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Sample records for acute antidepressant treatment

  1. Early Prediction of Acute Antidepressant Treatment Response and Remission in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Rongrong; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Nakonezny, Paul; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    The rate of symptom improvement during the early weeks of acute fluoxetine treatment is a good indicator of remission. This finding was made after evaluating the outcome of the fluoxetine treatment on 168 children and adults with depression.

  2. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required.

  3. Sleep deprivation and antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The mood-improving effect of sleep deprivation (SD) in depression is even today still not fully understood. Despite the fact that mood and cognitive functions are lowered by prolonged sleep loss and despite convincing data that insomnia is a strong risk factor for subsequent depression,1 acute SD for one night or even partial SD in the second half of the night improves mood in about 60% of depressed patients the day after.2,3 In this respect, among alt types of antidepressant treatments, SD elicits the fastest results, faster even than electroconvulsive therapy. Many authors correlate the likelihood of responding to SD with clinical variables. A summary of predictors is listed in Table I. PMID:22033748

  4. Therapeutic drug monitoring for antidepressant drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Ostad Haji, Elnaz; Hiemke, Christoph; Pfuhlmann, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The aim of antidepressant drug treatment is to produce remission without causing adverse effects during the acute phase of the illness and to prevent relapses or recurrences during continuation or maintenance therapy. To achieve these goals, drug choice and dosage must be optimized for each patient individually. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), which is based on the assumption that clinical effects correlate better with blood levels than doses, can be helpful. When using tricyclic antidepressant drugs TDM enhances safety and efficacy. For newer antidepressant drugs, however, it is a matter of debate to which extend TDM can have beneficial effects. For many antidepressants there exist carefully designed studies concerning the relationship between plasma concentration and clinical effects that allow the definition of recommended therapeutic ranges of the plasma concentration. In some drugs however, concentration-effect studies are lacking so far, but target ranges resulting from clinically relevant plasma concentrations or from pharmacokinetic studies could be provided. During the last years, knowledge on therapeutic references ranges in blood towards TDM guided treatment has markedly improved for new antidepressant drugs, and many specific indications have been defined for useful TDM. Recently published guidelines describe the best practice of TDM for neuropsychiatric drugs. The aim of this review is to summarize the current status of TDM for antidepressant drugs and discuss the literature with regard to response optimization, pharmacovigilance and economic benefits and with regard to needs for further research.

  5. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  6. Combining Antidepressants in Acute Treatment of Depression: A Meta-Analysis of 38 Studies Including 4511 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Henssler, Jonathan; Bschor, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Combining antidepressants (ADs) for therapy of acute depression is frequently employed, but randomized studies have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at determining efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy. Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL databases were systematically searched through March 2014 for controlled studies comparing combinations of ADs with AD monotherapy in adult patients suffering from acute depression. The prespecified primary outcome was standardized mean difference (SMD), secondary outcomes were response, remission, and dropouts. Results: Among 8688 articles screened, 38 studies were eligible, including 4511 patients. Combination treatment was statistically, significantly superior to monotherapy (SMD 0.29; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.42). During monotherapy, slightly fewer patients dropped out due to adverse events (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.53). Studies were heterogeneous (I2 = 63%), and there was indication of moderate publication bias (fail-safe N for an effect of 0.1:44), but results remained robust across prespecified secondary outcomes and subgroups, including analyses restricted to randomized controlled trials and low risk of bias studies. Meta-regression revealed an association of SMD with difference in imipramine-equivalent dose. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors was superior to other combinations. Conclusion: Combining ADs seems to be superior to monotherapy with only slightly more patients dropping out. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors seems to be significantly more effective than other combinations. Overall, our search revealed a dearth of well-designed studies. PMID:27582451

  7. Acute stress-mediated increases in extracellular glutamate levels in the rat amygdala: differential effects of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Piroli, Gerardo G; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Reagan, Lawrence P; Fadel, Jim

    2007-05-01

    Depressive illness is associated with changes in amygdalar volume, and stressful life events are known to precipitate depressive episodes in this patient population. Stress affects amygdalar synaptic plasticity and several neurotransmitter systems have been implicated in stress-mediated changes in the brain, including the glutamatergic system. However, the role of the glutamatergic system in stress-mediated plasticity in the amygdala remains to be determined. Accordingly the current study examined the stress modulation of extracellular glutamate levels in the basolateral nucleus (BLA) and the central nucleus (CeA) of the amygdala by in vivo microdialysis. Acute stress increased extracellular glutamate levels in the BLA and CeA, although the dynamics of these stress-mediated changes were dramatically different in these amygdalar nuclei. Tetrodotoxin administration reduced basal, and completely eliminated stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the amygdala, demonstrating that stress effects are dependent on local axonal depolarization. Moreover, stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the BLA were inhibited by the antidepressant tianeptine but not by the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that stress-induced modulation of glutamate neurochemistry reflects a fundamental pathological change that may contribute to the aetiology and progression of depressive illness, and suggest that some antidepressants such as tianeptine may elicit their clinical effects by modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  8. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of first-generation and second-generation antidepressants in the acute treatment of major depression: protocol for a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salanti, Georgia; Atkinson, Lauren Z; Leucht, Stefan; Ruhe, Henricus G; Turner, Erick H; Chaimani, Anna; Ogawa, Yusuke; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu; Imai, Hissei; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Suganuma, Aya; Watanabe, Norio; Stockton, Sarah; Geddes, John R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many antidepressants are indicated for the treatment of major depression. Two network meta-analyses have provided the most comprehensive assessments to date, accounting for both direct and indirect comparisons; however, these reported conflicting interpretation of results. Here, we present a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis aimed at updating the evidence base and comparing all second-generation as well as selected first-generation antidepressants in terms of efficacy and acceptability in the acute treatment of major depression. Methods and analysis We will include all randomised controlled trials reported as double-blind and comparing one active drug with another or with placebo in the acute phase treatment of major depression in adults. We are interested in comparing the following active agents: agomelatine, amitriptyline, bupropion, citalopram, clomipramine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, levomilnacipran, milnacipran, mirtazapine, nefazodone, paroxetine, reboxetine, sertraline, trazodone, venlafaxine, vilazodone and vortioxetine. The main outcomes will be the proportion of patients who responded to or dropped out of the allocated treatment. Published and unpublished studies will be sought through relevant database searches, trial registries and websites; all reference selection and data extraction will be conducted by at least two independent reviewers. We will conduct a random effects network meta-analysis to synthesise all evidence for each outcome and obtain a comprehensive ranking of all treatments. To rank the various treatments for each outcome, we will use the surface under the cumulative ranking curve and the mean ranks. We will employ local as well as global methods to evaluate consistency. We will fit our model in a Bayesian framework using OpenBUGS, and produce results and various checks in Stata and R. We will also assess the quality of evidence contributing to network

  9. Ketamine: stimulating antidepressant treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Byrow, Yulisha; Cassidy, Frederick; Cipriani, Andrea; Demyttenaere, Koen; Frye, Mark A.; Gitlin, Michael; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Lam, Raymond W.; McShane, Rupert; Mitchell, Alex J.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Rizvi, Sakina J.; Thase, Michael E.; Tohen, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Speaker’s Bureau payments): GlaxoSmithKline, and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals; royalties from American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. Also, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP provided publication support to Parexel for preparation of a manuscript. Spouse employee and stockholder of Janssen Pharmaceuticals. R.W.L. Honoraria for speaking/advising/consulting, and/or received research funds: AstraZeneca, Brain Canada, Bristol Myers Squibb, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, Canadian Psychiatric Association, Coast Capital Savings, Johnson and Johnson, Lundbeck, Lundbeck Institute, Pfizer, Servier, St. Jude Medical, Takeda University, Health Network Foundation, and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute. R.M. Investigator Janssen trials of esketamine; ‘paid-for’ ketamine clinic operated by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust - fees used to support the Trust. M.J.O. Consultant: Sunovion and Acadia Pharmaceuticals. Full-time employee of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. M.E.T. Advisory/Consultant: Alkermes, Allergan, AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Cerecor inc., Eli Lilly & Co., Forest Laboratories, Gerson Lehrman Group, Fabre-Kramer Pharmaceuticals, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline, Guidepoint Global, H. Lundbeck A/S, MedAvante Inc., Merck and Co. Inc. (formerly Schering Plough and Organon), Moksha8, Naurex Inc., Neuronetics Inc., Novartis, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals (Johnson & Johnson; Janssen), Otsuka, Pamlab, L.L.C. (Nestle), Pfizer (formerly Wyeth Ayerst Pharmaceuticals), Shire US Inc., Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., Trius Therapeutical Inc. and Takeda. Grant support: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Alkermes, AssureRx, Avanir, Forest Pharmaceuticals, Janssen, National Institute of Mental Health, and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals. Speakers Bureau: None since June, 2010. Equity Holdings: MedAvante, Inc. Royalties: American Psychiatric Foundation, Guilford

  10. General and comparative efficacy and effectiveness of antidepressants in the acute treatment of depressive disorders: a report by the WPA section of pharmacopsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Baghai, Thomas C; Blier, Pierre; Baldwin, David S; Bauer, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Kasper, Siegfried; Leonard, Brian E; Malt, Ulrik F; Stein, Dan; Versiani, Marcio; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    Current gold standard approaches to the treatment of depression include pharmacotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic interventions with social support. Due to current controversies concerning the efficacy of antidepressants in randomized controlled trials, the generalizability of study findings to wider clinical practice and the increasing importance of socioeconomic considerations, it seems timely to address the uncertainty of concerned patients and relatives, and their treating psychiatrists and general practitioners. We therefore discuss both the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of antidepressants in the treatment of depressive disorders. We explain and clarify useful measures for assessing clinically meaningful antidepressant treatment effects and the types of studies that are useful for addressing uncertainties. This includes considerations of methodological issues in randomized controlled studies, meta-analyses, and effectiveness studies. Furthermore, we summarize the differential efficacy and effectiveness of antidepressants with distinct pharmacodynamic properties, and differences between studies using antidepressants and/or psychotherapy. We also address the differential effectiveness of antidepressant drugs with differing modes of action and in varying subtypes of depressive disorder. After highlighting the clinical usefulness of treatment algorithms and the divergent biological, psychological, and clinical efforts to predict the effectiveness of antidepressant treatments, we conclude that the spectrum of different antidepressant treatments has broadened over the last few decades. The efficacy and clinical effectiveness of antidepressants is statistically significant, clinically relevant, and proven repeatedly. Further optimization of treatment can be helped by clearly structured treatment algorithms and the implementation of psychotherapeutic interventions. Modern individualized antidepressant treatment is in most cases a well-tolerated and efficacious

  11. Bipolar depression and treatment with antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Guy M

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of bipolar disorder with antidepressants tested almost exclusively in unipolar cases is common but unsupported by an appropriate body of evidence. This anomaly is highlighted by a large Taiwanese study, which implies that patients with depression difficult to treat with antidepressants are quite likely to be diagnosed subsequently with bipolar disorder.

  12. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  13. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression.

    PubMed

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-05-05

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed.

  14. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  15. Choice of treatment with antidepressants: influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Wranik, Dominika W

    2012-01-01

    Depressive disorders place a large burden on patients and on society. Although efficacious treatment options for unipolar depressive disorders exist, substantial gaps in care remain. In part, the challenge lies in the matching of individual patients with appropriate care. This is complicated by the steady increases in the variety of antidepressants available in the market. The goal of this study is to highlight the decision processes in the selection of antidepressants by clinicians, given that most treatments have similar clinical effectiveness profiles. We conducted a systematic literature review of studies that referred to the decisions surrounding treatment with antidepressants for the treatment of non-psychotic unipolar depression. Our analysis of the literature reveals that the choice of treatment is based on a variety of factors, of which clinical evidence is only one. These factors can be categorized into clinical factors such as illness and treatment characteristics, individual factors such as patient and physician characteristics, and contextual factors such as setting characteristics, decision supports and pharmacoeconomic aspects. Illness characteristics are defined by the type and severity of depression. Treatment characteristics include drug properties, efficacy, effectiveness and favorable as well as unintended adverse effects of the drug. Examples for patient characteristics are co-morbidities and individual preferences, and physician characteristics include knowledge, experience, values and beliefs, and the relationship with the patient. Treatment guidelines, algorithms, and most recently, computational supports and biological markers serve as decision supports.

  16. The depressogenic-like effect of acute and chronic treatment with dexamethasone and its influence on the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Andrzej; Serefko, Anna; Wlaź, Piotr; Poleszak, Ewa

    2014-10-03

    There is a close relationship between chronic stress, glucocorticoids and depression. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms resembling major depression have been observed in patients experiencing elevated glucocorticoid levels, and a high percentage of people suffering from depression have undergone a stressful event/events prior to the onset of this mental disorder. In our study, we investigated whether acute and chronic treatment of dexamethasone induces depression-like behavior in mice and if dexamethasone therapy influences the activity of antidepressant drugs with diverse modes of action. The antidepressant-like effect was assessed by the forced swim test in adult mice. The depressogenic-like activity of dexamethasone turned out to be dose-dependent: only the highest tested dose of the glucocorticoid (i.e., 64μg/kg) given as a single injection increased immobility time, whereas 16μg/kg/day of dexamethasone (but not 4μg/kg/day) administered repeatedly induced a significant alteration in animal behavior. These depressogenic doses of dexamethasone (i.e., 64μg/kg and 16μg/kg/day for an acute and repeated administration, respectively) diminished the antidepressant potential of the therapeutic doses of imipramine (10mg/kg), amitriptyline (10mg/kg), tianeptine (25mg/kg), mianserin (10mg/kg), citalopram (15mg/kg) and moclobemide (25mg/kg). Two main findings of our study should be particularly underlined: (1) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone evoked a depression-like behavior of mice, (2) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone were able to modify the activity of the antidepressant agents from various pharmacological groups, which may lead to a considerable reduction in the efficacy of pharmacotherapy prescribed for patients with mood disorders.

  17. Lateral Diffusion of Gαs in the Plasma Membrane Is Decreased after Chronic but not Acute Antidepressant Treatment: Role of Lipid Raft and Non-Raft Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Czysz, Andrew H; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    GPCR signaling is modified both in major depressive disorder and by chronic antidepressant treatment. Endogenous Gαs redistributes from raft- to nonraft-membrane fractions after chronic antidepressant treatment. Modification of G protein anchoring may participate in this process. Regulation of Gαs signaling by antidepressants was studied using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-Gαs. Here we find that extended antidepressant treatment both increases the half-time of maximum recovery of GFP-Gαs and decreases the extent of recovery. Furthermore, this effect parallels the movement of Gαs out of lipid rafts as determined by cold detergent membrane extraction with respect to both dose and duration of drug treatment. This effect was observed for several classes of compounds with antidepressant activity, whereas closely related molecules lacking antidepressant activity (eg, R-citalopram) did not produce the effect. These results are consistent with previously observed antidepressant-induced translocation of Gαs, but also suggest an alternate membrane attachment site for this G protein. Furthermore, FRAP analysis provides the possibility of a relatively high-throughput screening tool for compounds with putative antidepressant activity. PMID:25249058

  18. Augmentation with antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment: benefit or risk

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ye-Meng; Zhang, Ming-Dao

    2015-01-01

    We focused on the application of antidepressants in schizophrenia treatment in this review. Augmentation of antidepressants with antipsychotics is a common clinical practice to treat resistant symptoms in schizophrenia, including depressive symptoms, negative symptoms, comorbid obsessive–compulsive symptoms, and other psychotic manifestations. However, recent systematic review of the clinical effects of antidepressants is lacking. In this review, we have selected and summarized current literature on the use of antidepressants in patients with schizophrenia; the patterns of use and effectiveness, as well as risks and drug–drug interactions of this clinical practice are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the treatment of depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:25834445

  19. Why is mechanism of action important in antidepressant treatment?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas L

    2016-05-01

    Antidepressants are one of the most common treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, antidepressant medications have different mechanisms of action that can theoretically and in practice affect how patients respond. Clinicians should assess their patients' symptoms and response to medication at every visit to determine whether or not the treatment is fully effective. Here, follow the case of Maria, a 42-year-old teacher who is experiencing her first depressive episode.

  20. Antidepressant Effects of Mallotus oppositifolius in Acute Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Kukuia, Kennedy K. E.; Mante, Priscilla K.; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Adongo, Donatus W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Mallotus oppositifolius (MOE), a plant used for CNS conditions in Ghana, was investigated for acute antidepressant effects in the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). Results. In both FST and TST, MOE (10, 30, and 100 mg kg−1) significantly decreased immobility periods and frequencies. A 3-day pretreatment with 200 mg kg−1, i.p., para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, reversed the decline in immobility and the increase of swimming score induced by MOE in the modified FST. Pretreatment with reserpine alone (1 mg kg−1), α-methyldopa alone (400 mg kg−1, i.p.), or a combination of both drugs failed to reverse the decline in immobility or the increase in swimming score caused by the extract in the modified FST. The extract potentiated the frequency of head twitch responses induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine. Pretreatment with d-serine (600 mg kg−1, i.p.), glycine/NMDA agonist, abolished the behavioural effects of MOE while d-cycloserine (2.5 mg kg−1, i.p.), a glycine/NMDA partial agonist, potentiated it in both TST and modified FST. Conclusion. The extract exhibited antidepressant effects in mice which is mediated by enhancement of serotoninergic neurotransmission and inhibition of glycine/NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25045543

  1. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  2. Gene expression and proliferation biomarkers for antidepressant treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Breitfeld, J; Scholl, C; Steffens, M; Laje, G; Stingl, J C

    2017-03-14

    The neurotrophic hypothesis of depression suggests an association between effects on neuroplasticity and clinical response to antidepressant drug therapy. We studied individual variability in antidepressant drug effects on cell proliferation in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from n=25 therapy-resistant patients versus n=25 first-line therapy responders from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Furthermore, the variability in gene expression of genes associated with cell proliferation was analyzed for tentative candidate genes for prediction of individual LCL donor's treatment response. Cell proliferation was quantified by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) assays after 21-day incubation of LCLs with fluoxetine (0.5 ng μl(-1)) and citalopram (0.3 ng μl(-1)) as developed and described earlier. Gene expression of a panel of candidate genes derived from genome-wide expression analyses of antidepressant effects on cell proliferation of LCLs from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) study was analyzed by real-time PCR. Significant differences in in vitro cell proliferation effects were detected between the group of LCLs from first-line therapy responders and LCLs from treatment-resistant patients. Gene expression analysis of the candidate gene panel revealed and confirmed influence of the candidate genes ABCB1, FZD7 and WNT2B on antidepressant drug resistance. The potential of these genes as tentative biomarkers for antidepressant drug resistance was confirmed. In vitro cell proliferation testing may serve as functional biomarker for individual neuroplasticity effects of antidepressants.

  3. Increased alcohol consumption in rats after subchronic antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Alén, Francisco; Orio, Laura; Gorriti, Miguel Á; de Heras, Raquel Gómez; Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Pozo, Miguel Ángel; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2013-09-01

    The use of antidepressants for alcoholism in humans has been a matter of controversy in recent years. Despite the existence of an important co-morbidity for depression and alcoholism, some studies suggest that the use of antidepressants could worsen the prognosis of alcoholism. However, there is a lack of studies in animal models exploring this phenomenon. In the present study, we show how the 15-d treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or venlafaxine (50 mg/kg) affected alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) and subsequent alcohol consumption. Initially, fluoxetine reduced ADE and venlafaxine did not affect it. However, in the following days, both antidepressants increased alcohol consumption, an effect that was found to last at least 5 wk. Fluoxetine treatment was shown to cause a locomotor sensitized response to a challenge dose of amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg), indicating the presence of a supersensitive dopaminergic transmission. In summary, antidepressant treatment may increase alcohol consumption in rats after a period of alcohol deprivation and this could be related to alterations in the reward circuitry. This finding confirms in an animal model previous reports in humans that may limit the use of antidepressants for alcoholism.

  4. Epigenetic alterations in depression and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Menke, Andreas; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-09-01

    Epigenetic modifications control chromatin structure and function, and thus mediate changes in gene expression, ultimately influencing protein levels. Recent research indicates that environmental events can induce epigenetic changes and, by this, contribute to long-term changes in neural circuits and endocrine systems associated with altered risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. In this review, we describe recent approaches investigating epigenetic modifications associated with altered risk for major depression or response to antidepressant drugs, both on the candidate gene levels as well as the genome-wide level. In this review we focus on DNA methylation, as this is the most investigated epigenetic change in depression research.

  5. Research on antidepressants in India

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Aggarwal, Munish

    2010-01-01

    Data suggests that antidepressants are useful in the management of depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, sexual dysfunction, eating disorders, impulse control disorders, enuresis, aggression and some personality disorders. Research focusing on the usefulness of antidepressants in India has more or less followed the trends seen in the West. Most of the studies conducted in India have evaluated various antidepressants in depression. In this article, we review studies conducted in India on various antidepressants. The data suggests that antidepressants have been evaluated mainly in the acute phase treatment and rare studies have evaluated the efficacy in continuation phase treatment. PMID:21836704

  6. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Agnes; Nash, Michael; Lynch, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person's quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction.

  7. Non-Antidepressant Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Zahreddine, Nada; Richa, Sami

    2013-02-04

    Introduction: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent and very disabling anxiety disorder. First-line medications are antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). However, a substantial number of patients do not reach remission while on antidepressants and they may develop troublesome side effects, which highlights the necessity of new therapeutic options for GAD.  Methods: The purpose of this review is to discuss all non-antidepressant treatments studied in GAD. We searched MedLine for English articles published between 1980 and 2012, containing the following keywords: "generalized (or generalised) anxiety disorder" OR "anxiety disorder", AND "drug therapy" OR "herbal medicine". 76 articles were finally selected. Results: Pregabalin is the anticonvulsant with the most robust level of evidence in GAD. It rapidly reduces anxiety, have a safe side effect profile and presents a low potential for abuse. Among antipsychotics, quetiapine is the one of choice in GAD, with similar efficacy to SSRIs in low dosages, yet with lower overall tolerability. Benzodiazepines, buspirone and hydroxyzine are Food and Drugs administration (FDA) approved for GAD and have relatively good evidence of efficacy. Other drugs (betablockers, zolpidem, riluzole, etc…) and natural remedies (e.g. Piper methysticum) could be potential treatment options, yet additional research is warranted. Conclusion:  Pregabalin and quetiapine are the two most promising non-antidepressant treatments for GAD.

  8. Antidepressant-like activity of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, following systemic acute and chronic administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Partyka, Anna; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The study was designed to examine the potency of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, to exert antidepressant-like properties in animal models following acute and chronic intraperitoneal administration to rats. The modified rat forced swim test (FST) was utilized to examine a potential antidepressant effect of EMD 386088 after acute treatment (30 min before the test) and three times in a 24-h administration scheme (24 h, 5 h, and 30 min prior to the FST). The olfactory bulbectomy (OB) model was used to assess its antidepressant-like properties after chronic treatment (the drug was administered once daily for 14 days). EMD 386088 showed an antidepressant-like effect in all conducted tests. Its activity in FST after its acute administration (5 mg/kg) was blocked by the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB 271046. The obtained results seem to be specific, as there was no observed locomotor stimulation by the drug given at a lower/antidepressant dose. In the three times in the 24-h treatment scheme, EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) exerted antidepressant properties in FST as well as increased locomotor activity in the open field test. Chronic administration of EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) significantly improved the learning deficit in OB rats without affecting performance in Sham-operated (SH) animals in the passive avoidance test, and reduced OB-related rats' locomotor hyperactivity, but did not change the number of rearing + peeping episodes. The obtained findings suggest that EMD 386088 produces antidepressant-like activity after systemic acute and chronic administration which may result from direct stimulation of 5-HT6 receptors.

  9. Chronic Antidepressant Treatment Impairs the Acquisition of Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Nesha S.; Sigurdsson, Torfi; Gorman, Jack M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Like fear conditioning, the acquisition phase of extinction involves new learning that is mediated by the amygdala. During extinction training, the conditioned stimulus is repeatedly presented in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus and the expression of previously learned fear gradually becomes suppressed. Our previous study revealed that chronic treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) impairs the acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. To gain further insight into how SSRIs affect fear learning, we tested the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on the acquisition of extinction. Methods Rats were treated chronically (22 days) or subchronically (9 days) with the SSRI citalopram (10 mg/kg/day) before extinction training. The results were compared to those following chronic and subchronic treatment with tianeptine (10 mg/kg/day), an antidepressant with a different method of action. The expression of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the amygdala was examined after behavioral testing. Results Chronic but not subchronic administration of citalopram impaired the acquisition of extinction and downregulated the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the lateral and basal nuclei of the amygdala. Similar behavioral and molecular changes were found with tianeptine treatment. Conclusions These results provide further evidence that chronic antidepressant treatment can impair amygdala-dependent learning. Our findings are consistent with a role for glutamatergic neurotransmission in the final common pathway of antidepressant treatment. PMID:23260230

  10. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are

  11. Induction of neuroserpin expression in rat frontal cortex after chronic antidepressant treatment and electroconvulsive treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Yamada, Misa; Kitahara, Sari; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Honda, Kazuo; Kamijima, Kunitoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2006-02-01

    Using expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis, we previously identified certain molecular machinery that mediates antidepressant effects. To date, several partial cDNA fragments, termed antidepressant-related genes (ADRGs), have been isolated as ESTs from rat brain. In the present study, we identified two of the ADRGs to be rat neuroserpin. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we demonstrated increased neuroserpin mRNA expression in rat frontal cortex after chronic treatment with several classes of antidepressants, including imipramine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine. Electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), another therapeutic treatment for depression, also increased neuroserpin expression in rat frontal cortex. Neuroserpin is a serine protease inhibitor that is implicated in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neuronal migration, and axogenesis in the central nervous system. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that neuroserpin-mediated plastic changes in frontal cortex may underlie the therapeutic action of antidepressants and ECT.

  12. Pharmacological interaction with the sigma1 (σ1)-receptor in the acute behavioral effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Villard, Vanessa; Meunier, Johann; Chevallier, Nathalie; Maurice, Tangui

    2011-01-01

    Selective agonists of the sigma-1 (σ(1)) ligand-operated chaperone protein, like igmesine or PRE-084, are antidepressants in preclinical depression models. σ(1)-Protein activation may contribute to the antidepressant efficacy of drugs known to act as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) or noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors through direct or indirect involvement of the σ(1)-receptor in the drug effect. We here compared antidepressant effects in two behavioral procedures, the forced swimming test (FST) and conditioned fear stress (CFS). The involvement of the σ(1)-receptor was examined using a co-treatment with the σ(1)-antagonist BD1047 or using σ(1)-knockout (KO) mice. Igmesine but not PRE-084 decreased FST immobility. The SSRI fluoxetine and sertraline, but not fluvoxamine, and the tricyclic antidepressants imipramine, desipramine, and amitriptyline were also effective. Only the effect of igmesine was blocked by BD1047 or in σ(1)-KO mice. Igmesine, PRE-084, fluvoxamine, and sertraline decreased the CFS immobility in a BD1047- and σ(1)-KO-sensitive manner. Among tricyclics, only amitriptyline was effective and its effect was unaffected by BD1047 or in σ(1)-KO mice. The behavioral effects induced by mixed σ(1)-receptor/SSRI antidepressants, like fluvoxamine or sertraline, may therefore involve a non-selective action at both targets. Moreover, the CFS appears to more reliably uncover a σ(1) pharmacological component in antidepressant screening.

  13. Acute toxicity of 8 antidepressants: what are their modes of action?

    PubMed

    Minguez, Laetitia; Farcy, Emilie; Ballandonne, Céline; Lepailleur, Alban; Serpentini, Antoine; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Bureau, Ronan; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Currently, the hazard posed by pharmaceutical residues is a major concern of ecotoxicology. Most of the antidepressants belong to a family named the Cationic Amphipathic Drugs known to have specific interactions with cell membranes. The present study assessed the impact of eight antidepressants belonging to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors by the combination of multi-approaches (in vivo, in vitro, in silico) and gives some insights on the mode of action for these molecules. Antidepressants were from the most to the least toxic compound for Daphnia magna: Sertraline (EC50=1.15 mg L(-1))>Clomipramine (2.74 mg L(-1))>Amitriptyline (4.82 mg L(-1))>Fluoxetine (5.91 mg L(-1))>Paroxetine (6.24 mg L(-1))>Mianserine (7.81 mg L(-1))>Citalopram (30.14 mg L(-1)) and Venlafaxine (141.28 mg L(-1)). These acute toxicities were found correlated to Log Kow coefficients (R=0.93, p<0.001) and to cytotoxicity assessed on abalone hemocytes through the neutral red uptake assay (R=0.96, p<0.001). If narcosis as mode of action is typically expected during acute ecotoxicity bioassays, we showed by molecular modeling that particular interactions can exist between antidepressants and phosphatidylcholine, a major component of cell membranes, leading to a more specific mode of action corresponding to a potential acidic hydrolysis of ester functions.

  14. From antidepressant drugs to beta-mimetics: preclinical insights on potential new treatments for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barrot, Michel; Yalcin, Ipek; Choucair-Jaafar, Nada; Benbouzid, Malika; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José

    2009-11-01

    The market for pain treatment is a major segment of nervous system pathologies. Despite this dynamism, the management of some pain conditions remains a clinical challenge. Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is generally a chronic and disabling condition which is difficult to treat. Antidepressant drugs are recommended as one of the first line treatments, but they display noticeable side effects and are not effective on all patients. Using a murine model of neuropathy, we demonstrated that the stimulation of beta2-adrenergic receptors (beta2-AR) is not only necessary for antidepressant drugs to exert their antiallodynic action but that it is in fact sufficient to alleviate neuropathic allodynia. Chronic, but not acute, treatment with beta-mimetics such as terbutaline, salbutamol, fenoterol, salmeterol, ritodrine, isoprenaline (isoproterenol), metaproterenol (orciprenaline), procaterol, formoterol, clenbuterol or bambuterol, relieves allodynia. Agonists of beta2-ARs, and more generally any molecule stimulating beta2-ARs such as beta-mimetics, are thus proposed as potential new treatments for neuropathic pain. Clinical studies are now in preparation to confirm this potential in patients with neuropathic pain. This article reviews the findings leading to propose beta-mimetics for neuropathic pain treatment and other recent patents on the topic.

  15. Anxious distress predicts subsequent treatment outcome and side effects in depressed patients starting antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Gaspersz, Roxanne; Lamers, Femke; Kent, Justine M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Smit, Johannes H; van Hemert, Albert M; Schoevers, Robert A; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier captures a clinically valid construct that predicts a worse clinical course. Although of importance for treatment planning and monitoring, however, the specifier's ability to predict treatment outcome is unknown. This is the first study to examine the ability of the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier to predict treatment response and side effects in depressed patients who recently initiated antidepressant treatment. Patients were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study. Baseline, 1-year and 2-year follow-up data were used from 149 patients (18-65 years) with current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) who recently started adequately dosed antidepressant medication. Five self-report items were used to construct the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier. Treatment outcomes were depression severity after 1 year and 2 years, remission of MDD after 2 years and antidepressant side effects during treatment. For comparison, analyses were repeated for comorbid DSM-IV-based anxiety disorders as a predictor. In depressed patients who received antidepressant treatment, the anxious distress specifier (prevalence = 59.1%) significantly predicted higher severity (1 year: B = 1.94, P = 0.001; 2 years: B = 1.63, P = 0.001), lower remission rates (OR = 0.44, P = 0.0496) and greater frequency of side effects (≥4 vs. 0: OR = 2.74, P = 0.061). In contrast, the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders did not predict these treatment outcomes. The anxious distress specifier significantly predicts poorer treatment outcomes as shown by higher depression severity, lower remission rates, and greater frequency of antidepressant side effects in patients with MDD on adequate antidepressant treatment. Therefore, this simple 5-item specifier is of potential great clinical usefulness for treatment planning and monitoring in depressed patients.

  16. Patients' perspectives on antidepressant treatment in consultations with physicians.

    PubMed

    Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2014-05-01

    Patient perspectives on antidepressant treatment and physician attention, and responses toward these in consultations with patients diagnosed with depression, are rarely studied. We analyzed video-recorded consultations with general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists. We used conversation analysis and systemic functional linguistics and found that the perspectives patients expressed related to the possibility of achieving, and the inability to retain, a sense of agency. Patients also presented indirect expressions of shame and expressions suggesting alienation toward medical treatment. GPs attended to patient perspectives by talking about medication indirectly. When patients expressed their perspectives, GPs responded by being nonauthoritative but also without prompting patients to elaborate on their reflections. Psychiatrists responded authoritatively and never urged patients to reflect on their perspectives. Shared decision making did not take place because physicians did not explore patients' perspectives in depth or offer their expertise by taking these perspectives into consideration.

  17. Non-Antidepressant Psychopharmacologic Treatment of Specific Phobias.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Rami Bou

    2013-02-04

    Specific phobias are among the most frequently diagnosed disorders in community with a twelve-month prevalence of 8.7% and a lifetime prevalence of 12.5%. Exposure-based therapies constitute the most effective treatment for this type of anxiety disorders. However, pharmacotherapies can still be considered for patients suffering from specific phobias in case they were non-adherent or resistant to exposure-based therapies or in case this kind of therapies was not accessible for them. Few data support the use of antidepressant in the treatment of specific phobias. A literature search via MedLine has been done in order to review all available studies in the domain of non-antidepressant pharmacotherapy of specific phobias. The importance of benzodiazepines such as diazepam, alprazolam and midazolam resides in the short-term reduction of subjective self-reported fear during the exposure to the feared object or situation. General anesthesia for the treatment of dental phobia does not seem to be efficient unless conducted with the inhalation anesthetic nitrous oxide which seems to be efficient on the short and on the long-term. Beta-adrenergic antagonists have been essayed with conflicting results. Cognitive enhancers such as D-cycloserine, glucocorticoids and yohimbine hydrochloride, seem to be more effective than placebo after a short term period of follow-up in treating specific phobia sympotms. In conclusion, promising efficient pharmacotherapies for specific phobias consists of drugs that enhance the efficacy of exposure-based therapies sessions by reducing anticipating phobia-related fear and/or by enhancing cognition during these sessions.

  18. Effect of sildenafil on the activity of some antidepressant drugs and electroconvulsive shock treatment in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Sildenafil, a potent and selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type 5, is used clinically to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is often taken by patients suffering from depression and receiving antidepressant drug treatment. However, its influence on the efficacy of antidepressant treatment was not sufficiently studied. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of sildenafil on the anti-immobility action of several antidepressant drugs (i.e., sertraline, fluvoxamine, citalopram, maprotiline, trazodone, and agomelatine) as well as on antidepressant-like effect of electroconvulsive stimulations in the forced swim test in mice. The obtained results showed that acute sildenafil treatment enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of all of the studied drugs. The observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity. The interactions between sildenafil and sertraline, maprotiline, and trazodone were pharmacodynamic in nature, as sildenafil did not affect concentrations of these drugs neither in serum nor in brain tissue. Increased concentrations of fluvoxamine, citalopram, and agomelatine in brain tissue evoked by sildenafil co-administration suggest that pharmacokinetic interactions between sildenafil and these drugs are very likely. Sildenafil injected acutely did not alter the antidepressant-like efficacy of electroconvulsive stimulations in mice, as assessed in the forced swim test. Interestingly, repeated (14 days) administration of sildenafil decreased the anti-immobility action of the electroconvulsive stimulations. In conclusion, the present study shows that sildenafil may alter the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment. Further studies are warranted to better characterize the influence of sildenafil on the activity of antidepressant drugs and electroconvulsive therapy.

  19. Effects of different antidepressant treatments on the core of depression

    PubMed Central

    Baghai, Thomas C.; Eser, Daniela; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Core symptoms of depression are a combination of psychological and somatic symptoms, often combined with psychomotor and cognitive disturbances. Diagnostic classification of depression including the concepts of melancholic, endogenous, or severe depression describe severely depressed patients suffering from most of the core symptoms, together with clinical characteristics of a cyclic unipolar or bipolar course, lower placebo response rates, higher response rates to electroconvulsive therapy, to antidepressant treatments with dually or mixed modes of action, or to lithium augmentation. Higher rates ofhypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity and specific electroencephalograph patterns have also been shown in this patient group. Summarizing the symptomatology of depression in these patients, a broad overlap between the abovementioned subgroups can be suggested. Because the positive diagnosis of those core symptoms of depression may include clinical consequences, it would be of use to integrate all the mentioned concepts in the upcoming new versions of the diagnostic systems DSM-V and ICD-11. PMID:18979944

  20. Interaction of different antidepressants with acute and chronic methadone in mice, and possible clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Barak, Yonatan; Hostovsky, Avner; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Volis, Ina; Rubovitch, Vardit; Pick, Chaim G

    2014-04-01

    We studied the interaction of a single dose of different antidepressant medications with a single (acute) dose or implanted mini-pump (chronic) methadone administration in mice, using the hotplate assay. For the acute experiment, subthreshold doses of six antidepressant drugs were administered separately with a single dose of methadone. The addition of a subthreshold dose of desipramine or clomipramine to methadone produced significant augmentation of the methadone effect with each drug (p < 0.05). Fluvoxamine given at a fixed subthreshold dose induced a synergistic effect only with a low methadone dose. Escitalopram, reboxetine and venlafaxine given separately, each at a fixed subthreshold dose, induced no interaction. Possible clinical implications of these findings are that while escitalopram, reboxetine and venlafaxine do not affect methadone's antinociception in mice and are safe to be given together with methadone when indicated, fluvoxamine, clomipramine and desipramine considerably augment methadone-induced effects and should be avoided in this population due to the risk of inducing opiate overdose. For the chromic experiment, when a subthreshold dose of either escitalopram, desipramine or clomipramine was injected to mice following 2 weeks of methadone administration with the mini-pump, none of the antidepressant drugs strengthened methadone's analgesic effect. Further studies are needed before possible clinical implications can be drawn.

  1. Acute Stress Increases Depolarization-Evoked Glutamate Release in the Rat Prefrontal/Frontal Cortex: The Dampening Action of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Farisello, Pasqualina; Zappettini, Simona; Tardito, Daniela; Barbiero, Valentina S.; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Mallei, Alessandra; Baldelli, Pietro; Racagni, Giorgio; Raiteri, Maurizio; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Background Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. Methodology/Findings Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine) and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated), and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486). On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats). Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. Conclusions/Significance Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of

  2. Treatment of depression: an update on antidepressant monotherapy and combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lenderts, Susan; Kalali, Amir

    2009-08-01

    We analyzed the trends in product regimens used to treat depression to investigate whether there has been a shift in treatment patterns following the May 2008 launch of desvenalfaxine in the United States and the approval of an atypical antipsychotic as add-on therapy to antidepressants. Our analysis suggests that antidepressant monotherapy continues to be the most widely used drug treatment approach, accounting for 84 percent of depression treatment regimens. Antidepressant monotherapy is more prevalent among primary care physician-prescribed treatment regimens (92%) than psychiatry-prescribed regimens (73%). Combination treatment regimens have become increasingly more common as physician perception of disease severity increases, with antidepressant combination therapy accounting for eight percent, 17 percent, and 27 percent of treatment regimens for mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. The most commonly used agents in addition to an antidepressant in combination treatment regimens include another antidepressant (40% of combination regimens), an anxiety agent (40%), and/or atypical antipsychotics (18%). A trend analysis suggests that combination regimens that include an antidepressant plus an atypical antipsychotic, anxiety agent, or a prescription sleep aid comprise a greater share of combination regimens in 12 months ending May 2009 than they did in 12 months ending June 2008.

  3. Antidepressant monotherapy and combination of antidepressants in the treatment of resistant depression in current clinical practice: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Bares, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Stopkova, Pavla; Höschl, Cyril

    2010-11-01

    Abstract Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of antidepressant monotherapies and combinations of antidepressants in the treatment of resistant patients in current clinical practice. Methods. We reviewed chart documents of resistant depressive inpatients treated at least 4 weeks with a new treatment. Depressive symptoms and clinical status were assessed using Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form and Clinical Global Impression at the baseline, week 2 and in the end of treatment. Results. We identified 81 patients (27 with combinations and 51 with monotherapies) that were suitable for analyses. The combination group achieved higher reduction of MADRS score (14.6 vs 10.2 pts., p=0.02) and response rate (≥ 50% reduction of MADRS, 67% vs 39%, p=0.03). Number needed to treat for response was 4. Conclusions. Based on our results, we suggest that combination of antidepressants might be more effective than monotherapy in clinical practice.

  4. Predictors of an acute antidepressant response to fluoxetine and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Flament, M F; Lane, R M; Zhu, R; Ying, Z

    1999-09-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine have different pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic profiles which may be of clinical relevance in the determination of response in different subtypes of depression. A randomized, double-blind, 6-week study comparing sertraline (50-100 mg/day) with fluoxetine (20-40 mg/day) in 286 outpatients with major depression, who had demonstrated comparable efficacy and tolerability for the two drugs, was analysed by subgroups of patients at baseline with melancholia, severe depression, single depressive episode, multiple depressive episodes, high anxiety, low anxiety, psychomotor retardation and psychomotor agitation. Multiple logistic regression with regressors including treatment-by-subgroup variables revealed that, within certain subgroups, the efficacy might differ substantially from that of the whole treatment group. However, the only treatment-by-subgroup interaction term that was significant was anxiety (P < 0.05). There was no evidence of interaction in single or recurrent episode subgroups, and these were not included in subsequent analyses. Subsequent two-sample statistical comparison tests of response (i.e. Hamilton Depression Scale reduction > or = 50%) rates at study endpoint between treatment groups demonstrated that patients with melancholic depression and those with symptoms of psychomotor agitation yielded a significantly greater proportion of responders with sertraline compared to fluoxetine (P < 0.05). Response rates in sertraline- and fluoxetine-treated patients, respectively, were: overall study 59%, 51%; melancholia 59%, 44%; severe depression 59%, 41%; low anxiety 71%, 55%; high anxiety 47%, 48%; psychomotor retardation, 48%, 46%; and psychomotor agitation 62%, 39%. Multiple logistic regression adjusting for possible confounding factors, that included a treatment by anxiety interaction term, also led to similar findings. In particular, the analysis showed that significant differences existed in favour of sertraline in patients

  5. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an update and implications for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Brandl, Eva J; Müller, Daniel J; Richter, Margaret A; Kennedy, James L

    2014-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder with high genetic influence. Antidepressants such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are widely accepted as the first-line medications for OCD; however, approximately 50% of OCD patients show poor response. Personalized medicine utilizing genetic testing has recently received much attention because the variability of antidepressant response and tolerability are partly due to an individual's genetic variations. This has led to researchers investigating the role of specific genetic factors on antidepressant response and utility of testing in the clinical realm. Genetic test panels are showing promise for guiding antidepressant treatment to improve outcomes in depression. This article will review the most recent findings in the pharmacogenetics of OCD and its related disorders. Promising results have been reported for several serotonergic and glutamatergic system genes and the cytochrome CYP450 liver enzyme genes, which appear to play an important role in OCD and antidepressant response.

  6. [Threshold of Application of Antidepressant Drugs for Treatment of Depressive Disorder].

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Toshihide; Tanaka, Teppei

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, along with the expansion of medical care for depressive disorder, there has been much controversy regarding the application of antidepressant drugs for its treatment. The aim of this paper is to consider critical issues concerning the threshold of application of antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression. It was formerly important to diagnose the 'quality' of depression (melancholia or non-melancholia) in order to choose antidepressant treatment, whereas an assessment of the 'quantity' of depression (severity of symptoms) is crucial today to decide on the threshold. Recent guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder do not positively recommend the use of medication for the treatment of mild depression. The guidelines published by the Japanese Society of Mood Disorders also state that doctors have to give priority to treatments avoiding medication, although the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs for mild depression is controversial. Actually, in a clinical setting, doctors have to understand the conditions of individual cases and cope with many issues, such as a risk of suicide, comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders, target symptoms of pharmacotherapy, and choices of classes and doses of antidepressant drugs. The threshold of application of antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression may vary according to the doctor-patient relationship and surrounding conditions. Doctors are required to provide treatment options other than pharmacotherapy.

  7. The Antidepressant Treatment Response Index as a Predictor of Reboxetine Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Marissa M; Hunter, Aimee M; Cook, Ian A; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2015-10-01

    Biomarkers to predict clinical outcomes early during the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) could reduce suffering and improve outcomes. A quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) biomarker, the Antidepressant Treatment Response (ATR) index, has been associated with outcomes of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants in patients with MDD. Here, we report the results of a post hoc analysis initiated to evaluate whether the ATR index may also be associated with reboxetine treatment outcome, given that its putative mechanism of action is via norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI). Twenty-five adults with MDD underwent qEEG studies during open-label treatment with reboxetine at doses of 8 to 10 mg daily for 8 weeks. The ATR index calculated after 1 week of reboxetine treatment was significantly associated with overall Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) improvement at week 8 (r=0.605, P=.001), even after controlling for baseline depression severity (P=.002). The ATR index predicted response (≥50% reduction in HAM-D) with 70.6% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity, and remission (final HAM-D≤7) with 87.5% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. These results suggest that the ATR index may be a useful biomarker of clinical response during NRI treatment of adults with MDD. Future studies are warranted to investigate further the potential utility of the ATR index as a predictor of noradrenergic antidepressant treatment response.

  8. Epigenetics and energetics in ventral hippocampus mediate rapid antidepressant action: Implications for treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Benedetta; Mathé, Aleksander A.; Sousa, Vasco C.; Zelli, Danielle; Svenningsson, Per; McEwen, Bruce S.; Nasca, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Although regulation of energy metabolism has been linked with multiple disorders, its role in depression and responsiveness to antidepressants is less known. We found that an epigenetic and energetic agent, acetyl-l-carnitine (LAC, oral administration), rapidly rescued the depressive- and central and systemic metabolic-like phenotype of LAC-deficient Flinders Sensitive Line rats (FSL). After acute stress during LAC treatment, a subset of FSL continued to respond to LAC (rFSL), whereas the other subset did not (nrFSL). RNA sequencing of the ventral dentate gyrus, a mood-regulatory region, identified metabolic factors as key markers predisposing to depression (insulin receptors Insr, glucose transporters Glut-4 and Glut-12, and the regulator of appetite Cartpt) and to LAC responsiveness (leptin receptors Lepr, metabotropic glutamate receptors-2 mGlu2, neuropeptide-Y NPY, and mineralocorticoid receptors MR). Furthermore, we found that stress-induced treatment resistance in nrFSL shows a new gene profile, including the metabolic regulator factors elongation of long chain fatty acids 7 (Elovl7) and cytochrome B5 reductase 2 (Cyb5r2) and the synaptic regulator NPAS4. Finally, while improving central energy regulation and exerting rapid antidepressant-like effects, LAC corrected a systemic hyperinsulinemia and hyperglicemia in rFSL and failed to do that in nrFSL. These findings establish CNS energy regulation as a factor to be considered for the development of better therapeutics. Agents such as LAC that regulate metabolic factors and reduce glutamate overflow could rapidly ameliorate depression and could also be considered for treatment of insulin resistance in depressed subjects. The approach here serves as a model for identifying markers and underlying mechanisms of predisposition to diseases and treatment responsiveness that may be useful in translation to human behavior and psychopathology. PMID:27354525

  9. Pharmacological Evaluation of Antidepressant-Like Effect of Genistein and Its Combination with Amitriptyline: An Acute and Chronic Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jia Jia, Tay; Yee Woon, Lim; Kumar Chellappan, Dinesh; Candasamy, Mayuren; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the acute and chronic antidepressant effect of genistein in combination with amitriptyline in mice. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6) for treatment with water, genistein, or amitriptyline, either alone or in combination for ten days. Animals were subjected to locomotor activity testing; tail suspension test (TST); and forced swim test (FST) and immobility time was recorded on day one and day ten. Acute treatment of all treatment groups did not significantly reduce the immobility time (p > 0.05). Chronic treatment of combination of genistein (10 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility time as compared to control group (p < 0.001) and was comparable to amitriptyline alone (10 mg/kg). However, no changes in anti-immobility activity in combination of subeffective doses of genistein (5 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) were observed. Genistein at its standard dose (10 mg/kg) rendered synergistic effects in combination with subeffective dose of amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) and additive effects in combination with therapeutic dose of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg). PMID:26681936

  10. Antidepressants in the Treatment of Functional Dyspepsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yaoyao; Chen, Meng; Huang, Zhiyin; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Antidepressants have been empirically used in the treatment of functional dyspepsia (FD). However, results from recent clinical trials investigating their efficacy are conflicting. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of antidepressants in the management of FD in adults. Methods Databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and BIOSIS Previews were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCT) investigating efficacy of antidepressants in the management of FD in adult patients. Data of overall symptom unimproved and adverse events were compared between the antidepressants and placebo group. Results The search strategy identified 432 citations. Of those, eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of symptom unimproved with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) versus placebo was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = 0.01; I2 = 0%, P = 0.39). By contrast, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) did not show a benefit over placebo (RR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.86 to 1.17, P = 0.95; I2 = 0%, P = 0.82). Adverse events were significantly more frequent among patients receiving antidepressants than those receiving placebos (RR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.35, P = 0.007). Conclusion TCAs but not SSRIs, are effective in the treatment of FD, but antidepressants were also associated with more adverse events compared with placebo. PMID:27310135

  11. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Martín-López, Luis M.; Rojo, Jose E.; Gibert, Karina; Martín, Juan Carlos; Sperry, Lyli; Duñó, Lurdes; Bulbena, Antonio; Vallejo, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The combination of antidepressants is a useful tool in the treatment of major depression, especially in cases where there is a partial response to antidepressant monotherapy. However, the use of this strategy is a matter of controversy, and its frequency of use in clinical practice is not clear. The aim of our study is to assess the use of antidepressants combination in Spain by reviewing three databases used between 1997 and 2001. Methods. Databases pertain to patients who are study subjects of major depression treatment. These databases are a result of studies performed in Spain and in which 550 psychiatrists participated. The total studied sample was comprised of N = 2, 842 patients, aged over 18, fitting DSM-IV criteria for Major Depressive Episode. The percentage of patients who received more than one antidepressant and the types of combinations used was described. Subsequently, a comparative study between the group which received a combination of antidepressants (N = 64) and the group which received antidepressant monotherapy (N = 775) was performed. Results. 27.1% of patients were on antidepressive monotherapy treatment, and 2.2% were on combination therapy. In the comparison of patients on combination therapy and monotherapy, there were significant differences only in episode duration (P = 0.001). The most frequent combinations are SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants. The active principle most widely combined is fluoxetine. Conclusions. The prevalence of use of antidepressant combination therapy is 2.2% of the global sample and 8.3% of treated patients. Other than duration of the depressive episode, no clinical characteristics exclusive to patients who received combination rather than monotherapy were found. Our study found that the most frequent combination is SSRIs + TCAs, also being the most studied. PMID:21738865

  12. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse.

