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Sample records for acute ankle sprains

  1. Update on acute ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Tiemstra, Jeffrey D

    2012-06-15

    Ankle sprains are a common problem seen by primary care physicians, especially among teenagers and young adults. Most ankle sprains are inversion injuries to the lateral ankle ligaments, although high sprains representing damage to the tibiofibular syndesmosis are becoming increasingly recognized. Physicians should apply the Ottawa ankle rules to determine whether radiography is needed. According to the Ottawa criteria, radiography is indicated if there is pain in the malleolar or midfoot zone, and either bone tenderness over an area of potential fracture (i.e., lateral malleolus, medial malleolus, base of fifth metatarsal, or navicular bone) or an inability to bear weight for four steps immediately after the injury and in the emergency department or physician's office. Patients with ankle sprain should use cryotherapy for the first three to seven days to reduce pain and improve recovery time. Patients should wear a lace-up ankle support or an air stirrup brace combined with an elastic compression wrap to reduce swelling and pain, speed recovery, and protect the injured ligaments as they become more mobile. Early mobilization speeds healing and reduces pain more effectively than prolonged rest. Pain control options for patients with ankle sprain include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and mild opioids. Because a previous ankle sprain is the greatest risk factor for an acute ankle sprain, recovering patients should be counseled on prevention strategies. Ankle braces and supports, ankle taping, a focused neuromuscular training program, and regular sport-specific warm-up exercises can protect against ankle injuries, and should be considered for patients returning to sports or other high-risk activities. PMID:22962897

  2. Ankle Sprains.

    PubMed

    1986-02-01

    In brief: Ankle sprain is a risk for many athletes, especially those in the jumping sports (eg, volleyball and basketball) as well as football and soccer, where players tend to roll over on the ankle. Lateral sprains occur much more frequently than medial eversion sprains, but the latter are more devastating. In addition to types of sprains, this panel of specialists discussed surgical vs nonsurgical treatment, tape vs brace for support, rehabilitation and exercise, and ways to prevent ankle sprains.

  3. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  4. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's the Treatment for a Sprained Ankle? More Serious Sprains en español Esguinces de tobillo As a field hockey player, Jill was used to twisting her ankle. She'd always been able to walk it off and get back in the game. But one day she stepped on another player's ...

  5. Comparison of two main treatment modalities for acute ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Serkan; Durusu, Murat; Aliyev, Bahtiyar; Akpancar, Serkan; Ersen, Omer; Yasar, S.Mehmet; Ardic, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Acute ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in emergency departments. Immobilization is widely accepted as the basic treatment modality for acute ankle sprains; however, immobilization method remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to compare two treatment modalities: splint and elastic bandage for the management of acute ankle sprains. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in the emergency department. Fifty-one consecutive patients who were admitted to the emergency department owing to the complaint of ankle sprain and who were treated with an elastic bandage or a splint were included in the study. After bone injury was ruled out, treatment choice was left to the on-shift physicians’ discretion. The extent of edema was evaluated before and after the treatment by using a small, graduated container filled with warm water. Volume differences were calculated by immersing both lower extremities in a container filled to a constant level. Pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. Results: There were 25 patients in the elastic bandage group and 26 patients in the splint group. VAS scores of these groups before and after the treatment were similar. Although edema size before and after the treatment were similar between the groups, edema size reduction was significantly more in the elastic bandage group [p=0,025]. Conclusions: This study showed that treatment of acute ankle sprains with an elastic bandage was more effective than splint in reducing edema. Therefore, an elastic bandage could be preferred over a splint for the treatment of acute ankle sprains. PMID:26870123

  6. The sprained ankle.

    PubMed

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury.

  7. Rehabilitation of the Ankle after Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines rehabilitation concepts applicable to acute and chronic ankle injury, providing evidence for current techniques used in ankle rehabilitation and describing a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into account empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. The article notes that…

  8. Ankle sprains and instability.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Cory M; Tran, Elaine; Cai, Andrew N; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries presenting to primary care providers and emergency departments and may cause considerable time lost to injury and long-term disability. Inversion injuries about the ankle involve about 25% of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and 50% of all sports-related injuries. Medial-sided ankle sprains occur less frequently than those on the lateral side. High ankle sprains occur less frequently in the general population, but do occur commonly in collision sports. Providers should apply the Ottawa ankle rules when radiography is indicated and refer fractures and more severe injuries to orthopedic surgery as needed. PMID:24559877

  9. Prevention of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Walsh, W M; Blackburn, T

    1977-01-01

    Ankles are sprained when supported on an unstable foundation, while too rididly fixed to the playing surface, or when forced into unnatural positions by extrinsic muscle tightness. The unstable foundation may be the shoe itself, a chuck-hole, or another player's foot. Undue fixation may be by 1-inch mud cleats, baseball spikes, or a modern wrestling mat. When these circumstances occur, heel cord tightness may alter the ankle's response. Thus, prevention of ankle sprains may be by modification of any of these factors.

  10. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  11. Avulsion of the perforating branch of the peroneal artery secondary to an ankle sprain: a cause of acute compartment syndrome in the leg.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Mark A; Barnes, James R; Thorpe, Paul L; Williams, James L

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we describe the case of an adult male who developed an acute compartment syndrome localized to the anterior compartment of the leg following an ankle sprain. Compartment syndrome in association with ankle sprain is unusual, and has been previously described in association with avulsion of the perforating peroneal artery. Because of the potential for severe morbidity, we feel that it is important to make foot and ankle surgeons aware of this unusual injury.

  12. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

  13. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse's lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key pointsA single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan.Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not modified

  14. Supervised rehabilitation versus home exercise in the treatment of acute ankle sprains: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Herb, C Collin; Fraser, John J; Glaviano, Neal; Hertel, Jay

    2015-04-01

    In competitive sports medicine, supervised rehabilitation is the standard of care; in the general population, unsupervised home exercise is more common. We systematically reviewed randomized, controlled trials comparing outcomes for supervised rehabilitation versus home exercise programs. Supervised rehabilitation programs resulted in (1) less pain and subjective instability, (2) greater gains in ankle strength and joint position sense, and (3) inconclusive results regarding prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. We recommend supervised rehabilitation over home exercise programs owing to the improved short-term patient-recorded evidence with a strength-of-recommendation taxonomy level of evidence of 2B. PMID:25818717

  15. Supervised rehabilitation versus home exercise in the treatment of acute ankle sprains: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Herb, C Collin; Fraser, John J; Glaviano, Neal; Hertel, Jay

    2015-04-01

    In competitive sports medicine, supervised rehabilitation is the standard of care; in the general population, unsupervised home exercise is more common. We systematically reviewed randomized, controlled trials comparing outcomes for supervised rehabilitation versus home exercise programs. Supervised rehabilitation programs resulted in (1) less pain and subjective instability, (2) greater gains in ankle strength and joint position sense, and (3) inconclusive results regarding prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. We recommend supervised rehabilitation over home exercise programs owing to the improved short-term patient-recorded evidence with a strength-of-recommendation taxonomy level of evidence of 2B.

  16. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  17. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  18. Lateral ankle sprains and instability problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Jason, W J

    1994-10-01

    The lateral ankle complex is the most frequently injured single structure in athletes, consisting of 38% to 45% of all injuries. One-sixth of all sports injury loss time is from ankle sprains. In North America, ankle inversion sprains are considered "de rigeur" for basketball participation.

  19. Lateral and syndesmotic ankle sprain injuries: a narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Joshua C.; Comeau, Doug; McClelland, Rebecca I.; Dubin, Rachel A.; Ferrel, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to review the literature that discusses normal anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle, mechanisms that may result in a lateral ankle sprain or syndesmotic sprain, and assessment and diagnostic procedures, and to present a treatment algorithm based on normal ligament healing principles. Methods Literature was searched for years 2000 to 2010 in PubMed and CINAHL. Key search terms were ankle sprain$, ankle injury and ankle injuries, inversion injury, proprioception, rehabilitation, physical therapy, anterior talofibular ligament, syndesmosis, syndesmotic injury, and ligament healing. Discussion Most ankle sprains respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment, such as those offered by physical therapists, doctors of chiropractic, and rehabilitation specialists. A comprehensive history and examination aid in diagnosing the severity and type of ankle sprain. Based on the diagnosis and an understanding of ligament healing properties, a progressive treatment regimen can be developed. During the acute inflammatory phase, the goal of care is to reduce inflammation and pain and to protect the ligament from further injury. During the reparative and remodeling phase, the goal is to progress the rehabilitation appropriately to facilitate healing and restore the mechanical strength and proprioception. Radiographic imaging techniques may need to be used to rule out fractures, complete ligament tears, or instability of the ankle mortise. A period of immobilization and ambulating with crutches in a nonweightbearing gait may be necessary to allow for proper ligament healing before commencing a more active treatment approach. Surgery should be considered in the case of grade 3 syndesmotic sprain injuries or those ankle sprains that are recalcitrant to conservative care. Conclusion An accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment can minimize an athlete's time lost from sport and prevent future reinjury. Most ankle sprains can be successfully

  20. Treatment of ankle sprains in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, R W; Reischl, S F

    1986-01-01

    To study the incidence of fibulocollateral ligament ankle sprains in the young male athlete, a survey of 84 varsity basketball players was done. Seventy percent of the players had a history of an ankle sprain. Eighty percent of those with a positive history had multiple sprains. Most of the injuries were mild, but in 32% of the injuries, the athlete missed more than 2 weeks of play. No medical attention was sought in 55% of the cases. About 50% of the athletes with a sprain had residual symptoms from their injuries; 15% of the injured athletes felt that their residual symptoms compromised their playing performance. This article emphasizes the potential seriousness of the ankle sprain in the young athlete and presents a recommended method of management, including assessment of severity, treatment, and rehabilitation.

  1. Fibular osteochondroma presenting as chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Montella, B J; O'Farrell, D A; Furr, W S; Harrelson, J M

    1995-04-01

    A 19-year-old baseball player was referred for assessment of recurrent sprains of the right ankle. This was found to be secondary to a palsy of the common peroneal nerve that was compressed by an osteochondroma of the fibular neck. The lesion was resected from the fibula and the patient made a complete recovery. We present this case as an example of a rare underlying problem in a patient who was initially diagnosed as having a sports-related ankle injury.

  2. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P < .01). This observation was associated with altered temporal sagittal-plane kinematic profiles throughout each reach attempt and at the point of maximum reach (P < .05). This result was associated with a reduced FD of the COP path for each reach direction on the injured limb only (P < .05). Conclusions Acute first-time LAS was associated with bilateral deficits in postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral

  3. A mechanical supination sprain simulator for studying ankle supination sprain kinematics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue-Yan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-08-01

    This study presents a free-fall mechanical supination sprain simulator for evaluating the ankle joint kinematics during a simulated ankle supination sprain injury. The device allows the foot to be in an anatomical position before the sudden motion, and also allows different degrees of supination, or a combination of inversion and plantarflexion. Five subjects performed simulated supination sprain trials in five different supination angles. Ankle motion was captured by a motion analysis system, and the ankle kinematics were reported in plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, inversion/eversion and internal/external rotation planes. Results showed that all sprain motions were not pure single-plane motions but were accompanied by motion in other two planes, therefore, different degrees of supination were achieved. The presented sprain simulator allows a more comprehensive study of the kinematics of ankle sprain when compared with some previous laboratory research designs.

  4. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  5. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain. PMID:27064668

  6. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  7. Sprained ankles as they relate to the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Teasdall, R D

    1993-04-01

    Concepts based on newer medical information concerning ankle injuries have changed in recent years. With these changing concepts, the method of treatment has also changed. It is the purpose of this article to review some of the commonly known information concerning ankle sprains, to emphasize the association of subtalar injury with the ankle sprain complex, to outline new information concerning the static stabilizers on the lateral aspect of the ankle, and finally, to utilize this information in producing a rationale for a new type of surgical treatment for chronic instability of the ankle.

  8. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  9. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  10. Predictive Factors for Lateral Ankle Sprains: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Beynnon, Bruce D.; Murphy, Darlene F.; Alosa, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To review the prospective studies of ankle-ligament-injury risk factors. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE from 1978 to 2001 using the terms ankle, ligament, injury, risk factor, and epidemiology. Data Synthesis: The results included many studies on the treatment and prevention of ankle injuries. There were, however, very few prospective studies focusing on identifying the risk factors that predispose an athlete to ankle-ligament trauma. Conclusions/Recommendations: There is some agreement among authors with regard to the risk factors for ankle-ligament injury; however, considerable controversy remains. Although female athletes are at significantly greater risk of suffering a serious knee sprain, such as disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament, this does not appear to be the case for ankle-ligament sprains. Therefore, sex does not appear to be a risk factor for suffering an ankle-ligament sprain. Athletes who have suffered a previous sprain have a decreased risk of reinjury if a brace is worn, and the consensus is that generalized joint laxity and anatomical foot type are not risk factors for ankle sprains. However, the literature is divided with regard to whether or not height, weight, limb dominance, ankle-joint laxity, anatomical alignment, muscle strength, muscle-reaction time, and postural sway are risk factors for ankle sprains. Future research is needed on this topic to develop a consensus on all ankle-injury risk factors. This will allow future intervention studies to be designed that will reduce the incidence and severity of this common injury. PMID:12937558

  11. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance.

  12. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports. PMID:17190537

  13. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  14. When something is not quite right: an ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    da Encarnação, António Paulo Martins

    2014-10-01

    Ankle sprains are a common musculoskeletal injury in sport. Older people are increasingly participating in sports such as running. The specificities of musculoskeletal injuries in older people pose a different diagnostic challenge from that in young people participating in the same activities. A clinical case is presented of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with a grade 1, plantar flexion/inversion ankle sprain that was later diagnosed as a quite different and rare injury. Fractures of the fibular malleolus, talar neck and dome are possible differential diagnoses for an ankle sprain, as are talar dome chondral defects. Response to treatment may help to guide the diagnostic procedure when pain persists after appropriate treatment.

  15. Peroneal muscle weakness in female basketballers following chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Rottigni, S A; Hopper, D

    1991-01-01

    Female A-grade basketballers were examined for invertor and evertor muscle strength. Two test groups participated. The injured group were players who had persisting disability following ankle sprains. The control group were players who had never sustained an ankle sprain. Test apparatus was the Orthotron isokinetic dynamometer at contraction speed of 180° per second. Trends towards higher invertor and evertor strength in uninjured group when compared with the injured group found in the present study have been supported by one other report. Invertors were found to be significantly stronger than evertors in both injured and uninjured groups, with the exception of the dominant leg of the uninjured group. A significant weakness in non-dominant evertors of the uninjured group was detected. Dominance did not significantly alter strength differences in the invertor or evertor muscle groups within the uninjured population. The clinical importance of strengthening the peroneal muscles in ankle sprain rehabilitation is discussed, and further research considerations provided.

  16. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  17. Risk factors for lateral ankle sprain: a prospective study among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Shlamkovitch, N; Finestone, A; Eldad, A; Laor, A; Danon, Y L; Lavie, O; Wosk, J; Simkin, A

    1991-08-01

    In a prospective study of risk factors for lateral ankle sprain among 390 male Israeli infantry recruits, a 18% incidence of lateral ankle sprains was found in basic training. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of lateral ankle sprains between recruits who trained in modified basketball shoes or standard lightweight infantry boots. By multivariate stepwise logistic regression a statistically significant relationship was found between body weight x height (a magnitude which is proportional to the mass moment of inertia of the body around a horizontal axis through the ankle), a previous history of ankle sprain, and the incidence of lateral ankle sprains. Recruits who were taller and heavier and thus had larger mass moments of inertia (P = 0.004), and those with a prior history of ankle sprain (P = 0.01) had higher lateral ankle sprain morbidity in basic training.

  18. Prospective epidemiological study of basketball injuries during one competitive season: ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent's foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  19. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle.

  20. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries. PMID:19825746

  1. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  2. Population based epidemiology of ankle sprains attending accident and emergency units in the West Midlands of England, and a survey of UK practice for severe ankle sprains

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, S; Clement, D; Downing, A; Walley, G; Phair, I; Maffulli, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of ankle sprains and severe ankle sprains attending accident and emergency (A&E) units; to describe current practice for severe ankle sprains in A&E units in the United Kingdom. Methods: Crude age and sex specific incidence rates were calculated for four health districts from cases ascertained from data on seven A&E clinical information systems. Case records of patients with ankle sprains at an A&E unit in another health district were audited and the proportion of severe ankle sprains calculated. UK A&E units were surveyed about their usual treatment of patients with severe ankle sprains. Results: The estimate of the crude incidence rate of ankle sprains was a minimum of 52.7 per 10 000, rising to 60.9 (95% CI 59.4 to 62.4) when figures were adjusted for the proportion of patients without a diagnostic code (13.7%). There were important age-sex differences with unadjusted rates observed from 127.8 per 10 000 (CI 115.5 to 140.0) in girls aged 10–14 years to 8.2 (CI 4.2 to 12.3) in men aged 70–74 years. As 14% of ankle sprains attending A&E were classed as severe, this would equate to 42 000 severe ankle sprains per year in the UK. In the UK wide survey, there was a response rate of 79% (211 of 266). Among the responders, Tubigrip was used routinely in 55%, below knee casts in 3%, and braces in 2%. Boots were not used routinely in any unit. Conclusion: While there is considerable variation in severe ankle sprain management in UK A&E units, most are treated with the minimal mechanical support of Tubigrip. PMID:14623833

  3. The PRICE study (Protection Rest Ice Compression Elevation): design of a randomised controlled trial comparing standard versus cryokinetic ice applications in the management of acute ankle sprain [ISRCTN13903946

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Chris M; O'Connor, Seán; Tully, Mark A; Rocke, Laurence G; MacAuley, Domnhall C; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cryotherapy (the application of ice for therapeutic purposes) is one of the most common treatment modalities employed in the immediate management of acute soft tissue injury. Despite its widespread clinical use, the precise physiological responses to therapeutic cooling have not been fully elucidated, and effective evidence-based treatment protocols are yet to be established. Intermittent ice applications are thought to exert a significant analgesic effect. This could facilitate earlier therapeutic exercise after injury, potentially allowing for a quicker return to activity. The primary aim of the forthcoming study is therefore to examine the safety and effectiveness of combining intermittent ice applications with periods of therapeutic exercise in the first week after an acute ankle sprain. Methods/Design The study is a randomised controlled trial. 120 subjects with an acute grade I or grade II ankle sprain will be recruited from Accident & Emergency and a University based Sports Injury Clinic. Subjects will be randomised under strict double-blind conditions to either a standard cryotherapy (intermittent ice applications with compression) or cryokinetic treatment group (intermittent ice applications with compression and therapeutic exercise). After the first week, treatment will be standardised across groups. Assessor blinding will be maintained throughout the trial. Primary outcome will be function, assessed using the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). Additional outcomes will include pain (10 cm Visual Analogue Scale), swelling (modified figure-of-eight method) and activity levels (activPAL™ physical activity monitor, PAL Technologies, Glasgow, UK). Diagnostic Ultrasound (Episcan-1-200 high frequency ultrasound scanning system, Longport International Ltd, PA) will also be used to assess the degree of soft tissue injury. After baseline assessment subjects will be followed up at 1, 2, 3 & 4 weeks post injury. All data will be analysed using

  4. Do voluntary strength, proprioception, range of motion, or postural sway predict occurrence of lateral ankle sprain?

    PubMed Central

    de Noronha, M; Refshauge, K M; Herbert, R D; Kilbreath, S L

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of ankle sprain, the most common sporting injury, is only possible once risk factors have been identified. Voluntary strength, proprioception, postural sway, and range of motion are possible risk factors. A systematic review was carried out to investigate these possiblities. Eligible studies were those with longitudinal design investigating ankle sprain in subjects aged ⩾15 years. The studies had to have measured range of motion, voluntary strength, proprioception, or postural sway before monitoring incidence of lateral ankle sprain. Dorsiflexion range strongly predicted risk of ankle sprain. Postural sway and possibly proprioception were also predictors. Therefore the preliminary evidence suggests that people with reduced ankle dorsiflexion range may be at increased risk of ankle sprain. PMID:16920769

  5. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  6. Clinical Examination Results in Individuals With Functional Ankle Instability and Ankle-Sprain Copers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context: Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. Objective: To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Intervention(s): Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Results: Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Conclusions: Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected

  7. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  8. Peroneal nerve injury with foot drop complicating ankle sprain--a series of four cases with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brief, James M; Brief, Rochelle; Ergas, Enrique; Brief, L Paul; Brief, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    Foot drop has many etiologies. One rarely mentioned and often neglected reason for foot drop is an acute inversion sprain of the ankle. Over the past 14 years, a collection of 32 cases of foot drop have been compiled in our orthopaedic and physiatric practices. All cases had appropriate evaluations, including electrodiagnostic studies (electromyography and nerve conduction studies) to determine the location and type of injury. Treatment and follow-up are also discussed. Of the 32 case studies, four were caused by a straightforward acute inversion sprain of the ankle. These cases are described with the electrodiagnostic evaluations, treatments, and outcomes. Proposed mechanisms for this type of foot drop are discussed, including traction and compression of the common peroneal nerve as it winds around the neck of the fibula, and possible compression by hematoma. Surgical versus conservative treatment is described. The functional impairment associated with foot drop is detailed.

  9. The prevention of ankle sprains in sports. A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thacker, S B; Stroup, D F; Branche, C M; Gilchrist, J; Goodman, R A; Weitman, E A

    1999-01-01

    To assess the published evidence on the effectiveness of various approaches to the prevention of ankle sprains in athletes, we used textbooks, journals, and experts in the field of sports medicine to identify citations. We identified 113 studies reporting the risk of ankle sprains in sports, methods to provide support, the effect of these interventions on performance, and comparison of prevention efforts. The most common risk factor for ankle sprain in sports is history of a previous sprain. Ten citations of studies involving athletes in basketball, football, soccer, or volleyball compared alternative methods of prevention. Methods tested included wrapping the ankle with tape or cloth, orthoses, high-top shoes, or some combination of these methods. Most studies indicate that appropriately applied braces, tape, or orthoses do not adversely affect performance. Based on our review, we recommend that athletes with a sprained ankle complete supervised rehabilitation before returning to practice or competition, and those athletes suffering a moderate or severe sprain should wear an appropriate orthosis for at least 6 months. Both coaches and players must assume responsibility for prevention of injuries in sports. Methodologic limitations of published studies suggested several areas for future research.

  10. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods and analysis A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients’ perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context

  11. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Conservative Management and Prevention of Ankle Sprains in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Thomas W.; Hertel, Jay; Amendola, Ned; Docherty, Carrie L.; Dolan, Michael G.; Hopkins, J. Ty; Nussbaum, Eric; Poppy, Wendy; Richie, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals in the conservative management and prevention of ankle sprains in athletes. Background: Because ankle sprains are a common and often disabling injury in athletes, athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals must be able to implement the most current and evidence-supported treatment strategies to ensure safe and rapid return to play. Equally important is initiating preventive measures to mitigate both first-time sprains and the chance of reinjury. Therefore, considerations for appropriate preventive measures (including taping and bracing), initial assessment, both short- and long-term management strategies, return-to-play guidelines, and recommendations for syndesmotic ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability are presented. Recommendations: The recommendations included in this position statement are intended to provide athletic trainers and other sports health care professionals with guidelines and criteria to deliver the best health care possible for the prevention and management of ankle sprains. An endorsement as to best practice is made whenever evidence supporting the recommendation is available. PMID:23855363

  12. A wearable device for monitoring and prevention of repetitive ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mohammed; Taher, Mona F

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the design and implementation of a wearable wireless device, connected to a smart phone, which monitors and prevents repetitive ankle sprain due to chronic ankle instability (CAI). The device prevents this common foot injury by electrical stimulation of the peroneal muscles using surface electrodes which causes dorsiflexion of the foot. This is done after measuring ankle kinematics using inertial motion sensors and predicting ankle sprain. The prototype implemented here has a fast response time of 7 msec which enables prevention of ankle sprain before ligament damage occurs. Wireless communication between the components of the device, in addition to their small size, low cost and low power consumption, makes it unobtrusive, easy to wear and not hinder normal activities. The device connects via Bluetooth to an android smart phone application for continuous data logging and reporting to keep track of the incidences of possible ankle sprain and correction. This is a significant feature of this device since it enables monitoring of patients with CAI and quantifying progression of the condition or improvement in the case of treatment. PMID:26737335

  13. How to Strengthen Your Ankle After a Sprain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Tie the resistance bands around a fixed object and ... starting position and cycle your ankle 10 times. Tie the bands around an object to the outer ...

  14. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  15. Coordination and symmetry patterns during the drop vertical jump, 6-months after first-time lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the adaptive movement and motor control patterns of a group with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury during a drop vertical jump (DVJ) task. Fifty-one participants with a 6-month history of first-time acute LAS injury and twenty controls performed a DVJ task. 3D kinematic and sagittal plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump (phase 1) and drop landing (phase 2) phases of the DVJ. Inter-limb symmetry and the rate of impact modulation (RIM) relative to bodyweight (BW) during both phases of the DVJ were also determined. LAS participants displayed bilateral increases in knee flexion and an increase in ankle inversion during phases 1 and 2, respectively. They also displayed reduced ankle plantar flexion on their injured limb during both phases of the DVJ (p < 0.05); increased inter-limb asymmetry of RIM was noted for both phases of the DVJ, while the moment-of-force profile exhibited bilaterally greater hip extensor dominance during phase 1. Participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS display some movement patterns consistent with those observed in chronic ankle instability populations during similar tasks. PMID:25940807

  16. Coordination and symmetry patterns during the drop vertical jump, 6-months after first-time lateral ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Patterson, Matthew R; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the adaptive movement and motor control patterns of a group with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury during a drop vertical jump (DVJ) task. Fifty-one participants with a 6-month history of first-time acute LAS injury and twenty controls performed a DVJ task. 3D kinematic and sagittal plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump (phase 1) and drop landing (phase 2) phases of the DVJ. Inter-limb symmetry and the rate of impact modulation (RIM) relative to bodyweight (BW) during both phases of the DVJ were also determined. LAS participants displayed bilateral increases in knee flexion and an increase in ankle inversion during phases 1 and 2, respectively. They also displayed reduced ankle plantar flexion on their injured limb during both phases of the DVJ (p < 0.05); increased inter-limb asymmetry of RIM was noted for both phases of the DVJ, while the moment-of-force profile exhibited bilaterally greater hip extensor dominance during phase 1. Participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS display some movement patterns consistent with those observed in chronic ankle instability populations during similar tasks.

  17. Efficacy of a sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of ankle sprains in basketball.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a 22- week prescribed sports specific balance training programme on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains in basketball players. A controlled clinical trial was set up. In total 54 subjects of six teams participated and were assigned to either an intervention (IG) or a control group (CG). The IG performed a prescribed balance training programme on top of their normal training routine, using balance semi-globes. The programme consisted of 4 basketball skills each session and its difficulty was progressively thought-out. The intervention lasted 22 weeks and was performed 3 times a week for 5 to 10 minutes. Efficacy of the intervention on the incidence of lateral ankle sprains was determined by calculating Relative Risks (RR, including their 95% Confidence Intervals or CI) and incidence rates expressed per 1000h. RR (95% CI) showed a significantly lower incidence of lateral ankle sprains in the IG compared to the CG for the total sample (RR= 0.30 [95% CI: 0.11-0.84]) and in men (RR= 0.29 [95% CI: 0.09-0.93]). The difference in RR was not confirmed when examining the incidence rates and their 95%CI's, which overlapped. The risk for new or recurrent ankle sprains was slightly lower in the IG (new: RR= 0.76 [95% CI: 0.17-3.40]; re-injury: RR= 0.21 [95% CI: 0.03-1.44]). Based on these pilot results, the use of balance training is recommended as a routine during basketball activities for the prevention of ankle sprains. Key pointsWe could not establish a true preventive effect of the training, most likely due to the low sample size.Although not significant, large differences in incidence rates were found between the intervention and control group and relative risks showed a significant difference.Our results were in line with previous results and therefore proprioceptive balance training should become a part of the training routine.Concerning this study and the literature, proprioceptive balance training should

  18. Ankle sprain and postural sway in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Wykman, A; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    The present study compares postural ankle stability between previously injured basketball players, uninjured players and a control/group. Postural sway was recorded and analysed by stabilometry using a specially designed computer-assisted forceplate. Recordings were obtained for 60 s on each foot. The stabilometric results in the players with no previous injuries did not differ from those in the controls. Players with a previously injured ankle differed significantly from the control group. These players had a larger mean postural sway and used a larger sway area.

  19. Intrinsic Predictive Factors of Noncontact Lateral Ankle Sprain in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yoshida, Makoto; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lateral ankle sprain (LAS) is one of the most common injuries in sports. Despite extensive research, intrinsic factors that predict initial and recurrent noncontact LAS remain undefined. Purpose: To identify the predictive factors of initial and recurrent noncontact LAS, focusing on ankle flexibility and/or alignment in collegiate athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 191 athletes were assessed during the preseason for factors predictive of noncontact LAS. The baseline measurements included weightbearing dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), leg-heel angle, foot internal rotation angle in plantar flexion, classification according to the mortise test, and navicular–medial malleolus (NMM) distance. Occurrence of noncontact LAS and participation in practice and games were prospectively recorded for 11 months. Results: Of the 191 athletes assessed, 169 (145 males, 24 females) completed the study; 125 athletes had a history of ankle sprain. During the observational period, 16 athletes suffered noncontact LAS (0.58 per 1000 athlete-exposures) consisting of 4 initial sprains and 12 recurrences. The hazard ratio estimated by a Cox regression analysis showed that athletes with an NMM distance ≥4.65 cm were 4.14 times more likely to suffer an initial noncontact LAS than were athletes with a shorter NMM distance (95% confidence interval, 1.12-14.30) and that athletes with a weightbearing dorsiflexion ROM >49.5° were 1.12 times as likely to suffer a recurrent noncontact LAS compared with athletes with a lower ROM (95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20). Conclusion: NMM distance predicts initial noncontact LAS, and weightbearing dorsiflexion ROM predicts recurrent noncontact LAS. PMID:26535263

  20. Comparison of diflunisal and acetaminophen with codeine in the management of grade 2 ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Aghababian, R V

    1986-01-01

    The emergency physician treats many patients with mild to moderate pain due to musculoskeletal injury. The physician must consider the extent of injury, the patient's medication history, and the potential for abuse when prescribing an oral analgesic. A study was designed to compare the efficacy of two oral analgesics, one containing a narcotic and one nonnarcotic, in relieving mild to moderate pain associated with grade 2 ankle sprain. Forty patients were enrolled--all with moderate pain--and were randomly allocated to treatment with either diflunisal or acetaminophen with codeine. Both analgesic agents were equally effective in relieving the pain. Side effects were experienced by six patients, all of whom were receiving acetaminophen with codeine; none of the patients given diflunisal noted side effects. Global assessments of the efficacy and tolerability of the study drugs showed that 89% of 19 patients given diflunisal and 43% of 21 patients given acetaminophen with codeine considered their respective analgesics excellent or very good.

  1. Management and prevention of acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in athletic patient populations

    PubMed Central

    McCriskin, Brendan J; Cameron, Kenneth L; Orr, Justin D; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability are common in high-demand patient populations. If not managed appropriately, patients may experience recurrent instability, chronic pain, osteochondral lesions of the talus, premature osteoarthritis, and other significant long-term disability. Certain populations, including young athletes, military personnel and those involved in frequent running, jumping, and cutting motions, are at increased risk. Proposed risk factors include prior ankle sprain, elevated body weight or body mass index, female gender, neuromuscular deficits, postural imbalance, foot/ankle malalignment, and exposure to at-risk athletic activity. Prompt, accurate diagnosis is crucial, and evidence-based, functional rehabilitation regimens have a proven track record in returning active patients to work and sport. When patients fail to improve with physical therapy and external bracing, multiple surgical techniques have been described with reliable results, including both anatomic and non-anatomic reconstructive methods. Anatomic repair of the lateral ligamentous complex remains the gold standard for recurrent ankle instability, and it effectively restores native ankle anatomy and joint kinematics while preserving physiologic ankle and subtalar motion. Further preventative measures may minimize the risk of ankle instability in athletic cohorts, including prophylactic bracing and combined neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs. These interventions have demonstrated benefit in patients at heightened risk for lateral ankle sprain and allow active cohorts to return to full activity without adversely affecting athletic performance. PMID:25793157

  2. Wii Fit™ exercise therapy for the rehabilitation of ankle sprains: Its effect compared with physical therapy or no functional exercises at all.

    PubMed

    Punt, I M; Ziltener, J-L; Monnin, D; Allet, L

    2016-07-01

    Lateral ankle sprains represent the most common sports-related injuries. The Nintendo Wii Fit™ could be useful in the treatment of ankle sprains. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of exercise training using the Wii Fit™ in ankle sprain patients: (a) with physical therapy; and (b) a control group not receiving any treatment. Ninety lateral ankle sprain patients were randomized to a Wii Fit™, physical therapy, or control group. We assessed the following outcome measures before, and 6 weeks after starting the allocated treatment: Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, pain during rest and walking, delay before return to sport, patient satisfaction, and effectiveness of the allocated treatment. Six weeks after the baseline measures, foot and ankle ability scores had improved in all groups, and pain had decreased during walking (P < 0.050). No between-group differences were detected between Wii Fit™ treatment, and both other groups (P > 0.050). In conclusion, the Wii Fit™ could be used as an exercise therapy to treat ankle sprain patients. However, Wii Fit™ was not more effective than only physical therapy, or no exercise therapy at all. Patients who did not receive treatment showed similar results as people who got any kind of exercise therapy. PMID:26076737

  3. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches

    PubMed Central

    Ridao-Fernández, Carmen; Ojeda, Joaquín; Benítez-Lugo, Marisa; Sevillano, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale—CHAGS) and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles. Design Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree) were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1), deviation of Center of Gravity(2), crutch inclination(3), steps rhythm(4), symmetry of step length(5), cross support(6), simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7), forearm off(8), facing forward(9) and fluency(10). Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding). Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested. Results CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable. Conclusion CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs. PMID:27168236

  4. High- versus low-top shoes for the prevention of ankle sprains in basketball players. A prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J R; Tanji, J L; Drake, C; Fuller, D; Kawasaki, R I; Fenton, R M

    1993-01-01

    Using a prospective, randomized experimental design, 622 college intramural basketball players were stratified by a previous history of ankle sprains to wear a new pair of either high-top, high-top with inflatable air chambers, or low-top basketball shoes during all games for a complete season. Subjects were asked to complete a history questionnaire and were given a complete ankle examination. They were allowed to wear these shoes only during basketball competition. Followed over the course of a 2-month intramural season, 15 ankle injuries occurred during 39,302 minutes of player-time: 7 in high-top shoes, 4 in low-top shoes, and 4 in high-top shoes with inflatable air chambers. The injury rates (injuries per player-minute) were 4.80 x 10(-4) in high-top shoes, 4.06 x 10(-4) in low-top shoes, and 2.69 x 10(-4) in high-top shoes with inflatable air chambers. There was no significant difference among these 3 groups, leading to the conclusion that there is no strong relationship between shoe type and ankle sprains.

  5. The influence of ankle sprain injury on muscle activation during hip extension.

    PubMed

    Bullock-Saxton, J E; Janda, V; Bullock, M I

    1994-08-01

    The likely influence of a localised injury in a distal joint on the function of proximal muscles is an important consideration in assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. However, little experimental evidence in humans exists in this area. Accordingly, a controlled study was carried out, in which the function of muscles at the hip was compared between subjects who had suffered previous severe unilateral ankle sprain and matched control subjects. The pattern of activation of the gluteus maximus, the hamstring muscles and the ipsilateral and contralateral erector spinae muscles was monitored through the use of surface electromyography during hip extension from prone lying. Analyses revealed that the pattern of muscle activation in subjects with previous injury differed markedly from normal control subjects, and that changes appeared to occur on both the uninjured and the injured sides of the body. A significant difference between the two groups was the delay in onset of activation of the gluteus maximus in previously injured subjects. The existence of remote changes in muscle function following injury found in this study emphasise the importance of extending assessment beyond the side and site of injury.

  6. Ankle sprains: surgical treatment for recurrent sprains. Report of 10 patients treated with the Chrisman-Snook modification of the Elmslie procedure.

