral noninfarcted region was compared with the affected side in each patient. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine statistical significance. Clinical data were collected at the time of CTP and at the time of follow-up NCCT. RESULTS Twenty-one patients with SAH were included in the study. There was a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product in the regions of subsequent infarction compared with the contralateral control regions (P < .0001). However, CBF and MTT values were not significantly different in these 2 regions. Subsequent follow-up NCCT demonstrated new delayed infarction in all 21 patients, at which time 38% of patients had new focal neurologic deficits. CONCLUSIONS Our study reveals a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product preceding delayed infarction in patients with SAH. Further investigation of early permeability changes in SAH may provide new insights into the prediction of delayed infarction. PMID:25572949

  2. Loss of visual evoked potential following temporary occlusion of the superior hypophyseal artery during aneurysm clip placement surgery. Case report.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kodama, Kunihiko; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Keiichi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2007-10-01

    The authors report a case in which a 62-year-old woman with a history of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm was found to have a de novo paraclinoid aneurysm in the right internal carotid artery during a routine medical examination. Surgical clip placement was performed via a contralateral pterional approach under visual evoked potential (VEP) monitoring. The superior hypophyseal artery (SHA) was found to originate from the aneurysm body. The artery was temporarily occluded prior to application of the clip to the aneurysm neck. The VEP signal was lost 3 minutes after the SHA was occluded, and the potentials gradually recovered 10 minutes after the artery was released. The disappearance of VEP signal was reproducible with SHA occlusion. The clip was applied to the aneurysm body to preserve the origin of the SHA. The patient did not have any deterioration of vision after surgery. Intraoperative VEP monitoring can be used to help determine whether the SHA can be sacrificed safely.

  3. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  4. A Ruptured Basilar Tip Aneurysm Showing Repeated Perianeurysmal Edema after Endovascular Coil Embolization: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TAKESHITA, Tomonori; HORIE, Nobutaka; FUKUDA, Yutaka; SO, Gohei; HAYASHI, Kentaro; MORIKAWA, Minoru; SUYAMA, Kazuhiko; NAGATA, Izumi

    The authors present an extremely rare case of a 48-year-old female who developed repeated perianeurysmal edema at 2, 9, and 16 weeks after endovascular coil embolization for the ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Interestingly, the mechanism for this edema could be different at each time point in this case; acute thrombosis formation, chemical inflammation, and aneurysm recanalization. We have to be aware of this potential complication in the long term after endovascular coil embolization for the intracranial aneurysm, especially with large size or buried into the brain parenchyma. The clinical implications of this case are discussed with a review of the literature. PMID:24390180

  5. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review.

  6. A rare association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula with venous aneurysm and contralateral flow-related middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Onu, David O; Hunn, Andrew W; Harle, Robin A

    2013-01-01

    The association of cerebral dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and ipsilateral flow related aneurysm has infrequently been reported. We describe a male patient who presented with an acute haemorrhagic stroke and was found to have a large right fronto-parietal intra-parenchymal haemorrhage from the ruptured Borden type II DAVF in addition to a large venous aneurysm and a flow related intraosseous aneurysm of the contralateral middle meningeal artery (MMA) all clearly delineated by CT and DSA. He underwent emergency stereotactic evacuation of the intraparenchymal haemorrhage and successful surgical treatment of all the vascular lesions at the same time with residual neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case. We discuss the challenging surgical treatment, emphasising the role of CT/DSA in management, and provide a literature review. PMID:24051149

  7. Ruptured Left Gastric Artery Aneurysm: Unique Presentation with Hemothorax and Hemomediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Michael K.S. Vrazas, John I.

    2006-06-15

    Although splanchnic artery aneurysms are uncommon and remain mostly asymptomatic, they are associated with a high mortality rate when they rupture. We discuss the case of a 66-year-old woman who had successful embolization of a left gastric artery aneurysm after presenting with acute chest pain and the unusual computed tomography findings of hemothorax and hemomediastinum. To our knowledge, only one other similar case has been published in the literature.

  8. Multiple Intrahepatic Artery Aneurysms in a Patient with Behcet's Disease: Use of Transcatheter Embolization for Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fotiadis, Nikolas I. Dilks, Phil; Kocher, Hemant M.; Fotheringham, Tim; Matson, Matthew

    2010-04-15

    Intrahepatic artery aneuryms are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. We present the first case in the English literature of multiple intrahepatic artery aneuryms in a patient with Behcet's disease who presented acutely with rupture. The ruptured aneurysm was treated successfully with transcatheter arterial coil embolization-CT and clinical follow-up confirming a good result. We discuss the management dilemma with regard to prophylactic embolization of the numerous other small asymptomatic intrahepatic aneurysms in this same patient.

  9. Blister-like aneurysms of middle cerebral artery: a multicenter retrospective review of diagnosis and treatment in three patients.

    PubMed

    Peschillo, Simone; Missori, P; Piano, M; Cannizzaro, D; Guidetti, G; Santoro, A; Cenzato, M

    2015-01-01

    Blood blister-like aneurysms (BBA) were described for the first time in the 1990s, as small hemispherical bulges arising from a very fragile arterial wall. Until 2008, it was thought that this type of aneurysm almost exclusively affected the internal carotid artery, in particular, its dorsal portion. Subsequently, it was discovered that a BBA may also be present on the anterior communicating artery and on the vessels of the posterior cranial fossa. However, we found no reports in English-language literature of BBA arising from the middle cerebral artery (MCA). In this article, we present three cases of MCA BBA and discuss the unique diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this vascular lesion. In our retrospective, multicenter review of 1330 patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage admitted to our services from 2000 to 2013, we found three cases (all in men) of MCA BBA. The patients' outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale. All three patients underwent angio-computed tomography, which did not reveal any aneurysms. Digital subtraction angiography performed within 24-48 h after admission, in all cases, demonstrated a very small aneurysm (<2 mm), with a triangular shape and abroad base, at non-branching sites of MCA. All the aneurysms were treated: one by wrapping + clipping, one by wrapping + flow-diverter stent, and one with coils. At the time of surgery, the aneurysms appeared on the surface of the parent artery without any involvement of the branches. All presented as blister-like aneurysms that were thin-walled and lacked a surgical neck. At the time of discharge, the outcome was good in one patient and poor in the other two. Our cases demonstrate that BBA can also arise from the MCA, despite the lack of previous reports of this occurrence; a BBA should be suspected, particularly in cases of non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage in which the presence of a MCA aneurysm is suspected but not revealed by digital subtraction angiography

  10. Collaborative retrospective multicentre series of giant intracavernous carotid aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Penchet, G; Mourier, K

    2015-12-01

    Giant intracavernous carotid aneurysms (GICCA) occur with very unusual clinical symptoms often resulting from a compressive mechanism that may possibly resolve although seldom from a rupture or haemorrhage. In fact, due to their clinical presentation their treatment is different from that of the intracranial subarachnoid aneurysms. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical symptoms, therapeutic decisions, and the clinical state at 6 months follow up in a retrospective consecutive multicentre series of 27 GICCA between 2004 and 2008. All the patients in the series were female, mean age 65 years (21 to 82 years). A pseudo tumoural cavernous sinus syndrome revealed the disease in 25 patients (92.6%), an atypical headache in one patient, and in another patient an intraoperative haemorrhage led to the diagnosis. In most of the cases the aneurysms were sacciform in shape (89%), with a size between 25 and 30 millimeters (66.6%) and contained a blood clot due to intrasacular thrombosis (57.5%). An occlusion test of the internal carotid artery was performed during the diagnostic angiography in 24 cases (88.8%) and good tolerance of occlusion was observed in 16 of them. An endovascular procedure was performed in 21 patients (77.7%): selective coiling of the aneurysm facilitated by stenting or by remodeling techniques in 2 cases, whereas internal carotid artery occlusion was performed on the 19 other cases. Among these latter patients, 2 of them (10.5%) presented with a poor tolerance during the pre-therapeutic carotid occlusion test, necessitating a surgical intra-extra cranial by-pass prior to the carotid endovascular occlusion. In 1 other case of these 19, the internal carotid endovascular occlusion was carried-out in emergency because the aneurysm was revealed by a major haemorrhage during the surgical transsphenoidal approach of a hypophyseal tumour. No treatment was decided in the remaining 6 cases of the series (22.2%). At 6 months follow-up, 18 of the 21

  11. [The process of ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarct associated with left ventricular aneurysm and ventricular septum rupture treated with radical surgery].