  13. Efficacy and feasibility of antidepressant treatment in patients with post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-min; Zou, De-zhi; Shen, Liu-yan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xin-yu; Pu, Jun-cai; Dong, Mei-xue; Wei, You-dong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Depression greatly impacts the quality of life in most stroke survivors. Therefore, effective treatment of post-stroke depression (PSD) is critically important. However, evidence supporting the effectiveness and feasibility of antidepressant treatment in this population is limited and somewhat confusing. Methods: A comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases from inception up to November 2015 was conducted. We reviewed all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assigned patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSD to antidepressant or placebo treatment. Reduction in depression rating scale scores and response rate to antidepressants were defined as the efficacy outcomes. Rates of dropout for any reason and for adverse effects were defined as the acceptability outcomes. We also assessed improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) as functional outcomes. Results: In total, 11 trials consisting of 740 participants were indentified. A significant advantage of antidepressants compared with placebo treatment in PSD was observed in overall pooled effect size analysis (SMD = −0.96; 95% CI = −1.41 to −0.51; P <0.0001). In addition, patients receiving antidepressants presented a much greater improvement in various depressive symptoms than those with placebo (RR = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.01–1.83; P = 0.04). However, antidepressants were less well tolerated than placebo because of some adverse events (RR = 2.72; 95% CI = 1.37–5.43; P = 0.04). Intriguingly, no consistent evidence was found for a positive effect of antidepressants on ADL in our analysis. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that antidepressants treatment confers potentially positive effects in patients with PSD as compared with simple placebo treatment. However, this must be carefully considered in light of its possible adverse events in some individual patients. PMID:27828858

  14. Inflammation and Immune Regulation as Potential Drug Targets in Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Frank M.; Kirkby, Kenneth C.; Lichtblau, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a mutual relationship between inflammation and major depression. A variety of mechanisms are outlined, indicating how inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis, course and treatment of major depression. In particular, this review addresses 1) inflammatory cytokines as markers of depression and potential predictors of treatment response, 2) findings that cytokines interact with antidepressants and non-pharmacological antidepressive therapies, such as electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation and physical activity, 3) the influence of cytokines on the cytochrome (CYP) p450-system and drug efflux transporters, and 4) how cascades of inflammation might serve as antidepressant drug targets. A number of clinical trials have focused on agents with immunmodulatory properties in the treatment of depression, of which this review covers nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cytokine inhibitors, ketamine, polyunsaturated fatty acids, statins and curcumin. A perspective is also provided on possible future immune targets for antidepressant therapy, such as toll-like receptor-inhibitors, glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, oleanolic acid analogs and minocycline. Concluding from the available data, markers of inflammation may become relevant factors for more personalised planning and prediction of response of antidepressant treatment strategies. Agents with anti-inflammatory properties have the potential to serve as clinically relevant antidepressants. Further studies are required to better define and identify subgroups of patients responsive to inflammatory agents as well as to define optimal time points for treatment onset and duration. PMID:26769225

  15. The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Kaihola, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2015-01-01

    The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy on both mother and child are vigorously studied, but the underlying biology for these effects is largely unknown. The placenta plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the fetus. We performed a gene expression study on the fetal side of the placenta to investigate gene expression patterns in mothers with antenatal depression and in mothers using antidepressant treatment during pregnancy. Placental samples from mothers with normal pregnancies, from mothers with antenatal depression, and from mothers using antidepressants were collected. We performed a pilot microarray study to investigate alterations in the gene expression and selected several genes from the microarray for biological validation with qPCR in a larger sample. In mothers with antenatal depression 108 genes were differentially expressed, whereas 109 genes were differentially expressed in those using antidepressants. Validation of the microarray revealed more robust gene expression differences in the seven genes picked for confirmation in antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women. Among the genes that were validated ROCK2 and C12orf39 were differentially expressed in both depressed and antidepressant-treated women, whereas ROCK1, GCC2, KTN1, and DNM1L were only differentially expressed in the antidepressant-treated women. In conclusion, antenatal depression and antidepressant exposure during pregnancy are associated with altered gene expression in the placenta. Findings on those genes picked for validation were more robust among antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women, possibly due to the fact that depression is a multifactorial condition with varying degrees of endocrine disruption. It remains to be established whether the alterations found in the gene expression of the placenta are found in the fetus as well. PMID:25628539

  16. Effectiveness of Antidepressants and Predictors of Treatment Response for Depressed HIV Patients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Victoria K.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Nakasujja, Noeline; Dickens, Akena; Aunon, Frances; Musisi, Seggane

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is well-established for the treatment of depression, but little is known about its effectiveness for HIV populations in sub-Saharan Africa. This study examined the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment and predictors of treatment response among depressed HIV patients in Uganda. Data was obtained from two open label trials in which 184 HIV patients were diagnosed with depression and started on antidepressants. Data at treatment baseline and month 6 were compared to assess treatment response, and baseline predictors of response were assessed. 154 completed Month 6, of whom 122 (79%) had responded to treatment and were no longer depressed (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score < 5). Bivariate analysis found that education, CD4 count, general health functioning, physical health, pain, quality of life, and social support variables were associated with antidepressant treatment response; however, only secondary education and social support independently predicted treatment response in logistic multiple regression analysis. Baseline depression severity was not associated with treatment response. In conclusion, antidepressants are effective in treating both moderate and more severe depression among persons living with HIV in Uganda, and education [O.R. (95% C.I.) = 4.33 (1.33 – 14.11)] and social support [O.R. (95% C.I.) = 1.54 (1.03 – 2.30)] were most predictive of treatment response. PMID:25525053

  17. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S.; Palazzo, M. Carlotta; Masdrakis, Vasilios G.

    2013-01-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants. PMID:23431429

  18. TPH-2 Polymorphisms Interact with Early Life Stress to Influence Response to Treatment with Antidepressant Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gavin P.; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yanyan; Pu, Mengjia; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variation in genes implicated in monoamine neurotransmission may interact with environmental factors to influence antidepressant response. We aimed to determine how a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms in monoaminergic genes influence this response to treatment and how they interact with childhood trauma and recent life stress in a Chinese sample. An initial study of monoaminergic coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms identified significant associations of TPH2 and HTR1B single nucleotide polymorphisms with treatment response that showed interactions with childhood and recent life stress, respectively (Xu et al., 2012). Methods: A total of 47 further single nucleotide polymorphisms in 17 candidate monoaminergic genes were genotyped in 281 Chinese Han patients with major depressive disorder. Response to 6 weeks’ antidepressant treatment was determined by change in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score, and previous stressful events were evaluated by the Life Events Scale and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form. Results: Three TPH2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs11178998, rs7963717, and rs2171363) were significantly associated with antidepressant response in this Chinese sample, as was a haplotype in TPH2 (rs2171363 and rs1487278). One of these, rs2171363, showed a significant interaction with childhood adversity in its association with antidepressant response. Conclusions: These findings provide further evidence that variation in TPH2 is associated with antidepressant response and may also interact with childhood trauma to influence outcome of antidepressant treatment. PMID:27521242

  19. Treatment Resistant Depression with Loss of Antidepressant Response: Rapid—Acting Antidepressant Action of Dextromethorphan, A Possible Treatment Bridging Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) may have ketamine—like rapid—acting, treatment—resistant, and conventional antidepressant effects.1,2 This reports our initial experience with DM in unipolar Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A patient with treatment—resistant MDD (failing adequate trials of citalopram and vortioxetine) with loss of antidepressant response (to fluoxetine and bupropion) twice experienced a rapid—acting antidepressant effect within 48 hours of DM administration and lasting 7 days, sustained up to 20 days with daily administration, then gradually developing labile loss of antidepressant response over the ensuing 7 days. Upon full relapse in DSM-5 MDD while taking 600 mg/day of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor bupropion XL, a 300 mg oral loading dose of DM was given, followed by 60 mg po bid after an additional dose—finding period, without side effects. DM exhibited a ketamine—like rapid—acting antidepressant effect, thought to be mediated by mTOR activation (related to NMDA PCP site antagonism, sigma-1 and beta adrenergic receptor stimulation) and 5HTT inhibition, resulting in AMPA receptor trafficking, and dendritogenesis, spinogenesis, synaptogenesis, and increased neuronal survival (related to NMDA antagonism and sigma-1 and mTOR signaling). This report appears to be the first report of a rapid—acting effect in unipolar MDD and adds to antidepressant effects observed in the retrospective chart review of 77 patients with Bipolar II Disorder (Kelly and Lieberman 2014). If replicated, there is some reason to think that the administration of other agents with DM, such as lithium or D-cycloserine, might prolong the duration of the rapid-antidepressant effect. PMID:27738380

  20. Poor guideline adherence in the initiation of antidepressant treatment in children and adolescents in the Netherlands: choice of antidepressant and dose.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Ymkje Anna; de Jonge, Peter; Kalverdijk, Luuk; Bos, Jens H J; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C M; Hak, Eelko

    2016-11-01

    The Dutch guideline for the treatment of depression in young people recommends initiating antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine, as the evidence for its efficacy is strongest and the risk of suicidality may be lower than with other antidepressants. Furthermore, low starting doses are recommended. We aimed to determine whether antidepressant prescriptions are in accord with guidelines. A cohort of young people aged between 6 and 17 at the time of antidepressant initiation was selected from IABD, a Dutch pharmacy prescription database. The percentage of prescriptions for each antidepressant was determined. Starting and maintenance doses were determined and compared with recommendations for citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline. During the study period, 2942 patients initiated antidepressant treatment. The proportion of these young people who were prescribed fluoxetine increased from 10.1 % in 1994-2003 to 19.7 % in 2010-2014. However, the most commonly prescribed antidepressants were paroxetine in 1994-2003 and citalopram in 2004-2014. The median starting and maintenance doses were ≤0.5 DDD/day for tricyclic antidepressants and 0.5-1 DDD/day for SSRIs and other antidepressants. Starting doses were guideline-concordant 58 % of the time for children, 31 % for preteens, and 16 % for teens. Sixty percent of teens were prescribed an adult starting dose. In conclusion, guideline adherence was poor. Physicians preferred citalopram over fluoxetine, in contrast to the recommendations. Furthermore, although children were prescribed a low starting dose relatively frequently, teens were often prescribed an adult starting dose. These results suggest that dedicated effort may be necessary to improve guideline adherence.

  1. Regulation of BDNF and trkB mRNA in rat brain by chronic electroconvulsive seizure and antidepressant drug treatments.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Morinobu, S; Duman, R S

    1995-11-01

    The influence of chronic electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) or antidepressant drug treatments on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, trkB, was examined by in situ hybridization and Northern blot. In frontal cortex, acute ECS increased BDNF mRNA approximately twofold, an effect significantly augmented by a prior course of chronic ECS treatment (10 d). In the hippocampus, the influence of chronic ECS varied between the major subfields. In the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, chronic ECS decreased the acute induction of BDNF and trkB mRNA by approximately 50%, but prolonged their expression: levels remained elevated two- to threefold 18 hr later after the last chronic ECS treatment, but returned to control 18 hr after acute ECS. In CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell layers, chronic ECS significantly elevated the acute induction of BDNF, and tended to prolong the expression of BDNF and trkB mRNA. A similar effect was observed in layer 2 of the piriform cortex, where chronic ECS significantly increased the acute induction and prolonged the expression of BDNF and trkB mRNA. Chronic (21 d), but not acute (1 d), administration of several different antidepressant drugs, including tranylcypromine, sertraline, desipramine, or mianserin, significantly increased BDNF mRNA and all but mianserin increased trkB mRNA in hippocampus. In contrast, chronic administration of nonantidepressant psychotropic drugs, including morphine, cocaine, or haloperidol, did not increase levels of BDNF mRNA. Furthermore, chronic administration of ECS or antidepressant drugs completely blocked the down-regulation of BDNF mRNA in the hippocampus in response to restraint stress. The enhanced induction and prolonged expression of BDNF in response to chronic ECS and antidepressant drug treatments could promote neuronal survival, and protect neurons from the damaging effects of stress.

  2. Antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Lauren; Price, Annabel; Evans, Alison; Valsraj, Koravangattu; Hotopf, Matthew; Higginson, Irene J

    2011-01-01

    Depression can exacerbate symptoms associated with life-threatening illness and increase disability and distress. In palliative care, depression occurs in a context of multiple symptoms, which complicates detection and treatment. While systematic reviews of antidepressants have been conducted in specific life-threatening diseases, no previous study has synthesized the evidence in palliative care. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of antidepressants for the treatment of depression in palliative care. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCINFO and Cochrane trials registers were systematically searched to identify randomized controlled trials comparing antidepressants and placebo for the treatment of depression in palliative care. The primary outcome was efficacy assessed at three time-points. Twenty-five studies were included in the review. At each time-point antidepressants were more efficacious than placebo: 4-5 weeks odds ratio (OR) 1.93 (1.15-3.42) p = 0.001; 6-8 weeks OR 2.25 (1.38-3.67) p = 0.001; 9-18 weeks OR 2.71 (1.50-4.91) p = 0.001. This review provides evidence that antidepressants are effective in treating depression in palliative care. Their superiority over placebo is apparent within 4-5 weeks and increases with continued use. It is probable that the effect sizes yielded in this review overestimate the efficacy of antidepressants due to biases such as selective reporting and publication. Nevertheless, the magnitude and consistency of the effect suggests genuine benefit.

  3. The effect of antidepressant medication treatment on serum levels of inflammatory cytokines: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hannestad, Jonas; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, for example, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1 beta (IL-1β), are elevated in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). The reason why this occurs is unclear. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines could be a result of brain dysfunction in MDD. It is also possible that inflammatory cytokines contribute to depressive symptoms in MDD. If the first assumption is correct, one would expect levels to normalize with resolution of the depressive episode after treatment. Several studies have measured changes in cytokine levels during antidepressant treatment; however, the results vary. The purpose of this study was to pool all available data on changes in serum levels of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β during antidepressant treatment to determine whether these levels change. Studies were included if they used an approved pharmacological treatment for depression, patients had a diagnosis of MDD, and serum levels of TNFα, IL-6, and/or IL-1β were measured before and after treatment. Twenty-two studies fulfilled these criteria. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that, overall, while pharmacological antidepressant treatment reduced depressive symptoms, it did not reduce serum levels of TNFα. On the other hand, antidepressant treatment did reduce levels of IL-1β and possibly those of IL-6. Stratified subgroup analysis by class of antidepressant indicated that serotonin reuptake inhibitors may reduce levels of IL-6 and TNFα. Other antidepressants, while efficacious for depressive symptoms, did not appear to reduce cytokine levels. These results argue against the notion that resolution of a depressive episode is associated with normalization of levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines; however, the results are consistent with the possibility that inflammatory cytokines contribute to depressive symptoms and that antidepressants block the effects of inflammatory cytokines on the brain.

  4. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. The glucocorticoid receptor: pivot of depression and of antidepressant treatment?

    PubMed

    Anacker, Christoph; Zunszain, Patricia A; Carvalho, Livia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2011-04-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and increased levels of glucocorticoid hormones in patients with depression have mostly been ascribed to impaired feedback regulation of the HPA axis, possibly caused by altered function of the receptor for glucocorticoid hormones, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Antidepressants, in turn, ameliorate many of the neurobiological disturbances in depression, including HPA axis hyperactivity, and thereby alleviate depressive symptoms. There is strong evidence for the notion that antidepressants exert these effects by modulating the GR. Such modulations, however, can be manifold and range from regulation of receptor expression to post-translational modifications, which may result in differences in GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent gene transcription. The idea that the therapeutic action of antidepressants is mediated, at least in part, by restoring GR function, is consistent with studies showing that decreased GR function contributes to HPA axis hyperactivity and to the development of depressive symptoms. Conversely, excessive glucocorticoid signalling, which requires an active GR, is associated with functional impairments in the depressed brain, especially in the hippocampus, where it results in reduced neurogenesis and impaired neuroplasticity. In this review, we will focus on the GR as a key player in the precipitation, development and resolution of depression. We will discuss potential explanations for the apparent controversy between glucocorticoid resistance and the detrimental effects of excessive glucocorticoid signalling. We will review some of the evidence for modulation of the GR by antidepressants and we will provide further insight into how antidepressants may regulate the GR to overcome depressive symptoms.

  6. HBK-14 and HBK-15 with antidepressant-like and/or memory-enhancing properties increase serotonin levels in the hippocampus after chronic treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Pawlica-Gosiewska, Dorota; Witalis, Jadwiga; Waszkielewicz, Anna

    2017-04-01

    5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands might have antidepressant-like properties and improve cognitive function. We previously reported significant antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of two dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists in various behavioral tests in rodents. As a continuation of our previous experiments, in this study we aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of 1-[(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)ethoxyethyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (HBK-14) and 1-[(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxy)ethoxyethyl]-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (HBK-15) caused antidepressant-like effects and elevated serotonin levels in the murine hippocampus. We also evaluated cholinolytic properties and the influence of acute administration of both compounds on cognitive function in mice. To assess antidepressant-like properties and the influence on learning and memory we used forced swim test and step-through passive avoidance task in mice, respectively. Both compounds showed antidepressant-like properties and significantly elevated serotonin levels in the hippocampus after chronic treatment (HBK-14 - 2.5 mg/kg; HBK-15 - 0.625 and 1.25 mg/kg). HBK-15 administered chronically antidepressant-like activity at lower dose (0.625 mg/kg) than the dose active after acute treatment (1.25 mg/kg). None of the compounds affected locomotor activity of mice. HBK-15 possessed very weak cholinolytic properties, whereas HBK-14 did not show any effect on muscarinic receptors. Only HBK-15 (0.625 mg/kg) presented memory-enhancing properties and ameliorated cognitive impairments caused by scopolamine (1 mg/kg). Our results indicate that 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 antagonists might have potential in the treatment of depression and possess positive influence on cognitive function.

  7. Effect of 3 weeks treatment with yohimbine on salivary secretion in healthy volunteers and in depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants.

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, H; Schmitt, L; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1992-01-01

    The effect of yohimbine treatment (4 mg three times daily) for 3 weeks on salivary secretion was investigated. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of yohimbine increased salivary volume within 1 h to a similar extent before and at the end of the treatment period. In depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants (and exhibiting a reduced salivary flow), yohimbine also acutely increased salivary volume. In contrast, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist failed to modify resting values measured in the morning (i.e. 10 and 14 h after the last administration in healthy volunteers and depressed patients respectively). This result indicates that alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists may have a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of dry mouth caused by tricyclic antidepressant drugs. PMID:1362888

  8. The effects of drugs on human models of emotional processing: an account of antidepressant drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Abbie; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-12-01

    Human models of emotional processing suggest that the direct effect of successful antidepressant drug treatment may be to modify biases in the processing of emotional information. Negative biases in emotional processing are documented in depression, and single or short-term dosing with conventional antidepressant drugs reverses these biases in depressed patients prior to any subjective change in mood. Antidepressant drug treatments also modulate emotional processing in healthy volunteers, which allows the consideration of the psychological effects of these drugs without the confound of changes in mood. As such, human models of emotional processing may prove to be useful for testing the efficacy of novel treatments and for matching treatments to individual patients or subgroups of patients.

  9. The effects of drugs on human models of emotional processing: an account of antidepressant drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Abbie; Harmer, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Human models of emotional processing suggest that the direct effect of successful antidepressant drug treatment may be to modify biases in the processing of emotional information. Negative biases in emotional processing are documented in depression, and single or short-term dosing with conventional antidepressant drugs reverses these biases in depressed patients prior to any subjective change in mood. Antidepressant drug treatments also modulate emotional processing in healthy volunteers, which allows the consideration of the psychological effects of these drugs without the confound of changes in mood. As such, human models of emotional processing may prove to be useful for testing the efficacy of novel treatments and for matching treatments to individual patients or subgroups of patients. PMID:26869848

  10. Relationship between Antidepressant Prescription Rates and Features of Schizophrenic Patients and Its Outcome in Schizophrenia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    HANCI, Nurcan; ÇETİN EKER, Özlem; MİRALOĞLU, Özlem; ARGUN USLU, Meral; ÖZKAYA, Güven; EKER, Salih Saygın

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comorbid depression in schizophrenia is associated with poor outcome, increased risk of relapse and a high rate of suicide. Identification of depressive symptoms and their appropriate treatment is crucial for depressed schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the rates of antidepressant prescription and their outcomes. Methods The records of the schizophrenic outpatients, who were consulted at Psychosis Unit of Psychiatry Department between January 2007 and September 2012, were evaluated retrospectively. Enrolled schizophrenic patients’ antidepressant medications were at their minimal effective doses and effective duration. Results The present study demonstrates that 39 of the 101 patients during their follow-ups were prescribed antidepressants. The mean follow-up period was 6.3 (±4.2) years; the mean age at onset was 22 (±6.5) years; the mean duration of illness was 14.7 (±7.3) years and the mean number of psychotic exacerbation was 5 (±3.7). The most prescribed antidepressants were; sertraline (36.9%), venlefaxine (23.8%) and essitalopram (20.2%). SSRI’s were prescribed 57 (73.1%), where as SNRI’s 21 times (26.9%). There was no significant difference between SSRI (78.6%) and SNRI (21.4%) treatments in terms of psychotic exacerbation under antidepressant medication. Full remission of depressive symptoms was achieved in 21 patients (53.8%). Remission rates were significantly higher (p<0.01) in SNRI treated depressed schizophrenic patients (85.7%) compared to SSRI treated patients (50.9%). In 8 of the 39 patients (20.5%) antidepressant treatment was terminated due to side effects. Conclusion This study demonstrates that SSRI’s were more often prescribed compared to other classes of antidepressants in emerging depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients despite full remission with SNRI’s is more common. There was no significant difference between SSRI and SNRI treatment in terms of psychotic exacerbation.

  11. Efficacy and safety of antidepressant's use in the treatment of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder - review of research.

    PubMed

    Antosik-Wójcińska, Anna Zofia; Stefanowski, Bogdan; Święcicki, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The use of antidepressants in treatment of depression in course of bipolar disorders (BD) is controversial. In case of no improvement during monotherapy with mood stabilizer, the use of antidepressants is often necessary. The safety of this group (in context of phase change, mixed states and rapid cycling) is essential and is the subject of many research. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning efficacy and safety of use of antidepressants in the treatment of affective disorders and long-term impact on the course of the disease. Selection of articles have been made by searching the Medline and Pubmed databases using keywords: antidepressant drugs, bipolar depression, bipolar disorder, efficacy, safety, mania, hypomania. The risk of mania is greater in bipolar disorder type I, than in type II or during treatment with Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and treatment with venlafaxine. The use of SSRIs and bupropion is associated with a relatively small increase of phase change risk. There are different opinions concerning recommended duration of antidepressant treatment. Generally antidepressant use should end after 2-3 months of remission, the risk of recurrence of depression after discontinuation of antidepressants is, however, higher than in case of continuation. In BD type II or BD spectrum, antidepressant monotherapy is allowed in severe depression. In bipolar disorder type I and in case of phase change after antidepressants use in the past, use of antidepressants should be very cautious. Antidepressants are contraindicated in rapid cycling and in mixed episodes. Further work is needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antidepressants use.

  12. Does melatonin treatment change emotional processing? Implications for understanding the antidepressant mechanism of agomelatine.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Abbie; Bogdanovskaya, Maria; Waskett, Poppy; Zacharia, Sophie; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-10-01

    The antidepressant, agomelatine, has a novel pharmacological profile, with agonist properties at M1 and M2 receptors and antagonist properties at 5HT2C receptors. Whether the antidepressant effects of this treatment are mediated by the drug's effects at the M1 and M2 receptors or the 5HT2C receptor or a synergy between these actions remains unclear. In the present study, a healthy volunteer model of emotional processing, which discriminates between effective and non-effective antidepressant compounds, was used to assess the contribution of melatonin agonism to the efficacy of agomelatine. Fifty-eight healthy volunteers were randomised to receive 7 days of once daily treatment with either 1 mg melatonin, 3 mg melatonin or placebo. Seven days treatment with 3 mg melatonin resulted in earlier bedtimes consistent with a phase advance in circadian rhythm. Some marginal effects of melatonin were observed on emotional processing; however, these were neither consistent with nor comparable to those seen following conventional antidepressant treatment or with agomelatine itself. These data suggest that the antidepressant action of agomelatine cannot be accounted for solely by its action at the M1 and M2 receptors.

  13. Hippocampal bone morphogenetic protein signaling mediates behavioral effects of antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Sarah M.; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Chen, Jessie; Peng, Chian-Yu; Kessler, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Many antidepressants stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but the mechanisms by which they increase neurogenesis and modulate behavior are incompletely understood. Here we show that hippocampal bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is modulated by antidepressant treatment, and that the changes in BMP signaling mediate effects of antidepressant treatment on neural progenitor cell proliferation and behavior. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine suppressed BMP signaling in the adult mouse hippocampus both by decreasing levels of BMP4 ligand and increasing production of the BMP inhibitor noggin. Increasing BMP signaling in the hippocampus via viral overexpression of BMP4 blocked the effects of fluoxetine on proliferation in the dentate gyrus and on depressive behavior. Conversely, inhibiting BMP signaling via viral overexpression of noggin in the hippocampus or infusion of noggin into the ventricles exerted antidepressant and anxiolytic activity along with an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis. Similarly, conditional genetic deletion of the type II BMP receptor in Ascl1-expressing cells promoted neurogenesis and reduced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, suggesting that neural progenitor cells contribute to the effects of BMP signaling on affective behavior. These observations indicate that BMP signaling in the hippocampus regulates depressive behavior, and that decreasing BMP signaling may be required for the effects of some antidepressants. Thus BMP signaling is a new and powerful potential target for the treatment of depression. PMID:27698430

  14. Tianeptine treatment induces antidepressive-like effects and alters BDNF and energy metabolism in the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ribeiro, Karine F; Antunes, Altamir R; Scaini, Giselli; Jeremias, Isabela C; dos Santos, Lis Mairá M; Jeremias, Gabriela C; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2012-08-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the behavioral and molecular effects of tianeptine. To this aim, Wistar rats were treated with tianeptine (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) or imipramine (30 mg/kg) acutely and chronically. The results showed that both treatments reduced the immobility time. The BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex with tianeptine and decreased in the nucleus accumbens after acute treatment; in chronic treatment, BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal and hippocampus with tianeptine. Acute treatment decreased the citrate synthase activity in the prefrontal cortex with tianeptine, and increased it in the amygdala with imipramine; chronic treatment increased the citrate synthase in the hippocampus with tianeptine. The creatine kinase was increased in the prefrontal cortex with tianeptine and in the amygdala with imipramine after acute treatment; chronic treatment increased the creatine kinase activity in the hippocampus with imipramine and tianeptine. The complex I activity was decreased in the prefrontal cortex with imipramine and increased in the hippocampus with tianeptine. The other complexes were increased with imipramine and tianeptine at all doses, but were related to the treatment given and the brain area studied. Chronic treatment increased the malate dehydrogenase activity in the amygdala with tianeptine. Acute treatment decreased the succinate activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala with tianeptine; chronic treatment increased the succinate activity in the hippocampus with tianeptine at all doses. In conclusion, tianeptine exerted antidepressant-like behavior which can be attributed to its effects on pathways related to depression, such as BDNF and metabolism energy.

  15. Out of the Black Box: Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents and the Antidepressant Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Vitiello, Benedetto; Clarke, Gregory; Keller, Martin; Emslie, Graham J.; Ryan, Neal; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish; Ritz, Louise; Zelanzny, Jamie; Onorato, Matthew; Brent, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this article is to describe the effects of the pediatric antidepressant controversy on the Treatment of Serotonin-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial. Method Adolescents, ages 12–18 years, with SSRI resistant depression were randomized to one of four treatments for a 12 week trial: Switch to different SSRI, switch to an alternate antidepressant (venlafaxine), switch to an alternate SSRI plus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), or switch to venlafaxine plus CBT. Results The health advisories and “black box” warnings regarding suicidality and antidepressants in adolescents occurred during the course of the TORDIA trial. Revisions to the protocol, multiple-consent form changes, and re-consenting of patients were necessary. Recruitment of participants was adversely affected. Conclusion Despite a cascade of unforeseen events that delayed the completion of the study, the TORDIA trial resulted in clinically important information about treatment-resistant depression in adolescents. PMID:22251022

  16. Antidepressant Drug Treatment in Association with Multiple Sclerosis Disease-Modifying Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mirsky, Matthew M.; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Explorys Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) database contains de-identified clinical data for 50 million patients. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), specifically interferon beta (IFNβ) treatments, may potentiate depression. Conflicting data have emerged, and a large-scale claims-based study by Patten et al. did not support such an association. This study compares the results of Patten et al. with those using the EPM database. Methods: “Power searches” were built to test the relationship between antidepressant drug use and DMT in the MS population. Searches were built to produce a cohort of individuals diagnosed as having MS in the past 3 years taking a specific DMT who were then given any antidepressant drug. The antidepressant drug therapy prevalence was tested in the MS population on the following DMTs: IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, combined IFNβ, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and dimethyl fumarate. Results: In patients with MS, the rate of antidepressant drug use in those receiving DMTs was 40.60% to 44.57%. The rate of antidepressant drug use for combined IFNβ DMTs was 41.61% (males: 31.25%–39.62%; females: 43.10%–47.33%). Antidepressant drug use peaked in the group aged 45 to 54 years for five of six DMTs. Conclusions: We found no association between IFNβ treatment and antidepressant drug use in the MS population compared with other DMTs. The EPM database has been validated against the Patten et al. data for future use in the MS population. PMID:27999525

  17. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  18. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Hunter, Aimee M.; Krantz, David E.; Cook, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD. PMID:25809789

  19. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments.

    PubMed

    Leuchter, Andrew F; Hunter, Aimee M; Krantz, David E; Cook, Ian A

    2015-05-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD.

  20. Central effects following repeated treatment with antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Maj, J

    1984-01-01

    The review sums up the results of experiments in which there were studied central effects following repeated administration of various antidepressant drugs (AD) in rats and mice. A number of typical and atypical AD, except for selective inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake, potentiate the clonidine aggressiveness in mice (medicated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors). These results indicate that the repeated AD administration enhances responsiveness of central postsynaptic alpha 1-adrenoceptors. This assumption is in accordance with electrophysiological literature data. A few AD (including citalopram, a selective inhibitor of the 5-HT uptake), administered repeatedly, potentiate the locomotor hyperactivity induced by D-amphetamine or apomorphine, without affecting the stereotypy evoked by both dopaminomimetics. It may be supposed that AD enhance the responsiveness of a dopamine (DA) system, probably the mesolimbic one (but not the striatal one). A repeated administration of various AD also counteracts the locomotor hypoactivity induced by salbutamol (mediated by a beta-adrenoceptor). The importance of the effects stated above (alpha 1 up-regulation, DA up-regulation, beta down-regulation) for the mechanism of antidepressant action has been discussed.

  1. Evaluation of antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine: an acute and chronic study.

    PubMed

    Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Anovadiya, Ashish; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu B

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of commonly used spice Curuma longa Linn. In the present study, the antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine was studied in acute model (three doses 24, 5 and 1 h before test) of forced swimming test (FST) in glass jar and tail suspension test (TST) in mice and in chronic model (14 day study) of FST with water wheel in rats. All the tests were carried out in the following seven groups (n = 6 in each group), drugs being given orally (doses for mice): Group 1 (vehicle), group 2 (curcumin 50 mg/kg), group 3 (curcumin 100 mg/kg), group 4 (fluoxetine 20 mg/kg), group 5 (imipramine 15 mg/kg), group 6 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus fluoxetine 20 mg/kg) and group 7 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus imipramine 15 mg/kg). Equivalent doses for rats were used. Both the acute model of FST and TST, and the chronic model of FST with water wheel showed significant antidepressant like activity of curcumin in 100 mg/kg dose as compared to vehicle control (p < 0.05). The effect of curcumin (100 mg/kg) was similar to that of fluoxetine and imipramine (p > 0.05) but its addition to fluoxetine and imipramine did not improve their antidepressant activity (p > 0.05). Curcumin increased both the swimming and climbing behavior in FST, thus its antidepressant like activity could be due to an increase in serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the brain. Curcumin can be a useful antidepressant especially in cases which respond to drugs having mixed effects on serotonin and catecholamines levels in the brain.

  2. Simvastatin treatment exerts antidepressant-like effect in rats exposed to chronic mild stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Yen; Chang, Alice Y W; Lin, Tsu-Kung

    2014-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease and stroke, both of which, in turn, are risk factors of old-age depression. Statins are extensively used for decreasing cholesterol levels. Clinical investigations revealed that long-term use of statins appeared to be associated with a lower risk of anxiety and depression. However, the antidepressant property of statins has not been well examined. This study aimed at examining the antidepressant-like effects of statins in rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS). We found that animals exposed to CMS for 4 weeks developed depressive-like state, shown by forced swim test and sucrose preference test. However, these CMS-induced behavioral changes were reversed by simvastatin (5 or 10mg/kg/day) for 14 days, comparable to imipramine (10mg/kg/day) treatment. Locomotor activity and anxiety-like behaviors were not altered by CMS or these treatments. These results demonstrated antidepressant-like effects of statin in CMS model of rats and suggested the potential that statins could be used to facilitate antidepressant treatment in clinical setting.

  3. Ferulic acid chronic treatment exerts antidepressant-like effect: role of antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Juliana; Rodrigues, Andre Felipe; Rós, Adriana de Sousa; de Castro, Amanda Blanski; de Castro, Bianca Blanski; de Lima, Daniela Delwing; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal; Zeni, Ana Lúcia Bertarello

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been claimed a place in pathophysiology of depression; however, the details of the neurobiology of this condition remains incompletely understood. Recently, treatments employing antioxidants have been thoroughly researched. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic compound with antioxidant and antidepressant-like effects. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the antioxidant activity of chronic oral FA treatment in its antidepressant-like effect using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. The modulation of antioxidant system in blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex was assessed after stress induction through TST and FST. Our results show that FA at the dose of 1 mg/kg has antidepressant-like effect without affecting locomotor activity. The stress induced by despair tests was able to decrease significantly the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the blood, catalase (CAT) in the blood and cerebral cortex and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the cerebral cortex. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) levels were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the results show that FA was capable to increase SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities and decrease TBA-RS levels in the blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These findings demonstrated that FA treatment in low doses is capable to exert antidepressant-like effect with the involvement of the antioxidant defense system modulation.

  4. A comparative analysis of standard and alternative antidepressants in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G J; Rabkin, J G; Rabkin, R

    1996-01-01

    Our research group has conducted clinical trials of standard (imipramine, fluoxetine, and sertraline) and alternative antidepressants (dextroamphetamine and testosterone replacement therapy) in the treatment of clinical depression among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) illness. This report presents secondary analyses of data pooled from these trials with the purpose of comparing the antidepressant efficacy of these various agents. In all trials, a DSM-III-R depressive disorder was the primary criterion for study entry, and each treatment resulted in significant improvement after both 2 and 6 weeks of treatment according to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Response rates for standard antidepressants ranged from 70% to 74%, with similar, high response rates found in trials of dextroamphetamine (93%) and testosterone (81%). The response rate of each active drug treatment was superior to that of placebo (33%). Each treatment was well-tolerated in terms of side effects, and there was essentially no effect of any treatment on CD4 cell count. Differences in trial design, entrance criteria, and measurements require that caution be used in interpreting these results; nonetheless, each of the five treatments studied demonstrated strong efficacy and possessed relatively unique benefits, providing health care providers with valuable treatment options in addressing individual needs of patients.

  5. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  6. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  7. Ketamine plus imipramine treatment induces antidepressant-like behavior and increases CREB and BDNF protein levels and PKA and PKC phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Stringari, Roberto B; Ribeiro, Karine F; Ferraro, Ana K; Vitto, Marcelo F; Cesconetto, Patrícia; Souza, Claúdio T; Quevedo, João

    2011-08-01

    A growing body of evidence has pointed to the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of major depression. The present study investigated the possibility of synergistic interactions between antidepressant imipramine with the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. Wistar rats were acutely treated with ketamine (5 and 10mg/kg) and imipramine (10 and 20mg/kg) and then subjected to forced swimming tests. The cAMP response element bindig (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels and protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala by imunoblot. Imipramine at the dose of 10mg/kg and ketamine at the dose of 5mg/kg did not have effect on the immobility time; however, the effect of imipramine (10 and 20mg/kg) was enhanced by both doses of ketamine. Ketamine and imipramine alone or in combination at all doses tested did not modify locomotor activity. Combined treatment with ketamine and imipramine produced stronger increases of CREB and BDNF protein levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala, and PKA phosphorylation in the hippocampus and amygdala and PKC phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex. The results described indicate that co-administration of antidepressant imipramine with ketamine may induce a more pronounced antidepressant activity than treatment with each antidepressant alone. This finding may be of particular importance in the case of drug-resistant patients and could suggest a method of obtaining significant antidepressant actions whilst limiting side effects.

  8. Role of depression in heart failure--choosing the right antidepressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Antonopoulos, Alexis S; Antoniades, Charalambos; Saldari, Chrysa; Stefanadi, Elli; Siasos, Gerasimos; Stougianos, Pavlos; Plastiras, Aris; Korompelis, Porfirios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-04-01

    Major depression is a common feature of heart failure patients and possibly stems from their common biochemical background. Depression and heart failure co-morbidity has several clinical implications on the prognosis of these patients. Furthermore antidepressive drugs have known cardiovascular side effects, while their safety and efficacy in heart failure has not been fully elucidated yet. The right choice of antidepressive treatment in heart failure constitutes an issue of high importance as it can affect the clinical outcome of these patients. In this article we highlight the role of major depression in heart failure and demonstrate their common biochemical background. Moreover we review the acquired so far knowledge on the use of the various categories of antidepressants in heart failure by reference to the existing clinical studies on antidepressants efficacy and safety in heart failure. Even though certain conclusions cannot be drawn yet, evidence suggests that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may have a beneficial effect on clinical outcome of heart failure patients.

  9. Neuropeptidomics of mouse hypothalamus after imipramine treatment reveal somatostatin as a potential mediator of antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Stroth, Nikolas; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Qi, Hongshi; Fälth, Maria; Sköld, Karl; Hoyer, Daniel; Andrén, Per E; Svenningsson, Per

    2012-01-01

    Excessive activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been associated with numerous diseases, including depression, and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has been shown to suppress activity of the HPA axis. Central hypothalamic control of the HPA axis is complex and involves a number of neuropeptides released from multiple hypothalamic subnuclei. The present study was therefore designed to determine the effects of imipramine administration on the mouse hypothalamus using a peptidomics approach. Among the factors found to be downregulated after acute (one day) or chronic (21 days) imipramine administration were peptides derived from secretogranin 1 (chromogranin B) as well as peptides derived from cerebellin precursors. In contrast, peptides SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 (1-11) derived from somatostatin (SRIF, somatotropin release inhibiting factor) were significantly upregulated by imipramine in the hypothalamus. Because diminished SRIF levels have long been known to occur in depression, a second part of the study investigated the roles of individual SRIF receptors in mediating potential antidepressant effects. SRA880, an antagonist of the somatostatin-1 autoreceptor (sst1) which positively modulates release of endogenous SRIF, was found to synergize with imipramine in causing antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test. Furthermore, chronic co-administration of SRA880 and imipramine synergistically increased BDNF mRNA expression in the cerebral cortex. Application of SRIF or L054264, an sst2 receptor agonist, but not L803807, an sst4 receptor agonist, increased phosphorylation of CaMKII and GluR1 in cerebrocortical slices. Our present experiments thus provide evidence for antidepressant-induced upregulation of SRIF in the brain, and strengthen the notion that augmented SRIF expression and signaling may counter depressive-like symptoms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  10. Structural Imaging in Late Life Depression: Association with Mood and Cognitive Responses to Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Christopher M.; Workman, Clifford I.; Lyman, Christopher H.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Kraut, Michael A.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent positron emission tomography studies of cerebral glucose metabolism have identified the functional neural circuitry associated with mood and cognitive responses to antidepressant treatment in late life depression (LLD). The structural alterations in these networks are not well understood. The present study used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to evaluate the association between grey matter volumes and changes in mood symptoms and cognitive function with treatment with the antidepressant citalopram. Design Open label trial with baseline brain MR scan. Mood and cognitive assessments performed at baseline and during citalopram treatment. Setting Outpatient clinics of an academic medical center. Participants 17 previously unmedicated patients age 55 or older with a major depressive episode and 17 non-depressed comparison subjects. Intervention 12 week trial of flexibly dosed citalopram. Measurements Grey matter volumes, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, California Verbal Learning Test, Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System™. Results In LLD, higher grey matter volumes in the cingulate gyrus, superior and middle frontal gyri, middle temporal gyrus and precuneus was associated with greater mood improvement. Higher grey matter volumes in primarily frontal areas were associated with greater improvement in verbal memory and verbal fluency performance. Conclusions Associations with antidepressant induced improvements in mood and cognition were observed in several brain regions previously correlated with normalization of glucose metabolism after citalopram treatment in LLD. Future studies will investigate molecular mechanisms underlying these associations (e.g. beta-amyloid, inflammation, glutamate). PMID:24238925

  11. Long-term antidepressant treatment in general practice: changes in body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Chiwanda, Laura; Cordiner, Matthew; Thompson, Anne T.; Shajahan, Polash

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method To discern changes in body mass index (BMI) in patients on long-term antidepressant treatment in a general practice population and establish BMI changes in patients with and without a diagnosis of diabetes. We used a retrospective observational method and identified patients on four antidepressants of interest. We excluded those who did not have start and current BMI readings within the past 3 years and noted whether or not patients had a diagnosis of diabetes. Results Long-term treatment with citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazapine and sertraline was associated with increased BMI in two-thirds of patients. There was reduction in BMI in patients with diabetes and an increase in BMI for patients who did not have diabetes. Clinical implications Awareness of environmental factors and their impact on individuals is important. Medication is not the only cause of abnormal metabolic effects. Overall monitoring of physical health is important in all groups of patients.

  12. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, T.; Matsushita, H.

    1981-03-09

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (/sup 3/H-SPD) and /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity.

  13. Effect of chronic antidepressant treatment on responses to apomorphine in selectively bred rat strains.

    PubMed

    Pucilowski, O; Overstreet, D H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the dopamine-sensitizing behavioral effect of chronic antidepressant treatment in two selectively bred rat strains: the hypercholinergic Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Two antidepressants, desipramine HCl (DMI) and sertraline HCl, were injected IP in separate groups of FSL and FRL rats in a dose of 16.5 mumol/kg twice daily for 16 days. Twenty-four hours after withdrawal, locomotor and hypothermic responses to 0.2 mg/kg of apomorphine, SC, were examined. Attenuation of the effect of apomorphine was observed in the open field: FRLs withdrawn from sertraline were significantly less mobile than control FRLs, and the same trend was found in FSL rats. Chronic DMI resulted in similar changes in the locomotor activity. Sertraline treatment decreased apomorphine-induced hypothermia by almost half in FSLs, whereas slight hyperthermia was induced in FRL rats instead. The present results suggest that in these selectively bred strains, a serotonergic antidepressant such as sertraline may have sensitized dopaminergic autoreceptors and/or desensitized postsynaptic receptors. Apomorphine-induced hypothermia could be mediated by serotonergic neuron function that may have been altered by chronic sertraline but not DMI treatment.

  14. The Auditory P3 in Antidepressant Pharmacotherapy Treatment Responders, Non-Responders and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Natalia; De Somma, Elisea; Blondeau, Claude; Tessier, Pierre; Norris, Sandhaya; Fusee, Wendy; Smith, Dylan; Blier, Pierre; Knott, Verner

    2013-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs), derived from electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, can index electrocortical activity related to cognitive operations. The fronto-central P3a ERP is involved in involuntary processing of novel auditory information, whereas the parietal P3b indexes controlled attention processing. The amplitude of the auditory P3b has been found to be decreased in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, few studies have examined the relationship between the P3b, the related P3a, and antidepressant treatment response. We tested 53 unmedicated individuals (25 females) with MDD as well as 43 non-depressed controls (23 females) on the novelty oddball task, wherein infrequent deviant (target) and frequent standard (non-target) tones were presented, along with infrequent novel (non-target/distractor) sounds. The P3a and P3b ERPs were assessed to the novel and target sounds, respectively, as were accompanying behavioural performance measures. Depression ratings and antidepressant response status were assessed following 12 weeks of pharmacotherapy with three different regimens. Antidepressant treatment non-responders had smaller baseline P3a/b amplitudes than responders and healthy controls. Baseline P3b amplitude also weakly predicted the extent of depression rating changes by week 12. Females exhibited larger P3a/b amplitudes than males. With respect to task performance, controls had more target hits than treatment non-responders. ERP measures correlated with clinical changes in males and with behavioural measures in females. These results suggest that greater (or control-like) baseline P3a/b amplitudes are associated with a positive antidepressant response, and that gender differences characterize the P3 and, hence, basic attentive processes. PMID:23664712

  15. Loss of phenotype of parvalbumin interneurons in rat prefrontal cortex is involved in antidepressant- and propsychotic-like behaviors following acute and repeated ketamine administration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, ZhiQiang; Zhang, GuangFen; Li, XiaoMin; Liu, XiaoYu; Wang, Nan; Qiu, LiLi; Liu, WenXue; Zuo, ZhiYi; Yang, JianJun

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that single subanesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant-like effects. Nevertheless, repeated subanesthetic doses of ketamine produce psychosis-like effects with dysfunction of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons. We hypothesized that PV interneurons play an important role in the antidepressant-like actions of ketamine, and different changes in PV interneurons occur with the antidepressant-like and propsychotic-like effects of ketamine. To test this hypothesis, ketamine's antidepressant-like effects were evaluated by the forced swimming test. Ketamine-induced stereotyped behaviors and hyperactivity actions and the function of PV interneurons were also assessed. We demonstrated that an acute dose of 10 mg/kg ketamine induced significant antidepressant-like effects and reduced the levels of PV and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing enzyme GAD67 in the rat prefrontal cortex. Moreover, inhibition of ketamine-induced loss of PV by apocynin blocked these antidepressant-like effects. Repeated administration of 30 mg/kg ketamine elicited stereotyped behaviors and hyperactivity actions as well as a longer duration of PV and GAD67 loss, higher brain glutamate levels, and lower brain GABA levels than acute single dose of ketamine. Our results reveal that the loss of phenotype of PV interneurons in the prefrontal cortex contributes to the antidepressant-like actions and is also involved in the propsychotic-like behaviors following acute and repeated ketamine administration, which may be partially mediated by the disinhibition of glutamate signaling. The different degrees and durations of the actions on PV interneurons produced by the two regimens of ketamine may partly underline the behavioral variance between the antidepressant- and propsychotic-like effects.

  16. [Antidepressant treatment and risk of suicidal attempts. A case series report].

    PubMed

    Henzen, Alexandre; Sentissi, Othman; Arnold, Myriam

    2013-12-04

    Scientific evidence that fluoxetine is one of the effective treatment of depression exists. Since 2000, a debate has been launched concerning the possibility of antidepressant drugs, especially, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor to induce suicidality in some depressive patients. Suicidal attempts of 3 of the outpatients taken into care in a crisis center in Geneva, following the introduction of fluoxetine in the usual dose of 20 mg per day, led us to investigate and to carry out a non-exhaustive comprehensive literature review of available randomized trials, meta-analyses and epidemiological studies. This work enabled us to highlight some points of interest, including medical attitudes and therapeutic guidelines that sometimes seem to be contradictory, especially regarding the use of antidepressants in children and adolescents.

  17. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Caroline A.; Lucki, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine's effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse potential of ketamine

  18. [Unipolar periodic depressive psychosis and chronic tricyclic antidepressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Pascalis, G

    1981-11-01

    Part of unipolar periodic déxpressions may - enjoy an active and comfortable existence, with-out recourse; - during at the less 10 years after beginning of the cure; - under condition of a long-course treatment by tricyclic antidepressors, the patient being trained to module himself the daily doses.

  19. Neuropeptide Y administration reverses tricyclic antidepressant treatment-resistant depression induced by ACTH in mice.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Michelle S; Ruff, Jossana Rodrigues; de Oliveira Espinosa, Dieniffer; Piegas, Manuela Bastos; de Brito, Maicon Lenon Otenio; Rocha, Kellen Athaíde; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Goes, André Tiago Rossito; Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Donato, Franciele; Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Jesse, Cristiano R

    2015-07-01

    Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and a primary cause of disability. To better treat patients suffering this illness, elucidation of the underlying psychopathological and neurobiological mechanisms is urgently needed. Based on the above-mentioned evidence, we sought to investigate the effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) treatment in tricyclic antidepressant treatment-resistant depression induced by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration. Mice were treated with NPY (5.84, 11.7 or 23.4mmol/μl) intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) for one or five days. The levels of serum corticosterone, tryptophan (TRP), kynurenine (KYN), serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in the hippocampus were analyzed. The behavioral parameters (depressive-like and locomotor activity) were also verified. This study demonstrated that ACTH administration increased serum corticosterone levels, KYN, 5-HIAA levels, IDO activity (hippocampus), immobility in the forced swimming test (FST) and the latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT). In addition, ACTH administration decreased the BDNF and NGF levels in the hippocampus of mice. NPY treatment was effective in preventing these hormonal, neurochemical and behavioral alterations. It is suggested that the main target of NPY is the modulation of corticosterone and neuronal plasticity protein levels, which may be closely linked with pharmacological action in a model of tricyclic antidepressant treatment-resistant depression. Thus, this study demonstrated a protective effect of NPY on the alterations induced by ACTH administration in mice, indicating that it could be useful as a therapy for the treatment of tricyclic antidepressant treatment-resistant depression.

  20. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  1. FAAH inhibition produces antidepressant-like efforts of mice to acute stress via synaptic long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xia

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degradative enzyme of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), produced antidepressant behavioral responses, but its underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we find that a systemic administration of the FAAH inhibitor PF3845 or an intra-CA1 application of AEA elicits an in vivo long-term depression (LTD) at excitatory glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses of the hippocampus. The PF3845- and/or AEA-elicited LTD are abolished by the LTD-blocking peptide Tat-GluR2. PF3845 significantly decreases passive behavioral coping of naïve mice to acute inescapable stress, which is also abolished by Tat-GluR2 peptide. However, PF3845 does not significantly affect sucrose assumption ratio of mice receiving chronic administration of corticosterone. These results suggest that FAAH inhibitors are able to produce antidepressant effects in naïve animals in response to acute stress through LTD at hippocampal glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses.

  2. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S.; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder. PMID:26771598

  3. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-12

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder.