    PubMed

    Savastano, A A; Lowe, E B

    1980-01-01

    A group of 10 patients (3 women and 7 men; 17 to 57 years old, average 23.9; mean, 21 years) was evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively following surgical repair with a modification of the Elmslie procedure (i.e., by using one-half of the tendinous portion of the peroneus brevis ligament to reconstruct the anterior and middle fasciculi of the lateral ligament). The patients were athletes who participated in bicycling, boxing, tennis, hockey, basketball, football, soccer, or a combination of sports. Each patient gave a history of spraining the ankle numerous times. Stress films were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. The talar tilt was generally reduced in postoperative films (average preoperatively, 12.5 degrees; average postoperatively, 5.6 degrees). We conclude that the Elmslie procedure, as modified by Chrisman and Snook, is simpler to perform than the Watson-Jones procedure and has provided the majority of our patients with satisfactory results.

  7. Myoelectric stimulation on peroneal muscles with electrodes of the muscle belly size attached to the upper shank gives the best effect in resisting simulated ankle sprain motion.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Wang, Dan; Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports related injury that may be caused by incorrect positioning of the foot prior to and at initial contact during landing from a jump or gait. Furthermore a delayed reaction of the peroneal muscle may also contribute to the injury mechanism. A recent study demonstrated that myoelectric stimulation of the peroneal muscles within 15 ms of a simulated inversion event would significantly resist an ankle spraining motion. This study further investigated its effect with three different electrode sizes and three different lateral shank attachment positions. Twelve male subjects with healthy ankles performed simulated ankle supination spraining motion on a pair of mechanical sprain simulators. A pair of electrodes of one of the three sizes (large, medium, small) was attached to one of the three positions (upper 1/4, middle, lower 1/4) along the lateral shank to deliver an electrical signal of 130 V for 0.5s when the sprain simulator started. Ankle kinematics data were collected by a tri-axial gyroscope motion sensor and the peak inward heel tilting velocity was obtained to represent the effect in resisting the simulated ankle spraining motion. Repeated measures one-way analysis of variance was performed and showed a significant drop from 273.3 (control, no stimulation) to 215.8 deg/s (21%) when small electrodes were attached to the upper 1/4 position. Decrease was found in all other conditions but the drops (11-18%) were not statistically significant. The small electrodes used in this study fitted the width of the peroneal muscle belly at the upper 1/4 position, so the electrical current may have well flowed to the motor points of the muscles to initiate quick contraction. PMID:23453396

  8. EFFECT OF ATHLETIC TAPING AND KINESIOTAPING® ON MEASUREMENTS OF FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN BASKETBALL PLAYERS WITH CHRONIC INVERSION ANKLE SPRAINS

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Nihan; Baltaci, Gul

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic inversion ankle sprains are common in basketball players. The effect of taping on functional performance is disputed in the literature. Kinesiotaping® (KT®) is a new method that is being used as both a therapeutic and performance enhancement tool. To date, it appears that no study has investigated the effect of ankle KT® on functional performance. Purpose: To investigate the effects of different types of taping (KT® using Kinesio Tex®, athletic taping) on functional performance in athletes with chronic inversion sprains of the ankle. Study Design: Crossover Study Design Methods: Fifteen male basketball players with chronic inversion ankle sprains between the ages of 18 and 22 participated in this study. Functional performance tests (Hopping test by Amanda et al, Single Limb Hurdle Test, Standing Heel Rise test, Vertical Jump Test, The Star Excursion Balance Test [SEBT] and Kinesthetic Ability Trainer [KAT] Test) were used to quantify agility, endurance, balance, and coordination. These tests were conducted four times at one week intervals using varied conditions: placebo tape, without tape, standard athletic tape, and KT®. One-way ANOVA tests were used to examine difference in measurements between conditions. Bonferroni correction was applied to correct for repeated testing. Results: There were no significant differences among the results obtained using the four conditions for SEBT (anterior p=0.0699; anteromedial p=0.126; medial p=0.550; posteromedial p=0.587; posterior p=0.754; posterolateral p=0.907; lateral p=0.124; anterolateral p=0.963) and the KAT dynamic measurement (p=0.388). Faster performance times were measured with KT® and athletic tape in single limb hurdle test when compared to placebo and non-taped conditions (Athletic taping- placebo taping: p=0.03; athletic taping- non tape p=0.016;KT®- Placebo taping p=0.042; KT®-Non tape p=0.016). In standing heel rise test and vertical jump test, athletic taping led to decreased

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Hans; Kanz, Karl Georg; Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Ockert, Ben; Mutschler, Wolf; Grote, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, there are still no standardized examination procedures or evidence-based treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence, and develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews or, if applicable, observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations have been formulated: i) the Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures; ii) physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex; iii) classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance; iv) the squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis; v) magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify injuries of the syndesmosis; vi) stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis while for unstable ankle sprains, conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without the related possible complications; vii) early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of reinjury; viii) supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we present an applicable and evidence-based, step by step, decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor's practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and promotes confidence in the attending physician. PMID:22577506

  10. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  11. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case. PMID:27266242

  12. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  13. Basketball injuries of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    McDermott, E P

    1993-04-01

    Foot and ankle injuries in basketball are discussed in three unrelated categories in this article. This includes a practical differential diagnosis of ankle sprains, acute conditions of the mid and hindfoot, overuse syndromes of nerve entrapment, fascial strain, synovitis, joint subluxation, and inflammation resulting from repetitive stress. The diagnosis and treatment of tendon inflammation of the extrinsic foot musculature is also reviewed.

  14. Systematic Review of Postural Control and Lateral Ankle Instability, Part I: Can Deficits Be Detected With Instrumented Testing

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Patrick O; Hertel, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To answer the following clinical questions: (1) Is poor postural control associated with increased risk of a lateral ankle sprain? (2) Is postural control adversely affected after acute lateral ankle sprain? (3) Is postural control adversely affected in those with chronic ankle instability? Data Sources: PubMed and CINAHL entries from 1966 through October 2006 were searched using the terms ankle sprain, ankle instability, balance, chronic ankle instability, functional ankle instability, postural control, and postural sway. Study Selection: Only studies assessing postural control measures in participants on a stable force plate performing the modified Romberg test were included. To be included, a study had to address at least 1 of the 3 clinical questions stated above and provide adequate results for calculation of effect sizes or odds ratios where applicable. Data Extraction: We calculated odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for studies assessing postural control as a risk factor for lateral ankle sprains. Effect sizes were estimated with the Cohen d and associated 95% confidence intervals for comparisons of postural control performance between healthy and injured groups, or healthy and injured limbs, respectively. Data Synthesis: Poor postural control is most likely associated with an increased risk of sustaining an acute ankle sprain. Postural control is impaired after acute lateral ankle sprain, with deficits identified in both the injured and uninjured sides compared with controls. Although chronic ankle instability has been purported to be associated with altered postural control, these impairments have not been detected consistently with the use of traditional instrumented measures. Conclusions: Instrumented postural control testing on stable force plates is better at identifying deficits that are associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain and that occur after acute ankle sprains than at detecting deficits related to chronic ankle

  15. Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Anat V; Price, Robert; McCoy, Sarah W

    2016-07-01

    Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 s in a series of 60-s trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session's goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration.

  16. Effects of Achilles tendon vibration, surface and visual conditions on lower leg electromyography in young adults with and without recurrent ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lubetzky, Anat V; Price, Robert; McCoy, Sarah W

    2016-07-01

    Functional ankle instability is associated with decreased ankle muscle function. Compliant surfaces and eyes-closed training are commonly used for rehabilitation and prevention of ankle sprains. Brief Achilles tendon vibration is commonly used in the study of postural control. To test the level of activation of tibialis anterior (TIB) and fibularis longus (FIB), bilateral Achilles tendon vibration was applied for the middle 20 s in a series of 60-s trials, when 10 healthy young adults and 10 adults with history of repeated ankle sprains were standing bipedal: on floor, on memory foam, or on a Both Sides Up (BOSU) ball, with eyes open, and on floor and foam with eyes closed. Differences in Integrated surface electromyography (IEMG) of TIB and FIB were significant for both groups pre, during, and post vibration (Friedman Tests, p < 0.001 for all). In both groups, the highest IEMG for TIB was obtained during vibration when standing on foam with eyes closed, whereas the highest IEMG for FIB was obtained during vibration when standing on the BOSU. Bipedal stance on BOSU and brief Achilles tendon vibration may be a useful intervention when a session's goal is to facilitate lower leg muscles activation. Future research should explore training effects as well as the effect of FIB tendon vibration. PMID:27634090

  17. Post-traumatic overload or acute syndrome of the os trigonum: a possible cause of posterior ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Mouhsine, E; Crevoisier, X; Leyvraz, P F; Akiki, A; Dutoit, M; Garofalo, R

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the post-traumatic overload syndrome of the os trigonum as a possible cause of posterior ankle impingement and hindfoot pain. We have reviewed 19 athletes who were referred to our foot unit between 1995 and 2001 because of posterior ankle pain, and in whom a post-traumatic overload syndrome of os trigonum was diagnosed. All these patients were followed up over a period of 2 years. In 11 cases a chronic repetitive movements in forced plantar flexion was found. In the other eight cases the pain appeared to persist after a standard treatment of an ankle sprain in inversion plantar flexion. The diagnosis was based on clinical history, physical examination and X-rays that revealed a non-fused os trigonum. The confirmation of diagnosis was carried-out injecting local anaesthetic under fluoroscopic control. In all cases a corticosteroid injection as first line treatment was performed. In 6 cases a second injection was necessary to alleviate pain because incomplete recovery with the first injection. Three cases (16%) were recalcitrant to this treatment and in these three cases a surgical excision of the os trigonum was carried out. Our conclusion is that after some chronic athletic activity or an acute ankle sprain the os trigonum, if present, may undergo mechanical overload, remain undisrupted and become painful. Treatment by corticosteroid injection often resolves the problem.

  18. [Ankle sprains. Comparison of long-term results of functional treatment methods with adhesive tape and bandage ("brace") and stability measurement].

    PubMed

    Twellaar, M; Veldhuizen, J W; Verstappen, F T

    1993-09-01

    Both taping and bracing can be applied in the early functional treatment of ankle sprains. In this study the long-term (2.3 +/- 0.5 years) results of functional treatment with two types of bandages were compared. Out of 165 patients treated, 112 were available for interview, 60 of whom had been treated with adhesive, non-elastic tape and 52, with a confection brace. In 93 of these patients (47 in the tape group), the ankle was examined and stabilometry was performed. The distance (D) and area (A) covered by each patient's centre of gravity while he/she stood on one leg for 30 s were measured. The following symptoms were found on the total population: pain on movement in 5%, swelling in 8% and functional instability (recurrent sprain or a feeling of giving way) in 38%. Mechanical instability was found in 34%. Pain on palpation of the lateral ligaments was the only symptom whose frequency differed significantly (P < 0.05) between the tape group (47%) and the brace group (20%). Stabilometric measurements revealed no substantial difference between the tape group (D: 436 +/- 100 mm; A: 192 +/- 87 mm2) and the brace group (D: 459 +/- 111 mm; A: 206 +/- 92 mm2). Nor was any difference in stability observed between the injured and the non-injured ankle, between the stable and the unstable ankle, or between the unstable ankle with and without brace application. Stabilometry is thus not an appropriate means of quantifying the symptoms of ankle instability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... 2015 Source Care of the Young Athlete Patient Education Handouts (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics) The ...

  20. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  1. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  2. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  3. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  4. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  5. Evaluation of a novel topical essential oxygen oil for the treatment of pain in acute tendinopathy and sprains.

    PubMed

    Pappagallo, Marco; Leslie, John B; Raffa, Robert B; Kash, Peter; Fleischer, Charles; Sinclair, Nicholas; Labhestwar, Sumedha; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Tabor, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Topical analgesics may play an increasingly important role in managing acute and chronic pain as acetaminophen, NSAIDs, and opioid drugs come under heightened scrutiny. This article reviews studies about essential oxygen oil, a topical over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic new to the American market but available for many years in Europe. Prospective studies evaluating the oil's safety and efficacy in acute and chronic pain patients, a dermatological study in which healthy subjects served as their own controls, and a post-marketing surveillance study were considered. These studies found the novel essential oxygen oil to be safe and effective in a variety of acute and chronic pain syndromes as well as being well tolerated with few side effects. Its mechanism of action is not understood and further study is warranted. Essential oxygen oil is safe and effective for the treatment of pain associated with many common conditions, including tendinopathy, arthritis, sprains, and others.

  6. The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injuries in basketball. A randomized clinical study at West Point.

    PubMed

    Sitler, M; Ryan, J; Wheeler, B; McBride, J; Arciero, R; Anderson, J; Horodyski, M

    1994-01-01

    This randomized clinical study was designed to prospectively determine the efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer in reducing the frequency and severity of acute ankle injuries in basketball. Athletic shoe, playing surface, athlete-exposure, ankle injury history, and brace assignment were either statistically or experimentally controlled. Participants in the study were 1601 United States Military Academy cadets with no preparticipation, clinical, functional, or radiographic evidence of ankle instability. Subjects experienced a total of 13,430 athlete-exposures in the 1990 and 1991 intramural basketball seasons. Ankle injury was defined as acute trauma to the ankle ligaments that resulted in an athlete's inability to participate in basketball 1 day after the injury. Use of ankle stabilizers significantly reduced the frequency of ankle injuries. Reduction in ankle injuries, however, depended on the nature of injury (fewer contact injuries occurred among those who wore braces). Injury severity was not statistically reduced, and wearing the ankle stabilizer did not affect the frequency of knee injuries. Attitude toward ankle stabilizer use improved as use of the stabilizer increased.

  7. Ibuprofen in the treatment of acute ankle joint injuries. A double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Fredberg, U; Hansen, P A; Skinhøj, A

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-eight patients who presented to the casualty ward with acute ankle joint injuries were studied to examine the effect of ibuprofen on pain and ankle swelling. Thirty-two patients were treated with placebo tablets and 36 with 600 mg ibuprofen tablets taken four times a day for 4 to 6 days. All of the patients were immobilized and requested to keep the foot elevated. The results showed that ibuprofen had no effect on the ankle swelling. The need for additional analgesics was not influenced by treatment with ibuprofen, which means that ibuprofen has no effect on pain. The time elapsed from occurrence of the injury to arrival at the casualty ward was negatively correlated to the reduction of ankle joint swelling during the treatment period. Treatment with ice-sprays, icebags, or cold water during the acute stage of injury did not influence the reduction of swelling during the treatment period. PMID:2675651

  8. Incidence of acute volleyball injuries: a prospective cohort study of injury mechanisms and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bahr, R; Bahr, I A

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the incidence and mechanisms of acute volleyball injuries, with particular reference to possible risk factors for ankle injuries. Coaches and players in the top two divisions of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation were asked to keep records of exposure time and all acute volleyball injuries causing a player to miss at least one playing day during one season. We found 89 injuries among 272 players during 51588 player hours, 45837 h of training and 5751 h of match play. The total injury incidence was 1.7 +/- 0.2 per 1000 h of play, 1.5 +/- 0.2 during training and 3.5 +/- 0.8 during match play. The ankle (54%) was the most commonly injured region, followed by the lower back (11%), knee (8%), shoulder (8%) and fingers (7%). Of the ankle injuries, 79% were recurrences, and the relative risk of injury was 3.8 (P < 0.0001) for previously injured ankles (38 of 232) vs. non-injured ankles (10 of the 234). Moreover, a reinjury was observed in 21 of the 50 ankles that had suffered an ankle sprain within the last 6 months (42.0 +/- 7.0%; risk ratio: 9.8 vs. uninjured ankles; P < 0.000001). The data indicate that external supports should be worn for 6-12 months after an ankle sprain and that specific injury prevention programs may be developed for ankle sprains in volleyball. PMID:9200321

  9. Treatment of common deficits associated with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Alison; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are amongst the most common injuries incurred by athletes, with the high rate of reoccurrence after initial injury becoming of great concern. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) refers to the development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent residual symptoms post-injury. Some of the initial symptoms that occur in acute sprains may persist for at least 6 months post-injury in the absence of recurrent sprains, despite the athlete having returned to full functional activity. CAI is generally thought to be caused by mechanical instability (MI) or functional instability (FI), or both. Although previously discussed as separate entities, recent research has demonstrated that deficits associated with both MI and FI may co-exist to result in CAI. For clinicians, the main deficits associated with CAI include deficits in proprioception, neuromuscular control, strength and postural control. Based on the literature reviewed, it does seem that subjects with CAI have a deficit in frontal plane ankle joint positional sense. Subjects with CAI do not appear to exhibit any increased latency in the peroneal muscles in response to an external perturbation. Preliminary data suggest that feed-forward neuromuscular control may be more important than feed-back neuromuscular control and interventions are now required to address deficits in feed-forward neuromuscular control. Balance training protocols have consistently been shown to improve postural stability in subjects with CAI. Subjects with CAI do not experience decreased peroneus longus strength, but instead may experience strength deficits in the ankle joint invertor muscles. These findings are of great clinical significance in terms of understanding the mechanisms and deficits associated with CAI. An appreciation of these is vital to allow clinicians to develop effective prevention and treatment programmes in relation to CAI.

  10. Prophylactic Ankle Taping and Bracing: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat and Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Lauren C.; Vela, Luzita I.; Denegar, Craig R.; Hertel, Jay

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: Taping and bracing are thought to decrease the incidence of ankle sprains; however, few investigators have addressed the effect of preventive measures on the rate of ankle sprains. Our purpose was to examine the effectiveness of ankle taping and bracing in reducing ankle sprains by applying a numbers-needed-to-treat (NNT) analysis to previously published studies. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SPORT Discus, and PEDro for original research from 1966 to 2002 with key words ankle taping, ankle sprains, injury incidence, prevention, ankle bracing, ankle prophylaxis, andnumbers needed to treat. We eliminated articles that did not address the effects of ankle taping or bracing on ankle injury rates using an experimental design. DATA SYNTHESIS: The search produced 8 articles, of which 3 permitted calculation of NNT, which addresses the clinical usefulness of an intervention by providing estimates of the number of treatments needed to prevent 1 injury occurrence. In a study of collegiate intramural basketball players, the prevention of 1 ankle sprain required the taping of 26 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 143 without a prior history. In a military academy intramural basketball program, prevention of 1 sprain required bracing of 18 athletes with a history of ankle sprain and 39 athletes with no history. A study of ankle bracing in competitive soccer players produced an NNT of 5 athletes with a history of previous sprain and 57 without a prior injury. A cost- benefit analysis of ankle taping versus bracing revealed taping to be approximately 3 times more expensive than bracing. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Greater benefit is achieved in applying prophylactic ankle taping or bracing to athletes with a history of ankle sprain, compared with those without previous sprains. The generalizability of these results to other physically active populations is unknown.

  11. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  12. Acute Tibialis Posterior Tendon Rupture With Pronation-Type Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Derek T; Harris, Joshua D; Cosculluela, Pedro E; Varner, Kevin E

    2016-09-01

    Tibialis posterior tendon rupture in the setting of pronation-type ankle fractures can lead to long-term debility as a result of chronic tendon dysfunction. This rare injury pattern presents a diagnostic challenge because thorough preoperative examination of the function of the tendon is limited by pain, swelling, and inherent instability of the fracture. As such, a high index of suspicion is necessary in ankle fractures with radiographs showing a medial malleolus fracture with an associated suprasyndesmotic fibula fracture. This report describes 3 cases of tibialis posterior tendon rupture associated with pronation-type ankle fractures treated acutely with open reduction and internal fixation and primary tendon repair. Additionally, common features of this injury pattern are discussed based on the current literature. In accordance with this report, the typical mechanism of injury is high energy and includes forced pronation, external rotation, and dorsiflexion of the ankle, which places maximal stress on the tibialis posterior tendon. Rupture most commonly occurs in a relatively hypovascular area of the tendon located at the posteromedial extent of the medial malleolus fracture. In the operative treatment of pronation-type ankle fractures, direct inspection of the tibialis posterior tendon allows for timely diagnosis and treatment of associated ruptures. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e970-e975.]. PMID:27248337

  13. Acute compartment syndrome of the foot following fixation of a pilon variant ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Henning, Amy; Gaines, Robert J; Carr, Donald; Lambert, Edward

    2010-12-01

    Acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the foot is a serious potential complication after fractures, crush injuries, or reperfusion injury after vascular repair. Foot compartment syndrome in association with injuries to the ankle is rare. This article presents a case of acute compartment syndrome of the foot following open reduction and internal fixation of an ankle fracture. A 16-year-old girl presented after sustaining a left ankle injury. Radiographs demonstrated a length-stable posterior and lateral malleolar ankle fracture. Initial treatment consisted of a bulky splint and crutches pending the improvement of her swelling. Over the course of a week, the soft tissue environment of the distal lower extremity improved, and the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of both her fibula and distal tibia through 2 approaches. Approximately 2 hours from the completion of surgery, the patient reported worsening pain over the medial aspect of her foot and into her calcaneus. Physical examination of the foot demonstrated a swollen and tense abductor hallicus and heel pad. Posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis pulses were palpable and her sensation was intact throughout her foot. Emergently, fasciotomy of both compartments was performed through a medial incision. Postoperatively, the patient reported immediate pain relief. At 18-month follow-up, she reported no pain and had returned to all of her preinjury athletic activities.

  14. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-01

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  15. Salvage of a Failed Agility Total Ankle Replacement System Associated with Acute Traumatic Periprosthetic Midfoot Fractures.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a rare case involving combined revision of a failed Agility Total Ankle Replacement System (DePuy Orthopaedics, Warsaw, Indiana) and open reduction with internal fixation of periprosthetic midfoot fractures secondary to acute traumatic injury. The rationale for these procedures, the operative sequence of events, and recovery course are presented in detail. Causes for concern regarding subsequent revision, should this be required, are raised.

  16. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  17. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  18. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ankle Exercises (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Ankle Sprain 踝部扭傷 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) Ankle Exercises Exercices pour la cheville - ...

  19. Ankle Sprains: Healing and Preventing Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to stand on your foot. Ice--Using ice packs, ice slush baths or ice massages can decrease ... after your injury. Ice treatments can consist of ice packs, ice slush baths or ice massages. To use ...

  20. A literature-based guide to the conservative and surgical management of the acute Charcot foot and ankle

    PubMed Central

    Schade, Valerie L.; Andersen, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle presents with the insidious onset of a unilateral acutely edematous, erythematous, and warm lower extremity. The acute stages are typically defined as Eichenholtz Stage 1, or Stage 0, which was first described by Shibata et al. in 1990. The ultimate goal of treatment is maintenance of a stable, plantigrade foot which can be easily shod, minimizing the risk of callus, ulceration, infection, and amputation. The gold standard of treatment is non-weight-bearing immobilization in a total contact cast. Surgical intervention remains controversial. A review of the literature was performed to provide an evidenced-based approach to the conservative and surgical management of acute Charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle. PMID:25795102

  1. Wrist sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... begins to heal. This can improve with light stretching. Severe (grade 3) wrist sprains may need to ... times. Bend your wrist in the opposite direction, stretching downward and holding for 30 seconds. Relax your ...

  2. Personality profile among symptomatic and recovered patients with neck sprain injury, measured by MCMI-I acutely and 6 months after car accidents.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G E; Stiles, T C; Borchgrevink, P C; Lereim, I

    1997-04-01

    The relationships between personality and psychiatric symptoms and long-lasting physical symptoms were assessed in 88 neck sprain patients injured in car accidents. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-I) was completed at time of occurrence (intake) and 6 months after the injury. The neck sprain patients were divided into three subgroups according to symptoms 6 months after the accident. In addition, the total neck sprain group was compared with three other subject groups. The results indicated that the three neck sprain subgroups did not differ on the MCMI-I neither at intake nor 6 months later. The total neck sprain patients group was significantly different from patients with major depression on all scales of the MCMI-I, but not significantly different compared to patients with localized musculoskeletal pain. Compared to a group of health personnel, there were only a few significant differences. The study does not support the view that premorbid personality traits can predict outcome for neck sprain patients.

  3. Lateral ankle stabilization. Modified Lee and Chrisman-Snook.

    PubMed

    Saltrick, K R

    1991-07-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is not always a severe disability, but surgical reconstruction may be necessary in patients with instability or when conservative measures fail. Although recent articles by Ahlgren and Larsson and Bergsten et al provide evidence of satisfactory results with late ligamentous repair of chronic ankle instability via imbrication, lateral ankle stabilization procedures that use tenodesing of fasciodesing techniques continue to provide good results. Prolonged disability after acute lateral ankle ligament disruption has been reported in 20% of patients. With long-term instability, uneven stress distribution with recurrent sprains can lead to osteoarthritis. Various methods for evaluation of the chronically unstable ankle include inversion stress testing, anterior drawer sign, arthrography, and tenography. All of these methods are controversial with false negative results, unreliability, and variations in measurements and interpretation being cited. With this in mind, radiographic instability must be correlated with mechanical and clinical instability. Once all of these findings are correlated the physician can determine the appropriate procedure that will provide the patient with long-term stability. Although more recent studies have addressed repair of chronic instability with ligamentous reinforcement or imbrication, these procedures remain controversial in lieu of Freeman's deafferentiation theory with loss of proprioception. There is also mechanical instability of the subtalar joint, which may also require stabilization. Use of the modified Lee and the Chrisman-Snook techniques as described have provided good results.

  4. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  5. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections ...

  6. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  7. Chronic sprains of the carpometacarpal joints.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R B; Linscheid, R L; Dobyns, J H; Bryan, R S

    1981-03-01

    The relatively rigid second and third carpometacarpal joints provide stability for the cantilevered metacarpals of the index and middle fingers, about which the thumb and ulnar metacarpals move, providing spatial adaptation for grasping objects. Although seldom recognized, sprains of the carpometacarpal joints as part of a range of injury which includes subluxations, dislocations, and fractures are apparently common. The entity known as carpe bossu also may be related. The second and third carpometacarpal joints are more susceptible to injury in palmar flexion than in dorsiflexion. The sprain may be acute or chronic. Severe swelling over the carpometacarpal area, with tenderness and weakness without significant roentgenographic findings, is suggestive of the acute sprain, which generally responds to immobilization. The chronic sprain is often overlooked or misdiagnosed. Point tenderness of one or more carpometacarpal joints, a palpable laxity, and crepitus with manipulation are seen as physical findings, in decreasing order of frequency. Lidocaine, 0.5 ml, injected directly into the joint offers dramatic relief. If conservative measures are insufficient, arthrodesis of the joint is relatively simple, symptomatically reliable, and functionally uncompromising, especially of the second and third rays.

  8. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle surgery; Arthroscopy - ankle; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic ... You will likely receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means you will be asleep and unable ...

  9. Sprains and Strains - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ... Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases French (français) Ankle Sprain Entorse de la cheville - français ( ...

  10. Lateral ankle instability: MR imaging of associated injuries and surgical treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Leyla; Chiodo, Christopher P

    2008-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability has been defined as the development of recurrent ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial lateral ankle sprain. The diagnosis of ankle instability is usually established on the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic assessment. Patients have signs of both functional and mechanical instability, and the repetitive, chronic nature of the injury may lead to intra-articular and periarticular pathologies. This article discusses the incidence, etiology, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of these pathologies, reviews the surgical treatment procedures for lateral ankle instability, and presents the postoperative MR imaging findings.

  11. A new paradigm for rehabilitation of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Luke; Hertel, Jay

    2012-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains have been shown to be one of the most common musculoskeletal injuries in both athletes and the recreationally active population. Moreover, it is estimated that approximately 30% of people who incur a lateral ankle sprain will sustain recurrent ankle sprains and experience symptoms of pain and instability that last > 1 year. Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is the term used to describe cases involving repetitive ankle sprains, multiple episodes of the ankle "giving way," persistent symptoms, and diminished self-reported function for > 1 year after the initial ankle sprain. The optimal conservative treatment for CAI is yet to be determined; however, comparison between patients with CAI and individuals showing no history of ankle sprain has revealed several characteristic features of CAI. These include diminished range of motion, decreased strength, impaired neuromuscular control, and altered functional movement patterns. We propose a new treatment paradigm for conservative management of CAI with the aim of assessing and treating specific deficits exhibited by individual patients with CAI.

  12. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF US HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS-RELATED LIGAMENTOUS ANKLE INJURIES, 2005/06-2010/11

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Objective Describe ankle injury epidemiology among US high school athletes in 20 sports. Design Descriptive prospective epidemiology study. Setting Sports injury data for the 2005/06–2010/11 academic years were collected using an internet-based injury surveillance system, Reporting Information Online (RIO). Participants A nationwide convenience sample of US high schools. Assessment of Risk Factors Injuries sustained as a function of sport and gender. Main Outcome Measures Ankle sprain rates and patterns, outcomes, and mechanisms. Results From 2005/06–2010/11, certified athletic trainers reported 5,373 ankle sprains in 17,172,376 athlete exposures [AEs], for a rate of 3.13 ankle sprains per 10,000 AEs. Rates were higher for girls than boys (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.17–1.34) in gender-comparable sports and higher in competition than practice for boys (RR 3.42, 95% CI 3.20–3.66) and girls (RR 2.71, 95% CI 2.48–2.95). The anterior talofibular ligament was most commonly injured (involved in 85.3% of sprains). Overall, 49.7% of sprains resulted in loss of participation from 1–6 days. While 0.5% of all ankle sprains required surgery, 6.6% of those involving the deltoid ligament required surgery. Athletes were wearing ankle braces in 10.6% of all sprains. The most common injury mechanism was contact with another person (42.4% of all ankle sprains). Conclusions Ankle sprains are a serious problem in high school sports, with high rates of recurrent injury and loss of participation from sport. PMID:23328403

  13. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  14. The gender issue: epidemiology of ankle injuries in athletes who participate in basketball.

    PubMed

    Hosea, T M; Carey, C C; Harrer, M F

    2000-03-01

    The increased participation of women in organized athletics has resulted in an interest in gender-related injury patterns. Previous reports have indicated an increased incidence in anterior cruciate knee injuries among female intercollegiate basketball players compared with their male counterparts. The current epidemiologic study prospectively evaluated the relative risk of ankle injuries in scholastic and collegiate basketball players during a 2-year period. Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty athletes participated in this study, 4940 females and 6840 males. There were 1052 ankle injuries. Overall, females had a 25% greater risk of sustaining a Grade I ankle sprain compared with their male counterparts. This increased risk was present in the interscholastic and intercollegiate players. There was no significant difference in the risk for Grades II and III ankle sprains, ankle fractures, or syndesmotic sprains. Male and female athletes doubled their risk for sustaining an ankle injury at the intercollegiate level compared with the interscholastic level.

  15. Difference Between Strain and Sprain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Provided in this description of the differences between a strain (damage to the muscle or tendon) and a sprain (damage to the ligament) are definitions of mild, moderate, and severe (first, second, and third degree) strains and sprains. A final caution is given that these are two separate and distinct problems and should be treated as such. (DC)

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic ankle pain.

    PubMed

    Wukich, Dane K; Tuason, Dominick A

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis for chronic ankle pain is quite broad. Ankle pain can be caused by intra-articular or extra-articular pathology and may be a result of a traumatic or nontraumatic event. A detailed patient history and physical examination, coupled with judicious selection of the appropriate imaging modalities, are vital in making an accurate diagnosis and providing effective treatment. Chronic ankle pain can affect all age groups, ranging from young athletes to elderly patients with degenerative joint and soft-tissue disorders. It has been estimated that 23,000 ankle sprains occur each day in the United States, representing approximately 1 sprain per 10,000 people per day. Because nearly one in five ankle injuries result in chronic symptoms, orthopaedic surgeons are likely to see patients with chronic ankle pain. Many patients with chronic ankle pain do not recall any history of trauma. Reviewing the management of the various disorders that can cause chronic ankle pain will help orthopaedic surgeons provide the best treatment for their patients. PMID:21553785

  17. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Runners.

    PubMed

    Tenforde, Adam S; Yin, Amy; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Foot and ankle injuries account for nearly one-third of running injuries. Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciopathy, and ankle sprains are 3 of the most common types of injuries sustained during training. Other common injuries include other tendinopathies of the foot and ankle, bone stress injuries, nerve conditions including neuromas, and joint disease including osteoarthritis. This review provides an evidence-based framework for the evaluation and optimal management of these conditions to ensure safe return to running participation and reduce risk for future injury. PMID:26616180

  18. Acute Effects of Two Massage Techniques on Ankle Joint Flexibility and Power of the Plantar Flexors

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Grant J.B.; Young, Warren B.; Behm, David G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if three minutes of petrissage and tapotement forms of massage would influence plantar flexors’ flexibility, and muscle power. Nineteen participants were randomly subjected to three conditions (control and two massages) before performing two power tests. Prior to the intervention, subjects completed ankle joint flexibility assessments. The conditions were; (1) control, where subjects lay prone and had a therapist’s hands resting, (2) vigorous petrissage, and (3) tapotement applied at a rate of 4Hz; all on the triceps surae. Following completion of the intervention, subjects immediately completed a post- ankle joint flexibility test, followed by a drop-jump and concentric calf raise. The power measures were; concentric peak force, rate of force development, and drop-jump height / contact time. The data showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in ankle joint angle on the right leg and a corresponding tendency on the left. No significant change was seen with the power measures. Results suggest that massage can increase plantar flexors’ flexibility without a change in power and thus may be an alternative to static stretching during an athletic warm-up. Key pointsThree minutes of petrissage and tapotement forms of massage increased ankle flexibility.Massage did not adversely affect jump power measures.Massage may be an effective alternative to static stretching as a component of a pre-event warm-up. PMID:24149484

  19. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  20. Ankle flexibility and injury patterns in dancers.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, E R; Hunter, D M; Martin, D F; Curl, W W; Hoen, H

    1996-01-01

    Lower-extremity injuries are common among dancers and cause significant absences from rehearsals and performances. For this study of lower-extremity injuries in 101 ballet and 47 modern dance students, injuries requiring medical attention sustained over 1 academic year were associated with the following data obtained at the beginning of the school year: ankle flexibility, sex, dance discipline, previous injury, body mass index, and years of training. Eighty-three of the 148 students (age range, 12 to 28 years) reported prior lower-limb injuries, the most common being ankle sprains (28% of all dancers). Previous leg injuries correlated significantly with lower dorsiflexion measurements and with more new injuries. Female students had greater ankle and first metatarsophalangeal flexibility. Modern dancers had greater ankle inversion. Ninety-four students sustained 177 injuries during the study, including 75 sprains or strains and 71 cases of tendinitis. Thirty-nine percent (N = 69) were ankle injuries; 18% (N = 33) were knee injuries; 23% (N = 40) were foot injuries; and 20% (N = 35) were either hip or thigh injuries. Sixty-seven percent (N = 78) of the injured students were ballet dancers. Age, years of training, body mass index, sex, and ankle range of motion measurement had no predictive value for injury; previous injury and dance discipline both correlated with increased risk of injury. PMID:8947396

  1. Which X-ray views are required in juvenile ankle trauma?

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Blankstein, A; Israeli, A; Horoszowski, H

    1990-01-01

    Although ankle sprains are probably the most common injury in adolescent sports people, epiphyseal injuries are missed on the presumption of a ligamentous tear. The risk of damaged ligaments has been overemphasized while the potentially dangerous epiphyseolysis has been understressed. An oblique X-ray of the ankle joint is indicated prior to "stress" pictures.

  2. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms. PMID:25474297

  3. Prevalence of chronic ankle instability and associated symptoms in university dance majors: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Janet; Hall, Emily; Docherty, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms.

  4. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  5. Rehabilitation of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis sprains: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pajaczkowski, Jason A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To present the epidemiology, etiology, diagnostic criteria and therapeutic interventions for an important clinical entity – tibiofibular syndesmosis or “high ankle” sprains. Clinical Features The most common mechanism of injury is forced external rotation in a dorsiflexed foot. Pain is located anteriorly over the anterior tibiofibular ligament, and is elicited through a variety of tests designed to stress this articulation through diastatic forces. Pain with ambulation is typical, and is usually present during the push-off phase of gait. Radiographs may be useful in determining the extent of this injury, as syndesmotic sprains with malleolar fractures are more common than those without. Intervention and Outcome Convalescence is generally protracted compared with a lateral ankle sprain, and care must be taken to avoid stressing the supporting ligaments during the early course of therapy. Initial treatment is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation using modalities such as microcurrent, electroacupuncture and P.R.I.C.E. principles. Treatment over subsequent weeks involves progressive resistance exercises, proprioceptive challenges, plyometric exercises and sport-specific agility drills, while maintaining cardiovascular fitness. Conclusion The practitioner should also be cognizant of the indolent nature of this injury and possibility for sequelae. Anterior ankle pain and pain with a deep squat or during the push-off phase of gait are typical of this injury. Radiographs to rule out fracture and evaluate the extent of the injury may be warranted. Conservative therapy involving rehabilitation and tissue injury care is appropriate for Grade I and II injuries, while Grade III injuries require a surgical intervention. PMID:17657290

  6. Radiographic evaluation of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Rettig, A C; Shelbourne, K D; Beltz, H F; Robertson, D W; Arfken, P

    1987-10-01

    Injuries of the ankle and foot in athletes are quite common. They range from the extremely simple sprain to the difficult stress fracture, and may result in long-term disability. In all cases, the athlete is best treated after an accurate diagnosis is achieved.