    PubMed

    Hůla, J

    1997-01-01

    Even after a successful operation of mechanical complications on account of acute myocardial infarction gradually developing adverse remodelling of the left ventricle has to be envisaged. In a six-year clinical study by means of echocardiography the authors followed up systematically some cardiac dimensions and volumes and functional systolic and diastolic left ventricular parameters. The changes pertained in particular to the endsystolic and enddiastolic volume, the ejection fraction, the peak maximum rate, early and late diastolic filling and their ratio as well as to indirect values of the mean pressure in the pulmonary artery. These changes, which at first indicated impaired relaxation, are caused subsequently by increasing stiffness of the left ventricle. With regard to the large number of complicated pathophysiological phenomena pertaining to active relaxation and passive elastic properties of the left ventricle during ventricular diastole, different Doppler parameters must be evaluated very carefully, individually and with regard to the clinical condition. Attention is drawn to the importance of complicating mitral regurgitations and an increased pressure in the left atrium and lesser circulation after aneurysmectomy of the left ventricle. Mitral regurgitation has an impact on the process of left ventricular filling investigated by means of diastolic Doppler functions. Despite limitations of echocardiographic methods within the framework of assessment of diastolic left ventricular functions after myocardial infarction echocardiography remains the main means for evaluating left ventricular function by a non-invasive route and its position in this respect is irreplaceable. Further experimental work is needed for better understanding, use and more intelligent interpretation of non-invasive parameters of left ventricular function also in these complicated conditions after surgery of mechanical complications resulting from myocardial infarction. PMID:9221569

  12. Idiopathic internal mammary artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Jens; Zimmermann, Hanna; Klose, Alexander; Luchting, Benjamin; Hinske, Christian; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysms of the internal mammary artery are extremely rare, and their presentation and treatment are variable. Since these aneurysms often tend to rupture and cause haemothorax and life-threatening conditions, the knowledge of secure treatment options is indispensable. We here report the case of an idiopathic internal mammary aneurysm in a 46-year-old man. Open surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed in this case without any complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was in a good physical condition without any vascular or neurological abnormalities during follow-up. PMID:25452261

  13. A ruptured aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the extracranial vertebral artery to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery associated with bilateral vertebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Nishimura, Shinjitu; Kimura, Naoto; Ezura, Masayuki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a small ruptured aneurysm of the leptomeningeal collateral circulation from the vertebral artery (VA) to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA); this aneurysm was associated with bilateral VA occlusion. A 72-year-old woman with sudden headache, nausea, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was admitted to our hospital. On admission, no evidence of cerebral signs or cranial nerve palsy was found. Computed tomography imaging showed SAH predominantly in the posterior fossa, and digital subtraction angiography revealed bilateral VA occlusion and the left VA aneurysm located proximal to the VA union. In addition, a small aneurysm was observed at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation located between the extracranial left VA and the left PICA. The patient underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset of the symptoms associated with SAH. However, the VA aneurysm was unruptured and surgically trapped. The small aneurysm arising at the leptomeningeal collateral circulation was ruptured during the surgery and was electrocoagulated; the collateral circulation was preserved, and no neurologic deficits were observed. The postoperative course was uneventful. SAH with the occlusion of major vessels should be diagnosed with utmost caution to allow preoperative neurologic and radiological assessments.

  14. Hybrid, Y-configured, dual stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Balli, Tugsan; Aksungur, Erol H

    2015-01-01

    In Y-stenting, stabilization of the first stent may be problematic as in some cases it migrates during second stent insertion. This report evaluates the safety and effectiveness of the technique and presents the long-term results of hybrid, Y-configured, dual stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. We retrospectively evaluated the patients treated endovascularly due to cerebral aneurysms. Twenty patients treated with hybrid Y-stent-assisted coil embolization were enrolled in the study. In hybrid stenting, an open-cell intracranial stent (Neuroform) was used as a first stent to prevent stent migration. A closed-cell stent (Enterprise or Acclino) was used as a second stent and the aneurysm was embolized with coils between the stent struts. In all patients, hybrid Y-stenting and coil embolization were accomplished successfully. No stent migration occurred. Clinically, neither symptomatic neurologic complication nor death was seen. Of 20 wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms, nine were at the basilar tip, while seven were at the middle cerebral artery and three at the anterior communicating artery. In one patient, the aneurysm was at the A2-3 junction of the anterior cerebral artery. One of the patients had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mean angiographic follow-up was 25.6 months. No in-stent stenosis was seen in any of the patients and recanalization in only one. Hybrid, Y-configured, dual stent-assisted coil embolization is a safe and effective method in the treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms to prevent stent migration and aneurysm recanalization, and is a viable alternative to microsurgery. PMID:25934772

  15. Management of Giant Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sami; Otan, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To provide an overview of the medical literature on giant splenic artery aneurysm (SAA). The PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to SAA. Keywords used were splenic artery aneurysm, giant splenic artery aneuryms, huge splenic artery aneurysm, splenic artery aneurysm rupture, and visceral artery aneurysm. SAAs with a diameter ≥5 cm are considered as giant and included in this study. The language of the publication was not a limitation criterion, and publications dated before January 15, 2015 were considered. The literature review included 69 papers (62 fulltext, 6 abstract, 1 nonavailable) on giant SAA. A sum of 78 patients (50 males, 28 females) involved in the study with an age range of 27–87 years (mean ± SD: 55.8 ± 14.0 years). Age range for male was 30–87 (mean ± SD: 57.5 ± 12.0 years) and for female was 27–84 (mean ± SD: 52.7 ± 16.6 years). Most frequent predisposing factors were acute or chronic pancreatitis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cirrhosis. Aneurysm dimensions were obtained for 77 patients with a range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 97.1 ± 46.0 mm). Aneurysm dimension range for females was 50–210 mm (mean ± SD: 97.5 ± 40.2 mm) and for males was 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.9 ± 48.9 mm). Intraperitoneal/retroperitoneal rupture was present in 15, among which with a lesion dimension range of 50–180 mm (mean ± SD; 100 ± 49.3 mm) which was range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.3 ± 45.2 mm) in cases without rupture. Mortality for rupture patients was 33.3%. Other frequent complications were gastrosplenic fistula (n = 3), colosplenic fistula (n = 1), pancreatic fistula (n = 1), splenic arteriovenous fistula (n = 3), and portosplenic fistula (n = 1). Eight of the patients died in early postoperative period while 67 survived. Survival status of the

  16. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  17. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  2. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  3. [Experimental Subarachnoid hemmorrhage in dogs--effect of various drugs and sympathectomy on cerebral arterial spasm (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Noda, S

    1975-09-01

    Adult mongrel dogs were used. The posterior communicating artery was punctured with a fine needle and subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced, which simulated aneurysmal rupture in human. The cerebral basal arteries were constricted remarkably after the puncture. However this vasospasm disappeared in about 60-120 minutes. After this restoration, the vessels began to be constricted again and reduced their diameter in greater degree with lapse of time. Effect of various drugs and sympathectomy on the experimental spasm induced by this method were studied utilizing the magnified vertebral angiography. The drugs used were papverine, isoxuprine, methysergide, phentolamine and propranolol. One of these drugs was given to each dog into the vertebral artery 15 minutes after the puncture of the artery for study of the early spasm, and the same procedure was carried out 24 hours after the late spasm. Vertebral arteriograms were taken immediately after and at 5, 10 and 30 minutes after injection of the drug. Diameter changes of the cerebral basal arteries were measured on the film. Smooth muscle relaxtants, papaverine and isoxsuprine, were effective on relieving the early and the late spasm. An antiserotonin agent, methysergide, relieved slightly the early spasm, but it had no effect on the late spasm. Phentolamine, that is an adrenergic blocking agent, relieved the early spam remarkably, but it was less effective on the late spam. A beta adrenergic blocking agent, propranolol, was effective on relieving neither the early nor the late spasm. Two weeks after the removal of the bilateral upper cervical ganglia, subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by the smae method as mentioned above in four dogs. Arteriograms taken 24 hours after puncture of the posterior communicating artery in these dogs showed vasoconstriction as same as in the non-sympathectomized dogs. From these experimental results, it was suggested that an etiological difference in the early and the late spasm may exist

  4. Endovascular occlusion of a ruptured transitional aneurysm associated with a developmental venous anomaly. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ducruet, Andrew F; Kellner, Christopher P; Connolly, E Sander; Meyers, Philip M

    2009-05-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) represent a rare cause of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. This case demonstrates an unusual DVA associated with venous hypertension, arteriovenous shunting, and a ruptured transitional aneurysm. The authors describe the first use of embolization as a treatment method for an unstable ruptured transitional aneurysm associated with a DVA. This 33-year-old man suffered acute onset of headache, gait ataxia, and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography brain scans demonstrated a deep paramedian right frontal intraparenchymal hemorrhage. No cavernous malformation was apparent on MR imaging. Diagnostic angiography revealed arteriovenous shunting from the right anterior and middle cerebral arteries to a large DVA with an associated arteriovenous fistula, with a 3-mm aneurysm in the transition from pericallosal artery to the collecting vein. Both surgical and endovascular treatment options were considered. The patient underwent repeat angiography on hospital Day 7, at which time the aneurysm had increased to 5 mm, and endovascular treatment was selected. Acrylic occlusion of the aneurysm was performed and confirmed angiographically. The patient's neurological symptoms resolved throughout the hospital stay, and he remains symptom free in the 10 months since treatment. Developmental venous anomalies are not usually associated with arteriovenous shunting and aneurysms as a source of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Endovascular occlusion of the aneurysm without blockage of physiologically necessary venous structures is a possible method of treatment for this complex mixed vascular lesion, and has proven safe and effective in this patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first presentation of this situation in the literature.