  4. Improvement of Glycemic Control in Insulin-Dependent Diabetics with Depression by Concomitant Treatment with Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Radojkovic, Jana; Sikanic, Natasa; Bukumiric, Zoran; Tadic, Marijana; Kostic, Nada; Babic, Rade

    2016-01-01

    Background It is still disputable whether negative effects of comorbid depression in diabetics can be diminished by successful treatment of depression. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether addition of antidepressants to existing insulin treatment would further improve glycemic control in these patients. A secondary objective was to assess whether such treatment impairs their lipid and inflammatory status. Material/Methods Total of 192 patients with poorly controlled diabetes (defined as HbA1c ≥8%) in the absence of any uncontrolled medical condition entered the 6-month run-in phase with optimization of diabetic therapy. Depression status was screened at the end of this phase by BDI-II depression testing. Patients with BDI-II ≥14 and psychiatric confirmation of depression (58 patients) entered the 6-month interventional phase with SSRI class antidepressants. Results Fifty patients completed the study. During the run-in phase, HbA1c dropped from 10.0±1.8% to 8.5±1.2% (p<0.001), and during the interventional phase it dropped from 8.5±1.2% to 7.7±0.7% (p<0.001). BDI-II scores improved significantly from 30.4±13.2 to 23.5±11.0 (p=0.02) during the interventional phase. A positive linear correlation between improvement in depression scale and improvement in glycemic control was observed (R2=0.139, p=0.008). Lipid profile and inflammatory status did not change significantly during the interventional phase. Conclusions Patients with poorly controlled diabetes and comorbid depression might benefit from screening and treatment of depression with SSRI antidepressants by achieving an incremental effect on glycoregulation. This therapy did not have any adverse effects on lipid profile or inflammatory status. PMID:27329213

  5. Increased neuroplasticity and hippocampal microglia activation in a mice model of rapid antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Muzio, Luca; Brambilla, Valentina; Calcaterra, Lorenza; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Martino, Gianvito; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-09-15

    The search for biomarkers of antidepressant effects focused on pathways regulating synaptic plasticity, and on activated inflammatory markers. Repeated Sleep Deprivation (SD) provides a model treatment to reverse-translate antidepressant effects from in vivo clinical psychiatry to model organisms. We studied the effects of repeated SD alone (ASD) or combined with exercise on a slow spinning wheel (SSW), in 116 C57BL/6J male mice divided in three groups (ASD, SSW, untreated). Forced Swimming Test (FST) was used to detect antidepressant-like effects. Unbiased evaluation of the transcriptional responses were obtained in the hippocampus by Illumina Bead Chip Array system, then confirmed with real time PCR. Spine densities in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG) were assayed by standard Golgi staining. Activation of Microglial/Macrophages cells was evaluated by immunufluorescence analysis for Iba1. Rates of cell proliferation was estimated pulsing mice with the S-phase tracer 5-Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IdU). All SD procedures caused a decreasing of floating time at FST, and increased expression of the immediate early gene Arc/Arg3.1. In addition, SSW also increased expression of the Microglia/Macrophages genes Iba-1 and chemokine receptors Cx3cR1 and CxcR4, of the canonical Wnt signaling gene Wnt7a, and of dendritic spines in CA4 neurons of the DG. SSW up-regulated both the number of Iba1+ cells and rates of cell proliferation in the subgranular region of the DG. The antidepressant-like effects of SD dissociated both, from hippocampal neuroplasticity in the DG (not occurring after ASD), and from microglial activation (not preventing behavioral response when occurring). The increase in dendritic spine density in the DG after SD and exercise was associated with an up-regulation of Wnt 7a, and with activation of the innate immune system of the brain. Increased Arc/Arg3.1 suggests however increased neuroplasticity, which could be common to all fast-acting antidepressants

  6. Mind the Gap: Gaps in Antidepressant Treatment, Treatment Adjustments, and Outcomes among Patients in Routine HIV Care in a Multisite U.S. Clinical Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cholera, Rushina; Pence, Brian W.; Bengtson, Angela M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Christopoulos, Katerina; Cole, Steven R.; Fredericksen, Rob; Gaynes, Bradley N.; Heine, Amy; Mathews, W. Christopher; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Moore, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; O’Clerigh, Conall; Safren, Steven; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Depression affects 20–30% of HIV-infected patients and is associated with worse HIV outcomes. Although effective depression treatment is available, depression is largely untreated or undertreated in this population. Methods We quantified gaps in antidepressant treatment, treatment adjustments, and outcomes among US patients in routine HIV care in the nationally distributed CNICS observational clinical cohort. This cohort combines detailed clinical data with regular, self-reported depressive severity assessments (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, PHQ-9). We considered whether participants with likely depression received antidepressants, whether participants on antidepressants with persistently high depressive symptoms received timely dose adjustments, and whether participants achieved depression remission. We considered a cross-sectional analysis (6,219 participants in care in 2011–2012) and a prospective analysis (2,936 participants newly initiating CNICS care when PHQ-9 screening was active). Results The cross-sectional sample was 87% male, 53% Caucasian, 25% African American, and 18% Hispanic; the prospective sample was similar. In both samples, 39–44% had likely depression, with 44–60% of those receiving antidepressants. Of participants receiving antidepressants, 20–26% experienced persistently high depressive symptoms; only a small minority of those received antidepressant dose adjustments. Overall, 35–40% of participants on antidepressants achieved full depression remission. Remission among participants with persistently high depressive symptoms was rare regardless of dose adjustments. Conclusions In this large, diverse cohort of US patients engaged in routine HIV care, we observed large gaps in antidepressant treatment, timely dose adjustment to address persistently high depressive symptoms, and antidepressant treatment outcomes. These results highlight the importance of more effective pharmacologic depression treatment models for HIV

  7. Pre-treatment insomnia as a predictor of single and combination antidepressant outcomes: a CO-MED report

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Sharon C.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Luther, James F.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Rush, A. John

    2014-01-01

    Background Most patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) report clinically significant sleep problems. Pre-treatment insomnia been associated with poorer treatment outcomes in some antidepressant trials, leading to suggestions that combined treatment regimens may be more successful in this subgroup. This study investigated this question using data from the CO-MED trial. Methods Adult outpatients with chronic and/or recurrent MDD were randomly assigned in 1:1:1 ratio to 28 weeks of single-blind, placebo-controlled antidepressant treatment with (1) escitalopram+placebo, (2) bupropion-sustained-release+escitalopram, or (3) venlafaxine-extended-release+mirtazapine. We compared baseline characteristics, tolerability, and treatment outcomes at 12 and 28 weeks for patients with and without pre-treatment insomnia. Results Of the 665 evaluable patients, the majority (88.3%) reported significant pre-treatment insomnia. Those with pre-treatment insomnia were more likely to be female (69.3% vs. 57.7%) and African-American (29.1% vs 11.8%). Those with pre-treatment insomnia symptoms reported higher rates of concurrent anxiety disorders, lower rates of alcohol and substance use disorders, and greater impairment in psychosocial functioning. The two groups did not differ in either tolerability or treatment outcomes among the three antidepressant treatments. Conclusions Insomnia symptoms, while common in patients with chronic/recurrent MDD, were not predictive of response, remission, or tolerability with either single or combined antidepressant medications. PMID:25497473

  8. A proteomic investigation of similarities between conventional and herbal antidepressant treatments.

    PubMed

    Pennington, K; Föcking, M; McManus, C A; Pariante, C M; Dunn, M J; Cotter, D R

    2009-07-01

    Increasing clinical evidence for the effectiveness of herbal antidepressants has led to investigations at the molecular level. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, this study investigated similarities in protein expression between clomipramine, St John's wort and a Chinese herbal formula, xiao-yao-san, often used in mood disorder treatment. HT22 cells, derived from a mouse hippocampal cell line, were treated for 24 h, and protein expression was compared with that of the untreated cells (n = 4/group). Forty-three protein spots were found to be significantly differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in more than one of the treatment groups. Twenty-nine of these were identified using mass spectrometry. The most affected proteins were those involved in the cytoskeleton and energy metabolism, and an up-regulation of vimentin by all three treatments was confirmed by Western blotting. This study provides preliminary evidence for multiple common molecular targets between conventional and alternative antidepressants, which appear to collectively affect neuronal plasticity.

  9. FMRP regulates an ethanol-dependent shift in GABABR function and expression with rapid antidepressant properties

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Sarah A.; Workman, Emily R.; Heaney, Chelcie F.; Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Farris, Sean P.; Drew, Michael R.; Zemelman, Boris V.; Harris, R. Adron; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol promotes lasting neuroadaptive changes that may provide relief from depressive symptoms, often referred to as the self-medication hypothesis. However, the molecular/synaptic pathways that are shared by alcohol and antidepressants are unknown. In the current study, acute exposure to ethanol produced lasting antidepressant and anxiolytic behaviours. To understand the functional basis of these behaviours, we examined a molecular pathway that is activated by rapid antidepressants. Ethanol, like rapid antidepressants, alters γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR) expression and signalling, to increase dendritic calcium. Furthermore, new GABABRs are synthesized in response to ethanol treatment, requiring fragile-X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Ethanol-dependent changes in GABABR expression, dendritic signalling, and antidepressant efficacy are absent in Fmr1-knockout (KO) mice. These findings indicate that FMRP is an important regulator of protein synthesis following alcohol exposure, providing a molecular basis for the antidepressant efficacy of acute ethanol exposure. PMID:27666021

  10. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-01-01

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors—overall trauma ‘load' and specific type of abuse—on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer

  11. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-05-03

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors-overall trauma 'load' and specific type of abuse-on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer outcomes

  12. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  13. Antidepressant treatment and adherence to antiretroviral medications among privately insured persons with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Akincigil, Ayse; Wilson, Ira B; Walkup, James T; Siegel, Michele J; Huang, Cecilia; Crystal, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    In order to examine relationships between depression treatments (antidepressant and/or psychotherapy utilization) and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), we conducted a retrospective analysis of medical and pharmacy insurance claims for privately insured persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) diagnosed with depression (n = 1,150). Participants were enrolled in 80 insurance plans from all 50 states. Adherence was suboptimal. Depression treatment initiators were significantly more likely to be adherent to ART than the untreated. We did not observe an association between psychotherapy utilization and ART adherence, yet given the limitations of the data (e.g., there is no information on types of psychological treatment and its targets), the lack of association should not be interpreted as lack of efficacy.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mood disorders and antidepressant treatments.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Eero; Kojima, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reduced in the brain and serum of depressed patients and at least the reduction in serum levels is reversible upon successful treatment. These data, together with a wealth of reports using different animal models with depression-like behavior or manipulation of expression of BDNF or its receptor TrkB have implicated BDNF in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Recent findings have shown that posttranslational processing of BDNF gene product can yield different molecular entities that differently influence signaling through BNDF receptor TrkB and the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). We will here review these data and discuss new insights into the possible pathophysiological roles of those new BDNF subtypes as well as recent findings on the role of BDNF mediated neuronal plasticity in mood disorders and their treatments.

  15. Lithium and Valproate Levels Do Not Correlate with Ketamine's Antidepressant Efficacy in Treatment-Resistant Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Annie J; Niciu, Mark J; Lundin, Nancy B; Luckenbaugh, David A; Ionescu, Dawn F; Richards, Erica M; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Brutsche, Nancy E; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine and lithium both inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, lithium and ketamine have synergistic antidepressant-like effects at individually subeffective doses in rodents. We hypothesized that ketamine's antidepressant effects would be improved by therapeutic doses of lithium versus valproate and that serum lithium levels would positively correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Thirty-six patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression maintained on therapeutic-dose lithium (n = 23, 0.79 ± 0.15 mEq/L) or valproate (n = 13, 79.6 ± 12.4 mg/mL) received 0.5 mg/kg ketamine infusion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. The primary depression outcome measure-the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)-was assessed before infusion and at numerous postinfusion time points. Both lithium (F 1,118 = 152.08, p < 0.001, and d = 2.27) and valproate (F 1,128 = 20.12, p < 0.001, and d = 0.79) significantly improved depressive symptoms, but no statistically significant difference was observed between mood stabilizer groups (F 1,28 = 2.51, p = 0.12, and d = 0.60). Serum lithium and valproate levels did not correlate with ketamine's antidepressant efficacy. Although the study was potentially underpowered, our results suggest that lithium may not potentiate ketamine's antidepressant efficacy in treatment-resistant bipolar depression.

  16. The treatment of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Cesarani, A; Alpini, D; Monti, B; Raponi, G

    2004-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are very common symptoms in the general population. The aim of this paper is to describe the physical and pharmacological treatment of symptoms characterized by sudden onset of rotatory vertigo. Acute vertigo can be subdivided into two main groups: (1) spontaneous vertigo and (2) provoked vertigo, usually by postural changes, generally called paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Sudden onset of acute vertigo is usually due to acute spontaneous unilateral vestibular failure. It can be also fluctuant as, e.g., in recurrent attacks of Ménière's disease. Pharmacotherapy of acute spontaneous vertigo includes Levo-sulpiride i.v., 50 mg in 250 physiologic solution, once or twice a day, methoclopramide i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, or triethilperazine rectally, once or twice a day, to reduce neurovegetative symptoms; diazepam i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, to decrease internuclear inhibition, sulfate magnesium i.v., two ampoules in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, or piracetam i.v., one ampoule in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, to decrease vestibular damage. At the onset of the acute symptoms, patients must lie on their healthy side with the head and trunk raised 20 degrees. The room must be quiet but not darkened. If the patient is able to swallow without vomiting, it is important to reduce nystagmus and stabilize the visual field with gabapentine, per os, 300 mg twice or three times a day. The first step of the physical therapy of acute vertigo is vestibular electrical stimulation, that is to say, a superficial paravertebral electrical stimulation of neck muscles, aimed to reduce antigravitary failure and to increase proprioceptive cervical sensory substitution. PPV is a common complaint and represents one of the most common entities in peripheral vestibular pathology. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, the etiopathogenesis of PPV is still a matter of debate. Despite the different

  17. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Quetiapine-XR Monotherapy or Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressant in Acute Major Depressive Disorder with Current Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ranran; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jun; Kemp, David E.; Ren, Ming; Conroy, Carla; Chan, Philip; Serrano, Mary Beth; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To pilot efficacy and safety data of quetiapine-XR monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to antidepressant(s) in the acute treatment of MDD with current generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to ascertain the diagnosis of DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to quetiapine-XR or placebo for up to 8 weeks. Changes from baseline to endpoint in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HAMD-17), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomatology-16 items Self-Report (QIDS-16-SR) total scores, and other outcome measures were analyzed with the last observation carried forward strategy and/or mixed-effects modeling for repeated measures. Results Of the 34 patients screened, 23 patients were randomized to receive quetiapine-XR (n = 11) or placebo (n = 12), with 5 and 4 completing the study, respectively. The mean dose of quetiapine-XR was 154 ± 91 mg/d. The change from baseline to endpoint in the total scores of HAMD-17, HAM-A, QIDS-16-SR, and CGI-S were significant in the quetiapine-XR group, but only the change in HAM-A total score was significant in the placebo group. The differences in these changes between the two groups were only significant in CGI-S scores, with the rest of numerical larger in the quetiapine-XR group. The most common side effects from quetiapine-XR were dry mouth, somnolence/sedation, and fatigue. Conclusions In this pilot study, quetiapine-XR was numerically superior to placebo in reducing depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with MDD and current GAD. Large sample studies are warranted to support or refute these preliminary findings. PMID:27738370

  18. Race, genetic ancestry and response to antidepressant treatment for major depression.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eleanor; Hou, Liping; Maher, Brion S; Woldehawariat, Girma; Kassem, Layla; Akula, Nirmala; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J

    2013-12-01

    The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Study revealed poorer antidepressant treatment response among black compared with white participants. This racial disparity persisted even after socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors were taken into account. Some studies have suggested genetic contributions to this disparity, but none have attempted to disentangle race and genetic ancestry. Here we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to examine independent contributions of race and genetic ancestry to citalopram response. Secondary data analyses included 1877 STAR*D participants who completed an average of 10 weeks of citalopram treatment and provided DNA samples. Participants reported their race as White (n=1464), black (n=299) or other/mixed (n=114). Genetic ancestry was estimated by multidimensional scaling (MDS) analyses of about 500 000 SNPs. Ancestry proportions were estimated by STRUCTURE. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the direct and indirect effects of observed and latent predictors of response, defined as change in the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) score from baseline to exit. Socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors, race, and anxiety significantly predicted response, as previously reported. However, direct effects of race disappeared in all models that included genetic ancestry. Genetic African ancestry predicted lower treatment response in all models. Although socioeconomic and baseline clinical factors drive racial differences in antidepressant response, genetic ancestry, rather than self-reported race, explains a significant fraction of the residual differences. Larger samples would be needed to identify the specific genetic mechanisms that may be involved, but these findings underscore the importance of including more African-American patients in drug trials.

  19. Systematic review and meta-analysis of serotonin transporter genotype and discontinuation from antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Andrew A; Lewis, Glyn; Lewis, Sarah J; Munafò, Marcus R

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that 5-HTTLPR is associated with response following treatment from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The short (S) allele has reduced serotonin transporter expression, compared to the long (L) allele, and has been reported to be associated with poorer response in Europeans, with the effect in other populations unclear. However the published literature is inconsistent. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to investigate the effect of 5-HTTLPR on discontinuation from antidepressant treatment. Data were obtained from 17 studies including 4309 participants. The principal outcome measure was the allelic odds ratio (OR) for the 5-HTTLPR S allele and discontinuation status. A random effects meta-analysis provided no evidence that the S allele was associated with increased odds of discontinuation from SSRIs in Europeans (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.83-1.42, p=0.53; 10 studies, n=2504) but in East Asians there was evidence of a reduced odds of discontinuation (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.64, p=0.002; 2 studies, n=136). There was a suggestion of small study bias (p=0.05). This meta-analysis provides no evidence of an association between 5-HTTLPR and discontinuation from antidepressant treatment in Europeans. The low number of studies in East Asian samples using SSRIs reduces confidence in our evidence that the S allele decreases the odds of discontinuation in this population. At present, there is no evidence of an association between 5-HTTLPR and discontinuation from SSRI treatment in a European population with further studies required to investigate its effects in different populations.

  20. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of Z-drug adjunction to antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsunaga, Shinji; Iwata, Nakao

    2017-03-01

    improves the treatment efficacy for MDD compared with the placebo + antidepressants/antidepressants alone. However, the therapy requires close monitoring of adverse events, particularly dizziness.

  2. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  3. Antidepressant treatment differentially affects the phenotype of high and low stress reactive mice.

    PubMed

    Surget, Alexandre; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Petra S; Heinzmann, Jan-Michael; Knapman, Alana; McIlwrick, Silja; Westphal, Willy-Paul; Touma, Chadi; Belzung, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Modelling key endophenotypes can be a powerful approach to gain insight into mechanisms underlying the aetiology and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on evidence of stress hormone system dysregulations in depression, the Stress Reactivity (SR) mouse model has been generated by a selective breeding approach for extremes in HPA axis reactivity, resulting in high (HR), intermediate (IR) and low (LR) reactive mice. The characterisation of their phenotypic alterations has highlighted many similarities of HR and LR mice with the melancholic and atypical depression, respectively. We therefore aimed to examine whether the antidepressant fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day i.p., 4-5 weeks) can ameliorate the phenotypic characteristics of HR and LR mice in neuroendocrine functions (HPA axis basal activity, stress reactivity, negative feedback), emotional reactivity/coping-strategy (open field, forced swim tests), spatial learning/memory (Morris water-maze) and hippocampal neurogenesis. Line differences in HPA axis reactivity were maintained under fluoxetine treatment. However, we observed fluoxetine effects on glucocorticoid-induced negative feedback, stress-coping behaviours, cognitive functions and neurogenesis. Specifically, our results revealed line-dependent consequences of fluoxetine treatment: (1) an amelioration of the 'melancholic-like' features of HR mice (reversing the negative feedback resistance, the hyperactive coping style and the memory deficits; increasing hippocampal neurogenesis); (2) an exacerbation of the phenotypic deviations of LR mice (increasing their pronounced negative feedback and passive coping style). Thus, these findings support the predictive validity of antidepressant treatment in the HR mouse line and emphasize the translational value of the SR mouse model for the development of therapeutic strategies based on endophenotype-driven classifications.

  4. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  5. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-12-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors.

  6. Tricyclic Antidepressants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gary J.

    The use of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is becoming increasingly prevalent for the treatment of depressed patients. It has been suggested that, analogous to many other drug substances, the tricyclic drugs exhibit clinical effectiveness within a defined therapeutic concentration range (1-10). Very recently, both Dito (11) and Orsulak and Schildkraut (12) have summarized the usefulness of measuring serum concentrations of these drugs. These authors suggest that knowledge of the plasma concentrations of these drugs aid the physician in determining patient compliance and initiating the best possible drug treatment.

  7. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  8. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  9. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressive drugs: a way towards personalized treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Shira; Gonda, Xenia; Dome, Peter; Faludi, Gabor

    2012-06-01

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and in spite of extensive ongoing research, we neither fully understand its etiopathological background, nor do we possess sufficient pharmacotherapeutic tools to provide remission for all patients. Depression is a heterogenous phenomenon both in its manifestation and its biochemical and genetic background with multiple systems involved. Similarly, the employed pharmaceutical agents in the treatment of depression also effect multiple neurotransmitter systems in the brain. However, we do not yet possess sufficient tools to be able to choose the medication that treats the symptoms most effectively while contributing to minimal side effects in parallel and thus provide personalized pharmacotherapy for depression. In the present paper we review genetic polymorphisms that may be involved in the therapeutic effects and side effects of antidepressive medications and which, in the future, may guide customized selection of the pharmacotherapeutic regimen in case of each patient.

  10. The Effect of Antidepressant Treatment on HIV and Depression Outcomes: The SLAM DUNC Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    PENCE, Brian W.; GAYNES, Bradley N.; ADAMS, Julie L.; THIELMAN, Nathan M.; HEINE, Amy D.; MUGAVERO, Michael J.; MCGUINNESS, Teena; RAPER, James L.; WILLIG, James H.; SHIREY, Kristen G.; OGLE, Michelle; TURNER, Elizabeth L.; QUINLIVAN, E. Byrd

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a major barrier to HIV treatment outcomes. Objective Test whether antidepressant management decision support integrated into HIV care improves antiretroviral adherence and depression morbidity. Design Pseudo-cluster randomized trial. Setting Four US infectious diseases clinics. Participants HIV-infected adults with major depressive disorder. Intervention Measurement-Based Care: depression care managers used systematic metrics to give HIV primary-care clinicians standardized antidepressant treatment recommendations. Measurements Primary: Antiretroviral medication adherence (monthly unannounced telephone-based pill counts for 12m). Primary timepoint: 6m. Secondary: Depressive severity, depression remission, depression-free days, measured quarterly for 12m. Results From 2010-2013, 149 participants were randomized to intervention and 155 to usual care. Participants were mostly male, Black non-Hispanic, unemployed, and virally suppressed with high baseline self-reported antiretroviral adherence and depressive severity. Over follow-up, no differences between arms in antiretroviral adherence or other HIV outcomes were apparent. At 6 months, depressive severity was lower among intervention participants than usual care (mean difference −3.7 [95% CI: −5.6, −1.7]), probability of depression remission was higher (risk difference 13% [1%, 25%]), and suicidal ideation was lower (RD −18% [−30%, −6%]). By 12 months the arms had comparable mental health outcomes. Intervention arm participants experienced an average of 29 (95% CI: 1-57) more depression-free days over 12 months. Conclusions In the largest trial of its kind among HIV-infected adults, MBC did not improve HIV outcomes, possibly because of high baseline adherence, but achieved clinically significant depression improvements and increased depression-free days. MBC may be an effective, resource-efficient approach to reducing depression morbidity among HIV patients. PMID:26134881

  11. Treatment of cognitive dysfunction in major depressive disorder--a review of the preclinical evidence for efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and the multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Leiser, Steven C; Gulinello, Maria; Dale, Elena; Li, Yan; Waller, Jessica A; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-04-15

    Although major depressive disorder is primarily considered a mood disorder, depressed patients commonly present with clinically significant cognitive dysfunction that may add to their functional disability. This review paper summarizes the available preclinical data on the effects of antidepressants, including monoamine reuptake inhibitors and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine, in behavioral tests of cognition such as cognitive flexibility, attention, and memory, or in potentially cognition-relevant mechanistic assays such as electroencephalography, in vivo microdialysis, in vivo or in vitro electrophysiology, and molecular assays related to neurogenesis or synaptic sprouting. The available data are discussed in context with clinically relevant doses and their relationship to target occupancy levels, in order to evaluate the translational relevance of preclinical doses used during testing. We conclude that there is preclinical evidence suggesting that traditional treatment with monoamine reuptake inhibitors can induce improved cognitive function, for example in cognitive flexibility and memory, and that the multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine may have some advantages by comparison to these treatments. However, the translational value of the reviewed preclinical data can be questioned at times, due to the use of doses outside the therapeutically-relevant range, the lack of data on target engagement or exposure, the tendency to investigate acute rather than long term antidepressant administration, and the trend towards using normal rodents rather than models with translational relevance for depression. Finally, several suggestions are made for advancing this field, including expanded use of target occupancy assessments in preclinical and clinical experiments, and the use of translationally valuable techniques such as electroencephalography.

  12. Disparities in Depressive Symptoms and Antidepressant Treatment by Gender and Race/Ethnicity among People Living with HIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Heidi M.; Christopoulos, Katerina; Fredericksen, Rob J.; Gaynes, Bradley N.; Heine, Amy; Mathews, W. Christopher; Moore, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Safren, Steven; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe disparities along the depression treatment cascade, from indication for antidepressant treatment to effective treatment, in HIV-infected individuals by gender and race/ethnicity. Methods The Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) cohort includes 31,000 HIV-infected adults in routine clinical care at 8 sites. Individuals were included in the analysis if they had a depressive symptoms measure within one month of establishing HIV care at a CNICS site. Depressive symptoms were measured using the validated Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Indication for antidepressant treatment was defined as PHQ-9 ≥ 10 or a current antidepressant prescription. Antidepressant treatment was defined as a current antidepressant prescription. Evidence-based antidepressant treatment was considered treatment changes based on a person’s most recent PHQ-9, in accordance with clinical guidelines. We calculated the cumulative probability of moving through the depression treatment cascade within 24 months of entering CNICS HIV care. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate associations between gender, race/ethnicity, and a range of depression outcomes. Results In our cohort of HIV-infected adults in routine care, 47% had an indication for antidepressant treatment. Significant drop-offs along the depression treatment cascade were seen for the entire study sample. However, important disparities existed. Women were more likely to have an indication for antidepressant treatment (HR 1.54; 95% CI 1.34, 1.78), receive antidepressant treatment (HR 2.03; 95% CI 1.53, 2.69) and receive evidence-based antidepressant treatment (HR 1.67; 95% CI 1.03, 2.74), even after accounting for race/ethnicity. Black non-Hispanics (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.35, 0.65), Hispanics (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.44, 0.89) and other race/ethnicities (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17, 0.73) were less likely to initiate antidepressant treatment, compared to white

  13. Atypical Antidepressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous reactions when combined with certain medications or herbal supplements. Serotonin syndrome. Rarely, an antidepressant can cause high ... antidepressants, certain pain or headache medications, and the herbal supplement St. John's wort. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome include ...

  14. New advances in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine.

    PubMed

    Orsolini, Laura; Tomasetti, Carmine; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Vellante, Federica; Fornaro, Michele; Fiengo, Annastasia; Mazza, Monica; Vecchiotti, Roberta; Perna, Giampaolo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; De Berardis, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a persistent condition characterized by chronic anxiety, exaggerated worry and tension, mainly comorbid with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line treatment of GAD. However, some patients may not respond to the treatment or discontinue due to adverse effects. Vortioxetine (VRX) is a multimodal antidepressant with a unique mechanism of action, by acting as 5-HT3A, 5-HT1D and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, partial agonist at the 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors and inhibitor at the 5-HT transporter. Preliminary clinical trials showed contrasting findings in terms of improvement of the anxiety symptomatology and/or cognitive impairment. Here, we aim to systematically review the evidence currently available on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of VRX in the treatment of GAD. The generalizability of results on the efficacy of VRX in patients with anxiety symptomatology and GAD is limited due to few and contrasting RCTs so far available. Only two studies, of which one prevention relapse trial, reported a significant improvement in anxiety symptomatology compared to three with negative findings.

  15. Electro-peroxone treatment of the antidepressant venlafaxine: Operational parameters and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Yujue; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Huijiao; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2015-12-30

    Degradation of the antidepressant venlafaxine by a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process, electro-peroxone (E-peroxone), was studied. The E-peroxone treatment involves sparging ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 gas mixture) into an electrolysis reactor that is equipped with a carbon-polytetrafluoroethylene cathode to electrocatalytically transform O2 in the bubbled gas to H2O2. The in-situ generate H2O2 then reacts with the bubbled O3 to yield OH, which can non-selectively degrade organic compounds rapidly in the solution. Thanks to the significant OH production, the E-peroxone treatment greatly enhanced both venlafaxine degradation and total organic carbon (TOC) removal as compared to ozonation and electrolysis alone. Under optimal reaction conditions, complete venlafaxine degradation and TOC elimination could be achieved within 3 and 120 min of E-peroxone process, respectively. Based on the by-products (e.g., hydroxylated venlafaxine, phenolics, and carboxylic acids) identified by UPLC-UV and UPLC/Q-TOF-mass spectrometry, plausible reaction pathways were proposed for venlafaxine mineralization by the E-peroxone process. The results of this study suggest that the E-peroxone treatment may provide a promising way to treat venlafaxine contaminated water.

  16. Switch in treatment from tricyclic antidepressants to moclobemide: a new generation monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, J; Kneer, J; Fotteler, B; Groen, H; Peeters, P A; Jonkman, J H

    1995-02-01

    The combination of classic monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCAs) has been associated with a variety of adverse events. A switch in treatment from TCAs to moclobemide, a reversible and selective inhibitor of MAO-A, was investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers. Two groups of 12 subjects were treated with either amitriptyline (75 mg/day) or clomipramine (100 mg/day) until steady-state conditions had been attained (14 days). Treatment with the TCAs was discontinued abruptly and switched to either a therapeutic dose regimen of moclobemide (300 mg/day) or placebo. The tolerability and safety pattern did not reveal any clinically relevant differences between moclobemide and placebo recipients, nor was there any sign of a pharmacokinetic interaction between the TCAs and moclobemide. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that therapeutic doses of moclobemide up to 300 mg daily can be given 24 hours after the last dose of treatment with either amitriptyline or clomipramine without major risks.

  17. Antidepressant Withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) If you stop taking antidepressants, could you experience antidepressant withdrawal? Do withdrawal symptoms mean you were addicted to the drug? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Antidepressant withdrawal is possible if you ...

  18. [Antidepressants in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Castaño-Monsalve, Beatriz

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a common condition in patients with epilepsy that entails a deterioration of the quality of life of this population and that, therefore, requires appropriate treatment. The potential risk of antidepressants in relation to the seizure threshold is overestimated by many professionals, and this has an influence when it comes to making the decision to treat them. It sometimes means that the patients do not receive antidepressant drugs. In this regard, the aim of this review is to present the current state of the art in terms of the safety of antidepressants in patients with epilepsy. A search of the medical literature was conducted and, following its analysis, the most significant results are presented. Current information indicates that most antidepressants are safe for epileptic patients at therapeutic doses and that the risk of seizures occurs mainly in cases of overdose. Preferred drugs for treating depression in epilepsy are serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Bupropion and tricyclic antidepressants must be avoided.

  19. Tricyclic Antidepressants and Tetracyclic Antidepressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... dangerous reactions when combined with certain medications or herbal supplements. Serotonin syndrome. Rarely, an antidepressant can cause high ... antidepressants, certain pain or headache medications, and the herbal supplement St. John's wort. Signs and symptoms of serotonin ...

  20. Six-month compliance with antidepressant medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Demyttenaere, Koen; Adelin, Albert; Patrick, Mesters; Walthère, Dewé; Katrien, De Bruyckere; Michèle, Sangeleer

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of compliance in patients with major depressive disorder (in drop-outs versus completers and in first episode versus recurrent episode patients). A total of 85 outpatients with major depressive disorder were followed for 6 months. Different dimensions of compliance were investigated: drop-outs versus completers and their medication adherence (with electronic monitoring). General linear mixed models were applied to examine the time courses of adherence. Drop-out rates were higher in younger patients and in patients with a lower initial depression severity. The adherence during 6 months of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was above 80 in 70% of the patients. The adherence decreased by 2.5% per month and decreased more than three times more rapidly in drop-outs (from baseline to time of drop-out). A medical visit resulted in a temporary increase in pill intake. General linear mixed model analysis showed that the predicted outcome was worse in drop-outs than in completers and worse in recurrent episode patients than in first episode patients (the former showing a higher adherence). Adherence decreases with time during 6 months of treatment with antidepressants and is influenced by demographic and clinical variables. Completers show a higher adherence than drop-outs. The outcome was worse in recurrent episode patients than first episode patients although they had a higher adherence.

  1. Stress, depression and antidepressant treatment options in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Robert; Adamaszek, Michael; Sommer, Norbert; Kirkby, Kenneth C

    2012-01-01

    Stress constitutes a risk factor for diseases where the immune system plays a significant role. Stress is recognized as a possible trigger for flare ups during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS). The disclosure to the patient of the diagnosis of MS, the commencement of immunomodulatory therapy, and the unpredictability and vagaries of disease progression are all sources of stress. Biological stress systems such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system and the sympathetic nervous system may influence the pathogenesis and the disease course of MS. The ability to cope with stress may also be impaired, mediated for example by cognitive deficits or loss of abilities and resources as disease progresses or by the high prevalence of concurrent mood disturbances such as depression and chronic fatigue. Psychiatric comorbidities of MS disease or therapy as well as impairments of coping strategies are underrecognized in clinical practice. Treatment plans for depression among MS patients, as the most common psychiatric comorbidity, should be individualized with integrated approaches. Antidepressants are effective for the treatment of depression in MS patients although further clinical research into the neurobiological and psychological bases of depressive disorders in MS patients is clearly needed. In therapy, coping strategies can be enhanced through multidisciplinary assessment of the various challenges and restrictions imposed by the disease and assisting and supporting the patient in addressing these. Exercise, as a form of positive stress (eustress), also has a role in therapy.

  2. Significant Treatment Effect of Bupropion in Patients With Bipolar Disorder but Similar Phase-Shifting Rate as Other Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bupropion is widely used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), and especially those with depressive mood, based on its good treatment effect, safety profile, and lower risk of phase shifting. However, increasing evidence indicates that the safety of bupropion in BD patients may not be as good as previously thought. The aim of this study was to summarize data on the treatment effect and safety profile of bupropion in the treatment of BD via a meta-analysis. Electronic search through PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. The inclusion criteria were: (i) studies comparing changes in disease severity before and after bupropion treatment or articles comparing the treatment effect of bupropion in BD patients with those receiving other standard treatments; (ii) articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were (i) case reports/series, and (ii) nonclinical trials. All effect sizes from 10 clinical trials were pooled using a random effects model. We examined the possible confounding variables using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Bupropion significantly improved the severity of disease in BD patients (P < 0.001), and the treatment effect was similar to other antidepressants/standard treatments (P = 0.220). There were no significant differences in the dropout rate (P = 0.285) and rate of phase shifting (P = 0.952) between BD patients who received bupropion and those who received other antidepressants. We could not perform a detailed meta-analysis of every category of antidepressant, nor could we rule out the possible confounding effect of concurrent psychotropics or include all drug side effects. Furthermore, the number of studies recruited in the meta-analysis was relatively small. Our findings reconfirm the benefits of bupropion for the treatment of bipolar depression, which are similar to those of other antidepressants. However, the rate of phase shifting with bupropion usage was not as low compared to other

  3. The 5-HTTLPR and BDNF polymorphisms moderate the association between uncinate fasciculus connectivity and antidepressants treatment response in major depression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Erica L; Hall, Geoff B C; Clark, Darren; Foster, Jane; Ramasubbu, Rajamannar

    2017-03-01

    Symptom improvement in depression due to antidepressant treatment is highly variable and clinically unpredictable. Linking neuronal connectivity and genetic risk factors in predicting antidepressant response has clinical implications. Our investigation assessed whether indices of white matter integrity, serotonin transporter-linked polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism predicted magnitude of depression symptom change following antidepressant treatment. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was used as an indicator of white matter integrity and was assessed in the uncinate fasciculus and superior longitudinal fasciculus using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and probabilistic tractography. Forty-six medication-free patients with major depressive disorder participated in a diffusion tensor imaging scan prior to completing an 8-week treatment regime with citalopram or quetiapine XR. Indexed improvements in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score from baseline to 8-week endpoint were used as an indicator of depression improvement. Carriers of the BDNF met allele exhibited lower FA values in the left uncinate fasciculus relative to val/val individuals [F(1, 40) = 7.314, p = 0.009]. Probabilistic tractography identified that higher FA in the left uncinate fasciculus predicted percent change in depression severity, with BDNF moderating this association [F(3, 30) = 3.923, p = 0.018]. An interaction between FA in the right uncinate fasciculus and 5-HTTLPR also predicted percent change in depression severity [F(5, 25) = 5.315, p = 0.002]. Uncorrected TBSS results revealed significantly higher FA in hippocampal portions of the cingulum bundle in responders compared to non-responders (p = 0.016). The predictive value of prefrontal and amygdala/hippocampal WM connectivity on antidepressant treatment response may be influenced by 5-HTTLPR and BDNF polymorphisms in MDD.

  4. Co-Morbid Erectile Dysfunction (Ed) and Antidepressant Treatment in a Patient - A Management Challenge?

    PubMed

    Zainol, Maszaidi; Sidi, Hatta; Kumar, Jaya; Das, Srijit; Ismail, Shaiful; Hatta, Muhammad Hizri; Baharudin, Najwa; Ravindran, Arun

    2017-03-15

    Across the globe, antidepressants (AD) and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) are commonly prescribed psychopharmacological agents for patients with co-morbid mental-health problem and sexual dysfunction (SD). The serotonergic and/or noradrenergic ADs, although is an effective agent are not without SD side-effects, especially erectile dysfunction (ED). ED is an inability to achieve, or maintain an erection for satisfactory sexual intercourse during the phases of male's sexual arousal. It is recognized as an important reason why non-adherence to treatment was observed in patients who are on AD. AD intervention caused remission to some of the pre-treatment psychopathology of ED, but to many patients, AD potentially magnified the unwanted sexual side-effects. This made this situation a challenging task for the mental health professional. These challenges are based on the complexity of ED - its etiology, and the associated risk factors, which further compounded with AD side-effect. The neuro-psychopharmacological basis for AD treatment selection used was deliberated. Biopsychosocial interventions are recommended at a two pivotal stage. First, a step should be taken for proper assessment (e.g. detailed history, psychosocial and laboratory investigations); and identifying some modifiable risk factors for ED and associated mental health issue. Secondly, with guidance of an algorithm pathway, a practical intervention should include steps like dose reduction, augmentation or changing to an AD with lesser/ no sexual side-effects like bupropion and mirtazepine. Some achievable suggestions, e.g. revising sexual scripts and improving sexual techniques, life-style modifications, psychotherapy and other non-pharmacological approaches will be beneficial for both patients and his partner.

  5. The pharmacological properties of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Antidepressant drugs represent one of the main forms of effective treatment for the amelioration of depressive symptoms. Most available antidepressants increase extracellular levels of monoamines. However, it is now recognized that monoamine levels and availability are only part of the story, and that antidepressants whose mechanism of action is mainly based on the modulation of monoaminergic systems may not be able to satisfy the unmet needs of depression. Therefore, a number of compounds, developed for their potential antidepressant activity, are endowed with putative mechanisms of action not affecting traditional monoamine targets. This article briefly reviews, within a mechanistic perspective, the pharmacological profiles of representative antidepressants from each class, including monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclics, norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants interacting with dopaminergic, melatonergic, glutamatergic, or neuropeptide systems. The undesirable side effects of currently used antidepressants, which can often be a reason for lack of compliance, are also considered.

  6. [Pharmacological treatment of acute catatonia].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Delgado, Christian L

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome of psychomotor dysregulation that can be present in a broad spectrum of clinical situations. Advances made over the last decades have progressively contributed to its clinical differentiation and its conceptual delimitation. Both Benzodiazepines (BZD) and Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been consolidated as first-line therapy. In this regard, a BZD response rate ranging from 70 to 90 per cent has been reported in different case series. Furthermore, NMDA receptor antagonists represent an emerging strategy in the therapeutic approach to the disorder. Most of the evidence that supports the aforementioned treatment recommendations arises from descriptive observational studies. Traditionally, catatonia pathophysiological research focused on the study of subcortical brain structures. Currently there exists compelling evidence that supports a cortical origin of the syndrome, emphasizing the role of the prefrontal cortex. Neuropsychiatric catatonia models that integrate clinical, pathophysiological, and neurobiological findings have been postulated. The aim of the present review is to summarize up-to-date available evidence associated with the pharmacotherapeutic approach to acute catatonia as well as the neurochemical basis of its effectiveness. Likewise, general measures intended to prevent morbimortality are subject to discussion herein.

  7. Trazodone Addition to Paroxetine and Mirtazapine in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Depression: The Pros and Cons of Combining Three Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Alves, José Carlos; Rego, Raquel Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Dual antidepressant combination for treatment-resistant depression is a strategy well supported by literature and accepted in clinical practice. Rather, the usefulness of the combination of more than two antidepressants is controversial. This may be related to the possibility of higher side-effect burden and to doubts about its pharmacological effectiveness and therapeutic advantage compared to other standard treatment options. We report a relapse of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms with insomnia that successfully remitted after the addition of trazodone to a dual combination of paroxetine and mirtazapine (in standard effective doses) in a patient with treatment-resistant depression. We also review the literature and discuss the utility of triple antidepressant combination in treatment-resistant depression. This clinical case highlights the utility of combining trazodone as a third antidepressant for the relapse of depressive symptoms after the failure of a dual antidepressant combination. Trazodone may be advantageous in patients presenting recurrence of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms that include sleep problems and/or insomnia and may be particularly useful when benzodiazepines are not recommended. Although its use may be controversial and associated with higher risk of side-effects, more investigation is needed to determine the efficacy and safety for triple antidepressant combinations as reliable strategies for treatment-resistant depression in clinical practice. PMID:27807450

  8. Trazodone Addition to Paroxetine and Mirtazapine in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Depression: The Pros and Cons of Combining Three Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rui; Alves, José Carlos; Rego, Raquel Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Dual antidepressant combination for treatment-resistant depression is a strategy well supported by literature and accepted in clinical practice. Rather, the usefulness of the combination of more than two antidepressants is controversial. This may be related to the possibility of higher side-effect burden and to doubts about its pharmacological effectiveness and therapeutic advantage compared to other standard treatment options. We report a relapse of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms with insomnia that successfully remitted after the addition of trazodone to a dual combination of paroxetine and mirtazapine (in standard effective doses) in a patient with treatment-resistant depression. We also review the literature and discuss the utility of triple antidepressant combination in treatment-resistant depression. This clinical case highlights the utility of combining trazodone as a third antidepressant for the relapse of depressive symptoms after the failure of a dual antidepressant combination. Trazodone may be advantageous in patients presenting recurrence of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms that include sleep problems and/or insomnia and may be particularly useful when benzodiazepines are not recommended. Although its use may be controversial and associated with higher risk of side-effects, more investigation is needed to determine the efficacy and safety for triple antidepressant combinations as reliable strategies for treatment-resistant depression in clinical practice.

  9. Mirtazapine versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Norio; Omori, Ichiro M; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Cipriani, Andrea; Barbui, Corrado; Churchill, Rachel; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Background Mirtazapine has a unique mechanism of antidepressive action and is one of the commonly used antidepressants in clinical practice. Objectives The aim of the present review was to assess the evidence on the efficacy and acceptability of mirtazapine compared with other antidepressive agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis review group’s specialised register (CCDANCTR), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic databases: The Cochrane Library (all years to April 2011), EMBASE, (1980 to July 2011) MEDLINE (1950 to July 2011) and PsycINFO (1974 to July 2011). Reference lists of the reports of relevant studies were checked and experts in the field contacted. The review was not limited to English-language articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) allocating participants with major depression to mirtazapine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently checked eligibility and extracted data on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome was response to treatment. The secondary outcomes included dropouts and individual adverse events. Meta-analyses were conducted using the random-effects model. Main results A total of 29 RCTs (n = 4974), mostly following up the participants for six weeks in outpatient clinics and inadequately reporting the risk of bias, were included. In comparison with tricyclic antidepressants (10 trials, n = 1553) there was no robust evidence to detect a difference between mirtazapine and tricyclics in terms of response at two weeks (odds ratio (OR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64 to 1.13) or at the end of acute-phase treatment (at 6 to 12 weeks) (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.10). In comparison with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (12 trials, n = 2626) mirtazapine was significantly more

  10. Rapid improvement of depressive symptoms in suicide attempters following treatment with milnacipran and tricyclic antidepressants - a case series.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Eiji; Gitoh, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a serious social problem in many countries, including Japan. The majority of people who commit suicide suffer from depression. Suicide attempt patients suffering from serious physical injuries are initially treated in hospital emergency departments. The present post hoc analysis examined data from patients admitted to an emergency hospital for treatment of physical injuries, resulting from a suicide attempt, and initial psychiatric treatment for depression and prevention of future suicide attempts. The effects on depressive symptoms were studied in two groups of patients using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAMD). One group (n = 6) had received intravenous tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) (amitriptyline or clomipramine) while the other group (n = 7) had been treated orally with milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. Prior to treatment the four highest scoring items on the HAMD scale were the same in both groups namely, item 1 (depressed mood), item 3 (suicidality), item 7 (interest in work and activities), and item 10 (psychic anxiety). After 1 week of treatment, mean global HAMD scores were significantly reduced in both groups. Treatment resulted in a significant reduction of five HAMD items in the TCA group, whereas in the milnacipran group 12 HAMD items were significantly reduced. Suicidality (item 3) was significantly improved by 1 week treatment with milnacipran, but not by TCAs. Milnacipran rapidly improved a wide range of depressive symptoms, including suicidality within the first week. The improvement with milnacipran would appear to be, at least, equivalent to that achieved with TCAs, possibly affecting a wider range of symptoms. Since milnacipran has been shown in comparative studies to be better tolerated than TCAs, this antidepressant offers an interesting option for the treatment of suicidal patients in an emergency setting.

  11. How do antidepressants work? New perspectives for refining future treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Catherine J; Duman, Ronald S; Cowen, Philip J

    2017-01-30

    Most currently available antidepressants target monoamine neurotransmitter function. However, a purely neurotransmitter-based explanation for antidepressant drug action is challenged by the delayed clinical onset of most agents and the need to explain how neurochemical changes reverse the many different symptoms of depression. Novel approaches to understanding of antidepressant drug action include a focus on early changes in emotional and social processing and the role of neural plasticity. In this Review, we discuss the ways in which these two different theories reflect different or complementary approaches, and how they might be integrated to offer novel solutions for people with depression. We consider the predictions made by these mechanistic approaches for the stratification and development of new therapeutics for depression, and the next steps that need to be made to facilitate this translation of science to the clinic.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Evidence for the Treatment of Acute Depression in Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cerullo, Michael A.; Strakowski, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast five studies of lamotrigine were negative although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of anti-depressants we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and Armodafinil while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam. PMID:23507138

  13. A systematic review of the evidence for the treatment of acute depression in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Michael A; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression, and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine, with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast, five studies of lamotrigine were negative, although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws, and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of antidepressants, we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants, but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and armodafinil, while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam.

  14. Effects of single and repeated treatment with antidepressants on apomorphine-induced yawning in the rat: the implication of alpha-1 adrenergic mechanisms in the D-2 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Delini-Stula, A; Hunn, C

    1990-01-01

    Acute (10 or 20 mg/kg IP) and subchronic (2 x 5 or 10 mg/kg IP daily for 7 days) effects of desipramine, imipramine, maprotiline, (+)- and (-)-oxaprotiline enantiomers as well as selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors citalopram and ifoxetine on yawning, induced by low doses of apomorphine, were investigated in the rat. In addition, the effects of alpha-1 receptor agonist adrafinil and antagonist prazosin were also tested. After acute treatment, desipramine, the stereoselective NA-uptake inhibiting (+)-enantiomer of oxaprotiline, and the alpha-1 agonist adrafinil, markedly and significantly suppressed yawning. Prazosin, in contrast, clearly potentiated it. This potentiating effect was abolished by the pretreatment with (+)-oxaprotiline and adrafinil. Other drugs were inactive. After subchronic administration, yawning was antagonized by NA-uptake-inhibiting antidepressants, including imipramine and maprotiline. By comparison to the acute treatment, the inhibitory effects of desipramine and (+)-oxaprotiline were considerably enhanced. Neither selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors nor (-)-oxaprotiline (levoprotiline) were active. Antidepressants therefore modulate the functional activity of D-2 receptors, activated by low doses of apomorphine, predominantly by the virtue of their noradrenergic enhancing properties. This modulatory effect appears to be mediated by alpha-1 adrenergic receptors.

  15. Antidepressants in the treatment of depression/depressive symptoms in cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past thirty years a number of studies have suggested that antidepressants can be effective in the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with cancer. The aim of this paper was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to perform a meta-analysis in order to quantify their overall effect. Methods Pubmed and the Cochrane libraries were searched for the time period between 1980 and 2010. Results Nine RCTs were identified and reviewed. Six of them (with a total of 563 patients) fulfilled the criteria for meta-analysis, but exhibited an unclear risk for bias. The estimated effect size was 1.56 with 95% CI: 1.07- 2.28 (p= 0.021). There were no differences in discontinuation rates between antidepressants and placebo groups (RR= 0.86 with 95% CI 0.47- 1.56, p=0.62). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that antidepressants can be effective in treating depressive symptoms beside clinical depression. When considering the risk of side effects and interactions and the heterogeneity among the mostly small studies, a general recommendation cannot be made until well-controlled studies are conducted. PMID:23679841

  16. Neuroplasticity and second messenger pathways in antidepressant efficacy: pharmacogenetic results from a prospective trial investigating treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Chiara; Crisafulli, Concetta; Calati, Raffaella; Albani, Diego; Forloni, Gianluigi; Calabrò, Marco; Martines, Rosalba; Kasper, Siegfried; Zohar, Joseph; Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Souery, Daniel; Montgomery, Stuart; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-03-04

    Genes belonging to neuroplasticity, monoamine, circadian rhythm, and transcription factor pathways were investigated as modulators of antidepressant efficacy. The present study aimed (1) to replicate previous findings in an independent sample with treatment-resistant depression (TRD), and (2) to perform a pathway analysis to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms involved. 220 patients with major depressive disorder who were non-responders to a previous antidepressant were treated with venlafaxine for 4-6 weeks and in case of non-response with escitalopram for 4-6 weeks. Symptoms were assessed using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale. The phenotypes were response and remission to venlafaxine, non-response (TRDA) and non-remission (TRDB) to neither venlafaxine nor escitalopram. 50 tag SNPs in 14 genes belonging to the pathways of interest were tested for association with phenotypes. Molecular pathways (KEGG database) that included one or more of the genes associated with the phenotypes were investigated also in the STAR*D sample. The associations between ZNF804A rs7603001 and response, CREB1 rs2254137 and remission were replicated, as well as CHL1 rs2133402 and lower risk of TRD. Other CHL1 SNPs were potential predictors of TRD (rs1516340, rs2272522, rs1516338, rs2133402). The MAPK1 rs6928 SNP was consistently associated with all the phenotypes. The protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum pathway (hsa04141) was the best pathway that may explain the mechanisms of MAPK1 involvement in antidepressant response. Signals in genes previously associated with antidepressant efficacy were confirmed for CREB1, ZNF804A and CHL1. These genes play pivotal roles in synaptic plasticity, neural activity and connectivity.

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  19. [Are antidepressants really effective?].

    PubMed

    Ammendola, S; Kornreich, C

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used for a long time and it is estimated that about 10 % of the belgian population is taking some of them each year. However, there are important controversies about their real efficacy. We review successively arguments for and against their efficacy. On the one hand, meta-analysis have shown no big efficacy differences between antidepressants and placebo. On the other hand, those meta-analysis have been criticized for their methodology. Animal models show a real effect of antidepressants on the brain and clinical observations, such as an impact on suicide prevention, the possibility of induced manic switch, and an efficacy on anxiety disorders are in favour of a real efficacy. Given our current state of knowledge about them it seems appropriate to continue to use anti-depressants in the treatment of depressive patients.