  7. Factors Contributing to Chronic Ankle Instability: Kinesthesia and Joint Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Konradsen, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present a comprehensive review of the influence of altered kinesthesia and joint position sense on chronic ankle instability and to present a model connecting deficits in ankle position sense with the increased risk of sustaining lateral ankle sprains. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE for the years 1966–2001 using the key words ankle and kinesthesia or position sense and books on proprioception. Data Synthesis: Study findings suggest a risk for unprovoked lateral ankle sprains when the lateral border of the foot accidentally catches the ground surface during the late swing phase of normal locomotion. In normal situations, the lateral border of the foot clears the ground by only 5 mm, and a small increase in ankle-position error may substantially increase the risk of a collision. Findings of affected kinesthesia and joint position sense in subjects with chronically unstable ankles dominate over studies showing nonsignificant results, but the answer is far from clear. Conclusions/Recommendations: Changes in joint position sense and kinesthesia of a magnitude found in subjects with chronically unstable ankles can lead to an increased risk of sustaining lateral ankle sprains. Results from a small number of studies suggest that balance and coordination training can restore the increased uncertainty of joint positioning to normal levels. PMID:12937559

  8. Gait Kinematics After Taping in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Dicharry, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan; Wilder, Robert; Hertel, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Context: Chronic ankle instability is characterized by repetitive lateral ankle sprains. Prophylactic ankle taping is a common intervention used to reduce the risk of ankle sprains. However, little research has been conducted to evaluate the effect ankle taping has on gait kinematics. Objective: To investigate the effect of taping on ankle and knee kinematics during walking and jogging in participants with chronic ankle instability. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Participants: A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age = 26.9 ± 6.8 years, height = 171.7 ± 6.3 cm, mass = 73.5 ± 10.7 kg) with self-reported chronic ankle instability volunteered. They had an average of 5.3 ± 3.1 incidences of ankle sprain. Intervention(s): Participants walked and jogged in shoes on a treadmill while untaped and taped. The tape technique was a traditional preventive taping procedure. Conditions were randomized. Main Outcome Measure(s): Frontal-plane and sagittal-plane ankle and sagittal-plane knee kinematics were recorded throughout the entire gait cycle. Group means and 90% confidence intervals were calculated, plotted, and inspected for percentages of the gait cycle in which the confidence intervals did not overlap. Results: During walking, participants were less plantar flexed from 64% to 69% of the gait cycle (mean difference = 5.73° ± 0.54°) and less inverted from 51% to 61% (mean difference = 4.34° ± 0.65°) and 76% to 81% (mean difference = 5.55° ± 0.54°) of the gait cycle when taped. During jogging, participants were less dorsiflexed from 12% to 21% (mean difference = 4.91° ± 0.18°) and less inverted from 47% to 58% (mean difference = 6.52° ± 0.12°) of the gait cycle when taped. No sagittal-plane knee kinematic differences were found. Conclusions: In those with chronic ankle instability, taping resulted in a more neutral ankle position during walking and jogging in shoes on a treadmill. This change in

  9. Acute compartment syndrome following revisional arthroplasty of the forefoot: the dangers of ankle-block.

    PubMed

    Noorpuri, B S; Shahane, S A; Getty, C J

    2000-08-01

    A case of acute compartment syndrome of the forefoot after revisional arthroplasty of the forefoot is presented. Shortening of the compartments due to bony resection and extensive dissection due to previous scarring may have predisposed to the pathological condition. Prompt decompression based on clinical grounds prevented any long term sequelae. Allowance must be made for the concomitant use of local anaesthetic procedures which may obscure the clinical picture.

  10. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  11. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: [1] Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, [2] Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, [3] ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and [4] ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors. PMID:21658224

  12. Alternative treatments for neck sprain.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Kerstin; Morton, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether osteopathy or chiropractic treatments improve outcome in patients with neck sprain. Altogether 206 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. A clinical bottom line is stated

  13. [A woman with a painful ankle after a sprain].

    PubMed

    Sieverink, W J M; Duijff, J W

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with symptoms resembling an Achilles tendon rupture. Careful examination revealed a large avulsion fracture of the calcaneal tuberosity. Successful screw osteosynthesis of this tongue-type fracture was performed. Such careful examination is paramount to prevent one from missing this fracture. PMID:27650025

  14. Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Turner, an associate professor at the Center for Biomedical Engineering Systems at the University of North Carolina ... Turner, Ph.D., ATC, associate professor, Center for Biomedical Engineering Systems, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; ...

  15. Vascular Physiology according to Clinical Scenario in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Evaluation using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Mori, Kento; Kikuchi, Shohei; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness may be an important cause of acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical scenario (CS), which classifies the pathophysiology of AHF based on the initial systolic blood pressure (sBP), was proposed to provide the most appropriate therapy for AHF patients. In CS, elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, has been considered as a feature of patients categorized as CS1 (sBP > 140 mmHg at initial presentation). However, whether elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, is present in such patients has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we assessed aortic stiffness in AHF patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), which is considered to be independent of instantaneous blood pressure. Sixty-four consecutive AHF patients (mean age, 70.6 ± 12.8 years; 39 men) were classified with CS, based on their initial sBP: CS1: sBP > 140 mmHg (n = 29); CS2: sBP 100-140 mmHg (n = 22); and CS3: sBP < 100 mmHg (n = 13). There were significant group differences in CAVI (CS1 vs. CS2 vs. CS3: 9.7 ± 1.4 vs. 8.4 ± 1.7 vs. 8.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.006, analysis of variance). CAVI was significantly higher in CS1 than in CS2 (p = 0.02) and CS3 (p = 0.04). CAVI did not significantly correlate with sBP at the time of measurement of CAVI (r = 0.24 and p = 0.06). Aortic stiffness assessed using blood pressure-independent methodology apparently increased in CS1 AHF patients. We conclude that vascular failure is a feature of CS1 AHF initiation. PMID:27594650

  16. The acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on postural sway and gastrocnemius muscle activity during single-leg balance tasks.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bráulio N; Lucareli, Paulo R G; Gomes, Willy A; Silva, Josinaldo J; Bley, Andre S; Hartigan, Erin H; Marchetti, Paulo H

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static- stretching on surface electromyography (sEMG) and the center of pressure (COP) during a single-leg balance task in both lower limbs. Fourteen young healthy, non-athletic individuals performed unipodal quiet standing for 30s before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) a unilateral ankle plantar flexor static- stretching protocol [6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort (POD)]. Postural sway was described using the COP area, COP speed (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) and COP frequency (antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions). Surface EMG (EMG integral [IEMG] and Median frequency[FM]) was used to describe the muscular activity of gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion increased in the stretched limb before and after the static-stretching protocol (mean ± SD: 15.0° ± 6.0 and 21.5° ± 7.0 [p < 0.001]). COP area and IEMG increased in the stretch limb between pre-stretching and immediately post-stretching (p = 0.015 and p = 0.036, respectively). In conclusion, our static- stretching protocol effectively increased passive ankle ROM. The increased ROM appears to increase postural sway and muscle activity; however these finding were only a temporary or transient effect. Key PointsThe postural control can be affected by static- stretching protocol.The lateral gastrocnemius muscle action was increased after the static- stretching protocol.The static- stretching effects remain for less than 10 minutes.

  17. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  18. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-01-01

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed. PMID:27608626

  19. Ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Kyle P; McHale, Kevin J; Rossy, William H; Theodore, George

    2016-09-09

    Ankle impingement is a syndrome that encompasses a wide range of anterior and posterior joint pathology involving both osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. In this review, the etiology, pathoanatomy, diagnostic workup, and treatment options for both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes are discussed.

  20. Conservative management of posterior ankle impingement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Isabelle; Richer, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the pain and functional improvements of a patient with posterior ankle impingement following a treatment plan incorporating soft tissue therapy, chiropractic adjustment and a progressive rehabilitation program. Clinical Features: A 37-year- old male presented with posterolateral ankle pain exacerbated by plantar flexion two weeks after sustaining an inversion ankle sprain. Oedema was present and the patient was describing a sensation of instability while walking. The initial diagnosis of lateral ankle sprain was found to be complicated by a posterior ankle impingement caused by a tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus sheath suspected during the physical examination and confirmed by MRI. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated over a 14-week period. Soft tissue therapy, a rehabilitation program and cortisone injection were used to treat this condition. A precise description of the rehabilitation program that contains open kinetic chain, closed kinetic chain, proprioception, and conditioning exercises prescribed to the patient is given. After the treatment plan, the patient returned to play pain free and had no daily living restrictions. Summary: A protocol including rest, soft tissue therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises, sport-specific exercises and cortisone injection appeared to facilitate complete recovery of this patient’s posterior ankle impingement. PMID:27385836

  1. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  2. The effect of repetitive ankle perturbations on muscle reaction time and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Thain, Peter Kevin; Hughes, Gerwyn Trefor Gareth; Mitchell, Andrew Charles Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The use of a tilt platform to simulate a lateral ankle sprain and record muscle reaction time is a well-established procedure. However, a potential caveat is that repetitive ankle perturbation may cause a natural attenuation of the reflex latency and amplitude. This is an important area to investigate as many researchers examine the effect of an intervention on muscle reaction time. Muscle reaction time, peak and average amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain (combined inversion and plantar flexion movement) were calculated in twenty-two physically active participants. The 40 perturbations were divided into 4 even groups of 10 dominant limb perturbations. Within-participants repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted to assess the effect of habituation over time for each variable. There was a significant reduction in the peroneus longus average amplitude between the aggregated first and last 10 consecutive ankle perturbations (F2.15,45.09=3.90, P=0.03, ɳp(2)=0.16). Authors should implement no more than a maximum of 30 consecutive ankle perturbations (inclusive of practice perturbations) in future protocols simulating a lateral ankle sprain in an effort to avoid significant attenuation of muscle activity.

  3. A 4-Week Neuromuscular Training Program and Gait Patterns at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Garrett; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Context: Previous research into the rehabilitation of ankle sprains has primarily focused on outcome measures that do not replicate functional activities, thus making it difficult to extrapolate the results relative to the weight-bearing conditions under which most ankle sprains occur. Objective: To measure the effects of a training program on gait during walking and running in an active athletic population. Design: Matched-pairs, controlled trial. Setting: University motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten subjects from an athletic population (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 25.8 ± 3.9 years, height = 177.6 ± 6.1 cm, mass = 66.8 ± 7.4 kg) and 10 controls matched for age, sex, activity, and ankle instability (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 27.4 ± 5.8 years, height = 178.7 ± 10.8 cm, mass = 71.6 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): A 4-week neuromuscular training program undertaken by the treatment group. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured ankle position and velocity in the frontal (x) and sagittal (y) planes in all subjects during treadmill walking and running for the periods 100 milliseconds before heel strike, at heel strike, and 100 milliseconds after heel strike. Results: A 4-week neuromuscular training program resulted in no significant changes in ankle position or velocity during treadmill walking and running. Conclusions: The mechanisms by which neuromuscular training improves function in normal subjects and those with functional ankle instability do not appear to result in measurable changes in gait kinematics. Our findings raise issues regarding methods of ankle sprain rehabilitation and the measurement of their effectiveness in improving functional activities. Further research in a larger population with functional ankle instability is necessary. PMID:17597944

  4. Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... JJ. Bursitis, tendinitis, and other periarticular disorders and sports medicine. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  5. The effect of talo-crural joint manipulation on range of motion at the ankle joint in subjects with a history of ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Skye; Fryer, Gary A; McLaughlin, Patrick

    2003-07-01

    Introduction: There is little research available on the effects of peripheral joint manipulation. Only a few studies have examined the effect of manipulation on ankle range of motion, with conflicting results. This study aimed to determine whether a single high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to the talo-crural joint altered ankle range of motion in subjects with a history of lateral ligament sprain.Methods: Male and female volunteers (N=52) with a history of lateral ligament sprain were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n=26) or a control group (n=26). Those in the experimental group received a single HVLA thrust to the talo-crural joint, whilst those in the control group received no treatment intervention. Pre-test and post-test measurements of passive dorsiflexion range of motion were taken.Results: No significant changes in dorsiflexion range of motion were detected between manipulated ankles and those of control subjects using dependent and independent t-tests. Ankles that cavitated displayed a greater mean DFR and large effect size (d=0.8) compared to those that did not gap and cavitate, but analysis with ANOVA revealed these differences to be not significant.Conclusion: HVLA manipulation of the ankle did not increase dorsiflexion range of motion in subjects with a history of lateral ligament sprain.

  6. Incidence and Severity of Foot and Ankle Injuries in Men’s Collegiate American Football

    PubMed Central

    Lievers, W. Brent; Adamic, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American football is an extremely physical game with a much higher risk of injury than other sports. While many studies have reported the rate of injury for particular body regions or for individual injuries, very little information exists that compares the incidence or severity of particular injuries within a body region. Such information is critical for prioritizing preventative interventions. Purpose: To retrospectively analyze epidemiological data to identify the most common and most severe foot and ankle injuries in collegiate men’s football. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were obtained from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for all foot and ankle injuries during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 seasons. Injuries were analyzed in terms of incidence and using multiple measures of severity (time loss, surgeries, medical disqualifications). This frequency and severity information is summarized in tabular form as well as in a 4 × 4 quantitative injury risk assessment matrix (QIRAM). Results: The rate of foot and ankle injuries was 15 per 10,000 athletic exposures (AEs). Five injuries were found to be responsible for more than 80% of all foot and ankle injuries: lateral ankle ligament sprains, syndesmotic (high ankle) sprains, medial ankle ligament sprains, midfoot injuries, and first metatarsophalangeal joint injuries. Ankle dislocations were found to be the most severe in terms of median time loss (100 days), percentage of surgeries (83%), and percentage of medical disqualifications (94%), followed by metatarsal fractures (38 days, 36%, and 49%, respectively) and malleolus fractures (33 days, 41%, and 59%, respectively). Statistical analysis suggests that the 3 measures of severity are highly correlated (r > 0.94), thereby justifying the use of time loss as a suitable proxy for injury severity in the construction of the QIRAM. Conclusion: Based on the QIRAM analysis

  7. Foot and Ankle Injuries in Professional Soccer Players: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Expectations.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world. It has undergone many changes in recent years, mainly because of increased physical demands, and this has led to an increased injury risk. Direct contact accounts for half of all injuries in both indoor and outdoor soccer and ankle sprains are the most common foot and ankle injury. There is a spectrum of foot and ankle injuries and their treatment should be individualized in these high-demand patients. An injury prevention program is also important and should the players, the trainer, responsible physician, and physical therapists. PMID:27261812

  8. Four Weeks of Balance Training does not Affect Ankle Joint Stiffness in Subjects with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarang Kumar; Wauneka, Clayton N.; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance training has been shown to be effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) but the biomechanical pathways underlying the clinical outcomes are still unknown. This study was conducted to determine if a 4-week balance training intervention can alter the mechanical characteristics in ankles with CAI. Methods Twenty-two recreationally active subjects with unilateral CAI were randomized to either a control (n = 11, 35.1 ± 9.3 years) or intervention (n = 11, 33.5 ± 6.6 years) group. Subjects in the intervention group were trained on the affected limb with static and dynamic components using a Biodex balance stability system for 4-weeks. The ankle joint stiffness and neutral zone in inversion and eversion directions on the involved and uninvolved limbs was measured at baseline and post-intervention using a dynamometer. Results At baseline, the mean values of the inversion stiffness (0.69 ± 0.37 Nm/degree) in the involved ankle was significantly lower (p < 0.011, 95% CI [0.563, 0.544]) than that of uninvolved contralateral ankle (0.99 ± 0.41 Nm/degree). With the available sample size, the eversion stiffness, inversion neutral zone, and eversion neutral zone were not found to be significantly different between the involved and uninvolved contralateral ankles. The 4-week balance training intervention failed to show any significant effect on the passive ankle stiffness and neutral zones in inversion and eversion. Conclusion Decreased inversion stiffness in the involved chronic unstable ankle was found that of uninvolved contralateral ankle. The 4-week balance training program intervention was ineffective in altering the mechanical characteristics of ankles with CAI. Level of evidence Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. PMID:27642647

  9. Balance assessments for predicting functional ankle instability and stable ankles.

    PubMed

    Ross, Scott E; Linens, Shelley W; Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L

    2011-10-01

    A number of instrumented and non-instrumented measures are used to detect balance deficits associated with functional ankle instability (FAI). Determining outcome measures that detect balance deficits associated with FAI might assist clinicians in identifying impairments that may otherwise go undetected with less responsive balance measures. Thus, our objective was to determine the balance measure that best predicted ankle group membership (FAI or stable ankle). Participants included 17 subjects without a history of ankle sprains (168±9 cm, 66±14 kg, 24±5 yr) and 17 subjects with FAI (172±9 cm, 71±11 kg, 22±3 yr). Balance trials were performed without vision and subjects stood on a single leg as motionless as possible for 20s. Balance was quantified with center-of-pressure measures (velocity, area) and error score. Measures were positively correlated with each other (r range: 0.60-0.76). The multifactorial model with all three measures best predicted group membership (F((3,30))=7.20, P=0.001; R(2)=0.42; percent classified correctly=77%), and was followed by the multifactorial model with resultant center-of-pressure velocity and error score (F((2,31))=8.73, P=0.001; R(2)=0.36; percent classified correctly=74%). The resultant center-of-pressure velocity (F((1,32))=13.46, P=0.001; R(2)=0.30; percent classified correctly=74%; unique variance=12.7%) and error score (F((1,32))=12.51, P=0.001; R(2)=0.28; percent classified correctly=71%; unique variance=12.0%) predicted group membership; however, 95th percentile center-of-pressure area ellipse did not (F((1,32))=4.16, P=0.05; R(2)=0.12; percent classified correctly=65%; unique variance=5.8%). A multifactorial single leg balance assessment is best for predicting group membership. COPV is the best single predictor of group membership, but clinicians may use error score to identify deficits associated with FAI if force plates are not available. PMID:21868225

  10. Efficacy and tolerance of a comfrey root extract (Extr. Rad. Symphyti) in the treatment of ankle distorsions: results of a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Koll, R; Buhr, M; Dieter, R; Pabst, H; Predel, H G; Petrowicz, O; Giannetti, B; Klingenburg, S; Staiger, C

    2004-09-01

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.) is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, analgesic and tissue regenerating properties. In a double-blind, multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, group comparison study on patients suffering from unilateral acute ankle sprains (n = 142, mean age 31.8 years, 78.9% male), the percutaneous efficacy of an ointment of comfrey extract (Kytta-Salbe f, four treatments per day for 8 days) was confirmed decisively. Compared to placebo, the active treatment was clearly superior regarding the reduction of pain (tonometric measurement, p<0.0001, as the primary efficacy variable) and ankle edema (figure-of-eight method, p = 0.0001). Statistically significant differences between active treatment and placebo could also be shown for ankle mobility (neutral zero method), and global efficacy. Under active treatment, no adverse drug reactions were reported. The good local and global tolerance of the trial medication could also be confirmed. The study results are consistent with the known pre-clinical and clinical data concerning comfrey. PMID:15500257

  11. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  12. Basketball shoe height and the maximal muscular resistance to applied ankle inversion and eversion moments.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, R A; Ashton-Miller, J A; Kothari, S U; Wojtys, E M

    1995-01-01

    To determine if the height of a basketball shoe alters the maximal inversion and eversion moment that can be actively resisted by the ankle in the frontal plane, we tested 20 healthy, young adult men with no recent ankle injuries. Subjects underwent unipedal functional ankle strength testing under weightbearing conditions at 0 degrees, 16 degrees, and 32 degrees of ankle plantar flexion using a specially designed testing apparatus. Testing was performed with the subject wearing either a low- or a three quarter-top basketball shoe. Shoe height did not significantly affect an individual's ability to actively resist an eversion moment at any angle of ankle plantar flexion. However, tests at 0 degrees of ankle plantar flexion demonstrated that the three quarter-top basketball shoe we tested significantly increased the maximal resistance to an inversion moment by 29.4%. At 16 degrees of ankle plantar flexion, inversion resistance was also significantly improved by 20.4%. These results show that athletic shoe height can significantly increase the active resistance to an inversion moment in moderate ankle plantar flexion. The findings apply to a neutral foot position in the frontal plane, an orientation equivalent to the early phase of a potential ankle sprain.

  13. Management of sports injuries of the foot and ankle: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballal, M S; Pearce, C J; Calder, J D F

    2016-07-01

    Sporting injuries around the ankle vary from simple sprains that will resolve spontaneously within a few days to severe injuries which may never fully recover and may threaten the career of a professional athlete. Some of these injuries can be easily overlooked altogether or misdiagnosed with potentially devastating effects on future performance. In this review article, we cover some of the common and important sporting injuries involving the ankle including updates on their management and outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:874-83.

  14. Management of sports injuries of the foot and ankle: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballal, M S; Pearce, C J; Calder, J D F

    2016-07-01

    Sporting injuries around the ankle vary from simple sprains that will resolve spontaneously within a few days to severe injuries which may never fully recover and may threaten the career of a professional athlete. Some of these injuries can be easily overlooked altogether or misdiagnosed with potentially devastating effects on future performance. In this review article, we cover some of the common and important sporting injuries involving the ankle including updates on their management and outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:874-83. PMID:27365464

  15. Ankle trauma significantly impairs posture control--a study in basketball players and controls.

    PubMed

    Perrin, P P; Béné, M C; Perrin, C A; Durupt, D

    1997-07-01

    Both ankle and hip movements are used to maintain balance in strategies defined as bottom up and top down models. This suggests that pathological impairment of either of these articulations could modify the parameters of balance control. In order to appreciate the bearing of ankle damage on the proper control of equilibrium, posturographic recordings were compared, in a static and two dynamic tests, between 15 professional national basketball players, with histories of 10 to 15 ankle sprains, and 50 controls. In statokinesigrams obtained with eyes open or closed, center of foot pressure displacements were of similar length (way) between controls and players, while the area covered was increased for the latter and related to the history of ankle trauma. In a toes-up dynamic test (4 degrees, 50 degrees/s) coupled with electromyographic recordings, the short latency response (myotatic reflex in the triceps surae muscle) normalized to one meter body height, was shorter in players without relationship to histories of ankle damage. In a prolonged sinusoidal dynamic test, players with the largest number of ankle trauma showed greater difficulties in maintaining posture control. These data pinpoint the role of ankles in the control of both static and dynamic balance and demonstrate that the role of the hip joints becomes more important (top down strategy) in the case of damaged ankles.

  16. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Murphy GA. Total ankle arthroplasty. In: Canale ST, Beatty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 10. Wexler D, Grosser DM. Ankle arthrtitis. ...

  17. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. PMID:27599442

  18. Dorsiflexion deficit during jogging with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Lindsay K; McKeon, Patrick O; Kerrigan, D Casey; Hertel, Jay

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) demonstrate altered dorsiflexion/plantar flexion range of motion (ROM) compared to controls during jogging. The case control study took place in a university motion analysis laboratory. Fourteen volunteers participated in the study, seven suffered from CAI (age 25+/-4.2 years, height 173+/-9.4 cm, mass 71+/-8.1kg) and seven were healthy, matched controls (age 25+/-4.5 years, height 168+/-5.9 cm, mass 67+/-9.8kg). All subjects jogged on an instrumented treadmill while a ten-camera motion analysis system collected three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities. The main outcome measure was sagittal plane (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) range of motion of the ankle throughout the gait cycle. CAI subjects had significantly less dorsiflexion compared to the control group from 9% to 25% during jogging (4.83+/-0.55 degrees ). CAI subjects demonstrated limited ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the time of maximal dorsiflexion during jogging. Limited dorsiflexion ROM during gait among individuals with CAI may be a risk factor for recurrent ankle sprains. These deficits should be treated appropriately by rehabilitation clinicians.

  19. Ankle dislocation without accompanying malleolar fracture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Masahito; Kotajima, Satoshi; Smith, Richard A; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without associated fracture is rare. We present here a 21-year-old man who sustained open posteromedial dislocation of the left ankle without malleolar facture when he jumped and sprained his right ankle while playing basketball. The most likely mechanism is forced flexion applied to the ankle joint leading to a rupture of the anterior capsule and lateral structures of the ankle followed by an accelerating inversion stress leading to a posteromedial dislocation of the talus from the tibial condyle. Transient paresthesia was noted in the area of the superficial peroneal nerve. At surgery, the anterior part of the tibiotalar joint capsule and anterior talofibular ligament were detached from their original sites. The calcaneofibular ligament was also detached with its associated periosteum and a tiny avulsed bony fragment. The articular facets of the tibia and talus were intact. The treatment consisted of wound irrigation, debridement, reduction and capsular suture followed by immobilization with a short leg cast. About 10 degrees of loss in the range of dorsiflexion was observed. The patient achieved good long-term functional results.

  20. Dynamic high-resolution US of ankle and midfoot ligaments: normal anatomic structure and imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The ankle is the most frequently injured major joint in the body, and ankle sprains are frequently encountered in individuals playing football, basketball, and other team sports, in addition to occurring in the general population. Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to provide excellent evaluation of ligaments around the ankle, with the ability to show associated intraarticular abnormalities, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema. Ultrasonography (US) performed with high-resolution broadband linear-array probes has become increasingly important in the assessment of ligaments around the ankle because it is low cost, fast, readily available, and free of ionizing radiation. US can provide a detailed depiction of normal anatomic structures and is effective for evaluating ligament integrity. In addition, US allows the performance of dynamic maneuvers, which may contribute to increased visibility of normal ligaments and improved detection of tears. In this article, the authors describe the US techniques for evaluation of the ankle and midfoot ligaments and include a brief review of the literature related to their basic anatomic structures and US of these structures. Short video clips showing dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US of ankle and midfoot structures and their principal pathologic patterns are included as supplemental material. Use of a standardized imaging technique may help reduce the intrinsic operator dependence of US. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. Acute compartment syndrome of the lower extremity secondary to noncontact injury.

    PubMed

    Moyer, R A; Boden, B P; Marchetto, P A; Kleinbart, F; Kelly, J D

    1993-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the cases of three patients with injuries similar to the mechanism of an ankle sprain which resulted in compartment syndrome of the lower extremity. All three patients presented with sharp, proximal, anterolateral pain in the leg after an indirect, twisting injury. None of the injuries involved direct contact. Two of the three athletes initially presented to local hospitals, where the injury was misdiagnosed as an ankle sprain. The mechanism appears to be a muscle strain or tear with resultant hemorrhage in the compartment. All three patients returned to high-level athletics after prolonged recovery periods.

  2. Ankle injuries and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1988-01-01

    In transmitting the body's weight, the ankle is subject to frequent static and dynamic injury due to concentrated stresses during standing and movement. The frequency of athletic ankle injuries ranges from 10 to 90 percent, with the highest rate occurring in basketball players. There is prolonged disability and recurrent instability for months to years for 25 to 40 per cent of these patients. Because most of this trauma is handled by primary care physicians, this review presents the mechanism of injury, relevant anatomy, physical examination, and appropriate therapeutic intervention in the acute and rehabilitative phases.

  3. Comparison of diflunisal and acetaminophen with codeine in the treatment of mild to moderate pain due to strains and sprains.

    PubMed

    Indelicato, P A

    1986-01-01

    Fifty college athletes with acute sprains and strains from football-related activities were randomly assigned to treatment with either diflunisal or acetaminophen with codeine for seven days. Additional treatment in both groups included rest, elevation, local application of cold or heat, splinting, and physical therapy, as indicated. Both treatment groups exhibited clinically significant improvements in pain, tenderness, and swelling. The results of this study show that diflunisal, a peripherally acting nonnarcotic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties, was as effective as acetaminophen with codeine in relieving mild to moderate pain due to musculo-skeletal sprains and strains. The long duration of action of diflunisal permits less frequent dosing, an important consideration when prescribing medication for active young adults.

  4. Medial compressible forefoot sole elements reduce ankle inversion in lateral SSC jumps.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Jana; Mornieux, Guillaume; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-06-01

    Sideward movements are associated with high incidences of lateral ankle sprains. Special shoe constructions might be able to reduce these injuries during lateral movements. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether medial compressible forefoot sole elements can reduce ankle inversion in a reactive lateral movement, and to evaluate those elements' influence on neuromuscular and mechanical adjustments in lower extremities. Foot placement and frontal plane ankle joint kinematics and kinetics were analyzed by 3-dimensional motion analysis. Electromyographic data of triceps surae, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior were collected. This modified shoe reduced ankle inversion in comparison with a shoe with a standard sole construction. No differences in ankle inversion moments were found. With the modified shoe, foot placement occurred more internally rotated, and muscle activity of the lateral shank muscles was reduced. Hence, lateral ankle joint stability during reactive sideward movements can be improved by these compressible elements, and therefore lower lateral shank muscle activity is required. As those elements limit inversion, the strategy to control inversion angles via a high external foot rotation does not need to be used.

  5. Ankle moment generation and maximum-effort curved sprinting performance.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-11-15

    Turning at high speed along acute curves is crucial for athletic performance. One determinant of curved sprinting speed is the ground reaction force that can be created by the supporting limb; the moment generated at the ankle joint may influence such force generation. Body lean associated with curved sprints positions the ankle joints in extreme in-/eversion, and may hinder the ankle moment generation. To examine the influence of ankle moment generation on curved sprinting performance, 17 male subjects performed maximum-effort curved sprints in footwear with and without a wedge. The wedged footwear was constructed with the intention to align the ankle joints closer to their neutral frontal-plane configuration during counter-clockwise curved sprints so greater joint moments might be generated. We found, with the wedged footwear, the average eversion angle of the inside leg ankle was reduced, and the plantarflexion moment generation increased significantly. Meanwhile, the knee extension moment remained unchanged. With the wedged footwear, stance-average centripetal ground reaction force increased significantly while no difference in the vertical ground reaction force was detected. The subjects created a greater centripetal ground reaction impulse in the wedged footwear despite a shortened stance phase when compared to the control. Stance-average curved sprinting speed improved by 4.3% with the wedged footwear. The changes in ankle moment and curved sprinting speed observed in the current study supports the notion that the moment generation at the ankle joint may be a performance constraint for curved sprinting. PMID:23022207

  6. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  7. Noise‐enhanced postural stability in subjects with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Scott E

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of stochastic resonance (SR) stimulation on the postural stability of subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI). Design Experimental research design. Setting Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants 12 subjects with FAI who reported a history of recurrent ankle sprains and “giving way” sensations at the ankle. Interventions Subjects performed 20 s single‐leg balance tests under SR stimulation at 0.05 mA and 0.01 mA and under control conditions. Testing order was randomised. Stimulators that delivered subsensory stimulation to ankle muscles and ligaments were worn. Subjects were blinded to the test conditions, as SR stimulation was subsensory and stimulators were turned off during the control condition. Main outcome measures Anterior/posterior and medial/lateral centre‐of‐pressure velocities (COPVs) were combined to form a resultant vector (COPV‐R). The COPV‐R differences between the optimal SR stimulation and control conditions were analysed. Optimal SR stimulation was defined as the SR stimulation input intensity level (0.05 mA or 0.01 mA) that produced the greatest percentage improvement in postural stability compared with the control condition. Slower velocities indicated enhanced postural stability. Results The optimal input intensity was 0.05 mA for nine subjects and 0.01 mA for the other three. The optimal SR stimulation significantly (p<0.05) improved COPV‐R compared with the control condition (6.60 (1.06) vs 7.20 (1.03) cm/s; mean (SD)). Conclusion SR stimulation may enhance signal detection of sensorimotor signals associated with postural stability. This result has clinical relevance as improvements in postural instability associated with FAI may decrease ankle sprain injury. PMID:17550917

  8. Dynamic force distribution during level walking under the feet of patients with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Nyska, M; Shabat, S; Simkin, A; Neeb, M; Matan, Y; Mann, G

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To examine changes in the pattern of force transfer between the foot and the floor associated with chronically sprained ankles by measuring the peak forces and their timing under several regions of the feet during level walking. Methods: Twelve young male subjects (mean (SD) age 21 (2) years) with recurrent ankle sprains were studied. Seven of them had unilateral and bilateral chronic instability and laxity, and five had bilateral instability. Twelve healthy men (without orthopaedic or medical disease) served as a control group. Subjects walked at their own pace along a 7 m walkway, which included a Mini-EMED pressure distribution measuring system. The variables measured were relative peak force (fraction of body weight) and relative timing (fraction of stance time). These variables were measured under six regions of interest in each foot print: heel, midfoot, medial, central, and lateral forefoot, and toes. Results: (a) A significant delay to the time of peak force under the central and lateral forefoot and toes in subjects with chronic ankle instability. (b) A significant decrease in the relative forces under the heel and toes and an increase in the relative forces under the midfoot and lateral forefoot in subjects with chronic ankle instability. (c) In the patients with unilateral instability, there were no significant differences in any of the variables between the injured and non-injured foot. Conclusions: In patients with chronic ankle instability, there is a slowing down of weight transfer from heel strike to toe off, a reduced impact at the beginning and end of the stance phase, and a lateral shift of body weight. PMID:14665586

  9. Foot and ankle injuries during the Athens 2004 Olympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Badekas, Thanos; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Vergados, Nikolaos; Galanakos, Spyros P; Siapkara, Angeliki; Forgrave, Mike; Romansky, Nick; Mirones, Steven; Trnka, Hans-Jeorg; Delmi, Marino

    2009-01-01

    Background Major, rare and complex incidents can occur at any mass-gathering sporting event and team medical staff should be appropriately prepared for these. One such event, the Athens Olympic Games in 2004, presented a significant sporting and medical challenge. This study concerns an epidemiological analysis of foot and ankle injuries during the Games. Methods An observational, epidemiological survey was used to analyse injuries in all sport tournaments (men's and women's) over the period of the Games. Results A total of 624 injuries (525 soft tissue injuries and 99 bony injuries) were reported. The most frequent diagnoses were contusions, sprains, fractures, dislocations and lacerations. Significantly more injuries in male (58%) versus female athletes (42%) were recorded. The incidence, diagnosis and cause of injuries differed substantially between the team sports. Conclusion Our experience from the Athens Olympic Games will inform the development of public health surveillance systems for future Olympic Games, as well as other similar mass events. PMID:19361341

  10. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Painless swelling may affect both legs and may include the calves or ... of gravity makes the swelling most noticeable in the lower ...

  11. Risk of degenerative ankle joint disease in volleyball players: study of former elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Marti, B

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the influence of long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing on premature osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint, we examined a group of 22 former elite volleyball-players age (34 +/- 6 yrs.) who had played for at least 3 years in the highest volleyball league in Switzerland, and 19 normal healthy untrained controls (35 +/- 6 yrs.). Volleyball-athletes had played during an average of 5.5 (+/- 2) h/wk for 8.5 (+/- 3) yrs. Twenty of the 22 players had suffered from at least one ankle sprain (average: 3.5), 10 had had ruptures of the lateral ligaments (8 of them operated). Four players had severe mechanical instability, 5 a talar varus tilt in the stress X-ray of more than 8 degrees. Subchondral sclerosis and osteophytes were more prevalent in volleyballers than in controls (p < 0.001), while the difference in joint space was not significant. No severe grades of OA could be observed in these former elite volleyball players. Yet, a radiologic score of degenerative ankle disease was elevated in 19/22 of them, but only in 2/19 controls (p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis among athletes, the anterior drawer sign and a feeling of instability were the only significant and independent predictors of an increased radiological index (p = 0.003 and p = 0.02, respectively) from an initial set of 9 variables covering career length and intensity as volleyball player, clinical signs of ankle instability and age. Even if in the present study, athletes had clearly more radiologic findings than controls--such as spur formation and subchondral sclerosis--long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing alone could not be confirmed as an independent risk factor for OA of the ankle joint however, a combination of chronic lateral ankle instability with intensive volleyball playing could marginally increase the risk of ankle OA. PMID:10090465

  12. Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Robert F; Wahi, Monika M; Hill, Owen T; Kay, Ashley B

    2011-03-01

    Ankle and foot injuries (AFI) are a major cause of Active-Duty Army (ADA) soldiers' time lost from training and combat operations. We used the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database to compute the rates of AFI to identify high-risk ADA groups for the years 2000-2006. During this time, 16% of soldiers were clinically seen at least once for an AFI. Yearly, 60% to 70% of ADA soldiers with AFI had an ankle sprain/strain, and ankle sprain/strain had the highest 7-year rate of all AFIs (103 per 1,000). From 2000 to 2006, all AFI rates declined; however, enlisted male soldiers < or = 30 years of age without an advanced degree were at highest risk. A history of an AFI in the previous 2 years increased AFI rates by 93% to 160%. Our findings provide preliminary evidence for identifying specific ADA groups at high risk of AFI; these groups should be targeted for preventive interventions. PMID:21456354

  13. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  14. Proactive and reactive neuromuscular control in subjects with chronic ankle instability: evidence from a pilot study on landing.