  5. [Repeated Rupture of Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms in a Short Period in Association with Polyarteritis Nodosa:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Miura, Takanori; Maruya, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Sato, Ryuta; Hatakeyama, Takashi; Nishimaki, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral involvement is rare in polyarteritis nodosa(PAN);furthermore, secondary intracranial hemorrhage due to cerebral aneurysm is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case of repeated subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)in a 64-year-old woman with a history of PAN. Initially, she developed severe headache(probable first SAH, day 0), and presented at our hospital with second severe headache with disturbed consciousness on day 6. Computed tomography(CT)revealed that SAH was mainly distributed in the right basal cistern and sylvian fissure(second SAH). Three aneurysms were detected using CT angiography on the bilateral internal carotid arteries. An intentionally delayed surgery was planned because of the high risk period of cerebral vasospasm and takotsubo cardiomyopathy. On day 15, she complained of headache and had a convulsion. CT revealed a third SAH in the left sylvian fissure;cerebral angiography revealed enlargement of the left internal carotid-posterior communicating artery(IC-PC)aneurysm. Coil embolization of the aneurysm was performed on day 16, and she was treated using prednisolone(20mg/day)for PAN. However, on day 20, the patient became comatose, and CT revealed a fourth SAH in the right sylvian fissure. Cerebral angiography revealed enlargement of the right IC-PC aneurysm. Clipping of the aneurysm was successfully performed in spite of ventricular dysfunction, and the dose of prednisolone was increased to 40mg/day. After treatment, the ventricular dysfunction gradually resolved. Cerebral aneurysms with PAN are candidates for intervention because of their strong tendency to rupture. In our case, takotsubo cardiomyopathy might have been associated with impairment of the coronary microcirculation due to PAN. We suggest that aggressive immunosuppressive treatment for PAN and curative treatments for cerebral aneurysms should be considered with careful radiological examination and follow-up monitoring. PMID:27506843

  6. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Malik, Ahmed A; Saeed, Omar; Defillo, Archie; Sherr, Gregory T; Suri, M Fareed K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) increases after menopause. Anecdotal data suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce the rate of SAH and aneurysm formation in women. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of HRT on occurrence of SAH in a large prospective cohort of postmenopausal women. METHODS The data were analyzed for 93, 676 women 50-79 years of age who were enrolled in the observational arm of the Women's Health Initiative Study. The effect of HRT on risk of SAH was determined over a period of 12 ± 1 years (mean ± SD) using Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for potential confounders. Additional analysis was performed to identify the risk associated with "estrogen only" and "estrogen and progesterone" HRT among women. RESULTS Of the 93, 676 participants, 114 (0.1%) developed SAH during the follow-up period. The rate of SAH was higher among women on active HRT compared with those without HRT used (0.14% vs 0.11%, absolute difference 0.03%, p < 0.0001). In unadjusted analysis, participants who reported active use of HRT were 60% more likely to suffer an SAH (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3). Compared with women without HRT use, the risk of SAH continued to be higher among women reporting active use of HRT (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.2) after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, race/ethnicity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The risk of SAH was nonsignificantly higher among women on "estrogen only" HRT (RR 1.4, 95% CI 0.91-2.0) than "estrogen and progesterone" HRT(RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-2.1) after adjusting for the above-mentioned confounders. CONCLUSIONS Postmenopausal women, particularly those at risk for SAH due to presence of unruptured aneurysms, family history, or cardiovascular risk factors, should be counseled against use of HRT.

  7. The effect of changes in barometric pressure on the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Landers, A T; Narotam, P K; Govender, S T; van Dellen, J R

    1997-06-01

    Several meteorological variables have been linked with an altered incidence of cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we had noticed that, following abrupt changes in weather, patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) often presented in groups. This study was undertaken to determine whether changes in barometric pressure would be an important factor. A retrospective analysis of a two year period was carried out. Daily mean, peak and trough atmospheric pressures had been recorded independently by a weather bureau. Of the 157 patients with SAH due to a berry aneurysm, confirmed by CT and angiography, 60 were entered into the study. Patients residing outside the weather bureau region (n = 86), or where there was uncertainty of their day of ictus (n = 11), were excluded. Daily peak to trough pressure changes and mean monthly pressure fluctuations showed no association with an increased risk of SAH. However, a significant relationship between the incidence of onset of symptoms indicative of a rupture of the aneurysm and a change in barometric mean pressure (BMP) of > 10 hectapascals from the previous day was found (p = 0.0247). The calculated odds ratio of sustaining a SAH with this associated BMP change was therefore 2.7 times with a risk of 1-13 times at a 95% confidence level (p = 0.035).

  8. [A Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm Involving the Anterior Spinal Artery:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tomura, Nagatsuki; Kono, Kenichi; Okada, Hideo; Yoshimura, Ryo; Shintani, Aki; Tanaka, Yuko; Terada, Tomoaki

    2016-07-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm(VADA)involving the anterior spinal artery(ASA). The ASA branched at the proximal component of the dissecting aneurysm. The rupture point was presumed to be the distal region of the dissecting aneurysm. We performed coil embolization of the distal part only in order to prevent rebleeding and preserve the ASA. The patient showed no neurological deficits. Six months after the procedure, an angiogram demonstrated occlusion of a distal portion of the right vertebral artery. However, the ASA was still patent. No rebleeding occurred, and the patient has remained neurologically symptom-free for 3 years from the treatment. ASA-involved VADAs are extremely rare. Treatment strategy is difficult because there are no options for bypass surgery and occlusion of the ASA may lead to quadriplegia unless there is collateral flow to the ASA. Although the outcome of the patient was good with partial coil embolization in this case, the treatment strategy should be carefully considered for ASA-involved VADAs. PMID:27384118

  9. Combined suture and clipping for the reconstruction of a ruptured blister-like aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Archavlis, Eleftherios; Giese, Alf

    2016-10-01

    Blister-like aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) present a severe therapeutical challenge. While several reconstructive techniques are in use in case of acute rupture sacrifice of the parent vessel may be required. We present a combined technique of micro-sutures and clip application to repair the parent vessel in an intraoperatively ruptured blister-like aneurysm. Following temporary trapping of an intraoperatively ruptured 7-mm blister-like aneurysm four 8-0 nylon sutures were applied to adapt the vessel walls and support the branches of subsequently applied mini-clips. The combination of micro-sutures and mini-clips might be a valuable alternative to direct clipping or suturing in some cases with intraoperative rupture of blister-like aneurysms. PMID:27514829

  10. Combined suture and clipping for the reconstruction of a ruptured blister-like aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Archavlis, Eleftherios; Giese, Alf

    2016-10-01

    Blister-like aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) present a severe therapeutical challenge. While several reconstructive techniques are in use in case of acute rupture sacrifice of the parent vessel may be required. We present a combined technique of micro-sutures and clip application to repair the parent vessel in an intraoperatively ruptured blister-like aneurysm. Following temporary trapping of an intraoperatively ruptured 7-mm blister-like aneurysm four 8-0 nylon sutures were applied to adapt the vessel walls and support the branches of subsequently applied mini-clips. The combination of micro-sutures and mini-clips might be a valuable alternative to direct clipping or suturing in some cases with intraoperative rupture of blister-like aneurysms.

  11. Splenic artery aneurysm presenting as a submucosal gastric lesion: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tannoury, Jenny; Honein, Khalil; Abboud, Bassam

    2016-07-25

    We are reporting the rare case of splenic artery aneurysm of 4 cm of diameter presenting as a sub mucosal lesion on gastro-duodenal endoscopy. This aneurysm was treated by endovascular coil embolization and stent graft implantation. The procedure was uneventful. On day 1, the patient presented an acute severe epigastric pain and cardiovascular arrest. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed an active leak of the intravenous contrast dye in the peritoneum from the splenic aneurysm. We performed an emergent resection of the aneurysm, and peritoneal lavage. Postoperatively, hemorrhagic choc was refractory to large volumes replacement, and intravenous vaso-active drugs. On day 2, he presented massive hematochezia. We performed a total colectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy for ischemic colitis, with spleen and gallbladder infarction. Despite vaso-active drugs and aggressive treatment with Factor VIIa, the patient died after uncontrolled disseminated intravascular coagulation. PMID:27499832

  12. Splenic artery aneurysm presenting as a submucosal gastric lesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Jenny; Honein, Khalil; Abboud, Bassam

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting the rare case of splenic artery aneurysm of 4 cm of diameter presenting as a sub mucosal lesion on gastro-duodenal endoscopy. This aneurysm was treated by endovascular coil embolization and stent graft implantation. The procedure was uneventful. On day 1, the patient presented an acute severe epigastric pain and cardiovascular arrest. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed an active leak of the intravenous contrast dye in the peritoneum from the splenic aneurysm. We performed an emergent resection of the aneurysm, and peritoneal lavage. Postoperatively, hemorrhagic choc was refractory to large volumes replacement, and intravenous vaso-active drugs. On day 2, he presented massive hematochezia. We performed a total colectomy with splenectomy and cholecystectomy for ischemic colitis, with spleen and gallbladder infarction. Despite vaso-active drugs and aggressive treatment with Factor VIIa, the patient died after uncontrolled disseminated intravascular coagulation. PMID:27499832

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms in the Flow Diverter Era: Frequency of Use and Results in a Consecutive Series of 550 Treatments in a Single Centre

    PubMed Central

    Jan van Rooij, Willem; Bechan, Ratna S; Peluso, Jo P; Sluzewski, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Summary Flow diverter devices became available in our department in 2009. We considered treatment with flow diverters only in patients with aneurysms not suitable for surgery or conventional endovascular techniques. This paper presents our preliminary experience with flow diverters in a consecutive series of 550 endovascular aneurysm treatments. Between January 2009 and July 2013, 550 endovascular treatments for intracranial aneurysms were performed. Of these, 490 were first-time aneurysm treatments in 464 patients and 61 were additional treatments of previously coiled aneurysms in 51 patients. Endovascular treatments consisted of selective coiling in 445 (80.8%), stent-assisted coiling in 68 (12.4%), balloon-assisted coiling in 13 (2.4%), parent vessel occlusion in 12 (2.2%) and flow diverter treatment in 12 (2.2%). Eleven patients with 12 aneurysms were treated with flow diverters. Two patients had ruptured dissecting aneurysms. One patient with a basilar trunk aneurysm died of acute in stent thrombosis and another patient died of brain stem ischaemia at 32 months follow-up. One patient had ischaemia with permanent neurological deficit. Two aneurysms are still open at up to 30 months follow-up. Flow diversion was used in 2% of all endovascular treatments. Both our own poor results and the high complication rates reported in the literature have converted our initial enthusiasm to apprehension and hesitancy. The safety and efficacy profile of flow diversion should discourage the use of these devices in aneurysms that can be treated with other techniques. PMID:25207905

  14. Extravasation during Aneurysm Embolization without Neurologic Consequences. Lessons learned from Complications of Pseudoaneurysm Coiling. Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hue, Yun Hee; Kim, Young-Joon