  20. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  1. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  2. Resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin mRNA expression, and decreased leptin serum levels.

    PubMed

    Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Kohli, Martin A; Reppermund, Simone; Salyakina, Daria; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Perlis, Roy H; Hamilton, Steven P; Pütz, Benno; Hennings, Johannes; Brückl, Tanja; Klengel, Torsten; Bettecken, Thomas; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Dose, Tatjana; Unschuld, Paul G; Zihl, Josef; Binder, Elisabeth; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone from adipose tissue and key player in weight regulation, has been suggested to be involved in sleep and cognition and to exert antidepressant-like effects, presumably via its action on the HPA-axis and hippocampal function. This led us to investigate whether genetic variants in the leptin gene, the level of leptin mRNA-expression and leptin serum concentrations are associated with response to antidepressant treatment. Our sample consisted of inpatients from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project with weekly Hamilton Depression ratings, divided into two subsamples. In the exploratory sample (n=251) 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the leptin gene region were genotyped. We found significant associations of several SNPs with impaired antidepressant treatment outcome and impaired cognitive performance after correction for multiple testing. The SNP (rs10487506) showing the highest association with treatment response (p=3.9×10(-5)) was analyzed in the replication sample (n=358) and the association could be verified (p=0.021) with response to tricyclic antidepressants. In an additional meta-analysis combining results from the MARS study with data from the Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(⁎)D) studies, nominal associations of several polymorphisms in the upstream vicinity of rs10487506 with treatment outcome were detected (p=0.001). In addition, we determined leptin mRNA expression in lymphocytes and leptin serum levels in subsamples of the MARS study. Unfavorable treatment outcome was accompanied with decreased leptin mRNA and leptin serum levels. Our results suggest an involvement of leptin in antidepressant action and cognitive function in depression with genetic polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin gene expression and leptin deficiency in serum being risk factors for resistance to antidepressant

  3. Antidepressant-like activity of resveratrol treatment in the forced swim test and tail suspension test in mice: the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of ERK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Gu, Jianhua; Wang, Xueer; Xie, Kai; Luan, Qinsong; Wan, Nianqing; Zhang, Qun; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Dexiang

    2013-11-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in Polygonum cuspidatum and has diverse biological activities. There is only limited information about the antidepressant-like effect of resveratrol. The present study assessed whether resveratrol treatment (20, 40 and 80mg/kg, i.p., 21days) has an antidepressant-like effect on the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) in mice and examined what its molecular targets might be. The results showed that resveratrol administration produced antidepressant-like effects in mice, evidenced by the reduced immobility time in the FST and TST, while it had no effect on the locomotor activity in the open field test. Resveratrol treatment significantly reduced serum corticosterone levels, which had been elevated by the FST and TST. Moreover, resveratrol increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. All of these antidepressant-like effects of resveratrol were essentially similar to those observed with the clinical antidepressant, fluoxetine. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of resveratrol in the FST and TST are mediated, at least in part, by modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, BDNF and ERK phosphorylation expression in the brain region of mice.

  4. Abuse and misuse of antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Sullivan, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of prescription drug abuse have reached epidemic proportions. Large-scale epidemiologic surveys of this under-recognized clinical problem have not included antidepressants despite their contribution to morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to look specifically at the misuse of antidepressants and how this behavior may fit into the growing crisis of nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, Medline, and PsycINFO using the search terms “antidepressant”, “abuse”, “misuse”, “nonmedical use”, “dependence”, and “addiction”, as well as individual antidepressant classes (eg, “SSRI”) and individual antidepressants (eg, “fluoxetine”) in various combinations, to identify articles of antidepressant misuse and abuse. Results A small but growing literature on the misuse and abuse of antidepressants consists largely of case reports. Most cases of antidepressant abuse have occurred in individuals with comorbid substance use and mood disorders. The most commonly reported motivation for abuse is to achieve a psychostimulant-like effect. Antidepressants are abused at high doses and via a variety of routes of administration (eg, intranasal, intravenous). Negative consequences vary based upon antidepressant class and pharmacology, but these have included seizures, confusion, and psychotic-like symptoms. Conclusion The majority of individuals prescribed antidepressants do not misuse the medication. However, certain classes of antidepressants do carry abuse potential. Vulnerable patient populations include those with a history of substance abuse and those in controlled environments. Warning signs include the presence of aberrant behaviors. Physicians should include antidepressants when screening for risky prescription medication use. When antidepressant misuse is detected, a thoughtful treatment plan, including referral to an addiction specialist, should be developed and

  5. GLP-1 is both anxiogenic and antidepressant; divergent effects of acute and chronic GLP-1 on emotionality.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and hindbrain, is known for its glucoregulatory and appetite suppressing effects. GLP-1 agonists are in clinical use for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. GLP-1, however, may also affect brain areas associated with emotionality regulation. Here we aimed to characterize acute and chronic impact of GLP-1 on anxiety and depression-like behavior. Rats were subjected to anxiety and depression behavior tests following acute or chronic intracerebroventricular or intra-dorsal raphe (DR) application of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Serotonin or serotonin-related genes were also measured in the amygdala, DR and the hippocampus. We demonstrate that both GLP-1 and its long lasting analog, Exendin-4, induce anxiety-like behavior in three rodent tests of this behavior: black and white box, elevated plus maze and open field test when acutely administered intraperitoneally, into the lateral ventricle, or directly into the DR. Acute central GLP-1 receptor stimulation also altered serotonin signaling in the amygdala. In contrast, chronic central administration of Exendin-4 did not alter anxiety-like behavior but significantly reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. Importantly, this positive effect of Exendin-4 was not due to significant body weight loss and reduced food intake, since rats pair-fed to Exendin-4 rats did not show altered mood. Collectively we show a striking impact of central GLP-1 on emotionality and the amygdala serotonin signaling that is divergent under acute versus chronic GLP-1 activation conditions. We also find a novel role for the DR GLP-1 receptors in regulation of behavior. These results may have direct relevance to the clinic, and indicate that Exendin-4 may be especially useful for obese patients manifesting with comorbid depression.

  6. Effects of antidepressant treatment on total antioxidant capacity and free radical levels in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chen; Lee, Chun-Te; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ju, Po-Chung; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Lai, Te-Jen

    2015-12-15

    In this prospective study, we investigated the effects of antidepressant therapy on total antioxidant capacity and free radical levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We recruited thirty-five first-episode patients who met the criteria of the Fourth Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of MDD and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were measured to investigate oxidative status and the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) assay was performed to evaluate antioxidant capacity in healthy controls and in patients before and after receiving a 12-week regimen of sertraline. The severity of depression was evaluated using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Before treatment, the mean HDRS score in patients with MDD was 26.11±4.93. Of the 35 patients with MDD, 19 (54.29%) completed the 12-week treatment regimen and all achieved remission. Patients with MDD had significantly lower TRAP baseline values than healthy controls. After adjusting for age, sex, occupation, education and marital status, we found that HDRS score was negatively correlated with TRAP value and level of superoxide radicals. After treatment, the MDD group demonstrated significantly higher TRAP values and significantly lower levels of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. In conclusion, MDD patients are accompanied by lowered antioxidant capacity than healthy individuals. Antidepressant treatment for 12 weeks results in increased antioxidant capacity and a decrease in circulating free radicals.

  7. Effects of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 on the expression of α1-adrenoceptor subtypes after antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, Grzegorz; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Kowalska, Marta; Bielawski, Adam; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Nalepa, Irena

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported that chronic imipramine and electroconvulsive treatments increase the α(1A)-adrenoceptor (but not the α(1B) subtype) mRNA level and the receptor density in the rat cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we have also shown that chronic treatment with citalopram does not affect the expression of either the α(1A)- or the α(1B)-adrenoceptor, indicating that the previously observed up-regulation of α(1A)-adrenoceptor may depend on the noradrenergic component of the pharmacological mechanism of action of these antidepressants. Here, we report that previous noradrenergic depletion with DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) (a neurotoxin selective for the noradrenergic nerve terminals) significantly attenuated the increase of α(1A)-adrenoceptor mRNA induced by a 14-day treatment with imipramine (IMI, 20 mg/kg, ip) and abolished the effect of electroconvulsive shock (ECS, 150 mA, 0.5 s) in the prefrontal cortex of the rat brain. The changes in the receptor protein expression (as reflected by its density) that were induced by IMI and ECS treatments were differently modulated by DSP-4 lesioning, and only the ECS-induced increase in α(1A)-adrenoceptor level was abolished. This study provides further evidence corroborating our initial hypothesis that the noradrenergic component of the action of antidepressant agents plays an essential role in the modulation of α(1A)-adrenoceptor in the rat cerebral cortex.

  8. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  9. Acute scurvy during treatment with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, D T; Dasanu, C A; Kauffman, C L

    2009-10-01

    The association of vitamin C deficiency with nutritional factors is commonly recognized. However, an acute form of scurvy can occur in patients with an acute systemic inflammatory response, which is produced by sepsis, medications, cancer or acute inflammation. The frequency of acute hypovitaminosis C in hospitalized patients is higher than previously recognized. We report the occurrence of acute signs and symptoms of scurvy (perifollicular petechiae, erythema, gingivitis and bleeding) in a patient hospitalized for treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma with high-dose interleukin-2. Concomitantly, serum vitamin C levels decreased to below normal. Better diets and longer lifespan may result a lower frequency of acute scurvy and a higher frequency of scurvy associated with systemic inflammatory responses. Therefore, increased awareness of this condition can lead to early recognition of the cutaneous signs of acute scurvy in hospitalized patients with acute illnesses or in receipt of biological agents, and prevent subsequent morbidity such as bleeding, anaemia, impaired immune defences, oedema or neurological symptoms.

  10. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolzhenko, A.T.; Komissarov, I.V.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of /sup 14/C-NA and /sup 3/H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC/sub 50/ and EC/sub 2/ were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10/sup -4/ M) and of 5-HT (10/sup -5/ M) on presynaptic release of /sup 14/C-NA and /sup 3/H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants.

  11. Treatment of acute lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Acute lower limb ischaemia poses a major threat to limb survival. For many years surgical thromboembolectomy was the mainstay of treatment. Recent years have brought an endovascular revolution in the management of acute lower limb ischaemia. A wide range of endovascular procedures can nowadays be employed, providing results at least as good as the traditional surgical approach. This paper is an overview of currently utilised endovascular options as well as recent modifications of standard surgical techniques.

  12. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the chronic unpredictable stress rat model and the effects of chronic antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne H; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Sandi, Carmen

    2010-10-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) is a widely used animal model of depression. The present study was undertaken to investigate behavioral, physiological and molecular effects of CUS and/or chronic antidepressant treatment (venlafaxine or imipramine) in the same set of animals. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, was assessed by measuring consumption of a palatable solution. Exposure to CUS reduced intake of a palatable solution and this effect was prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment. Moreover, chronic antidepressant treatment decreased depressive-like behavior in a modified forced swim test in stressed rats. Present evidence suggests a role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in depression. BDNF mRNA levels in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus were assessed by in situ hybridization. Exposure to CUS was not correlated with a decrease but rather with an increase in BDNF mRNA expression in both the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus and the CA3 region of the ventral hippocampus indicating that there is no simple link between depression-like behaviors per se and brain BDNF levels in rats. However, a significant increase in BDNF mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus correlated with chronic antidepressant treatment emphasizing a role for BDNF in the mechanisms underlying antidepressant activity.

  13. Regulation of insulin receptor phosphorylation in the brains of prenatally stressed rats: New insight into the benefits of antidepressant drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Głombik, Katarzyna; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Trojan, Ewa; Chamera, Katarzyna; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2017-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the involvement of disturbances in the brain insulin pathway in the pathogenesis of depression. On the other hand, data concerning the impact of antidepressant drug therapy on brain insulin signaling remain scare and insufficient. We determinated the influence of chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs (imipramine, fluoxetine and tianeptine) on the insulin signaling pathway of the brain of adult prenatally stressed rats. 3-month-old prenatally stressed and control rats were treated for 21 days with imipramine, fluoxetine or tianeptine (10mg/kg/day i.p.).The impact of chronic antidepressant administration was examined in forced swim test. In the frontal cortex and hippocampus, the mRNA and protein expression of insulin, insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1,IRS-2) and adaptor proteins (Shc1, Grb2) before and after drugs administration were measured.Rats exposed prenatally to stressful stimuli displayed depressive-like disturbances, which were attenuated by antidepressant drug administration. We did not reveal the impact of prenatal stress or antidepressant treatment on insulin and the insulin receptor expression in the examined structures. We revealed that diminished insulin receptor phosphorylation evoked by the prenatal stress procedure was attenuated by drugs treatment. We demonstrated that the favorable effect of antidepressans on insulin receptor phosphorylation in the frontal cortex was mainly related with the normalization of serine312 and tyrosine IRS-1 phosphorylation, while in the hippocampus, it was related with the adaptor proteins Shc1/Grb2. It can be suggested that the behavioral effectiveness of antidepressant drug therapy may be related with the beneficial impact of antidepressant on insulin receptor phosphorylation pathways.

  14. [Mirtazapine versus other antidepressive agents for depression].

    PubMed

    Knud Larsen, Jens

    2012-11-12

    A Cochrane analysis compared efficacy and side effects of mirtazapine with other antidepressants. After six weeks of treatment no reliable difference of efficacy between mirtazapine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants was found. The side effects like increased sleep and weight gain were compared by treatment with mirtazapine and treatment with SSRI antidepressants. The very fact of the sleep effect and the fast onset of action have probably increased the effect size compared with SSRI antidepressants. The results of the Cochrane analysis cannot for certain be generalized to inpatients, as other studies have found tricyclic antidepressants to be especially effective.

  15. Comparative benefits and harms of second generation antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapies in initial treatment of major depressive disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gartlehner, Gerald; Gaynes, Bradley N; Forneris, Catherine; Asher, Gary N; Morgan, Laura C; Coker-Schwimmer, Emmanuel; Boland, Erin; Lux, Linda J; Gaylord, Susan; Bann, Carla; Pierl, Christiane Barbara; Lohr, Kathleen N

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the benefits and harms of second generation antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) in the initial treatment of a current episode of major depressive disorder in adults? Methods This was a systematic review including qualitative assessment and meta-analyses using random and fixed effects models. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, PsycINFO, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched from January1990 through January 2015. The 11 randomized controlled trials included compared a second generation antidepressant CBT. Ten trials compared antidepressant monotherapy with CBT alone; three compared antidepressant monotherapy with antidepressant plus CBT. Summary answer and limitations Meta-analyses found no statistically significant difference in effectiveness between second generation antidepressants and CBT for response (risk ratio 0.91, 0.77 to 1.07), remission (0.98, 0.73 to 1.32), or change in 17 item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score (weighted mean difference, −0.38, −2.87 to 2.10). Similarly, no significant differences were found in rates of overall study discontinuation (risk ratio 0.90, 0.49 to 1.65) or discontinuation attributable to lack of efficacy (0.40, 0.05 to 2.91). Although more patients treated with a second generation antidepressant than receiving CBT withdrew from studies because of adverse events, the difference was not statistically significant (risk ratio 3.29, 0.42 to 25.72). No conclusions could be drawn about other outcomes because of lack of evidence. Results should be interpreted cautiously given the low strength of evidence for most outcomes. The scope of this review was limited to trials that enrolled adult patients with major depressive disorder and compared a second generation antidepressant with CBT, and many of the included trials had methodological shortcomings that may limit confidence in some of

  16. Lipidomic analyses of the mouse brain after antidepressant treatment: evidence for endogenous release of long-chain fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Lee, Lynette Hui-Wen; Shui, Guanghou; Farooqui, Akhlaq A; Wenk, Markus R; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2009-08-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in a possible link between changes in brain polyunsaturated fatty acids, neural membrane phospholipid degradation, serotonergic neurotransmission, and depression. The present study aims to examine effects of antidepressants on lipids in different regions of the brain at individual molecular species level, using the novel technique of lipidomics. Balb/C mice received daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 10 mg/kg of the antidepressants maprotiline, fluoxetine and paroxetine for 4 wk. The prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum were harvested, and lipid profiles compared to those of saline-injected mice. Treatment with maprotiline and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine, resulted in significant decreases in phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, PC36:1, PC38:3, PC40:2p, PC40:6, PC40:5, PC42:7p, PC42:6p and PC42:5p in the prefrontal neocortex. The decreases in phospholipids were accompanied by increases in lysophospholipid species, lysoPC16:0, lysoPC18:2 and lysoPC18:0 in the prefrontal cortex, indicating increase in phospholipase A2 activity and possible release of long-chain fatty acids. Maprotiline and paroxetine treatment also resulted in decreases in sphingomyelin and increases in several ceramide species in the prefrontal cortex. It is postulated that endogenous release of long-chain fatty acids may be related to the mechanism of action of maprotiline and paroxetine.

  17. Treatment of human aggression with major tranquilizers, antidepressants, and newer psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Wadud, A

    1975-02-01

    Most of the drugs used in the treatment of aggressive syndromes have originally been developed for other clinical applications. Despite significant differences in the pathogenesis of various aggressive disorders, the frequently used "antiaggression" drugs are the major tranquilizers (neuroleptics). If the aggresstion is associated with psychosis, chlorpromazine or haloperidol are the drugs of choice. Aggressive disorders within the acute and chronic brain syndromes are best treated with pericyazine, thioridazine, and thiothixene. In aggressive symptoms of mentally retarded patients, particularly with epileptic syndromes, a new benzazepine (SCH12,679)was found to be very effective. Aggression associated with alcoholism or narcotic addiction showed best response to chlorpormazine and haloperidol. As a general rule, in aggressive patients with clinically known epilepsy, or with abnormal electroencephalographic findings, the major tranquilizers with potent sedative properties should be given with great caution.

  18. Milnacipran versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Atsuo; Watanabe, Norio; Omori, Ichiro M; Barbui, Corrado; Cipriani, Andrea; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs are frequently used as first-line treatment in primary and secondary care settings. Milnacipran, a dual serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is one of the antidepressant drugs that clinicians use for routine depression care. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of milnacipran in comparison with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), heterocyclics, SSRIs and other newer antidepressive agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety & Neurosis review group Controlled Trials Register (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) were electronically searched in August 2008. References of relevant trials and other reviews were also checked. Trial databases of the drug-approving agencies and ongoing clinical trial registers for all published and unpublished trials were handsearched in 2007. All relevant authors were contacted for supplemental data. No language restriction was applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing milnacipran with any other active antidepressive agents (including non-conventional agents such as herbal products like hypericum) as monotherapy in the acute phase of major depression were selected. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently checked eligibility, assessed methodological quality and extracted data from the eligible trials using a standardised data extraction form. The number of participants who responded to treatment or those who achieved remission were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted, combining data from the included trials. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (n=2277) were included in the meta-analysis. Despite the size of this sample, the pooled 95% confidence intervals were

  19. Antidepressant-like cognitive and behavioral effects of acute ketamine administration associated with plasticity in the ventral hippocampus to medial prefrontal cortex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jett, Julianne D.; Boley, Angela M.; Girotti, Milena; Shah, Amiksha; Lodge, Daniel J.; Morilak, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Acute low-dose administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects in humans and rodents. Recently, we found that the long-lasting effect of ketamine on the forced swim test requires ventral hippocampal (vHipp) activity at the time of drug administration. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a target of the vHipp dysregulated in depression, is important for cognitive flexibility and response strategy selection. Deficits in cognitive flexibility, the ability to modify thoughts and behaviors in response to changes in the environment, are associated with depression. We have shown that chronic stress impairs cognitive flexibility on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), and induces a shift from active to passive response strategies on the shock-probe defensive burying test (SPDB). Objective In this study, we tested the effects of ketamine on chronic stress-induced changes in cognitive flexibility and coping behavior on the AST and SPDB, respectively. Subsequently, we investigated vHipp-mPFC plasticity as a potential mechanism of ketamine’s therapeutic action. Results Ketamine reversed deficits in cognitive flexibility and restored active coping behavior in chronically stressed rats. Further, high frequency stimulation in the vHipp replicated ketamine’s antidepressant-like effects on the forced swim test and AST, but not on the SPDB. Conclusion These results show that ketamine restores cognitive flexibility and coping response strategy compromised by stress. Activity in the vHipp-mPFC pathway may represent a neural substrate for some of the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine, including cognitive flexibility, but other circuits may mediate the effects of ketamine on coping response strategy. PMID:25986748

  20. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms.

  1. Mesoporous hydroxyapatite as a carrier of olanzapine for long-acting antidepression treatment in rats with induced depression.

    PubMed

    Shyong, Yan-Jye; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Kuo, Li-Wei; Su, Chang-Fu; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Chang, Kuo-Chi; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2017-04-06

    An antidepressant carrier, mesoporous hydroxyapatite olanzapine (mesoHAP-OLZ), was designed to maintain 3weeks of constant medication release. The carrier was intramuscularly (IM) injected, where cellular activity played a role in achieving the goal of constant release. The efficiency of the treatment was evaluated from 3 perspectives in in vivo studies: locomotor activities, biomarkers, and learning and memory ability. MesoHAP-OLZ can increase the locomotor activity in rats with induced depression determined by open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST). Serotonin (5-HT), one of the most important biomarker in depression can also be increased by mesoHAP-OLZ, leading to increased hippocampus activity as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MesoHAP-OLZ can also improve learning and memory ability in rats with induced depression during Morris water maze (MWM) test. Our findings further show that mesoHAP-OLZ can provide long-term drug release with a single IM injection, helping to solve the problem of non-adherent medication intake that often occurs in antidepressant therapy.

  2. 5-HT₂A receptor inactivation potentiates the acute antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram: involvement of the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Quesseveur, G; Repérant, C; David, D J; Gardier, A M; Sanchez, C; Guiard, B P

    2013-04-01

    Evidence suggests that the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) modulates the therapeutic activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Indeed, among the genetic factors known to influence the individual response to antidepressants, the HTR2A gene has been associated with SSRIs response in depressed patients. However, in these pharmacogenetic studies, the consequences of HTR2A gene polymorphisms on 5-HT2AR expression or function are lacking and the precise role of this receptor is still matter of debate. This study examined the effect of 5-HT2AR agonism or antagonism with DOI and MDL100907, respectively, on the serotonergic system and the antidepressant-like activity of the SSRI escitalopram in mouse. The 5-HT2AR agonist DOI decreased the firing rate of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus of 5-HT2AR(+/+) anesthetized mice. This inhibitory response persisted in 5-HT2CR(-/-) but was completely blunted in 5-HT2AR(-/-) mutants. Moreover, the suppressant effect of DOI on DR 5-HT neuronal activity in 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice was attenuated by the loss of noradrenergic neurons induced by the neurotoxin DSP4. Conversely, in 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice, the pharmacological inactivation of the 5-HT2AR by the selective antagonist MDL100907 reversed escitalopram-induced decrease in DR 5-HT neuronal activity. Remarkably, in microdialysis experiments, a single injection of escitalopram increased cortical extracellular 5-HT, but not NE, levels in awake 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice. Although the addition of MDL100907 did not potentiate 5-HT neurotransmission, it allowed escitalopram to increase cortical NE outflow and consequently to elicit an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test. These results suggest that the blockade of the 5-HT2AR may strengthen the antidepressant-like effect of escitalopram by facilitating the enhancement of the brain NE transmission. They provide support for the use of atypical antipsychotics with SSRIs as a relevant antidepressant augmentation

  3. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects.

  4. Antidepressant and anxiolytic potential of the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine (Lu AA21004) assessed by behavioural and neurogenesis outcomes in mice.

    PubMed

    Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Mendez-David, Indira; Pehrson, Alan; Guiard, Bruno P; Repérant, Christelle; Orvoën, Sophie; Gardier, Alain M; Hen, René; Ebert, Bjarke; Miller, Silke; Sanchez, Connie; David, Denis J

    2013-10-01

    Vortioxetine (Lu AA21004) is an investigational novel antidepressant with multimodal activity that functions as a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT(1D) receptor antagonist, 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist, 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and inhibitor of the 5-HT transporter in vitro. Here we explore its anxiolytic and antidepressant potential in adult mice. Vortioxetine was assessed in BalB/cJ@RJ mice using the open-field and forced-swim tests (acute: p.o. 1 h, repeated: daily p.o. 21 days), and in 129S6/SvEvTac mice using the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm (acute: p.o. 1 h, sustained: daily p.o. 14 or 21 days). Fluoxetine and diazepam were controls. Acute and repeated dosing of vortioxetine produced more pronounced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like activities than fluoxetine. Vortioxetine significantly increased cell proliferation and cell survival and stimulated maturation of immature granule cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus after 21 days of treatment. After 14 days, a high dose of vortioxetine increased dendritic length and the number of dendrite intersections, suggesting that vortioxetine accelerates the maturation of immature neurons. Vortioxetine displays an antidepressant and anxiolytic profile following repeated administration associated with increased neurogenesis at several stages. Vortioxetine effects were observed at low levels of 5-HT transporter occupancy, suggesting an alternative mechanism of action to 5-HT reuptake inhibition.

  5. [Poisoning with antidepressants].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Intoxications with medications are among the most frequent diagnoses in patients admitted to medical emergency departments and intensive care units. Due to their particular toxicity tricyclic antidepressants play an important role despite a decreasing incidence. Tricyclic antidepressant toxicity includes an inhibition of myocardial excitability, central (sedation, seizures) and peripheral anticholinergic signs, and arterial hypotension. Cardiac arrhythmia including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, sustained seizures and severe central anticholinergic symptoms such as agitation, delirium, and hyperthermia, are life threatening. Important treatment options include gastrointestinal decontamination with oral single-dose activated charcoal within 1-2 hours post ingestion, and antidotal therapy with boluses of sodium bicarbonate for cardiotoxicity. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and the atypical antidepressants are far less toxic than tricyclics. They may lead to serotonin toxicity (serotonin syndrome).

  6. Which antidepressant?

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, K; Eagles, J M

    1991-01-01

    The prescription of psychotropic drugs, and particularly the use of antidepressants, has received considerable attention in the medical literature, the media and from legislative bodies in recent years. Medical practitioners are faced with a bewildering array of apparently efficacious drugs from which they must choose when prescribing for a depressed patient. This paper discusses the main parameters which guide this choice, namely clinical efficacy, adverse effects profile, safety in overdose and monetary cost. It concludes by making some recommendations for the prescription of antidepressant drugs. PMID:2031757

  7. A treatment for the acute migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Adam, E I

    1987-01-01

    A compound analgesic/anti-emetic formulation was significantly effective in reducing the severity of acute attacks of migraine, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial of 34 patients referred to a migraine clinic. The preparation contained paracetamol (acetaminophen) 500 mg, codeine phosphate 8 mg, buclizine hydrochloride 6.25 mg and dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate 10 mg. The dosage was two tablets taken as early as possible in the acute attack. No specific factors could be identified which influenced response to treatment. Patients with a long history of migraine (more than 10 years) responded as well as those with a recent onset of the condition.

  8. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep.

  9. Treatment of acute and remote symptomatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2009-07-01

    In principle, the use of anticonvulsant drugs does not differ between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, but control of acute symptomatic seizures requires simultaneous treatment of the underlying etiology. Prevention of remote seizures when the risk is known to be high has been the subject of intense efforts at antiepileptogenesis, but the optimal duration of treatment after an injury is not yet known. Appropriate evaluation of a seizure depends on individual circumstances, but findings on examination, laboratory tests (serum electrolytes, magnesium, glucose, assessment of hepatic and renal function), and brain imaging (CT scan or MRI) are necessary to determine the most likely cause. Lumbar puncture is always required when there is suspicion of meningitis or encephalitis. Preferred medications for treatment of acute symptomatic seizures or status epilepticus are those available for intravenous use, such as benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin or phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, and phenobarbital. Diazepam is also available as a gel for rectal administration. Seizures that occur in patients with epilepsy because of missed antiepileptic drugs or inadequate serum levels should be treated with additional doses of their regular medications; loading doses can be administered with minimal toxicity in tolerant patients. Surgery is rarely necessary in the acute setting except for intracerebral lesions with rapidly rising intracranial pressure and impending herniation. After seizures are controlled, the provoking condition must also be determined and treated.

  10. Impacts of acute imipramine treatment on plasma and brain amino acid metabolism in mice given graded levels of dietary chicken protein.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mao; Murakami, Tatsuro; Tomonaga, Shozo; Sato, Mikako; Takahata, Yoshihisa; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have shown a relationship between depression and animal protein intake. To evaluate whether the difference of dietary chicken protein levels induces an antidepressant-like effect and potentiates acute antidepressant effects, three levels of dietary chicken protein were used as the representative animal protein with imipramine used as the antidepressant. In addition, the effects of dietary chicken protein on brain metabolism were evaluated. Open field test (OFT) and forced swimming test (FST) were conducted on the 27th and 28th days, respectively. OFT and FST were not influenced by both imipramine and dietary protein levels. However, characteristic effects of imipramine treatment on brain monoamine metabolism were observed in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus. In addition, dietary protein significantly increased taurine and L-ornithine levels even though these amino acids were not contained in the diets. In conclusion, the metabolism of several amino acids in the plasma and brain were altered by dietary chicken protein.

  11. Amygdala Reactivity to Emotional Faces in the Prediction of General and Medication-Specific Responses to Antidepressant Treatment in the Randomized iSPOT-D Trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Leanne M; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Song, Yun C; Paton, Rebecca; Eagles, Sarah; Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea; Grieve, Stuart M; Harris, Anthony W F; Usherwood, Tim; Etkin, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Although the cost of poor treatment outcomes of depression is staggering, we do not yet have clinically useful methods for selecting the most effective antidepressant for each depressed person. Emotional brain activation is altered in major depressive disorder (MDD) and implicated in treatment response. Identifying which aspects of emotional brain activation are predictive of general and specific responses to antidepressants may help clinicians and patients when making treatment decisions. We examined whether amygdala activation probed by emotion stimuli is a general or differential predictor of response to three commonly prescribed antidepressants, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A test–retest design was used to assess patients with MDD in an academic setting as part of the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression. A total of 80 MDD outpatients were scanned prior to treatment and 8 weeks after randomization to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors escitalopram and sertraline and the serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine-extended release (XR). A total of 34 matched controls were scanned at the same timepoints. We quantified the blood oxygen level-dependent signal of the amygdala during subliminal and supraliminal viewing of facial expressions of emotion. Response to treatment was defined by ⩾50% symptom improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Pre-treatment amygdala hypo-reactivity to subliminal happy and threat was a general predictor of treatment response, regardless of medication type (Cohen's d effect size 0.63 to 0.77; classification accuracy, 75%). Responders showed hypo-reactivity compared to controls at baseline, and an increase toward ‘normalization' post-treatment. Pre-treatment amygdala reactivity to subliminal sadness was a differential moderator of non-response to venlafaxine-XR (Cohen's d effect size 1.5; classification accuracy, 81%). Non-responders to

  12. Preferential reduction of binding of sup 125 I-iodopindolol to beta-1 adrenoceptors in the amygdala of rat after antidepressant treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ordway, G.A.; Gambarana, C.; Tejani-Butt, S.M.; Areso, P.; Hauptmann, M.; Frazer, A. )

    1991-05-01

    This study utilized quantitative receptor autoradiography to examine the effects of repeated administration of antidepressants to rats on the binding of the beta adrenoceptor antagonist, {sup 125}I-iodopindolol ({sup 125}I-IPIN) to either beta-1 or beta-2 adrenoceptors in various regions of brain. Antidepressants were selected to represent various chemical and pharmacological classes including tricyclic compounds (desipramine and protriptyline), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline, phenelzine and tranylcypromine), atypical antidepressants (mianserin and trazodone) and selective inhibitors of the uptake of serotonin (citalopram and sertraline). Additionally, rats were treated with various psychotropic drugs that lack antidepressant efficacy (cocaine, deprenyl, diazepam and haloperidol). Repeated treatment of rats with desipramine, protriptyline, clorgyline, phenelzine, tranylcypromine or mianserin reduced the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-1 adrenoceptors in many brain areas. Only in the basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala did all six of these antidepressants significantly reduce {sup 125}I-IPIN binding to beta-1 adrenoceptors. In these amygdaloid nuclei, the magnitude of the reduction in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN caused by each of these drugs was comparable to or greater than the reduction in binding produced in any other region of brain. Reductions of binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN after antidepressant treatments were not consistently observed in the cortex, the area of brain examined most often in homogenate binding studies. Only the monoamine oxidase inhibitors caused reductions in the binding of {sup 125}I-IPIN to beta-2 adrenoceptors, and this effect was generally localized to the amygdala and hypothalamus.

  13. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  14. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  16. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  17. Sertraline versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; La Ferla, Teresa; Furukawa, Toshi A; Signoretti, Alessandra; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Churchill, Rachel; McGuire, Hugh; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence clinical practice guideline on the treatment of depressive disorder recommended that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors should be the first-line option when drug therapy is indicated for a depressive episode. Preliminary evidence suggested that sertraline might be slightly superior in terms of effectiveness. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of sertraline in comparison with tricyclics (TCAs), heterocyclics, other SSRIs and newer agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2008), EMBASE (1974 to 2008), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to July 2008. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical companies and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to sertraline versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data. Discrepancies were resolved with another member of the team. A double-entry procedure was employed by two reviewers. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy (the number of patients who responded or remitted), acceptability (the number of patients who failed to complete the study) and tolerability (side-effects). Main results A total of 59 studies, mostly of low quality, were included in the review, involving multiple treatment comparisons between sertraline and other antidepressant agents. Evidence favouring sertraline over some other antidepressants for the acute phase treatment of major depression was found, either

  18. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, G; McGuffie, A; Wilkie, S

    2001-01-01

    Overdoses of tricyclic antidepressants are among the commonest causes of drug poisoning seen in accident and emergency departments. This review discusses the pharmacokinetics, clinical presentation and treatment of tricyclic overdose. PMID:11435353

  19. Propensity Score Matching in Nonrandomized Studies: A Concept Simply Explained Using Antidepressant Treatment During Pregnancy as an Example.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2017-02-01

    In prospective and retrospective observational studies, such as those that examine the effects of antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression during pregnancy, patients are not randomized to whatever treatments they do or do not receive. As a result, treatment groups may be unbalanced for a wide range of sociodemographic and clinical variables. In such studies, because the illness (and its correlates) for which the treatment is indicated may itself influence the study outcomes, the use of the treatment becomes indirectly linked to these outcomes (this is known as confounding by indication), and the effects of treatment and illness on the study outcomes are difficult if not impossible to separate. Case-control research designs, regression analyses that adjust for independent variables, and propensity score matching are ways in which baseline differences between groups and confounding by indication are statistically addressed. This article examines the concepts involved, explains what is done in propensity score matching procedures, and discusses the advantages and limitations of propensity score matching. Whereas propensity score matching can substantially reduce baseline differences between groups in observational studies, it can never correct for unmeasured confounds; therefore, cause-effect relationships can never be deduced from such studies. However, in situations in which gold standard randomized controlled trials are impractical, researchers must make do with statistical approaches such as propensity score matching.

  20. Is there a place for tricyclic antidepressants and subsequent augmentation strategies in obtaining remission for patients with treatment resistant depression?

    PubMed

    Gervasoni, Nicola; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Bertschy, Gilles; Bondolfi, Guido

    2009-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a worrying mental health problem and obtaining remission from treatment resistant depression (TRD) remains an important clinical issue. Twenty patients (14 women, 6 men) considered as treatment resistant after the fourth step of a seven-step treatment algorithm to obtain remission in major depression received clomipramine 150 mg/day for 1 month (step 5). In case of failure, two subsequent augmentation strategies with lithium and lithium plus triiodothyronine (T3) were implemented. Median Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score at initiation of clomipramine treatment was 29 (range 8-43). Treatment with clomipramine alone allowed five patients to achieve sustained remission (MADRS < or = 8), while three patients were responders (MADRS decrease > or = 50%) and three patients were partial responders (MADRS decrease > 25%). Lithium augmentation in 10 patients led to one additional remission, whereas no additional remission was observed in 6 patients with further T3 augmentation. Tricyclic antidepressants have demonstrated efficacy in TRD. The present study suggests that treatment with clomipramine might allow obtaining remission in some patients who do not fully respond despite multiple interventions.

  1. [Switching and combining strategies of antidepressant medications].

    PubMed

    Charpeaud, Thomas; Moliere, Fanny; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Allaïli, Najib; Bation, Rémy; Nieto, Isabel; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Saba, Ghassen; Bellivier, Frank; Bennabi, Djamila; Holtzmann, Jérôme; Camus, Vincent; Courtet, Philippe; Courvoisier, Pierre; d'Amato, Thierry; Doumy, Olivier; Garnier, Marion; Bougerol, Thierry; Lançon, Christophe; Haffen, Emmanuel; Leboyer, Marion; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Vaiva, Guillaume; El-Hage, Wissam; Aouizerate, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Switching antidepressant medication may be helpful in depressed patients having no benefit from the initial antidepressant treatment. Before considering switching strategy, the initial antidepressant treatment should produce no therapeutic effect after at least 4 weeks of administration at adequate dosage. Choosing an antidepressant of pharmacologically distinct profile fails to consistently demonstrate a significant superiority in terms of effectiveness over the switching to another antidepressant within the same pharmacological class. Augmenting SSRI/SNRIs with mirtazapine/mianserin has become the most recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations. Augmenting SSRI with tricyclic drugs is now a less recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations given the increased risk for the occurrence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and adverse effects.

  2. Antidepressive and BDNF effects of enriched environment treatment across ages in mice lacking BDNF expression through promoter IV

    PubMed Central

    Jha, S; Dong, B E; Xue, Y; Delotterie, D F; Vail, M G; Sakata, K

    2016-01-01

    Reduced promoter IV-driven expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in stress and major depression. We previously reported that defective promoter IV (KIV) caused depression-like behavior in young adult mice, which was reversed more effectively by enriched environment treatment (EET) than antidepressants. The effects of promoter IV-BDNF deficiency and EET over the life stages remain unknown. Since early-life development (ED) involves dynamic epigenetic processes, we hypothesized that EET during ED would provide maximum antidepressive effects that would persist later in life due to enhanced, long-lasting BDNF induction. We tested this hypothesis by determining EET effects across three life stages: ED (0–2 months), young adult (2–4 months), and old adult (12–14 months). KIV mice at all life stages showed depression-like behavior in the open-field and tail-suspension tests compared with wild-type mice. Two months of EET reduced depression-like behavior in ED and young adult, but not old adult mice, with the largest effect in ED KIV mice. This effect lasted for 1 month after discontinuance of EET only in ED mice. BDNF protein induction by EET in the hippocampus and frontal cortex was also the largest in ED mice and persisted only in the hippocampus of ED KIV mice after discontinuance of EET. No gender-specific effects were observed. The results suggest that defective promoter IV causes depression-like behavior, regardless of age and gender, and that EET during ED is particularly beneficial to individuals with promoter IV-BDNF deficiency, while additional treatment may be needed for older adults. PMID:27648918

  3. Pycnogenol treatment of acute hemorrhoidal episodes.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Errichi, Bruno; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Ricci, Andrea; Dugall, Mark; Cornelli, Umberto; Cacchio, Marisa; Rohdewald, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 h of onset of an acute attack, patients were enrolled and signs and symptoms were scored. This evaluation was repeated after seven days' treatment and again seven days following treatment cessation. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol-treated groups than in the control group given placebo (p < 0.05), showing the efficacy of Pycnogenol for relieving signs and symptoms of acute external hemorrhoids. In a group of patients given topical (0.5%) Pycnogenol in addition to oral Pycnogenol the improvement in symptoms set in significantly faster and was more pronounced. The most prominent symptom, hemorrhoidal bleeding, was completely absent in all patients treated with Pycnogenol for seven days and also at the 14 days follow-up. In contrast, bleedings were still observed in the control group during the two weeks follow-up. This study indicates that Pycnogenol, both in oral and in topical form, is effective for controlling this common, disabling health problem. The application of Pycnogenol eases the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks and help avoid bleedings.

  4. Fuzi polysaccharide-1 produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hua-Cheng; Qu, Hong-Da; Sun, Li-Rong; Li, Shu-Ji; Cao, Xiong; Fang, Ying-Ying; Jie, Wei; Bean, Jonathan C; Wu, Wei-Kang; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Current antidepressants are clinically effective only after several weeks of administration. We show that Fuzi polysaccharide-1 (FPS), a new water-soluble polysaccharide isolated from Fuzi, which has been used to treat mood disorders in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries, increases the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus in adult mice, and most of these cells subsequently differentiate into new neurons. We also found that FPS administration reduces immobility in the forced swim test, and latency in the novelty suppressed-feeding test. Moreover, a 14-d regimen with FPS reverses avoidance behaviour and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis induced by chronic defeat stress. In contrast, imipramine, a well known antidepressant, reverses this avoidance behaviour only after 4 wk of continuous administration. Finally, acute treatment with FPS had no effect on brain monoamine levels in frontal cortex but significantly increases BDNF in the hippocampus, while the antidepressant effect and enhancement of cell proliferation induced by FPS administration were totally blocked by K252a, an inhibitor of trkB in a chronic social defeat depression model, suggesting that the neurogenic and antidepressant effects of FPS may involve BDNF signalling. In conclusion, our findings suggest that FPS could be developed as a putative antidepressant with a rapid onset of action.

  5. [The approaches in the discovery of antidepressants using affective disorder models].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa; Murasawa, Hiroyasu; Kamei, Junzo

    2003-04-01

    With the recent appearance of SSRI and SNRI, medication options with respect to depression have broadened. However, patients displaying clear improvement with existing antidepressants still do not exceed about 60 percent of total patients. New types of therapeutic agent development are currently required. Conditions for the determination of new antidepressants are: 1) instantaneous medications displaying a high level of antidepressant action in the early stages of treatment and 2) medications displaying efficacy with respect to patients that are therapy-resistant. However, drug discovery using new animal models is critical as part of drug development of these types of antidepressants in addition to models used in the past such as the forced swim test. We adopted two animal models (olfactory bulbectomy model and conditioned fear stress (CFS) model) developed for pharmacological evaluation of antidepressants. It has been well known that olfactory bulbectomied rats display extreme emotional response (aggressiveness and anxiety). However the improvement of this response occurs following chronic but not acute antidepressant treatment. Thus, we used this model to evaluate the period of the manifestation of antidepressant action. Mice exhibited a marked suppression of motility when they were returned to the same environment in which they had previously received an electric foot shock. Thus, it is suggested that the CFS stress model may be a useful model for therapy-resistant depression due to the fact that motor suppression is not readily attenuated by antidepressant treatment. In this report, we provide an overview of the approaches in the discovery of new antidepressants using these affective disorder models.

  6. Acute hepatitis C: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Tahan, Veysel

    2009-04-01

    HCV can cause acute or chronic hepatitis and is a health problem all over the world. It is one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is a common indication for liver transplantation. Unrecognized patients with HCV infection may transmit the virus to uninfected people. The acute form of the disease leads to chronic hepatitis in the majority of cases. Since the success rate of treatment given in the chronic phase is much lower than that given in the acute phase, recognizing acute hepatitis is critical. Although HCV is less prevalent since 1990s in the Western world after improved blood-donor screening programs, needle-exchange facilities and education among intravenous drug users, it is still endemic in some regions, including African countries, Egypt, Taiwan, China and Japan. Acute HCV infection may be a challenge for the clinician; since it is often asymptomatic, detection and diagnosis are usually difficult. After an incubation period of 7 weeks (2-12 weeks), only a minority of patients (10-15%) report symptoms. The spontaneous clearance of the virus is more frequent primarily during the first 3 months of clinical onset of the disease, but may occur anytime during the 6 months of acute infection. This spontaneous resolution seems to be more frequent in symptomatic cases. Viremia persisting more than 6 months is accepted as chronic infection. The virus is transmitted more frequently through infected blood or body fluids. Detection of antibodies against HCV is not a reliable method of diagnosing acute HCV infection since the appearance of antibodies against HCV can be delayed in up to 30% of patients at the onset of symptoms. Thus, the diagnosis of acute hepatitis C relies on the qualitative detection of HCV RNA, which may appear as early as 1-2 weeks after exposure quickly followed by highly elevated alanine aminotransferase. After a follow-up period of 8-12 weeks for allowing spontaneous resolution, treatment should be initiated

  7. Liver Function Test Abnormalities in Depressed Patients Treated with Antidepressants: A Real-World Systematic Observational Study in Psychiatric Settings

    PubMed Central

    Verstuyft, Céline; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Colle, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerning the risk of antidepressant induced liver injury, it is not clear whether psychiatrists perform a liver function test (LFT) and whether an increase in aminotransferase levels should contraindicate antidepressant treatment. Aim To evaluate LFT availability, the prevalence of LFT abnormalities and the probable cause of an altered LFT in patients with a major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug. Methods We studied LFT evaluation in a real world psychiatric setting, in a sample of 321 consecutive patients with a current major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug treatment, but without current alcohol or drug dependence or unstable medical disease. Results An LFT is performed in 36.1% (116/321) of depressed patients. One fifth of antidepressant-treated patients who had an LFT evaluation had abnormal results. The most frequent causes of LFT abnormalities were: NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) (7/321; 2.1%), acute alcohol consumption (4/321; 1.2%), antidepressant-induced liver injury (3/321; 0.9%), hepatitis C virus infection (2/321; 0.6%) and heart failure (1/321; 0.3%). The cause of LFT abnormalities was unknown in 32% of patients (8/25) due to the absence of etiological investigations. Conclusion These results demonstrate that an LFT is infrequently performed by psychiatrists in depressed patients requiring an antidepressant drug. Baseline LFT assessment and observations during the first six months of antidepressant treatment may be useful for detection of patients with pre-existing liver disease such as NAFLD, and early identification of cases of antidepressant-induced liver injury. An increase in aminotransferase levels may be related to an underlying liver disease, but does not contraindicate antidepressant treatment. PMID:27171561

  8. Association of cerebral metabolic activity changes with vagus nerve stimulation antidepressant response in treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Charles R.; Chibnall, John T.; Gebara, Marie Anne; Price, Joseph L.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mintun, Mark A.; (Bud) Craig, A.D.; Cornell, Martha E.; Perantie, Dana C.; Giuffra, Luis A.; Bucholz, Richard D.; Sheline, Yvette I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has antidepressant effects in treatment resistant major depression (TRMD); these effects are poorly understood. This trial examines associations of subacute (3 months) and chronic (12 months) VNS with cerebral metabolism in TRMD. Objective 17Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was used to examine associations between 12-month antidepressant VNS response and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu) changes at 3 and 12 months. Methods Thirteen TRMD patients received 12 months of VNS. Depression assessments (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) and PET scans were obtained at baseline (pre-VNS) and 3/12 months. CMRGlu was assessed in eight a priori selected brain regions (bilateral anterior insular [AIC], orbitofrontal [OFC], dorsolateral prefrontal [DLPFC], and anterior cingulate cortices [ACC]). Regional CMRGlu changes over time were studied in VNS responders (decreased 12 month HDRS by ≥50%) and nonresponders. Results A significant trend (decreased 3 month CMRGlu) in the right DLPFC was observed over time in VNS responders (n = 9; P = 0.006). An exploratory whole brain analysis (Puncorrected = 0.005) demonstrated decreased 3 month right rostral cingulate and DLPFC CMRGlu, and increased 12 month left ventral tegmental CMRGlu in responders. Conclusions/Limitations VNS response may involve gradual (months in duration) brain adaptations. Early on, this process may involve decreased right-sided DLPFC/cingulate cortical activity; longer term effects (12 months) may lead to brainstem dopaminergic activation. Study limitations included: a) a small VNS nonresponders sample (N = 4), which limited conclusions about nonresponder CMRGlu changes; b) no control group; and, c) patients maintained their psychotropic medications. PMID:23485649

  9. Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Accelerated Response to Antidepressants in Mice with Specific Deletion of CREB in the Hippocampus: Role of cAMP Response-Element Modulator τ

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Brigitta B.; Briand, Lisa A.; Onksen, Jennifer L.; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. However, altering CREB levels appears to have differing effects on anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, depending on which brain region is examined. Furthermore, many manipulations of CREB lead to corresponding changes in other CREB family proteins, and the impact of these changes has been largely ignored. To further investigate the region-specific importance of CREB in depression-related behavior and antidepressant response, we used CrebloxP/loxP mice to localize CREB deletion to the hippocampus. In an assay sensitive to chronic antidepressant response, the novelty-induced hypophagia procedure, hippocampal CREB deletion, did not alter the response to chronic antidepressant treatment. In contrast, mice with hippocampal CREB deletion responded to acute antidepressant treatment in this task, and this accelerated response was accompanied by an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis. Upregulation of the CREB-family protein cAMP response-element modulator (CREM) was observed after CREB deletion. Viral overexpression of the activator isoform of CREM, CREMτ, in the hippocampus also resulted in an accelerated response to antidepressants as well as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of CREMτ within the brain playing a role in behavior and specifically in behavioral outcomes following antidepressant treatment. The current results suggest that activation of CREMτ may provide a means to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy of current antidepressant treatment. PMID:23966689

  10. Tolerability and safety: essentials in antidepressant pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lader, M H

    1996-01-01

    Current antidepressants achieve similar efficacy, with 60% to 80% of patients responding adequately. Clinical response is gradual, and differential response factors are difficult to discern. However, side effect profiles and toxicity vary substantially, so the choice of medication depends primarily on tolerability and safety. Dry mouth is prevalent with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), whereas nausea occurs more frequently with a serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Long-term unwanted effects tend not to be a major problem, with a dropout rate of approximately 5% due to side effects. The relationship between suicidality and antidepressants remains under debate. Many TCAs are highly toxic in overdose whereas the SSRIs appear much safer. Nefazodone is a unique antidepressant with demonstrated efficacy. It is different from other antidepressants because of its two actions in the serotonin system, moderate serotonin selective reuptake blocking properties and direct 5-HT2 antagonism, which also can enhance 5-HT1 neurotransmission. The 5-HT2 antagonist properties may limit serotonin-mediated effects and, as a result, nefazodone may be more anxiolytic than other antidepressants. Nefazodone also moderately inhibits norepinephrine reuptake and blocks alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. The data base on the safety of nefazodone currently comprises approximately 3,500 patients from all research trials, which include controlled trials that allow comparisons of nefazodone treatment with several hundred patients taking TCAs or SSRIs and nearly 900 patients receiving placebo. The most frequent adverse experiences with nefazodone as compared with placebo treatment are nausea (21% vs. 14%), somnolence (19% vs. 13%), dry mouth (19% vs. 13%), dizziness (12% vs. 6%), constipation (11% vs. 7%), asthenia (11% vs. 6%), light-headedness (10% vs. 4%), and amblyopia (blurred vision; 6% vs. 3%). Approximately 12% of nefazodone-treated patients dropped out because of adverse experiences

  11. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  12. [Antidepressants in migraine prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Eiichiro

    2009-10-01

    The initiation of a prophylactic treatment for migraine depends on the frequency of migraine attacks and the extent of the function disability associated with these attacks. Antidepressants have good evidence of efficacy in the prophylactic treatment for migraine. In general, among the antidepressants, amitriptyline is the most frequently prescribed by headache specialists. Several clinical trials on this drug have also evidenced the remarkable benefits of amitriptyline in the prophylactic treatment of migraine attack. In evidence-based guidelines developed by Japanese Headache Society and American Neurological Association, it is classified as a Group 1 drugs (effective drug for the prevention of migraine attack). Moreover, these drugs are more useful in cases where there is comorbidity with conditions such as depression. The side-effects of these drugs are sleepiness and dry mouth. Administration of amytriptyline at low dose can reduce the frequency of side effects such as sleepiness.