    PubMed

    Levin, Oron; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Thijsen, Jo R J; Helsen, Werner F; Staes, Filip F; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    To understand why subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have frequent sprains, one must study the preparation/reactions of these subjects to situations related to ankle inversion in real life. In the present pilot study, we examined whether subjects with CAI altered their neuromuscular control and reflex responses during and after ankle perturbations in landing. EMG signals were collected from the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and gluteus medius (GLM) of both legs in 9 subjects with CAI and 9 subjects with intact ankles (control). A trapdoor was used to produce an ankle inversion of 25° with the left leg (control) or the affected leg (CAI) in 0%, 50% or 100% of the landing trials. As compared to controls, subjects with CAI had increased proactive activity in the contralateral side prior to touchdown during landing trials with 50% (PL) and 100% (PL and MG) chance of inversion (all, p < 0.05). The increase proactive control on the contralateral side could be part of a strategy to smooth the impact of landing on the affected side in subjects with CAI. Following touchdown, the CAI group showed decreased ipsilateral short latency reflex (SLR) responses in all test conditions both in distal (PL and MG) and in proximal muscles (GLM) on the affected side (all, p < 0.05). Finally, subjects with CAI adjusted their reflex gain differently as compared to controls when exposed to a possible inversion. Overall, individuals with CAI displayed different neuromuscular strategies from controls while landing. PMID:25439444

  15. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes.

  16. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  17. Neck sprains after road traffic accidents: a modern epidemic.

    PubMed

    Galasko, C S; Murray, P M; Pitcher, M; Chambers, H; Mansfield, S; Madden, M; Jordon, C; Kinsella, A; Hodson, M

    1993-03-01

    This study was carried out to determine the incidence of soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine after road traffic accidents and to assess whether the incidence had changed with time. The results show that there has been a progressive increase since 1982 in the number of patients seen in accident and emergency departments with a neck sprain after road traffic accidents. The results suggest that the increase is not necessarily due to the introduction of seat belts, but that the relentless increasing epidemic may be due to other factors.

  18. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided.

  19. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  20. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI. PMID:26180349

  1. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Matthew D; Baca, John; Arbuckle, Keith

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedures have been described for many years. New technological advances and a deeper understanding of the pathobiomechanics involved in chronic lateral ankle instability have allowed an expansion of arthroscopic approaches to this common pathology. As experience is gained and outcomes within the patient profile are understood, the authors feel that the arthroscopic approach to lateral ankle stabilization may prove superior to traditional methods secondary to the risk and traditional complications that are mitigated within minimally invasive arthroscopic approaches. Additionally, the arthroscopic approach may allow a quicker return to ballistic sport and decrease time for rehabilitation. PMID:27599440

  3. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the ankle. This condition often... Barefoot Running Barefoot running is running while barefoot, without wearing any shoes on the feet. Running in thin-soled, flexible shoes is related but ...

  4. Neuromuscular Risk Factors for Knee and Ankle Ligament Injuries in Male Youth Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Read, Paul J; Oliver, Jon L; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Myer, Gregory D; Lloyd, Rhodri S

    2016-08-01

    Injuries reported in male youth soccer players most commonly occur in the lower extremities, and include a high proportion of ligament sprains at the ankle and knee with a lower proportion of overuse injuries. There is currently a paucity of available literature that examines age- and sex-specific injury risk factors for such injuries within youth soccer players. Epidemiological data have reported movements that lead to non-contact ligament injury include running, twisting and turning, over-reaching and landing. Altered neuromuscular control during these actions has been suggested as a key mechanism in females and adult populations; however, data available in male soccer players is sparse. The focus of this article is to review the available literature and elucidate prevalent risk factors pertaining to male youth soccer players which may contribute to their relative risk of injury. PMID:26856339

  5. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  6. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  7. Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Thomas; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions is widely accepted in some parts of the world, but not in others. Their main attraction is their potential to provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. Objectives To review the evidence from randomised, double-blind, controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute pain. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and our own in-house database to December 2009. We sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching on-line clinical trial registers and manufacturers web sites. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, active or placebo (inert carrier)-controlled trials in which treatments were administered to adult patients with acute pain resulting from strains, sprains or sports or overuse-type injuries (twisted ankle, for instance). There had to be at least 10 participants in each treatment arm, with application of treatment at least once daily. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Forty-seven studies were included; most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar placebo, with 3455 participants in the overall analysis of efficacy. For all topical NSAIDs combined, compared with placebo, the number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) for clinical success, equivalent to 50% pain relief, was 4.5 (3.9 to 5.3) for treatment periods of 6 to 14 days. Topical diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and piroxicam were of similar efficacy, but indomethacin and benzydamine were not significantly better than placebo. Local skin reactions were generally mild and transient, and did not differ from

  8. Comparative study of therapies for fibular ligament rupture of the lateral ankle joint in competitive basketball players.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Höher, J; Tiling, T

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study compares the results of different therapies for fibular ligament rupture in a homogenous group of professional athletes. The endpoint "competitive sports" was an outcome consideration. Subjects were examined by means of a standardized questionnaire and a structured interview. One hundred and seventy-nine of the questionnaires were completed and returned for evaluation. All of the basketball players with severe ankle sprain (supination trauma with swelling, pain, and inability to bear stress) were included. Those players with fractures of the foot, pronation trauma, or additional distal fibula or tibia fractures were excluded from this study. Of the 179 basketball players 160 (89%) had suffered severe ankle sprain. The treatment was divided into three groups: primary surgery (N = 35), plaster cast (N = 39), and functional treatment (N = 89). While simple ligament injuries (Grade I and II) were mostly treated functionally, complex ligament injuries (Grade III) were usually operated on. A total of 119 (74%) of the players reported no further pain. For pain reduction surgical and functional treatments showed advantages over plaster treatment. In the surgical group 63% of the players judged their regained stability to be equivalent to that of their healthy leg. Only 50% of the players in the plaster and functional groups believed their ankle joints to have regained the same stability as before their injuries. Despite the achievement of good results through surgery, there were clear differences in the players' assessments of their performance in competitive sports. Most subjects (92%) did not have any problems in everyday life regardless of which kind of therapy had been chosen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The origin of the ankle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codino, Antonio; Plouin, Francois

    2007-03-01

    The differential intensity of cosmic radiation shows a sequence of depressions referred to as knees in a large energy band above 1015eV. The global depression entailed in the complete spectrum with respect to the extrapolated intensity based on low energy data, amounts to a maximum factor of 8, occurring at 5×10eV, where flux measurements exhibit a relative minimum, referred to as the ankle. It is demonstrated by a full simulation of cosmic ray trajectories in the Galaxy that the intensity minimum around the ankle energy is primarily due to the nuclear interactions of the cosmic ions with the interstellar matter and to the galactic magnetic field. Ankles signal the onset energies of the rectilinear propagation in the Milky Way at Earth, being for example, 4×10eV for helium and 6×10eV for iron. The ankle, in spite of its notable importance at Earth, is a local perturbation of the universal spectrum which, between the knee and the ankle, decreases by a round factor 109 regaining its unperturbed status above 1019eV.

  10. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. PMID:27291681

  11. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management.

  12. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes.

  13. The foot and ankle examination.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Vanushkina, Maria A; Richardson, Nicholas G; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Most foot and ankle disorders can be diagnosed after a proper history and clinical examination and can be effectively managed in a primary care setting. It is important to assess the entirety of patient disorders that present as they can be multifactorial in cause. A broad differential should include disorders of bones, joints, muscles, neurovasculature, and surrounding soft tissue structures. Physical examination should be thorough and focused on inspection, palpation, range of motion, and appropriate special tests when applicable. This article highlights some of the salient features of the foot and ankle examination and diagnostic considerations.

  14. Closed posteromedial dislocation of the tibiotalar joint without fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Uyar, M; Tan, A; Işler, M; Cetinus, E

    2004-06-01

    Acute ankle injury is one of the most common problems in sports medicine. Although most are ankle sprains, dislocations are occasionally seen. The case is presented of a closed posteromedial ankle dislocation without fracture which occurred during a basketball match. The literature is also reviewed.

  15. Neck sprain not arising from car accidents: a retrospective study covering 25 years.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Kingma, J; Meijler, W J; ten Duis, H J

    1998-01-01

    During the 25-year period 1970-1994, 680 patients were diagnosed with neck sprain due to causes other than car accidents at the Emergency Room of the University Hospital Groningen. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the prevalence, groups at risk and trends in patients with neck sprain. We defined the population as patients diagnosed with neck sprain that was not due to a car accident (NCA). The binominal test was used to obtain measures of statistical significance, deltax was used to obtain both the total increase in the number of neck sprain victims over the whole period (1970-1994) and the relative contribution of successive 5-year periods. Over the 25-year period a steady increase in the number of patients was observed from 55 in 1970-1974 to 241 in 1990-1994. The highest prevalence was found among 15- to 19-year-olds (3.92 per 10,000), followed by 10- to 14-year-olds (3.40 per 10,000). The major causes of neck sprain NCA were accidental falls (25%), sports injuries (24%) and bicycling injuries. Across the life span, the male: female ratio was 0.63. Ten percent of patients were treated as inpatients. The increase in neck sprain NCA can be only partly attributed to increased media attention. The reduction of working hours resulting in more leisure time activities, which in turn increases the exposure time in at risk situations, and the awareness of both patients and physicians is discussed.

  16. Neck sprain not arising from car accidents: a retrospective study covering 25 years.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Kingma, J; Meijler, W J; ten Duis, H J

    1998-01-01

    During the 25-year period 1970-1994, 680 patients were diagnosed with neck sprain due to causes other than car accidents at the Emergency Room of the University Hospital Groningen. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the prevalence, groups at risk and trends in patients with neck sprain. We defined the population as patients diagnosed with neck sprain that was not due to a car accident (NCA). The binominal test was used to obtain measures of statistical significance, deltax was used to obtain both the total increase in the number of neck sprain victims over the whole period (1970-1994) and the relative contribution of successive 5-year periods. Over the 25-year period a steady increase in the number of patients was observed from 55 in 1970-1974 to 241 in 1990-1994. The highest prevalence was found among 15- to 19-year-olds (3.92 per 10,000), followed by 10- to 14-year-olds (3.40 per 10,000). The major causes of neck sprain NCA were accidental falls (25%), sports injuries (24%) and bicycling injuries. Across the life span, the male: female ratio was 0.63. Ten percent of patients were treated as inpatients. The increase in neck sprain NCA can be only partly attributed to increased media attention. The reduction of working hours resulting in more leisure time activities, which in turn increases the exposure time in at risk situations, and the awareness of both patients and physicians is discussed. PMID:9684952

  17. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  18. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  19. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction.

  20. Ankle and knee kinetics between strike patterns at common training speeds in competitive male runners.

    PubMed

    Kuhman, Daniel; Melcher, Daniel; Paquette, Max R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of foot strike and common speeds on sagittal plane ankle and knee joint kinetics in competitive rear foot strike (RFS) runners when running with a RFS pattern and an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) pattern. Sixteen competitive habitual male RFS runners ran at two different speeds (i.e. 8 and 6 min mile(-1)) using their habitual RFS and an imposed FFS pattern. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess a potential interaction between strike pattern and speed for selected ground reaction force (GRF) variables and, sagittal plane ankle and knee kinematic and kinetic variables. No foot strike and speed interaction was observed for any of the kinetic variables. Habitual RFS yielded a greater loading rate of the vertical GRF, peak ankle dorsiflexor moment, peak knee extensor moment, peak knee eccentric extensor power, peak dorsiflexion and sagittal plane knee range of motion compared to imposed FFS. Imposed FFS yielded greater maximum vertical GRF, peak ankle plantarflexor moment, peak ankle eccentric plantarflexor power and sagittal plane ankle ROM compared to habitual RFS. Consistent with previous literature, imposed FFS in habitual RFS reduces eccentric knee extensor and ankle dorsiflexor involvement but produce greater eccentric ankle plantarflexor action compared to RFS. These acute differences between strike patterns were independent of running speeds equivalent to typical easy and hard training runs in competitive male runners. Current findings along with previous literature suggest differences in lower extremity kinetics between habitual RFS and imposed FFS running are consistent among a variety of runner populations.

  1. Ankle and knee kinetics between strike patterns at common training speeds in competitive male runners.

    PubMed

    Kuhman, Daniel; Melcher, Daniel; Paquette, Max R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of foot strike and common speeds on sagittal plane ankle and knee joint kinetics in competitive rear foot strike (RFS) runners when running with a RFS pattern and an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) pattern. Sixteen competitive habitual male RFS runners ran at two different speeds (i.e. 8 and 6 min mile(-1)) using their habitual RFS and an imposed FFS pattern. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess a potential interaction between strike pattern and speed for selected ground reaction force (GRF) variables and, sagittal plane ankle and knee kinematic and kinetic variables. No foot strike and speed interaction was observed for any of the kinetic variables. Habitual RFS yielded a greater loading rate of the vertical GRF, peak ankle dorsiflexor moment, peak knee extensor moment, peak knee eccentric extensor power, peak dorsiflexion and sagittal plane knee range of motion compared to imposed FFS. Imposed FFS yielded greater maximum vertical GRF, peak ankle plantarflexor moment, peak ankle eccentric plantarflexor power and sagittal plane ankle ROM compared to habitual RFS. Consistent with previous literature, imposed FFS in habitual RFS reduces eccentric knee extensor and ankle dorsiflexor involvement but produce greater eccentric ankle plantarflexor action compared to RFS. These acute differences between strike patterns were independent of running speeds equivalent to typical easy and hard training runs in competitive male runners. Current findings along with previous literature suggest differences in lower extremity kinetics between habitual RFS and imposed FFS running are consistent among a variety of runner populations. PMID:26371382

  2. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  3. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons are ...

  4. Which ankle fractures require syndesmotic stabilization?

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Lamme, Bas; Hogervorst, Mike; Bolhuis, Hugo W

    2007-01-01

    Syndesmotic ruptures associated with ankle fractures are most commonly caused by external rotation of the foot, eversion of the talus within the ankle mortise, and excessive dorsiflexion. The distal tibiofibular syndesmosis consists of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and interosseous ligament, and it is essential for stability of the ankle mortise. Despite the numerous biomechanical and clinical studies pertaining to ankle fractures, there are no uniform recommendations regarding the use of the syndesmotic screw for specific injury patterns and fracture types. The objective of this review was to formulate recommendations for clinical practice related to the use of syndesmotic screw placement. PMID:17980843

  5. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  6. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E.; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice. PMID:27134529

  7. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  8. Nonoperative management of athletic ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Vegso, J J; Harmon, L E

    1982-03-01

    Few injuries in sports are more ubiquitous than those involving the ankle. Athletes in some endeavors, notably football and basketball, routinely have their ankles prophylactically taped at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars and, probably, millions of man hours. Other sports, such as skiing, involve encasement of the foot, ankle and lower leg in plastic and foam to the extent of almost complete exclusion of motion. In spite of these rather heroic measures, ankle injuries continue to constitute a significant threat to athletes in these and most other activities.

  9. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  10. Current concepts review: ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Arastu, M H; Demcoe, R; Buckley, R E

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries that require meticulous technique in order to optimise outcome. The Lauge-Hansen and Danis-Weber classifications in addition to careful evaluation of the injury mechanism can help guide treatment but surgeons must be aware that there are injury patterns that will not always fit the afore mentioned patterns. The principles of atraumatic soft tissue handling, rigid internal fixation and early range of motion exercises are critical for successfully treating these injuries. There are still areas of treatment uncertainty and future directed research is needed in order to address some of these questions.

  11. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  12. Trunk-Rotation Differences at Maximal Reach of the Star Excursion Balance Test in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    de la Motte, Sarah; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Functional reach on the Star Excursion Balance Test is decreased in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). However, comprehensive 3-dimensional kinematics associated with these deficits have not been reported. Objective: To determine if lower extremity kinematics differed in CAI participants during anteromedial, medial, and posteromedial reach on the Star Excursion Balance Test. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty CAI participants (age = 24.15 ± 3.84 years, height = 168.95 ± 11.57 cm, mass = 68.95 ± 16.29 kg) and 20 uninjured participants (age = 25.65 ± 5.58 years, height = 170.14 ± 8.75 cm, mass = 69.89 ± 10.51 kg) with no history of ankle sprain. We operationally defined CAI as repeated episodes of ankle “giving way” or “rolling over” or both, regardless of neuromuscular deficits or pathologic laxity. All CAI participants scored ≤26 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Intervention(s): Star Excursion Balance Test reaches in the anteromedial, medial, and posteromedial directions. The CAI participants used the unstable side as the stance leg. Control participants were sex, height, mass, and side matched to the CAI group. The 3-dimensional kinematics were assessed with a motion-capture system. Main Outcome Measure(s): Group differences on normalized reach distance, trunk, pelvis, and hip-, knee-, and ankle-joint angles at maximum Star Excursion Balance Test reach. Results: No reach-distance differences were detected between CAI and uninjured participants in any of the 3 reach directions. With anteromedial reach, trunk rotation (t1,38 = 3.06, P = .004), pelvic rotation (t1,38 = 3.17, P = .003), and hip flexion (t1,38 = 2.40, P = .002) were greater in CAI participants. With medial reach, trunk flexion (t1,38 = 6.39, P = .05) was greater than for uninjured participants. No differences were seen with posteromedial reach. Conclusions: We did not detect

  13. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  14. From the RSNA Refresher Courses. Radiological Society of North America. MR imaging of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Z S; Beltran, J; Bencardino, J T

    2000-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has opened new horizons in the diagnosis and treatment of many musculoskeletal diseases of the ankle and foot. It demonstrates abnormalities in the bones and soft tissues before they become evident at other imaging modalities. The exquisite soft-tissue contrast resolution, noninvasive nature, and multiplanar capabilities of MR imaging make it especially valuable for the detection and assessment of a variety of soft-tissue disorders of the ligaments (eg, sprain), tendons (tendinosis, peritendinosis, tenosynovitis, entrapment, rupture, dislocation), and other soft-tissue structures (eg, anterolateral impingement syndrome, sinus tarsi syndrome, compressive neuropathies [eg, tarsal tunnel syndrome, Morton neuroma], synovial disorders). MR imaging has also been shown to be highly sensitive in the detection and staging of a number of musculoskeletal infections including cellulitis, soft-tissue abscesses, and osteomyelitis. In addition, MR imaging is excellent for the early detection and assessment of a number of osseous abnormalities such as bone contusions, stress and insufficiency fractures, osteochondral fractures, osteonecrosis, and transient bone marrow edema. MR imaging is increasingly being recognized as the modality of choice for assessment of pathologic conditions of the ankle and foot.

  15. A new jump-landing protocol identifies differences in healthy, coper, and unstable ankles in collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Dierkes, Caitlin; Blair, Logan

    2016-09-01

    Ankle sprains are the most common injury in sport. With stability being an important risk factor for ankle sprains, a jump-landing protocol that can elicit differences in time-to-stabilisation (TTS) is necessary. The objective of this study was to develop a jump-landing protocol that could identify differences in TTS among healthy, 'coper', and unstable ankles of high-level athletes. 61 Division I collegiate athletes (32 females, 29 males; age: 19.9 ± 1.2 years; height: 176.6 ± 9.5 cm; mass: 74.3 ± 10.8 kg) participated in a jump-landing protocol that utilised sporting movements with preparatory steps and a vertical propulsion of the body in two multi-directional jumps. Utilising the landing on a force plate, ground reaction forces were used to quantify TTS. TTS of the unstable group (1.58 ± 0.62s) was significantly longer than the healthy (1.19 ± 0.37s; p = 0.050) and 'coper' (1.13 ± 0.49s; p = 0.019) groups in the forward hops. In addition, TTS of the lateral hops in the unstable group (1.55 ± 0.63s) was also significantly longer than the healthy (1.14 ± 0.37s; p = 0.026) and 'coper' (1.15 ± 0.39s; p = 0.028) groups. This new jump-landing protocol was able to elicit differences in TTS in high-level athletes that were not found using previous protocols. This new jump-landing protocol could be an effective tool to identify injury risk for high-level athletes. PMID:27194616

  16. Influence of a previous neck sprain on recovery after whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Nee, Patrick A

    2008-12-01

    The impact of a previous neck sprain on recovery from whiplash injury is unknown as published studies have produced conflicting results. This article reviews the literature on the prognosis of a second whiplash injury, distinguishing between previous injuries with and without complete recovery. The best available evidence suggests that a previous injury with incomplete recovery represents an adverse prognostic indicator. However, where there has been complete recovery, the prior injury does not influence the prognosis.

  17. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  18. MRI of cerebrum and cervical columna within two days after whiplash neck sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G; Smevik, O; Haave, I; Haraldseth, O; Nordby, A; Lereim, I

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate if MRI within 2 days of a motor vehicle accident could reveal pathology of importance for understanding long-term disability after whiplash neck-sprain injuries. As part of a prospective study cervical and cerebral MRI was performed on 40 neck sprain patients with whiplash injury after car accidents. The imaging was done within 2 days of the injury to make sure that any neck muscle bleeding, oedema or other soft tissue injuries could be detected. The MRI findings from the patients were both correlated to reported symptoms 6 months after the accident and compared to a control group of 20 volunteers. The MRI of both brain and neck revealed no significant differences between the patients and the control group. When the patients were grouped according to the main MRI findings at intake and compared according to the development of subjective symptoms reported by the patients, the only significant difference was more headaches at 6 months in the groups with disk pathology or spondylosis when compared to the group with no pathology. In conclusion, MRI within 2 days of the whiplash neck-sprain injury could not detect pathology connected to the injury nor predict symptom development and outcome. PMID:9764227

  19. Sprain of the neck: quality of life and psychological functioning. A 4-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Dijkstra, P U; Jaspers, J P C; Meijler, W J; ten Duis, H J; Klip, E C

    2003-05-01

    Aim of the study was to analyse quality of life and psychological functioning in patients with sprain of the neck, to analyse the relationship between complaints, quality of life, psychological functioning and personality factors, and to analyse the profile of patients with whiplash associated disorders (WAD), 4 years after trauma. From the University Hospital Groningen 193 patients with the diagnose sprain of the neck filled out a questionnaire. Of this group 100 subjects did not have complaints before the accident and were therefore at risk for the development of complaints as a result of sprain of the neck. Quality of life and psychological functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 and the SCL-90, respectively. Personality was assessed by means of the Dutch Personality Questionnaire. Of the group at risk (56% women and 44% men, mean age: 33.9, SD: 14.6) quality of life was significantly worse in subjects with complaints (mean: 78.4, SD: 15.5) compared to subjects without complaints (mean: 87.5, SD: 8.7). Psychological functioning did not differ significantly between the group with complaints compared to group without complaints. Personality did not differ between the groups. Personality and complaints together were significantly related to quality of life (r: 0.77) and psychological functioning (r: 0.85). No specific profile of WAD patients was found. In conclusion, personality and complaints influence quality of life and psychological functioning to a considerable extent.

  20. MRI of cerebrum and cervical columna within two days after whiplash neck sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Borchgrevink, G; Smevik, O; Haave, I; Haraldseth, O; Nordby, A; Lereim, I

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate if MRI within 2 days of a motor vehicle accident could reveal pathology of importance for understanding long-term disability after whiplash neck-sprain injuries. As part of a prospective study cervical and cerebral MRI was performed on 40 neck sprain patients with whiplash injury after car accidents. The imaging was done within 2 days of the injury to make sure that any neck muscle bleeding, oedema or other soft tissue injuries could be detected. The MRI findings from the patients were both correlated to reported symptoms 6 months after the accident and compared to a control group of 20 volunteers. The MRI of both brain and neck revealed no significant differences between the patients and the control group. When the patients were grouped according to the main MRI findings at intake and compared according to the development of subjective symptoms reported by the patients, the only significant difference was more headaches at 6 months in the groups with disk pathology or spondylosis when compared to the group with no pathology. In conclusion, MRI within 2 days of the whiplash neck-sprain injury could not detect pathology connected to the injury nor predict symptom development and outcome.

  1. [Biomechanics of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1989-03-01

    According to Fick, the tree-dimensional patterns of foot motion are best characterized as jawlike movement. Anatomically and biomechanically, this process represents conjoined, synchronous motion within the three mobile segments of the hindfoot: the ankle joint, the posterior subtalar joint, and the anterior subtalar joint. Foot kinematics can be described more completely if the anterior subtalar joint is defined not only as the talocalcaneal navicular joint, but as including the calcaneocuboid joint, thus representing the transverse joint of the tarsus, i.e., the Chopart joint. The axes of these three joints can be defined precisely. In some parts they represent a screwlike motion, clockwise or counter-clockwise, around the central ligamentous structures (fibulotibial ligament, talocalcaneal interosseous ligament, bifurcate ligament). The individual anatomy and structure of these ligaments provide variations in the degree and direction of foot motion. A precise knowledge of foot kinematics is important in surgical ligament and joint reconstruction and in selective foot arthrodeses.

  2. Sonographic anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Precerutti, M; Bonardi, M; Ferrozzi, G; Draghi, F

    2014-06-01

    Ankle sonography is one of the most commonly ordered examinations in the field of osteoarticular imaging, and it requires intimate knowledge of the anatomic structures that make up the joint. For practical purposes, the examination can be divided into four compartments, which are analyzed in this pictorial essay: the anterior compartment, which includes the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor digitorum longus tendons; the accessory peroneus tertius tendon; and the extensor retinaculum; the medial compartment (tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons; the flexor retinaculum; the medial collateral-or deltoid-ligament, and the neurovascular bundle); the lateral compartment (peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and peroneus quartus tendons; superior and inferior peroneal retinacula, lateral collateral ligament); and the posterior compartment (Achilles tendon, plantaris tendon, Kagar's triangle, superficial, and deep retrocalcaneal bursae). Scanning techniques are briefly described to ensure optimal visualization of the various anatomic structures.

  3. Sonographic anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Precerutti, M; Bonardi, M; Ferrozzi, G; Draghi, F

    2014-06-01

    Ankle sonography is one of the most commonly ordered examinations in the field of osteoarticular imaging, and it requires intimate knowledge of the anatomic structures that make up the joint. For practical purposes, the examination can be divided into four compartments, which are analyzed in this pictorial essay: the anterior compartment, which includes the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor digitorum longus tendons; the accessory peroneus tertius tendon; and the extensor retinaculum; the medial compartment (tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus tendons; the flexor retinaculum; the medial collateral-or deltoid-ligament, and the neurovascular bundle); the lateral compartment (peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and peroneus quartus tendons; superior and inferior peroneal retinacula, lateral collateral ligament); and the posterior compartment (Achilles tendon, plantaris tendon, Kagar's triangle, superficial, and deep retrocalcaneal bursae). Scanning techniques are briefly described to ensure optimal visualization of the various anatomic structures. PMID:24883130

  4. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  5. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field Hockey Football Injuries Golf Injuries Lacrosse Rugby Running Soccer Softball Tennis Volleyball Find an ACFAS Physician ... Foot and Ankle Although golf does not involve running or jumping, injuries can occur to the foot ...

  6. Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... quality of life can suffer as they lose mobility," added Willett. He is a professor of orthopedics, ... two groups in terms of pain, ankle motion, mobility or quality of life, the study found. Patients ...

  7. Can textured insoles improve ankle proprioception and performance in dancers?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Begg, Rezaul; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-08-01

    With the aim of determining both the acute and the chronic effects of textured insoles on the ankle discrimination and performance ability of dancers, 60 ballet dancers from the Australian Ballet School, aged 14-19 years, were divided into three groups (two intervention groups and a control group), age- and level-matched. In the first 5 weeks (weeks 1 to 5), the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their ballet shoes and the second intervention group (GRP2) was not given textured insoles to wear. In the next 5 weeks (weeks 6 to 10), GRP2 was asked to wear the same type of textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. The control group (CTRL) did not wear textured insoles during the whole 10 weeks. All participants were tested preintervention, after 5 weeks and after 10 weeks for ankle discrimination score (AUC scores). Dance performance was assessed by 5-7 dance teachers. Pre-to-post change in AUC scores was significantly greater for the groups wearing insoles than for the controls (P = .046) and the size of pre-to-post changes did not differ between the two intervention groups (P = .834). Significant correlation was found between ankle discrimination score and performance scores, using the textured insoles (r = .412; P = .024). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for five weeks was sufficient to improve the proprioceptive ability and performance ability of ballet dancers.

  8. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  9. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  10. Complex ankle arthrodesis: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Remy V; Haleem, Amgad M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2015-01-01

    Complex ankle arthrodesis is defined as an ankle fusion that is at high risk of delayed and nonunion secondary to patient comorbidities and/or local ankle/hindfoot factors. Risk factors that contribute to defining this group of patients can be divided into systemic factors and local factors pertaining to co-existing ankle or hindfoot pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of these risk factors and their association with patients’ outcomes after complex ankle fusions. Both external and internal fixations have demonstrated positive outcomes with regards to achieving stable fixation and minimizing infection. Recent innovations in the application of biophysical agents and devices have shown promising results as adjuncts for healing. Both osteoconductive and osteoinductive agents have been effectively utilized as biological adjuncts for bone healing with low complication rates. Devices such as pulsed electromagnetic field bone stimulators, internal direct current stimulators and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound bone stimulators have been associated with faster bone healing and improved outcomes scores when compared with controls. The aim of this review article is to present a comprehensive approach to the management of complex ankle fusions, including the use of biophysical adjuncts for healing and a proposed algorithm for their treatment. PMID:26396936

  11. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  12. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  13. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  14. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  15. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenxin; Feng, Tienan; Wang, Lejun; Jiang, Chenghua; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs) may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2) and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2) during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1) the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2) the subject number and trial number were known; 3) the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4) the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5) the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6) the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject's body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05) and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71) and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65) with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane. Key pointsPAS can effectively protect the ligamentous structure from spraining by providing mechanical support and cutaneous proprioceptive benefits.Using of PAS can

  16. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wenxin; Feng, Tienan; Wang, Lejun; Jiang, Chenghua; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs) may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2) and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2) during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1) the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2) the subject number and trial number were known; 3) the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4) the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5) the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6) the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject’s body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05) and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71) and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65) with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane. Key points PAS can effectively protect the ligamentous structure from spraining by providing mechanical support and cutaneous proprioceptive benefits. Using of PAS can

  17. Resting Doppler ankle brachial pressure index measurement: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sihlangu, Dorcus; Bliss, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is under-diagnosed in primary and acute settings. The use of Doppler ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) is effective in diagnosing PVD , aid in determining aetiology of leg ulcers and is cost efficient in reducing the effects of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The aim of this literature review was to review practitioners' experience in using Doppler ABPI, different skills used to measure ABPI and to examine practitioners' confidence in ABPI. The findings identified variation in method for Doppler measurement: including position of the artery, arm measurement, resting period and type of equipment for measuring blood pressure, variations in practitioners' training and experience have demonstrated variability in ABPI results. Although limited in number, the studies have demonstrated knowledge gap, and the need for training among health professionals. PMID:22875182

  18. Primary meningococcal septic arthritis of the ankle joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christopher; Tandon, Tarang; Avasthi, Adish; Jerwood, Susie; Rao, Biyyam M; Cavanagh, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a healthy 18-year-old female who presented with history of an acute onset, painful, swollen right ankle joint. Microbiologic samples from the ankle aspirate grew Neisseria meningitidis. She had had no previous contact with a patient with meningitis nor any existing or preceding clinical symptoms of meningitis. She was treated with surgical drainage with mini-open arthrotomy and a repeat washout at 48 hours. The identification of the organism was expedited using the Analytical Profiling Index (bioMérieux UK, Basingstoke, UK). Our patient was treated with 2 weeks of third-generation cephalosporin antibiotics. At the final follow-up visit, the inflammatory markers had returned to normal, with a normal ankle joint and no evidence of long-term sequelae of septic arthritis. Primary septic arthritis with N. meningitidis is exceptionally rare in the adult population and has been most often reported in the knee. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary septic arthritis of the native adult ankle joint in a healthy individual due to N. meningitides that was diagnosed and treated appropriately with no residual sequelae of the disease.

  19. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  20. Unsupported standing with minimized ankle muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2004-08-01

    In the past, limited unsupported standing has been restored in patients with thoracic spinal cord injury through open-loop functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed knee extensor muscles and the support of intact arm musculature. Here an optimal control system for paralyzed ankle muscles was designed that enables the subject to stand without hand support in a sagittal plane. The paraplegic subject was conceptualized as an underactuated double inverted pendulum structure with an active degree of freedom in the upper trunk and a passive degree of freedom in the paralyzed ankle joints. Control system design is based on the minimization of a cost function that estimates the effort of ankle joint muscles via observation of the ground reaction force position, relative to ankle joint axis. Furthermore, such a control system integrates voluntary upper trunk activity and artificial control of ankle joint muscles, resulting in a robust standing posture. Figures are shown for the initial simulation study, followed by disturbance tests on an intact volunteer and several laboratory trials with a paraplegic person. Benefits of the presented methodology are prolonged standing sessions and in the fact that the subject is able to maintain voluntary control over upper body orientation in space, enabling simple functional standing. PMID:15311817

  1. Unsupported standing with minimized ankle muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2004-08-01

    In the past, limited unsupported standing has been restored in patients with thoracic spinal cord injury through open-loop functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed knee extensor muscles and the support of intact arm musculature. Here an optimal control system for paralyzed ankle muscles was designed that enables the subject to stand without hand support in a sagittal plane. The paraplegic subject was conceptualized as an underactuated double inverted pendulum structure with an active degree of freedom in the upper trunk and a passive degree of freedom in the paralyzed ankle joints. Control system design is based on the minimization of a cost function that estimates the effort of ankle joint muscles via observation of the ground reaction force position, relative to ankle joint axis. Furthermore, such a control system integrates voluntary upper trunk activity and artificial control of ankle joint muscles, resulting in a robust standing posture. Figures are shown for the initial simulation study, followed by disturbance tests on an intact volunteer and several laboratory trials with a paraplegic person. Benefits of the presented methodology are prolonged standing sessions and in the fact that the subject is able to maintain voluntary control over upper body orientation in space, enabling simple functional standing.

  2. Cervical sprains, disc herniations, minor fractures, and other cervical injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Zmurko, Matthew G; Tannoury, Tony Y; Tannoury, Chadi A; Anderson, D Greg

    2003-07-01

    In today's health-conscious society, more people are participating in athletic endeavors. As participation increases, so does the incidence of cervical injuries. Fortunately, most of the cervical injuries seen in sports are minor and can be treated successfully with minimal morbidity. It is important, however, to accurately assess the patient sustaining a cervical injury to rule out the presence of a more severe cervical injury. When practitioners understand the pathophysiology and treatment of common injuries, including sprains, strains, contusions, disc herniations, and simple fractures, most athletes can be returned to full function.

  3. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anindo; Bever, Christopher T.; Forrester, Larry W.; Macko, Richard F.; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults. PMID:21346215

  4. Arthrometric Measurement of Ankle-Complex Motion: Normative Values

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Neil A.; Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Gubler-Hanna, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Valid and reliable measurements of ankle-complex motion have been reported using the Hollis Ankle Arthrometer. No published normative data of ankle-complex motion obtained from ankle arthrometry are available for use as a reference for clinical decision making. Objective: To describe the distribution variables of ankle-complex motion in uninjured ankles and to establish normative reference values for use in research and to assist in clinical decision making. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both ankles of 50 men and 50 women (age = 21.78 ± 2.0 years [range, 19–25 years]) were tested. Intervention(s): Each ankle underwent anteroposterior (AP) and inversion-eversion (I-E) loading using an ankle arthrometer. Main Outcome Measure(s): Recorded anterior, posterior, and total AP displacement (millimeters) at 125 N and inversion, eversion, and total I-E rotation (degrees) at 4 Nm. Results: Women had greater ankle-complex motion for all variables except for posterior displacement. Total AP displacement of the ankle complex was 18.79 ± 4.1 mm for women and 16.70 ± 4.8 mm for men (U = 3742.5, P < .01). Total I-E rotation of the ankle complex was 42.10° ± 9.0° for women and 34.13° ± 10.1° for men (U = 2807, P < .001). All variables were normally distributed except for anterior displacement, inversion rotation, eversion rotation, and total I-E rotation in the women's ankles and eversion rotation in the men's ankles; these variables were skewed positively. Conclusions: Our study increases the available database on ankle-complex motion, and it forms the basis of norm-referenced clinical comparisons and the basis on which quantitative definitions of ankle pathologic conditions can be developed. PMID:21391797

  5. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed Central

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage. PMID:20151110

  6. Interpretation of the ankle in UHECR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    Ankle is a flattening in CR spectrum observed first in Volcano Ranch experiment in 1963 at E _{a} ˜ 10 EeV, and it was interpreted as transition from galactic to extragalactic CRs. Since that time the ankle was observed in all large UHECR detectors and most recently in HiRes, TA and Auger detectors at E _{a} ˜ 4 - 5 EeV. At present there are two interpretations of the ankle: as transition from galactic to extragalactic CRs (the conventional interpretation) and as a part of the dip, produced by extragalactic protons interacting with the CMB photons. These two interpretations will be discussed in the light of recent observations and models of UHECR origin.