    2008-01-01

    Although endovascular intervention is the first-line treatment of intracranial aneurysm, intraprocedural rupture or extravasation is still an endangering event. We describe two interesting cases of extravasation during embolotherapy for ruptured peripheral cerebral pseudoaneurysms. Two male patients were admitted after development of sudden headache with presentation of intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Initial angiographic assessment failed to uncover any aneurysmal dilatation in both patients. Two weeks afterwards, catheter angiography revealed aneurysms each in the peripheral middle cerebral artery and anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Under a general anesthesia, endovascular embolization was attempted without systemic heparinization. In each case, sudden extravasation was noted around the aneurysm during manual injection of contrast after microcatheter navigation. Immediate computed tomographic scan showed a large amount of contrast collection within the brain, but they tolerated and made an unremarkable recovery thereafter. Intraprocedural extravasation is an endangering event and needs prompt management, however proximal plugging with coil deployment can be sufficient alternative, if one confronts with peripheral pseudoaneurysm. Peculiar angiographic features are deemed attributable to extremely fragile, porous vascular wall of the pseudoaneurysm. Accordingly, it should be noted that extreme caution being needed to handle such a friable vascular lesion. PMID:19096673

  15. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  16. Post-operative monitoring of cortical taurine in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    De Micheli, E; Pinna, G; Alfieri, A; Caramia, G; Bianchi, L; Colivicchi, M A; Della Corte, L; Bricolo, A

    2000-01-01

    Intracerebral MD enables the retrieval of endogenous substances from the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the brain and has been demonstrated to be a sensitive technique for early detection of subtle vasospasm-induced neurometabolic abnormalities in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The aim of this study was to monitor cortical extracellular concentrations of energy metabolism markers, such as glucose and lactate, neurotransmitter amino acids, such as glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine to identify any neurochemical patterns of cerebral ischemia. A prospective clinical study was conducted on a group of 16 patients with non-severe SAH operated on within 72 hours after initial bleeding. Following aneurysm clipping, an MD catheter was inserted in the cortical region where vasospasm could be expected to develop, and perfused with artificial CSF at 0.3 microl/min flow rate. Dialysate was collected every 6 hours and then analyzed on High Performance Liquid Cromatography (HPLC) for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine. Mean ECF taurine concentrations ranged from 1.4 + 0.7 to 12.3 + 7.8 micromol/l in single patients: global mean value was 5.8 + 3.8 micromol/l. In this series, the highest absolute taurine value was 25.7 micromol/l, observed in a patient who developed clinical and radiological signs of cerebral ischemia. Nine patients presented clinical disturbances related to cerebral vasospasm. In this setting, representing a mild-to-moderate hypoxic condition, MD data demonstrated that lactate is the most sensitive marker of cellular energy imbalance. Increased lactate levels positively correlated with glutamate (P<0.0001), aspartate (P<0.0001), GABA (P<0.0001) and taurine (P<0.0001) concentrations. These results suggest that also in humans increased taurine levels reflect a condition of cellular stress. This study confirms that MD is a sensitive technique to reveal subtle metabolic abnormalities possibly resulting in cell damage.

  17. HIF-1α Mediates Isoflurane-Induced Vascular Protection in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Eric; Johnson, Andrew W; Nelson, James W; Harries, Michael D; Gidday, Jeffrey M; Han, Byung Hee; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) depends critically on delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) – a process driven primarily by vascular events including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction. This study sought to determine the impact of postconditioning – the phenomenon whereby endogenous protection against severe injury is enhanced by subsequent exposure to a mild stressor – on SAH-induced DCI. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham, SAH, or SAH plus isoflurane postconditioning. Neurological outcome was assessed daily via sensorimotor scoring. Contributors to DCI including cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, and microvascular dysfunction were measured 3 days later. Isoflurane-induced changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent genes were assessed via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HIF-1α was inhibited pharmacologically via 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or genetically via endothelial cell HIF-1α-null mice (EC-HIF-1α-null). All experiments were performed in a randomized and blinded fashion. Results Isoflurane postconditioning initiated at clinically relevant time points after SAH significantly reduced cerebral vasospasm, microvessel thrombosis, microvascular dysfunction, and neurological deficits in wild-type (WT) mice. Isoflurane modulated HIF-1α-dependent genes – changes that were abolished in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Isoflurane-induced DCI protection was attenuated in 2ME2-treated WT mice and EC-HIF-1α-null mice. Interpretation Isoflurane postconditioning provides strong HIF-1α-mediated macro- and microvascular protection in SAH, leading to improved neurological outcome. These results implicate cerebral vessels as a key target for the brain protection afforded by isoflurane postconditioning, and HIF-1α as a critical mediator of this vascular protection. They also identify isoflurane postconditioning as a promising novel

  18. Detection of CT occult aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage using a novel spectrophotometric analysis of cerebral spinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Bhadri, Prashant R.; Huang, Jian; Kumar, Alla S.; Pyne, Gail J.; Caffery, James, Jr.; Clark, Joseph F.; Shukla, Rakesh; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    In North America, approximately 30,000 people annually suffer an aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Using computerized tomography (CT), the blood is generally not visible after 12 hours. Currently lumbar puncture (LP) results are equivocal for diagnosing SAH largely because of technical limitations in performing a quick and objective evaluation. Having ruptured once, an aneurysm is statistically more likely to rupture again. Therefore, for those individuals with a sentinel (or warning) hemorrhage, detection within the first 12 hours is paramount. We present a diagnostic technology based on visible spectroscopy to quickly and objectively assess low-blood volume SAH from a diagnostic spinal tap. This technology provides clinicians, with the resources necessary for assessing patients with suspected aneurismal SAH beyond the current 12-hour limitation imposed by CT scans. This aids in the improvement of patient care and results in rapid and appropriate treatment of the patient. To perform this diagnosis, we quantify bilirubin and hemoglobin in human CSF over a range of concentrations. Because the bilirubin and hemoglobin spectra overlap quantification is problematic. To solve this problem, two algorithmic approaches are presented: a statistical or a random stochastic component known as Partial Least Square (PLS) and a control theory based mathematical model. These algorithms account for the noise and distortion from blood in CSF leading to the quantification of bilirubin and methemoglobin spectroscopically. The configurations for a hardware platform is introduced, that is portable and user-friendly composed of specific components designed to have the sensitivity and specificity required. This aids in measuring bilirubin in CSF, hemorrhagic-CSF and CSF-like solutions. The prototype uses purpose built algorithms contained within the platform, such that physicians can use it in the hospital and lab as a point of care diagnostic test.

  19. Association of early post-procedure hemodynamic management with the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Matsuda, Shinya; Ishikawa, Koichi B; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fujimori, Kenji

    2013-03-01

    Post-procedure hemodynamic management for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is controversial because of the paucity of studied patients. Using a Japanese administrative database, we tested whether increased albumin, catecholamine, and volumes of fluid administered between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day would be associated with outcomes of mortality, consciousness deterioration at discharge and re-intubation between the 5th and 14th post-procedure days. Across 550 hospitals, 5,400 patients were identified who received clipping, wrapping and endovascular coiling within 48 h after admission in 2010. Patient characteristics and the administration of albumin, catecholamine, and volume of fluid normalized by body weight were analyzed among the groups and categorized according to the presence of albumin and catecholamine administered between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day. The association of early hemodynamic management with outcomes was measured using logistic regression models, through controlling for the preference of early administration of albumin and catecholamine. For the patients, 9.3 % received albumin only, 14.4 % catecholamine only, and 4.9 % both between the procedure and the 4th post-procedure day, while 16.5 % received albumin or catecholamine on other days. Variation in albumin and catecholamine administration was observed. Higher normalized fluid volume, commenced before the 4th post-procedure day, was associated with increased mortality and re-intubation (although with decreased complications), and vice versa between the 4th and 14th post-procedure days. Catecholamine administration was associated with worsened outcomes. Hypervolemic and hypertensive therapies commenced before the 4th post-procedure day require further research to determine whether their associations with outcomes in this administrative data base are causal or not.

  20. Macrocephaly in infancy: benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jacqueline; Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Piatt, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Benign enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces (BESS) is a common finding on imaging studies indicated by macrocephaly in infancy. This finding has been associated with the presence of subdural fluid collections that are sometimes construed as suggestive of abusive head injury. The prevalence of BESS among infants with macrocephaly and the prevalence of subdural collections among infants with BESS are both poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the relative frequencies of BESS, hydrocephalus, and subdural collections in a large consecutive series of imaging studies performed for macrocephaly and to determine the prevalence of subdural fluid collections among patients with BESS. METHODS A text search of radiology requisitions identified studies performed for macrocephaly in patients ≤ 2 years of age. Studies of patients with hydrocephalus or acute trauma were excluded. Studies that demonstrated hydrocephalus or chronic subdural hematoma not previously recognized but responsible for macrocephaly were noted but not investigated further. The remaining studies were reviewed for the presence of incidental subdural collections and for measurement of the depth of the subarachnoid space. A 3-point scale was used to grade BESS: Grade 0, < 5 mm; Grade 1, 5-9 mm; and Grade 2, ≥ 10 mm. RESULTS After exclusions, there were 538 studies, including 7 cases of hydrocephalus (1.3%) and 1 large, bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (0.2%). There were incidental subdural collections in 21 cases (3.9%). Two hundred sixty-five studies (49.2%) exhibited Grade 1 BESS, and 46 studies (8.6%) exhibited Grade 2 BESS. The prevalence of incidental subdural collections among studies with BESS was 18 of 311 (5.8%). The presence of BESS was associated with a greater prevalence of subdural collections, and higher grades of BESS were associated with increasing prevalence of subdural collections. After controlling for imaging modality, the odds ratio of the association of