  13. Pharmacogenetic analysis of genes implicated in rodent models of antidepressant response: association of TREK1 and treatment resistance in the STAR(*)D study.

    PubMed

    Perlis, Roy H; Moorjani, Priya; Fagerness, Jesen; Purcell, Shaun; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A John; Smoller, Jordan W

    2008-11-01

    Recent rodent models of antidepressant response implicate a novel set of genes in mechanisms of antidepressant action. The authors examined variants in four such genes (KCNK2 (TREK1), SLC18A2 (VMAT2), S100A10, and HDAC5) for association with remission in a large effectiveness trial of antidepressant treatments. Subjects were drawn from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(*)D) study, a multicenter, prospective, effectiveness trial in major depressive disorder (MDD). Outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD were initially treated with citalopram for up to 14 weeks; those who did not remit with citalopram were sequentially randomized to a series of next-step treatments, each for up to 12 weeks. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in four genes were examined for association with remission, defined as a clinician-rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C(16)) score < or =5. Of 1554 participants for whom DNA was available, 565 (36%) reached remission with citalopram treatment. No association with any of the four genes was identified. However, among the 751 who entered next-step treatment, variants in KCNK2 were associated with treatment response (Bonferroni-corrected, gene-based empirical p<0.001). In follow-up analyses, KCNK2 was also associated with effects of similar magnitude for third-step treatment among those with unsatisfactory benefit to both citalopram and one next-step pharmacotherapy (n=225). These findings indicate that genetic variation in KCNK2 may identify individuals at risk for treatment resistance. More broadly, they indicate the utility of animal models in identifying genes for pharmacogenetic studies of antidepressant response.

  14. Antidepressant effects assessed using behavior maintained under a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) operant schedule.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, James M; Marek, Gerard J; Seiden, Lewis S

    2005-01-01

    Behavior maintained under a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-s operant schedule, which reinforces responses with interresponse times greater than 72 s, exhibits a rather unique sensitivity to antidepressant drugs. Antidepressants from a number of pharmacological classes, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, as well as a number of atypical antidepressants and putative antidepressants, reduce response rate and increase reinforcement rate of rats under this schedule. These effects are observed acutely but persist or are augmented with repeated treatment. By contrast, drugs from a number of other psychotherapeutic classes do not, in general, produce similar effects. This includes anxiolytic, sedative, stimulant, opioid, antihistaminic, and anticholinergic drugs, which can produce false positive results in some preclinical tests for antidepressant efficacy. There are conflicting data regarding the utility of DRL behavior for discriminating the effects of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs. This results in part from methodological differences among studies, but likely also reflects the overlap between the neuropharmacological and clinical effects of some antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs. DRL behavior also has proven useful for identifying neurochemical and neuroanatomical mediators of antidepressant effects on behavior. Consistent with clinical data, it appears that activation of noradrenergic or serotonergic systems provides for parallel means of producing antidepressant-like effects on DRL behavior. Finally, the results of studies using DRL behavior highlight important roles for central beta-1 adrenergic receptors, as well as 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptors, in the mediation of antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

  15. Assessment of pharmacological strategies for management of major depressive disorder and their costs after an inadequate response to first-line antidepressant treatment in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the most common treatment strategies and their costs for patients with an inadequate response to first-line antidepressant treatment (AD) in primary care. Method A retrospective cohort study of medical records from six primary care centers was conducted. Adults with a major depressive disorder diagnosis, at least 8 weeks of AD treatment after the first prescription, and patient monitoring for 12 months were analyzed. Healthcare (direct cost) and non-healthcare costs (indirect costs; work productivity losses) were described. Results A total of 2,260 patients were studied. Forty-three percent of patients (N = 965) presented an inadequate response to treatment. Summarizing the different treatment approaches: 43.2% were switched to another AD, 15.5% were given an additional AD, AD dose was increased in 14.6%, and 26.7% remained with the same antidepressant agent. Healthcare/annual costs were 451.2 Euros for patients in remission vs. 826.1 Euros in those with inadequate response, and productivity losses were 991.4 versus 1,842.0 Euros, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Antidepressant switch was the most common therapeutic approach performed by general practitioners in naturalistic practice. A delay in treatment change when no remission occurs and a significant heterogeneity in management of these patients were also found. PMID:22862816

  16. Long-term voluntary exercise and the mouse hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis: impact of concurrent treatment with the antidepressant drug tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Droste, S K; Schweizer, M C; Ulbricht, S; Reul, J M H M

    2006-12-01

    We investigated whether voluntary exercise and concurrent antidepressant treatment (tianeptine; 20 mg/kg/day; 4 weeks) exert synergistic effects on the mouse hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Animals had access to a running wheel, were treated with the antidepressant, or received both conditions combined. Control mice received no running wheel and no drug treatment. Exercise resulted in asymmetric changes in the adrenal glands. Whereas sedentary mice had larger left adrenals than right ones, this situation was abolished in exercising animals, mainly due to enlargement of the right adrenal cortex. However, antidepressant treatment alone was ineffective whereas the combination of antidepressant treatment and exercise resulted in an enlargement of both adrenal cortices. In these respective conditions, the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression in the left and right adrenal medullas varied greatly in parallel to the changes observed in the adrenal cortex sizes. TH mRNA expression in the locus coeruleus of exercising mice was significantly increased irrespective of concomitant tianeptine treatment. Corticotrophin-releasing factor mRNA levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus were decreased after voluntary exercise but were unaffected by tianeptine. Exercise, particularly in combination with tianeptine treatment, resulted in decreased early morning baseline plasma levels of corticosterone. If animals were exposed to novelty (i.e. a mild psychological stressor), a decreased response in plasma corticosterone levels was observed in the exercising mice. By contrast, after restraint, a mixed physical and psychological stressor, exercising mice showed an enhanced response in plasma corticosterone compared to the controls; a response which was even further boosted in exercising mice concomitantly treated with tianeptine. Under either condition, plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels were not different between groups. Thus, voluntary

  17. Antidepressants worsen rapid-cycling course in bipolar depression: A STEP-BD randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael M.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of antidepressants in rapid-cycling bipolar disorder has been controversial. We report the first randomized clinical trial with modern antidepressants on this topic. Methods As part of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study, we analyzed, as an a priori secondary outcome, rapid cycling as a predictor of response in 68 patients randomized to continue versus discontinue antidepressant treatment, after initial response for an acute major depressive episode. Outcomes assessed were percent time well and total number of episodes. All patients received standard mood stabilizers. Results In those continued on antidepressants (AD), rapid cycling (RC) subjects experienced 268% (3.14/1.17) more total mood episodes/year, and 293% (1.29/0.44) more depressive episodes/year, compared with non-rapid cycling (NRC) subjects (mean difference in depressive episodes per year RC vs NRC was 0.85 ± 0.37 (SE), df=28, p =0.03). In the AD continuation group, RC patients also had 28.8% less time in remission than NRC patients (95% confidence intervals [9.9%, 46.5%], p = 0.004). No such differences between RC and NRC subjects were seen in the AD discontinuation group (Table 1). Analyses within the rapid-cycling subgroup alone were consistent with the above comparisons between RC and NRC subjects, stratified by maintenance antidepressant treatment, though limited by sample size. Conclusions In an a priori analysis, despite preselection for good antidepressant response and concurrent mood stabilizer treatment, antidepressant continuation in rapid-cycling was associated with worsened maintenance outcomes, especially for depressive morbidity, versus antidepressant discontinuation. PMID:26142612

  18. BDNF - a key transducer of antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Björkholm, Carl; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    How do antidepressants elicit an antidepressant response? Here, we review accumulating evidence that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves as a transducer, acting as the link between the antidepressant drug and the neuroplastic changes that result in the improvement of the depressive symptoms. Over the last decade several studies have consistently highlighted BDNF as a key player in antidepressant action. An increase in hippocampal and cortical expression of BDNF mRNA parallels the antidepressant-like response of conventional antidepressants such as SSRIs. Subsequent studies showed that a single bilateral infusion of BDNF into the ventricles or directly into the hippocampus is sufficient to induce a relatively rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effect. Importantly, the antidepressant-like response to conventional antidepressants is attenuated in mice where the BDNF signaling has been disrupted by genetic manipulations. Low dose ketamine, which has been found to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in patients with treatment-resistant depression, is also dependent on increased BDNF signaling. Ketamine transiently increases BDNF translation in hippocampus, leading to enhanced synaptic plasticity and synaptic strength. Ketamine has been shown to increase BDNF translation by blocking NMDA receptor activity at rest, thereby inhibiting calcium influx and subsequently halting eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinase leading to a desuppression of protein translation, including BDNF translation. The antidepressant-like response of ketamine is abolished in BDNF and TrkB conditional knockout mice, eEF2 kinase knockout mice, in mice carrying the BDNF met/met allele, and by intra-cortical infusions of BDNF-neutralizing antibodies. In summary, current data suggests that conventional antidepressants and ketamine mediate their antidepressant-like effects by increasing BDNF in forebrain regions, in particular the hippocampus, making BDNF an

  19. Antidepressant-like behavioral effects of IGF-I produced by enhanced serotonin transmission.

    PubMed

    Hoshaw, Brian A; Hill, Tiffany I; Crowley, James J; Malberg, Jessica E; Khawaja, Xavier; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Schechter, Lee E; Lucki, Irwin

    2008-10-10

    Previous research has suggested that mobilization of neurotrophic factors, such as insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), can be involved in the effects of antidepressant treatments. The current experiments showed that IGF-I leads to antidepressant-like effects in the modified rat forced swim test when tested 3 days, but not 1 day, after i.c.v. administration. These effects were sustained longer than the antidepressants paroxetine and desipramine. In addition, blockade of the IGF-I receptor with the IGF-I antagonist JB1 30 min before IGF-I administration prevented the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. However, when JB1 was administered 3 days after IGF-I administration and 30 min prior to testing, the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I were still present suggesting that IGF-1 produces a long-term activation of neural systems involved in the antidepressant response. Because the pattern of antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I resembled those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the role of serotonin in the behavioral effects of IGF-I was studied. Depletion of serotonin, by the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine, blocked the antidepressant-like effects of IGF-I. Administration of IGF-I increased basal serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus and altered the effects of acute citalopram. IGF-I administration did not change hippocampal cell proliferation at the 3-day timepoint when behavioral effects were seen. In addition, IGF-I did not alter the expression of mRNA levels of tryptophan hydroxylase or SERT in the brain stem, or [3H] citalopram binding in the hippocampus or cortex. Thus, IGF-I administration initiates a long-lasting cascade of neurochemical effects involving increased serotonin levels that results in antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

  20. Antidepressant-induced undesirable weight gain: prevention with rimonabant without interference with behavioral effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Gobshtis, Nikolai; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Fride, Ester

    2007-01-12

    Antidepressant pharmacotherapy has dramatically improved the quality of life for many patients. However, prolonged use may induce weight gain, resulting in enhanced risk for treatment noncompliance. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists decrease food intake and body weight, but may also affect mood. We investigated in female Sabra mice first, whether acute treatment with the cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (5-(4-Chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, SR141716, 5 mg/kg) interfered with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (15 mg/kg) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in the Porsolt forced swimming test. Second, whether chronic treatment (3 months) with desipramine (5 mg/kg) enhanced weight gain and whether cotreatment with rimonabant (2 mg/kg), prevented the excessive weight gain, while retaining antidepressant effectiveness. Motor activity and anxiety-like behavior were also investigated. The acute studies indicated that rimonabant did not influence 'antidepressant' activity of desipramine or fluoxetine. In the chronic studies, desipramine enhanced weight gain, despite the observation that the injection procedure reduced weight gain. The enhanced weight gain continued at least 35 days after treatment ended. Rimonabant reduced weight gain to which no tolerance developed and which persisted at least 30 days beyond treatment. Mice cotreated with rimonabant and desipramine had body weights closer to controls or to those receiving rimonabant alone than to those treated with desipramine alone. The antidepressant effects of desipramine were maintained throughout treatment; this was not altered by the chronic rimonabant treatment at any time, although rimonabant together with desipramine transiently enhanced anxiety-like behavior. These observations suggest that combined treatment with antidepressants and cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist to prevent undesirable weight

  1. Early increase in marker of neuronal integrity with antidepressant treatment of major depression: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of N-acetyl-aspartate

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew J.; Godlewska, Beata R.; Norbury, Ray; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Near, Jamie; Cowen, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing interest surrounds potential neuroprotective or neurotrophic actions of antidepressants. While growing evidence points to important early clinical and neuropsychological effects of antidepressants, the time-course of any effect on neuronal integrity is unclear. This study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess effects of short-term treatment with escitalopram on N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity. Thirty-nine participants with major depression were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg escitalopram or placebo daily in a double-blind, parallel group design. On the seventh day of treatment, PRESS data were obtained from a 30×30×20 mm voxel placed in medial frontal cortex. Age and gender-matched healthy controls who received no treatment were also scanned. Levels of NAA were significantly higher in patients treated with escitalopram than in either placebo-treated patients (p<0.01) or healthy controls (p<0.01). Our findings are consistent with the proposition that antidepressant treatment in depressed patients can produce early changes in neuronal integrity. PMID:22449253

  2. Early increase in marker of neuronal integrity with antidepressant treatment of major depression: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of N-acetyl-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Godlewska, Beata R; Norbury, Ray; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Near, Jamie; Cowen, Philip J

    2012-11-01

    Increasing interest surrounds potential neuroprotective or neurotrophic actions of antidepressants. While growing evidence points to important early clinical and neuropsychological effects of antidepressants, the time-course of any effect on neuronal integrity is unclear. This study used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess effects of short-term treatment with escitalopram on N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity. Thirty-nine participants with major depression were randomly assigned to receive either 10 mg escitalopram or placebo daily in a double-blind, parallel group design. On the seventh day of treatment, PRESS data were obtained from a 30×30×20 mm voxel placed in medial frontal cortex. Age and gender-matched healthy controls who received no treatment were also scanned. Levels of NAA were significantly higher in patients treated with escitalopram than in either placebo-treated patients (p<0.01) or healthy controls (p<0.01). Our findings are consistent with the proposition that antidepressant treatment in depressed patients can produce early changes in neuronal integrity.

  3. The use of tricyclic antidepressants in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders: systematic review of the literature of the last 20 years.

    PubMed

    Cascos-Romero, Jordi; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of temporomandibular disorders, including the use of different drugs. However, lack of knowledge about the mechanisms behind the pain associated with this pathology, and the fact that the studies carried out so far use highly disparate patient selection criteria, mean that results on the effectiveness of the different medications are inconclusive. This study makes a systematic review of the literature published on the use of tricyclic antidepressants for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders, using the SORT criteria (Strength of recommendation taxonomy) to consider the level of scientific evidence of the different studies. Following analysis of the articles, and in function of their scientific quality, a type B recommendation is given in favor of the use of tricyclic antidepressants for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

  4. Use of antidepressants in the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care during a period of economic crisis

    PubMed Central

    Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe antidepressant (AD) use in the treatment of major depressive disorder during a period of economic crisis. Patients and methods This was a retrospective, observational study using population-based databases. Two periods were considered: 1) 2008–2009, precrisis, and 2) 2012–2013, economic crisis. Certain inclusion/exclusion criteria were taken into account for the study (initiation of AD treatment). Patients were followed up for 12 months. The main measures were use (defined daily doses), epidemiologic measures, strategies used and treatment persistence, referrals, and use of resources. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results In the precrisis period, 3,662 patients were enrolled, and 5,722 were enrolled in the period of economic crisis. Average age was 58.8 years and 65.4% were women. Comparing the two periods, major depressive disorder prevalence was 5.4% vs 8.1%, P<0.001. During the period of economic crisis, AD use rose by 35.2% and drug expenditures decreased by 38.7%. Defined daily dose per patient per day was 10.0 mg vs 13.5 mg, respectively, P<0.001. At 12-month follow-up, the majority of patients (60.8%) discontinued the treatment or continued on the same medication as before, and in 23.3% a change of AD was made. Conclusion Primary health care professionals are highly involved in the management of the illness; in addition, during the period of economic crisis, patients with major depressive disorder showed higher rates of prevalence of the illness, with increased use of AD drugs. PMID:26766910

  5. Treatment of acute cyanide intoxication with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wesson, D E; Foley, R; Sabatini, S; Wharton, J; Kapusnik, J; Kurtzman, N A

    1985-01-01

    A dramatic response was noted in a patient at our hospital who received hemodialysis therapy for severe acidosis secondary to an unknown toxin, subsequently identified as cyanide. We were unable to find any information concerning the hemodialysis clearance and extraction ratio of cyanide; thus, we studied the effect of hemodialysis in dogs receiving a constant infusion of cyanide with and without a simultaneous infusion of thiosulfate. The hemodialysis clearance of cyanide in the presence of thiosulfate was 38.3 +/- 5.4 ml/min with an extraction ratio of 0.43 +/- 0.06 (n = 4). Hemodialysis was found to increase the lethal dose of cyanide without thiosulfate infusion, and a further increase was noted with the thiosulfate infusion. Thiosulfate promotes mitochondrial metabolism of cyanide to thiocyanate. The end product, thiocyanate, is quickly removed by hemodialysis. We believe that the demonstrated effectiveness of hemodialysis in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication is related not only to the hemodialysis clearance of cyanide, but also to the removal of its metabolic end product, thiocyanate. Based on our observations, we feel that hemodialysis is an effective adjunct in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication.

  6. [Surgical and therapeutic treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sandakov, P Ia; Samartsev, V A; Mineev, D A

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the features of different forms of acute pancreatitis in 1001 patients including 324 cases with pancreatonecrosis and 245 patients with middle severity of disease. It was shown that monitoring of patients' condition and destructive process in pancreas by using of modified SOFA-scale and evaluation of sonographic signs of inflammation are advisable. Flow indicators including resistance index and the maximum flow velocity in celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery represented severity of gland's destruction. Sonographic investigation revealed small-focal pancreonecrosis. It allows to differentiate medical tactics. Surgical treatment was performed in 582 patients. Efficiency of surgical treatment is determined by diagnostic methods, timely sanation of destructive focuses of pancreas, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal fiber, adequate drainage and mini-invasive techniques using in case of purulent complications. The main prognostic factors of development of complications and adverse outcomes are determined.

  7. [Treatment guidelines for acute and preventive treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Kun; Chen, Hsi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yeng-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lee, Lian-Hui; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Kao-Chang; Tseng, Hung-Ping; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wang, Po-Jen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Yang, Chun-Pai; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Wu, Zin-An

    2011-09-01

    The Treatment Guideline Subcommittee of the Taiwan Headache Society evaluated both the acute and the preventive treatments for cluster headache now being used in Taiwan, based on the principles of evidence- based medicine. We assessed the quality of clinical trials and levels of evidence, and referred to other treatment guidelines proposed by other countries. Throughout several panel discussions, we merged opinions from the subcommittee members and proposed a consensus on the major roles, recommended levels, clinical efficacy, adverse events and cautions of clinical practice regarding acute and preventive treatments of cluster headache. The majority of Taiwanese patients have episodic cluster headaches, because chronic clusters are very rare. Cluster headache is characterized by severe and excruciating pain which develops within a short time and is associated with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Therefore, emergency treatment for a cluster headache attack is extremely important. Within the group of acute medications currently available in Taiwan, the subcommittee determined that high-flow oxygen inhalation has the best evidence of effectiveness, followed by intranasal triptans. Both are recommended as first-line medical treatments for acute attacks. Oral triptans were determined to be second-line medications. For transitional prophylaxis, oral corticosteroids are recommended as the first-line medication, and ergotamine as the second-line choice. As for maintenance prophylaxis, verapamil has the best evidence and is recommended as the first-line medication. Lithium, melatonin, valproic acid, topiramate and gabapentin are suggested as the second-line preventive medications. Surgical interventions, including occipital nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, radiofrequency block of the sphenopalatine ganglion, percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and trigeminal nerve section, are invasive and their long-term efficacy and adverse events are still not clear in

  8. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  9. Altered brain concentrations of citalopram and escitalopram in P-glycoprotein deficient mice after acute and chronic treatment.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Louise; Carlsson, Björn; Hiemke, Christoph; Ahlner, Johan; Bengtsson, Finn; Schmitt, Ulrich; Kugelberg, Fredrik C

    2013-11-01

    According to both in vitro and in vivo data P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may restrict the uptake of several antidepressants into the brain, thus contributing to the poor success rate of current antidepressant therapies. The therapeutic activity of citalopram resides in the S-enantiomer, whereas the R-enantiomer is practically devoid of serotonin reuptake potency. To date, no in vivo data are available that address whether the enantiomers of citalopram and its metabolites are substrates of P-gp. P-gp knockout (abcb1ab (-/-)) and wild-type (abcb1ab (+/+)) mice underwent acute (single-dose) and chronic (two daily doses for 10 days) treatment with citalopram (10mg/kg) or escitalopram (5mg/kg) Serum and brain samples were collected 1-6h after the first or last i.p. injection for subsequent drug analysis by an enantioselective HPLC method. In brain, 3-fold higher concentrations of S- and R-citalopram, and its metabolites, were found in abcb1ab (-/-) mice than in abcb1ab (+/+) mice after both acute and chronic citalopram treatments. After escitalopram treatment, the S-citalopram brain concentration was 3-5 times higher in the knockout mice than in controls. The results provide novel evidence that the enantiomers of citalopram are substrates of P-gp. Possible clinical and toxicological implications of this finding need to be further elucidated.

  10. Baseline depression severity as a predictor of single and combination antidepressant treatment outcome: Results from the CO-MED Trial

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Edward S.; Davis, Lori L.; Zisook, Sidney; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to report associations between baseline depressive severity and (1) baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, (2) treatment outcomes, and (3) differential outcomes for three treatment groups. Six hundred and sixty-five outpatients with nonpsychotic, major depressive disorder were prospectively randomized to treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) monotherapy (escitalopram plus placebo) or one of two antidepressant medication combinations (bupropion-sustained release plus escitalopram, or venlafaxine-extended release plus mirtazapine). For purposes of these analyses, participants were divided into four groups based on baseline severity by the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - Self-Report (QIDS-SR16) total score: mild (0–10) [N=81], moderate (11–15) [N=238], severe (16–20) [N=260] and very severe (21–27) [N=67]. Treatment outcomes at 12 and 28 weeks were compared among the four severity groups. A history of childhood neglect and/or abuse was strongly associated with the severity of adult depression (1/2 of participants in the very severy group versus 1/5–1/4 of those in the mild group reported abuse and/or neglect). The degree of suicidality (e.g., 15/.4% of the very severe group ever attempted suicide versus none in the mild group), the number of suicide attempts (e.g., mean of .41 +/− 1.99 suicide attempts in the severe group versus o.o +/−0.0 in the mild group) and severity of suicidality (e.g., 9.2% of participants in very severe group had a plan or made a gesture versus 5.6% in moderate group and none in the mild group) were increased in more severe groups. Participants with a greater baseline depressive severity reported significantly more psychiatric comorbitities (e..g. [at p < 0.05] increased rates of agoraphobia, bulimia, generalized anxiety, hypocondriasis, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia and somatoform disorder

  11. Common genetic variation in the indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase genes and antidepressant treatment outcome in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Jessica A; Rush, A John; McMahon, Francis J; Laje, Gonzalo

    2012-03-01

    The essential amino acid tryptophan is the precursor to serotonin, but it can also be metabolized into kynurenine through indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Increased immune activation has long been associated with symptoms of depression and has been shown to upregulate the expression of IDO. The presence of additional IDO directs more tryptophan down the kynurenine pathway, leaving less available for synthesis of serotonin and its metabolites. Kynurenine can be metabolized through a series of enzymes to quinolinic acid, a potent N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist with demonstrated neurotoxic effects. We tested the hypothesis that IDO plays a role in outcome of treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. Patients consisted of 1953 participants enrolled in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study (STAR*D). Genotypes corresponding to 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes IDO1 and IDO2, which encode IDO and IDO2, were extracted from a larger genome-wide set and analyzed using single marker tests to look for association with previously defined response, remission and QIDS-C score change phenotypes, with adequate correction for racial stratification and multiple testing. One SNP, rs2929115, showed evidence of association with citalopram response (OR = 0.64, p = 0.0005) after experiment-wide correction for multiple testing. Another closely associated marker, rs2929116 (OR = 0.64, p = 0.0006) had an experiment-wide significant result. Both implicated SNPs are located between 26 kb and 28 kb downstream of IDO2. We conclude that common genetic variation in IDO1 and IDO2 may play a role in antidepressant treatment outcome. These results are modest in a genome-wide context and need to be replicated in an independent sample.

  12. Multidimensional prediction of treatment response to antidepressants with cognitive control and functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Crane, Natania A; Jenkins, Lisanne M; Bhaumik, Runa; Dion, Catherine; Gowins, Jennifer R; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Langenecker, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    Predicting treatment response for major depressive disorder can provide a tremendous benefit for our overstretched health care system by reducing number of treatments and time to remission, thereby decreasing morbidity. The present study used neural and performance predictors during a cognitive control task to predict treatment response (% change in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale pre- to post-treatment). Forty-nine individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder were enrolled with intent to treat in the open-label study; 36 completed treatment, had useable data, and were included in most data analyses. Participants included in the data analysis sample received treatment with escitalopram (n = 22) or duloxetine (n = 14) for 10 weeks. Functional MRI and performance during a Parametric Go/No-go test were used to predict per cent reduction in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores after treatment. Haemodynamic response function-based contrasts and task-related independent components analysis (subset of sample: n = 29) were predictors. Independent components analysis component beta weights and haemodynamic response function modelling activation during Commission errors in the rostral and dorsal anterior cingulate, mid-cingulate, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, and lateral orbital frontal cortex predicted treatment response. In addition, more commission errors on the task predicted better treatment response. Together in a regression model, independent component analysis, haemodynamic response function-modelled, and performance measures predicted treatment response with 90% accuracy (compared to 74% accuracy with clinical features alone), with 84% accuracy in 5-fold, leave-one-out cross-validation. Convergence between performance markers and functional magnetic resonance imaging, including novel independent component analysis techniques, achieved high accuracy in prediction of treatment response for major depressive disorder. The strong link to a task paradigm

  13. Possible role of NO modulators in protective effect of trazodone and citalopram (antidepressants) in acute immobilization stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Garg, Ruchika; Gaur, Vaibhav; Kumar, Puneet

    2010-11-01

    Stress is an aversive stimulus which disturbs physiological homeostasis and is reflected on a variety of biological systems. The present study was designed to investigate the nitric oxide mechanism in neuroprotective effect of trazodone and citalopram against acute immobilization-induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in mice. Mice were immobilized for a 6 h. Acute immobilization stress caused anxiety, hyperalgesia, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage. Pretreatment with trazodone and citalopram significantly reversed immobilized stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations. L-arginine, pretreatment with trazodone or citalopram significantly reversed their protective effects. However, L-NAME or methylene blue pretreatment with trazodone or citalopram significantly potentiated their protective effects alone. Results suggest the involvement of nitric oxide pathways in the protective effect of trazodone and citalopram against immobilization stress induced behavioral and biochemical alterations.

  14. Involvement of PKA, CaMKII, PKC, MAPK/ERK and PI3K in the acute antidepressant-like effect of ferulic acid in the tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Ana Lúcia Bertarello; Zomkowski, Andréa Dias Elpo; Maraschin, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia Severo; Tasca, Carla Inês

    2012-12-01

    Ferulic acid (FA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid) is a phytochemical compound naturally present in several plants and foods that is approved as an antioxidant additive and food preservative. It exerts a beneficial action in chronic mild stress-induced depressive-like behavior and produces an acute antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test (TST) through the activation of the serotonergic system. This study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of signaling pathways in the antidepressant-like effect of acute and oral administration of FA, in the TST in mice. The anti-immobility effect of orally administered FA (0.01mg/kg, p.o.) was prevented by pretreatment of mice with H-89 (1μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PKA), KN-62 (1μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of CaMKII), GF109203X (5ng/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PKC), U0126 (5μg/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of MAPK/ERK) or LY294002 (10nmol/site, i.c.v., an inhibitor of PI3K), all involved with neurotrophic signaling pathways. The results demonstrated that FA exerts antidepressant-like effect in the TST in mice, through the activation of signaling pathways related to neuroplasticity, neurogenesis and cell survival.

  15. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  16. Antidepressant psychopharmacology and the social brain.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant drugs are a mainstay in psychiatric treatment and have the ability to influence neural substrates related to social bonding and interaction. This article explores the potential neurobiological overlap between social attachment and antidepressant mechanisms and reviews work related to the effects of antidepressants on separation distress, social affiliation, dominance hierarchies, romantic love, and socio-emotional processing. It is proposed that similarities between antidepressant pharmacology and the neurobiological effects of an effective care-giver may help create a sense of safety that in turn promotes changes in behavior and mood.

  17. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence base for add-on treatment for patients with major depressive disorder who have not responded to antidepressant treatment: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, Pauline; Kantaria, Rakesh; Young, Allan H

    2014-02-01

    Previous comparative reviews of add-on therapies for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with an inadequate response to antidepressants have not used meta-analytic techniques to compare different drug classes and have included non-licensed therapies. This meta-analysis reviewed all published peer-reviewed evidence for the efficacy of EU-licensed therapies in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to antidepressant monotherapy. Papers concerning randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were identified using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Add-on therapies reviewed were antidepressants, quetiapine XR, lithium, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe). Seven RCTs that reported response and remission in a way that allowed quantitative analysis were included in this meta-analysis. Comparison of the different drug classes indicated that most interventions had similar efficacy. The likelihood of response was significantly greater with SAMe versus placebo and lithium and with quetiapine XR versus placebo. Most add-on interventions demonstrated comparable efficacy in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to initial antidepressants. However, there is currently a paucity of high-quality data regarding the use of add-on treatments in patients with MDD who are inadequate responders to antidepressants, with quetiapine XR presenting the most comprehensive evidence base to date.

  19. Serotonin and emotional processing: does it help explain antidepressant drug action?

    PubMed

    Harmer, Catherine J

    2008-11-01

    There is growing interest in the effects of antidepressant drug treatment on measures of emotional processing. Such actions may help us understand the role of monoamines in emotional dysfunction in depression and how antidepressant drug treatments work. Recent studies suggest that decreasing central serotonin function with tryptophan depletion can reinstate negative biases in recovered depressed patients, even at doses insufficient to induce changes in mood. Conversely, antidepressant drug administration increases the processing of positive emotional information in healthy volunteers and acutely depressed patients early in treatment. This increase in positive bias may provide a platform for subsequent cognitive restructuring and learning which contributes to the evolution of symptom change in depression. Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that these early antidepressant effects involve fronto-limbic and extra-striate circuitry suggestive of actions on both the initial appraisal and attentional processing of affective stimuli. This approach may therefore provide a framework for linking psychological and biological processes in emotional disorders and their treatment. Antidepressants may not directly modulate mood and anxiety but rather allow a different perspective for our ongoing evaluation of our self, the world and the future.

  20. Milnacipran: a unique antidepressant?

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Pail, Gerald

    2010-09-07

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are among the most effective antidepressants available, although their poor tolerance at usual recommended doses and toxicity in overdose make them difficult to use. While selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are better tolerated than TCAs, they have their own specific problems, such as the aggravation of sexual dysfunction, interaction with coadministered drugs, and for many, a discontinuation syndrome. In addition, some of them appear to be less effective than TCAs in more severely depressed patients. Increasing evidence of the importance of norepinephrine in the etiology of depression has led to the development of a new generation of antidepressants, the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Milnacipran, one of the pioneer SNRIs, was designed from theoretic considerations to be more effective than SSRIs and better tolerated than TCAs, and with a simple pharmacokinetic profile. Milnacipran has the most balanced potency ratio for reuptake inhibition of the two neurotransmitters compared with other SNRIs (1:1.6 for milnacipran, 1:10 for duloxetine, and 1:30 for venlafaxine), and in some studies milnacipran has been shown to inhibit norepinephrine uptake with greater potency than serotonin (2.2:1). Clinical studies have shown that milnacipran has efficacy comparable with the TCAs and is superior to SSRIs in severe depression. In addition, milnacipran is well tolerated, with a low potential for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Milnacipran is a first-line therapy suitable for most depressed patients. It is frequently successful when other treatments fail for reasons of efficacy or tolerability.

  1. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or “orphan” treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice. PMID:23393416

  2. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or "orphan" treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice.

  3. [Antidepressants in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Cortajarena García, M C; Ron Martin, S; Miranda Vicario, E; Ruiz de Vergara Eguino, A; Azpiazu Gomez, P J; Lopez Aldana, J

    2016-10-01

    Depression in the elderly is a changing, difficult and common disorder. At this age, there are more relapses and more long-life treatment is required. The pharmacology approach is a challenge because of concurrent factors that make their treatment more difficult. It is very important to have a basic antidepressant scheme, in order to help treat this disorder with efficiency and success from Primary Care. There are no drugs without side effects, and their characteristics have to be known in order to make the right selection depending on effectiveness, safety and tolerance.

  4. Motivational pharmacotherapy: combining motivational interviewing and antidepressant therapy to improve treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Balán, Iván C; Moyers, Theresa B; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Treatment non-adherence in psycho-pharmacotherapy remains a significant challenge to the effective clinical management of psychiatric disorders, especially among underserved racial/ethnic groups. This article introduces motivational pharmacotherapy, an approach that integrates motivational interviewing into psycho-pharmacotherapy sessions in order to increase treatment adherence. We describe what aspects of motivational interviewing were incorporated into motivational pharmacotherapy and how we tailored the intervention to the clinical and cultural characteristics of monolingual Spanish-speaking immigrants with major depressive disorder. Transcriptions of the interactions between psychiatrists and patients help illustrate this approach. In our experience, motivational pharmacotherapy differs substantially from standard pharmacotherapy in how it recasts clinicians and patients as equal experts, prioritizes patients' motivation to engage in treatment rather than clinicians' multiple inquiries about symptoms, encourages patients' self-efficacy to overcome barriers, and attends to the momentum of patients' language about commitment to change. We also found that motivational pharmacotherapy can be feasibly incorporated into medication treatment, can be tailored to patients' culture and disorder, and may help increase adherence to psycho-pharmacotherapy.

  5. Use of band-pass filter analysis to evaluate outcomes in an antidepressant trial for treatment resistant patients.

    PubMed

    Targum, Steven D; Burch, Daniel J; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Petersen, Timothy; Gomeni, Roberto; Fava, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    Band-pass filtering is a novel statistical methodology that proposes that filtering out data from trial sites generating non-plausible high or low levels of placebo response can yield a more accurate effect size and greater separation of active drug (when efficacious) from placebo. We applied band-pass filters to re-analyze data from a negative antidepressant trial (NCT00739908) evaluating CX157 (a reversible and selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor-A) versus placebo. 360 patients from 29 trial sites were randomized to either CX157 treatment (n=182) or placebo (n=178). We applied two filters of<3 or>7 points (filter #1) or<3 and>9 points (filter #2) mean change of the total MADRS placebo scores for each site. Trial sites that had mean placebo MADRS score changes exceeding the boundaries of these band-pass filter thresholds were considered non-informative and all of the data from these sites were excluded from the post-hoc re-analysis. The two band-pass filters reduced the sample of informative patients from 353 patients in the mITT population to 62 in filter #1 and 152 in the filter #2 group. The placebo response was reduced from 31.1% in the mITT population to 9.4% with filter #1 and 20.8% with filter #2. MMRM analysis revealed a non-statistically significant trend of p=0.13 and 0.16 for the two filters in contrast to the mITT population (p= 0.58). Our findings support the band-pass filter hypothesis and highlight issues related to site-based scoring variability and inappropriate subject selection that may contribute to trial failure.

  6. Extinction-induced "despair" in the water maze, exploratory behavior and fear: effects of chronic antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Daniela; Buddenberg, Tim; Huston, Joseph P

    2007-05-01

    In former studies, we found evidence for the hypothesis that withdrawal of negative reinforcement presents a major source for stress and despair. Specifically, the removal of a hidden platform in the water maze induced extinction of previously reinforced escape behavior and behavioral immobility, indicative of "despair", which also correlated with indices of fear. Here, we tested the effects of antidepressants on extinction in the water maze, and expected that such drugs would attenuate the rate of extinction of a conditioned place preference (CPP) and also any emotionally relevant behavior that is induced by the loss of reinforcement, such as immobility. Adult male Wistar rats were trained to escape onto a hidden platform for 10 days. Daily treatment with desipramine hydrochloride (DMI, 10mg/kg) or fluoxetine (FLX, 10 mg/kg) commenced 1 day before the first of 11 extinction trials without the platform, administered 48 h apart, and continued thereafter, as the rats were tested in an open field and elevated-plus maze. As compared to controls, DMI increased the resistance-to-extinction of CPP, attenuated immobility, and increased wall climbing behavior. In the open field, DMI reduced activity levels, but was without effect on traditional fear parameters in the elevated-plus maze. FLX, by contrast, increased immobility during the extinction trials and fear in the elevated-plus maze. The withdrawal of reinforcement induced "despair" that was alleviated by the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor DMI. The effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor FLX on immobility and fear may be explained in terms of its side effect profile.

  7. The use of statins for the treatment of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Bae, K Y; Kim, J M; Shin, I S; Hong, Y J; Ahn, Y; Jeong, M H; Berk, M; Yoon, J S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of statins for the treatment of depression in individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We used 1-year follow-up data of a 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of escitalopram and a naturalistic prospective observational cohort study. Of 446 participants with comorbid depressive disorders and ACS at baseline, 300 participated in a randomised escitalopram trial and the remaining 146 participated in a naturalistic observational study. The participants in the two studies were approached for a 1-year follow-up investigation. Treatment response rates, defined as a ⩾50% reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores, were used as the outcome variables. In the escitalopram trial, both HAM-D and BDI response rates were highest in patients taking escitalopram and statins together and lowest in patients receiving neither medication. Logistic regression analyses revealed that statin use was significantly associated with higher response rates on both the HAM-D and BDI at 1 year, whereas no such associations were found for escitalopram. In the naturalistic observational study, the response rates at 1 year did not differ significantly by statin use. Instead, the HAM-D response rate was significantly higher in patients taking lipophilic statins than in those who did not. In conclusion, statins may be effective for the treatment of depression independent of medical status and escitalopram use, and they may potentiate the antidepressant action of serotonergic antidepressants in patients with ACS. PMID:26285130

  8. Antidepressant treatment decreases daily salt intake and prevents heart dysfunction following subchronic aortic regurgitation in rats.

    PubMed

    De Gobbi, Juliana Irani Fratucci; Omoto, Ana Carolina Mieko; Siqueira, Tamires Ferreira; Matsubara, Luiz Shigueto; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2015-05-15

    Depression is a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with heart failure. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve these outcomes. Left ventricular volume overload induced hypertrophy that is associated with aortic regurgitation (AR) leads to ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the SSRI paroxetine on cardiac function, as well as on fluid intake and excretion, in subchronic AR. Male Wistar rats (260 to 280g) received sham (SH) surgery or AR induced by retrograde puncture of the aortic valve leaflets. The presence of AR was confirmed by echocardiography (ECHO) exams. Four weeks after AR surgery, subcutaneous injections of paroxetine (PAR: 10mg/kg 3 times in a week) or saline were administered. The rats were randomly divided into the following 4 groups and treated for 4 weeks: AR-PAR, ARsaline, SH-PAR and SH-saline. At the end of the treatment period, fractional shortening was preserved in AR-PAR, compared to AR-saline (46.6±2.7% vs 38.3±2.2%, respectively). Daily 0.3 M NaCl intake was reduced in PAR-treated rats. Natriuresis was increased in weeks 2-3 after PAR treatment. Our results suggest that augmentation of central 5-HT neurotransmission has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular remodeling following volume overload. The mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown.

  9. Citalopram versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Purgato, Marianna; Furukawa, Toshi A; Trespidi, Carlotta; Imperadore, Giuseppe; Signoretti, Alessandra; Churchill, Rachel; Watanabe, Norio; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent US and UK clinical practice guidelines recommend that second-generation antidepressants should be considered amongst the best first-line options when drug therapy is indicated for a depressive episode. Systematic reviews have already highlighted some differences in efficacy between second-generation antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) introduced in the market, is one of these antidepressant drugs that clinicians use for routine depression care. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with tricyclics, heterocyclics, other SSRIs and other conventional and non-conventional antidepressants in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to February 2012. No language restriction was applied. We contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts in this field for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to citalopram versus any other antidepressants. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy (the number of patients who responded or remitted), patient acceptability (the number of patients who failed to complete the study) and tolerability (side-effects). Main results Thirty-seven trials compared citalopram with other antidepressants (such as tricyclics, heterocyclics, SSRIs and other antidepressants, either conventional ones, such as mirtazapine, venlafaxine and reboxetine, or non-conventional, like hypericum). Citalopram was shown to be significantly less effective than escitalopram in achieving acute response (odds

  10. Pulmonary embolism: treatment of the acute episode.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Roncon, Loris; Greco, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    The prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is mainly related to the clinical presentation and circulatory state of the patient: the therapeutic strategy is consequently different, ranging from an aggressive treatment in patients in life-threatening clinical conditions to a "stabilization" treatment in those hemodynamically stable. Since the majority of PE patients are clinically stable, a well conducted anticoagulant therapy, either with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins together with a vitamin K antagonist, is sufficient to stop thrombus extension, to minimize the risk of recurrent embolism and prevent mortality. In about 15-20% of cases presenting with clinical instability of variable severity, prompt intravenous thrombolysis with a short-acting compound often represents a life-saving treatment and should be the first-line approach. In normotensive patients with right ventricular dysfunction at echocardiography, who represent about 30% of PE patients, the debate regarding the optimal therapy is still open and further studies are required to document a clinically relevant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio of thrombolytic agents over heparin alone: young people, with a very low risk of bleeding and a concomitant reduction of cardiopulmonary reserve might be the best candidates to systemic thrombolysis. In any case such patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit to monitor the clinical status for at least 48-72 hours and detect signs of possible hemodynamic worsening. Mechanical thrombectomy, either percutaneous or surgical, are ancillary procedures and should be reserved to a minority of highly compromised patients who are unable to receive thrombolysis.

  11. Problematizing the neurochemical subject of anti-depressant treatment: the limits of biomedical responses to women's emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Simone; O'Brien, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    In this article we situate empirical research into women's problematic experiences of anti-depressant medication within broader debates about pharmaceuticalization and the rise of the neurochemical self. We explore how women interpreted and problematized anti-depressant medication as it impeded their recovery in a number of ways. Drawing upon Foucauldian and feminist work we conceptualize anti-depressants as biotechnologies of the self that shaped how women thought about and acted upon their embodied (and hence gendered) subjectivities. Through the interplay of biochemical, emotional and socio-cultural effects medication worked to shape women's self-in-recovery in ways that both reinscribed and undermined a neurochemical construction of depression. Our analysis outlines two key discursive constructions that focused on women's problematization of the neurochemical self in response to the side-effects of anti-depressant use. We identified how the failure of medication to alleviate depression contributed to women's reinterpretation of recovery as a process of 'working' on the emotional self. We argue that women's stories act as a form of subjugated knowledge about the material and discursive forces shaping depression and recovery. These findings offer a gendered critique of scientific and market orientated rationalities underpinning neurochemical recovery that obscure the embodied relations of affect and the social conditions that enable the self to change.

  12. Circadian Rhythm Hypotheses of Mixed Features, Antidepressant Treatment Resistance, and Manic Switching in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi-Hoon; Geum, Dongho

    2013-01-01

    Numerous hypotheses have been put forth over the years to explain the development of bipolar disorder. Of these, circadian rhythm hypotheses have gained much importance of late. While the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivation hypothesis and the monoamine hypothesis somewhat explain the pathogenic mechanism of depression, they do not provide an explanation for the development of mania/hypomania. Interestingly, all patients with bipolar disorder display significant disruption of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles throughout their mood cycles. Indeed, mice carrying the Clock gene mutation exhibit an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperactivity, decreased sleep, lowered depression-like behavior, and lower anxiety. It was recently reported that monoamine signaling is in fact regulated by the circadian system. Thus, circadian rhythm instability, imposed on the dysregulation of HPA axis and monoamine system, may in turn increase individual susceptibility for switching from depression to mania/hypomania. In addition to addressing the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the manic switch, circadian rhythm hypotheses can explain other bipolar disorder-related phenomena such as treatment resistant depression and mixed features. PMID:24302944

  13. Major Depression and Antidepressant Treatment: Impact on Pregnancy and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Bogen, Debra L.; Hunker, Diane F.; Perel, James M.; Jones-Ivy, Sonya; Bodnar, Lisa M.; Singer, Lynn T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy incurs a low absolute risk for major malformations; however, other adverse outcomes have been reported. Major depression also affects reproductive outcomes. This study examined whether 1) minor physical anomalies, 2) maternal weight gain and infant birth weight, 3) preterm birth, and 4) neonatal adaptation are affected by SSRI or depression exposure. Method This prospective observational investigation included maternal assessments at 20, 30, and 36 weeks of gestation. Neonatal outcomes were obtained by blinded review of delivery records and infant examinations. Pregnant women (N=238) were categorized into three mutually exclusive exposure groups: 1) no SSRI, no depression (N=131); 2) SSRI exposure (N=71), either continuous (N=48) or partial (N=23); and 3) major depressive disorder (N=36), either continuous (N=14) or partial (N=22). The mean depressive symptom level of the group with continuous depression and no SSRI exposure was significantly greater than for all other groups, demonstrating the expected treatment effect of SSRIs. Main outcomes were minor physical anomalies, maternal weight gain, infant birth weight, pregnancy duration, and neonatal characteristics. Results Infants exposed to either SSRIs or depression continuously across gestation were more likely to be born preterm than infants with partial or no exposure. Neither SSRI nor depression exposure increased risk for minor physical anomalies or reduced maternal weight gain. Mean infant birth weights were equivalent. Other neonatal outcomes were similar, except 5-minute Apgar scores. Conclusions For depressed pregnant women, both continuous SSRI exposure and continuous untreated depression were associated with preterm birth rates exceeding 20%. PMID:19289451

  14. [Acute acalculous cholecystitis. Results of surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    de la Garza Villaseñor, L

    1993-01-01

    During an 11 year period, 47 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were operated on. Two to one male/female ratio was observed with a mean age of 55 age of 55 years. No one had a past history of biliary tract pathology but 70 per cent of the patients had risk factors, mainly diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and collagenous diseases, some different of those reported in the world literature (sepsis, trauma, non biliary tract surgery, etc.). The ultrasound was the best diagnostic tool. Open cholecystectomy was performed in all patients and some sort of local complication was found in 85 per cent of patients (empyema, gangrene or perforation) in spite of the surgical procedure was done on emergency or early elective basis, a 31 per cent operative mortality rate was found and a 10.6% Operative mortality rates was observed. The bacterial cultures showed gram negative and anaerobic flora. This report shows that an early diagnosis and surgical treatment keeps a low morbidity and mortality rates but the gallbladder late complications have a high rates.

  15. Sleep and cognition at baseline and the effects of REM sleep diminution after 1 week of antidepressive treatment in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Göder, Robert; Seeck-Hirschner, Mareen; Stingele, Karoline; Huchzermeier, Christian; Kropp, Cornelia; Palaschewski, Milena; Aldenhoff, Josef; Koch, Jakob

    2011-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep facilitates declarative memory consolidation, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is particularly important in promoting procedural learning. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of pharmacological REM sleep suppression on performance in different neuropsychological tasks. For our baseline, we chose 41 moderately depressed patients (age range 19-44 years), who were not taking antidepressants. In the morning after polysomnography, we tested memory recall and cognitive flexibility by assessment of verbal and figural fluency, a shift of attention task and the Trail Making Test B. After recording baseline values, patients were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups: medication with citalopram; medication with reboxetine; or exclusive treatment with psychotherapy. Retesting took place 1 week after onset of treatment. The main results were: (1) an association of slow-wave sleep with verbal memory performance at baseline; (2) a suppression of REM sleep in patients taking citalopram and reboxetine; (3) no differences regarding neuropsychological performance within the treatment groups; and (4) no association of REM sleep diminution with decreases in memory performance or cognitive flexibility in patients treated with citalopram or reboxetine. In line with other studies, our results suggest that there are no negative effects of a decrease in REM sleep on memory performance in patients taking antidepressants.

  16. An investigation of EEG, genetic and cognitive markers of treatment response to antidepressant medication in patients with major depressive disorder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Spronk, D; Arns, M; Barnett, K J; Cooper, N J; Gordon, E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if biomarkers in QEEG, genetic and neuropsychological measures are suitable for the prediction of antidepressant treatment outcome in depression. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder were assessed twice, pretreatment and at 8-wk follow-up, on a variety of QEEG and neuropsychological tasks. Additionally, cheek swab samples were collected to assess genetic predictors of treatment outcome. The primary outcome measure was the absolute decrease on the HAM-D rating scale. Regression models were built in order to investigate which markers contribute most to the decrease in absolute HAM-D scores. Patients who had a better clinical outcome were characterized by a decrease in the amplitude of the Auditory Oddball N1 at baseline. The 'Met/Met' variant of the COMT gene was the best genetic predictor of treatment outcome. Impaired verbal memory performance was the best cognitive predictor. Raised frontal Theta power was the best EEG predictor of change in HAM-D scores. A tentative integrative model showed that a combination of N1 amplitude at Pz and verbal memory performance accounted for the largest part of the explained variance. These markers may serve as new biomarkers suitable for the prediction of antidepressant treatment outcome.

  17. A pubertal immune challenge alters the antidepressant-like effects of chronic estradiol treatment in inbred and outbred adult female mice

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nafissa; Kumlin, Ashley M.; Blaustein, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    Puberty is a period characterized by brain reorganization that contributes to the development of neural and behavioral responses to gonadal steroids. A single injection of the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during the pubertal period decreases sexual receptivity in response to ovarian hormones in adulthood. Because chronic estradiol treatment alleviates depression-like symptoms in ovariectomized adult mice, we investigated the effect of pubertal LPS treatment on estradiol’s antidepressant effects. We hypothesized that pubertal LPS treatment would decrease the antidepressant-like effect of estradiol in adult ovariectomized female mice, as it decreases other behavioral responses to ovarian hormones. As expected, chronic estradiol treatment decreased depression-like behavior, as measured by the duration of immobility, in saline-treated mice from two different strains, as well as in mice treated with LPS in adulthood. In contrast, in mice treated pubertally with LPS, estradiol strikingly increased the duration of immobility. No difference in body weight and in locomotion was found among the groups, suggesting that the differences in depression-like behavior were not due to differences in body weight or locomotor activity between LPS-treated and control mice. These results suggest that exposure to an immune challenge during the pubertal period alters the responsiveness of depression-like behavior to estradiol. PMID:23036617

  18. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Weight gain is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. ...