  7. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  8. Ankle osteoarthritis: etiology, diagnostics, and classification.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Pagenstert, Geert I; Hügle, Thomas; Gloyer, Marcel; Wiewiorski, Martin; Henninger, Heath B; Valderrabano, Victor

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is defined as the syndrome of joint pain and dysfunction caused by substantial joint degeneration. In general, OA is the most common joint disease and is one of the most frequent and symptomatic health problems for middle-aged and older people: OA disables more than 10% of people who are older than 60 years. This article reviews the etiology of ankle OA, and describes the onset and development of posttraumatic ankle OA, the most common form of OA in the tibiotalar joint. Various methods of clinical and radiographic assessment are described in detail.

  9. An unusual cause of an ankle mass

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Aditya; Roberts, Catherine; Doherty, Tom; Oddy, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who presented with a 7-year history of a mass over the medial aspect of his right ankle, which had been gradually increasing in size. He had given up his occupation as a bus driver due to decreased movement of his ankle. An initial diagnosis of endemic syphilis was made after treponemal antibody and treponema pallidum particle agglutination tests were positive. However, following surgical debulking, cultures grew Fusarium solani and the diagnosis was changed to eumycetoma. He received prolonged treatment with antifungal agents and at 18 months follow-up remains well. PMID:25260425

  10. [Turf toe injury--extension sprain of the first metatarsophalangeal joint].

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, T; Carl, H D; Jendrissek, A; Swoboda, B; Barg, A; Engelhardt, M

    2014-09-01

    Injuries of the first metatarsophalangeal (1MTP) joint in the performance of sports are normally rare. The term turf toe injury designates a sprain of the first metatarsophalangeal (1MTP) joint. The trauma mechanism describes a hyperextension in contrast to a "sand-toe"-injury which is caused by a hyperflexion. Injuries to the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint of the great toe have increased in incidence over the last years following the introduction of synthetic surfaces and the establish use of lighter footwear. Although most common in American football players, similar injuries can also be found in sporting activities like basketball, soccer, gymnastics or dance. The trauma mechanism leads to varying degrees of sprain or disruption of the supporting soft-tissue structures. Furthermore damage to the articular cartilage and adjacent bone can be detected. An assessment of the extent of soft-tissue disruption or even damage of the cartilage is essential in treatment planning. The conservative treatment methods including relative rest, shoe modification, and insoles are in most cases successful. But in case of an advanced stage or failure of conservative treatment, surgical treatment is mostly necessary. The turf toe injury must be diagnosed early and evaluated properly. The injury leads to a loss in sports time and competition and can progress to chronic osteoarthritis of the first metatarsal joint.

  11. Effect of Semi-Rigid and Soft Ankle Braces on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability in Young Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Noriaki; Urabe, Yukio; Tsutsumi, Shogo; Numano, Shuhei; Morita, Miho; Takeuchi, Takuya; Iwata, Shou; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Ankle braces have been suggested to protect ankle joints from a sprain by restricting inversion and improving proprioception. However, the difference in effects between a semi-rigid brace and a soft brace regarding dynamic postural control after landing is not known. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of soft (SB) and semi-rigid (SRB) ankle braces on static and dynamic postural stability in healthy young men. Altogether, 21 male adults (mean age 24.0 ± 1.5 years) were assessed for one leg while wearing non-brace (NB), SB or SRB. Balance in single-limb stance on a single-force platform with open eyes and closed eyes were assessed for the non-dominant leg under SB, SRB, and NB conditions. Locus length/second (mm/s) and the enveloped area (mm·s-2) surrounded by the circumference of the wave pattern during postural sway were calculated. For assessing dynamic postural stability, the participant jumped and landed on one leg on a force platform, and the Dynamic Postural Stability Index (DPSI) and the maximum vertical ground reaction force (vGRFmax) were measured. The data were compared among the three conditions with repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlations between locus length/second, enveloped area, DPSI values (DPSI, Anterior-Posterior Stability Index, Medial-Lateral Stability Index, and Vertical Stability Index), and vGRFmax were then calculated. The results indicated that locus length/second and enveloped area with open eyes and closed eyes were not significantly different for each condition. However, a significant lower in the DPSI and Vertical Stability Index were observed with the SRB in comparison to the SB and NB. A significant improvement in vGRFmax was also observed with the SRB in comparison to NB. SRB demonstrated a positive effect on dynamic postural stability after landing on a single leg and may improve balance by increasing dynamic postural stability. Key points This study examined the effect of ankle braces on

  12. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F.; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context  Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. Objective  To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Design  Controlled laboratory study. Setting  University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Intervention(s)  Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results  We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Conclusions  Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint. PMID:26285088

  13. Complex Versus Simple Ankle Movement Training in Stroke Using Telerehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huiqiong; Durfee, William K.; Nuckley, David J.; Rheude, Brandon S.; Severson, Amy E.; Skluzacek, Katie M.; Spindler, Kristen K.; Davey, Cynthia S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Telerehabilitation allows rehabilitative training to continue remotely after discharge from acute care and can include complex tasks known to create rich conditions for neural change. Objectives The purposes of this study were: (1) to explore the feasibility of using telerehabilitation to improve ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of gait in people with stroke and (2) to compare complex versus simple movements of the ankle in promoting behavioral change and brain reorganization. Design This study was a pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting Training was done in the participant's home. Testing was done in separate research labs involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and multi-camera gait analysis. Patients Sixteen participants with chronic stroke and impaired ankle dorsiflexion were assigned randomly to receive 4 weeks of telerehabilitation of the paretic ankle. Intervention Participants received either computerized complex movement training (track group) or simple movement training (move group). Measurements Behavioral changes were measured with the 10-m walk test and gait analysis using a motion capture system. Brain reorganization was measured with ankle tracking during fMRI. Results Dorsiflexion during gait was significantly larger in the track group compared with the move group. For fMRI, although the volume, percent volume, and intensity of cortical activation failed to show significant changes, the frequency count of the number of participants showing an increase versus a decrease in these values from pretest to posttest measurements was significantly different between the 2 groups, with the track group decreasing and the move group increasing. Limitations Limitations of this study were that no follow-up test was conducted and that a small sample size was used. Conclusions The results suggest that telerehabilitation, emphasizing complex task training with the paretic limb, is feasible and can be effective in promoting

  14. Evaluation of the foot and ankle outcome score in patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Mani, S B; Do, H; Vulcano, E; Hogan, M V; Lyman, S; Deland, J T; Ellis, S J

    2015-05-01

    The foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) has been evaluated for many conditions of the foot and ankle. We evaluated its construct validity in 136 patients with osteoarthritis of the ankle, its content validity in 37 patients and its responsiveness in 39. Data were collected prospectively from the registry of patients at our institution. All FAOS subscales were rated relevant by patients. The Pain, Activities of Daily Living, and Quality of Life subscales showed good correlation with the Physical Component score of the Short-Form-12v2. All subscales except Symptoms were responsive to change after surgery. We concluded that the FAOS is a weak instrument for evaluating osteoarthritis of the ankle. However, some of the FAOS subscales have relative strengths that allow for its limited use while we continue to seek other satisfactory outcome instruments. PMID:25922461

  15. Sprain of the neck in clinically treated patients in The Netherlands: an inventory of different categories of car accidents.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Kingma, J; ten Duis, H J

    2001-06-01

    Different categories of car accidents of victims with sprain of the neck were investigated for both drivers and passengers. The predominant category of the car crash was a collision with another car for drivers as well as for passengers. The second cause was unknown. The distribution of the accidents was statistically significantly different for drivers and passengers.

  16. Neck sprain in patients injured in car accidents: a retrospective study covering the period 1970-1994.

    PubMed

    Versteegen, G J; Kingma, J; Meijler, W J; ten Duis, H J

    1998-01-01

    During the 25-year period 1970-1994 694 patients were diagnosed with neck sprain resulting from a car accident at the Emergency Room of the University Hospital Groningen. The purpose of the present study was to analyse the prevalence, groups at risk and trends in these patients, taking into account changes in the number of cars per inhabitant and the average number of kilometres driven. We defined the population as car accident victims diagnosed with neck sprain. Binominal tests were used to obtain measures of statistical significance. Over the 25-year period a steady increase in the number of these patients was observed, from 10 in 1970 to 122 in 1994. The highest prevalence was found for the age group 25- to 29-year olds (28.3 per 100,000), followed by 40- to 44-year-olds (27.9 per 100,000). Across the life span, the male: female ratio was 1: 0.98. Eight percent of the victims were treated as inpatients. The increase in the number of car accident victims with neck sprain appears not to be an isolated phenomenon, because a parallel rise in the number of cars per inhabitant and in the average number of kilometres driven was found. No direct relation was observed between seat belt legislation and the increase in neck sprain injuries. The effect of the media on awareness of the consequences of car accidents is discussed.

  17. Biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G; Wirth, Stephan H; Espinosa, Norman

    2012-12-01

    Understanding biomechanics of the normal and arthritic ankle joint can aid in analysis of an underlying clinical problem and provide a strategic basis for a more optimal management. The challenge to the clinician and the biomechanist is that the mechanical complexity of the ankle joint still clouds current understanding. This article provides an overview of current understanding of functional ankle anatomy, how this function can be altered in the degenerated ankle, and how surgical intervention further affects foot and ankle biomechanics. The focus is on how altered loading of neighboring joints in the midfoot and hindfoot may induce postoperative joint remodeling and can manifest in secondary clinical problems.

  18. Effectiveness of an outside-the-boot ankle brace in reducing parachuting related ankle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M; Sulsky, S; Amoroso, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the efficacy of an outside-the-boot parachute ankle brace (PAB) in reducing risk of ankle injury to army paratrooper trainees and to identify inadvertent risks associated with PAB use. Design: The authors compared hospitalization rates for ankle, musculoskeletal, and other traumatic injury among 223 172 soldiers trained 1985–2002 in time periods defined by presence/absence of PAB use protocols. Multiple logistic regression analysis estimated adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for injury outcomes, comparing pre and post brace periods to the brace protocol period. Setting: A research database consisting of training rosters from the US Army Airborne training facility (Fort Benning, GA) occupational, demographic, and hospitalization information. Main outcome measures: Injuries were considered training related if they occurred during a five week period starting with first scheduled static line parachute jump and a parachuting cause of injury code appeared in the hospital record. Results: Of 939 parachuting related hospitalizations during the defined risk period, 597 (63.6%) included an ankle injury diagnosis, 198 (21.1%) listed a musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury, and 69 (7.3%) cited injuries to multiple body parts. Risk of ankle injury hospitalization was higher during both pre-brace (adjusted OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.92 to 2.95) and post-brace (adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.32) periods compared with the brace protocol period. Odds of musculoskeletal (non-ankle) injury or injury to multiple body parts did not change between the brace and post-brace periods. Conclusion: Use of a PAB during airborne training appears to reduce risk of ankle injury without increasing risk of other types of traumatic injury. PMID:15933409

  19. An examination of ankle, knee, and hip torque production in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Phillip A; Robinson, Richard H

    2009-03-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether strength deficits exist at the ankle in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Additionally, there is evidence to suggest that knee and hip performance is altered in those with CAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether CAI is associated with deficits in ankle, knee, and hip torque. Fifteen subjects with unilateral CAI and fifteen subjects with healthy ankles participated. Subjects reported to the laboratory for one session during which the torque production of ankle plantar flexion/dorsiflexion, knee flexion/extension, and hip flexion/extension were measured with an isokinetic device. Subjects performed 5 maximum-effort repetitions of a concentric/concentric protocol at 60 degrees .s for both extremities. Average peak torque (APT) values were calculated. The subjects with CAI demonstrated significantly less APT production for knee flexion (F1,28 = 5.40; p = 0.03) and extension (F1,28 = 5.34; p = 0.03). Subjects with CAI exhibited significantly less APT for ankle plantar flexion in the injured limb compared with their noninjured limb (F1,28 = 6.51; p = 0.02). No significant difference in ankle dorsiflexion or hip flexion/extension APT production existed between the 2 groups. Individuals with CAI, in addition to deficits in ankle plantar flexion torque, had deficits in knee flexor and extensor torque, suggesting that distal joint instability may lead to knee joint neuromuscular adaptations. There were no similar deficits at the hip. Future research should determine what implications this has for prevention and rehabilitation of lower-extremity injury. Clinicians may need to consider including rehabilitation efforts to address these deficits when rehabilitating patients with CAI.

  20. Post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the ankle and foot: a study of 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Bacchini, M; Vaienti, E; Soncini, G

    1999-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy is still undefined, and diagnosis and treatment are difficult. It is the purpose of this study to propose precise diagnostic and therapeutic criteria for post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the ankle and foot. Diagnosis is pre-eminently clinical. Clinical progression of the disease occurs in three stages: acute, dystrophic, chronic. Radiographic examination cannot be used to classify the stage of the syndrome. Bone scan with Tc 99M methylendiphosphonate aids diagnosis, and helps establish the prognosis of the disease. Clinical symptoms and instrumental tests (x-ray, bone scan, CT scan, MRI) are discussed in relation to differential diagnosis with other pathologies of the ankle and foot. Furthermore, the effective use of drugs, physiokinesitherapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy is discussed. The authors present a study of 32 patients, paying close attention to early clinical signs of the disease. X-ray examination and bone scan were routinely carried out in established diagnostic protocols.

  1. Mediomalleolar fracture combined with Achilles tendon rupture--a rare simultaneous injury of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Pieper, H G; Radas, C B; Quack, G; Krahl, H

    1998-01-01

    Achilles tendon injuries are rarely associated with osseous lesions. The combination of mediomalleolar fracture with Achilles tendon rupture has been reported as a rare combination injury in alpine skiers, but never before in basketball. This report presents an Achilles tendon rupture in a senior basketball player in combination with a non-displaced fracture of the medial malleolus. The osseous lesion was initially missed, because the tendon injury with all typical clinical and sonographical signs predominated. The routine X-ray examination was only done in the lateral and axial plane, because the examiner did not even think of an ankle fracture, since the description of the sports accident and the clinical signs were so typical for a sole tendon injury. This case report should remind us not to exclude an osseous or ligamentous ankle injury in those cases of acute Achilles tendon rupture especially if postoperative swelling and pain persist for a prolonged period.

  2. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    PubMed

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  3. Ankle muscle strength influence on muscle activation during dynamic and static ankle training modalities.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Baltich, Jennifer; Enders, Hendrik; Nigg, Sandro; Nigg, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered a risk factor for ankle injury. Balance training and barefoot running have been used in an attempt to strengthen the muscles crossing the ankle. It is expected that training tasks that successfully strengthen the ankle would elicit increased muscular activity. However, it is unknown how an individual's ankle strength will influence the muscle activity used during a given task. Twenty-six participants performed dynamic (shod, barefoot running) and static tasks (squat on ground, squat on ®Bosu Ball) believed to strengthen the muscles surrounding the ankle. Electromyographic signals of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) were recorded and analysed using a non-linearly scaled wavelet analysis. Participants were divided into a strong group and a weak group according to their isometric plantar-flexion torque. The weak group required more relative GL and GM muscle activity during each training task compared to the strong group. No difference was observed between shod and barefoot running. There was a significant effect of training task on muscle activation level for the weak group. Differences in ankle strength had a significant impact on muscle activation.

  4. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance. PMID:19878952

  5. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance.

  6. Imaging of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, H

    1990-09-01

    The foot and ankle are subjected to daily stresses and strains ranging from normal walking activities to the excessive forces encountered in the active sports enthusiast. These traumatic events as well as systemic and local arthritic conditions and tumors can be temporarily or permanently disabling. Early, expedited, and cost-efficient diagnosis is the daily challenge for the radiologist, clinician, and patient. PMID:1975109

  7. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    PubMed

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  8. Posterior Ankle and Hind Foot Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Aydın, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: While anterior ankle arthroscopy is a widely accepted technique, posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy is still a relatively new procedure. The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and vulnerabilty of the posteromedial neurovascular structures to injury scared orthopaedic surgeons. The goal of this review is to highlight the indications, and to present the long term follow up results of posterior ankle/hind foot arthroscopy. Methods: The study included 21 ankles in 21 patients (12 male and 9 female ).The mean age was 37.7 , the mean duration of preoperative symptoms 12.8 months . Arthroscopy performed with the patient prone , under general and spinal anesthesia with tourniquet hemostasis . Preoperative intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is performed (cefazolin 1g) , sand bag placed under ipsilateral anteresuperior iliac spine to correct natural external rotated posture of the ankle and ankle is left hanging of the table so that it can moved freely during surgery. We applied noninvasive distraction method with simple rope which tied and knotted waist of the surgeon . The posterolateral and posteromedial portals which described by Van Dijk was utilized . The arthroscopic visualisation was often initially limited and careful debritement of some adipose tissue of the kager fat pad (Kager's fat pad, also known as the pre-Achilles fat pad) was necessary to create more space to aid visualization .The most valuable point to stay clear from trouble is to understand , know and aware where the flexor hallucis longus tendon exist .So neurovascular structures located beyond this tendon. Principally the process must advance into lateral to medial manner. The mean follow up period was 55 months. The most common preoperative diagnoses were osteochondral lesions of talus (ten ),painful os trigonum syndrome with (five )or without (three) FHL tenosynovitis (total eight ), posterior talofibular ligament thickenning (two ), Haglund’s deformity (one

  9. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  10. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  11. High intensity electrical stimulation effect on thigh musculature during immobilization for knee sprain. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nitz, A J; Dobner, J J

    1987-02-01

    We conducted high intensity electrical stimulation of the quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle groups daily during a three-week period of lower extremity cast immobilization for an athlete who sustained Grade II medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament sprains. Thigh muscle hypertrophy of the injured (stimulated) leg was suggested by an increase in girth measurement on the day of cast removal. Three weeks after cast removal, single-leg, vertical-leap height was 92% of that accomplished by the dominant, uninjured leg, and the patient was able to return to athletic competition. This case report documents the usefulness of high intensity electrical stimulation for maintaining limb motor function during cast immobilization. Limb stabilization during stimulation and simultaneous excitation of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs also are discussed.

  12. Wrist Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  13. Thumb Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  14. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost. PMID:26696703

  15. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted. PMID:23777376

  16. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  17. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  18. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost. PMID:26696703

  19. Mechanics of knee and ankle bandages.

    PubMed

    Viljakka, T

    1986-02-01

    Different types of bandages were tested mechanically and clinically. Four elastic and three elastic adhesive bandages were mechanically tested. The former proved better. Seven different ankle bandages and three knee bandages were tested in a simulated clinical situation, measuring the pressure which developed while walking for 15, 50 and 100 min, and immediately after application of the bandage. The bandages slackened most markedly during the first period of walking. The compression pressure of the padded adhesive ankle bandage was lower than that produced by most other bandages. The padded adhesive and elastic bandages proved to be most suitable for clinical use. The padded knee bandage produced a lower compression load than the elastic bandage tested. On the basis of this trial we recommend the use of a padded knee bandage.

  20. Imaging in Foot and Ankle Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Victoria H; Rowbotham, Emma L; Grainger, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The foot and ankle are commonly involved in a range of arthritides that affect the joints, bones, and soft tissues. Accurate plain film interpretation can often aid the diagnosis and monitor disease progression and treatment response. Ultrasound and MRI afford superior depiction of the soft tissues, and advances over recent years have centered on early detection of synovitis, enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques of radiography, multidetector computed tomography, ultrasound, and MRI are discussed, as is optimization of these modalities for the assessment of the anatomically complex joints of the foot and ankle. Diagnostic features enabling differentiation between rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, osteoarthritis, gout, crystal deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, Charcot arthropathy, septic arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilia, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are also reviewed. PMID:27336451

  1. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  2. Participation in sports after arthrodesis of the foot or ankle.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Nunley, James A

    2002-07-01

    Currently no data or guidelines exist for the surgeon on how to advise patients about returning to sports participation after arthrodesis within the foot or ankle. Sequelae of inappropriate activity after arthrodesis includes periarticular arthrosis, arthrodesis failure and stress fracture. Some arthrodeses will preclude certain sports because it limits the patient's ability to perform movement vital to the game, for example, ankle arthrodesis preventing basketball players from jumping. Questionnaires were sent to members of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and to trainers of professional basketball and American football teams. This paper reports on the responses of orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons about return to sports participation, after arthrodeses within the foot and ankle, and suggests guidelines for sports participation after an arthrodesis of the lower extremity. A selective sports participation policy is advised. Patients with an ankle or triple fusion should avoid high-impact sports, while those with more distal arthrodeses should be monitored for arthrosis and stress fracture.

  3. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles.

    PubMed

    Su, Alvin W; Larson, A Noelle

    2015-12-01

    Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation, and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate examination, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, computed tomography. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high-risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  4. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  5. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    PubMed

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies. PMID:7132650

  6. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  7. Physiotherapy Treatment in Patients with Hemophilia and Chronic Ankle Arthropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle causes pain and deterioration in gait, causing disability. Although some physiotherapy modalities are effective in the management of acute bleeding, the results are unknown in chronic arthropathy. Our objective was to determine the most effective physiotherapy procedures for treating the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A systematic review was carried out in the Cochrane Database, PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PEDro, TESEO, and specialized journals (Haemophilia and Haematologica). It included articles with at least one group undergoing any kind of physiotherapy treatment and with pretest and posttest evaluation, published before April 2013. An analysis of variables was performed and assessed the methodological quality of studies. Five studies met the criteria for inclusion. Hydrotherapy treatments, strength training and balance strength, balance training, and sports therapy, have improved range of movement, pain, balance, and subjective physical performance. The proposed methodological analysis was not possible due to the low quality of the studies. Although the results are positive, they lack rigorous evidence on the effects of treatments. Studies are needed to establish the efficacy of the various forms of physiotherapy in the haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle. PMID:23997955

  8. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  9. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon following ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Keith, Troy; Robinson, Andrew H N

    2016-03-01

    Impingement following arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis has not been reported in the literature previously. We present a case report of a 68-year-old male 9 months following an uncomplicated arthroscopic ankle fusion presenting with persistent posteromedial ankle pain. Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon impingement resulting from a prominent os trigonum was identified. This was successfully treated utilising hindfoot endoscopy with excision of the os trigonum and FHL release.

  10. Ankle-Knee prosthesis with powered ankle and energy transfer for CYBERLEGs α-prototype.

    PubMed

    Geeroms, J; Flynn, L; Jimenez-Fabian, R; Vanderborght, B; Lefeber, D

    2013-06-01

    Restoring natural walking for amputees has been increasingly investigated because of demographic evolution, leading to increased number of amputations, and increasing demand for independence. The energetic disadvantages of passive pros-theses are clear, and active prostheses are limited in autonomy. This paper presents the simulation, design and development of an actuated knee-ankle prosthesis based on a variable stiffness actuator with energy transfer from the knee to the ankle. This approach allows a good approximation of the joint torques and the kinematics of the human gait cycle while maintaining compliant joints and reducing energy consumption during level walking. This first prototype consists of a passive knee and an active ankle, which are energetically coupled to reduce the power consumption.

  11. Acute fracture of the os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Eva M; MacDonald, Taylor L; Hunter, John C

    2006-12-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with ankle pain after a motor vehicle accident. Imaging revealed an acute fracture of the os trigonum in addition to multiple, other lower-extremity fractures. In this case, the fracture of the os trigonum was a result of a significant traumatic injury. Thus, the presence of this fracture in an acute setting should prompt a search for other associated fractures.

  12. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  13. [Measurement ofthe ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)].

    PubMed

    Kulisić, Sandra Marinović

    2012-10-01

    Measurement of the ankle-brachial pressure index, also known as ankle-brachial index or ankle-arm index is a ratio of the ankle blood pressure and brachial blood pressure. It is easy to perform and allows for diagnosis and further definition of the severity of peripheral arterial disease with sensitivity 90% and specificity 98%. The test is not appropriate for mild arterial changes as in case of comorbidity. Its further objectives are to identify patients at an higher risk of cardiovascular events. PMID:23193828

  14. Ankle arthritis: review of diagnosis and operative management.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, Robert; Aydogan, Umur; Juliano, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic options for ankle arthritis are reviewed. The current standard of care for nonoperative options include the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, orthotics, and ankle braces. Other modalities lack high-quality research studies to delineate their appropriateness and effectiveness. The gold standard for operative intervention in end-stage degenerative arthritis remains arthrodesis, but evidence for the superiority in functional outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty is increasing. The next few years will enable more informed decisions and, with more prospective high-quality studies, the most appropriate patient population for total ankle arthroplasty can be identified.

  15. Acute elbow injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Kenter, K; Behr, C T; Warren, R F; O'Brien, S J; Barnes, R

    2000-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review to evaluate acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in professional football players from 1991 to 1996 (5 seasons). There were 5 acute medial collateral ligament injuries in 4 players (1 player with bilateral involvement). All injuries occurred with the hand planted on the playing surface while a valgus or hyperextension force was applied to the elbow. There were 2 centers, both involved with long-snapping situations, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All elbows had valgus instability on physical examination. Despite this instability, all players were able to function without operative reconstruction of the medial collateral ligament. No evidence of valgus instability was seen at the time of follow-up (average, 3.4 years). Next, we reviewed all acute elbow injuries in the National Football League from the same 5-season period. Ninety-one acute elbow injuries were reviewed. Overall, there were 70 (76.9%) elbow sprains, 16 (17.6%) dislocation/subluxation patterns, 4 (4.4%) fractures, and 1 (1.1%) miscellaneous injury. Review of the acute elbow sprains revealed 39 (55.7%) hyperextension injuries, 14 (20%) medial collateral ligament injuries, 2 (2.9%) lateral collateral ligament sprains, and 15 (21.4%) nonspecific sprains. The epidemiology of the 14 medial collateral ligament injuries was studied in more detail. The 2 most common mechanisms of injury were blocking at the line of scrimmage (50%) and the application of a valgus force with the hand planted on the playing surface (29%). There were 8 linemen, 4 receivers, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All injuries were managed with nonoperative treatment. The average time lost was 0.64 games (range, 0 to 4). We report 19 acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in elite football players, 2 of whom are considered overhead throwing athletes, who were able to function at a competitive level without surgical repair or reconstruction, in contrast to baseball

  16. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (stroke) often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot ("anklebot") training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7) who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/- 8.0 to 31.4 +/- 4.8, p = 0.05), higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/- 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/- 2.6 degrees/s, p < 0.01, peak: 42.8 +/- 9.0 degrees/s to 45.6 +/- 9.4 degrees/s, p = 0.03), and smoother movements (normalized jerk: 654.1 +/- 103.3 s(-2) to 537.6 +/- 86.7 s(-2), p < 0.005, number of speed peaks: 27.1 +/- 5.8 to 23.7 +/- 4.1, p < 0.01). In contrast, nondisabled subjects did not make statistically significant gains in any metric after training except in the number of successful passages (32.3 +/- 7.5 to 36.5 +/- 6.4, p = 0

  17. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in assessing deltoid ligament injury in supination external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Henari, Shwan; Banks, Louisa N; Radovanovic, Ingrid; Radiovanovic, Ingrid; Queally, Joseph; Morris, Seamus

    2011-10-01

    The medial deltoid ligament is the primary stabilizing structure in the ankle joint following lateral malleolar fracture. However, medial deltoid ligament ruptures are difficult to diagnose using current imaging modalities. We hypothesized that ultrasonography can be used to accurately allow early clinical assessment of ankle fracture stability, thereby negating the need to perform plain film stress views of the acutely injured ankle. This prospective study included 12 patients (age range, 18-72) with supination external rotation fractures requiring operative fixation. Following induction of anesthesia, ultrasonography examination was performed, followed by an arthrogram under fluoroscopic screening. Radiographs, ultrasonography, and arthrographic findings were compared. There was 100% correlation between ultrasonography and arthrogram findings. Ultrasonography accurately diagnosed medial deltoid rupture with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Plain film radiographs of the ankle had a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 60%. The difference between these was significant (χ(2)=.0091). This study demonstrates diagnostic ultrasonography to be an accurate diagnostic modality in assessing medial deltoid ligament integrity in patients with supination external rotation fractures. It offers the same sensitivity and specificity as arthrography without the need for additional invasive procedures. Its relative ease of use and lack of ionizing radiation make it a potentially useful tool, particularly in a busy trauma service.

  18. Cutaneous innervation of the ankle: an anatomical study showing danger zones for ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Wenny, Raphael; Entenfellner, Johanna; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2014-05-01

    Three nerves innervate the skin in the foot and ankle region: the saphenous, sural, and superficial peroneal nerves. Because they are close to the medial and lateral malleoli, these nerves are at significant risk during orthopedic interventions. The aims of this study were to investigate the distal courses of the three cutaneous nerves of the ankle and to determine their exact relationships with easily identifiable bony landmarks. Ten freshly frozen and 40 embalmed lower extremities of adults were dissected. The positions of the superficial peroneal, sural, and saphenous nerves were determined using reference lines based on easily palpable osseous landmarks. The frequencies and distributions of all three nerves and their branches were converted into absolute numbers. A danger zone for each nerve was established on the basis of the distribution of crossings between the nerves and the different reference lines. Determination of the exact orientation of the nerves around the ankle should help minimize the nerve injury rate during surgical approaches in this area. Using this easily translatable new grid system, the course and danger zones of each cutaneous nerve around the ankle can be estimated clinically.

  19. Cutaneous innervation of the ankle: an anatomical study showing danger zones for ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Dominik; Wenny, Raphael; Entenfellner, Johanna; Weninger, Patrick; Hirtler, Lena

    2014-05-01

    Three nerves innervate the skin in the foot and ankle region: the saphenous, sural, and superficial peroneal nerves. Because they are close to the medial and lateral malleoli, these nerves are at significant risk during orthopedic interventions. The aims of this study were to investigate the distal courses of the three cutaneous nerves of the ankle and to determine their exact relationships with easily identifiable bony landmarks. Ten freshly frozen and 40 embalmed lower extremities of adults were dissected. The positions of the superficial peroneal, sural, and saphenous nerves were determined using reference lines based on easily palpable osseous landmarks. The frequencies and distributions of all three nerves and their branches were converted into absolute numbers. A danger zone for each nerve was established on the basis of the distribution of crossings between the nerves and the different reference lines. Determination of the exact orientation of the nerves around the ankle should help minimize the nerve injury rate during surgical approaches in this area. Using this easily translatable new grid system, the course and danger zones of each cutaneous nerve around the ankle can be estimated clinically. PMID:24343871

  20. A Refined Prediction Model for Core and Lower Extremity Sprains and Strains Among Collegiate Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Gary B.; Colston, Marisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Researchers have identified high exposure to game conditions, low back dysfunction, and poor endurance of the core musculature as strong predictors for the occurrence of sprains and strains among collegiate football players. Objective To refine a previously developed injury-prediction model through analysis of 3 consecutive seasons of data. Design Cohort study. Setting National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Subdivision football program. Patients or Other Participants For 3 consecutive years, all 152 team members (age = 19.7 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.84 ± 0.08 m, mass = 101.08 ± 19.28 kg) presented for a mandatory physical examination on the day before initiation of preseason practice sessions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Associations between preseason measurements and the subsequent occurrence of a core or lower extremity sprain or strain were established for 256 player-seasons of data. We used receiver operating characteristic analysis to identify optimal cut points for dichotomous categorizations of cases as high risk or low risk. Both logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were used to identify a multivariable injury-prediction model with optimal discriminatory power. Results Exceptionally good discrimination between injured and uninjured cases was found for a 3-factor prediction model that included equal to or greater than 1 game as a starter, Oswestry Disability Index score equal to or greater than 4, and poor wall-sit–hold performance. The existence of at least 2 of the 3 risk factors demonstrated 56% sensitivity, 80% specificity, an odds ratio of 5.28 (90% confidence interval = 3.31, 8.44), and a hazard ratio of 2.97 (90% confidence interval = 2.14, 4.12). Conclusions High exposure to game conditions was the dominant injury risk factor for collegiate football players, but a surprisingly mild degree of low back dysfunction and poor core-muscle endurance appeared to be important modifiable risk factors that

  1. Multivariable Static Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Ho, Patrick; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports quantification of multivariable static ankle mechanical impedance when muscles were active. Repetitive measurements using a highly backdrivable therapeutic robot combined with robust function approximation methods enabled reliable characterization of the nonlinear torque-angle relation at the ankle in two coupled degrees of freedom simultaneously, a combination of dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion, and how it varied with muscle activation. Measurements on 10 young healthy seated subjects quantified the behavior of the human ankle when muscles were active at 10% of maximum voluntary contraction. Stiffness, a linear approximation to static ankle mechanical impedance, was estimated from the continuous vector field. As with previous measurements when muscles were maximally relaxed, we found that ankle stiffness was highly direction-dependent, being weakest in inversion/eversion. Predominantly activating a single muscle or co-contracting antagonistic muscles significantly increased ankle stiffness in all directions but it increased more in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane, accentuating the relative weakness of the ankle in the inversion-eversion direction. Remarkably, the observed increase was not consistent with simple superposition of muscle-generated stiffness, which may be due to the contribution of unmonitored deep ankle muscles. Implications for the assessment of neuro-mechanical disorders are discussed.

  2. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steven H.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and “recycles” it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost. PMID:20174659

  3. Independent ankle motion control improves robotic balance simulator.

    PubMed

    Pospisil, Eric R; Luu, Billy L; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    We present a validation study for the effectiveness of an additional ankle-tilt platform to enhance somatosensory ankle feedback available to subjects actuating a 6-axis robotic balance simulator platform. To address this need, we have developed and integrated a device to permit independent manipulation of ankle rotation while the whole-body is actuated by the balance simulator. The addition of ankle rotation is shown to provide both quantitative and qualitative improvements to the balance simulation experience compared to when the ankle joint is referenced to the motion of the balance simulator. Eight out of ten subjects reported that balancing on the simulator with ankle motion required less conscious effort. This self-reported improvement corresponded to a 32% decrease in the mean-removed RMS amplitude for sway angle, demonstrating better balance control for subjects actuating the simulator. The new ankle-tilt platform enables examination of the contributions of ankle proprioception to the control of standing balance in human subjects.

  4. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed. PMID:24320195

  5. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  6. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  7. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies.