  1. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-10-15

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  2. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  3. Techniques in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Phade, Sachin V.; Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms, with over half of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed endoluminally each year. Since the first endografts were placed two decades ago, many changes have been made in graft design, operative technique, and management of complications. This paper summarizes modern endovascular grafts, considerations in preoperative planning, and EVAR techniques. Specific areas that are addressed include endograft selection, arterial access, sheath delivery, aortic branch management, graft deployment, intravascular ultrasonography, pressure sensors, management of endoleaks and compressed limbs, and exit strategies. PMID:22121487

  4. Management of cholelithiasis in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Ouriel, K; Ricotta, J J; Adams, J T; Deweese, J A

    1983-01-01

    Gallstones were detected in 42 of 865 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (4.9%). Eighteen patients underwent concomitant aneurysm resection and cholecystectomy. Eleven patients had aneurysmectomy without cholecystectomy. Thirteen patients underwent cholecystectomy alone. There were no significant increases in operative mortality, duration of operation, or length of hospital stay when cholecystectomy was added to aneurysm resection. However, there was one instance of prosthetic infection which occurred in a patient who did not have his graft retroperitonealized prior to cholecystectomy, and who also underwent gastrostomy and drainage of the liver bed. There have been no graft complications in the remaining 17 consecutive patients who had their graft retroperitonealized prior to cholecystectomy. Nine of 11 patients who underwent aneurysmectomy without cholecystectomy experienced an episode of acute cholecystitis during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years. Two of these episodes occurred in the immediate postoperative period and one patient died of biliary sepsis. On the basis of these findings, concomitant aneurysmectomy and cholecystectomy is advised in those patients with cholelithiasis undergoing aortic aneurysm resection providing no contraindications exist. PMID:6639176

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms. [Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Ling, D.; Heiken, J.P.; Glazer, H.S.; Sicard, G.A.; Totty, W.G.; Levitt, R.G.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients with radiologically or surgically proven abdominal aortic aneurysms using a Siemens Magnetom scanner with a 0.35-T superconductive magnet. Of nine patients who underwent surgical repair, MRI correctly demonstrated the origin of the aortic aneurysm in nine and accurately determined the status of the iliac arteries in eight. Of 11 patients who did not have surgical repair, MRI findings correlated well with other radiologic studies. MRI was found to be more reliable than sonography in determining the relation between the aneurysm and the renal arteries as well as the status of the iliac arteries. Despite these advantages, the authors still advocate sonography as the screening procedure of choice in patients with suspected abdominal aortic aneurysms because of its lower cost and ease of performance. MRI should be reserved for patients who have had unsuccessful or equivocal sonographic examinations.

  6. Memory impairment caused by cerebral hematoma in the left medial temporal lobe due to ruptured posterior cerebral artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive disorders, such as memory disturbances, are often observed following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. We present a very rare case where rupture of a posterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused restricted damage to the hippocampus unilaterally, and caused memory disturbances. Case presentation A 56-year-old, right-handed man, with a formal education history of 16 years and company employees was admitted to our hospital because of a consciousness disturbance. He was diagnosed as having a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a left posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm, and coil embolization was performed. Subsequently, he had neither motor paresis nor sensory disturbances, but he showed disorientation, and both retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Although immediate recall and remote memory were almost intact, his recent memory was moderately impaired. Both verbal and non-verbal memories were impaired. Brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cerebral hematoma in the left temporal lobe involving the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) demonstrated low perfusion areas in the left medial temporal lobe. Conclusions We suggest that the memory impairment was caused by local tissue destruction of Papez’s circuit in the dominant hemisphere due to the cerebral hematoma. PMID:24602130

  7. [Complete remission of consciousness disturbances and spasticity due to a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage after intrathecal baclofen therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Asahi, Takashi; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Koh, Masaki; Matsumura, Nobuhisa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Typically, intrathecal baclofen therapy(ITB)for spasticity is continuously required because the spasticity can recur if the ITB is stopped. Thus, an infusion pump for the ITB is permanently implanted. Some sporadic cases exhibiting remarkable improvements in their spasticity and consciousness disturbances have been reported after implanting the ITB pump. We experienced a rare case involving removal of the ITB pump after the spasticity resolved and the consciousness disturbances markedly improved. A 15-year-old girl developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an aneurysm in the right anterior cerebral artery. Her initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 4(E1V1M2). Trapping of the aneurysm and decompression craniotomy were performed. Subsequently, she underwent a tracheotomy, and a percutaneous gastrostomy(PEG)tube was implanted because of persistent consciousness disturbances. Cranioplasty and lumbar-peritoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus were performed after 1 month. An ITB pump was implanted to improve the spasticity observed mainly in the lower extremities 61 days after hemorrhage onset. Right hemiparesis remained due to Kernohan's notch. After transfer to the rehabilitation hospital, her consciousness disturbances and spasticity remarkably improved(1.9 to 1.0 and 3.5 to 1.0 on the Ashworth scale for the upper and lower extremities, respectively). The tracheostomy and PEG tubes were removed, and the baclofen dose was gradually reduced. She was completely off baclofen after 7 months, and she was discharged with a short leg brace and a cane for walking. The baclofen pump was then removed. In this case, temporary ITB improved the spasticity and consciousness disturbances.

  8. Idiopathic cystic artery aneurysm complicated with hemobilia.

    PubMed

    Anand, Utpal; Thakur, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Jha, Achyutanand; Prakash, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Aneurysm of the cystic artery is not common, and it is a rare cause of hemobilia. Most of reported cases are pseudoaneurysms resulting from either an inflammatory process in the abdomen or abdominal trauma. We report a healthy individual who developed hemobilia associated with cystic artery aneurysm. The patient was managed with cholecystectomy and concomitant aneurysm repair. Visceral artery aneurysms are rare and can rupture with potentially grave outcome due to excessive bleeding. Angiographic embolization is a common method of treatment for visceral artery aneurysms. Open cholecystectomy and aneurysm repair was performed in our patient due to radiological evidence of associated cholecystitis.

  9. Subarachnoid block for caesarean section in severe preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sujata; Salhotra, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations and it complicates about 6–8% of pregnancies. Severe preeclampsia poses a dilemma for the anesthesiologist especially in emergency situations where caesarean deliveries are planned for uninvestigated or partially investigated parturients. This article is aimed to review the literature with regards to the type of anesthesia for such situations. A thorough search of literature was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Google to retrieve the articles. Studies on parturients with severe preeclampsia, undergoing caesarean section, were included in this article. There is growing evidence to support the use of subarachnoid block in such situations when the platelet counts are >80,000 mm-3. Better hemodynamic stability with the use of low-dose local anesthetic along with additives and better neonatal outcomes has been found with the use of subarachnoid block when compared to general anesthesia. PMID:21772674

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Hepatic Artery with Intra-aneurysmal Glue (N-Butyl 2-Cyanoacrylate) Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Ashwin Banait, Swati; Babhad, Sudeep; Kanchankar, Niraj; Nimade, Pradeep; Panchal, Chintan

    2007-09-15

    A 40-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, presented with acute epigastric pain. Selective celiac arteriography showed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the common hepatic artery. We hereby describe a technical innovation where complete pseudoaneurysm exclusion was seen after intra-aneurysmal N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (glue) injection with preservation of antegrade hepatic arterial flow and conclude that intra-aneurysmal liquid injection may have potential as a therapeutic option to reconstruct a defective vessel wall and thereby maintain the antegrade flow.

  12. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  13. Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, P. D.; Lodge, Brian

    1960-01-01

    This paper records an incidence of 10·4% of aneurysm of the splenic artery in 250 consecutive routine post-mortem examinations. Medial degeneration seemed to be the commonest cause of such aneurysms and although a number were associated with other intraabdominal pathology, including portal hypertension, the association may be fortuitous and not causal. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:13688586

  14. Flow Diverters for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alderazi, Yazan J.; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (pipeline embolization device, Silk flow diverter, and Surpass flow diverter) have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms. These endovascular devices are placed within the parent artery rather than the aneurysm sac. They take advantage of altering hemodynamics at the aneurysm/parent vessel interface, resulting in gradual thrombosis of the aneurysm occurring over time. Subsequent inflammatory response, healing, and endothelial growth shrink the aneurysm and reconstruct the parent artery lumen while preserving perforators and side branches in most cases. Flow diverters have already allowed treatment of previously untreatable wide neck and giant aneurysms. There are risks with flow diverters including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, distant and delayed hemorrhages, and perforator occlusions. Comparative efficacy and safety against other therapies are being studied in ongoing trials. Antiplatelet therapy is mandatory with flow diverters, which has highlighted the need for better evidence for monitoring and tailoring antiplatelet therapy. In this paper we review the devices, their uses, associated complications, evidence base, and ongoing studies. PMID:24967131

  15. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  16. Relationship between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings: aneurysm wall thickness on high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and contact with surrounding tissue on steady-state free precession imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Seisuke; Takadou, Michiko; Ogawa, Takahiro; Mandai, Ayako; Nanto, Masataka; Osaka, Yasuhiko; Nakahara, Yoshikazu; Umeda, Masahiro; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the aneurysm wall thickness by high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and the contact between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue by steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging. The surgical findings were prospectively compared with these preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in 35 consecutive patients with 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs). The aneurysm wall was not visible in 13 UCAs, but was visible in 23. Subarachnoid space between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue was visible in 16 UCAs, a visible layer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the aneurysm and surrounding tissue in 12, and no visible layer in 7. MR imaging predicted the surgical findings in 29 UCAs (78%), showed different findings in six UCAs (16%), and two (5%) could not be evaluated due to insufficient quality of preoperative MR images. Among the UCAs with different findings, five UCAs had a partially thin wall even though high-resolution T1-weighted imaging had shown a visible wall, and one UCA showed less contact with the surrounding tissue even though the SSFP imaging had shown no visible CSF layer. In conclusion, high-resolution T1-weighted imaging and SSFP imaging provided significant additional preoperative information regarding UCAs and the surrounding tissue.