  19. [Some aspects of the complex treatment of acute suppurative perionitis].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, M M; Roĭ, V P; Zaritskiĭ, I; Konovalenko, V V; Mellin, V M

    1976-10-01

    The authors present an analysis of the results of complex treatment in 4318 patients operated upon for acute peritonitis, caused by acute appendicitis, perforating gastric and duodenal ulcers, acute cholecystitis, ruptures and perforations of the intestine and other surgical and gynecological diseases. Patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis showed marked disorders in protein-aminoacid, nitrogen, and water electrolyte metabolism, acid-base balance, a reduced nonspecific immune responsiveness of the organism. Therpeutic tactics was delineated taking into account the revealed changes.

  20. Antidepressants and psychotherapy: a clinical research review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ellen; Novick, Danielle; Kupfer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on information concerning antidepressants and psychotherapy in the treatement of both acute and chronic forms of unipolar depression in the English language literature. In it, we address the use of combination therapy, both from the outset of treatment and in a variety of sequences, ie, we examine the potential advantages of adding a targeted psychotherapy to an incompletely effective pharmacotherapy and the potential advantages of adding pharmacotherapy to an incompletely effective psychotherapy The number of research reports available to address these questions is small relative to their importance for clinical practice. There is a clear need for more information about the relative efficacy of pharmacotherapy-psychotherapy combinations or sequences versus either pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy provided as monotherapies. PMID:16156384

  1. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M; Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis.

  2. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  3. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  4. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... a “black box warning” regarding the potential for suicide and suicidal thinking in children and adolescents taking ... Flares Women & IC Pregnancy & IC Intimacy & IC Pelvic Exam Tips Men & IC Intimacy & IC Support for Men ...

  5. Early life stress triggers sustained changes in histone deacetylase expression and histone H4 modifications that alter responsiveness to adolescent antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Amir; Worrell, Trent R.; Zimnisky, Ross; Schmauss, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Early life stress can elicit long-lasting changes in gene expression and behavior. Recent studies on rodents suggest that these lasting effects depend on the genetic background. Whether epigenetic factors also play a role remains to be investigated. Here we exposed the stress-susceptible mouse strain Balb/c and the more resilient strain C57Bl/6 to a powerful early life stress paradigm, infant maternal separation. In Balb/c mice, infant maternal separation led to decreased expression of mRNA encoding the histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 3, 7, 8, and 10 in the forebrain neocortex in adulthood, an effect accompanied by increased expression of acetylated histone H4 proteins, especially acetylated H4K12 protein. These changes in HDAC expression and histone modifications were not detected in C57Bl/6 mice exposed to early life stress. Moreover, a reversal of the H4K12 hyperacetylation detected in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice (achieved with chronic adolescent treatment with a low dose of theophylline that only activates HDACs) worsened the abnormal emotional phenotype resulting from this early life stress exposure. In contrast, fluoxetine, a drug with potent antidepressant efficacy in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice, potentiated all histone modifications triggered by early life stress. Moreover, in non-stressed Balb/c mice, co-administration of an HDAC inhibitor and fluoxetine, but not fluoxetine alone, elicited antidepressant effects and also triggered changes in histone H4 expression that were similar to those provoked by fluoxetine treatment of mice exposed to early life stress. These results suggest that Balb/c mice develop epigenetic modifications after early life stress exposure that, in terms of the emotive phenotype, are of adaptive nature, and that enhance the efficacy of antidepressant drugs. PMID:21964251

  6. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  7. Evaluation of 5-HT2A and mGlu2/3 receptors in postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder: effect of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Muguruza, Carolina; Miranda-Azpiazu, Patricia; Díez-Alarcia, Rebeca; Morentin, Benito; González-Maeso, Javier; Callado, Luis F; Meana, J Javier

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated alterations in serotonin 5-HT2A (5-HT2AR) and glutamate metabotropic mGlu2 (mGlu2R) receptors in depression, but never in the same sample population. Recently it has been shown that both receptors form a functional receptor heterocomplex that is altered in schizophrenia. The present study evaluates the gene expression and protein density of 5-HT2AR and mGlu2/3R in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder (n = 14) compared with control subjects (n = 14) in a paired design. No significant differences between subjects with depression and controls in the relative mRNA levels of the genes HTR2A, GRM2 and GRM3 were observed. The 5-HT2AR density evaluated by [(3)H]ketanserin binding was significantly lower in antidepressant-treated subjects (Bmax = 313 ± 17 fmol/mg protein; p < 0.05) compared to controls (Bmax = 360 ± 12 fmol/mg protein) but not in antidepressant-free subjects (Bmax = 394 ± 16 fmol/mg protein; p > 0.05). In rats, chronic treatment with citalopram (10 mg/kg/day) and mirtazapine (5 mg/kg/day) decreased mRNA expression and 5-HT2AR density whereas reboxetine (20 mg/kg/day) modified only mRNA expression. The mGlu2/3R density evaluated by [(3)H]LY341495 binding was not significantly different between depression and control subjects. The present results demonstrate no changes in expression and density of both 5-HT2AR and mGlu2/3R in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depressive disorder under basal conditions. However, antidepressant treatment induces a decrease in 5-HT2AR density. This finding suggests that 5-HT2AR down-regulation may be a mechanism for antidepressant effect.

  8. Treating Depression: Should You Consider an Antidepressant?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Depression: Should You Consider An Antidepressant? What are antidepressants? Antidepressants are drugs used to treat the symptoms of depression. Do I need an antidepressant? You probably do ...

  9. Effects of postnatal isolation rearing and antidepressant treatment on the density of serotonergic and noradrenergic axons and depressive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, M; Nakamura, S

    2009-09-29

    The development of monoaminergic axons is affected by pharmacological and environmental manipulations during early periods of brain development. In addition, it has been proposed that changes in the density of monoaminergic axons are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The present experiments examined the effects of neonatal treatment with antidepressants on the density of monoaminergic axons containing 5-HT or noradrenaline (NA) and depressive behavior in rats. In this study, clomipramine (CL) was used as an antidepressant, because a large amount of data has been accumulated on the effects of neonatal CL treatment on monoaminergic neurons and depressive behavior. It was also examined whether the effects of neonatal CL treatment could be further modified by environmental conditions. In the present experiments, postweaning isolation rearing (Iso) was examined as an environmental condition, because postweaning Iso is reported to change the density of 5-HT axons in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, neonatal CL treatment alone had no effect on the density of 5-HT or NA axons or depressive behavior. Postweaning social Iso rearing reduced the density of 5-HT axons in the central nucleus and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala and CA3 of the hippocampus. In the prelimbic area and infralimbic area of medial prefrontal cortex and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the density of 5-HT axons was not affected by social Iso alone, but was reduced when animals were socially isolated after neonatal CL treatment. Postweaning Iso, but not neonatal CL treatment, increased immobility in the forced swim test in adolescence/early adulthood. These findings suggest that postweaning social Iso alters the density of monoaminergic axons, particularly 5-HT axons, and induces a possible model of depression, while neonatal CL treatment alone has no effect on the density of NA or 5-HT axons or depressive behavior in adolescence/early adulthood.

  10. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; McCarthy, Michael J; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Tabaton, Massimo; Martino, Matteo; Colicchio, Salvatore; Cattaneo, Carlo Ignazio; D’Angelo, Emanuela; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD) suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute) or II cases of bipolar depression. Patients and methods Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime) for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index. Results Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64%) showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint), while 24 of the 28 subjects (86%) responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6%) valproate and six of the 11 (54.5%) lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4%) and 10 lithium treated (90.9%) subjects responded. At 36 weeks, there was a slight yet statistically significant (P = 0.001) reduction in body mass index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores compared to respective baseline values, regardless of mood stabilizer/outcome. Treatment related drop-out cases included four patients (14.28%) at week 6 two valproate-treated subjects with pseudo-vertigo and drug-induced hypomania, respectively, and two lithium-treated subjects with insomnia and mania, respectively. Week 36 drop outs were two hypomanic cases, one per group. Conclusion Agomelatine 25 mg/day was an effective and well-tolerated adjunct to valproate/lithium for acute depression in BD-II, suggesting the need for confirmation by future double blind, controlled clinical trials. PMID:23430979

  11. Heart rate variability in major depressive disorder and after antidepressant treatment with agomelatine and paroxetine: Findings from the Taiwan Study of Depression and Anxiety (TAISDA).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ta-Chuan; Kao, Lien-Cheng; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-01-04

    Evidence from previous studies suggests that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, whether this reduction is attributable to the disorder per se or to medication, since antidepressants may also affect HRV, is still debated. There is a dearth of information regarding the effects of agomelatine, a novel antidepressant, on HRV. Here, we investigated whether HRV is reduced in MDD and compared the effects of agomelatine and paroxetine on HRV. We recruited 618 physically healthy unmedicated patients with MDD and 506 healthy volunteers aged 20-65 years. Frequency-domain measures of resting HRV were obtained at the time of enrollment for all participants. For patients with MDD, these measures were obtained again after 6 weeks of either agomelatine or paroxetine monotherapy. Compared with healthy subjects, unmedicated patients with MDD exhibited significantly lower variance (total HRV), low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) HRV, and a higher LF/HF ratio. Depression severity independently contributed to decreased HRV and vagal tone. Fifty-six patients completed the open-label trial (n=29 for agomelatine, n=27 for paroxetine). Between-group analyses showed a significant group-by-time interaction for LF-HRV and HF-HRV, driven by increases in LF-HRV and HF-HRV only after agomelatine treatment. Within the paroxetine-treated group, there were no significant changes in mean R-R intervals or any HRV indices. We therefore concluded that MDD is associated with reduced HRV, which is inversely related to depression severity. Compared with paroxetine, agomelatine has a more vagotonic effect, suggesting greater cardiovascular safety. Clinicians should consider HRV effects while selecting antidepressants especially for depressed patients who already have decreased cardiac vagal tone.

  12. Differential behavioural and neurochemical outcomes from chronic paroxetine treatment in adolescent and adult rats: a model of adverse antidepressant effects in human adolescents?

    PubMed

    Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M; Motbey, Craig; Callaghan, Paul D; Katsifis, Andrew; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with increased risk of suicidal ideation in adolescent humans, yet the neuropharmacological basis of this phenomenon is unknown. Consequently, we examined the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic paroxetine (PRX) treatment in adult and adolescent rats. Rats received PRX in their drinking water (target dose 10 mg/kg) for 22 d, during which time they were assessed for depression- and anxiety-like behaviours. Subsequent ex-vivo analyses examined serum PRX concentrations, striatal neurotransmitter content, and regional serotonin and dopamine transporter (SERT, DAT) binding density. After 11-12 d treatment, PRX-treated adolescent rats showed a significant inhibition of social interaction while adults were unaffected. After 19-20 d treatment, adolescents failed to show an antidepressant-like effect of PRX treatment on the forced swim test (FST), while PRX-treated adults showed a typical decrease in immobility and increase in swimming. Two PRX-treated adolescents died unexpectedly after the FST suggesting a compromised response to physical stress. Despite their greater apparent adverse reaction to the drug, adolescents had significantly lower plasma PRX than adults at day 22 of treatment. Chronic PRX treatment had similar effects in adults and adolescents on striatal 5-HT (unchanged relative to controls) and 5-HIAA levels (decreased), while markers of dopaminergic function (DOPAC, HVA, DA turnover) were increased in adults only. SERT density was up-regulated in the amygdala in PRX-treated adolescents only while DAT density in the nucleus accumbens was down-regulated only in PRX-treated adults. These data suggest that the immature rat brain responds differently to PRX and that this might be of use in modelling the atypical response of human adolescents to antidepressants. The age-specific PRX-induced changes in dopaminergic markers and SERT and DAT binding provide clues as to the neural mechanisms

  13. Temporal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the rat hippocampus after treatment with selective and mixed monoaminergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne H; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Rønn, Lars C B; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2008-01-14

    Strong evidence suggests that antidepressants work by induction of neuroplastic changes mediated through regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This study was undertaken to investigate the time-course of the effect of three antidepressants; fluoxetine, imipramine and venlafaxine, which differentially affect monoamine reuptake, on BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The consequences of increased BDNF in the hippocampus are still indefinite. Here, we also determined the effects on the expression of two other genes (synaptophysin and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43)) known to be involved in synapse formation and axonal growth and likely regulated by BDNF. The effects were determined in rats after sub-chronic (7 days) and chronic (14 and 21 days) treatment using semi-quantitative in situ hybridisation. BDNF mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus (DG) were increased after treatment with venlafaxine (7, 14 and 21 days) and imipramine (14 and 21 days), but not after treatment with fluoxetine, indicating that stimulation of BDNF mRNA expression is dependent on the pharmacological profile and on the time-course of drug treatment. A transient increase in synaptophysin mRNA was observed after treatment with venlafaxine and fluoxetine whereas imipramine had no effect. In the CA3 region a reduction of GAP-43 mRNA was observed after treatment with imipramine (21 days) and fluoxetine (7 and 14 days). These results suggest that venlafaxine and imipramine, but not fluoxetine, induce neuroplastic effects in the hippocampus through stimulation of BDNF mRNA expression, and that the effect on BDNF is not directly translated into regulation of synaptophysin and GAP-43 mRNA.

  14. Mirtazapine, an antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Puzantian, T

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage and administration of mirtazapine are reviewed. Mirtazapine is a new anti-depressant that blocks presynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and postsynaptic serotonin type 2 and type 3 receptors. Mirtazapine has FDA-approved labeling for treatment of depression. Limited data suggest it may also have beneficial anxiolytic and sedative effects. The drug is rapidly and completely absorbed after oral administration. It is biotransformed by hepatic demethylation and is suitable for once-daily doses. In several clinical trials, patients receiving mirtazapine showed significantly greater improvement as measured by scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) compared with patients receiving placebo. Mirtazapine has been shown to be equally efficacious as amitriptyline, clomipramine, and doxepin as assessed by scores on the HAM-D or other depression rating scales. Mirtazapine is well tolerated. The most commonly reported adverse effects associated with mirtazapine are somnolence, increased appetite, weight gain, and dizziness. Few drug-drug interactions have been reported. The recommended starting dosage is 15 mg/day administered in a single dose at bedtime. Mirtazapine seems to be an effective, well-tolerated antidepressant and may be effective for treating comorbid anxiety disorders.

  15. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  16. Fluvoxamine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Ichiro M; Watanabe, Norio; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Cipriani, Andrea; Barbui, Corrado; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluvoxamine, one of the oldest selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), is prescribed to patients with major depression in many countries. Several studies have previously reviewed the efficacy and tolerability of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depression. However, these reviews are now outdated. Objectives Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness, tolerability and side effect profile of fluvoxamine for major depression in comparison with other anti-depressive agents, including tricyclics (TCAs), heterocyclics, other SSRIs, SNRIs, other newer agents and other conventional psychotropic drugs. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register. Trial databases and ongoing trial registers in North America, Europe, Japan and Australia, were handsearched for randomised controlled trials. We checked reference lists of the articles included in the review, previous systematic reviews and major textbooks of affective disorder for published reports and citations of unpublished research. The date of last search was 31 August 2008. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials, published in any language, that compared fluvoxamine with any other active antidepressants in the acute phase treatment of major depression. Data collection and analysis Two independent review authors inspected citations and abstracts, obtained papers, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. We analysed dichotomous data using odds ratios (ORs) and continuous data using the standardised mean difference (SMD). A random effects model was used to combine studies. Main results A total of 54 randomised controlled trials (n = 5122) were included. No strong evidence was found to indicate that fluvoxamine was either superior or inferior to other antidepressants regarding response, remission and tolerability. However, differing side effect profiles were evident, especially

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Albert, Ross H

    2010-12-01

    Cough is the most common symptom bringing patients to the primary care physician's office, and acute bronchitis is usually the diagnosis in these patients. Acute bronchitis should be differentiated from other common diagnoses, such as pneumonia and asthma, because these conditions may need specific therapies not indicated for bronchitis. Symptoms of bronchitis typically last about three weeks. The presence or absence of colored (e.g., green) sputum does not reliably differentiate between bacterial and viral lower respiratory tract infections. Viruses are responsible for more than 90 percent of acute bronchitis infections. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for bronchitis, and should be used only if pertussis is suspected to reduce transmission or if the patient is at increased risk of developing pneumonia (e.g., patients 65 years or older). The typical therapies for managing acute bronchitis symptoms have been shown to be ineffective, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends against using cough and cold preparations in children younger than six years. The supplement pelargonium may help reduce symptom severity in adults. As patient expectations for antibiotics and therapies for symptom management differ from evidence-based recommendations, effective communication strategies are necessary to provide the safest therapies available while maintaining patient satisfaction.

  18. Is increased antidepressant exposure a contributory factor to the obesity pandemic?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S H; Paz-Filho, G; Mastronardi, C; Licinio, J; Wong, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity are both common heterogeneous disorders with complex aetiology, with a major impact on public health. Antidepressant prescribing has risen nearly 400% since 1988, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In parallel, adult obesity rates have doubled since 1980, from 15 to 30 percent, while childhood obesity rates have more than tripled. Rising obesity rates have significant health consequences, contributing to increased rates of more than thirty serious diseases. Despite the concomitant rise of antidepressant use and of the obesity rates in Western societies, the association between the two, as well as the mechanisms underlying antidepressant-induced weight gain, remain under explored. In this review, we highlight the complex relationship between antidepressant use, MDD and weight gain. Clinical findings have suggested that obesity may increase the risk of developing MDD, and vice versa. Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activation occurs in the state of stress; concurrently, the HPA axis is also dysregulated in obesity and metabolic syndrome, making it the most well-understood shared common pathophysiological pathway with MDD. Numerous studies have investigated the effects of different classes of antidepressants on body weight. Previous clinical studies suggest that the tricyclics amitriptyline, nortriptyline and imipramine, and the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor mirtazapine are associated with weight gain. Despite the fact that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use has been associated with weight loss during acute treatment, a number of studies have shown that SSRIs may be associated with long-term risk of weight gain; however, because of high variability and multiple confounds in clinical studies, the long-term effect of SSRI treatment and SSRI exposure on body weight remains unclear. A recently developed animal paradigm shows that the combination

  19. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Psychoeducational Intervention in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Antidepressant Medication in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Casañas, R.; Catalán, R.; Penadés, R.; Real, J.; Valero, S.; Muñoz, MA.; Lalucat-Jo, LL.; Casas, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation (PE) in patients with symptoms of depression in primary care (PC), but very few studies have assessed this intervention in antidepressant-naïve patients. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a PE program in these patients, since the use of antidepressant (AD) medication may interfere with the effects of the intervention. Methods. 106 participants were included, 50 from the PE program (12 weekly 1.5-hour sessions) and 56 from the control group (CG) that received the usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and remission based on the BDI. The analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Results. The PE program group showed remission of symptoms of 40% (P = 0.001) posttreatment and 42% (P = 0.012) at 6 months. The analysis only showed significant differences in the BDI score posttreatment (P = 0.008; effect size Cohen's d′ = 0.55). Conclusions. The PE intervention is an effective treatment in the depressive population not treated with AD medication. Before taking an AD, psychoeducational intervention should be considered. PMID:26380366

  20. [New options in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Link, A; Böhm, M

    2014-06-01

    Acute heart failure is defined as the acute onset of symptoms due to hear failure necessitating emergency therapy. The in-hospital mortality rate ranges up to 10 % and in cardiogenic shock is 50-70 %. In acute heart failure, rapid diagnosis and causal therapy are necessary to avoid cardiogenic shock. In cases of acute coronary syndromes, primary percutaneous intervention should be performed immediately. Medical and apparative treatment strategies focus on decreasing pulmonary congestion, afterload, and neurohormonal activation in order to improve hemodynamics and reduce symptoms of dyspnea. In contrast to chronic heart failure, no medical therapy has been able to reduce mortality rates in acute heart failure. However, new medical therapies should at least improve clinical symptoms of congestion and favorably reduce cardiovascular events, re-hospitalization, and mortality rates.

  1. Additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine via modulation of 5-HT2 receptors in the mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingjin; Zhao, Jing; Lv, Jiayin; Tang, Fang; Liu, Lei; Sun, Zhihui; Wang, Liang; Siwela, Sibongile P; Wang, Yinuo; Song, Yunong; Manchishi, Stephen M; Cui, Ranji

    2014-01-03

    Recently, studies show that intermittent fasting and caloric restriction may improve symptoms of depression. However, there is little scientific evidence regarding the literature on the antidepressant-like effects of acute fasting. The present study aims to investigate the antidepressant-like effects and its influence on brain levels of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and its phosphorylated form (p-CREB) in different time periods of fasting mice. Furthermore, the additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine and the possible involvement of the 5-HT2 receptors were examined. In the present study 9h, but not 3h and 18h of fasting significantly reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST) without alteration in locomotor activity in the open field test. 9h fasting also enhanced the ratio of p-CREB/CREB in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Co-administration of 9h of fasting and imipramine (30mg/kg, i.p) produced the additive antidepressant-like effects in the FST and increased the ratio of p-CREB/CREB. Meanwhile, the additive effects were partially reversed by treatment with a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (±)-1-(2, 5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (5mg/kg, s.c). Furthermore, the antidepressant-like effects of 9h fasting was also blocked by DOI compared to the non-fasting control group. Serum corticosterone level, but not 5-HT and noradrenaline, was significantly increased in a time-dependent manner following different time periods of fasting. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fasting produces antidepressant-like effects via enhancement of the p-CREB/CREB ratio, and additive antidepressant-like effects of fasting with imipramine may be related to modulating 5-HT2 receptors.

  2. Neurotrophic-priming of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for neuronal plasticity to stress and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Lambert, W Marcus; Bath, Kevin G; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2015-12-22

    Neurotrophins and glucocorticoids are robust synaptic modifiers, and deregulation of their activities is a risk factor for developing stress-related disorders. Low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the desensitization of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and vulnerability to stress, whereas higher levels of BDNF facilitate GR-mediated signaling and the response to antidepressants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying neurotrophic-priming of GR function is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that activation of a TrkB-MAPK pathway, when paired with the deactivation of a GR-protein phosphatase 5 pathway, resulted in sustained GR phosphorylation at BDNF-sensitive sites that is essential for the transcription of neuronal plasticity genes. Genetic strategies that disrupted GR phosphorylation or TrkB signaling in vivo impaired the neuroplasticity to chronic stress and the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine. Our findings reveal that the coordinated actions of BDNF and glucocorticoids promote neuronal plasticity and that disruption in either pathway could set the stage for the development of stress-induced psychiatric diseases.

  3. Association between antipsychotic/antidepressant drug treatments and hospital admissions in schizophrenia assessed using a mental health case register

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Rudolf N; Savulich, George; Mann, Louisa M; Fernández-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact of psychotropic drug choice upon admissions for schizophrenia is not well understood. Aims: To examine the association between antipsychotic/antidepressant use and time in hospital for patients with schizophrenia. Methods: We conducted an observational study, using 8 years’ admission records and electronically generated drug histories from an institution providing secondary mental health care in Cambridgeshire, UK, covering the period 2005–2012 inclusive. Patients with a coded ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia were selected. The primary outcome measure was the time spent as an inpatient in a psychiatric unit. Antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs used by at least 5% of patients overall were examined for associations with admissions. Periods before and after drug commencement were compared for patients having pre-drug admissions, in mirror-image analyses correcting for overall admission rates. Drug use in one 6-month calendar period was used to predict admissions in the next period, across all patients, in a regression analysis accounting for the effects of all other drugs studied and for time. Results: In mirror-image analyses, sulpiride, aripiprazole, clozapine, and olanzapine were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. In regression analyses, sulpiride, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, and clozapine–aripiprazole and clozapine–amisulpride combinations were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. Conclusions: Use of these drugs was associated with fewer days in hospital. Causation is not implied and these findings require confirmation by randomized controlled trials. PMID:27336041

  4. The role of IL18-607C>A and IL18-137G>C promoter polymorphisms in antidepressant treatment phenotypes: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marlene; Carvalho, Serafim; Lima, Luís; Mota-Pereira, Jorge; Pimentel, Paulo; Maia, Dulce; Correia, Diana; Gomes, Sofia; Cruz, Agostinho; Medeiros, Rui

    2016-05-27

    Recent studies suggest that immune activation and cytokines, such as IL-18, are involved in depression. IL-18 is expressed in brain and is increased in patients with moderate to severe depression. In this study we aim to evaluate the role of IL18-607C>A and IL18-137G>C promoter polymorphisms in antidepressant treatment phenotypes, specifically relapse and treatment resistant depression (TRD). We genotyped the referred polymorphisms in a subset of 80 MDD patients followed at Hospital Magalhães Lemos, Portugal, within a period of 27 months. Patients carrying IL18-607 CA or AA genotypes were significantly more prone to relapse after AD treatment and present a significantly lower time to relapse than patients carrying CC genotype. Similarly, patients carrying IL18-137 GC or CC genotypes have a significantly higher risk of relapse and display relapse significantly earlier than the ones carrying GG genotype. Due to the low number of IL18-607 CC and IL18-137 GG in the relapse subgroup (n=3 and n=5, respectively), results were validated by bootstrapping analysis, and remained significant. No association was found between the evaluated genetic polymorphisms and TRD. IL18 peripheral mRNA levels were upregulated in IL18-607 CA or AA carriers. This preliminary report indicates that IL18-607C>A and IL18-137G>C genetic polymorphisms seem to influence depression relapse after antidepressant treatment in our subset of depressed patients, and may possibly contribute to the disregulated IL-18 levels found in patients with depression.

  5. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  6. [The fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase of acute arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ballester, A; Donato di Paola, M; Saccà, A; Cappello, I; D'Addato, M

    1993-01-01

    We present our experiences on 86 patients with acute arterial thrombosis of the legs, undergoing a fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase. Results from the treatment are analyzed according to: the administration way (systemic, locoregional, intrathrombotic), the level of thrombosis (upper or lower legs), the associated morbidity and mortality.

  7. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  8. Painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kanemitu, Toshiyuki; Kamoto, Akihito; Satoh, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Kenichiro; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Itatani, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. We report the case of a patient with painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. The patient was a 71-year-old man who had undergone surgery for left renal carcinoma and tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium (IVC-RA). After a follow-up period of 3 years, he developed right adrenal metastasis and received interferon (IFN)-alpha treatment. One year later, progression of the adrenal metastasis was observed, and he was admitted to a hospital for treatment with sorafenib, which was administered at a dose of 800 mg/day. Two weeks later, he developed painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. Thereafter, sorafenib treatment was discontinued, and he was treated with conservative therapy. Three weeks later, he was discharged. Even though painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment is rare, the possible development of painless acute pancreatitis in patients undergoing sorafenib treatment must be kept in mind.

  9. Pediatric Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Andrea; England, Jasmin; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is a common complication of a simple upper respiratory infection. Acute bacterial sinusitis and an upper respiratory infection, however, have different management plans. This article will help clinicians establish when a diagnosis of ABS can be made based on the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Also covered will be the pathophysiology of ABS, the role of diagnostic imaging, the recognition of complications of ABS, and treatment options.

  10. Antidepressants: update on new agents and indications.

    PubMed

    Ables, Adrienne Z; Baughman, Otis L

    2003-02-01

    A number of antidepressants have emerged in the U.S. market in the past two decades. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have become the drugs of choice in the treatment of depression, and they are also effective in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia. New indications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors include post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Extended-release venlafaxine has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Mirtazapine, which is unrelated to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, is unique in its action--stimulating the release of norepinephrine and serotonin. The choice of antidepressant drug depends on the agent's pharmacologic profile, secondary actions, and tolerability. Sexual dysfunction related to the use of antidepressants may be addressed by reducing the dosage, switching to another agent, or adding another drug to overcome the sexual side effects. Augmentation with lithium or triiodothyronine may be useful in patients who are partially or totally resistant to antidepressant treatment. Finally, tapering antidepressant medication may help to avoid discontinuation syndrome or antidepressant withdrawal.

  11. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, in primary and secondary care settings antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. Amongst antidepressants many different agents are available. Duloxetine hydrochloride is a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine and has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for major depressive disorder (MDD), generalised anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of duloxetine in comparison with all other antidepressant agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 2012), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to March 2012. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical company marketing duloxetine and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to duloxetine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and a double-entry procedure was employed. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (overall 5735 participants) were included in this systematic review. Of these, three trials were unpublished. We found 11 studies (overall 3304 participants) comparing duloxetine with one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (six studies versus paroxetine, three studies

  12. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Stefano; Drago, Antonio; Fabbri, Chiara; Gibiino, Sara; Calati, Raffaella; Serretti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine — the adaptation of therapies based on an individual’s genetic and molecular profile — is one of the most promising aspects of modern medicine. The identification of the relation between genotype and drug response, including both the therapeutic effect and side effect profile, is expected to deeply affect medical practice. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the genes related to antidepressant treatment response and provide methodologic proposals for future studies. We have mainly focused on genes associated with pharmacodynamics, for which a list of promising genes has been identified despite some inconsistency across studies. We have also synthesized the main results for pharmacokinetic genes, although so far they seem less relevant than those for pharmacodynamic genes. We discuss possible reasons for these inconsistent findings and propose new study designs. PMID:21172166

  13. Chronic mild stress and antidepressant treatment alter 5-HT1A receptor expression by modifying DNA methylation of a conserved Sp4 site

    PubMed Central

    Le François, Brice; Soo, Jeremy; Millar, Anne M.; Daigle, Mireille; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Leman, Samuel; Minier, Frédéric; Belzung, Catherine; Albert, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), a critical regulator of the brain serotonergic tone, is implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD) where it is often found to be dys-regulated. However, the extent to which stress and antidepressant treatment impact 5-HT1A expression in adults remains unclear. To address this issue, we subjected adult male BALB/c mice to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) to induce a depression-like phenotype that was reversed by chronic treatment with the antidepressant imipramine. In prefrontal cortex (PFC) and midbrain tissue, UCMS increased 5-HT1A RNA and protein levels, changes that are expected to decrease the brain serotonergic activity. The stress-induced increase in 5-HT1A expression was paralleled by a specific increase in DNA methylation of the conserved -681 CpG promoter site, located within a Sp1-like element. We show that the -681 CpG site is recognized and repressed by Sp4, the predominant neuronal Sp1-like factor and that Sp4-induced repression is attenuated by DNA methylation, despite a stress-induced increase in PFC Sp4 levels. These results indicate that adult life stress induces DNA methylation of the conserved promoter site, antagonizing Sp4 repression to increase 5-HT1A expression. Chronic imipramine treatment fully reversed the UCMS-induced increase in methylation of the -681 CpG site in the PFC but not midbrain of stressed animals and also increased 5-HT1A expression in the PFC of control animals. Incomplete reversal by imipramine of stress-induced changes in 5-HT1A methylation and expression indicates a persistence of stress vulnerability, and that sustained reversal of behavioral impairments may require additional pathways. PMID:26188176

  14. [Cerebrolysin in treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B

    1995-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is composed of low molecular peptides and free amino-acids and as a nootropic drug it administered in various diseases of central nervous system. In an open clinical trial patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the region of the middle cerebral artery, were treated. Cerebrolysin was administered as intravenous infusion in daily dose of 15 ml during 21 days. Recovery in 10 patients and improvement in 3 was obtained and only one patient died. The results were compared to the large group of 108 patients treated earlier with other drugs. Therapeutic effect was similar in all groups.

  15. [Antidepressive agents and suicidal tendencies].

    PubMed

    Gründer, G; Veselinović, T; Paulzen, M

    2014-09-01

    In the last 2 years the discussions on the question whether antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can lead to suicidality, aggression and violence, flared up again. The available data on the problem, which has been discussed since the introduction of this substance group in the late 1980s, is presented in this article. A systematic literature search showed that a scientific consensus exists that the benefits of antidepressant pharmacotherapy in general, and of treatment with SSRIs and selective serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) in particular, outweigh the risks of their use. This also applies to the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults. The agitation occasionally occurring at the beginning of treatment, which can be experienced as aversive in susceptible patients, can intensify or even trigger suicidal thoughts or impulses. This has to be paid particular attention to especially at the beginning of treatment. It is recommended that the indications for antidepressant pharmacotherapy of children, adolescents and young adults are assessed by a specialist.

  16. Acute treatment of mania: an update on new medications.

    PubMed

    Gajwani, Prashant; Kemp, David E; Muzina, David J; Xia, Guohua; Gao, Keming; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2006-12-01

    Acute mania is frequently a medical emergency requiring hospitalization for behavioral control, rapid resolution of irritability, agitation, de-escalation of mood, and decreasing of risk-taking behavior. Lithium efficacy in the management of acute mania was reported in 1949 and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. Chlorpromazine, from the class of typical antipsychotics, was approved for treatment of bipolar disorder in 1973. Typical antipsychotics were frequently used alone and as adjunct for the treatment of bipolar mania for the next 2 decades. Divalproex was approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute mania in 1994. Since the approval of olanzapine in 2000, all five atypical antipsychotics, namely risperidone (2003), quetiapine (2004), ziprasidone (2004), and aripiprazole (2004), have been approved by the FDA for the management of acute mania. Clozapine is the only atypical antipsychotic not FDA approved for any phase of bipolar disorder. This article will systematically review some of the major studies published, randomized controlled monotherapy, and adjunct therapy trials involving five atypical antipsychotics and newer anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  17. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  18. Neuronal plasticity and antidepressant actions.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Eero; Hen, René

    2013-05-01

    Antidepressant treatments enhance plasticity and increase neurogenesis in the adult brain, but it has been unclear how these effects influence mood. We propose that, like environmental enrichment and exercise, antidepressant treatments enhance adaptability by increasing structural variability within the nervous system at many levels, from proliferating precursors to immature synaptic contacts. Conversely, sensory deprivation and chronic stress reduce this structural variability. Activity-dependent competition within the mood-related circuits, guided by rehabilitation, then selects for the survival and stabilization of those structures that best represent the internal or external milieu. Increased variability together with competition-mediated selection facilitates normal function, such as pattern separation within the dentate gyrus and other mood-related circuits, thereby enhancing adaptability toward novel experiences.

  19. BDNF — a key transducer of antidepressant effects

    PubMed Central

    Björkholm, Carl; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    How do antidepressants elicit an antidepressant response? Here, we review accumulating evidence that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves as a transducer, acting as the link between the antidepressant drug and the neuroplastic changes that result in the improvement of the depressive symptoms. Over the last decade several studies have consistently highlighted BDNF as a key player in antidepressant action. An increase in hippocampal and cortical expression of BDNF mRNA parallels the antidepressant-like response of conventional antidepressants such as SSRIs. Subsequent studies showed that a single bilateral infusion of BDNF into the ventricles or directly into the hippocampus is sufficient to induce a relatively rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effect. Importantly, the antidepressant-like response to conventional antidepressants is attenuated in mice where the BDNF signaling has been disrupted by genetic manipulations. Low dose ketamine, which has been found to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in patients with treatment-resistant depression, is also dependent on increased BDNF signaling. Ketamine transiently increases BDNF translation in hippocampus, leading to enhanced synaptic plasticity and synaptic strength. Ketamine has been shown to increase BDNF translation by blocking NMDA receptor activity at rest, thereby inhibiting calcium influx and subsequently halting eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinase leading to a desuppression of protein translation, including BDNF translation. The antidepressant-like response of ketamine is abolished in BDNF and TrkB conditional knockout mice, eEF2 kinase knockout mice, in mice carrying the BDNF met/met allele, and by intra-cortical infusions of BDNF-neutralizing antibodies. In summary, current data suggests that conventional antidepressants and ketamine mediate their antidepressant-like effects by increasing BDNF in forebrain regions, in particular the hippocampus, making BDNF an

  20. Effects of amantadine and budipine on antidepressant drug-evoked changes in extracellular dopamine in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jenny C E; Whitton, Peter S

    2006-10-30

    NMDA receptors play a role in the aetiology of depression with non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists such as amantadine showing synergy with conventional antidepressants. To advance a neurochemical rational for these findings, we have studied the effects of administration of amantadine and budipine with the antidepressants reboxetine (REB), paroxetine (PAROX) and clomipramine (CLOM) on extracellular DA in rats using microdialysis. Acutely, amantadine (40 mg/kg) or budipine (10 mg/kg) did not significantly alter extracellular DA. REB (10 mg/kg), PAROX (10 mg/kg) both increased cortical DA while CLOM (10 mg/kg) produced a decrease. When amantadine or budipine was administered 30 min before the antidepressants, DA increases were markedly greater than following the antidepressants alone. Chronically drug effects were studied at 4, 7, 14 and 21 days. Amantadine and budipine did not significantly alter extracellular DA at any time. The three antidepressants elicited a gradual increase in DA which became significant after 7 days and tended to plateau thereafter. When amantadine (20 mg/kg) or budipine (5 mg/kg) was co-administered with the three antidepressants, two differences were seen compared with the antidepressants alone. Firstly, the time required for significant increases in cortical DA was reduced with elevated levels now being observed by 4 days. Secondly, the increase in extracellular DA was greater in these rats throughout the experiment. If increased extracellular DA represents a step in the mechanism of action of antidepressants, these data suggest that combined treatment with clinically tolerated NMDA antagonists such as amantadine could reduce the delay in therapeutic onset of antidepressants and possibly enhance their efficacy.

  1. [CONSERVATIVE THERAPY IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Khomyak, I V

    2015-07-01

    Developed and implemented a phased differentiated treatment tactics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, based on the theory of phase course of acute pancreatitis. Treatment started with conservative measures. Applications developed set of measures allowed us to achieve recovery of 39.53% patients without any instrumental interventions performans, including diapevtycal. Laparotomy reduced frequency performance of 57.14%--in the control group to 33.07%--in the main. Mortality in the main group was 6.72%; complication rate decreased 2.26 times; postoperative mortality was 9.83%.

  2. NMDA but not AMPA glutamatergic receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP during the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an antidepressant-like activity for 3-[(methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]-pyridine (MTEP), a highly selective, non-competitive antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR(5)). This effect has been observed following both acute and chronic MTEP treatments in behavioral tests and experimental models of depression, such as the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and the olfactory bulbectomy model of depression. However, the mechanism of action for mGluR(5) antagonists remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the antidepressant-like action of MTEPis dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic receptors. Male Albino Swiss mice were used, and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using the FST. The antidepressant-like effect of MTEP (0.3 mg/kg) was significantly antagonized by pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.). The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect the MTEP activity. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP in the FST involves NMDA but not AMPA receptors and suggest that the interaction between mGluR(5) and NMDA receptors plays an important role in the underlying antidepressant mechanism(s).

  3. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  4. Antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in acute and chronic neurobehavioral rodent models.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Thangaraj, Devadoss; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2014-07-15

    Depression and anxiety are the most debilitating mood disorders with poor therapeutic recovery rates. In the last decades, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been identified as potential agents for mood disorders. The current investigation focuses on evaluating the, antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of a novel 5-HT3 antagonist, 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide). Preliminary, in vitro 5-HT3 receptor binding affinity was performed in isolated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus from the guinea pig ileum. Consequently, neurobehavioral effects of 4i in acute and chronic rodent models were evaluated. In addition, involvement of serotonergic system in the postulated effects of the compound was analyzed by in vivo assay. in vitro, 4i demonstrated high 5-HT3 receptor antagonistic activity (pA2, 7.6). in vivo acute study, 4i exhibited decreased duration of immobility in forced swim and tail suspension tests, and increased exploratory parameters as number and duration of nose-poking in hole board test and latency and time spent in aversive brightly illuminated light chamber in light-dark model. Moreover, in chronic model of depression, i.e., olfactory bulbectomy with behavioral deficits, 4i reversed depressive anhedonia in sucrose preference test and anxious hyperactive behavior in open field test in rats. Furthermore, synergistic effect of 4i with fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and inhibitory effect of 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) revealed serotonergic modulation by 4i mediated 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, which was further confirmed by potentiation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (a serotonin synthesis precursor) induced head twitch response. These findings suggest the potential antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i, which may be related to the modulation of serotonergic system.

  5. Treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L; Novitzky, N

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-five consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 24 years (range 10-69 years), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, Adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate and monthly intrathecal therapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, Adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 59 patients (69%) and only the French-American-British (FAB) L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (P = 0.048). Twenty-three patients failed to achieve CR and of these 12 had primary drug resistance. Median follow-up is currently 260 weeks, median predicted survival of all patients is 58 weeks and for those who achieved CR it is 104 weeks. Median duration of CR is 70 weeks. Of the prognostic factors for survival, only FAB L1 subtype was significant. Bone marrow relapses occurred in 29 patients, and of these 9 (31%) achieved CR. There has been CNS relapse in two patients and both have died. Eleven patients continue in CR off therapy, with a median of 152 weeks. This regimen is effective, with acceptable toxicity, and a number of patients are potentially cured. The incidence of resistant and relapsing disease is an argument for further intensifying both induction and postinduction therapy.

  6. Octreotide treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Mayo, A; Paran, D; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Zissin, R; Singer, P; Kaplan, O; Skornik, Y; Freund, U

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of octreotide in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a case-control study. Experimental and clinical studies on the effect of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis have shown controversial results. Since January 1992, we have been conducting a prospective randomized study on the effect of octreotide in severe acute pancreatitis, in three hospitals in Israel. The entering criteria included three or more of the Ranson prognostic signs and CT findings of severe pancreatitis. Patients were randomly assigned to conservative treatment either with or without octreotide (0.1 mg subcutaneously three times a day). The end points of the study included: complication rate (ARDS, sepsis, renal failure, pseudocyst, fistula, and abscess), length of hospital stay, and mortality. From January 1992 to December 1996, 60 patients entered the study. After evaluating the files, 10 patients were excluded due to failure to meet the entering criteria, incomplete data, or incorrect diagnosis. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were assigned to octreotide (treatment group) and 25 to conservative treatment only (control group). The two groups matched with regard to age, sex, etiology, and severity of the disease. The complication rate was lower in the treatment group with regard to sepsis (24% vs 76%, P = 0.0002) and ARDS (28% vs 56%, P = 0.04). The hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group (20.6 vs 33.1 days, P = 0.04). Two patients died in the treatment group and eight in the control group (P < 0.019). These results suggest that octreotide may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

  7. Early rehabilitative treatment for pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Carlisi, E; Pavese, C; Mandrini, S; Carenzio, G; Dalla Toffola, E

    2015-06-01

    Although the diagnosis of and therapy for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) have been extensively investigated, the role of rehabilitation in modifying its functional outcome has received little attention in the literature so far. We report a case of pediatric ADEM who showed complete functional recovery following early rehabilitative treatment, started in the Intensive Care Unit.

  8. Validity of Sudden Gains in Acute Phase Treatment of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the validity of sudden gains identified with T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis's (1999) method in 2 clinical data sets that involved treatment of major depressive disorder (N=227). Sudden gains replicated among self- and clinician reports of depressive symptoms and predicted better psychosocial functioning at the acute phase…

  9. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  10. Acute and long-term treatments with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram modulate the HPA axis activity at different levels in male rats.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J B; Jessop, D S; Harbuz, M S; Mørk, A; Sánchez, C; Mikkelsen, J D

    1999-06-01

    It is well established that the maximal therapeutic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are achieved in depressive patients after several weeks of treatment, but the adaptive processes leading to the therapeutic effects are unclear. It has been shown that hyperactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in depressive patients is affected by long-term antidepressant treatment. These changes occur in association with the mood normalising effect, suggesting that antidepressants affect the HPA axis and this effect is associated with the therapeutic effect. Male Wistar rats were treated with the SSRI, citalopram, to investigate time-related changes in components that may be involved in the desensitization of the HPA axis. A single injection of citalopram (10 mg/kg, s.c.), increased the plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone in a dose-dependent manner and increased the number of c-Fos containing cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. A daily treatment with the same compound (10 mg/kg, s.c.) for 14 days decreased the expression of POMC mRNA ( approximately 40%). In addition, a blunted response to citalopram was observed in animals long-term treated with citalopram. Also CRF-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the pituitary was altered. In conclusion, acute citalopram activated the HPA-axis at the hypothalamic level and long-term citalopram treatment desensitized the HPA-axis at the pituitary level. These results support the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of long-term antidepressant treatments reduce HPA axis responsiveness.

  11. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1992-08-01

    Forty-six consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 23 years (range 14 to 64), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate, and monthly intrathecal chemotherapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 36 patients (78%) and only the FAB L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (Chi-squared = 3.91: p < 0.05). Eight of the 10 non-responders had significant drug resistance and 3 deaths were associated with marrow hypoplasia. Median follow-up is 52 months. Median duration of CR is 28 months, median survival of all patients is 16 months, and for those who achieved CR is 44 months. There was no difference between the two maintenance arms. Significant prognostic factors for survival are French-American-British (FAB) subtype, in which the L1 is better than L2 (p = 0.05), and age (p = 0.035). Nineteen patients have experienced medullary relapse and 7 (37%) achieved subsequent CR; this is durable in a single patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Eight patients (17%) had CNS disease at diagnosis; 5 achieved CR and 1 is alive and disease-free at 65+ months. There has been 1 CNS relapse. These results demonstrate that prolonged remissions and survival can be achieved with this protocol and many patients possibly cured. The level of toxicity is acceptable and the pattern of induction failure indicates that a margin exists for intensifying chemotherapy and thereby possibly further improving results.

  12. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  13. [Monitorering and complications by conservative treatment of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Novovic, Srdan; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Møller Andersen, Anders; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Philipsen, Else; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with a high morbidity and a mortality risk of up to 20%. Although much progress has occurred during the latest couple of years, there are still some major controversies on important issues such as monitoring, fluid therapy, antibiotic treatment, and nutrition. In this article we describe the underlying, pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for organ failure in SAP, and the rationale for monitoring and conservative treatment of SAP.

  14. How antidepressant drugs act: A primer on neuroplasticity as the eventual mediator of antidepressant efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Rao, N. Sanjay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Depression is conventionally viewed as a state of chemical imbalance, and antidepressants are suggested to act through increasing monoaminergic neurotransmission. These views are currently considered simplistic. This article examines the animal and human literature on the neurohistological mechanisms underlying stress, depression and antidepressant treatment. Pathological stress and depression are associated with changes such as loss of dendritic spines, shrinkage of the dendritic tree and loss of synapses in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. There is also a decrease in glia. Apoptosis may occur under extreme circumstances. In contrast, there is increased dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis in the amygdala. Antidepressant treatment protects against and even reverses some but not all of these stress-induced neurohistological changes. Pathological stress results in an aberrant neuroplasticity response characterized by abnormally increased activity in the amygdala and by impaired functioning of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and downstream structures. This aberrant neuroplasticity response directly explains most of the clinical symptoms of depression. Antidepressant treatment protects against stress-induced pathoplastic neurohistological and neurocognitive changes. Antidepressant treatment also restores functional neuroplasticity in stressed organisms and, thereby, presumably, facilitates re-adaptation through learning and memory mechanisms. Thus, the stress–depression syndrome and the therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of antidepressant treatments can be explained through a hardwiring analogy. In this context, glutamate is an important neurotransmitter. PMID:21267376

  15. Antidepressant augmentation with anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-01

    Antidepressant augmentation strategies are commonly employed to treat depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressant monotherapy. Neuroinflammatory mechanisms have been implicated in depression, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been found effective in animal models of depression both in monotherapy and when used to augment antidepressant drugs. However, results with NSAIDs have been mixed in human observational studies, with both better and worse depression outcomes reported. Four small (pooled N = 160) randomized controlled trials suggest that celecoxib (200-400 mg/d) augmentation of antidepressant medication improves 4-6 week outcomes in major depressive disorder. There are no data, however, to support the use of celecoxib or other NSAIDs in antidepressant-resistant depression. There are also concerns about adverse events associated with NSAID treatment, and about pharmacodynamic drug interactions between these drugs and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. A reasonable conclusion for the present is that NSAID augmentation of antidepressants is, at best, a tentative approach in nonrefractory major depression.

  16. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  17. Rapid-acting glutamatergic antidepressants: the path to ketamine and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, John H.; Sanacora, Gerard; Duman, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional antidepressants require many weeks to reveal their therapeutic effects. However, the widely replicated observation that a single subanesthetic dose of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, ketamine, produced meaningful clinical improvement within hours suggested that rapidly acting antidepressants might be possible. The ketamine studies stimulated a new generation of basic antidepressant research that identified new neural signaling mechanisms in antidepressant response and provided a conceptual framework linking a group of novel antidepressant mechanisms. This article presents the path that led to the testing of ketamine, considers its promise as an antidepressant, and reviews novel treatment mechanisms that are emerging from this line of research. PMID:23726151

  18. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  19. Is the antidepressive effect of second-generation antidepressants a myth?

    PubMed

    Bech, P

    2010-02-01

    Two recent meta-analyses on second-generation antidepressants versus placebo in mild to moderate forms of major depression, based on data on all randomized clinical trials using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) submitted to FDA, have shown an effect size of approximately 0.30 in favour of antidepressants in the acute therapy of major depression. The clinical significance of an effect size at this level was found to be so poor that these meta-analyses have subscribed to the myth of an exclusively placebo-like effect of second-generation antidepressants. A re-allocation of HAMD items focusing on those items measuring severity of clinical depression, the HAMD6, has identified effect sizes of >or=0.40 for second-generation antidepressants in placebo-controlled trials for which even a dose-response relationship can be demonstrated. In the relapse-prevention phase during continuation therapy of patients with major depression, the advantage of second-generation antidepressants over placebo was as significant as in the acute therapy phase. To explore a myth is not to deny the facts but rather to re-allocate them.