  8. Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement using a 3-component prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle replacement is an established surgical procedure in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. We analyzed complications and medium-term results in patients with simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement. Patients and methods 10 women and 16 men, mean age 60 (SD 13) years, were followed for a median of 5 (2–10) years. Results There were no intraoperative or perioperative complications, with the exception of 1 patient with prolonged wound healing. Major revision surgery was necessary in 6 of the 52 ankles, including 4 revisions of prosthetic components. The average pain score decreased from 6.9 (4−10) to 1.8 (0−4) points. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score increased from 32 (SD 14) points preoperatively to 74 (SD 12) points postoperatively. The average range of motion increased from 28° (SD 12) preoperatively to 38° (SD 9) postoperatively. All 8 categories of SF-36 score improved. Interpretation Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement is a suitable method for restoration of function and attainment of pain relief in patients with bilateral end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. The results of this procedure, including complication rates, revision rates, and functional outcome, are comparable to those reported in patients with unilateral total ankle replacement. PMID:21999622

  9. Dislocated ankle fracture complicated by near total distal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Duygun, Fatih; Sertkaya, Omer; Aldemir, Cengiz; Dogan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Total arterial ischaemia is rarely seen following a dislocated ankle fracture but if it does and intervention is not made, it can lead to serious morbidity. We present a 39-year-old woman with almost total occlusion in the arteria tibialis and arteria dorsalis pedis following a dislocated ankle fracture as a result of a bicycle fall. PMID:24248319

  10. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  11. Total ankle prostheses in rheumatoid arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Bernard; Louwerens, Jan Willem K; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The first generations of total ankle replacements (TARs) showed a high rate of early failure. In the last decades, much progress has been made in the development of TARs, with the newer generation showing better results. We evaluated TARs implanted with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or juvenile inflammatory arthritis (JIA) as indication. Patients and methods 58 total ankle prostheses (Buechel-Pappas and STAR type) were implanted in patients with RA (n = 53) or JIA (n = 5) in 54 patients (4 bilateral). After a mean follow-up of 2.7 (1–9) years, all patients were reviewed by two orthopedic surgeons who were not the surgeons who performed the operation. Standard AP and lateral radiographs were taken and a Kofoed ankle score was obtained; this is a clinical score ranging from 0–100 and consists of sub-scores for pain, disability, and range of motion. Results 2 patients died of unrelated causes. Of the 52 patients who were alive (56 prostheses), 51 implants were still in place and showed no signs of loosening on the most recent radiographs. The mean Kofoed score at follow-up was 73 points (SD 16, range 21–92). 4 patients showed a poor result (score < 50) with persistent pain for which no obvious reason could be found. 5 implants were removed, 4 because of infection and 1 because of aseptic loosening. Interpretation Medium-term results of the STAR and BP types of TAR in RA were satisfactory. The main reason for failure of the implant was infection. PMID:19634020

  12. Postural-Stability Tests That Identify Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Linens, Shelley W.; Ross, Scott E.; Arnold, Brent L.; Gayle, Richard; Pidcoe, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Context: Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is characterized by repeated ankle sprains, which have been linked to postural instability. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to identify individuals with CAI who can benefit from rehabilitation. Objective: To assess the likelihood that CAI participants will exhibit impaired postural stability and that healthy control participants will exhibit better test performance values. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: People with CAI (n = 17, age = 23 ± 4 years, height = 168 ± 9 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg) who reported ankle “giving-way” sensations and healthy volunteers (n = 17, age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 168 ± 8 cm, weight = 66 ± 12 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 7 balance tests: Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), time in balance, foot lift, single-legged stance on a force plate, Star Excursion Balance Test, side hop, and figure-of-8 hop. Main Outcome Measure(s): Balance was quantified with errors (score) for the BESS, length of time balancing (seconds) for time-in-balance test, frequency of foot lifts (score) for foot-lift test, velocity (cm/s) for all center-of-pressure velocity measures, excursion (cm) for center-of-pressure excursion measures, area (cm2) for 95% confidence ellipse center-of-pressure area and center-of-pressure rectangular area, time (seconds) for anterior-posterior and medial-lateral time-to-boundary (TTB) measures, distance reached (cm) for Star Excursion Balance Test, and time (seconds) to complete side-hop and figure-of-8 hop tests. We calculated area-under-the-curve values and cutoff scores and used the odds ratio to determine if those with and without CAI could be distinguished using cutoff scores. Results: We found significant area-under-the-curve values for 4 static noninstrumented measures, 3 force-plate measures, and 3 functional measures. Significant cutoff scores were noted for the time-in-balance test (≤25.89 seconds

  13. Foot and Ankle Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Greaser, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of stress fractures in the general athletic population is less than 1%, but may be as high as 15% in runners. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle account for almost half of bone stress injuries in athletes. These injuries occur because of repetitive submaximal stresses on the bone resulting in microfractures, which may coalesce to form complete fractures. Advanced imaging such as MRI and triple-phase bone scans is used to evaluate patients with suspected stress fracture. Low-risk stress fractures are typically treated with rest and protected weight bearing. High-stress fractures more often require surgical treatment. PMID:27637667

  14. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  15. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  16. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  17. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Pellegrini, Nicola; Adamini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated.

  18. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  19. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter.

  20. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex.

    PubMed

    Aggogeri, Francesco; Pellegrini, Nicola; Adamini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  1. The role of series ankle elasticity in bipedal walking

    PubMed Central

    Zelik, Karl E.; Huang, Tzu-Wei P.; Adamczyk, Peter G.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    The elastic stretch-shortening cycle of the Achilles tendon during walking can reduce the active work demands on the plantarflexor muscles in series. However, this does not explain why or when this ankle work, whether by muscle or tendon, needs to be performed during gait. We therefore employ a simple bipedal walking model to investigate how ankle work and series elasticity impact economical locomotion. Our model shows that ankle elasticity can use passive dynamics to aid push-off late in single support, redirecting the body's center-of-mass (COM) motion upward. An appropriately timed, elastic push-off helps to reduce dissipative collision losses at contralateral heelstrike, and therefore the positive work needed to offset those losses and power steady walking. Thus, the model demonstrates how elastic ankle work can reduce the total energetic demands of walking, including work required from more proximal knee and hip muscles. We found that the key requirement for using ankle elasticity to achieve economical gait is the proper ratio of ankle stiffness to foot length. Optimal combination of these parameters ensures proper timing of elastic energy release prior to contralateral heelstrike, and sufficient energy storage to redirect the COM velocity. In fact, there exist parameter combinations that theoretically yield collision-free walking, thus requiring zero active work, albeit with relatively high ankle torques. Ankle elasticity also allows the hip to power economical walking by contributing indirectly to push-off. Whether walking is powered by the ankle or hip, ankle elasticity may aid walking economy by reducing collision losses. PMID:24365635

  2. Are there any relationships among ankle proprioception acuity, pre-landing ankle muscle responses, and landing impact in man?

    PubMed

    Fu, Siu Ngor; Hui-Chan, Christina Wan Ying

    2007-05-01

    Proprioceptive input has been suggested to contribute to the pre-landing muscle responses associated with drop-landing, but its precise role has yet to be delineated. This study set out to examine the relationships among ankle proprioception, pre-landing muscle responses, and landing impact on drop-landing in healthy man. Fifteen healthy male basketball players aged 18 to 26 participated in this study. Passive ankle joint repositioning errors were used to examine ankle joint proprioception. Pre-landing EMG responses in the ankle muscles and the impact force on landing were recorded while the players performed self-initiated drops from a height of 30 cm. Results demonstrated that averaged ankle repositioning errors were significantly correlated with the co-contraction indexes between left tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles (TA/MG CoI) (r=0.67, p=0.006), and showed a trend towards a relationship with the right TA/MG CoI (r=0.47, p=0.079). TA/MG CoI from both ankles were further related to the magnitude of the total impact force on landing (r=0.54 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.05). We concluded that male basketball players with less accurate ankle joint sense adopted greater co-contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and platarflexors, which was in turn associated with greater impact force at the moment of landing.

  3. Medial collateral ligament knee sprains in college football. Effectiveness of preventive braces.

    PubMed

    Albright, J P; Powell, J W; Smith, W; Martindale, A; Crowley, E; Monroe, J; Miller, R; Connolly, J; Hill, B A; Miller, D

    1994-01-01

    This is the second of 2 articles on a 3-year investigation of medial collateral ligament sprains of the knee to assess the effectiveness of prophylactic knee braces in NCAA Division I college football players. Position, string, type of session, and daily brace wear were recorded. The injury rates for braced and unbraced knees were used to create an incidence density ratio. The data were stratified and simultaneously controlled for position, string, and session and evaluated for their statistical significance. The 987 Big Ten players generated 155,772 knee exposures over the study period (50% braced). Noticeable differences existed in the rates of injury for the braced and unbraced knees in almost every position during practices, depending on player or nonplayer status. When the influential factors of position, string, and session are considered, there is a consistent but not statistically significant tendency for the players wearing preventive knee braces to experience a lower injury rate than for their unbraced counterparts. For starters and substitutes in the line positions, as well as the linebackers and tight ends, there was a consistent trend toward a lower injury rate in both practices and games. The braced players in the skill positions (backs/kickers), at least during games, exhibited a higher injury rate.

  4. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. PMID:27599433

  5. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint... ankle joint. The device limits translation and rotation: in one or more planes via the geometry of...

  7. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  8. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-18

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain.

  9. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  10. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  11. SPECIFIC AND CROSS-OVER EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Flexibility is an important physical quality. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) methods such as foam rolling (FR) increase flexibility acutely but how long such increases in range of motion (ROM) last is unclear. Static stretching (SS) also increases flexibility acutely and produces a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs. FR may also produce a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs but this has not yet been identified. Purpose To explore the potential cross-over effect of SMFR by investigating the effects of a FR treatment on the ipsilateral limb of 3 bouts of 30 seconds on changes in ipsilateral and contralateral ankle DF ROM and to assess the time-course of those effects up to 20 minutes post-treatment. Methods A within- and between-subject design was carried out in a convenience sample of 26 subjects, allocated into FR (n=13) and control (CON, n=13) groups. Ankle DF ROM was recorded at baseline with the in-line weight-bearing lunge test for both ipsilateral and contralateral legs and at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes following either a two-minute seated rest (CON) or 3 3 30 seconds of FR of the plantar flexors of the dominant leg (FR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences in ankle DF ROM. Results No significant between-group effect was seen following the intervention. However, a significant within-group effect (p<0.05) in the FR group was seen between baseline and all post-treatment time-points (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes). Significant within-group effects (p<0.05) were also seen in the ipsilateral leg between baseline and at all post-treatment time-points, and in the contralateral leg up to 10 minutes post-treatment, indicating the presence of a cross-over effect. Conclusions FR improves ankle DF ROM for at least 20 minutes in the ipsilateral limb and up to 10 minutes in the contralateral limb, indicating that FR produces a cross-over effect into the contralateral limb. The mechanism producing these cross-over effects is

  12. Effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle osteoarthritis commonly involves sagittal malalignment with anterior translation of the talus relative to the tibia. Total ankle arthroplasty has become an increasingly popular treatment for patients with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis. However, no comprehensive study has been conducted on the outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with preoperative sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty. Methods One hundred and four osteoarthritic ankles in 104 patients who underwent three-component total ankle arthroplasty were included in this study. The 104 ankles were divided into 2 groups: ankles with anteriorly translated talus (50 ankles), and ankles with non-translated talus (54 ankles). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed in both groups. The mean follow-up duration was 42.8 ± 17.9 months (range, 24 to 95 months). Results Forty-six (92%) of 50 ankles with anterior translation of the talus showed relocation of the talus within the mortise at 6 months, and 48 (96%) ankles were relocated at 12 months after total ankle arthroplasty. But, 2 (4%) ankles were not relocated until the final follow-up. The AOFAS scores, ankle range of motion, and radiographic outcomes showed no significant difference between the two groups at the final follow-up (p > 0.05 for each). Conclusions In majority of cases, the anteriorly translated talus in osteoarthritic ankles was restored to an anatomical position within 6 months after successful three-component total ankle arthroplasty. The clinical and radiographic outcomes in the osteoarthritic ankles with anteriorly translated talus group were comparable with those in non-translated talus group. PMID:24007555

  13. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  14. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability. PMID:27401424

  15. Ultrasound-guided interventions of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) provides excellent delineation of tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle and provides real-time visualization of a needle during interventions, yielding greater accuracy and efficacy than the traditional blind approach using anatomical landmarks. For this reason, US is rapidly gaining acceptance as the preferred modality for guiding interventions in the foot and ankle where the anatomy is complex, neurovascular structures should be identified, and precise technique is demanded. In the foot and ankle, US is especially useful to guide tendon sheath, bursal, and Achilles paratenon injections, Morton neuroma injections, plantar fascial injections, and joint aspirations and injections.

  16. Outcome of unilateral ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement in terms of bilateral gait mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Swati; Rouhani, Hossein; Assal, Mathieu; Aminian, Kamiar; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies assessed the outcome of ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR) surgeries; however, the extent of postoperative recovery towards bilateral gait mechanics (BGM) is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of the two surgeries at least 2 years post rehabilitation, focusing on BGM. 36 participants, including 12 AA patients, 12 TAR patients, and 12 controls were included. Gait assessment over 50 m distance was performed utilizing pressure insoles and 3D inertial sensors, following which an intraindividual comparison was performed. Most spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the TAR group were indicative of good gait symmetry, while the AA group presented significant differences. Plantar pressure symmetry among the AA group was also significantly distorted. Abnormality in biomechanical behavior of the AA unoperated, contralateral foot was observed. In summary, our results indicate an altered BGM in AA patients, whereas a relatively fully recovered BGM is observed in TAR patients, despite the quantitative differences in several parameters when compared to a healthy population. Our study supports a biomechanical assessment and rehabilitation of both operated and unoperated sides after major surgeries for ankle osteoarthrosis.

  17. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  18. Arthroscopically Assisted Open Reduction-Internal Fixation of Ankle Fractures: Significance of the Arthroscopic Ankle Drive-through Sign.

    PubMed

    Schairer, William W; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Dare, David M; Drakos, Mark C

    2016-04-01

    Standalone open reduction-internal fixation (ORIF) of unstable ankle fractures is the current standard of care. Intraoperative stress radiographs are useful for assessing the extent of ligamentous disruption, but arthroscopic visualization has been shown to be more accurate. Concomitant arthroscopy at the time of ankle fracture ORIF is useful for accurately diagnosing and managing syndesmotic and deltoid ligament injuries. The arthroscopic ankle drive-through sign is characterized by the ability to pass a 2.9-mm shaver (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) easily through the medial ankle gutter during arthroscopy, which is not usually possible with both an intact deltoid ligament and syndesmosis. This arthroscopic maneuver indicates instability after ankle reduction and fixation and is predictive of the need for further stabilization. Furthermore, when this sign remains positive after fracture fixation, it may guide the surgeon to further evaluate the adequacy of fixation for the possible need for further fixation of the syndesmosis or deltoid. We present the case of an ankle fracture managed with arthroscopy-assisted ORIF and describe the clinical utility of the arthroscopic ankle drive-through sign. PMID:27462542

  19. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P < 0.001; mean difference 17.7 ± 2.5°), but no effect of the head position was observed (P > 0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P < 0.001). During submaximal ROM, no effects of the head and hip positioning (P > 0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  20. Stress fracture of the second metatarsal and sprain of lisfranc joint in a pre-professional ballet dancer.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Peter; Rafferty, Jason; Evangelista, Peter; Van Valkenburg, Scott; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:26045400

  1. Stress fracture of the second metatarsal and sprain of lisfranc joint in a pre-professional ballet dancer.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Peter; Rafferty, Jason; Evangelista, Peter; Van Valkenburg, Scott; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome.

  2. A comparison of chiropractic, medical and osteopathic care for work-related sprains and strains.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M R; Schultz, M K; Ferguson, A C

    1989-10-01

    The cost of care and the number of days lost because of work injury were analyzed from information gathered in a postal card survey sent to all Iowa back or neck injury claimants (sprain/strain) on record for 1984. Descriptive findings for the flow of care of the respondents were evaluated and a comparison made of the benefits and costs of care received by patients treated by chiropractic doctors (DCs), medical doctors (MDs) or osteopathic doctors (DOs). The analysis focused on those workers who lost enough time from work to qualify for compensation (4 days or more), whose cases were closed and who received all their care from one health professional. For those who received care from DCs (n = 266), the mean number of compensated days lost from work was at least 2.3 days less than for those who were treated by MDs (n = 494; p less than 0.025) and at least 3.8 days less than for those who were treated by DOs (n = 102; p less than 0.025). Consequently, much less money in employment compensation was paid, on the average, to those who saw DCs. Findings on provider care costs are less clear-cut because care-cost data on only a portion of the cases was recorded on the State records used. For the data available, the median provider cost was highest for patients who saw DCs, but the mean was highest for those who saw MDs. The study showed that 38% of claimants did change doctors. When change of provider occurred, days lost from work and cost of care varied widely across the care options, but generally, fewer workdays were lost and lower amounts of disability compensation and provider cost paid when chiropractic was included in the care pattern.

  3. Treatment of Isolated Ankle Osteoarthritis with Arthrodesis or the Total Ankle Replacement: A Comparison of Early Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Charles L.; Kadoko, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle arthrodesis and replacement are two common surgical treatment options for end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. However, the relative value of these alternative procedures is not well defined. This study compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes as well as the early perioperative complications of the two procedures. Methods Between January 2, 1998 and May 31, 2002, 138 patients were treated with ankle fusion or replacements. Seventy one patients had isolated posttraumatic or primary ankle arthritis. However, patients with inflammatory arthritis, neuropathic arthritis, concomitant hind foot fusion, revision procedures and two component system ankle replacement were excluded. Among them, one group of 42 patients had a total ankle replacement (TAR), whereas the other group of 29 patients underwent ankle fusion. A complete follow-up could be performed on 89% (37/42) and 73% (23/29) of the TAR and ankle fusion group, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 4.2 years (range, 2.2 to 5.9 years). Results The outcomes of both groups were compared using a student's t-test. Only the short form heath survery mental component summary score and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale pain scale showed significantly better outcomes in the TAR group (p < 0.05). In the radiographic evaluation, there was no significant difference in preoperative and postoperative osteoarthritis between the TAR and fusion groups. Conclusions The clinical results of TAR are similar to those of fusion at an average follow-up of 4 years. However, the arthroplasty group showed better pain relief and more postoperative complications that required surgery. PMID:20190994

  4. [Ankle fractures in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Crevoisier, Xavier; Baalbaki, Rayan; Dos Santos, Tiago; Assal, Mathieu

    2014-12-17

    Ankle fractures in adults are usually managed by open reduction internal fixation. In elderly patients the surgical dilemma relates to bone quality. Osteoporosis is the enemy of internal fixation, and secure purchase of screws in osteopenic bone may be difficult to achieve. Insufficient screw purchase may lead to loss of reduction, wound breakdown, and infection. Postoperative management after osteosynthesis usually requires an extended period of restricted weight bearing. However, this is not feasible in older patients as a result of their lack of strength in the upper extremities and frequent comorbidities. Therefore, augmen- ted methods of internal fixation and specific surgical techniques have been developed using metal and bone cement. This permits this fragile population to begin early full weight bearing in a removable brace. PMID:25752013

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Split Peroneal Tendon Lateral Ankle Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Bazán, D Issac; Evans, Andrew M; Agarwal, Monica R; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability is a common condition. Split peroneal tendon lateral ankle stabilization, a modification of the Chrisman-Snook procedure, is biomechanically stable and often used for severe and/or recurrent chronic lateral ankle instability. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this technique. Specifically, the midterm recurrence of instability and postoperative complications, such as stiffness, neurologic pain, and wound healing complications, were evaluated. We evaluated 30 consecutive procedures with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 13 (median 19, range 13 to 62) months. Five patients (17%) developed recurrent ankle instability, of whom 4 underwent revision surgery. One superficial infection and two wound disruptions developed. Two patients experienced stiffness and eight (27%) surgically induced neurologic complaints, such as sural neuritis. Finally, 2 patients developed complex regional pain syndrome.

  6. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  7. Open and arthroscopic surgical anatomy of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachel M; Hsu, Andrew R; Gross, Christopher E; Walton, David M; Lee, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  8. Design of a portable hydraulic ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Brett C; Nath, Jonathan; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure of 138 bar (2,000 psi). The battery-operated hydraulic power supply weighs about 3 kg and is worn at the waist. The ankle component weighs about 1.2 Kg and connects to the power supply with two hoses. Performance simulation and preliminary bench testing suggests that the device could be useful in certain rehabilitation applications. PMID:25570175

  9. Clinical anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle in dance.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A; McEwan, Islay M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    The ankle is an important joint to understand in the context of dance because it is the connection between the leg and the foot that establishes lower extremity stability. Its function coordinates with the leg and foot and, thus, it is crucial to the dancer's ability to perform. Furthermore, the ankle is one of the most commonly injured body regions in dance. An understanding of ankle anatomy and biomechanics is not only important for healthcare providers working with dancers, but for dance scientists, dance instructors, and dancers themselves. The bony architecture, the soft tissue restraints, and the locomotive structures all integrate to allow the athletic artistry of dance. Yet, there is still much research to be carried out in order to more completely understand the ankle of the dancer.

  10. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Anatomy of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Hsu, Andrew R.; Gross, Christopher E.; Walton, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Ankle-related complaints are among the most commonly encountered problems for musculoskeletal clinicians. Ankle pathology is widely variable, including, but not limited to, fractures, deformity, infection, oncologic diseases, neuromuscular conditions, and arthritis. While nonoperative management with activity modification, bracing and/or shoe modifications, and medications is usually indicated as first line of treatment, surgical intervention may become necessary. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle, and in particular, the potential neurovascular structures that may be encountered, is important to reduce complications and obtain good surgical outcomes. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most common open and arthroscopic exposures to the ankle with a focus on surgically relevant anatomy for each approach. PMID:24288614

  11. Design of a portable hydraulic ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Brett C; Nath, Jonathan; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hydraulics is ideal for powered human assistive devices including powered ankle foot orthoses because a large torque can be generated with an actuator that is small and light. A portable hydraulic ankle foot orthosis has been designed and is undergoing preliminary prototyping and engineering bench test evaluation. The device provides 90 Nm of ankle torque and has an operating pressure of 138 bar (2,000 psi). The battery-operated hydraulic power supply weighs about 3 kg and is worn at the waist. The ankle component weighs about 1.2 Kg and connects to the power supply with two hoses. Performance simulation and preliminary bench testing suggests that the device could be useful in certain rehabilitation applications.

  12. Posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture or diastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Love, M B

    1993-02-01

    This case report describes a patient with posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture and without disruption of the tibiofibular syndesmosis. The pathogenesis of this uncommon lesion is discussed.

  13. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Drakonaki, Eleni E; Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  14. Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-11-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic "peanut" shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed.

  15. Mechanics and energetics of incline walking with robotic ankle exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    We examined healthy human subjects wearing robotic ankle exoskeletons to study the metabolic cost of ankle muscle-tendon work during uphill walking. The exoskeletons were powered by artificial pneumatic muscles and controlled by the user's soleus electromyography. We hypothesized that as the demand for net positive external mechanical work increased with surface gradient, the positive work delivered by ankle exoskeletons would produce greater reductions in users' metabolic cost. Nine human subjects walked at 1.25 m s(-1) on gradients of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15%. We compared rates of O(2) consumption and CO(2) production, exoskeleton mechanics, joint kinematics, and surface electromyography between unpowered and powered exoskeleton conditions. On steeper inclines, ankle exoskeletons delivered more average positive mechanical power (P<0.0001; +0.37+/-0.03 W kg(-1) at 15% grade and +0.23+/-0.02 W kg(-1) at 0% grade) and reduced subjects' net metabolic power by more (P<0.0001; -0.98+/-0.12 W kg(-1) at 15% grade and -0.45+/-0.07 W kg(-1) at 0% grade). Soleus muscle activity was reduced by 16-25% when wearing powered exoskeletons on all surface gradients (P<0.0008). The ;apparent efficiency' of ankle muscle-tendon mechanical work decreased from 0.53 on level ground to 0.38 on 15% grade. This suggests a decreased contribution from previously stored Achilles' tendon elastic energy and an increased contribution from actively shortening ankle plantar flexor muscle fibers to ankle muscle-tendon positive work during walking on steep uphill inclines. Although exoskeletons delivered 61% more mechanical work at the ankle up a 15% grade compared with level walking, relative reductions in net metabolic power were similar across surface gradients (10-13%). These results suggest a shift in the relative distribution of mechanical power output to more proximal (knee and hip) joints during inclined walking. PMID:19088208

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chao, John

    2016-04-01

    The routine use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in patients undergoing foot and ankle procedures is not well supported in the literature. Multiple studies draw conclusions from heterogeneous populations, and specific studies have small numbers of specific pathologic conditions. Depending on the study, recommendations for and against venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery can be made. The identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism is paramount in the decision making of postoperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

  17. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies. PMID:27599435

  18. Ankle dislocation without fracture in a young athlete.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J; Burzotta, J; Brunetti, V

    1998-01-01

    This is a case report of a 34-year-old male who sustained an ankle dislocation injury without any associated fractures to the foot, ankle, or leg while playing basketball. After an extensive review of the literature, it was found that this type of injury without any associated fractures is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report and a review of the literature are presented in this paper.

  19. A novel assessment technique for measuring ankle orientation and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Nandakumar, Anoop; Quan Xie, Sheng

    2015-09-18

    The measurement of ankle orientation and stiffness can provide insight into improvements and allows for effective monitoring during a rehabilitation program. Existing assessment techniques have a variety of limitations. Dynamometer based methods rely on manual manipulation. The use of torque meter is usually for single degree-of-freedom (DOF) devices. This study proposes a novel ankle assessment technique that can be used for multiple DOFs devices working in both manual and automatic modes using the position sensor and the multi-axis load cell. As a preliminary evaluation, an assessment device for ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion was constructed. Nine subjects participated to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment device in determining ankle orientation and stiffness. The measured ankle orientation was consistent with that from the NDI Polaris optical tracking system. The measured ankle torque and stiffness compared well with published data. The test-retest reliability was high with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) values greater than 0.846 and standard error of measurement (SEM) less than 1.38. PMID:26159061

  20. Influence of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  1. Influence of Walking with Talus Taping on the Ankle Dorsiflexion Passive Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. PMID:24259905

  2. The Effect of Lateral Ankle Ligament Repair in Muscle Reaction Time in Patients with Mechanical Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Li, H-Y; Zheng, J-J; Zhang, J; Hua, Y-H; Chen, S-Y

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that functional ankle instability can result in prolonged muscle reaction time. However, the deficit in muscle reaction time in patients with mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and the effect of lateral ankle ligament repair on muscle reaction time are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the deficit in muscle reaction time, and to evaluate the role of lateral ligament repair in improving muscle reaction time in MAI patients. Sixteen MAI patients diagnosed with lateral ankle ligament tears by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligament repair with a modified Broström procedure. One day before the operation, reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles were recorded following sudden inversion perturbation while walking on a custom walkway, and anterior drawer test (ADT) and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale score were evaluated. Six months postoperatively, muscle reaction time, ADT and AOFAS scale score were reevaluated, and muscle reaction times in 15 healthy controls were also recorded. Preoperatively, the affected ankles in the MAI group had significantly delayed tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles reaction times compared with controls. Six months after the operation, median AOFAS scale scores were significantly greater than preoperatively, and ADT was negative in the MAI group. However, the affected ankles in the MAI group showed no difference in muscle reaction time compared with preoperative values. MAI patients had prolonged muscle reaction time. The modified Broström procedure produced satisfactory clinical outcomes in MAI patients, but did not shorten reaction times of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles.

  3. Pilot study of the cortical correlates and clinical effects of passive ankle mobilisation in children with upper motorneuron lesions.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Vassena, Elena; Strazzer, Sandra; Pittaccio, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Upper motoreuron lesions (UML) affects people of all ages and conditions and is a major cause of disability in the young. Whereas active exercise is recognised as paramount to restore the lost motor functions, passive mobilisation of the affected limbs is regarded as a means to safeguard muscular tissue properties during a period of disuse and lack of voluntary control, which often characterises the acute and sub-acute phases. The purpose of the present work is to study the cortical reactivity in UML patients who are treated for two weeks with a robotic passive ankle mobiliser, and the clinical effects of this treatment. The rationale is that, if passive mobilisation can affect positively the functional reorganisation at a cortical level, it could be proposed as a suitable tool to maintain afferentation and guide central nervous remapping, thus bridging the period of time when active exercise is impossible due to acute paresis. Preliminary results on 7 patients (aged 15.35±4.36) showed that this therapy is very well tolerated and suggest that its application could specifically improve ankle PROM and plantarflexor muscle length. EEG data showed improved desynchronisation in at least one frequency band in 3 patients of the study, thus confirming the effects of passive mobilisation on the cortical re-organisation of some patients having UML. PMID:26737809

  4. Pilot study of the cortical correlates and clinical effects of passive ankle mobilisation in children with upper motorneuron lesions.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Vassena, Elena; Strazzer, Sandra; Pittaccio, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Upper motoreuron lesions (UML) affects people of all ages and conditions and is a major cause of disability in the young. Whereas active exercise is recognised as paramount to restore the lost motor functions, passive mobilisation of the affected limbs is regarded as a means to safeguard muscular tissue properties during a period of disuse and lack of voluntary control, which often characterises the acute and sub-acute phases. The purpose of the present work is to study the cortical reactivity in UML patients who are treated for two weeks with a robotic passive ankle mobiliser, and the clinical effects of this treatment. The rationale is that, if passive mobilisation can affect positively the functional reorganisation at a cortical level, it could be proposed as a suitable tool to maintain afferentation and guide central nervous remapping, thus bridging the period of time when active exercise is impossible due to acute paresis. Preliminary results on 7 patients (aged 15.35±4.36) showed that this therapy is very well tolerated and suggest that its application could specifically improve ankle PROM and plantarflexor muscle length. EEG data showed improved desynchronisation in at least one frequency band in 3 patients of the study, thus confirming the effects of passive mobilisation on the cortical re-organisation of some patients having UML.

  5. The mid-term outcome of total ankle arthroplasty and ankle fusion in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthrodesis is the standard treatment of a severely arthritic ankle joint, total ankle arthroplasty has become a popular alternative. This review provides clinical outcomes and complications of both interventions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Studies were obtained from Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science (January 1980 – June 2011) and additional manual search. Inclusion criteria: original clinical study, > 5 rheumatoid arthritis (population), internal fixation arthrodesis or three-component mobile bearing prosthesis (intervention), ankle scoring system (outcome). The clinical outcome score, complication- and failure rates were extracted and the methodological quality of the studies was analysed. Results 17 observational studies of 868 citations were included. The effect size concerning total ankle arthroplasty ranged between 1.9 and 6.0, for arthrodesis the effect sizes were 4.0 and 4.7. Reoperation due to implant failure or reoperation due to non-union, was 11% and 12% for respectively total ankle arthroplasty and arthrodesis. The methodological quality of the studies was low (mean 6.4 out of a maximum of 14 points) and was lower for arthrodesis (mean 4.8) as compared to arthroplasty (mean 7.8) (p = 0.04). Conclusions 17 observational and no (randomized) controlled clinical trials are published on the effectiveness of arthroplasty or arthrodesis of the ankle in rheumatoid arthritis. Regardless of the methodological limitations it can be concluded that both interventions show clinical improvement and in line with current literature neither procedure is superior to the other. PMID:24161014

  6. Mechanics and energetics of level walking with powered ankle exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2008-05-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons that can alter joint mechanical power output are novel tools for studying the relationship between the mechanics and energetics of human locomotion. We built pneumatically powered ankle exoskeletons controlled by the user's own soleus electromyography (i.e. proportional myoelectric control) to determine whether mechanical assistance at the ankle joint could reduce the metabolic cost of level, steady-speed human walking. We hypothesized that subjects would reduce their net metabolic power in proportion to the average positive mechanical power delivered by the bilateral ankle exoskeletons. Nine healthy individuals completed three 30 min sessions walking at 1.25 m s(-1) while wearing the exoskeletons. Over the three sessions, subjects' net metabolic energy expenditure during powered walking progressed from +7% to -10% of that during unpowered walking. With practice, subjects significantly reduced soleus muscle activity (by approximately 28% root mean square EMG, P<0.0001) and negative exoskeleton mechanical power (-0.09 W kg(-1) at the beginning of session 1 and -0.03 W kg(-1) at the end of session 3; P=0.005). Ankle joint kinematics returned to similar patterns to those observed during unpowered walking. At the end of the third session, the powered exoskeletons delivered approximately 63% of the average ankle joint positive mechanical power and approximately 22% of the total positive mechanical power generated by all of the joints summed (ankle, knee and hip) during unpowered walking. Decreases in total joint positive mechanical power due to powered ankle assistance ( approximately 22%) were not proportional to reductions in net metabolic power ( approximately 10%). The ;apparent efficiency' of the ankle joint muscle-tendon system during human walking ( approximately 0.61) was much greater than reported values of the ;muscular efficiency' of positive mechanical work for human muscle ( approximately 0.10-0.34). High ankle joint

  7. Extraarticular Supramalleolar Osteotomy for Managing Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis, Alternatives for Osteotomy: How and Why?

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    The supramalleolar osteotomy has been reported to be a joint preserving surgery with good clinical outcome for asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis, especially varus ankle osteoarthritis. Conventional supramalleolar osteotomy of the tibia and fibula creates angulation and translation of the ankle joint without changing the width of the ankle mortise. Distal tibial oblique osteotomy improved the preoperative clinical and radiological parameters; however, mean talar tilt angle did not decrease. Assessment of the ankle arthritis in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes may be helpful to achieve a decrease of the talar tilt in ankle osteoarthritis.

  8. Time-Varying Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Hogan, Neville

    2015-09-01

    In human locomotion, we continuously modulate joint mechanical impedance of the lower limb (hip, knee, and ankle) either voluntarily or reflexively to accommodate environmental changes and maintain stable interaction. Ankle mechanical impedance plays a pivotal role at the interface between the neuro-mechanical system and the physical world. This paper reports, for the first time, a characterization of human ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom simultaneously as it varies with time during walking. Ensemble-based linear time-varying system identification methods implemented with a wearable ankle robot, Anklebot, enabled reliable estimation of ankle mechanical impedance from the pre-swing phase through the entire swing phase to the early-stance phase. This included heel-strike and toe-off, key events in the transition from the swing to stance phase or vice versa. Time-varying ankle mechanical impedance was accurately approximated by a second order model consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both inversion-eversion and dorsiflexion-plantarflexion directions, as observed in our previous steady-state dynamic studies. We found that viscosity and stiffness of the ankle significantly decreased at the end of the stance phase before toe-off, remained relatively constant across the swing phase, and increased around heel-strike. Closer investigation around heel-strike revealed that viscosity and stiffness in both planes increased before heel-strike occurred. This finding is important evidence of "pretuning" by the central nervous system. In addition, viscosity and stiffness were greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane across all subgait phases, except the early stance phase. Comparison with previous studies and implications for clinical study of neurologically impaired patients are provided.

  9. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  10. Muscular tendinous junction rupture of the posterior tibial tendon after closed bimalleolar ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, Salomon; Rodriguez-Corlay, Ruy Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we present an acute rupture in the muscular tendinous junction of a posterior tibialis muscle in a bimalleolar closed ankle fracture after a high-energy trauma in a 30-year-old patient with no significant medical history. Fracture was confirmed by simple X-rays, and was treated with an open reduction in which both of the fractures were treated with osteosynthesis material and reparation of the syndesmosis. If left untreated, this uncommon finding can result in a bad postsurgical outcome; we believe this injury is more common but under-reported in the literature. The surgeon should be aware and look specifically for this type of lesion during the procedure. Finding and treating this injury requires special postoperative care, non-weight-bearing instructions and balanced physiotherapy. PMID:26843223

  11. Effects of repeated ankle stretching on calf muscle-tendon and ankle biomechanical properties in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J.; Harvey, Richard; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate changes in active and passive biomechanical properties of the calf muscle-tendon unit induced by controlled ankle stretching in stroke survivors. Methods Ten stroke survivors with ankle spasticity/contracture and ten healthy control subjects received intervention of 60-min ankle stretching. Joint biomechanical properties including resistance torque, stiffness and index of hysteresis were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. Achilles tendon length was measured using ultrasonography. The force output of the triceps surae muscles was characterized via the torque-angle relationship, by stimulating the calf muscles at a controlled intensity across different ankle positions. Findings Compared to healthy controls, the ankle position corresponding to the peak torque of the stroke survivors was shifted towards plantar flexion (P<0.001). Stroke survivors showed significantly higher resistance torques and joint stiffness (P<0.05), and these higher resistances were reduced significantly after the stretching intervention, especially in dorsiflexion (P = 0.013). Stretching significantly improved the force output of the impaired calf muscles in stroke survivors under matched stimulations (P<0.05). Ankle range of motion was also increased by stretching (P<0.001). Interpretation At the joint level, repeated stretching loosened the ankle joint with increased passive joint range of motion and decreased joint stiffness. At the muscle-tendon level, repeated stretching improved calf muscle force output, which might be associated with decreased muscle fascicle stiffness, increased fascicle length and shortening of the Achilles tendon. The study provided evidence of improvement in muscle tendon properties through stretching intervention. PMID:21211873

  12. Relationship between ankle stiffness structure and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Wang, Shuo; Hogan, Neville

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of the structure of ankle stiffness under multiple levels of muscle activation and the relationship between them. A multi-variable impedance estimation method using a wearable ankle robot enabled clear identification of ankle stiffness structure in the space consisting of the sagittal and frontal planes. With visual feedback showing current and target muscle activation levels, all subjects could successfully maintain multiple target levels (5%∼30% of the maximum voluntary contraction level). Stiffness increased with muscle activation, but the increase was more pronounced in the dorsiflexion-plantarflexion direction than in the inversion-eversion direction, which resulted in a characteristic "peanut" shape. The relation between measured muscle activation level and ankle stiffness was evaluated. All subjects showed a highly linear relation not only for the two principal axis directions of the ankle, i.e., dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion, but also for the average stiffness value of all directions. These major findings were consistent both for the tibialis anterior and triceps surae activation.