  17. When Blood Vessels Bulge: All About Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vessels Bulge When Blood Vessels Bulge All About Aneurysms An aneurysm—a balloon-like bulge in an artery—can ... for years without causing any symptoms. But an aneurysm is a silent threat to your health. If ...

  18. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  19. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage: Influence on clinical course and predictors of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri; Cortsen, Marie; Eskesen, Vagn; Wagner, Aase

    2016-02-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy and clinical outcome of IAN treatment of symptomatic CV, and to assess the predictors of clinical outcome. Medical records of 25 patients undergoing a total of 41 IAN treatment sessions were retrospectively reviewed. Data on angiographic results, blood-flow velocities and the clinical condition before and after the IAN treatment were recorded. Predictors of the clinical outcome were assessed with a linear regression model. Positive angiographic response was achieved in 95.1% of 41 IAN treatment sessions. Flow-velocity measurements showed no relationship with angiographic responses of IAN. The immediate clinical improvement was observed in three patients (12%). Five patients (20%) had a favourable outcome at discharge and at three-month follow-up; 10 patients (40%) had a moderate to poor outcome; and the rest (40%) died. Increased number of affected vessels and number of procedures carried out per patient, and a trend toward an increased delay time from symptomatic CV to confirming angiographic CV and thus instituting IAN treatment predicted the poor clinical outcome. IAN treatment appears to be effective in reversing angiographic CV. However, it is not always effective in reversing clinical deterioration, as several other factors including treatment delay affect the clinical course.

  20. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the octogenarian.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, William T; Terramani, Thomas T; Najibi, Sasan; Weiss, Victor J; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Smith, Robert B; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patient outcomes following endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EAR) among patients 80 years of age or older. In this study, reporting standards of the Ad Hoc Committee for Standardized Reporting Practices for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair of the Society of Vascular Surgery/American Association for Vascular Surgery (SVS/AAVS) were followed. Between August 8, 1996 and February 12, 2001 EAR was performed in 31 patients (29 male and 2 female) with an average age of 83 +/- 3 years and an average maximum aneurysm diameter of 59 +/- 7 mm. Overall technical success was 90% (28/31) with a single acute conversion and a 6% (2/32) incidence of major morbidity. There were no in-hospital deaths, but two patients (6%) died within 30 days of intervention. Four endoleaks, two type I and two type II, were observed within the first 30 days after endograft implantation and three new type II endoleaks were noted after implant periods that exceeded 1 month. Average follow-up was 16 months, with a single aneurysm-related death that occurred after late conversion to open repair, 2 years following initial endovascular treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed 3-, 12-, and 24-month estimated survivals of 93% (+/-5), 75% (+/-8), and 68% (+/-10), respectively. Clinical success rates were 90% (+/-5), 90% (+/-5), and 72% (+/-17) at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. We conclude that, in the octogenarian with mild to moderate medical comorbidities, endovascular aneurysm repair provides an alternative to open AAA repair with low operative morbidity and good clinical success rates. Elevated SVS/AAVS medical comorbidity scores were not associated with increased operative mortality rates, but they did show a trend toward decreased mid-term survival. Careful consideration of life expectancy and the probability of rupture, as with traditional AAA repair, should dictate necessity for intervention. PMID:15175935

  1. Medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B Timothy; Terrin, Michael C; Dalman, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common condition that may be lethal when it is unrecognized. Current guidelines suggest repair as the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Most aortic aneurysms are detected incidentally when imaging is done for other purposes or through screening programs. Ninety percent of these aneurysms are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection. A number of studies have sought to determine factors that lead to progression of aneurysmal disease that might be amenable to intervention during this period of observation. We review these studies and make recommendations for the medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis of our current knowledge of the causes of aneurysm, a number of approaches have been proposed to prevent progression of aneurysmal disease. These include hemodynamic management, inhibition of inflammation, and protease inhibition. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines rules of evidence have helped to define strength of evidence to support these approaches. Level A evidence (from large randomized trials) is available to indicate that observation of small aneurysms in men is safe up to a size of 5.5 cm and that propranolol does not inhibit aneurysm expansion. Level B evidence (from small randomized trials) suggests that roxithromycin or doxycycline will decrease the rate of aneurysm expansion. A number of studies agree that tobacco use is associated with an increased rate of aneurysm expansion. Level B and C evidence is available to suggest that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may inhibit aneurysm expansion. There are animal data but no human data demonstrating that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, will decrease the rate of AAA expansion. A pharmacological agent without important side effects that inhibited aneurysm expansion could change

  2. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  3. Congenital left ventricular apical aneurysm presenting as ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Amado, José; Marques, Nuno; Candeias, Rui; Gago, Paula; de Jesus, Ilídio

    2016-10-01

    The authors present the case of a 34-year-old male patient seen in our department due to palpitations. On the electrocardiogram monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) was documented, treated successfully with amiodarone. The subsequent study revealed a normal echocardiogram and an apical aneurysm of the left ventricle on magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by computed tomography coronary angiography that also excluded coronary disease. He underwent an electrophysiological study to determine the origin of the VT and to perform catheter ablation using electroanatomical mapping. VT was induced and radiofrequency applications were performed in the left ventricular aneurysm area. VT was no longer inducible, with acute success. Despite this it was decided to implant a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Eight months after the ablation the patient was admitted again due to VT, treated by the ICD.

  4. Rupture of maternal splenic artery aneurysm and fetal demise.

    PubMed

    Le Tinier, B; Jungo-Nançoz, C; McCarey, C; Jastrow, N

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is the third most common intra-abdominal aneurysm. This condition, which occurs predominantly in young women, is generally asymptomatic and frequently discovered during pregnancy upon rupture. Reported maternal and fetal mortality are respectively 75% and 72.5-95%. A 40-year-old woman gravida 4 para 3 was referred to the obstetrical emergencies at term for loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension. At admission, the patient had developed upper abdominal pain. Fetal demise and hemoperitoneum were diagnosed. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed SAA rupture. An emergency hemostatic splenectomy was performed followed by a cesarean section with a favorable subsequent outcome. SAA rupture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain during pregnancy. Prompt multidisciplinary management is essential for patient's survival. PMID:26152017

  5. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  6. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  7. Hepatic artery mycotic aneurysm of tubercular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Beeresha; Ghotekar, L H; Dutta, T K; Verma, S K; Elangovan, S

    2000-02-01

    Hepatic artery aneurysm caused by tuberculosis is extremely rare, the commonest being atherosclerosis and vasculitis. A 13 year boy admitted with suspected disseminated tuberculosis had a hepatic bruit. Patient died of aneurysmal rupture before antemortem etiological diagnosis could be established. Postmortem examination revealed widespread tubercular lesions in the chest and abdomen and hepatic artery aneurysm.

  8. Risk Factors in the Initial Presentation of Specific Cardiovascular Disease Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-03

    Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Unstable Angina; Chronic Stable Angina; Ischemic Stroke; Cerebrovascular Accident; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Sudden Coronary Death; Ventricular Arrhythmia; Sudden Death; Cardiac Arrest; Heart Failure

  9. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Morphological Changes in the Subarachnoid Space after Graded Spinal Cord Contusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Alva, Horacio J.; Franco-Bourland, Rebecca E.; Martinez-Cruz, Angelina; Grijalva, Israel; Madrazo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous repair or treatment-induced recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) is very limited and might be related to extramedullary alterations that have only briefly been documented. Here we report on the morphological changes of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS) in a clinically relevant model of SCI. Anesthetized rats were subjected either to mild or severe spinal cord contusion at T9. Spine blocks from the site of injury and adjacent segments were harvested at acute (1 h and 1 day [d]), subacute (3 and 7 d), and chronic (1 and 3 months) stages post-injury. Histopathology and morphometry at each decalcified vertebral level were assessed. At acute and subacute stages, reduction of SAS lumen was observed after both mild and severe injuries. Acutely, after severe injuries, SAS occlusion was associated mainly with cord swelling and subarachnoid hematomas; a trend for dural sac constriction was observed for mild injuries. At 7 d, cord swelling diminished in both instances, but dural sac constriction increased for severe injuries. At early stages, in the epicenter and vicinity, histopathology revealed compression of neurovascular elements within the SAS, which was more intense in severe than in mild injuries. In the chronic stage, SAS lumen increased notably, mostly from cord atrophy, despite dural sac constriction. Myelograms complemented observations made on SAS lumen permeability. Post-traumatic arachnoiditis occurred mainly in animals with severe injury. In conclusion, early extramedullary SAS changes described here might be expected to produce alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cord blood perfusion, thereby contributing to the pathophysiology of SCI and becoming novel targets for treatment. PMID:23472674

  11. ESBL Escherichia coli Ventriculitis after Aneurysm Clipping: A Rare and Difficult Therapeutic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, F A; Silvaggio, J