  20. Antidepressants triggering suicidal ideation: An area of concern

    PubMed Central

    Rajgadhi, Himali; Gupta, Sapna; Malhotra, Supriya Deepak; Thakor, Advait; Patel, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of four cases of possible suicidal ideation with the use of antidepressants in Indian population. The patients presented to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with attempted suicide. All of them were prescribed at least one antidepressant. The association of increased suicidal attempts/ideation with antidepressant drugs themselves has been reported in the West, but data in the Indian population are lacking. Antidepressants are widely used not only for treatment of depression but also many other psychiatric illnesses; it is yet unclear whether suicidal ideation is because of these drugs or the progression of the disease. Hence, careful prescribing of these medicines is warranted. PMID:28066117

  1. The Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Vortioxetine for the Treatment of a Major Depressive Episode in Patients With Failed Prior Antidepressant Therapy: A Critique of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lomas, James; Llewellyn, Alexis; Soares, Marta; Simmonds, Mark; Wright, Kath; Eastwood, Alison; Palmer, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of vortioxetine (Lundbeck) to submit clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence for vortioxetine for the treatment of major depressive episodes (MDEs), as part of the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and the resulting NICE guidance TA367 issued in November 2015. The ERG critically reviewed the evidence presented in the manufacturer's submission and identified areas requiring clarification, for which the manufacturer provided additional evidence. Two phase III randomised controlled trials for a second-line population involving vortioxetine were identified-REVIVE and TAK318. These two trials represent only 972 of over 7000 patients included in trials of vortioxetine. In REVIVE, there was a statistically significant difference in depression scores favouring vortioxetine compared with agomelatine [mean Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score difference of 2.16 points; 95 % confidence interval 0.81-3.51]. The ERG concluded that, based on all the evidence, rather than the substantially restricted subset of evidence originally considered by the manufacturer, vortioxetine is likely to be similar in efficacy to other analysed antidepressants [citalopram, sertraline, escitalopram and venlafaxine extended release (XR)], and may be more efficacious than agomelatine and inferior to duloxetine. The ERG concluded that vortioxetine may be more tolerable than other analysed antidepressants (sertraline, venlafaxine XR and bupropion), although the limited data prevent firm conclusions. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of vortioxetine reported by the manufacturer was £378 per quality

  2. Treatment of acute experimental toxoplasmosis with investigational poloxamers.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Fukutomi, Y; Gu, L

    1993-01-01

    Because of the limited chemotherapeutic approaches available to treat reactivated latent Toxoplasma gondii infection manifested as toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients, investigation of novel chemotherapeutic agents is warranted. Several poloxamers (nonionic block copolymers composed of a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene flanked by two hydrophilic chains of polyoxyethylene) were tested for their abilities to alter the course of acute infection with a highly virulent T. gondii in mice. The effect varied markedly with the length of the constituent chains of the copolymers. The most effective preparations were highly effective when administered after infection and afforded remarkable protection against 10 to 1,000 100% lethal doses of T. gondii. Protection was dose dependent, and multiple treatments were more effective than single treatment. These preliminary findings warrant additional studies to determine whether this novel form of antitoxoplasma chemotherapy may prove promising in the treatment or prevention of acute toxoplasmic encephalitis in humans. PMID:8285605

  3. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    PubMed

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  4. Serotonin receptors involved in antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hdroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depression since the serendipitous discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s. However, despite the generalised use of serotonin-enhancing drugs, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), the exact neurobiological mechanisms involved in the therapeutic action of these drugs are poorly understood. Better knowledge of these mechanisms may help to identify new therapeutic targets and to overcome the two main limitations of current treatments: reduced efficacy and slowness of action. Here I review the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of different 5-HT receptors in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. Presynaptic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors play a major detrimental role in antidepressant treatments, as their activation by the excess of the active (extracellular) 5-HT fraction produced by serotonin transporter (SERT) blockade reduces presynaptic serotonergic function. Conversely, stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors in corticolimbic networks appears beneficial for the antidepressant action. The 5-HT(2) receptor family is also involved as 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor blockade improves the antidepressant action of SSRIs, and recent data suggest that 5-HT(2B) receptor activation enhances serotonergic activity. Less is known from the rest of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors. However, 5-HT(3) receptor blockade augments the 5-HT increase evoked by SERT inhibition, and 5-HT(4) receptor activation may have antidepressant effects on its own. Finally, blockade of 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors appears also to augment the antidepressant effects of SERT inhibition.

  5. Extreme Response Style in Recurrent and Chronically Depressed Patients: Change with Antidepressant Administration and Stability during Continuation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Timothy J.; Feldman, Greg; Harley, Rebecca; Fresco, David M.; Graves, Lesley; Holmes, Avram; Bogdan, Ryan; Papakostas, George I.; Bohn, Laurie; Lury, R. Alana; Fava, Maurizio; Segal, Zindel V.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined extreme response style in recurrently and chronically depressed patients, assessing its role in therapeutic outcome. During the acute phase, outpatients with major depressive disorder (N = 384) were treated with fluoxetine for 8 weeks. Remitted patients (n = 132) entered a continuation phase during which their fluoxetine dose…

  6. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  7. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  8. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of macranthol isolated from Illicium dunnianum tutch in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Geng, Di; Xu, Jiao; Weng, Lian-Jin; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2013-05-05

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the behavioral and biochemical effects of macranthol, a triphenyl lignan isolated from Illicium dunnianum. To this aim, mice were treated with macranthol (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) and then subjected to the forced swimming test, tail suspension test and chronic unpredictable mild stress. It was observed that macranthol significantly reduced the immobility time in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test after acute (1-day) treatment, and reversed the reduction of sucrose preference induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress after chronic (5-week) treatment. In addition, macranthol completely ameliorated the corticosterone hypersecretion by acute swim stress or chronic unpredictable mild stress. Chronic macranthol treatment attenuated the reduction of serotonergic neurotransmission in brain regions of frontal cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, our findings suggested that macranthol produced an antidepressant-like effect, which may be mediated by serotonergic and neuroendocrine system. Moreover, the finding that only chronic but not acute treatment enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression suggested that macranthol did not produce a rapid antidepressant-like response and long-term treatment was required in its clinical application.

  10. Emerging targets for antidepressant therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Holtzheimer, Paul E; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    Despite adequate antidepressant monotherapy, the majority of depressed patients do not achieve remission. Even optimal and aggressive therapy leads to a substantial number of patients who show minimal and often only transient improvement. In order to address this substantial problem of treatment-resistant depression, a number of novel targets for antidepressant therapy have emerged as a consequence of major advances in the neurobiology of depression. Three major approaches to uncover novel therapeutic interventions are: first, optimizing the modulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission; second, developing medications that act upon neurotransmitter systems other than monoaminergic circuits; and third, using focal brain stimulation to directly modulate neuronal activity. We review the most recent data on novel therapeutic compounds and their antidepressant potential. These include triple monoamine reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotic augmentation, and dopamine receptor agonists. Compounds affecting extra-monoamine neurotransmitter systems include CRF1 receptor antagonists, glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, substance P receptor antagonists, NMDA receptor antagonists, nemifitide, omega-3 fatty acids, and melatonin receptor agonists. Focal brain stimulation therapies include vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). PMID:19501541

  11. Differentiation syndrome in acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Christin B; Roberts, Owen

    2015-11-01

    We report a case report of hyperleukocytosis, fever, hypotension, pulmonary and pericardial effusions, and acute kidney injury during initial treatment with azacitidine in a patient with AML-MRC. Collectively, the symptomatology resembled differentiation syndrome. Azacitidine has been previously associated with fever, peripheral edema, and hyperleukocytosis, but its side effect profile has never been described as similar to differentiation syndrome. The patient's deteriorating course quickly turned around after treatment with dexamethasone. This potential reaction, and potential treatment, is important for clinicians to be aware of.

  12. Antidepressants and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... wine intake on antidepressant medications. National Alliance on Mental Illness. https://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=Ask_ ... 14:1. Treating major depression. National Alliance on Mental Illness. http://www.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Mental_Illnesses/ ...

  13. Role of the nicotinic receptor β4 subunit in the antidepressant activity of novel N,6-dimethyltricyclo[5.2.1.0²,⁶]decan-2-amine enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Arias, Hugo R

    2013-10-11

    The role of the nicotinic receptor β4 subunit in the antidepressant activity of N,6-dimethyltricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decan-2-amine enantiomers was investigated using wild-type (β4+/+) and knockout (β4-/-) mice. Mice were injected (i.p.) with saline (control) or with either enantiomer (1.0mg/kg base drug) daily for the first two weeks. Forced swim tests (FST) were performed on Day 1 to determine the acute effect of each enantiomer, and on Day 7 and 14, to determine the chronic activity. To examine the remnant effects after drug treatment, a withdrawal period of two more weeks was continued with FSTs performed on Day 21 and 28. Our results indicate that: (1) the acute antidepressant effect elicited by the (S,S)-enantiomer is observed in β4+/+ mice from both sexes, whereas the effect elicited by the (R,R)-enantiomer is only observed in male β4+/+ mice. There is no antidepressant effect for both novel compounds on male and female β4-/- mice, (2) the chronic antidepressant effect elicited by both enantiomers is observed in β4+/+, but not in β4-/-, mice from both sexes, and (3) the residual antidepressant effect mediated by each enantiomer after withdrawal was observed only in female β4+/+ mice. Our results clearly indicate that β4-containing AChRs are targets for the antidepressant activity of these compounds, and that this activity is gender-dependent.

  14. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  15. Single treatments that have lasting effects: some thoughts on the antidepressant effects of ketamine and botulinum toxin and the anxiolytic effect of psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon N

    2013-03-01

    Recent clinical trials suggest that 3 single biological treatments have effects that persist. Based on research showing that the muscles involved in facial expressions can feed back to influence mood, a single trial diminishing glabella frown lines with botulinum toxin demonstrated a significant antidepressant effect for 16 weeks. Based primarily on research with animal models of depression suggesting that glutamate may be involved in depression, the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist ketamine has been tested in several trials. A single dose decreased depression for up to a week. The reported effects of the use of mushrooms containing psilocybin by a number of cultures around the world has stimulated several trials showing beneficial effects of a single dose of psilocybin for over a year in healthy people, and for up to 3 months in patients with anxiety disorders who have advanced cancer. This article discusses these studies, their rationale, their possible mechanisms of action, the future clinical research required to establish these therapies and the basic research required to optimize single treatments that have lasting effects.

  16. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Schettler, Pamela J; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Parkin, Susannah R; Walker, Rosemary S W; Fehling, Kara B; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126.

  17. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Maca Root as Treatment for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Dording, Christina M.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Parkin, Susannah R.; Walker, Rosemary S. W.; Fehling, Kara B.; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126. PMID:25954318

  18. Early-life stress and antidepressant treatment involve synaptic signaling and Erk kinases in a gene-environment model of depression.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Mallei, Alessandra; Tardito, Daniela; Gruber, Susanne H M; El Khoury, Aram; Racagni, Giorgio; Mathé, Aleksander A; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-06-01

    Stress has been shown to interact with genetic vulnerability in pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Here we investigated the outcome of interaction between genetic vulnerability and early-life stress, by employing a rodent model that combines an inherited trait of vulnerability in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, with early-life stress (maternal separation). Basal differences in synaptic signaling between FSL rats and their controls were studied, as well as the consequences of early-life stress in adulthood, and their response to chronic antidepressant treatment (escitalopram). FSL rats showed basal differences in the activation of synapsin I and Erk1/2, as well as in alpha CaM kinase II/syntaxin-1 and alpha CaM kinase II/NMDA-receptor interactions in purified hippocampal synaptosomes. In addition, FSL rats displayed a blunted response of Erk-MAP kinases and other differences in the outcome of early-life stress in adulthood. Escitalopram treatment restored some but not all alterations observed in FSL rats after early-life stress. The marked alterations found in key regulators of presynaptic release/neurotransmission in the basal FSL rats, and as a result of early-life stress, suggest synaptic dysfunction. These results show that early gene-environment interaction may cause life-long synaptic changes affecting the course of depressive-like behavior and response to drugs.

  19. Increased water temperature renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice susceptible to antidepressant treatment in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bächli, Heidi; Steiner, Michel A; Habersetzer, Ursula; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2008-02-11

    To investigate genotype x environment interactions in the forced swim test, we tested the influence of water temperature (20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on floating behaviour in single-housed male C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. We observed a contrasting relationship between floating and water temperature between the two strains, with C57BL/6J floating more and BALB/c floating less with increasing water temperature, independent of the lightening conditions and the time point of testing during the animals' circadian rhythm. Both strains showed an inverse relationship between plasma corticosterone concentration and water temperature, indicating that the differences in stress coping are unrelated to different perception of the aversive encounter. Treatment with desipramine (20mg/kg, i.p.) caused a reduction in immobility time in C57BL/6J mice if the animals were tested at 30 degrees C water temperature, with no effect at 25 degrees C and no effects on forced swim stress-induced corticosterone secretion. The same treatment failed to affect floating behaviour in BALB/c at any temperature, but caused a decrease in plasma corticosterone levels. Taken together we demonstrate that an increase in water temperature in the forced swim test exerts opposite effects on floating behaviour in C57BL/6J and BALB/c and renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice, but not BALB/c mice, susceptible to antidepressant-like behavioral effects of desipramine.

  20. A pilot randomized placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive aripiprazole for chronic PTSD in US military Veterans resistant to antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jennifer C; Kilts, Jason D; Bradford, Daniel W; Strauss, Jennifer L; Capehart, Bruce P; Szabo, Steven T; Smith, Karen D; Dunn, Charlotte E; Conner, Kathryn M; Davidson, Jonathan R T; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Hamer, Robert M; Marx, Christine E

    2015-05-01

    Many individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience persistent symptoms despite pharmacological treatment with antidepressants. Several open-label monotherapy and adjunctive studies have suggested that aripiprazole (a second-generation antipsychotic) may have clinical utility in PTSD. However, there have been no randomized placebo-controlled trials of aripiprazole use for PTSD. We thus conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial of adjunctive aripiprazole versus placebo among Veterans with chronic PTSD serving in the US military since 11 September 2001 to assess the feasibility, safety, tolerability, and therapeutic potential of aripiprazole. Sixteen Veterans were randomized, and 14 completed at least 4 weeks of the study; 12 completed the entire 8-week trial. Outcome measures included the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), PTSD Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores. Aripiprazole was well-tolerated in this cohort, and improvements in CAPS, PTSD Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores were as hypothesized. Although CAPS change scores did not reach statistical significance, aripiprazole outperformed placebo by 9 points on the CAPS in the last observation carried forward analysis compared with the placebo group (n = 7 per group), and by 20 points in the group randomized to aripiprazole that completed the entire study (n = 5) compared with the placebo group (n = 7). Results suggest promise for aripiprazole as an adjunctive strategy for the treatment of PTSD.

  1. Faster, better, stronger: towards new antidepressant therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-04-15

    Major depression is a highly prevalent disorder and is predicted to be the second leading cause of disease burden by 2020. Although many antidepressant drugs are currently available, they are far from optimal. Approximately 50% of patients do not respond to initial first line antidepressant treatment, while approximately one third fail to achieve remission following several pharmacological interventions. Furthermore, several weeks or months of treatment are often required before clinical improvement, if any, is reported. Moreover, most of the commonly used antidepressants have been primarily designed to increase synaptic availability of serotonin and/or noradrenaline and although they are of therapeutic benefit to many patients, it is clear that other therapeutic targets are required if we are going to improve the response and remission rates. It is clear that more effective, rapid-acting antidepressants with novel mechanisms of action are required. The purpose of this review is to outline the current strategies that are being taken in both preclinical and clinical settings for identifying superior antidepressant drugs. The realisation that ketamine has rapid antidepressant-like effects in treatment resistant patients has reenergised the field. Further, developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients by drugs such as ketamine may uncover novel therapeutic targets that can be exploited to meet the Olympian challenge of developing faster, better and stronger antidepressant drugs.

  2. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. Data sources Clinical study reports for duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine obtained from the European and UK drug regulators, and summary trial reports for duloxetine and fluoxetine from Eli Lilly’s website. Eligibility criteria for study selection Double blind placebo controlled trials that contained any patient narratives or individual patient listings of harms. Data extraction and analysis Two researchers extracted data independently; the outcomes were meta-analysed by Peto’s exact method (fixed effect model). Results We included 70 trials (64 381 pages of clinical study reports) with 18 526 patients. These trials had limitations in the study design and discrepancies in reporting, which may have led to serious under-reporting of harms. For example, some outcomes appeared only in individual patient listings in appendices, which we had for only 32 trials, and we did not have case report forms for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli Lilly’s website, almost all deaths were noted, but all suicidal ideation events were missing, and the information on the remaining outcomes was

  3. Agomelatine: an antidepressant without deterioration of sexual response.

    PubMed

    Sapetti, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions caused by the use of antidepressants are relatively common. Agomelatine has demonstrated antidepressant properties in comparative studies with sertraline, fluoxetine, and venlafaxine as active controls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of agomelatine on sexual response. Acutely depressed patients (n = 25) treated with agomelatine (25-50 mg/day) were evaluated over 12 weeks. Agomelatine showed a favorable response on depressive symptoms using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale throughout the study. The Clinical Global Impression improvement score at the end of the study was 1.70 (SD = 0.89). The author assessed sexual response using the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale, the International Index of Erectile Function, and a Visual Analogue Scale for desire, arousal, time, and intensity of orgasm and vaginal lubrication. Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale scores improved after 3 weeks of treatment, mainly attributable to an improvement in women rather than in men. The Visual Analogue Scale showed improvement in all stages of sexual response in women, with minimal changes in men. Clinical Satisfaction Scores at the end of the study for all patients were 7.00 (SD = 1.53). In conclusion, agomelatine appears to be a good option for the treatment of depression because it would not have adverse effects on sexual function.

  4. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  5. Treatment of acute abscesses in the casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M H; Curran, F; Johnson, R A; Oates, J; Givel, J C; Chabloz, R; ALexander-Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    In the treatment of acute pyogenic soft-tissue abscess incision, curettage, and primary suture was compared with incision and drainage alone in a randomised prospective trial. Operations were performed under antibiotic cover by casualty officers, and patients were reviewed by an independent observer in a septic dressing clinic. Altogether 114 patients were studied, of whom 54 were treated by curettage and primary suture and 60 by simple drainage. The mean healing time was 8.9 days in those treated by primary suture and 7.8 days in those treated by simple drainage (p less than 0.05). Primary healing failed to occur in 19 (35%) of the sutured wounds, but there were no other complications in either group. It is concluded that incision and drainage alone is adequate treatment for acute soft-tissue abscess. PMID:6805714

  6. Pharmacogenetics of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Concetta; Fabbri, Chiara; Porcelli, Stefano; Drago, Antonio; Spina, Edoardo; De Ronchi, Diana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Up to 60% of depressed patients do not respond completely to antidepressants (ADs) and up to 30% do not respond at all. Genetic factors contribute for about 50% of the AD response. During the recent years the possible influence of a set of candidate genes as genetic predictors of AD response efficacy was investigated by us and others. They include the cytochrome P450 superfamily, the P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), the tryptophan hydroxylase, the catechol-O-methyltransferase, the monoamine oxidase A, the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR), the norepinephrine transporter, the dopamine transporter, variants in the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3A, 5-HT3B, and 5-HT6), adrenoreceptor beta-1 and alpha-2, the dopamine receptors (D2), the G protein beta 3 subunit, the corticotropin releasing hormone receptors (CRHR1 and CRHR2), the glucocorticoid receptors, the c-AMP response-element binding, and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Marginal associations were reported for angiotensin I converting enzyme, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput protein, glutamatergic system, nitric oxide synthase, and interleukin 1-beta gene. In conclusion, gene variants seem to influence human behavior, liability to disorders and treatment response. Nonetheless, gene × environment interactions have been hypothesized to modulate several of these effects. PMID:21687501

  7. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Wissam; Leman, Samuel; Camus, Vincent; Belzung, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant (AD) properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is a wide range of variability in response to ADs that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to AD therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:24319431

  8. Psychiatric and Psychological Factors in Patient Decision Making Concerning Antidepressant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Arie; Jaspers, Merlijne; van Zwieten, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    The observation that the use of antidepressants has strongly increased during the past decade implies that on a micro level doctors and patients more often decide that antidepressants are the appropriate treatment. Therefore, it is important to increase insight into patients' decision making regarding the use of antidepressants. The decision…

  9. Hydrocortisone treatment of early SIRS in acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gloor, B; Uhl, W; Tcholakov, O; Roggo, A; Muller, C A; Worni, M; Büchler, M W

    2001-10-01

    This work studied the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in experimental acute pancreatitis on cytokines, phospholipase A2, and breakdown products of arachidonic acid and survival. Edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis were induced in Wistar rats by cerulein hyperstimulation and retrograde intraductal infusion of sodium taurocholate, respectively. Hydrocortisone (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 10 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis. Serum was assayed for phospholipase A2; interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-6, IL-10, thromboxane B2; Prostaglandin E2; and leukotriene B4 at five different time points. A significant release of inflammatory mediators was seen only in the severe model. Hydrocortisone powerfully suppressed arachidonic acid breakdown products and only mildly attenuated the systemic increase of phospholipase A2 and pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. The mortality rate after 72 hr in the severe model was 86%. Hydrocortisone treatment reduced mortality to 13% (P = 0.001; Fisher's exact test). Hydrocortisone seems to be effective in the treatment of the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with severe acute pancreatitis.

  10. Selecting initial treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Stahl, Maximilian; Zeidan, Amer M; Gore, Steven D

    2016-10-08

    More than half of the patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are older than 60years. The treatment outcomes in this group remain poor with a median overall survival of <1year. Selecting initial treatment for these patients involves an assessment of 'fitness' for induction chemotherapy. This is done based on patient and disease-related characteristics which help to estimate treatment-related mortality and chance of complete remission with induction chemotherapy. If the risk of treatment-related mortality is high and/or the likelihood of a patient achieving a complete remission is low, lower-intensity treatment (low-dose cytarabine, decitabine and azacitidine) should be discussed. As outcomes in both groups of patients remain poor, enrolment into clinical trials of novel agents with varying mechanisms of action should be considered for all older adults with AML. Novel agents in Phase III development include CPX-351, guadecitabine (SGI-110), quizartinib, crenolanib, sapacitabine, vosaroxin and volasertib.

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist N-n-butyl-3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (6p): An approach using rodent behavioral antidepressant tests

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shvetank; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Jindal, Ankur Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the antidepressant potential of N-n-butyl-3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (6p), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in rodent behavioral models of depression. Materials and Methods: The compound 6p was examined in various behavioral models like forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), mechanistic models [5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch and reserpine-induced hypothermia (RIH)], and in chronic surgery model-olfactory bulbectomy in rats. Results: Compound 6p (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST after acute treatment without having an effect on baseline locomotor activity. Moreover, 6p (2 mg/kg, i.p.), potentiated the 5-HTP–induced head twitch responses in mice and inhibited the RIH in rats. Chronic treatment (14 days) with 6p (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o.) and paroxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.) in rats significantly reversed the behavioral anomalies induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy using open field exploration. Conclusion: The preliminary studies reveal that compound 6p exhibits antidepressant-like effect in behavioral rodent models of depression. PMID:24014909

  12. Prophylactic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through activation of endogenous analgesic systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liting; Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain impacts approximately 3-4.5% of the global population and remains an unresolved health problem. The management of neuropathic pain has two distinct goals-prevention of development and control of established neuropathic pain. We examined the impact of both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine on the development and maintenance of toxic neuropathic pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. We also investigated the involvement of endogenous analgesic (i.e., endogenous opioid and endocannabinoid) systems in the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in these two distinct phases of neuropathic pain. Chronic subcutaneous infusion of desipramine via osmotic pumps suppressed both the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. However, only prophylactic desipramine treatment blocked the development of neuropathic pain throughout the three month observation interval; neuropathic pain did not return. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocked the antinociceptive effects of both prophylactic and therapeutic desipramine treatments throughout the entire timecourse of desipramine-induced antinociception. By contrast, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists partially attenuated the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in a manner that was restricted to the development phase of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain only. Paclitaxel decreased cell viability in TMD231 tumor cells in an MTT assay in vitro. Notably, desipramine (1nM-1μM) alone did not alter tumor cell viability and did not prevent the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel under identical conditions. The highest concentration of desipramine (10μM) reduced tumor cell viability alone and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Our study identifies a previously unrecognized preemptive analgesic strategy that prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, and also dissects receptor mechanisms

  13. Filgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; MacVittie, T J

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Neupogen(®) (filgrastim) for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced myelosuppression following a radiological/nuclear incident. It is the first medical countermeasure currently approved by the FDA for this indication under the criteria of the FDA "animal rule". This article summarizes the consequences of high-dose radiation exposure, a description of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS), the use of hematopoietic growth factors in radiation accident victims and current available treatments for H-ARS with an emphasis on the use of Neupogen in this scenario.

  14. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  15. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Jin; Kuo, Chia-Chen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX) is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs) inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS). Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment. PMID:25136372

  16. Evaluating conservative treatment for acute appendicitis with lump formation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz Ahmad; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Irshad, Ifat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Interval appendectomy after acute appendicitis with lump formation (phlegmon) remains controversial. We conducted this study to determine the risk of recurrent appendicitis following initial non-operative treatment for appendicitis, and evaluate factors associated with recurrence. Secondarily, we evaluate the efficacy of interval appendectomy versus no appendectomy. Materials and Methods: Patients who received conservative treatment for appendicitis with lump formation were prospectively studied from June 2006 to June 2008. These patients were followed for recurrence of appendicitis. Results: Of 763 patients with acute appendicitis some 220 patients had lump formation (28.8%). Median age was 28 years. Conservative treatment was successful in 213 (96.8%) patients. The rate of recurrence was 13.1%, all occurring within six months after the index admission. Mean follow-up was 26±18 months. Conclusion: Conservative treatment of appendicitis with lump formation is efficient and the recurrence rate is low. Routine interval appendectomy after initial conservative treatment for lump formation is not a cost-effective intervention and not recommended. PMID:22416152

  17. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  18. Biopsy proven acute interstitial nephritis after treatment with moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of reversible acute kidney injury. At least 70% of AIN is caused by various drugs, mainly penicillines and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Quinolones are only rarely known to cause AIN and so far cases have been mainly described with older fluoroquinolones. Case Presentation Here we describe a case of biopsy proven interstitial nephritis after moxifloxacin treatment. The patient presented with fever, rigors and dialysis dependent acute kidney injury, just a few days after treatment of a respiratory tract infection with moxifloxacin. The renal biopsy revealed dense infiltrates mainly composed of eosinophils and severe interstitial edema. A course of oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) was commenced and rapidly tapered to zero within three weeks. The renal function improved, and the patient was discharged with a creatinine of 107 μmol/l. Conclusion This case illustrates that pharmacovigilance is important to early detect rare side effects, such as AIN, even in drugs with a favourable risk/benefit ratio such as moxifloxacin. PMID:20731847

  19. Treatment of Orbital Complications Following Acute Rhinosinusitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuzhu; Shi, Guanggang; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The orbital complications account for about 80% of all complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. If the treatment is not correct and in time, orbital complications could progress rapidly, leading to optic neuritis, cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis or life-threatening intracranial complications. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of conservative therapy for the patients with orbital cellulitis and endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) performed on patients with subperiosteal abscess (SPA) secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in children. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: The retrospective study included 31 pediatric patients with orbital complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of oral or intravenous antibiotics, glucocorticoid and gelomyrtol forte after admission. ESS was performed if an improvement in the condition of patients did not occur after 48 hours. However, the patients with orbital SPA, motility disorders of eyeball or decreased vision received ESS immediately within 24 hours. Results: Sixteen patients were cured by conservative therapy and 15 patients by ESS. All of the signs and symptoms disappeared after conservative therapy or ESS. There were no recurrences within the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years. Conclusion: Conservative therapy is an effective method for patients with inflammatory edema and most cases of orbital cellulitis in children. SPA can be cured by ESS. PMID:27606135

  20. Antidepressant-like effect of Tagetes lucida Cav. extract in rats: involvement of the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Gabriela, Guadarrama-Cruz; Javier, Alarcón-Aguilar Francisco; Elisa, Vega-Avila; Gonzalo, Vázquez-Palacios; Herlinda, Bonilla-Jaime

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the decoction of the aerial parts of Tagetes lucida Cav. produces an antidepressant effect during the forced swimming test (FST) in rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different organic extracts and one aqueous extract of the aerial parts of T. lucida on the FST. In addition, the possible involvement of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant-like effect of T. lucida in the FST was evaluated, as was its potential toxicological effect. The different extracts of T. lucida (methanol, hexane, dichloromethane and aqueous, 10 and 50 mg/kg), as well as fluoxetine (FLX, 5 mg/kg), were administered per os (p.o.) to rats for 14 days. All animals were subjected to the FST. Only the aqueous extract of T. lucida at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly reduced immobility behavior and increased swimming in the FST, similar to FLX. Later, the aqueous extract of T. lucida (50mg/kg) was administered for 1, 7 and 14 days. An antidepressant effect was observed after 7 days of treatment. To evaluate the participation of the serotoninergic system, the animals were pretreated with PCPA, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis (100 mg/kg/day for 4 consecutive days). The animals were treated with the aqueous extract of T. lucida (50 mg/kg) and FLX (5 mg/kg) 24 h after the final injection and were then subjected to the FST. Pretreatment with PCPA inhibited the antidepressant effect of both T. lucida and FLX. Finally, T. lucida was administered p.o. and intraperitoneal route to evaluate its acute toxicological effect. The aqueous extract of T. lucida, administered p.o., did not produce lethality or any significant changes in behavior. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of T. lucida manifested an antidepressant-like effect in the FST mediated by the serotonergic system, with no adverse effects when administered p.o.

  1. Clinical implications of antidepressant drug effects on sexual function.

    PubMed

    Harvey, K V; Balon, R

    1995-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in a patient being treated with antidepressant medications may be due to the underlying depression, a coexisting medical illness, disruption of interpersonal relationships, or it may be a side effect of the medication. Almost all antidepressants are associated with sexual side effects that go above and beyond any symptoms that can be explained by the disease process itself. The incidence of such sexual side effects can be as high as 92% for some antidepressants. Some of the newer antidepressants currently on the market seem to have a lower incidence of sexual dysfunction as a side effect. In view of the fairly common occurrence of these unwanted effects, and their potential contribution to noncompliance, careful selection of antidepressant medications is necessary. A variety of treatment options is available, including decreasing the dosage of medication to the lowest-effective level, adjunctive medications (such as cyproheptadine, bethanechol, yohimbine, and amantadine, as well as other antidepressants) to counteract the adverse sexual effects, or switching to another antidepressant. The treatment of antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction requires a creative approach on the part of the treating psychiatrist, and must be individualized to the patient.

  2. Treatment of acute erythroleukemia with Azacitidine: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Pierdomenico, Francesca; Almeida, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute erythroleukemia (AEL) is a rare form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) often associated with a poor prognosis. It is more frequent in elderly patients, limiting the use aggressive therapies. Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent with recognized efficacy in high risk myelodysplasia and AML in the elderly. Here we report 5 cases of AEL treated with Azacitidine. The cohort included 4 men and 1 woman, median age 70. One patient had been refractory to intensive chemotherapy, the others received Azacitidine as first line. Treatment was well tolerated. Four patients achieved transfusion independence. Two patients achieved complete remission and 1 achieved partial remission. After a median follow up time of 20 months, the median survival of the cohort was 20 months. Three patients died of disease progression. These results confirm the therapeutic value of Azacitidine in AEL. PMID:24371777

  3. Acute pancreatitis in ICU secondary to treatment with tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Bernas Albeniz, A; Aveiga Valencia, D A; Etxeberria Zabala, L; Zaldibar-Gerrikagoitia Bilbao, J; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2017-01-01

    Tigecycline is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, structurally similar to minocycline and that shares some tetracycline-related side effects. A case report is presented on a 68-year-old female who received tigecycline for a sepsis of unknown origin and who, in the following 5days, developed abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes, which suggested acute pancreatitis. After ruling out other origins, and according to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, tigecycline was the probable cause of the acute pancreatitis, a complication that has been reported 5 times in the database of the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system since 2009. Close monitoring of abdominal signs and symptoms is recommended during treatment with tigecycline, since adverse effects affecting the digestive system are the most prevalent ones when using this drug.

  4. The antidepressant effects of anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2009-06-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that is important for communication between neurons and muscle, is involved in direct neurotransmission in the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system, and has been implicated in cognitive processing, arousal, and attention in the brain. The cholinergic-adrenergic hypothesis of mood disorders states that a given affective state might represent a balance between central cholinergic and adrenergic neurotransmitter activity in those areas of the brain regulating moods. According to this hypothesis, depression would be the clinical manifestation of a state of cholinergic dominance, whereas mania would reflect adrenergic dominance. On the basis of this hypothesis, anticholinergic drugs have been investigated as potential treatments for depression, but study results have not shown consistent antidepressant effects. However, the dosage dependency of scopolamine's effect across different studies and the lack of antidepressant effects with other anticholinergic drugs suggest that a specific muscarinic receptor subtype might be most relevant to the potential antidepressant mechanism of action of anticholinergic drugs.

  5. Living with uncertainty: antidepressants and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian; McDonald, Liz

    2014-08-01

    There have been a large number of studies in recent years reporting on the reproductive safety of antidepressant medication. Some studies, but not all, have reported an association of antidepressant exposure in pregnancy and the subsequent development of autism spectrum disorders. It remains difficult to know whether the modest increase in risk is due to the medication, to the mood disorder itself, or to other confounding factors. For any individual woman the decision to commence or continue antidepressant medication in pregnancy must be made after a full consideration of the potential risks and benefits of all options, including non-pharmacological treatments. In making these difficult decisions it is important to recognise that episodes of severe psychiatric illness may have very serious negative consequences for the woman, her baby and her family, and these must be weighed against what is known about the risks of taking medication.

  6. [Headache Treatment].

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans Christoph; Holle-Lee, Dagny; Nägel, Steffen; Gaul, Charly

    2017-03-01

    A precondition for the successful treatment of headaches is the correct headache diagnosis. Triptans are effective for attack treatment of migraine and cluster headache. However, there are not effective for the treatment of tension-type headache. For the prevention of frequent episodic migraine betablockers, flunarizine, topiramate and amitriptyline are recommended. For the prevention of chronic migraine evidence is only available for onabotulinumtoxinA and topiramate. For prophylactic treatment of tension-type headaches tricyclic antidepressants are used. In cluster headache verapamil (in combination with steroids) is the most frequently used prophylactic agent. This article focusses on the current acute and prophylactic treatment of common headache syndromes.

  7. Monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors produce pro- or antidepressant responses via hippocampal CA1 GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Gu, N; Duan, T; Kesner, P; Blaskovits, F; Liu, J; Lu, Y; Tong, L; Gao, F; Harris, C; Mackie, K; Li, J; Tan, Q; Hill, M N; Yuan, Z; Zhang, X

    2017-01-01

    The probability of suffering the mood disorder depression is up to 30% in women and 15% in men during their life span. Pharmacological options for depression are limited: conventional antidepressants have low efficacy and a delayed onset of action (several weeks). Here we investigate the antidepressant actions of inhibitors of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the major degradative enzyme of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. A low-dose of MAGL inhibitors produces antidepressant effects on acute stress-exposed mice, through glutamatergic synaptic long-term depression (LTD), without significant effects on chronic corticosterone-exposed mice. In contrast, a high-dose of MAGL inhibitors produces pro- or antidepressant effects on acute stress- or chronic corticosterone-exposed mice, respectively, through GABAergic synaptic disinhibition. In the hippocampus, in vivo inhibition of MAGL induces a CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R)-dependent suppression of inhibitory GABAergic synapses and an in vivo LTD of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. LTD induction requires CB1R in astroglial cells (but not in GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons) and postsynaptic glutamate receptors. The conventional antidepressant fluoxetine produces rapid or delayed antidepressant effects in acute stress- or chronic corticosterone-exposed mice, respectively. We propose that depression-like behavior of animals in response to acute stress is the normal behavioral response, and thus, MAGL inhibitors, which produce antidepressant effects in chronic corticosterone-exposed animals through GABAergic synaptic disinhibition, represent a new class of rapidly-acting and long-lasting antidepressants. PMID:27001616

  8. [Immunotherapy for the treatment of acute appendicitis in children].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, A A; Akhanzaripov, Z A

    1994-08-01

    The immune status was studied during the development of the disease in 182 children who were operated on for acute appendicitis. T lymphocytes and their subpopulations circulating in the blood, as well as B lymphocytes, immunoglobulins A, M, G, and immune complexes were determined. The character of changes of these values before the operation and in various postoperative periods were determined. The effect of complex treatment, including T-activin, on the clinical and immunological parameters in children with acute appendicitis was appraised. Analysis of the results showed that a transitory immunodepressive state forms in children with the disease, which is more marked in the destructive form, with normalization of the main values of cell-mediated and humoral immunity by the 7th day after appendectomy. In a complicated course of acute appendicitis the state of immunodeficiency is torpid in character and does not return to normal values even after clinical recovery, i.e. before discharge from the clinic. Inclusion of the immunostimulating agent T-activin into the complex treatment of patients with appendicitis ensures a more rapid involution of the main clinical manifestations of the disease. The therapeutic effect was most pronounced in destructive appendicitis: after 3 days of treatment the pain syndrome was encountered twice less frequently and intestinal paresis more than twice less frequently in these patients, and the term of hospital stay (8.8 +/- 0.4 days) was less shorter than for children of the control group (12.2 +/- 1.9 days) who did not receive T-activin in the therapeutic complex.

  9. Pathophysiology and Surgical Treatment of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Miyamoto, Takuma; Matsuki, Yusuke; Isoda, Susumu; Goda, Motohiko; Suzuki, Shinichi; Masuda, Munetaka; Imoto, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We report the pathophysiology and treatment results of type A acute aortic dissection from our 20-year experience. Methods: We studied 673 patients with type A acute aortic dissection who underwent initial treatment from 1994 through July 2014. We divided these patients into two groups. The former group comprised 448 patients from 1994 through 2008, and the latter group comprised 225 patients from 2009 onward, when the current strategy of initial treatment and surgical technique including the early organ reperfusion therapies were established. Results: Women were significantly often presented than men in patients over 60 years of age. Thrombosed-type dissection accounted for more than half in patients over 70 years, and significantly often complicated pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade than patent type. Malperfusion occurred in 26% of patients. Central repair operations were performed in 579 patients. In-hospital mortality for all patients was 15%, and for the patients who underwent central repair operations was 10%. Former period of operation, malperfusion, and preoperative cardiopulmonary arrest were significant risk factor of in-hospital death. Preoperative left main trunk (LMT) stents were placed in eight patients and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) intervention was performed in five, they were effective to improve the outcome. From 2009 onward, in-hospital mortality was 5.0% and there was no significant risk factor. Conclusion: Surgical results of type A acute aortic dissection were dramatically improved in the past 20 years. Early reperfusion strategy for the patients with malperfusion improved the outcomes. (This article is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 127–134.) PMID:27738456

  10. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  11. [Acute kidney injury and septic shock: experiences in treatment].

    PubMed

    Pozzato, Marco; Ferrari, Fiorenza; Livigni, Sergio; Quarello, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 5-45% of critically ill patients, and renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required in 4-10% of patients with AKI. AKI has long been considered to be hemodynamic damage from low blood flow resulting in shock, and efforts have been made to prevent and cure it by increasing the renal blood flow and improving the cardiac output and perfusion pressure. In recent years, new experimental studies on patients with septic AKI have shown that the renal blood flow remains unaltered or even increases in septic shock. An important mechanism in the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock appears to be apoptosis rather than ischemic necrosis. The type of treatment as well as the dose and timing of initiation of RRT seem to have strategic importance in the recovery of AKI in patients admitted to the ICU. In critically ill (often postsurgical and septic) patients with acute renal failure the use of new anticoagulation strategies has permitted to perform treatments for a sufficient number of hours to achieve the correct level of purification by minimizing the downtime and the bleeding risk. In our center the use of protocols for different methods and different types of anticoagulants has simplified the treatment of all patients with AKI and septic shock admitted to the ICU.

  12. Chronic antidepressant administration increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Nestler, E J; Duman, R S

    1996-04-01

    The present study demonstrates that chronic, but not acute, adminstration of several different classes of antidepressants, including serotonin- and norepinephrine-selective reuptake inhibitors, increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA in rat hippocampus. In contrast, chronic administration of several nonantidepressant psychotropic drugs did not influence expression of CREB mRNA, demonstrating the pharmacological specificity of this effect. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that antidepressant administration increases expression of CREB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cell layers of the hippocampus. In addition, levels of CRE immunoreactivity and of CRE binding activity were increased by chronic antidepressant administration, which indicates that expression and function of CREB protein are increased along with its mRNA. Chronic administration of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors rolipram or papaverine also increased expression of CREB mRNA in hippocampus, demonstrating a role for the cAMP cascade. Moreover, coadministration of rolipram with imipramine resulted in a more rapid induction of CREB than with either treatment alone. Increased expression and function of CREB suggest that specific target genes may be regulated by these treatments. We have found that levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and trkB mRNA are also increased by administration of antidepressants or PDE inhibitors. These findings indicate that upregulation of CREB is a common action of chronic antidepressant treatments that may lead to regulation of specific target genes, such as BDNF and trkB, and to the long-term effects of these treatments on brain function.

  13. Morphine in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema--Why?

    PubMed

    Ellingsrud, C; Agewall, S

    2016-01-01

    Morphine has for a long time, been used in patients with acute pulmonary oedema due to its anticipated anxiolytic and vasodilatory properties, however a discussion about the benefits and risks has been raised recently. A literature search in Medline and Embase using the keywords "pulmonary oedema" OR "lung oedema" OR "acute heart failure" AND "morphine" was performed. A certain vasodilation has been described after morphine administration, but the evidence for this mechanism is relatively poor and morphine-induced anxiolysis may possibly be the most important factor of morphine in pulmonary oedema and therefore some authors have suggested benzodiazepines as an alternative treatment. Respiratory depression seems to be a less relevant clinical problem according to the literature, whereas vomiting is common, which may cause aspiration. In the largest outcome study, based on the ADHERE registry, morphine given in acute decompensated heart failure was an independent predictor of increased hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 4.8 (95% CI: 4.52-5.18, p<0.001). Other, smaller studies have shown a significant association between morphine administration and mortality, which was lost after adjusting for confounding factors. Morphine is still used for pulmonary oedema in spite of poor scientific background data. A randomised, controlled study is necessary in order to determine the effect--and especially the risk--when using morphine for pulmonary oedema. Since the positive effects are not sufficiently documented, and since the risk for increased mortality cannot be ruled out, one can advocate that the use should be avoided.

  14. [Protocol for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis with necrosis].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luis; Targarona, Javier; Rodriguez, César

    2005-01-01

    The Severe Acute Pancreatic Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital was officially created in the year 2000. Up to date, we have cared for more than 195 patients with Pancreatic Necrosis. All of them have been treated under a management protocol presented by us. This has helped us to standardize treatment and also to compare results with work groups around the world. This Protocol comes from our own experience and that of our colleagues abroad with a wide knowledge in this kind of pathology abroad, with whom we maintain close ties.

  15. [The efficacy of the acute pancreatitis' surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Rodionov, P N; Makarov, S V

    2012-01-01

    The comparative analysis of blood levels of leukocytes, lymphocytes, the leukocytic intoxication index, amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase, measured in operated patients with the acute pancreatitis, demonstrated the general positive dynamics of the patients condition. The higher blood levels of the substances in died patients demonstrate the important prognostic value of them. The higher levels of amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase by the end of the clinical treatment together with the normalization of the rest laboratory data may witness the higher risk of the chronisation of the pancreatitis.

  16. Antidepressant action of tianeptine is connected with acceleration of serotonin turnover in the synapse: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Uzbekov, Marat G

    2009-06-01

    Based on the results of our investigation of patients with anxious depression under the treatment with serotonergic antidepressants with different mechanism of action on serotonin reuptake we, the first time in the literature, propose the hypothesis about neurochemical mechanism of tianeptine action. According to this hypothesis tianeptine not only activates serotonin reuptake into the synaptic ending but also activates its release from the ending into the synaptic cleft thus accelerating serotonin turnover rate in the synapse. Proposed mechanism mainly refers the first, acute phase of its action directed to the normalization of serotonergic neurotransmission.

  17. Antidepressant-like effect of Hoodia gordonii in a forced swimming test in mice: evidence for involvement of the monoaminergic system

    PubMed Central

    Citó, M.C.O.; Silva, M.I.G.; Santos, L.K.X.; Fernandes, M.L.; Melo, F.H.C.; Aguiar, J.A.C.; Lopes, I.S.; Sousa, P.B.; Vasconcelos, S.M.M.; Macêdo, D.S.; Sousa, F.C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Hoodia gordonii is a plant species used traditionally in southern Africa to suppress appetite. Recently, it has been associated with a significant increase in blood pressure and pulse rate in women, suggesting sympathomimetic activity. The present study investigated the possible antidepressant-like effects of acute and repeated (15 days) administration of H. gordonii extract (25 and 50 mg/kg, po) to mice exposed to a forced swimming test (FST). Neurochemical analysis of brain monoamines was also carried out to determine the involvement of the monoaminergic system on these effects. Acute administration of H. gordonii decreased the immobility of mice in the FST without accompanying changes in general activity in the open-field test during acute treatment, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect. The anti-immobility effect of H. gordonii was prevented by pretreatment of mice with PCPA [an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis], NAN-190 (a 5-HT1A antagonist), ritanserin (a 5-HT2A/2C antagonist), ondansetron (a 5-HT3A antagonist), prazosin (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH23390 (a D1 receptor antagonist), yohimbine (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), and sulpiride (a D2 receptor antagonist). A significant increase in 5-HT levels in the striatum was detected after acute administration, while 5-HT, norepinephrine and dopamine were significantly elevated after chronic treatment. Results indicated that H. gordonii possesses antidepressant-like activity in the FST by altering the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic systems. PMID:25493384

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs.

  19. The effects of gestational stress and SSRI antidepressant treatment on structural plasticity in the postpartum brain - a translational model for postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Achikam; Albin-Brooks, Christopher; Sherer, Morgan; Mills, Emily; Leuner, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common complication following childbirth experienced by one in every five new mothers. Although the neural basis of PPD remains unknown previous research in rats has shown that gestational stress, a risk factor for PPD, induces depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period. Moreover, the effect of gestational stress on postpartum mood is accompanied by structural modifications within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) – limbic regions that have been linked to PPD. Mothers diagnosed with PPD are often prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant medications and yet little is known about their effects in models of PPD. Thus, here we investigated whether postpartum administration of Citalopram, an SSRI commonly used to treat PPD, would ameliorate the behavioral and morphological consequences of gestational stress. In addition, we examined the effects of gestational stress and postpartum administration of Citalopram on structural plasticity within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) which together with the mPFC and NAc forms a circuit that is sensitive to stress and is involved in mood regulation. Our results show that postpartum rats treated with Citalopram do not exhibit gestational stress-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. In addition, Citalopram was effective in reversing gestational stress-induced structural alterations in the postpartum NAc shell and mPFC. We also found that gestational stress increased spine density within the postpartum BLA, an effect which was not reversed by Citalopram treatment. Overall, these data highlight the usefulness of gestational stress as a valid and informative translational model for PPD. Furthermore, they suggest that structural alterations in the mPFC-NAc pathway may underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period and provide much needed information on how SSRIs may act in the

  20. The effects of gestational stress and Selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant treatment on structural plasticity in the postpartum brain--A translational model for postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Haim, Achikam; Albin-Brooks, Christopher; Sherer, Morgan; Mills, Emily; Leuner, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common complication following childbirth experienced by one in every five new mothers. Although the neural basis of PPD remains unknown, previous research in rats has shown that gestational stress, a risk factor for PPD, induces depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period. Moreover, the effect of gestational stress on postpartum mood is accompanied by structural modifications within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-limbic regions that have been linked to PPD. Mothers diagnosed with PPD are often prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant medications and yet little is known about their effects in models of PPD. Thus, here we investigated whether postpartum administration of Citalopram, an SSRI commonly used to treat PPD, would ameliorate the behavioral and morphological consequences of gestational stress. In addition, we examined the effects of gestational stress and postpartum administration of Citalopram on structural plasticity within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) which together with the mPFC and NAc forms a circuit that is sensitive to stress and is involved in mood regulation. Our results show that postpartum rats treated with Citalopram do not exhibit gestational stress-induced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. In addition, Citalopram was effective in reversing gestational stress-induced structural alterations in the postpartum NAc shell and mPFC. We also found that gestational stress increased spine density within the postpartum BLA, an effect which was not reversed by Citalopram treatment. Overall, these data highlight the usefulness of gestational stress as a valid and informative translational model for PPD. Furthermore, they suggest that structural alterations in the mPFC-NAc pathway may underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior during the postpartum period and provide

  1. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD) monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ), which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points). They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores) were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. PMID:27274258

  2. Antidepressants: Safe during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... possibility that a drug substitution could fail and cause a depression relapse. If you stop taking antidepressants during pregnancy, ... relapse. In addition, stopping an SSRI abruptly might cause various signs and symptoms, ... If you have depression and are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, ...

  3. Evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants: A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cleare, Anthony; Pariante, C M; Young, A H; Anderson, I M; Christmas, D; Cowen, P J; Dickens, C; Ferrier, I N; Geddes, J; Gilbody, S; Haddad, P M; Katona, C; Lewis, G; Malizia, A; McAllister-Williams, R H; Ramchandani, P; Scott, J; Taylor, D; Uher, R

    2015-05-01

    A revision of the 2008 British Association for Psychopharmacology evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants was undertaken in order to incorporate new evidence and to update the recommendations where appropriate. A consensus meeting involving experts in depressive disorders and their management was held in September 2012. Key areas in treating depression were reviewed and the strength of evidence and clinical implications were considered. The guidelines were then revised after extensive feedback from participants and interested parties. A literature review is provided which identifies the quality of evidence upon which the recommendations are made. These guidelines cover the nature and detection of depressive disorders, acute treatment with antidepressant drugs, choice of drug versus alternative treatment, practical issues in prescribing and management, next-step treatment, relapse prevention, treatment of relapse and stopping treatment. Significant changes since the last guidelines were published in 2008 include the availability of new antidepressant treatment options, improved evidence supporting certain augmentation strategies (drug and non-drug), management of potential long-term side effects, updated guidance for prescribing in elderly and adolescent populations and updated guidance for optimal prescribing. Suggestions for future research priorities are also made.