  13. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  14. Is Hardware Removal Recommended after Ankle Fracture Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Il; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jong-Tae; Eom, Joon-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The indications and clinical necessity for routine hardware removal after treating ankle or distal tibia fracture with open reduction and internal fixation are disputed even when hardware-related pain is insignificant. Thus, we determined the clinical effects of routine hardware removal irrespective of the degree of hardware-related pain, especially in the perspective of patients' daily activities. This study was conducted on 80 consecutive cases (78 patients) treated by surgery and hardware removal after bony union. There were 56 ankle and 24 distal tibia fractures. The hardware-related pain, ankle joint stiffness, discomfort on ambulation, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before and at least 6 months after hardware removal. Pain score before hardware removal was 3.4 (range 0 to 6) and decreased to 1.3 (range 0 to 6) after removal. 58 (72.5%) patients experienced improved ankle stiffness and 65 (81.3%) less discomfort while walking on uneven ground and 63 (80.8%) patients were satisfied with hardware removal. These results suggest that routine hardware removal after ankle or distal tibia fracture could ameliorate hardware-related pain and improves daily activities and patient satisfaction even when the hardware-related pain is minimal.

  15. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off. PMID:23465319

  16. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  17. Systematic ankle stabilization and the effect on performance.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J R; Frederick, E C; Cooper, L B

    1986-12-01

    Stabilization of the ankle joint is used as a deterrent to injury, however, insufficient or excessive ankle control can cause negative effects. This study determined the effects of systematic changes in ankle and subtalar joint stabilization on performance through an obstacle course. Data were collected on six subjects as they completed two test procedures. Ankle range of motion in the sagittal and frontal planes was determined using a modified Inman apparatus. Completion time through an obstacle course, set up on a basketball court, was used as a measure of performance. High-top basketball shoes were constructed with pockets which allowed strips of plastic (stiffeners) to be positioned just anterior and posterior to the medial and lateral malleoli. Four shoe conditions were used including the shoe with no stiffeners. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in eversion, flexion, and inversion were found between the shoe conditions. A general trend of decreased range of motion with increased restriction was observed. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in performance were found between the shoe conditions, with a general trend of increased times with increased restriction. These results indicate that systematic changes in the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints can measurably affect performance. PMID:3784875

  18. Rehabilitation after anatomical ankle ligament repair or reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher J; Tourné, Yves; Zellers, Jennifer; Terrier, Romain; Toschi, Pascal; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-04-01

    The selection, implementation of and adherence to a post-operative regimen are all essential in order to achieve the best outcomes after ankle ligament surgery. The purpose of this paper is to present a best-evidence approach to this, with grounding in basic science and a consensus opinion from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Basic science and clinical evidence surrounding tissue healing after surgical repair or reconstruction of the ligaments as well as around the re-establishment of sensorimotor control are reviewed. A consensus opinion based on this evidence as to the recommended rehabilitation protocol after ankle ligament surgery was then obtained from the members of the ESSKA-AFAS Ankle Instability Group. Rehabilitation recommendations are presented for the initial post-operative period, the early recovery phase and a goal-orientated late rehabilitation and return-to-sport phase. This paper presents practical, evidenced-based guidelines for rehabilitation and return to activity after lateral ankle ligament surgery.

  19. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Christiaan Ja; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim Tm; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2015-12-18

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available.

  20. Systematic ankle stabilization and the effect on performance.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J R; Frederick, E C; Cooper, L B

    1986-12-01

    Stabilization of the ankle joint is used as a deterrent to injury, however, insufficient or excessive ankle control can cause negative effects. This study determined the effects of systematic changes in ankle and subtalar joint stabilization on performance through an obstacle course. Data were collected on six subjects as they completed two test procedures. Ankle range of motion in the sagittal and frontal planes was determined using a modified Inman apparatus. Completion time through an obstacle course, set up on a basketball court, was used as a measure of performance. High-top basketball shoes were constructed with pockets which allowed strips of plastic (stiffeners) to be positioned just anterior and posterior to the medial and lateral malleoli. Four shoe conditions were used including the shoe with no stiffeners. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in eversion, flexion, and inversion were found between the shoe conditions. A general trend of decreased range of motion with increased restriction was observed. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in performance were found between the shoe conditions, with a general trend of increased times with increased restriction. These results indicate that systematic changes in the range of motion of the ankle and subtalar joints can measurably affect performance.

  1. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  2. Comparison of foot pressure in stretching exercises according to the type of ankle ramp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Keun; Yoo, Won-Gyu; Shin, Seung-Je

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study compared and analyzed use of an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects were included; they were stroke patients more than 6 months after onset, with no orthopedic or biological problems in the legs, so independent gait was possible. [Methods] The subjects performed stretching exercises for 5 min with an existing ankle ramp and a newly developed ankle ramp; foot pressure was then measured. [Results] The averaged percentage and kilopascal data for weight bearing and foot pressure on the affected side with the newly developed ankle ramp for stretching exercises were significantly higher than those with the existing ankle ramp. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that stretching exercises using the newly developed ankle ramp more effectively increase foot pressure than the existing ankle ramp.

  3. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ankle Conditions Disability...

  4. 78 FR 34708 - Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... Control No. 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-2. OMB Control Number: 2900--NEW...

  5. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  6. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  7. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  8. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Chapman, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial. PMID:25215242

  9. Evaluation and management of posterior ankle pain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Luk, Pamela; Thordarson, David; Charlton, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Posterior ankle pain is a common complaint in dancers. There are multiple structures in the posterior ankle that have the potential to be the source of pain. The objective of this article is to review several of the most common causes of posterior ankle pain: peroneal tendon subluxation, posterior impingement syndrome secondary to a painful os trigonum, posterior talus osteochondritis dissecans, flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy, and posterior tibial tendinopathy. For dancers, we offer typical clinical presentations of these disorders to increase awareness and provide guidance regarding when to seek professional medical attention. For medical personnel who are responsible for optimizing dancers' health and training, we include a discussion of pertinent physical exam findings, diagnostic imaging options, non-operative and operative management, as well as surgical suggestions and postoperative rehabilitation guidelines.

  10. Dedicated extremity MR imaging of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Hottya, G A; Péterfy, C G; Uffmann, M; Häckl, F O; LeHir, P; Rédei, J; Gindele, A U; Dion, E; Genant, H K

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide illustrative examples of diseases of the foot and ankle when imaged with a low-field MR imaging system. A retrospective review of 268 foot and ankle examinations, performed in our institution within the past 3 years with a 0.2-T (Artoscan Esaote, Genoa, Italy) dedicated extremity MR system was done. Additionally, illustrative comparison with conventional radiography and high-field MR imaging is presented in patients in whom these examinations were also performed. Although motion artifact limited the value of a few studies, in the majority of examinations low-field MR imaging provided diagnostic image quality for the full spectrum of disorders affecting the foot and ankle and seemed to be a feasible alternative to high-field MR imaging in establishing an accurate diagnosis.

  11. Surgical treatment of ankle and foot fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, J; Kröger, H

    2005-03-01

    Ankle fractures are the most common lower extremity fractures. In younger age groups these fractures occur more often in men than in women, but after menopause there is a female predominance. Foot fractures show a similar trend. The primary goal in the treatment of ankle and foot fractures is to obtain exact reduction and stable fixation to facilitate early mobilization and good functional recovery. However, the need for internal fixation to secure fracture reduction must be weighed against the risk of operating on osteoporotic bone which lacks the strength to hold screws and plates. In the elderly, the preoperative evaluation of the peripheral blood supply is essential to avoid wound healing complications. We review here the surgical treatment of ankle and foot fractures with special reference to elderly patients.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  18. Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wasim; Oragui, Emeka; Akagha, Edwin

    2010-07-01

    The ankle and foot are functionally important and complex joints. Bony fractures and ligamentous injuries are common. In this review paper we will discuss the functional anatomy, imaging, classification and the management of common ankle and foot injuries including ankle fractures, Achilles tendon ruptures, Lisfranc joint injuries, calcaneo fractures and fractures of the metatarsals and phalanges.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  6. Effect of an Ankle Compression Garment on Fatigue and Performance.

    PubMed

    Šambaher, Nemanja; Aboodarda, Saied J; Silvey, Dustin B; Button, Duane C; Behm, David G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an ankle compression garment (CG) on muscle performance and physiological variables associated with recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants took part in a randomized crossover study design with 2 experimental conditions (ankle CG and control). The dependent variables skin temperature, evoked muscle contractile properties, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, electromyography (EMG), drop jump performance (20, 35, and 50 cm box heights), continuous drop jump (30 cm), time to fatigue (TTF), and blood lactate concentration were measured pre- and post-warm-up and postfatigue. Compared with control condition, ankle CG condition had significantly reduced half-relaxation times (p = 0.043) and higher skin temperatures at post-warm-up and post-fatigue protocol (p < 0.001, Δ3.2 and Δ4%, respectively). Participants also exhibited significantly lower ground reaction forces (GRFs) for 50-cm drop jumps (p = 0.044, Δ9.9%) with ankle CG at post-warm-up. There were no significant differences between conditions for muscle contractile properties, MVC force or EMG, jump height, take-off velocity, contact time, and jumping TTF. Independent of group, there was a threefold increase in blood lactate (p < 0.01) from pre-warm-up to post-fatigue and a significant decrease in MVC force (p = 0.048, Δ8.1%) from post-warm-up to postfatigue. Results suggest that ankle CG increased and maintained skin temperature during recovery, decreased twitch half-relaxation times, and reduced GRF from a 50-cm drop height. However, ankle CG did not improve other performance measures, aid in recovery, or affect blood lactate clearance. PMID:25992662

  7. Intraoperative Radiation Exposure During Revision Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Iceman, Kelli; Elliott, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative C-arm image intensification is required for primary total ankle replacement implantation. Significant radiation exposure has been linked to these procedures; however, the radiation exposure during revision total ankle replacement remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the radiation exposure encountered during revision total ankle replacement. The data from 41 patients were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database: 19 Agility(™) to Agility(™); 4 Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™); 9 Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II; 5 Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT; 2 Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT; and 2 INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II revision total ankle replacements were performed. Two broad categories were identified: partial revision (Agility(™) to Agility(™), Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™), INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II) and complete conversion (Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT, Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT). The mean radiation exposure per case was significant at 3.49 ± 2.21 mGy. Complete conversions, specifically Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, exhibited the greatest radiation exposure and C-arm time. Revision implant selection and revision type (complete or partial) directly contributed to radiation exposure. Accordingly, revision systems requiring less radiation exposure are preferable. Surgeons should strive to minimize intraoperative complications and limit additional procedures to those necessary, because both lead to additional radiation exposure.

  8. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  9. The role of external nonrigid ankle bracing in limiting ankle inversion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L; Sanderson, D J; Hennig, E M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the nonrigid subtalar stabilizer (STS) ankle brace under conditions similar to an unexpected fall that could lead to a lateral ligament injury. The calcaneal inversion angles, times, and ground reaction forces were measured when the subject's right foot, bearing body weight, was suddenly inverted to a side slope of 22 degrees. Thirty subjects, 15 women and 15 men, participated in the study. The overall inversion drop was divided into two phases, free fall and loading. Based on the data of this study it is suggested that the major function of a brace is to restrict the amount of foot inversion during the fall before actual landing occurs rather than functioning as a force bypass for the lateral ligaments during loading after foot contact. The results showed that the brace significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the maximum calcaneal inversion angle from 27.4 +/- 6.1 to 18.3 +/- 6.0 degrees for the overall drop, significantly lengthened the inversion time from 0.14 +/- 0.04 to 0.18 +/- 0.04 s for the overall drop, and significantly reduced the calcaneal peak inversion velocity from 324.6 +/- 111.9 to 165.2 +/- 66.5 degrees/s during loading, and from 278.7 +/- 120.0 to 183.0 +/- 108.7 degrees/s for the overall drop. Following exercise, which incorporated lateral movements and sprinting, the STS ankle brace continued to provide significant (p < 0.05) reduction in the calcaneal inversion angle and velocity, although some of its effectiveness was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7614076

  10. Sonographic Evaluation and Sonographic-Guided Therapeutic Options of Lateral Ankle Pain: Peroneal Tendon Pathology Associated with the Presence of an Os Peroneum

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ronald S.; Saboeiro, Gregory R.; Pavlov, Helene

    2010-01-01

    Clinical implications of acute injuries of the os peroneum have been described, with the recommendation in some cases being the excision of the bone fragments. We describe the spectrum of sonographic appearances associated with pain in the region of the os peroneum, document associated peroneal tendon pathology, and describe the use of sonography to direct and guide therapeutic and/or diagnostic injections. All sonographic examinations in our ultrasound database from Jan 1, 2001–Jan 30, 2007 with the words “os peroneum” were reviewed. Patients were cross-referenced in our radiology database to find relevant foot or ankle radiographs for correlation. There were 47 patients (18 men and 29 women, age range 16 to 83) referred for sonographic evaluation of lateral foot and/or ankle pain who had an os peroneum identified during the sonographic evaluation. Eighteen patients were referred specifically for targeted injection of the lateral ankle, including peroneal tendon sheath injections (N = 10), calcaneocuboid joint injections (N = 1), and injections around symptomatic os peroneum (N = 7). All 47 patients had tendinosis of the peroneus longus, in varying degrees of severity. Radiographs were available for correlation in 28 patients. The causes of lateral ankle pain with a co-existent os peroneum are multifactorial and may not directly relate to the presence of an os peroneum. Ultrasound can be of value in separating out the specific etiology for pain, as well as provide a method for problem solving by the performance of targeted diagnostic or therapeutic injections in the lateral ankle. PMID:21886533

  11. International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB): past, present and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Christopher J; Leardini, Alberto; Cavanagh, Peter R; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Burns, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB) is an international collaborative activity which will have an important impact on the foot and ankle biomechanics community. It was launched on July 2nd 2007 at the foot and ankle session of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) meeting in Taipei, Taiwan. i-FAB is driven by the desire to improve our understanding of foot and ankle biomechanics as it applies to health, disease, and the design, development and evaluation of foot and ankle surgery, and interventions such as footwear, insoles and surfaces. PMID:19531239

  12. Prophylactic ankle bracing vs. taping: effects on functional performance in female basketball players.

    PubMed

    MacKean, L C; Bell, G; Burnham, R S

    1995-08-01

    Ankle support devices are commonly used for prevention and treatment of ankle injury, but the effect of these on sport performance has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different ankle support devices on four basketball-related performance tests. Eleven female basketball players underwent four performance tests (vertical jump, jump shot, sprint drill, and submaximal treadmill run) while wearing five different types of ankle support on both ankles (no support, tape, Swede-O-Universal, Active Ankle, and Aircast). Ankle support effect on overall performance was assessed using Friedman's analysis of variance (ANOVA) by ranks and on specific performance parameters using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures. Overall performance was impaired by ankle support. The Active Ankle brace impaired performance the least out of the support devices. Vertical jump was less with ankle tape as compared with no tape (p < .05), whereas jump shot accuracy was better with tape as compared with the Swede-O-Universal (p < .05). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure were higher with the Aircast as compared with tape (p < .05). It was concluded that the use of ankle support by female basketball players does adversely affect basketball-related performance tests, and the prophylactic benefit of bracing needs to be weighed against performance impairment.

  13. The postoperative COFAS end-stage ankle arthritis classification system: interobserver and intraobserver reliability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Fabian G; Di Silvestro, Matthew; Penner, Murray J; Wing, Kevin J; Glazebrook, Mark A; Daniels, Timothy R; Lau, Johnny T C; Younger, Alastair S E

    2012-02-01

    End-stage ankle arthritis is operatively treated with numerous designs of total ankle replacement and different techniques for ankle fusion. For superior comparison of these procedures, outcome research requires a classification system to stratify patients appropriately. A postoperative 4-type classification system was designed by 6 fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons. Four surgeons reviewed blinded patient profiles and radiographs on 2 occasions to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the classification. Excellent interobserver reliability (κ = .89) and intraobserver reproducibility (κ = .87) were demonstrated for the postoperative classification system. In conclusion, the postoperative Canadian Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (COFAS) end-stage ankle arthritis classification system appears to be a valid tool to evaluate the outcome of patients operated for end-stage ankle arthritis.

  14. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    PubMed Central

    Artul, Suheil; Habib, George

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013) at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel. PMID:24991476

  15. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least 9 training sessions for 3 neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  16. Ankle fractures in the elderly: an overlooked burden.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christopher W; Dahal, Luna; Rogers, Benedict A; Harry, Lorraine E

    2015-10-01

    Ankle fractures in the elderly are a complex under-recognized burden which require a multidisciplinary approach to management. This article discusses the holistic approach required, including the up-to-date surgical management options and the areas for future development.

  17. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P.; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs. PMID:26236986

  18. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; Del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  19. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  20. A Solitary Fibrous Tumor (Cellular Form) of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare type of mesenchymal tumor composed of uniform spindle cells that is classically described as a patternless feature. SFT normally originates from the pleura, with an SFT originating from skin rarely reported. We report what we believe to be the first case of an SFT arising from the ankle. Our case was confirmed histopathologically with immunohistochemical staining.

  1. Adjustments after an ankle dorsiflexion perturbation during human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, M; De Jaeger, D; Schepens, B

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a mechanical perturbation of unexpected timing during human running. With the use of a powered exoskeleton, we evoked a dorsiflexion of the right ankle during its swing phase while subjects ran on a treadmill. The perturbation resulted in an increase of the right ankle dorsiflexion of at least 5°. The first two as well as the next five steps after the perturbation were analyzed to observe the possible immediate and late biomechanical adjustments. In all cases subjects continued to run after the perturbation. The immediate adjustments were the greatest and the most frequent when the delay between the right ankle perturbation and the subsequent right foot touch-down was the shortest. For example, the vertical impact peak force was strongly modified on the first step after the perturbations and this adjustment was correlated to a right ankle angle still clearly modified at touch-down. Some late adjustments were observed in the subsequent steps predominantly occurring during left steps. Subjects maintained the step length and the step period as constant as possible by adjusting other step parameters in order to avoid stumbling and continue running at the speed imposed by the treadmill. To our knowledge, our experiments are the first to investigate perturbations of unexpected timing during human running. The results show that humans have a time-dependent, adapted strategy to maintain their running pattern. PMID:21872474

  2. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  3. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete's decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players' willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs. PMID:26236986

  4. Vascularized iliac bone graft in cases of ankle tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-02-01

    Ankle tuberculosis is a very rare occurrence. Because the ankle is a weightbearing joint, the affected ankle tends to become damaged. Consequently, the surgical procedure of arthrodesis is necessary, which usually proves effective. We report two cases of ankle tuberculosis, in patients 53 and 71 years of age. The former case had been diagnosed initially as osteoarthritis and then later as pyogenic osteomyelitis; the latter case had been diagnosed as pigmented villonodular synovitis, a benign but aggressive lesion that involves the joints. In addition to antitubercular medicine, these cases were treated with debridement for necrotic tissue and arthrodesis. In the former case, an iliac osteocutaneous flap was performed, and arthrodesis between the tibia, talus, and calcaneus was obtained. In the other case, a vascularized iliac bone graft was performed that resulted in arthrodesis between the tarsal bones, talus, and calcaneus but with pseudoarthrosis between the tibia and the talus. Settlement of the joint tuberculosis and gait ability without resorption or corruption of the grafted bone was obtained in both cases. Vascularized bone graft offers the benefits of achieving bone defect reconstruction with promotion of bone union, and the infection can be expected to resolve through medication delivered via the circulation.

  5. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  6. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood. PMID:25769168

  7. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Faress, Ahmed; Luong, Wilson P; Amin, Khizer; Eid, Joanne; Abdelshaheed, Tamer; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs). A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers) and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action) that may affect an athlete's decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36), as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37). Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players' willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  8. Comparison of Functional Ankle Motion Measures in Modern Dancers.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Danelle; Hollman-Gage, Kendra; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Bronner, Shaw

    2012-09-01

    Ankle injuries are the most common lower extremity injury in dance and sports, often resulting in limitation of dorsiflexion or plantar flexion. Accurate assessment of any limitation in range of motion is an important factor in implementing effective preventative and rehabilitative regimens. Ankle range of motion has traditionally been quantified with goniometers. However, standard goniometry may not be an adequate method of assessing plantar flexion range of motion in dancers. An alternative technique using inclinometers to quantify ankle plantar flexion has been reported, but reliability and inter-instrument correlations for this method are limited. The dorsiflexion lunge distance method has been used to assess ankle dorsiflexion. Although shown to be reliable, this method has not been objectively correlated. The purpose of this study was to determine the most clinically appropriate tool for assessing functional ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion in dancers. The aims were to: 1. determine reliability of the weightbearing ankle dorsiflexion lunge method using inclinometer, goniometer, and distance; 2. assess the reliability of inclinometer and goniometer measurements of non-weightbearing active plantar flexion; 3. conduct inter-method and experienced versus novice rater correlations; and 4. determine if a relationship exists between dorsiflexion distance (cm) and dorsiflexion inclinometer angle (degrees) measurements. Twenty-six modern dancers (age: 20.2 ± 1.8 years) participated in the study. Four raters measured weightbearing dorsiflexion in a lunge position using a goniometer, two inclinometer placements, and a distance measurement. They also measured active ankle plantar flexion using an inclinometer placed on the anterior talonavicular joint and a goniometer placed at the lateral ankle. Intra- and inter-rater reliability and inter-method correlations were calculated with Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM

  9. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques.

    PubMed

    Runge, C F; Shupert, C L; Horak, F B; Zajac, F E

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  10. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  11. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124 N m/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531 N m/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  12. Long-term Results After Ankle Syndesmosis Injuries.

    PubMed

    van Vlijmen, Nicole; Denk, Katharina; van Kampen, Albert; Jaarsma, Ruurd L

    2015-11-01

    Syndesmotic disruption occurs in more than 10% of ankle fractures. Operative treatment with syndesmosis screw fixation has been successfully performed for decades and is considered the gold standard of treatment. Few studies have reported the long-term outcomes of syndesmosis injuries. This study investigated long-term patient-reported, radiographic, and functional outcomes of syndesmosis injuries treated with screw fixation and subsequent timed screw removal. A retrospective cohort study was carried out at a Level I trauma center. The study group included 43 patients who were treated for ankle fractures with associated syndesmotic disruptions between December 2001 and May 2011. The study included case file reviews, self-reported questionnaires, radiologic reviews, and clinical assessments. At 5.1 (±1.76) years after injury, 60% of participants had pain, 26% had degenerative changes, 51% had loss of tibiofibular overlap, and 33% showed medial clear space widening. Retained syndesmotic positions on radiographs were linked to better self-reported outcomes. There is an inversely proportional relation between age at the time of injury and satisfaction with the outcome of the ankle fracture as well as a directly proportional relation between age at the time of injury and pain compared with the preinjury state. Optimal restoration and preservation of the syndesmosis is crucial. Syndesmotic disruption is associated with poor long-term outcomes after ankle fracture. Greater age is a risk factor for chronic pain and dissatisfaction with the outcome of ankle fracture and syndesmosis injury. Therefore, patient education to facilitate realistic expectations about recovery is vital, especially in older patients. PMID:26558664

  13. A Novel Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Treatment for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Chronic Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of improving active ankle dorsiflexion with contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES). Design CCNMES dorsiflexes the paretic ankle with a stimulation intensity that is directly proportional to the degree of voluntary dorsiflexion of the unimpaired contralateral ankle, which is detected by an instrumented sock. Three subjects with chronic (>6-mo poststroke) dorsiflexor paresis participated in a 6-wk CCNMES treatment, which consisted of self-administering CCNMES-assisted ankle dorsiflexion exercises at home daily and practicing an ankle motor control task in the research laboratory twice a week. Results For subjects 1 and 2, respectively, maximum voluntary ankle dorsiflexion increased by 13 and 17 degrees, ankle movement tracking error decreased by ~57% and 57%, and lower limb Fugl-Meyer score (maximum score is 34) increased by 4 and 5 points. Subject 3 had no appreciable improvement in these measures. Both subjects 1 and 2 maintained their performance in ankle movement tracking through the 3-mo follow-up; subject 2 also maintained the gains in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and Fugl-Meyer score. Conclusions These results suggest that CCNMES may have a positive effect on ankle motor impairment in some stroke survivors. Further investigation of the effect of CCNMES on gait is warranted. PMID:20531158

  14. Total Ankle Replacement for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, Beat; Knupp, Markus; Zwicky, Lukas; Barg, Alexej

    2012-01-01

    End-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle is a disabling problem, particularly in elderly patients who experience an overall loss of mobility and functional impairment and who then need compensatory adaption. Ankle arthrodesis, which has been demonstrated to provide postoperative pain relief and hindfoot stability, leaves the patient with a stiff foot and gait changes. For elderly patient, these changes may be more critical than generally believed. Additionally, the long duration of healing and rehabilitation process needed for ankle arthrodesis may be problematic in the elderly. In contrast to ankle arthrodesis, total ankle replacement has significant advantages including a less strenuous postoperative rehabilitation and preservation of ankle motion which supports physiological gait. Recently, total ankle replacement has evolved as a safe surgical treatment in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis with reliable mid- to long-term results. Total ankle replacement needs less immobilization than arthrodesis and does allow for early weight-bearing and should be considered as a treatment option of first choice in many elderly patients with end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle, especially in elderly patients with lower expectations and physical demands. PMID:22720158

  15. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  16. Fractures and Soft Tissue Injuries of the Feet and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    English, Edward

    1985-01-01

    An accurate clinical diagnosis of foot and ankle pain can be made by a history, physical examination and routine X-rays of the affected part. Each problem has a specific treatment; however, fractures and dislocations around the foot and ankle can be thought of in an organized fashion by proper physical examination and then the appropriate treatment. Fractures and soft tissue injuries can be treated rationally by understanding the mechanism of injury and the possibility of subsequent deformity. This article classifies specific injuries as a group and indicates a treatment program for each problem. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7aFig. 7bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:21274230

  17. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  18. Ankle Arthritis: You Can't Always Replace It.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brandon J; Gonzalez, Tyler A; Smith, Jeremy T; Chiodo, Christopher P; Bluman, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    End-stage arthritis of the tibiotalar joint is disabling and causes substantial functional impairment. End-stage arthritis of the tibiotalar joint is often the residual effect of a previous traumatic injury. Nonsurgical treatment for end-stage arthritis of the ankle includes bracing, shoe wear modifications, and selective joint injections. For patients who fail to respond to nonsurgical modalities, the two primary treatment options are arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Each treatment option has strong proponents who argue the superiority of their treatment algorithm. Although there is no ideal treatment for ankle arthritis, there are high-quality studies that help guide treatment in patients of varying demographics. Many inherent risks are linked with each treatment option; however, the risks of greatest concern are early implant loosening after arthroplasty that requires revision surgery and the acceleration of adjacent joint degeneration associated with arthrodesis. PMID:27049200

  19. Cosmic rays from the knee to the ankle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, Mario Edoardo

    2014-04-01

    The shape and composition of the primary spectrum as well as the large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays are key elements to understand the origin, acceleration and propagation of the Galactic radiation. Besides the well-known knee and ankle features, the measured energy spectrum exhibits also a less pronounced but still clear deviation from a single power law between the knee and the ankle, with a spectral hardening at ˜2×1016 eV and a steepening at ˜1017 eV. The average mass composition gets heavier after the knee till ˜1017 eV, where a bending of the heavy component is observed. An indication of a hardening of the light component just above 1017 eV has been measured as well. First indications of anisotropy of the arrival direction in the southern hemisphere have been reported at ˜1015 eV.

  20. Design of a quasi-passive 3 DOFs ankle-foot wearable rehabilitation orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Yanhe; Fan, Jizhuang; Zhao, Jie; Yu, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Muscular rigidity and atrophy caused by long-term underactivity usually lead to foot drop, strephenopodia, foot extorsion or some other complications for the lower limb movement disorders or lower limb surgery sufferers. The ankle-foot orthosis can help patients conduct the right ankle motion mode training, inhibit spasm and prevent ankle complications. In this paper, a quasi-passive 3 DOFs ankle-foot wearable orthosis was designed on the basis of kinematics and dynamics analysis of the ankle joint. Ankle joint trajectory and dynamic characteristics similar to those of natural gait can be obtained by the combination of passive energy storage and additional power complement. In terms of function, the orthosis has shock absorption and low energy consumption. Given its excellent characteristics of comfortableness, lightweight, and anthropomorphic construction, the orthosis can be used in medical institutions for rehabilitation training or as a daily-walking auxiliary equipment for surgery sufferers.

  1. Posterior Ankle Impingement in Two Athletic Twin Brothers, Could Genetics Play a Role?

    PubMed

    Bech, Niels H; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Haverkamp, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pain posteriorly in the ankle can be caused by bony impingement of the posterolateral process of the talus. This process impinges between the tibia and calcaneus during deep forced plantar flexion. If this occurs it is called posterior ankle impingement syndrome. We report the case of 2 athletic monozygotic twin brothers with bony impingement posteriorly in the left ankle. Treatment consisted of ankle arthroscopy in both patients during which the symptomatic process was easily removed. At 3 months after surgery, both patients were completely free of pain, and 1 of the brothers had already returned to sports. The posterior ankle impingement syndrome is not a rare syndrome, but it has not been described in siblings thus far. That these 2 patients are monozygotic twin brothers suggests that genetics could play a role in the development of skeletal deformities that can result in posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

  2. A Solitary Fibrous Tumor (Cellular Form) of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare type of mesenchymal tumor composed of uniform spindle cells that is classically described as a patternless feature. SFT normally originates from the pleura, with an SFT originating from skin rarely reported. We report what we believe to be the first case of an SFT arising from the ankle. Our case was confirmed histopathologically with immunohistochemical staining. PMID:25979291

  3. Conservative treatments for rheumatoid arthritis in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Anain, Joseph M; Bojrab, Angela R; Rhinehart, Francine C

    2010-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease that attacks peripheral joints, causing their destruction. Several pharmacologic therapies and physical modalities are available for its treatment. Because of the progressive nature of RA, complementary and alternative medicine therapy in conjunction with conventional medicine is administered to patients with RA. This article discusses the presence of undiagnosed RA in the foot and ankle and reviews the concurrent nonoperative measures in treatment, including pharmacologic and physical modalities.

  4. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  5. Percutaneous techniques for tendon transfers in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are useful for replacing a dysfunctional or diseased tendon or for restoring muscle imbalance. The tendon to be transferred is harvested as distal as is necessary to provide adequate length for rerouting and attachment at the different site. The harvesting of tendon itself can be attained using an open surgical approach or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques that limit surgical exposure. This article describes percutaneous techniques for tendon transfer procedures used to address foot and ankle disorders. PMID:24548514

  6. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2015-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years. PMID:27022527

  7. Embracing additive manufacture: implications for foot and ankle orthosis design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The design of foot and ankle orthoses is currently limited by the methods used to fabricate the devices, particularly in terms of geometric freedom and potential to include innovative new features. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, where objects are constructed via a series of sub-millimetre layers of a substrate material, may present the opportunity to overcome these limitations and allow novel devices to be produced that are highly personalised for the individual, both in terms of fit and functionality. Two novel devices, a foot orthosis (FO) designed to include adjustable elements to relieve pressure at the metatarsal heads, and an ankle foot orthosis (AFO) designed to have adjustable stiffness levels in the sagittal plane, were developed and fabricated using AM. The devices were then tested on a healthy participant to determine if the intended biomechanical modes of action were achieved. Results The adjustable, pressure relieving FO was found to be able to significantly reduce pressure under the targeted metatarsal heads. The AFO was shown to have distinct effects on ankle kinematics which could be varied by adjusting the stiffness level of the device. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate the potential design freedom made available by AM, and suggest that it may allow novel personalised orthotic devices to be produced which are beyond the current state of the art. PMID:22642941

  8. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hilal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders. PMID:26644697

  9. Fixation orientation in ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury.

    PubMed

    Nimick, Craig J; Collman, David R; Lagaay, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate reduction of the syndesmosis has been shown to be an important prognostic factor for functional outcome in ankle injuries that disrupt the syndesmosis. The purpose of the present case series was to assess the fixation orientation and the position of the fibula within the tibial incisura after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures with syndesmosis injury. Computed tomography was used to assess the accuracy of the reduction. Twelve patients were included in the present case series. A ratio representing the relationship between the tibia and fibula and the orientation of the syndesmotic fixation was measured preoperatively and postoperatively and compared with the uninjured contralateral ankle, representing the patient's normal anatomy. The measurements were accomplished electronically to one tenth of 1 mm using Stentor Intelligent Informatics, I-site, version 3.3.1 (Phillips Electronics; Andover, MA). Posteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused posterior translation of the fibula with respect to the tibia and anteriorly oriented syndesmotic fixation caused anterior translation. PMID:23540759

  10. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance. PMID:25856154

  11. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hilal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders.

  12. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hİlal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders. PMID:26644697

  13. Learning to walk with a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Ferris, Daniel P

    2007-01-01

    We used a lower limb robotic exoskeleton controlled by the wearer's muscle activity to study human locomotor adaptation to disrupted muscular coordination. Ten healthy subjects walked while wearing a pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton on one limb that effectively increased plantar flexor strength of the soleus muscle. Soleus electromyography amplitude controlled plantar flexion assistance from the exoskeleton in real time. We hypothesized that subjects' gait kinematics would be initially distorted by the added exoskeleton power, but that subjects would reduce soleus muscle recruitment with practice to return to gait kinematics more similar to normal. We also examined the ability of subjects to recall their adapted motor pattern for exoskeleton walking by testing subjects on two separate sessions, 3 days apart. The mechanical power added by the exoskeleton greatly perturbed ankle joint movements at first, causing subjects to walk with significantly increased plantar flexion during stance. With practice, subjects reduced soleus recruitment by approximately 35% and learned to use the exoskeleton to perform almost exclusively positive work about the ankle. Subjects demonstrated the ability to retain the adapted locomotor pattern between testing sessions as evidenced by similar muscle activity, kinematic and kinetic patterns between the end of the first test day and the beginning of the second. These results demonstrate that robotic exoskeletons controlled by muscle activity could be useful tools for testing neural mechanisms of human locomotor adaptation. PMID:17275829

  14. Intelligent stretching of ankle joints with contracture/spasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Qun; Chung, Sun G; Bai, Zhiqiang; Xu, Dali; van Rey, Elton M T; Rogers, Mark W; Johnson, Marjorie E; Roth, Elliot J

    2002-09-01

    An intelligent stretching device was developed to treat the spastic/contractured ankle of neurologically impaired patients. The device stretched the ankle safely throughout the range of motion (ROM) to extreme dorsiflexion and plantarflexion until a specified peak resistance torque was reached with the stretching velocity controlled based on the resistance torque. The ankle was held at the extreme position for a period of time to let stress relaxation occur before it was rotated back to the other extreme position. Stretching was slow at the joint extreme positions, making it possible to reach a larger ROM safely and it was fast in the middle ROM so the majority of the treatment was spent in stretching the problematic extreme ROM. Furthermore, the device evaluated treatment outcome quantitatively in multiple aspects, including active and passive ROM, joint stiffness and viscous damping and reflex excitability. The stretching resulted in considerable changes in joint passive ROM, stiffness, viscous damping and reflex gain. The intelligent control and yet simple design of the device suggest that with appropriate simplification, the device can be made portable and low cost, making it available to patients and therapists for frequent use in clinics/home and allowing more effective treatment and long-term improvement. PMID:12503779

  15. Immediate Weight-Bearing after Ankle Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Harnden, Emily

    2015-01-01

    We believe that a certain subset of surgical ankle fracture patients can be made weight-bearing as tolerated immediately following surgery. Immediate weight-bearing as tolerated (IWBAT) allows patients to return to ambulation and activities of daily living faster and may facilitate rehabilitation. A prospectively gathered orthopaedic trauma database at a Level 1 trauma center was reviewed retrospectively to identify patients who had ORIF after unstable ankle injuries treated by the senior author. Patients were excluded if they were not IWBAT based on specific criteria or if they did meet followup requirement. Only 1/26 patients was noted to have loss of fixation. This was found at the 6-week followup and was attributed to a missed syndesmotic injury. At 2-week followup, 2 patients had peri-incisional erythema that resolved with a short course of oral antibiotics. At 6-week followup, 20 patients were wearing normal shoes and 6 patients continued to wear the CAM Boot for comfort. To conclude, IWBAT in a certain subset of patients with stable osteosynthesis following an ankle fracture could potentially be a safe alternative to a period of protected weight-bearing. PMID:25785201

  16. Ultrasound of the ankle and foot in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Micu, Mihaela C; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Vlad, Violeta; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-03-01

    In the last years musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) has become a very useful imaging tool for the evaluation of rheumatic patients and a natural extension of the clinical examination of the ankle and foot. Musculoskeletal US allows the evaluation of the symptomatic and asymptomatic ankle and foot with a detailed analysis of a wide range of elementary lesions at the level of different anatomical structures and their distribution in early or long standing disease. In inflammatory pathology, it helps in the assessment of the disease activity and severity at the joint, tendon or entheseal level and in the detection of subclinical pathological features in early disease or residual activity after therapy. Moreover, US guided procedures allow accurate diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. It is a valuable imaging method that can be also used in the follow up of the treated patients (systemic and/ or local therapies or surgical procedures), being a patient friendly, non-invasive, and quick to perform method. The aim of this paper is to review the US technique of scanning and the indications of US in the analysis of the ankle and foot in rheumatic diseases.