    2015-01-01

    Background. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) produced Escherichia coli (E. coli) ventriculitis is a rare infection of the central nervous system, with increasing rarity in the adult population. The therapeutic strategy to achieve cure may need to involve a combination of intraventricular and intravenous (IV) therapy. Objective. To describe a case of ESBL E. coli meningitis/ventriculitis in an adult and outline the antimicrobial therapy that leads to cure. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the records of a patient admitted to the neurosurgical department for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, who developed ESBL E. coli ventriculitis. Results. A 55-year-old female, admitted for a Fisher grade 3, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade 1, subarachnoid hemorrhage, developed ESBL E. coli ventriculitis requiring a combination of intraventricular gentamicin and high dose intravenous meropenem for clearance. Cerebrospinal fluid clearance occurred at 7 days after initiation of combined therapy. The patient remained shunt dependent. Conclusions. Meningitis and ventriculitis caused by ESBL E. coli species are rare and pose significant challenges to the treating physician. Early consideration for combined intraventricular and IV therapy should be made. PMID:26064724

  12. Encephalic hemodynamic phases in subarachnoid hemorrhage: how to improve the protective effect in patient prognoses

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; de Azevedo, Daniel Silva; de Azevedo, Milena Krajnyk; de Carvalho Nogueira, Ricardo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently associated with poor prognoses. Three different hemodynamic phases were identified during subarachnoid hemorrhage: oligemia, hyperemia, and vasospasm. Each phase is associated with brain metabolic changes. In this review, we correlated the hemodynamic phases with brain metabolism and potential treatment options in the hopes of improving patient prognoses. PMID:26109948

  13. Pneumocephalus and Pneumorrhachis due to a Subarachnoid Pleural Fistula That Developed after Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Ki; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kim, Ho-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Yun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Development of a communication between the spinal subarachnoid space and the pleural space after thoracic spine surgery is uncommon. Subarachnoid pleural fistula (SAPF), a distressing condition, involves cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Here we report an unusual case of SAPF, occurring after thoracic spine surgery, that was further complicated by pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis postthoracentesis, which was performed for unilateral pleural effusion. PMID:27799999

  14. Evolution of a chronic dissecting aneurysm on magnetic resonance imaging in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Yau, Ivanna; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dirks, Peter; Armstrong, Derek; Krings, Timo

    2015-02-01

    Clinical and imaging manifestations of the so-called partially thrombosed aneurysm (PTA) are different from those of the classic intracranial saccular aneurysm. Given some of their peculiar imaging features, it had been hypothesized that some PTAs occur due to repeated intramural hemorrhages. The authors present a case of PTA that evolved from an acute dissecting aneurysm as shown by serial imaging. A previously healthy 5-year-old boy had a sudden onset of left hemiparesis. Initial MRI sequences showed a perforating vessel infarction in the right basal ganglia area secondary to an acute distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) dissection as demonstrated on conventional angiography. Conservative management with close observation of this dissection was chosen, and serial MRI studies revealed layering of blood of various ages within the wall of an aneurysmal outpouching of the MCA, thereby leading to the imaging appearance of a PTA. The findings in this case indicate that some PTAs may be caused by repeated or chronic dissections, with blood entering the wall through an endothelial defect. Understanding the pathological mechanism underlying the formation of these aneurysms will help inform appropriate treatment strategies.

  15. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  16. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  17. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  18. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation.

  19. Thrombosis of a Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurysm: Transarterial Thrombolysis and Transhepatic Aspiration Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hechelhammer, L.; Crook, D.W.; Widmer, U.; Wildermuth, S.; Pfammatter, T.

    2004-09-15

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain due to acute thrombosis of a superior and inferior mesenteric vein aneurysm, which was treated by a combination of arterial thrombolysis and transhepatic thrombus aspiration. At the last follow-up CT, 21 months following this procedure, there was no evidence of rethrombosis, and the patient continues to do well under oral anticoagulation. The literature regarding these uncommon mesenteric vein aneurysms without portal vein involvement, as well as their treatment options, is reviewed.

  20. Left Ventricular Aneurysm Presenting as a Late Complication of Childhood Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Amor, Martin Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a well known adverse effect of chemotherapy. Multiple cardiac injuries have been reported including cardiomyopathy, pericarditis, myocarditis, angina, arrhythmias, and myocardial infarction. A left ventricular aneurysm due to chemotherapy is a rare and a dangerous complication which is particularly challenging in diagnosis requiring a high index of suspicion and periodic imaging. We present a case of a young Caucasian male with a past medical history of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia status after chemotherapy during his childhood diagnosed with left ventricular aneurysm several years later.

  1. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  3. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  4. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  5. Coronary steal due to ruptured right coronary aneurysm causing myocardial infarction in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazuhito; Yagi, Nobuhito; Wake, Minoru; Takahashi, Takanori; Nakazato, Jun; Miyagi, Tadayoshi; Shimotakahara, Junichi

    2014-08-01

    A 34-year-old female with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed an acute inferior myocardial infarction while hospitalized for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus sepsis. An emergent coronary angiography revealed an ectatic proximal left coronary artery and a huge aneurysm (37 mm × 32 mm) in the mid-portion of the right coronary artery, which had ruptured into the right atrium. A "steal phenomenon" due to significant left to right shunt resulting from the ruptured aneurysm was the cause of the myocardial infarction. Infection of the wall of the aneurysm might have contributed to the growth and the rupture in the presence of a pre-existing coronary aneurysm.

  6. Lipocalin 2 and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in White Matter after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Iwama, Toru; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes acute white matter injury in mice. In this study, we investigated lipocalin 2 (LCN2) mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in white matter, which may lead to subsequent injury. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in wild-type (WT) and LCN2-knockout (LCN2(-/-)) mice. Sham mice underwent the same procedure without perforation. Mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 24 h after SAH to confirm the development of T2-hyperintensity in white matter. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of LCN2-mediated white matter injury and BBB disruption. It was confirmed that LCN2 expression was significantly increased in white matter of WT mice after SAH by Western blotting (versus sham; p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry showed that LCN2 receptor 24p3R was expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and pericytes in the white matter. In WT mice with SAH, albumin leakage along the white matter was prominently observed and was consistent with T2-hyperintensity on MRI. As with our previous report, LCN2(-/-) mice scarcely developed T2-hyperintensity on MRI or albumin leakage in white matter. Our results suggest that BBB leakage occurs in white matter after SAH and that LCN2 contributes to SAH-induced BBB disruption.

  7. Role of Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiying; Zhang, Dingding; Hao, Shuangying; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that mitochondrial Ca(2+) is undertaken by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), and its accumulation is associated with the development of many diseases. However, little was known about the role of MCU in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MCU can be opened by spermine under a physiological condition and inhibited by ruthenium red (RR). Herein, we investigated the effects of RR and spermine to reveal the role of MCU in SAH animal model. The data obtained with biochemical and histological assays showed that mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration was significantly increased in the temporal cortex of rats 1, 2, and 3 days after SAH, consistent with constant high levels of cellular Ca(2+) concentration. In agreement with the observation in the acute phase, SAH rats showed an obvious increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and decrease of ATP production. Blockage of MCU prevented Ca(2+) accumulation, abated the level of oxidative stress, and improved the energy supply. Translocation of cytochrome c, increased cleaved caspase-3, and a large amount of apoptotic cells after SAH were reversed by RR administration. Surprisingly, exogenous spermine did not increase cellular Ca(2+) concentration, but lessened the Ca(2+) accumulation after SAH to benefit the rats. Taken together, our results demonstrated that blockage of MCU or prevention of Ca(2+) accumulation after SAH is essential in EBI after SAH. These findings suggest that MCU is considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  8. A Case of Lateral Medullary Infarction after Endovascular Trapping of the Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In Yong

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of lateral medullary infarction after successful embolization of the vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). A 49-year-old man who had no noteworthy previous medical history was admitted to our hospital with a severe headache. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, located in the basal cistern and posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography showed a VADA, that did not involve the origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We treated this aneurysm via endovascular trapping of the vertebral artery distal to the PICA. After operation, CT revealed post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, which we resolved with a permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure. Postoperatively, the patient experienced transient mild hoarsness and dysphagia. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed a small infarction in the right side of the medulla. The patient recovered well, though he still had some residual symptom of dysphagia at discharge. Such an event is uncommon but can be a major clinical concern. Further investigation to reveal risk factors and/or causative mechanisms for the medullary infarction after successful endovascular trapping of the VADA are sorely needed, to minimize such a complication. PMID:22639714

  9. Large Saphenous Venous Graft Aneurysm with Right Atrial Fistulous Communication: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Kotaru, Veera Pavan; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute onset of substernal chest pain at rest with electrocardiogram showing diffuse ST segment depression. He had coronary artery bypass graft surgery 16 years ago with a left internal mammary artery graft to the left anterior descending artery and saphenous vein grafts to the right coronary artery (RCA) and left circumflex artery. He underwent coronary angiography, which showed two large aneurysms in the saphenous venous graft (SVG) to the RCA and a venous leak from the aneurysm. The venous leak was later confirmed with computer tomographic scan to be a fistulous communication between the SVG and the right atrium. We discuss in detail about the treatment options of SVG aneurysm. PMID:27512535

  10. Incidence of Ischemic Complications after Endovascular Treatment for Ruptured Dissecting Vertebral Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, T.; Iihara, K.; Satow, T.; Murao, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We analyzed the incidence of ischemic complications after internal trapping for ruptured VA dissecting aneurysms. Between April 2001 and August 2005, nine cases of ruptured VA dissecting aneurysms, five in women, "proximal" or distal (distal type) to the origin of the PICA, were treated by internal trapping in the acute stage after SAH. There were four cases of proximal type and five of distal type. The demographics of the patients were reviewed in the medical charts and radiological findings were evaluated by neuroradiologists. The dissected site was completely obliterated and PICA was preserved in all cases. Follow-up angiography performed five to 19 days after treatment revealed complete obliteration of the aneurysm and patency of the PICA. The incidence of perioprocedural ischemic complications for the PICA-distal type (75%) was higher than that for the PICA-proximal type (20%). Here we retrospectively analyzed and discussed the incidence and mechanisms of ischemic complications. PMID:20566095

  11. Rare Case of Takayasu Arteritis with Concurrent Aneurysmal Dilation and Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Skeik, Nedaa; Rodriguez, Alexander J.; Engstrom, Bjorn

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a rare, chronic large vessel vasculitis that primarily affects women aged 10 to 40 years of Asian descent. The inflammatory processes of the disease can result in stenosis and/or occlusion of the aorta and its branches, causing a wide range of symptoms. Rarely, damage of the elastic lamina or muscular media can cause aneurysmal dilation of the affected vessel. Diagnosis is based on the clinical presentation, laboratory proof of inflammation, and imaging finding of wall thickening in the acute phase and later arterial stenosis or occlusion. Management includes disease control with immunosuppression and some patients might require revascularization. Here, we present a rare case of Takayasu arteritis with both right common carotid artery aneurysmal dilation and stenosis at a conforming site. Although aneurysmal dilation has been sparsely reported in the Takayasu arteritis literature, our case may represent the distinct finding of concomitant dilation and stenosis in this disease. PMID:26417195

  12. Large Saphenous Venous Graft Aneurysm with Right Atrial Fistulous Communication: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Kotaru, Veera Pavan; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K.; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute onset of substernal chest pain at rest with electrocardiogram showing diffuse ST segment depression. He had coronary artery bypass graft surgery 16 years ago with a left internal mammary artery graft to the left anterior descending artery and saphenous vein grafts to the right coronary artery (RCA) and left circumflex artery. He underwent coronary angiography, which showed two large aneurysms in the saphenous venous graft (SVG) to the RCA and a venous leak from the aneurysm. The venous leak was later confirmed with computer tomographic scan to be a fistulous communication between the SVG and the right atrium. We discuss in detail about the treatment options of SVG aneurysm. PMID:27512535

  13. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  14. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  15. Importance of accessory outflow pathways in hydrocephalus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, R.W.; Black, P.M.; Pile-Spellman, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated the changes in pathways of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow that accompanied acute and compensated hydrocephalus in the rabbit. Intraventricularly injected 99mTc antimony sulfide was used as a tracer of outflow pathways, and specified structures were counted 12 to 24 hours after injection. Fifteen rabbits were divided into three groups: 1) an acutely hydrocephalic group in which 3 cisternal injections of blood were followed by a study of CSF pressure, ventricular size, and CSF outflow pathways 1 week after the last injection; 2) a control group treated according to the same protocol, except that sterile saline was injected instead of blood; and 3) a chronic group also treated according to the same protocol but in which the animals were maintained an average of 4 weeks after the last blood injection. Ventricular size was measured by computed digitation and expressed as an area ratio of ventricle to brain (VBR). In control animals, 11.8% of the injected colloid dosage was found in cranial perineural lymphatic channels, and 4.8% appeared in the spinal cord. The mean CSF pressure was 149 +/- 20.2 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and the mean VBR was 0.040 +/- 0.003. In animals evaluated 1 week after subarachnoid injection, accessory cranial perineural lymphatic outflow decreased significantly to 3.4%, and spinal cord activity increased to 9.8% (P less than 0.05, two-tailed t-test). These animals were hydrocephalic and had CSF pressure of 247 +/- 25.1 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and VBR of 0.083 +/- 0.009.

  16. Retinal Vessel Analysis (RVA) in the Context of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Miriam; Clusmann, Hans; Fuest, Matthias; Mueller, Marguerite; Brockmann, Marc Alexander; Vilser, Walthard; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Hoellig, Anke; Seiz, Marcel; Thomé, Claudius; Kotliar, Konstantin; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Timely detection of impending delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is essential to improve outcome, but poses a diagnostic challenge. Retinal vessels as an embryological part of the intracranial vasculature are easily accessible for analysis and may hold the key to a new and non-invasive monitoring technique. This investigation aims to determine the feasibility of standardized retinal vessel analysis (RVA) in the context of SAH. Methods In a prospective pilot study, we performed RVA in six patients awake and cooperative with SAH in the acute phase (day 2–14) and eight patients at the time of follow-up (mean 4.6±1.7months after SAH), and included 33 age-matched healthy controls. Data was acquired using a manoeuvrable Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (Imedos Systems UG, Jena) for examination of retinal vessel dimension and neurovascular coupling. Results Image quality was satisfactory in the majority of cases (93.3%). In the acute phase after SAH, retinal arteries were significantly dilated when compared to the control group (124.2±4.3MU vs 110.9±11.4MU, p<0.01), a difference that persisted to a lesser extent in the later stage of the disease (122.7±17.2MU, p<0.05). Testing for neurovascular coupling showed a trend towards impaired primary vasodilation and secondary vasoconstriction (p = 0.08, p = 0.09 resp.) initially and partial recovery at the time of follow-up, indicating a relative improvement in a time-dependent fashion. Conclusion RVA is technically feasible in patients with SAH and can detect fluctuations in vessel diameter and autoregulation even in less severely affected patients. Preliminary data suggests potential for RVA as a new and non-invasive tool for advanced SAH monitoring, but clinical relevance and prognostic value will have to be determined in a larger cohort. PMID:27388619

  17. Antihypertensives are administered selectively in emergency department patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Culyer, Virginia; McDonough, Erin; Lindsell, Christopher J; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Kissela, Brett M; Flaherty, Matthew L; Khatri, Pooja; Woo, Daniel; Ferioli, Simona; Broderick, Joseph P; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Adeoye, Opeolu

    2013-11-01

    Elevated blood pressure is common in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). American Heart Association guidelines do not specify a blood pressure target, but limited data suggest that systolic blood pressure (SBP)≥160 mmHg is associated with increased risk of rebleeding and neurologic decline. In a population-based study, we determined the frequency of antihypertensive therapy in emergency department (ED) patients with SAH and the proportion of those patients with SBP≥160 mmHg who received this therapy. In 2005, nontraumatic SAH cases were retrospectively ascertained at 16 hospitals in our region by screening for International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision diagnostic codes 430-436. Blood pressure was recorded at ED presentation and also before and after any treatment with antihypertensives. Hypotension was defined as SBP<100 mmHg. The Mann-Whitney U test and χ2 test were used for comparisons. Our cohort comprised 82 patients with SAH presenting to an ED; 4 patients were excluded. The median age of the included patients was 54 years, 74.4% were female, 29.5% were black, and 31 (39.7%) had SBP≥160 mmHg. Antihypertensive therapy was given to 22 of 31 patients (70.9%) with SBP≥160 mmHg and to 4 of 47 patients (8.5%) with SBP<160 mmHg. No patients became hypotensive after receiving treatment. Age, sex, Glascow Coma Scale score, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score were similar between treated and untreated patients. In the absence of definitive evidence, current blood pressure management in local EDs appears reasonable. Further studies of blood pressure management in acute SAH are warranted.

  18. Pregnancy-related rupture of arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J M; Van Hooydonk, J E; Boehm, F H

    1982-09-01

    Over 50 per cent of ruptured arterial aneurysms in women under the age of 40 are pregnancy-related. The hemodynamic and endocrine changes of pregnancy appear to be the cause of arterial alterations which may lead to new aneurysm formation and/or weakening of preexisting aneurysms. The most commonly reported arteries to have aneurysms rupture during pregnancy are the aorta, cerebral arteries, splenic artery, renal artery, coronary artery, and ovarian artery. In many instances, the rupture of an arterial aneurysm will initially simulate other less serious disease processes, thus delaying the correct diagnosis until a catastrophic event occurs. Early diagnosis and treatment of a ruptured arterial aneurysm are imperative in order to give optimal chances of survival to the mother and fetus.

  19. Clipping techniques in cerebral aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, Nicola; Toniato, Giovanni; Raabe, Andreas; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of cerebral aneurysm surgery owes a great tribute to the tenacity of pioneering neurosurgeons who designed and developed the clips used to close the aneurysms neck. However, until the beginning of the past century, surgery of complex and challenging aneurysms was impossible due to the lack of surgical microscope and commercially available sophisticated clips. The modern era of the spring clips began in the second half of last century. Until then, only malleable metal clips and other non-metallic materials were available for intracranial aneurysms. Indeed, the earliest clips were hazardous and difficult to handle. Several neurosurgeons put their effort in developing new clip models, based on their personal experience in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Finally, the introduction of the surgical microscope, together with the availability of more sophisticated clips, has allowed the treatment of complex and challenging aneurysms. However, today none of the new instruments or tools for surgical therapy of aneurysms could be used safely and effectively without keeping in mind the lessons on innovative surgical techniques provided by great neurovascular surgeons. Thanks to their legacy, we can now treat many types of aneurysms that had always been considered inoperable. In this article, we review the basic principles of surgical clipping and illustrate some more advanced techniques to be used for complex aneurysms. PMID:26657306

  20. Effects of lumbar drainage on CSF dynamics in subarachnoid hemorrhage condition: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Abolfazli, Ehsan; Fatouraee, Nasser; Seddighi, Amir Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar drainage is considered a therapeutic measure in treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the evidence on the effectiveness of this method is still inconclusive. In this study, a subject-specific three dimensional model of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways and compartments was developed. The ventricular and the cranial and spinal subarachnoid spaces were reconstructed using magnetic resonance images. Occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage was modeled. Since the presence of blood in the CSF spaces is known to be the cause of complications such as cerebral vasospasm, concentration of blood in these spaces was investigated. Two cases of lumbar drains that were different in the drainage rate were studied. Temporal variations of concentration of blood in CSF spaces were calculated. It was observed that lumbar drainage accelerates the clearance of blood and, thereby, the spasmogens present in the cranial and spinal subarachnoid space. Higher clearance rates were observed at higher drainage rates. PMID:27518326