  17. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance.

  18. Intermediate-Term Follow-up After Ankle Distraction for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai P.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Gao, Yubo; Saltzman, Charles L.; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, especially in young patients. Initial reports have shown early benefits of joint distraction for the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis. We report the five to ten-year results of a previously described patient cohort following ankle distraction surgery. Methods: All thirty-six patients who had undergone ankle distraction surgery between December 2002 and October 2006 were contacted. Patients were evaluated by a clinical investigator and completed the Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) surveys. Radiographs as well as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the ankles were obtained at the follow-up visits. Results: Twenty-nine patients (81%) were followed for a minimum of five years (mean and standard deviation, 8.3 ± 2.2 years). Sixteen (55%) of the twenty-nine patients still had the native ankle joint whereas thirteen patients (45%) had undergone either ankle arthrodesis or total ankle arthroplasty. Positive predictors of ankle survival included a better AOS score at two years (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.048, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0028 to 0.84, p = 0.04), older age at surgery (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.83 to 0.99, p = 0.04), and fixed distraction (HR = 0.094, 95% CI = 0.017 to 0.525, p < 0.01). Radiographs and advanced imaging revealed progression of ankle osteoarthritis at the time of final follow-up. Conclusions: Ankle function following joint distraction declines over time. Patients should be well informed of the commitment that they must make during the treatment period as well as the long-term results after surgery. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25834084

  19. An exoskeleton using controlled energy storage and release to aid ankle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Wiggin, M Bruce; Sawicki, Gregory S; Collins, Steven H

    2011-01-01

    Symmetric ankle propulsion is the cornerstone of efficient human walking. The ankle plantar flexors provide the majority of the mechanical work for the step-to-step transition and much of this work is delivered via elastic recoil from the Achilles' tendon - making it highly efficient. Even though the plantar flexors play a central role in propulsion, body-weight support and swing initiation during walking, very few assistive devices have focused on aiding ankle plantarflexion. Our goal was to develop a portable ankle exoskeleton taking inspiration from the passive elastic mechanisms at play in the human triceps surae-Achilles' tendon complex during walking. The challenge was to use parallel springs to provide ankle joint mechanical assistance during stance phase but allow free ankle rotation during swing phase. To do this we developed a novel `smart-clutch' that can engage and disengage a parallel spring based only on ankle kinematic state. The system is purely passive - containing no motors, electronics or external power supply. This `energy-neutral' ankle exoskeleton could be used to restore symmetry and reduce metabolic energy expenditure of walking in populations with weak ankle plantar flexors (e.g. stroke, spinal cord injury, normal aging).

  20. Screening Characteristics of Ultrasonography in Detection of Ankle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shojaee, Majid; Hakimzadeh, Farhad; Mohammadi, Parisa; Sabzghabaei, Anita; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ankle fracture is one of the most common joint fractures. X-ray and physical examination are its main methods of diagnosis. Recently, ultrasonography (US) is considered as a simple and non-invasive method of fracture diagnosis. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of US in detection of ankle fracture in comparison to plain radiography. Methods: In this diagnostic accuracy study, which was done in emergency departments of Imam Hossein and Shohadaye Tajrish hospitals, Tehran, Iran, during 2014, 141 patients with suspected diagnosis of distal leg or ankle fracture were examined by US and radiography (gold standard), independently. Screening performance characteristics of US in detection of distal leg fractures were calculated using SPSS version 21. Results: 141 patients with the mean age of 34 ± 11.52 years (range: 15 – 50) were evaluated (75.9% male). Radiography confirmed ankle fracture in 102 (72.3%) patients. There was a significant correlation between the results of US and radiography [Agreement: 95%; kappa: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.97); P < 0.001]. The screening performance characteristics of US in detection ankle fracture were as follows: sensitivity 98.9% (95% CI: 93.5% - 99.9%), specificity 86.4% (95% CI: 71.9%-94.3%), PPV 94.1% (95% CI: 87.1% - 97.6%), NPV 97.4% (95% CI: 84.9% - 99.8%), PLR 16 (95% CI: 7.3 – 34.8), and NLR 0.02 (95% CI: 0.003 – 0.182). The area under the ROC curve of US in this regard was 95.8 (95% CI: 91.9 ± 99.7). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, we can use US as an accurate and non-invasive method with high sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of malleolus fractures. However, the inherent limitations of US such as operator dependency should be considered in this regard. PMID:27800538

  1. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  2. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle. PMID:27423250

  3. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  4. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle.

  5. Acute Compartment Syndrome after Non-Contact Peroneus Longus Muscle Rupture.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Jarrad; Villacis, Diego; Kephart, Curtis; Yi, Anthony; Romano, Russ; Hatch, George F Rick

    2015-12-01

    This case demonstrates a rare variation in the pattern of injury and the presentation of acute lateral compartment syndrome of the leg. Although uncommon, lateral compartment syndrome of the leg after an ankle inversion leading to peroneus longus muscle rupture has been previously documented. This case was unusual because there was no overt ankle injury and the patient was able to continue physical activity, in spite of a significant rupture of the peroneus longus muscle that was determined later. This case highlights the necessary vigilance clinicians must maintain when assessing non-contact injuries in patients with possible compartment syndrome.

  6. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background/Methodology Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak. Principal Findings/Conclusions Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after

  7. Rotational stiffness of American football shoes affects ankle biomechanics and injury severity.

    PubMed

    Button, Keith D; Braman, Jerrod E; Davison, Mark A; Wei, Feng; Schaeffer, Maureen C; Haut, Roger C

    2015-06-01

    While previous studies have investigated the effect of shoe-surface interaction on injury risk, few studies have examined the effect of rotational stiffness of the shoe. The hypothesis of the current study was that ankles externally rotated to failure in shoes with low rotational stiffness would allow more talus eversion than those in shoes with a higher rotational stiffness, resulting in less severe injury. Twelve (six pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated to gross failure while positioned in 20 deg of pre-eversion and 20 deg of predorsiflexion by fixing the distal end of the foot, axially loading the proximal tibia, and internally rotating the tibia. One ankle in each pair was constrained by an American football shoe with a stiff upper, while the other was constrained by an American football shoe with a flexible upper. Experimental bone motions were input into specimen-specific computational models to examine levels of ligament elongation to help understand mechanisms of ankle joint failure. Ankles in flexible shoes allowed 6.7±2.4 deg of talus eversion during rotation, significantly greater than the 1.7±1.0 deg for ankles in stiff shoes (p = 0.01). The significantly greater eversion in flexible shoes was potentially due to a more natural response of the ankle during rotation, possibly affecting the injuries that were produced. All ankles failed by either medial ankle injury or syndesmotic injury, or a combination of both. Complex (more than one ligament or bone) injuries were noted in 4 of 6 ankles in stiff shoes and 1 of 6 ankles in flexible shoes. Ligament elongations from the computational model validated the experimental injury data. The current study suggested flexibility (or rotational stiffness) of the shoe may play an important role in both the severity of ankle injuries for athletes.

  8. Estimation of human ankle impedance during the stance phase of walking.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J; Perreault, Eric J; Kuiken, Todd A

    2014-07-01

    Human joint impedance is the dynamic relationship between the differential change in the position of a perturbed joint and the corresponding response torque; it is a fundamental property that governs how humans interact with their environments. It is critical to characterize ankle impedance during the stance phase of walking to elucidate how ankle impedance is regulated during locomotion, as well as provide the foundation for future development of natural, biomimetic powered prostheses and their control systems. In this study, ankle impedance was estimated using a model consisting of stiffness, damping and inertia. Ankle torque was well described by the model, accounting for 98 ±1.2% of the variance. When averaged across subjects, the stiffness component of impedance was found to increase linearly from 1.5 to 6.5 Nm/rad/kg between 20% and 70% of stance phase. The damping component was found to be statistically greater than zero only for the estimate at 70% of stance phase, with a value of 0.03 Nms/rad/kg. The slope of the ankle's torque-angle curve-known as the quasi-stiffness-was not statistically different from the ankle stiffness values, and showed remarkable similarity. Finally, using the estimated impedance, the specifications for a biomimetic powered ankle prosthesis were introduced that would accurately emulate human ankle impedance during locomotion.

  9. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  10. Effects of ankle biofeedback training on strength, balance, and gait in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-jin; Cho, Hwi-young; Kim, Kyung-hoon; Lee, Suk-min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of ankle biofeedback training on muscle strength of the ankle joint, balance, and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven subjects who had had a stroke were randomly allocated to either the ankle biofeedback training group (n=14) or control group (n=13). Conventional therapy, which adhered to the neurodevelopmental treatment approach, was administered to both groups for 30 minutes. Furthermore, ankle strengthening exercises were performed by the control group and ankle biofeedback training by the experimental group, each for 30 minutes, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. To test muscle strength, balance, and gait, the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer, functional reach test, and 10 m walk test, respectively, were used. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed a significant increase in muscle strength on the affected side and improved balance and gait. Significantly greater improvements were observed in the balance and gait of the ankle biofeedback training group compared with the control group, but not in the strength of the dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscles of the affected side. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle biofeedback training significantly improves muscle strength of the ankle joint, balance, and gait in patients with stroke. PMID:27799701

  11. Effects of spiral taping applied to the neck and ankle on the body balance index

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Lee, Hye Rim; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to investigate the changes in the body balance index when spiral taping is applied to the neck and ankle. The findings are expected to serve as evidence of the usefulness of taping the neck instead of the ankle when ankle taping is not feasible in clinical practice. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy male students at A university were enrolled in this study. Balance measurements were made under three conditions: no intervention, ankle intervention and neck intervention. Static balance was measured with subjects’ eyes open and closed, and dynamic balance was measured with subjects’ eyes closed. [Results] There were significant differences in dynamic balance assessed by the Overall Balance Index (OBI), and the Anteroposterior Balance Index (ABI) with subjects’ eyes open when ankle or neck taping was applied compared to no intervention. The static balance (OBI) of subjects with eyes open showed significant differences from the no intervention condition in both the ankle and neck intervention. The static balance (OBI) with subjects’ eyes closed also showed significant differences in both the ankle and neck interventions compared to the no intervention condition. [Conclusion] Our results indicate that neck taping stimulates the somatic senses around the neck and increase proprioception, resulting in balance improvement similar to that elicited by ankle taping. Further studies with larger sample sizes various experimental conditions should be performed to more systematically and objectively elucidate the effects of neck taping. PMID:25642043

  12. Ankle Accelerometry for Assessing Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls: Threshold Determination, Validity, Reliability, and Feasibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Erin R.; Treuth, Margarita S.; Gormely, Candice; Epps, LaShawna; Snitker, Soren; Black, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Ankle accelerometry allows for 24-hr data collection and improves data volume/integrity versus hip accelerometry. Using Actical ankle accelerometry, the purpose of this study was to (a) develop sensitive/specific thresholds, (b) examine validity/reliability, (c) compare new thresholds with those of the manufacturer, and (d) examine…

  13. Is ankle contracture after stroke due to abnormal intermuscular force transmission?

    PubMed

    Diong, Joanna; Herbert, Robert D

    2015-02-01

    Contracture after stroke could be due to abnormal mechanical interactions between muscles. This study examined if ankle plantarflexor muscle contracture after stroke is due to abnormal force transmission between the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Muscle fascicle lengths were measured from ultrasound images of soleus muscles in five subjects with stroke and ankle contracture and six able-bodied subjects. Changes in soleus fascicle length or pennation during passive knee extension at fixed ankle angle were assumed to indicate intermuscular force transmission. Changes in soleus fascicle length or pennation were adjusted for changes in ankle motion. Subjects with stroke had significant ankle contracture. After adjustment for ankle motion, 9 of 11 subjects demonstrated small changes in soleus fascicle length with knee extension, suggestive of intermuscular force transmission. However, the small changes in fascicle length may have been artifacts caused by movement of the ultrasound transducers. There were no systematic differences in change in fascicle length (median between-group difference adjusting for ankle motion = -0.01, 95% CI -0.26-0.08 mm/degree of knee extension) or pennation (-0.05, 95% CI -0.15-0.07 degree/ degree of knee extension). This suggests ankle contractures after stroke were not due to abnormal (systematically increased or decreased) intermuscular force transmission between the gastrocnemius and soleus.

  14. Dynamic ultrasonography: a cadaveric model for evaluating aseptic loosening of total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Paul M; Downey, Michael W; Fortenbaugh, David; Kirchner, John

    2013-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary method of failure in total ankle replacements. Currently, loosening is defined by morphologic changes in osseous architecture determined by plain radiography. The loss of bone noted at diagnosis presents difficulties in future ankle revisions. A method by which early aseptic loosening could be detected before bony deformation or reaction could lead to improved patient outcomes. A cadaveric fresh frozen ankle specimen (mid-tibia to include the foot) was used in the present study. An anterior approach to the ankle was performed. A total ankle prosthesis was implanted in the standard fashion (Salto Talaris, Tornier). The initial cuts were made for a size 1 ankle, and a size 1 ankle was implanted. Dynamic ultrasonography was used to evaluate the bone-implant interface. The prosthesis was removed, and sequential removal of bone was performed at the interface of the medial tibial tray until visible motion was seen with flexion and extension. The reimplanted prosthesis was then re-evaluated using dynamic ultrasonography and dynamic and static fluoroscopy. In the loose prosthesis model, dynamic ultrasonography was able to determine the motion at the bone-prosthesis interface. Dynamic ultrasonography might be a useful tool in the evaluation of early loosening in a total ankle arthroplasty model.

  15. Ankle Injuries: Reduce the Risk by Using a Soccer-Specific Warm-up Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Steven; Ellis, Margery; Combs, Sue; Hunt Long, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the ankle are among the most common injuries for soccer players at any age. Soccer coaches should be aware of current research and best practices that suggest it is possible to decrease the incidence of soccer players' ankle injuries by providing an appropriate warm-up to utilize prior to practices and games. This article introduces…

  16. Ankle Kinematics Described By Means Of Stereophotogrammetry And Mathematical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Paul; Nagata, Susan D.; Duhaime, Morris; Labelle, Hubert; Murphy, Norman

    1986-07-01

    The ankle is a complex structure allowing foot mobility while providing stability. In an attempt to improve the knowledge of the kinematics of the ankle, an approach incorporating both experimental and analytical techniques was developed. Stereophotogrammetry combined with the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) technique, was used to quantify the spatial displacements of the foot. Four motorized cameras were fixed on a baseboard 0.62 m from a support frame so as to obtain two stereopairs, one medial and one lateral. For a pair, the cameras were 0.52 m apart and maintained a convergent angle of 21.5°. The support frame was designed to fix the tibia while allowing foot motion. A device comprised of 76 markers, 38 of which were visible to each pair of cameras was used for the calibration. The spatial position of each marker was measured to a precision of 0.05 mm whereas their computed spatial position using the DLT technique was accurate to 0.4 mm. For the experiment, two embalmed cadaver legs and feet, amputated at midshank and of normal appearance were used. After a partial dissection, three pin markers were embedded into each of the medial and lateral sides of the talus permitting the calculation of its center of rotation. Each foot was photographed in 5 positions at 10° intervals, ranging from 30 ° of plantarflexion to 10° of dorsiflexion. An analytical model was developed to spatially describe the rotation of the foot about the ankle. The model calculates the plane of motion and the orientation of the axis of rotation relative to the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes. These were found respectively to be for foot one: 100°, 86°, 15° and for foot two: 91°, 69°, 21°.

  17. The knees and ankles in sport and veteran military parachutists.

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Leslie, C F; Lintott, D J; Wright, V

    1977-01-01

    112 actively parachuting sport (free fall) parachutists with more than 200 descents each and 109 veteran military parachutists no longer active returned a postal questionnaire about their parachuting activities, injuries, and current and past musculoskeletal symptoms. A high frequency of fractures and injuries was reported by each group, both in relation to parachuting and to other activities. 58 sport parachutists aged 23 to 57 years (mean 33 - 3 years) had weight-bearing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs taken of each knee. These showed a prevalence of radiological osteoarthrosis of 10 - 4% which was mild in degree in all but one knee in one subject. 46 ex-military parachutists aged 50 to 70 years (mean 55 - 2 years) had weight-bearing anteroposterior radiographs taken of both knees and showed a prevalence of radiological osteroarthrosis of 41 - 3%. Moderate and severe changes were found in 10 - 9%. In both groups of parachutists six of the eight knee joints showing either moderate or severe radiological osteroarthrosis had been subjected to a previous meniscectomy. Forty ex-military parachutists had anteroposterior radiographs of the ankles (talotibial articulation) and showed a prevalence of osteoarthrosis of 17 - 5%, with the majority showing mild changes. There was a poor correlation between radiological osteoarthrosis, ankle symptoms, and previous fractures. With the reservation that the great majority of the sport group are still young (95% aged less than 50 years), it is concluded that parachutists as a group do not show an increased prevalence of radiological osteoarthrosis of the knee or ankle. PMID:409358

  18. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  19. Validating a new computed tomography atlas for grading ankle osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael M; Vela, Nathan D; Levine, Jason E; Barnoy, Eran A

    2015-01-01

    As the most common joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) poses a significant source of pain and disability. It can be defined by classic radiographic findings, particular symptoms, or a combination of the 2. Although specific grading scales have been developed to evaluate OA in various joints, such as the shoulder, hip, and knee, no definitive classification system is available for grading OA in the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to create and validate a standardized atlas for grading (or staging) ankle osteoarthritis using computed tomography (CT) and "hallmark" findings noted on coronal, sagittal, and axial views extrapolated from the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. The CT scans of 226 patients at the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. An atlas was derived from a retrospective review of 30 remaining CT scans taken from July 2008 to November 2011. After this review, 3 orthogonal static CT images, obtained from 11 remaining patients, were chosen to represent the various stages on the OA scale and were used to test the validity of the atlas developed by 2 of us (M.M.C. and N.D.V.). A multispecialty panel of 9 examiners, excluding ourselves, independently rated the 11 CT scan subjects. The differences among examiners and specialties were calculated, including an intra-examiner agreement for 2 separate readings spaced 9 months apart. Although the small number of subspecialty examiners made the intraspecialty comparisons difficult to validate, the findings nevertheless indicated excellent agreement among all specialty groups, with good intra-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.962 and 1) inter-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.851) values. These results appeared to validate the CT ankle OA atlas, which we believe will be a valuable clinical and research tool, one that will likely be more beneficial than less relevant generalized OA grading scales in use today.

  20. Stress fractures about the tibia, foot, and ankle.

    PubMed

    Shindle, Michael K; Endo, Yoshimi; Warren, Russell F; Lane, Joseph M; Helfet, David L; Schwartz, Elliott N; Ellis, Scott J

    2012-03-01

    In competitive athletes, stress fractures of the tibia, foot, and ankle are common and lead to considerable delay in return to play. Factors such as bone vascularity, training regimen, and equipment can increase the risk of stress fracture. Management is based on the fracture site. In some athletes, metabolic workup and medication are warranted. High-risk fractures, including those of the anterior tibial diaphysis, navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and medial malleolus, present management challenges and may require surgery, especially in high-level athletes who need to return to play quickly. Noninvasive treatment modalities such as pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shock wave therapy may have some benefit but require additional research.

  1. [A very slow growing ankle swelling in a healthy male].

    PubMed

    Merlo, Christoph; Merlo, Pierina; Holzinger, Fernando; Pranghofer, Sigrid; Pfeiffer, David; Nüesch, Reto

    2014-08-20

    We describe the case report of a 66-year-old man with a very slow growing ankle tumour caused by a subcutaneous fungal abscess. Phaeoacremonium inflatipes, a member of the Dematiaceae family, was identified by needle puncture and culture of the non-odorous creamy yellow brown fluid. The fungal pseudocyst was surgically removed in toto and no further fungicidal drug therapy was required. Human infections by dematiaceous fungi causes subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, a rare, deep fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues usually acquired through traumatic skin lesions. In addition, systemic infections are reported, predominantly in immunosuppressed individuals.

  2. A mechatronic device for the rehabilitation of ankle motor function.

    PubMed

    Bucca, Giuseppe; Bezzolato, Alberto; Bruni, Stefano; Molteni, Franco

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the main results from a research aiming at the design of an electromechanical actuator for use in the rehabilitation of ankle motor function in patients suffering due to neurological diseases. Motivations for the research project are discussed within the framework of the application of mechatronic concepts for rehabilitation practice. The entire design process is then described, from the definition of project targets through the mechanical concept and control design steps until design validation by means of numerical simulations and tests on a prototype. PMID:20524738

  3. A Walking Controller for a Powered Ankle Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Amanda H.; Mitchell, Jason E.; Truex, Don; Lawson, Brian E.; Ledoux, Elissa; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a walking controller implemented on a powered ankle prosthesis prototype and assessed by a below-knee amputee subject on a treadmill at three speeds. The walking controller is a finite state machine which emulates a series of passive impedance functions at the joint in order to reproduce the behavior of a healthy joint. The assessments performed demonstrate the ability of the powered prosthesis prototype and walking controller to reproduce essential biomechanical aspects (i.e. joint angle, torque, and power profiles) of the healthy joint, especially relative to a passive prosthesis. PMID:25571414

  4. The effect of kinesiotape on dynamic balance following muscle fatigue in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kodesh, Einat; Dar, Gali

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of kinesiotape (KT) on dynamic stability following ankle muscle fatigue among individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Twenty participants with CAI participated in the study. Participants were tested under three conditions: KT, non-elastic tape, and no tape pre- and post-fatigue of the ankle muscles. Ankle muscles fatigue was induced using an isokinetic apparatus, activity of the fibularis muscle was recorded using one-channel vibromyography (VMG), and dynamic balance and neuromuscular control were assessed using the Y-Balance Test. Following fatigue exercises, the VMG signal significantly decreased in all groups (p < 0.01), without differences between groups. No significant difference in dynamic balance test scores was found between the pre- and post-fatigue condition for each group and between groups. Our results demonstrate that KT had no significant effects on dynamic balance and muscle activity following ankle muscle fatigue among individuals with CAI. PMID:26279271

  5. Correlation between toe flexor strength and ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the countermovement jump

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Joon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Kim, Young; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Each participant completed tests for peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and countermovement jump height and (2) a high correlation between peak first toe flexor muscle strength and countermovement jump height. Peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion are the main contributors to countermovement jump performance. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the measurement of peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion may be useful in clinical practice for improving jump performance in athletes training for sports such as volleyball and basketball. PMID:27630405

  6. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport. PMID:26583139

  7. Correlation between toe flexor strength and ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the countermovement jump.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Joon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Kim, Young; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Each participant completed tests for peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and countermovement jump height and (2) a high correlation between peak first toe flexor muscle strength and countermovement jump height. Peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion are the main contributors to countermovement jump performance. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the measurement of peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion may be useful in clinical practice for improving jump performance in athletes training for sports such as volleyball and basketball. PMID:27630405

  8. The Foot and Ankle: An Overview of Arthrokinematics and Selected Joint Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Janice K.; Bell, Stephania L.

    1996-01-01

    Limited range of motion of the ankle is common following a period of immobilization or injury to the lower extremity. If not corrected, this limited range of motion will disturb normal joint arthrokinematics and could affect the athlete's performance. Consequently, the athletic trainer must thoroughly evaluate the various joints of the ankle and foot in order to determine appropriate treatment. A comprehensive evaluation should include assessment of passive accessory motions at the foot and ankle. If accessory movements are restricted at any joint, mobilization techniques can be used to restore normal ankle/foot joint arthrokinematics. This article describes the biomechanics of the tibiofibular, talocrural, subtalar, and midtarsal joints and is a presentation of basic mobilization techniques for the ankle and related joints. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8.Fig 9.Fig 10.Fig 11.Fig 12.Fig 13. PMID:16558394

  9. Correlation between toe flexor strength and ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the countermovement jump

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Joon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Kim, Young; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Each participant completed tests for peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and countermovement jump height and (2) a high correlation between peak first toe flexor muscle strength and countermovement jump height. Peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion are the main contributors to countermovement jump performance. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the measurement of peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion may be useful in clinical practice for improving jump performance in athletes training for sports such as volleyball and basketball.

  10. Irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation due to tibialis anterior subluxation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Roman M; Summers, Hobie D

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible ankle fracture-dislocations are rare. Several cases of irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation have been reported in published studies secondary to the tibialis posterior tendon, deltoid ligament, or extensor digitorum longus tendon blocking the reduction. We report a case of irreducible ankle fracture-dislocation resulting from posteromedial subluxation of the tibialis anterior tendon around a medial malleolar fracture fragment. Ultimately, the ankle required open reduction of the incarcerated tendon to reduce the joint and proceed with internal fixation of the associated fracture. The patient's postoperative course was uncomplicated, and the tibialis anterior tendon was functioning at 10 months postoperatively, after which he did not return for follow-up examinations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the tibialis anterior tendon blocking closed reduction of an ankle fracture-dislocation. PMID:25618805

  11. The Role of Ankle Proprioception for Balance Control in relation to Sports Performance and Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Jia; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Balance control improvement is one of the most important goals in sports and exercise. Better balance is strongly positively associated with enhanced athletic performance and negatively associated with lower limb sports injuries. Proprioception plays an essential role in balance control, and ankle proprioception is arguably the most important. This paper reviews ankle proprioception and explores synergies with balance control, specifically in a sporting context. Central processing of ankle proprioceptive information, along with other sensory information, enables integration for balance control. When assessing ankle proprioception, the most generalizable findings arise from methods that are ecologically valid, allow proprioceptive signals to be integrated with general vision in the central nervous system, and reflect the signal-in-noise nature of central processing. Ankle proprioceptive intervention concepts driven by such a central processing theory are further proposed and discussed for the improvement of balance control in sport.

  12. Correlation between toe flexor strength and ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the countermovement jump.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Joon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Kim, Young; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Each participant completed tests for peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and countermovement jump height and (2) a high correlation between peak first toe flexor muscle strength and countermovement jump height. Peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion are the main contributors to countermovement jump performance. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the measurement of peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion may be useful in clinical practice for improving jump performance in athletes training for sports such as volleyball and basketball.

  13. Effectiveness of robot-assisted therapy on ankle rehabilitation – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to provide a systematic review of studies that investigated the effectiveness of robot-assisted therapy on ankle motor and function recovery from musculoskeletal or neurologic ankle injuries. Methods Thirteen electronic databases of articles published from January, 1980 to June, 2012 were searched using keywords ‘ankle*’, ‘robot*’, ‘rehabilitat*’ or ‘treat*’ and a free search in Google Scholar based on effects of ankle rehabilitation robots was also conducted. References listed in relevant publications were further screened. Eventually, twenty-nine articles were selected for review and they focused on effects of robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation. Results Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and a total of 164 patients and 24 healthy subjects participated in these trials. Ankle performance and gait function were the main outcome measures used to assess the therapeutic effects of robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation. The protocols and therapy treatments were varied, which made comparison among different studies difficult or impossible. Few comparative trials were conducted among different devices or control strategies. Moreover, the majority of study designs met levels of evidence that were no higher than American Academy for Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) level IV. Only one study used a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) approach with the evidence level being II. Conclusion All the selected studies showed improvements in terms of ankle performance or gait function after a period of robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation training. The most effective robot-assisted intervention cannot be determined due to the lack of universal evaluation criteria for various devices and control strategies. Future research into the effects of robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation should be carried out based on universal evaluation criteria, which could determine the most effective method of intervention. It

  14. Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Ankle Braces With and Without Free Rotation in the Sagittal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Alfuth, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Koch, Raphael; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Context: Various designs of braces including hinged and nonhinged models are used to provide external support of the ankle. Hinged ankle braces supposedly allow almost free dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot in the sagittal plane. It is unclear, however, whether this additional degree of freedom affects the stabilizing effect of the brace in the other planes of motion. Objective: To investigate the dynamic and passive stabilizing effects of 3 ankle braces, 2 hinged models that provide free plantar flexion–dorsiflexion in the sagittal plane and 1 ankle brace without a hinge. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University Movement Analysis Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seventeen healthy volunteers (5 women, 12 men; age = 25.4 ± 4.8 years; height = 180.3 ± 6.5 cm; body mass = 75.5 ± 10.4 kg). Intervention(s): We dynamically induced foot inversion on a tilting platform and passively induced foot movements in 6 directions via a custom-built apparatus in 3 brace conditions and a control condition (no brace). Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximum inversion was determined dynamically using an in-shoe electrogoniometer. Passively induced maximal joint angles were measured using a torque and angle sensor. We analyzed differences among the 4 ankle-brace conditions (3 braces, 1 control) for each of the dependent variables with Friedman and post hoc tests (P < .05). Results: Each ankle brace restricted dynamic foot-inversion movements on the tilting platform as compared with the control condition, whereas only the 2 hinged ankle braces differed from each other, with greater movement restriction caused by the Ankle X model. Passive foot inversion was reduced with all ankle braces. Passive plantar flexion was greater in the hinged models as compared with the nonhinged brace. Conclusions: All ankle braces showed stabilizing effects against dynamic and passive foot inversion. Differences between the hinged braces and the nonhinged brace did not appear to be

  15. Mobility of the ankle joint: recording of rotatory movements in the talocrural joint in vitro with and without the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, O; Tovborg-Jensen, I

    1982-02-01

    A method for graphic recording of rotatory movements in osteoligamentous ankle preparations is described. By this method it is possible to record characteristic mobility patterns in two planes at the same time. The ankle is affected by a known torque, so that the individual mobility patterns are reproducible with unchanged condition of the ligaments. Six amputated legs were investigated in the sagittal and horizontal planes and another six in the sagittal and frontal planes. Mobility patterns were recorded with intact ligaments and after successive cutting of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle in the anteroposterior direction. In the sagittal plane increased dorsiflexion was observed after total cutting of the lateral ligaments, while plantar flexion remained unchanged. In the horizontal plane the internal rotation of the talus increased in step with increasing injury to the ligament, particularly when the ankle was plantar flexed. When all collateral ligaments had been cut, an increase in external rotation occurred, especially in dorsiflexion. In the frontal plane the talar tilt increased gradually with increasing injury to the ligaments. Talar tilt was at a maximum in the neutral position of the ankle or in plantar flexion. After total severing of the collateral ligaments, however, talar tilt was most marked in dorsiflexion of the ankle.

  16. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome: A systematic four-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Hurley, Eoghan; Kennedy, John G

    2016-01-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) is a common injury in athletes engaging in repetitive plantarflexion, particularly ballet dancers and soccer players. Despite the increase in popularity of the posterior two-portal hindfoot approach, concerns with the technique remain, including; the technical difficulty, relatively steep learning curve, and difficulty performing simultaneous anterior ankle arthroscopy. The purpose of the current literature review is to provide comprehensive knowledge about PAIS, and to describe a systematic four-stage approach of the posterior two-portal arthroscopy. The etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategies are first introduced followed by options in conservative and surgical management. A detailed systematic approach to posterior hindfoot arthroscopy is then described. This technique allows for systematic review of the anatomic structures and treatment of the bony and/or soft tissue lesions in four regions of interest in the hindfoot (superolateral, superomedial, inferomedial, and inferolateral). The review then discusses biological adjuncts and postoperative rehabilitation and ends with a discussion on the most recent clinical outcomes after posterior hindfoot arthroscopy for PAIS. Although clinical evidence suggests high success rates following posterior hindfoot arthroscopy in the short- and mid-term it may be limited in the pathology that can be addressed due to the technical skills required, but the systematic four-stage approach of the posterior two-portal arthroscopy may improve upon this problem. PMID:27795947

  17. Condylomata lata on the ankle: an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Eri; Goto, Akane; Suzaki, Reiko; Sawada, Mizuki; Dekio, Itaru; Ishizaki, Sumiko; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Takahashi, Hayato; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese man presented with reddish nodules on the ankle. The nodules had a yellowish crust and eroded surface. Dermoscopy revealed red to milky-red globules at the periphery and some glomerular vessels in the center and a whitish-pink network, which corresponded to capillary dilatation in the papillary dermis and prominent acanthosis, respectively. These structures were surrounded by a yellowish peripheral structureless area and multiple white, small, round structures in the center, corresponding to the macerated horny layer and keratin plugs. Blood samples were positive for rapid plasma reagin (1:64), Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (1:20480), and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (1:1280). A lesional skin biopsy specimen showed irregular acanthosis and papillomatosis. The Warthin-Starry and anti-Treponema pallidum antibody stains on the biopsy specimen revealed many spirochetes in the lower epidermis and the papillary dermis. A diagnosis of secondary syphilis with condylomata lata was made. After one week of treatment with oral benzylpenicillin benzathine hydrate (Bicillin(®) G granules 400,000 units; Banyu Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Tokyo, Japan), 1.6 million units (U) daily, the ankle lesions had resolved with a small ulcer and pigmentation. Although syphilis is a relatively common disease, this case study reports an unusual presentation as well as dermoscopy findings. PMID:27222772

  18. Wear study of Total Ankle Replacement explants by microstructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Cottrino, S; Fabrègue, D; Cowie, A P; Besse, J-L; Tadier, S; Gremillard, L; Hartmann, D J

    2016-08-01

    The implantation of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) prostheses generally gives satisfactory results. However, a high revision rate is associated with the Ankle Evolutive System (AES) implant, due to periprosthetic osteolysis that generates significant cortical lesions and bone cysts in the periprosthetic region. Radioclinical and histological analyses of peri-implant tissues show the presence of numerous foreign particles that may come from the implant. It is known that a precocious wear of materials may lead to an important rate of foreign body in tissues and may generate osteolysis lesions and inflammatory reactions. Thus the objectives of this retrospective study of 10 AES TAR implants (recovered after revision surgeries) are to understand how the prostheses wear out, which part is the most stressed and to determine the nature and size of foreign body particles. A better understanding of friction mechanisms between the three parts of the implant and of the nature and morphology of foreign particles generated was needed to explain the in vivo behavior of the implant. This was achieved using microstuctural and tomographic analysis of both implants parts and periprosthetic tissues.

  19. Condylomata lata on the ankle: an unusual location

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Eri; Goto, Akane; Suzaki, Reiko; Sawada, Mizuki; Dekio, Itaru; Ishizaki, Sumiko; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Takahashi, Hayato; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese man presented with reddish nodules on the ankle. The nodules had a yellowish crust and eroded surface. Dermoscopy revealed red to milky-red globules at the periphery and some glomerular vessels in the center and a whitish-pink network, which corresponded to capillary dilatation in the papillary dermis and prominent acanthosis, respectively. These structures were surrounded by a yellowish peripheral structureless area and multiple white, small, round structures in the center, corresponding to the macerated horny layer and keratin plugs. Blood samples were positive for rapid plasma reagin (1:64), Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (1:20480), and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (1:1280). A lesional skin biopsy specimen showed irregular acanthosis and papillomatosis. The Warthin-Starry and anti-Treponema pallidum antibody stains on the biopsy specimen revealed many spirochetes in the lower epidermis and the papillary dermis. A diagnosis of secondary syphilis with condylomata lata was made. After one week of treatment with oral benzylpenicillin benzathine hydrate (Bicillin® G granules 400,000 units; Banyu Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Tokyo, Japan), 1.6 million units (U) daily, the ankle lesions had resolved with a small ulcer and pigmentation. Although syphilis is a relatively common disease, this case study reports an unusual presentation as well as dermoscopy findings. PMID:27222772

  20. Reflexes in cat ankle muscles after landing from falls.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, A; Schofield, P; Westerman, R A; Ziccone, S P

    1977-11-01

    1. Electrical activity and length of ankle muscles were recorded by telemetry during free fall and landing in cats. 2. After foot contact, there was a delay in onset of stretch of ankle extensors of between 8 and 11 ms. High-speed cinematography showed the delay to be associated with rapid initial dorsiflexion of the toes. 3. Electromyograms (e.m.g.) from lateral gastrocnemius increased in amplitude prior to landing. An early depression of lateral gastrocnemius e.m.g. commenced at 8 ms after foot contact, and was followed by a large peak of activity commencing some 8 ms after the first increase in lateral gastrocnemius length. 4. Local anaesthesia of the plantar cushion did not alter this pattern of response. 5. The early inhibition of lateral gastrocnemius was attributed to the action on lateral gastrocnemius motoneurones of non-cutaneous afferents responding to the initial toe dorsiflexion. Additional autogenetic inhibition may also have contributed. 6. The subsequent peak of e.m.g. was at a latenty consistent with a rapid stretch reflex, and occurred soon enough for the resulting active tension to contribute significantly to the extensor force during body deceleration.