  4. Cognitive Therapy Alone and in Combination with Antidepressants for Anxious Depression: A STAR*D Report

    PubMed Central

    Farabaugh, Amy; Alpert, Jonathan; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Otto, Michael W.; Fava, Maurizio; Baer, Lee; Perlis, Roy; Friedman, Edward S.; Nyer, Maren; Bitran, Stella; Balasubramani, G.K.; Inamori, Aya; Trivedi, Madhukar; Thase, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Anxious depression, defined as MDD with high levels of anxiety, has been associated with lower rates of antidepressant response and remission as well as greater chronicity, suicidality and antidepressant side-effect burden. The primary aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of cognitive therapy (CT) alone or in combination with medications for anxious versus non-anxious depression. Methods We assessed the STAR*D study participants who were partial or non-responders to citalopram. Subjects were then either switched (n = 696) to a new antidepressant or to CT alone, or they were kept on citalopram and augmented (n = 577) with another antidepressant or CT. We compared response and remission rates of those who met criteria for anxious depression to those who did not across treatment conditions. Results Those with anxious depression had significantly lower remission rates based on the QIDS, whether assigned to switch or augmentation, compared to those with non-anxious depression. Those with anxious depression, compared to those without, had significantly lower response rates based on the QIDS only in the switch group. There was no significant interaction between anxious depression and treatment assignment. Limitations Limitations include the use of citalopram as the only Level 1 pharmacotherapy and medication augmentation option, depression-focused CT rather than anxiety-focused CT, and focus on acute treatment outcomes. Conclusions Individuals with anxious depression appear to experience higher risk of poorer outcome following pharmacotherapy and/or CT after an initial course of SSRI, and continued efforts to target this challenging form of depression are needed. PMID:22877961

  5. Potential Antidepressant Constituents of Nigella sativa Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Elkhayat, Ehab S.; Alorainy, Mohammad S.; El-Ashmawy, Ibrahim M.; Fat’hi, Shawkat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nigella sativa Linn. is well known seed in the Middle East, Asia, and the Far East as a natural remedy for many ailments and as a flavoring agent proclaimed medicinal usage dating back to the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. An authentic saying of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) about black seed is also quoted in Al-Bukhari. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the antidepressant effect and isolate the potential antidepressant constituents of the polar extract of N. sativa seeds. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant effect was evaluated through the immobility duration in tail suspension and forced swim tests (FSTs). Albino mice were orally treated with N. sativa polar extract and its RP-18 column chromatography fractions (50 and 100 mg/kg,). Results: The polar extract and two of its sub-fractions were significantly able to decrease the immobility time of mice when subjected to both tail suspension and FSTs, the effects are comparable to standard drug (Sertraline, 5 mg/kg). However, these treatments did not affect the number of crossings and rearing in the open field test. Phytochemical investigation of the two active fractions led to the isolation of quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside 1, quercetin-7-O-β-D-gluco- pyranoside 2, tauroside E 3, and sapindoside B as the potential antidepressant constituents. SUMMARY Phytochemical and biological evaluation the antidepressant constituents in Nigella sativa using the tail suspension and forced swim methods afforded the isolation and identification of quercetin-3-O-α-L rhamnopyranoside, quercetin-7-O-β-D gluco pyranoside, tauroside E, and sapindoside B as the potential antidepressant constituents in the polar extract of N. sativa. The isolated compounds were identified through extensive NMR analysis (1D, 2D, ESI MS). Abbreviations used: TST: Tail suspension test, FST: Forced swim test, OFT: An Open field test PMID:27041854

  6. Fosfomycin for the initial treatment of acute haematogenous osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Corti, N; Sennhauser, F; Stauffer, U; Nadal, D

    2003-01-01

    Background and Aims: At our institution there has been a dichotomous antimicrobial treatment behaviour for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) since 1984. The surgical department favoured fosfomycin as initial choice and the medical department ß lactams. We aimed to compare the performance of both strategies. Methods: Data from patients discharged with the diagnosis of AHOM between January 1984 and January 1998 were gathered from the charts by means of a questionnaire. Patients receiving fosfomycin treatment (FT) were compared with those receiving fosfomycin plus other antimicrobials (FT+) and those receiving no fosfomycin treatment (NFT). Results: A total of 103 patients aged 0.1–15.5 years (mean 6.5, median 6.9) with AHOM received no surgical treatment initially. In 23 (22.3%) FT was instilled initially, in 47 (45.6%) FT+, and in 33 (32.0%) NFT. The pathogen was established in 30%, 36%, and 42% of FT, FT+, and NFT patients, respectively, Staphylococcus aureus being the predominant isolate. Mean C reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rates normalised in all treatment groups after two and four weeks, respectively. The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment in FT patients was 2.5 weeks, in FT+ patients 3.1 weeks, and in NFT patients 3.8 weeks (p < 0.05), whereas the mean duration of intravenous plus oral treatment was comparable (7.1 v 6.8 v 6.5 weeks). Conclusions: The leucocyte penetrating fosfomycin performed similarly to extracellular ß lactams in the treatment of AHOM. Intravenous treatment for longer than 2.5 weeks offered no advantage. PMID:12765918

  7. Combined treatment with subchronic lithium and acute intracerebral mirtazapine microinjection into the median raphe nucleus exerted an anxiolytic-like effect synergistically.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Inoue, Takeshi; Kitaichi, Yuji; Chen, Chong; Nakagawa, Shin; Wang, Ce; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2016-07-15

    Although preclinical and clinical studies have established the efficacy of lithium augmentation of antidepressant drugs, the mechanism of action of lithium augmentation is not fully understood. Our previous study reported that subchronic lithium treatment enhanced the anxiolytic-like effect of systemic mirtazapine. In the present study, we examined the effect of subchronic lithium in combination with acute local intracerebral injection of mirtazapine on fear-related behaviors in a contextual fear conditioning test in rats to clarify the target brain region of lithium augmentation of mirtazapine. After conditioning by footshock, diet (food pellets) containing Li2CO3 at a concentration of 0.2% was administered for 7 days. Ten min before testing and 7 days after conditioning, mirtazapine (3μg/site) in a volume of 0.5µl was acutely injected into the median raphe nucleus (MRN), hippocampus or amygdala. The combination of subchronic lithium and acute mirtazapine microinjection into the MRN but not the hippocampus or the amygdala reduced fear expression synergistically. These results suggest that intra-MRN mirtazapine treatment with subchronic lithium exerts the anxiolytic-like effect through the facilitation of the MRN-5HT pathway.

  8. Acute Coronary Syndromes in Women: Recent Treatment Trends and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    In the USA and internationally, women experience farranging differences with respect to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). Women suffer from more comorbidities than men, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and poor mental health. They some-times exhibit atypical MI presentation symptoms and are overall less likely to present with chest pain. Women are more likely than men to encounter delays between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital or to guideline treatment. The use of various surgical and pharmacological treatments, including revascularization approaches, also differs. Women, on average, have worse outcomes than men following MI, with more complications, higher mortality rates, and poorer recovery. Internationally, outcomes are similar despite various differences in health care and culture in non-US countries. In this review, we detail differences regarding ACS and MI in women, describing their complex correlations and discussing their possible causes. Educational approaches that are tailored to women might help to reduce the incidence of ACS and MI, as well as outcomes following hospitalization. Although outcomes following acute MI have been improving over the years, women may require special consideration in order to see continued improvement. PMID:26884685

  9. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  10. Stenting in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Dabus, Guilherme; Linfante, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40–81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES). These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion. PMID:22163225

  11. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  12. [Evidence for treatment of acute syndesmosis injuries in sports].

    PubMed

    Best, R; Mauch, F; Bauer, G

    2013-06-01

    Injuries of the distal syndesmosis often accompany acute ankle sprains especially in professional team sports. While small partial syndesmosis lesions can often be missed as a consequence of impressive symptoms due to ventrolateral capsuloligamentous injuries, higher grade injuries of the syndesmosis can mostly be diagnosed without any problem. Furthermore, there is a consensus concerning the necessity of operative treatment in significantly unstable situations as well concerning conservative treatment of incomplete partial lesions. Consequently, the greatest challenge regarding diagnostic tools, quantification and optimal therapy arises in the most common form of sport-associated, complete or partial lesions of the distal syndesmosis. This review article summarizes sports-associated injuries of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis considering the current literature and placing the emphasis on the anatomy, pathobiomechanics, diagnostics and therapy of syndesmosis lesions from an evidence-based viewpoint.

  13. [Consensus conference on acute bronchiolitis (IV): Treatment of acute bronchiolitis. Review of scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    González de Dios, J; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2010-04-01

    A review of the evidence on treatment of acute bronchiolitis is presented. There is sufficient evidence on the lack of effectiveness of most interventions tested in bronchiolitis. Apart from oxygen therapy, fluid therapy, aspiration of secretions and ventilation support, few treatment options will be beneficial. There are doubts about the efficacy of inhaled bronchodilators (salbutamol or adrenaline), with or without hypertonic saline solution, suggesting that these options should be selectively used as therapeutic trials in moderate-severe bronchiolitis. Heliox and non-invasive ventilation techniques, methylxanthine could be used in cases with respiratory failure, in patients with apnea, and surfactant and inhaled ribavirin in intubated critically ill patients. The available evidence does not recommend the use of oral salbutamol, subcutaneous adrenaline, anticholinergic drugs, inhaled or systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics, aerosolized o intravenous immunoglobulin, respiratory physiotherapy and others (nitric oxide, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease, recombinant interferon, nebulised furosemide and so on).

  14. The discovery of Yuanzhi-1, a triterpenoid saponin derived from the traditional Chinese medicine, has antidepressant-like activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zeng-liang; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Jian-rui; Li, Xiao-rong; Chen, Hong-xia; Xiong, Jie; Li, Yun-feng; Tang, Yu

    2014-08-04

    Yuanzhi, the dried root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd., is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine used for its sedative, antipsychotic, cognitive improving, neuroprotective, and antidepressant effects. The present study was designed to screen and identify the antidepressant-like effect of six triterpenoid saponin components derived from Yuanzhi (Yuanzhi-1 to Yuanzhi-6) using in vitro radioligand receptor binding assays and in vivo behavioral tests. Yuanzhi-1, -3, -5 and -6 were shown to have antidepressant-like activity in the tail suspension test and forced swim test in mice, with no stimulant effect on locomotor activity. The minimal effective dose of Yuanzhi-1 (2.5 mg/kg) was lower than that of duloxetine (5mg/kg), a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor commonly used in the treatment of depression. Yuanzhi-1 (1 nM) had a high affinity for serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporters. Acute toxicity tests indicated that the LD50 of Yuanzhi-1 (86.5mg/kg) was similar to that of duloxetine (73.2 mg/kg). These findings demonstrate that Yuanzhi-1 has a potential to be a novel triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor of antidepressant-like activity.

  15. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  16. Recent advances and novel treatment paradigms in acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Advani, Anjali S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) given the advances in the relapsed/refractory setting. The development of antibody treatments (including antibody drug conjugates with toxins) offers a different treatment approach compared with conventional chemotherapy regimens. Moreover, the use of bispecific T-cell-engager antibodies (BiTEs) such as blinatumomab harness the cytotoxic activity of T cells against CD19-positive lymphoblasts. Another strategy involves the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. CAR T cells have demonstrated promising results in the relapsed/refractory setting. However, the use of BiTEs and CAR T cells is also associated with a distinct set of adverse reactions that must be taken into account by the treating physician. Apart from the above strategies, the use of other targeted therapies has attracted interest. Namely, the discovery of the Philadelphia (Ph)-like signature in children and young adults with ALL has led to the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in these patients. The different drugs and strategies that are being tested in the relapsed/refractory ALL setting pose a unique challenge in identifying the optimum sequence of treatment and determining which approaches should be considered for frontline treatment. PMID:27695616

  17. Adjunctive treatment of brexpiprazole with fluoxetine shows a rapid antidepressant effect in social defeat stress model: Role of BDNF-TrkB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Min; Ren, Qian; Yang, Chun; Zhang, Ji-chun; Yao, Wei; Dong, Chao; Ohgi, Yuta; Futamura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Addition of low doses of the atypical antipsychotic drug brexpiprazole with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) could promote antidepressant effect in patients with major depressive disorder although the precise mechanisms underlying the action of the combination are unknown. Combination of low dose of brexpiprazole (0.1 mg/kg) and SSRI fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) could promote a rapid antidepressant effect in social defeat stress model although brexpiprazole or fluoxetine alone did not show antidepressant effect. Furthermore, the combination significantly improved alterations in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) - TrkB signaling and dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens in the susceptible mice after social defeat stress. Interestingly, TrkB antagonist ANA-12 significantly blocked beneficial effects of combination of brexpiprazole and fluoxetine on depression-like phenotype. These results suggest that BDNF-TrkB signaling plays a role in the rapid antidepressant action of the combination of brexpiprazole and fluoxetine. PMID:27991542

  18. Genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to antidepressants in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Domenici, Enrico; Lewis, Glyn; Malafosse, Alain; O'Donovan, Michael; Wendland, Jens R; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of response to antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) makes individual treatment outcomes currently unpredictable. It has been suggested that resistance to antidepressant treatment might be due to undiagnosed bipolar disorder or bipolar spectrum features. Here, we investigate the relationship between genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants in MDD. Polygenic scores indexing risk for bipolar disorder were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder whole genome association study. Linear regressions tested the effect of polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder on proportional reduction in depression severity in two large samples of individuals with MDD, treated with antidepressants, NEWMEDS (n=1,791) and STAR*D (n=1,107). There was no significant association between polygenic scores for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants. Our data indicate that molecular measure of genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder does not aid in understanding non-response to antidepressants.

  19. Shortened Antimicrobial Treatment for Acute Otitis Media in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Paradise, Jack L; Rockette, Howard E; Kearney, Diana H; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Shope, Timothy R; Martin, Judith M; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Copelli, Susan J; Colborn, D Kathleen; Block, Stan L; Labella, John J; Lynch, Thomas G; Cohen, Norman L; Haralam, MaryAnn; Pope, Marcia A; Nagg, Jennifer P; Green, Michael D; Shaikh, Nader

    2016-12-22

    Background Limiting the duration of antimicrobial treatment constitutes a potential strategy to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance among children with acute otitis media. Methods We assigned 520 children, 6 to 23 months of age, with acute otitis media to receive amoxicillin-clavulanate either for a standard duration of 10 days or for a reduced duration of 5 days followed by placebo for 5 days. We measured rates of clinical response (in a systematic fashion, on the basis of signs and symptomatic response), recurrence, and nasopharyngeal colonization, and we analyzed episode outcomes using a noninferiority approach. Symptom scores ranged from 0 to 14, with higher numbers indicating more severe symptoms. Results Children who were treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 5 days were more likely than those who were treated for 10 days to have clinical failure (77 of 229 children [34%] vs. 39 of 238 [16%]; difference, 17 percentage points [based on unrounded data]; 95% confidence interval, 9 to 25). The mean symptom scores over the period from day 6 to day 14 were 1.61 in the 5-day group and 1.34 in the 10-day group (P=0.07); the mean scores at the day-12-to-14 assessment were 1.89 versus 1.20 (P=0.001). The percentage of children whose symptom scores decreased more than 50% (indicating less severe symptoms) from baseline to the end of treatment was lower in the 5-day group than in the 10-day group (181 of 227 children [80%] vs. 211 of 233 [91%], P=0.003). We found no significant between-group differences in rates of recurrence, adverse events, or nasopharyngeal colonization with penicillin-nonsusceptible pathogens. Clinical-failure rates were greater among children who had been exposed to three or more children for 10 or more hours per week than among those with less exposure (P=0.02) and were also greater among children with infection in both ears than among those with infection in one ear (P<0.001). Conclusions Among children 6 to 23 months of age with acute

  20. Lithium Treatment of Acute Mania in Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Discontinuation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Coletti, Daniel J.; Dicker, Robert; Padula, Gina; Pleak, Richard R.; Alvir, Jose Ma. J.; Kane, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: There are no published placebo-controlled studies of any agent in the treatment of acute mania in children or adolescents. This is the first placebo-controlled study of lithium's efficacy in the treatment of acute mania in adolescents. Method: In this discontinuation study, participants received open treatment with lithium at…

  1. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the... treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes the revised draft guidance of...

  2. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. Results: There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors’ efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Conclusions: Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups—plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen

  3. Application of simplified bioclean apparatuses for treatment of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Horiuchi, A

    1983-01-01

    We used a portable horizontal laminar-air-flow clean bed and an open horizontal laminar-air-flow fan (clean wall unit) for treating patients with acute leukemia. The level of cleanliness as shown in the nonviable and viable particle counts was class 100 and class 1,000 at the head and foot, respectively, of the bed in the clean-bed rooms, while it was class 100 and class 10,000 respectively, in the clean-wall-unit rooms. The level of cleanliness in the open wards, on the other hand, was class 1,000,000. The incidence of infectious complications in the clean-bed rooms was 3.1/100 days when the granulocyte count was 1,000/mm3 or less, 3.9/100 days when the count was 500/mm3 or less and 6.1/100 days when it was 100/mm3 or less. In the clean-wall-unit rooms, these values were 3.1, 3.7 and 7.1, respectively, while in the open wards they were 4.6, 6.1 and 15.0. Thus, it was ascertained that, as the granulocyte count decreased, the incidence of infectious complications became significantly higher in the open wards than in the clean-bed rooms or the clean-wall-unit rooms. No complication of pneumonia was found in 37 patients with acute leukemia in the clean-bed rooms or in 40 in the clean-wall-unit rooms. Among 36 patients treated in the open wards, on the other hand, the complication of pneumonia was found in four. From the above results, it is believed that the use of clean-bed rooms or clean-wall-unit rooms is an extremely effective supplementary treatment method for preventing respiratory tract infection complications in patients with acute leukemia.

  4. [CHANGES OF A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Kostyrnoy, O V; Kosenko, A V; Bayomi, Imad Mokhamed Abdel S K

    2015-11-01

    Pathogenetically substantiated program of complex diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of purulent-necrotic complications (PNC) was elaborated for improvement of results of the necrotic pancreatitis treatment. With the objective to study the PNC pathogenesis and a probation of new preparations for local treatment the experimantal simulation of the disease was accomplished. There was proved, that during the disease course the integrity of pancreatic ductal system is disordered . A 42-year experience of treatment of an acute pancreatitis was analyzed. In I period (1970 - 1980) the operative interventions were conducted; in 11 period (1981 - 1991)--a scientifically substantiated conservative therapy; in III period (1992 - 2000)--the diagnostic procedures possibilities were extended, and operative intervention were performed in accordance to severe indications. There was established, that the main cause of PNC is a secondary microbal contamination occurrence on the third-fifth postoperative days, the immediate manipulations on pancreatic gland are forbidden; a one-time surgical processing of the necrosis foci is insufficient; the staged necrsequestrectomy constitutes the optimal operation.

  5. Brain Monoamines and Antidepressant-like Responses in MRL/MpJ Versus C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Darrick T.; Turner, Jill R.; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Hill-Smith, Tiffany E.; Blendy, Julie A.; Lucki, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    The MRL/MpJ mouse demonstrates enhanced wound healing and tissue regeneration and increased neurotrophic mobilization to chronic antidepressant drug treatments. This study compared brain monoamine systems between MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6J mice as a potential basis for strain differences after chronic antidepressant treatment. MRL/MpJ mice had significantly higher tissue levels of serotonin and dopamine in multiple brain regions. Microdialysis studies demonstrated that baseline levels of extracellular serotonin did not differ between strains. However, acute administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram produced an increase in extracellular serotonin in the ventral hippocampus of MRL/MpJ mice that was twice as large as achieved in C57BL/6J mice. The greater effects in MRL/MpJ mice on 5-HT levels were not maintained after local perfusion of citalopram, suggesting that mechanisms outside of the hippocampus were responsible for the greater effect of citalopram after systemic injection. The density of serotonin and norepinephrine transporters in the hippocampus was significantly higher in MRL/MpJ mice. In addition, the expression of 5-HT1A mRNA was lower in the hippocampus, 5-HT1B mRNA was higher in the hippocampus and brain stem and SERT mRNA was higher in the brain stem of MRL/MpJ mice. The exaggerated neurotransmitter release in MRL/MpJ mice was accompanied by reduced baseline immobility in the tail suspension test and a greater reduction of immobility produced by citalopram or the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine. These data suggest that differences in the response to acute and chronic antidepressant treatments between the two strains could be attributed to differences in serotonin or catecholamine transmission. PMID:23220293

  6. Acute urticaria and angioedema: diagnostic and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Frigas, Evangelo; Park, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria is defined as wheals consisting of three features: (i) central swelling of various sizes, with or without surrounding erythema; (ii) pruritus or occasional burning sensations; and (iii) the skin returning to normal appearance, usually within 1-24 hours. Angioedema is defined as: (i) abrupt swelling of the lower dermis and subcutis; (ii) occasional pain instead of pruritus; (iii) commonly involving the mucous membranes; and (iv) skin returning to normal appearance, usually within 72 hours. Acute urticaria and angioedema is defined by its duration (<6 weeks) compared with chronic urticaria and angioedema. The most common causes are infections, medications, and foods. The best tools in the evaluation of these patients are a comprehensive history and physical examination. There are a variety of skin conditions that may mimic acute urticaria and angioedema and the various reaction patterns associated with different drugs. Oral antihistamines are first-line treatment. In the event of a life-threatening reaction involving urticaria with angioedema, epinephrine may be needed to stabilize the patient. This review focuses on the value of a comprehensive clinical evaluation at the onset of symptoms. It underscores the importance of coordination of care among physicians, and the development of an action plan for evidence-based investigations, diagnosis, and therapy.

  7. Acute cyanide poisoning: clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Borron, S W; Baud, F J

    1996-09-01

    Cyanide poisoning presents in many forms. Industrial intoxications occur due to extensive use of cyanide compounds as reaction products. Smoke inhalation, a polyintoxication, is most often responsible for domestic cyanide poisonings. Suicidal poisonings are rare. Cyanogenic compounds may produce acute or subacute toxicity. Signs of cyanide poisoning include headache, vertigo, agitation, confusion, coma, convulsions and death. Definitive laboratory confirmation is generally delayed. Elevated plasma lactate, associated with cardiovascular collapse, should suggest cyanide intoxication. Immediate treatment includes 100% oxygen, assisted ventilation, decontamination, correction of acidosis and blood pressure support. Antidotes include oxygen, hydroxocobalamin, di-cobalt EDTA and methaemoglobin-inducers. Hydroxocobalamin is an attractive antidote due to its rapid cyanide binding and its lack of serious side-effects, even in the absence of cyanide intoxication. Sodium thiosulphate acts more slowly than other antidotes and is indicated in subacute cyanogen poisoning and as an adjunct to acute cyanide poisoning. Initial evaluation of antidotal efficacy is based on correction of hypotension and lactic acidosis; the final analysis rests on the degree of permanent central nervous system injury.

  8. [Surgical treatment of acute deep leg and pelvic vein trombosis].

    PubMed

    Gall, F; Husfeldt, K J

    1977-08-25

    In the last 3 years 93 cases of iliofermoral trombosis were treated by surgery. We prefer the method used by Brunner, but under general anaesthesia and using a Bentley-Autotransfusion-System (ATS). The average age of our patients was 55 years (age ranged between 17 and 87 years). No lethal pulmonary embolism was observed. 2, 1 percent of the patients died following apoplex or acute heart failure. Of 67 patients who were operated on 6 months ago or more 70 percent have no further complaints, 28 percent still have some residual edema and only 2 patients have a severe postthrombotic syndrome. 50 percent of 40 control-phlebograms demonstrated patency of all veins. 20 percent had short segmentary occlusions with definite signs of recanalisation, while in 27 percent of the cases occlusions of the lower leg and thigh were found, the iliac veins being free. Only 2 postoperative phlebograms showed a complete iliofemoral venous occlusion. Our results prove, that the operative thrombectomy is a successful method, with which the main complications of the iliofemoral thrombosis-pulmonary embolisation and postthrombotic syndrome-can difinitely be reduced. Also because of better long term results, the operative therapy of acute ilofemoral thrombosis should be generally prefered instead of conservative treatment.

  9. Acute renal and hepatic failure associated with allopurinol treatment.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, R M; Gentile, G; Ferrara, G; Brugnano, R

    2008-12-01

    Hyperuricemia is present in about 5% of the population, and allopurinol is frequently used to treat it. The use of this drug can be associated with a number of side effects, indicating allergic reactions, such as skin rash, reversible after its withdrawal. In some cases more severe hypersensitivity reactions may be seen, such as erythema multiforme exudativum, or Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS). Reversible clinical hepatotoxicity, as well as acute renal failure, may also develop after allopurinol therapy. We describe here the case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic renal failure who was admitted to hospital after 1 week of sore throat and fever, presenting mucous membrane lesions, widespread blistering of the skin, evolving to flaccid vesicles and bullae, and extensive epidermal detachment associated with acute renal failure and cholestatic jaundice. A diagnosis of allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) was established. Allopurinol was discontinued, and intensive care management was required: the patient was successfully treated by using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), standard hemodialysis, and albumin dialysis (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System - MARS, Teraklin AG, Rostock, Germany). Allopurinol-induced TEN is extremely rare, however, the survival rate is extremely low. Clinicians should be aware of this potentially severe adverse effect. This report emphasizes the importance of an aggressive pharmacological and dialysis treatment in the case of TEN.

  10. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Oliver G; Quednow, Boris B; Seifritz, Erich; Wetter, Thomas C

    2012-05-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system was and possibly still is one of the main alternative drug targets. Gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) was developed as an orally active GABA analogue. It was tested in animal models of depression and human studies. The effects on sleep, agitation, anhedonia and depression were promising. However, the rise of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants brought GHB out of the scope of possible treatment alternatives. GHB is a GABA(B) and GHB receptor agonist with a unique spectrum of behavioural, neuroendocrine and sleep effects, and improves daytime sleepiness in various disorders such as narcolepsy, Parkinson's disease and fibromyalgia. Although it was banned from the US market at the end of the 1990s because of its abuse and overdose potential, it later was approved for the treatment of narcolepsy. New research methods and an extended view on other neurotransmitter systems as possible treatment targets of antidepressant treatment brought GHB back to the scene. This article discusses the unique neurobiological effects of GHB, its misuse potential and possible role as a model substance for the development of novel pharmacological treatment strategies in depressive disorders.

  11. The mechanism of antidepressant-like effects of piroxicam in rats

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ronise Martins; Zaminelli, Tiago; Bassani, Taysa B; Boschen, Suelen L; Lima, Marcelo M S; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antidepressant-like effect of piroxicam with a focus on serotonergic neurotransmission. Materials and Methods: Rats were randomly distributed into the following groups: 0.9% saline control; 3 mg/kg pizotifen; 10 mg/kg sertraline; 10 mg/kg piroxicam; 10 mg/kg sertraline + 10 mg/kg piroxicam; 10 mg/kg sertraline + 3 mg/kg pizotifen; and 10 mg/kg piroxicam + 3 mg/kg pizotifen. All the drugs were dissolved in 0.9% saline. Three administrations of the drugs (piroxicam and sertraline) were performed 1, 5 and 24 h before testing the animals in the open field followed by the forced swim test (FST). Piroxicam and sertraline were administered orally by gavage and pizotifen was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before gavage. Immediately after the FST, the hippocampi were rapidly dissected for neurochemical analysis in high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Acute treatment with piroxicam promoted an antidepressant-like effect in the FST, which was associated with an increase in serotonin levels in the hippocampus. This effect was potentiated in the piroxicam + sertraline group but counteracted by administration of the non-selective serotonin receptor antagonist pizotifen. Conclusion: These results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of piroxicam in the FST is mediated by the serotonin system; however, by different mechanisms from those of sertraline. PMID:25709346

  12. The Behavioral Effects of the Antidepressant Tianeptine Require the Mu Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Nautiyal, Katherine M; Kruegel, Andrew C; Levinstein, Marjorie R; Magalong, Valerie M; Gassaway, Madalee M; Grinnell, Steven G; Han, Jaena; Ansonoff, Michael A; Pintar, John E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor; Hen, René

    2017-03-17

    Depression is a debilitating chronic illness that affects around 350 million people worldwide. Current treatments, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are not ideal because only a fraction of patients achieve remission. Tianeptine is an effective antidepressant with a previously unknown mechanism of action. We recently reported that tianeptine is a full agonist at the mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Here we demonstrate that the acute and chronic antidepressant-like behavioral effects of tianeptine in mice require MOR. Interestingly, while tianeptine also produces many opiate-like behavioral effects such as analgesia and reward, it does not lead to tolerance or withdrawal. Furthermore, the primary metabolite of tianeptine (MC5), which has a longer half-life, mimics the behavioral effects of tianeptine in a MOR-dependent fashion. These results point to the possibility that MOR and its downstream signaling cascades may be novel targets for antidepressant drug development.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 17 March 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.60.

  13. A Qualitative Analysis of the Perception of Stigma Among Latinos Receiving Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Interian, Alejandro; Martinez, Igda E.; Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Vega, William A.; Escobar, Javier I.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study sought to describe the role of stigma in antidepressant adherence among Latinos. Methods The study utilized data generated from six focus groups of Latino outpatients receiving antidepressants (N=30). By using a grounded theory approach, qualitative analysis focused specifically on the role of stigma in antidepressant treatment, as well as salient Latino values. Results Perceptions of stigma were related to both the diagnosis of depression and use of antidepressant medication. Qualitative analyses showed that antidepressant use was seen as implying more severe illness, weakness or failure to cope with problems, and being under the effects of a drug. Reports of stigma were also related to social consequences. Also, the perceived negative attributes of antidepressant use were at odds with self-perceived cultural values. Conclusions Stigma was a prominent concern among Latinos receiving antidepressants, and stigma often affected adherence. Furthermore, culture is likely to play an important role in the communication of stigma and its associated complications. PMID:18048562

  14. Chronic antidepressants induce redistribution and differential activation of alphaCaM kinase II between presynaptic compartments.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Valentina S; Giambelli, Roberto; Musazzi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Tardito, Daniela; Perez, Jorge; Drago, Filippo; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Changes in synaptic plasticity are involved in pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) kinase II, a protein kinase involved in synaptic plasticity, has been previously shown to be a target of antidepressants. We previously found that antidepressants activate the kinase in hippocampal neuronal cell bodies by increasing phosphorylation at Thr(286), reduce the kinase phosphorylation in synaptic membranes, and in turn its phosphorylation-dependent interaction with syntaxin-1 and the release of glutamate from hippocampal synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the chronic effect of different antidepressants (fluoxetine, desipramine, and reboxetine) on the expression and function of the kinase in distinct subcellular compartments in order to dissect the different kinase pools affected. Acute treatments did not induce any change in the kinase. In total tissue extracts chronic drug treatments induced activation of the kinase; in hippocampus (HC), but not in prefrontal/frontal cortex, this was partially accounted for by increased Thr(286) phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of different mechanisms of activation. In synaptosomes, all drugs reduced the kinase phosphorylation, particularly in HC where, upon fractionation of the synaptosomal particulate into synaptic vesicles and membranes, we found that the drugs induced a redistribution and differential activation of the kinase between membranes and vesicles. Furthermore, a large decrease in the level and phosphorylation of synapsin I located at synaptic membranes was consistent with the observed decrease of CaM kinase II. Overall, antidepressants induce a complex pattern of modifications in distinct subcellular compartments; at presynaptic level, these changes are in line with a dampening of glutamate release.

  15. Tianeptine in an experimental medicine model of antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Charlotte M; Whiting, Daniel A; Cowen, Philip J; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-05-01

    Changes in emotional processing have been shown following acute administration of a range of monoaminergic antidepressants, and may represent an important common neuropsychological mechanism underpinning their therapeutic effects. Tianeptine is an agent that challenges the traditional monoaminergic hypothesis of antidepressant action, though its exact mode of action remains controversial. Healthy volunteers were randomised to receive a single dose of tianeptine (12.5 mg) or placebo, and subsequently completed a battery of tasks measuring emotional processing, including facial expression recognition, emotional memory and attentional vigilance, as well as working and verbal memory. Tianeptine-treated subjects were less accurate at identifying facial expressions, though this was not valence specific. The tianeptine group also showed reduced positive affective memory and reduced attentional vigilance to positive stimuli. There were no effects on emotional categorization or non-emotional cognition. The negative biases in aspects of emotional processing observed following acute tianeptine administration are at variance with the positive biases generally seen after acute administration of conventional antidepressant drugs, despite tianeptine's putative antidepressant efficacy. This is an intriguing finding in the context of the lack of consensus regarding tianeptine's mechanism of action; however, it may be consistent with the reported ability of acute tianeptine to increase the re-uptake of serotonin.

  16. Acute and Chronic Treatments with Quetiapine Increase Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Activity in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Ignácio, Zuleide M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Titus, Stephanie E; Carlessi, Anelise S; da Luz, Jaine R; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Rebelo, Joyce; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have found that the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial energy metabolism are impaired in major depressive disorder (MDD). Classic antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics can alter the function of enzymes involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic that, in addition to having a therapeutic benefit in treating MDD, appears to exert antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of quetiapine on the activity of enzyme complexes I to IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase (CK) in brain regions involved with MDD. After a single dose or serial injections over 14 days of quetiapine (20, 40, and 80 mg) were administered, isolates from the pre- frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens were analyzed for enzyme activity levels. The enzyme activity varied according to the dose, brain region, and acute or chronic dosing protocols. In general, complexes I-III activity was increased, especially after acute administration. Acute administration also increased the activity of complex IV and CK in the amygdala while complex I was inhibited in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that quetiapine produces an increase in respiratory chain complex activity, which may be underlying its efficacy against psychiatric disorders and neuronal damage.

  17. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  18. Pharmacogenomics and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Bosó, Virginia; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous malignancy that is primarily treated with combinations of cytarabine and anthracyclines. Although this scheme remains effective in most of the patients, variability of outcomes in patients has been partly related with their genetic variability. Several pharmacogenetic studies have analyzed the impact of polymorphisms in genes encoding transporters, metabolizers or molecular targets of chemotherapy agents. A systematic review on all eligible studies was carried out in order to estimate the effect of polymorphisms of anthracyclines and cytarabine pathways on efficacy and toxicity of AML treatment. Other emerging genes recently studied in AML, such as DNA repair genes, genes potentially related to chemotherapy response or AML prognosis, have also been included.

  19. Effects of amantadine and budipine on antidepressant drug-evoked changes in extracellular 5-HT in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jenny C E; Whitton, Peter S

    2005-07-01

    1. Evidence has recently suggested that NMDA receptors may play a role in the aetiology and possible treatment of depression and that weak noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists such as amantadine can synergize with conventional antidepressants in a model of the illness. 2. To try to obtain a neurochemical rationale for these findings, we have studied the effects of acute and chronic administration of amantadine or the related drug budipine on cortical release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) following the antidepressants reboxitine (REB), paroxetine (PAROX) and clomipramine (CLOM) in freely moving rats by using microdialysis. 3. Acute administration of amantadine (40 mg kg(-1)), budipine (10 mg kg(-1)), REB (10 mg kg(-1)), PAROX (10 mg kg(-1)) or CLOM (10 mg kg(-1)) all failed to significantly alter extracellular 5-HT in the cortex. However, when either amantadine or budipine was administered 30 min prior to any of the three antidepressants, a significant rise in 5-HT was observed. 4. For chronic studies, the effects of the drugs were studied at 4, 7, 14 and 21 days. Amantadine and budipine did not significantly alter extracellular 5-HT at any time point. The three antidepressant drugs all elicited a gradual increase in 5-HT, which became significant after 14 days and tended to plateau thereafter. When either amantadine (20 mg kg(-1)) or budipine (5 mg kg(-1)) was coadministered with any of the three antidepressants, two differences were seen compared with the effects of the antidepressants alone. Firstly, the time required for significant increases in cortical 5-HT was reduced with elevated levels now being observed by 7 days. Secondly, the absolute magnitude of the increase in extracellular 5-HT was markedly greater in these rats from day 7 until the end of the experiment. 5. If, as is widely considered, an increase in extracellular 5-HT represents a critical step in the mechanism of action of antidepressants, these data suggest that combined treatment with

  20. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the "spadin" Antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate.

  1. Evaluating the tolerability of the newer antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M J; Anand, V S

    1999-02-01

    Given their equal efficacy, the choice of a specific antidepressant is largely influenced by side effect (SE) profiles. A number of new agents have recently become available. However, data directly comparing the side effects of these agents are scarce. As suggested by AHCPR guidelines, we used the 1998 Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) to construct a comparison table using treatment emergent, placebo-adjusted incidence rates for the major (gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and sexual) side effects caused by nine antidepressants (fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, nefazodone, bupropion SR, mirtazapine, venlafaxine XR, and citalopram). The results were tabulated to show the relative propensity of each drug to cause a particular side effect. Bupropion SR had the most favorable overall side-effect profile, and fluvoxamine the least favorable. However, there are several limitations in using the PDR to compare the newer antidepressants. Clinical studies directly comparing SEs of newer antidepressants are needed. Sexual SEs substantially affected total SE liability. A simplified summary table, with its advantages and some limitations, is not simple to construct. Pitfalls in this process are discussed.

  2. The mechanism of action of antidepressants revised.

    PubMed

    Ackenheil, M

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the clinical efficacy of imipramine and of the MAO-inhibitor iproniazid intensively stimulated biochemical-pharmacological research on the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Due to these investigations, until recently an enhanced activity of the central noradrenergic and/or serotonergic transmitter system was considered essential for the clinical antidepressive action. Such enhancement could be achieved either presynaptically by blocking alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, or in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting the transmitter reuptake or the main metabolic enzyme, MAO. The common final result, especially of chronic treatment, was the down-regulation of postsynaptic beta-receptors, modulated by interaction with the serotonergic system, neuropeptides, and hormones. The delay of clinical response corresponded better with such receptor alterations. However, the introduction of new, more selective antidepressants led to new reflections upon the mechanism of action. On the level of transmitters, alpha 1-upregulation, increased activity of the dopaminergic system, an alteration in the balance between the different transmitter systems, are reported and seem to be important. Most promising are recent investigations of the second messenger systems, the adenylate cyclase system and the phosphatidylinositol system. Both systems are modulated by antidepressant drugs including lithium and carbamazepine. These second messengers, in turn, modulate the phosphorylation status of neuronal proteins via protein kinase, which may lead to elevations of the above mentioned receptors and again their transduction systems.

  3. [Intracranial pressure targeted treatment in acute bacterial meningitis increased survival].

    PubMed

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-12-16

    To evaluate the efficacy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness, a prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study was performed. Included were patients with confirmed ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at a neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All patients received intensive care with me-chanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. ICP-targeted treatment was performed in the intervention group, aiming at ICP 50 mmHg. The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered, compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group. Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission.

  4. New agents approved for treatment of acute staphylococcal skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, Jan; Staniszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been a predominant treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections for decades. However, growing reservations about its efficacy led to an urgent need for new antibiotics effective against MRSA and other drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. This review covers three new anti-MRSA antibiotics that have been recently approved by the FDA: dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid. The mechanism of action, indications, antibacterial activity profile, microbial resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, interactions as well as available formulations and administration of each of these new antibiotics are described. Dalbavancin is a once-a-week, two-dose, long-acting intravenous bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. Oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity, was developed as a single-dose intravenous treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI), which offers simplifying treatment of infections. Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone-class bacteriostatic once-daily agent, available for intravenous as well as oral use. Increased ability to overcome bacterial resistance is the main therapeutic advantage of the novel agents over existing antibiotics. PMID:27904526

  5. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  6. [TREK-1: a potential target for novel antidepressants].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2007-08-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT: 5-hydroxytryptamin) was suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of depression as well as in the mechanisms of antidepressant treatments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology or treatment of depression are still poorly understood. A recent paper has shown that deletion of the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 results in an antidepressant-like phenotype. TREK-1 -deficient mice behave as if they have been treated with an antidepressant drug, such as fluoxetine. Moreover, TREK-1-deficient mice showed a reduced elevation of corticosterone level under stress, an increased efficacy of 5-HT neurotransmission and an increased fluoxetine-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) inhibited not only the 5-HT transporter but also the TREK-1 channel. In this article, we review the molecular and functional properties of the TREK-1 channel, which is a potential target for novel antidepressants.

  7. A model of placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Bret R; Roose, Steven P

    2013-07-01

    Placebo response in clinical trials of antidepressant medications is substantial and has been increasing. High placebo response rates hamper efforts to detect signals of efficacy for new antidepressant medications, contributing to trial failures and delaying the delivery of new treatments to market. Media reports seize upon increasing placebo response and modest advantages for active drugs as reasons to question the value of antidepressant medication, which may further stigmatize treatments for depression and dissuade patients from accessing mental health care. Conversely, enhancing the factors responsible for placebo response may represent a strategy for improving available treatments for major depressive disorder. A conceptual framework describing the causes of placebo response is needed in order to develop strategies for minimizing placebo response in clinical trials, maximizing placebo response in clinical practice, and talking with depressed patients about the risks and benefits of antidepressant medications. In this review, the authors examine contributors to placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials and propose an explanatory model. Research aimed at reducing placebo response should focus on limiting patient expectancy and the intensity of therapeutic contact in antidepressant clinical trials, while the optimal strategy in clinical practice may be to combine active medication with a presentation and level of therapeutic contact designed to enhance treatment response.

  8. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Dossou, Katina S.S.; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Wainer, Irving W.; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Thompson, Scott M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Gould, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts ~16 percent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite a number of available monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require many weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine), exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects following a single dose in depressed patients. Here we show that the metabolism of ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant actions in vivo. Notably, we demonstrate that these antidepressant actions are NMDAR inhibition-independent but they involve early and sustained α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor activation. We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side-effects. Our results indicate a novel mechanism underlying ketamine’s unique antidepressant properties, which involves the required activity of a distinct metabolite and is independent of NMDAR inhibition. These findings have relevance for the development of next generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  9. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J; Singh, Nagendra S; Dossou, Katina S S; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L; Wainer, Irving W; Albuquerque, Edson X; Thompson, Scott M; Thomas, Craig J; Zarate, Carlos A; Gould, Todd D

    2016-05-26

    Major depressive disorder affects around 16 per cent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite the availability of numerous monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require several weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive, glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor) antagonist (R,S)-ketamine exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects after a single dose in patients with depression, but its use is associated with undesirable side effects. Here we show that the metabolism of (R,S)-ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant-related actions in mice. These antidepressant actions are independent of NMDAR inhibition but involve early and sustained activation of AMPARs (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors). We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side effects. Our data implicate a novel mechanism underlying the antidepressant properties of (R,S)-ketamine and have relevance for the development of next-generation, rapid-acting antidepressants.

  10. Changes in Muscarinic M2 Receptor Levels in the Cortex of Subjects with Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder and in Rats after Treatment with Mood Stabilisers and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Jeon, Won Je; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, data are implicating muscarinic receptors in the aetiology and treatment of mood disorders. This led us to measure levels of different muscarinic receptor-related parameters in the cortex from people with mood disorders and the CNS of rats treated with mood stabilisers and antidepressant drugs. Methods: We measured [3H]AF-DX 384 binding in BA 46 and BA 24 from subjects with bipolar disorders (n = 14), major depressive disorders (n = 19), as well as age- and sex-matched controls (n = 19) and the CNS of rats treated with fluoxetine or imipramine. In addition, we used Western blots to measure levels of CHRM2 protein and oxotremorine-M stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding as a measure of CHRM 2 / 4 signaling. Results: Compared with controls, [3H]AF-DX 384 binding was lower in BA 24 and BA 46 in bipolar disorders and major depressive disorders, while CHRM2 protein and oxotremorine-M stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was only lower in BA 24. Compared with vehicle, treatment with mood stabilisers, antidepressant drugs for 10 days, or imipramine for 28 days resulted in higher levels of in [3H]AF-DX 384 binding select regions of rat CNS. Conclusions: Our data suggest that levels of CHRM2 are lower in BA 24 from subjects with mood disorders, and it is possible that signalling by that receptor is also less in this cortical region. Our data also suggest increasing levels of CHRM2 may be involved in the mechanisms of action of mood stabilisers and tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:26475745

  11. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  12. Antidepressant-like activity of liposomal formulation containing nimodipine treatment in the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso E Almendra Ibiapina; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction may be an etiological factor in affective illness. Nimodipine (NMD) is a Ca(2+) channel blocker that has been extensively investigated for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this work, we have evaluated the antidepressant-like activity of nimodipine encapsulated into liposomes (NMD-Lipo) in mice through tail suspension and forced swim assays, as well as MAOB activity. During the tail suspension test, the administration of NMD-Lipo at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg was able to promote a reduction in the immobility time of animals greater than the positive control (imipramine). In the forced swim test, the immobility time of mice treated with NMD-Lipo was reduced. This reduction was significantly greater than that found in the animals treated with imipramine and paroxetine. This may suggest that NMD-Lipo provides more antidepressant-like activity than in positive controls. The groups that received a combination of liposomal NMD and antidepressant drugs showed lower immobility time than the groups, which were treated only with imipramine or paroxetine. The mice treated with the combination of NMD-Lipo and reserpine presented an increase in the time of immobility compared with animals treated only with NMD-Lipo. There was a significant decrease in MAOB activity in animals treated with NMD-Lipo compared with untreated animals. The results of the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity suggested that the antidepressant activity of NMD-Lipo may be related to an increase in the cerebral monoamine concentrations.

  13. Superior antidepressant effect occurring 1 month after rTMS: add-on rTMS for subjects with medication-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Chang, Chung-Hung; Tsai, Hsin-Chi; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lin, Chaucer CH

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder. The standard treatment for depression is antidepressant medication, but the responses to antidepressant treatment are only partial, even poor, among 30%–45% of patients. Refractory depression is defined as depression that does not respond to antidepressant therapy after 4 weeks of use. There is evidence that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may exert effects in treating psychiatric disorder through moderating focal neuronal functions. High-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal area and low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal area were shown to be effective in alleviating depressive symptoms. Given the statistically significant antidepressant effectiveness noted, the clinical application of rTMS as a depression treatment warrants further studies. Application of rTMS as an add-on therapy would be a practical research model. High-frequency (5–20 Hz) rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was found to have a significant effect on medication-resistant depression. In the present study, we not only measured the acute antidepressant effect of rTMS during treatment and immediately after its completion but also evaluated participants 1 month after completion of the treatment protocol. Study participants were divided into two groups: an active rTMS group (n = 10) and a sham group (n = 10). The active rTMS group was defined as participants who received the rTMS protocol, and the sham group was defined as participants who received a sham rTMS procedure. A significant Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score reduction was observed in both groups after the fifth and tenth treatments. However, those in the active rTMS group maintained their improvement as measured one month after completion of the rTMS protocol. Participants who received active rTMS were more likely to have persistent improvement in depression scores than participants who received sham rTMS. PMID:23576870

  14. Combination treatment of fingolimod with antidepressants in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis patients with depression: a multicentre, open-label study – REGAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bayas, Antonios; Schuh, Katrin; Baier, Monika; Vormfelde, Stefan Viktor; Koppai-Reiner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one in two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from comorbid depression. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of fingolimod and antidepressant combination in relapsing–remitting MS patients with mild-to-moderate depression. Efficacy outcome variables were quality of life (QoL), fatigue, disability and depression. Methods: Patients received open-label fingolimod 0.5 mg over 2 weeks, followed by fingolimod plus citalopram (40 mg), fluoxetine (40 mg) or venlafaxine (150 mg) over 16 weeks. The antidepressant was selected at the physician’s discretion. Results: In total, 54 patients were recruited at 25 centres across Germany. No new safety signals (including cardiac) emerged compared with previous clinical studies. Adverse events (mostly mild-to-moderate) were reported in 43 patients. A total of three patients had serious adverse events and 10 discontinued the study. QoL (mean [95% confidence interval]) improved by 2.2 (−3.3, −1.2; Patient Reported Indices for MS questionnaire), fatigue by 8.2 (−13.1, −3.3; modified Fatigue Impact Scale) and depression by 6.3 (−8.4, −4.2; Hamilton Depression Scale) points. However, the results must be interpreted cautiously owing to limited patient numbers. Conclusions: Combination of fingolimod with antidepressant medication showed no unexpected safety signals. Patient-reported outcomes (QoL, disability, fatigue and depression) remained stable or improved. PMID:27582893

  15. The effectiveness of prefrontal theta cordance and early reduction of depressive symptoms in the prediction of antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with resistant depression: analysis of naturalistic data.

    PubMed

    Bares, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Brunovsky, Martin; Stopkova, Pavla; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Current studies suggest that an early improvement of depressive symptoms and the reduction of prefrontal theta cordance value predict the subsequent response to antidepressants. The aim of our study was (1) to compare the predictive abilities of early clinical improvement defined as ≥ 20 % reduction in Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 1 and 2, and the decrease of prefrontal theta cordance at week 1 in resistant depressive patients and (2) to assess whether the combination of individual predictors yields more robust predictive power than either predictor alone. Eighty-seven subjects were treated (≥ 4 weeks) with various antidepressants chosen according to the judgment of attending psychiatrists. Areas under curve (AUC) were calculated to compare predictive effect of defined single predictors (≥ 20 % reduction in MADRS total score at week 1 and 2, and the decrease of cordance at week 1) and combined prediction models. AUCs of all three predictors were not statistically different (pair-wise comparison). The model combining all predictors yielded an AUC value 0.91 that was significantly higher than AUCs of each individual predictor. The results indicate that the combined predictor model may be a useful and clinically meaningful tool for the prediction of antidepressant response in patients with resistant depression.

  16. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Armed Forces Ra ioloy Research Institute Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones, and General...Gnotobiological Isolation Russia State Medical University 19990119 114 Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones...effects of antibiotics and probiotics (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) in mice irradiated with 7 Gy. The effects were studied in normal mice and mice

  17. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advancements in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zheng, Hu-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Among all subtypes, a lack of consensus exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patient survival rates have remained modest for the past three decades in AML. Recently, targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research papers on diagnostic development, target therapy, and other novel therapies of AML. Clinical trial information was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov. For the major purpose of this review that is to outline the latest therapeutic development of AML, we only listed the ongoing clinical trials for reference. However, the published results of complete clinical trials were also mentioned. Study Selection: This article reviewed the latest developments related to the diagnosis and treatment of AML. In the first portion, we provided some novel insights on the molecular basis of AML, as well as provided an update on the classification of AML. In the second portion, we summarized the results of research on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. We will also highlight ongoing research and clinical trials in pediatric AML. Results: We described clonal evolution and how it changes our view on leukemogenesis, treatment responses, and disease relapse. Pediatric-specific genomic mapping was discussed with a novel diagnostic method highlighted. In the later portion of this review, we summarized the researches on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/FLT3 inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. Conclusion: Gene sequencing techniques should set the basis for next-generation diagnostic

  18. Potentiation of the time-dependent, antidepressant-induced changes in the agonistic behaviour of resident rats by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100635.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Redfern, P H

    1997-11-01

    Acute and chronic antidepressant drug treatments respectively decrease and increase the aggressive behaviour of resident rats during encounters with unfamiliar conspecifics. We have now examined the effect of the 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100635, on fluoxetine-, paroxetine- or venlafaxine-induced changes in aggression. WAY-100635 (0.1 mg/kg), which did not modify behaviour when given alone, potentiated the venlafaxine (5.54 mg/kg)-induced reduction in aggression after acute treatment and, during chronic treatment, accelerated the fluoxetine (0.34 mg/kg/day)-induced increase in aggression, from day 5 to day 2. A similar change in time course was seen with paroxetine (0.33 mg/kg/day), although the increase in aggression was smaller. Venlafaxine (5.54 mg/kg/day, alone or co-administered with WAY-100635) increased aggression by day 2. During chronic treatment, therefore, venlafaxine, at the dose used, had a more rapid onset of action than either fluoxetine or paroxetine, whereas the fluoxetine- and paroxetine-, but not the venlafaxine-, induced increase in aggression was accelerated by WAY-100635. These studies further support the hypothesis that selective blockade of the 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor augments the effects of antidepressant drugs in an animal model predictive of antidepressant activity, presumably by concomitant blockade of the somatodendritic 5-hydroxytryptamine1A autoreceptor-mediated negative feedback system of serotonergic neurones.

  19. Antidepressant-like Effects of Buprenorphine are Mediated by Kappa Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Edgardo; Browne, Caroline A; Leon, Rosa M; Fleites, Vanessa C; Sweeney, Rachel; Kirby, Lynn G; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified potential antidepressant effects of buprenorphine (BPN), a drug with high affinity for mu opioid receptor (MORs) and kappa opioid receptors (KORs) and some affinity at delta opioid receptor (DOR) and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL-1) receptors. Therefore, these studies examined which opioid receptors were involved in BPN's effects on animal behavior tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs. The acute effects of BPN were tested in the forced swim test (FST) using mice with genetic deletion of individual opioid receptors or after pharmacological blockade of receptors. For evaluating the effects of BPN on chronic stress, separate groups of mice were exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) for 3 weeks and treated with BPN for at least 7 days before behavioral assessment and subsequent measurement of Oprk1, Oprm1, and Pdyn mRNA expression in multiple brain regions. BPN did not reduce immobility in mice with KOR deletion or after pretreatment with norbinaltorphimine, even though desipramine remained effective. In contrast, BPN reduced immobility in MOR and DOR knockout mice and in mice pretreated with the ORL-1 antagonist JTC-801. UCMS reduced sucrose preference, decreased time in the light side of the light/dark box, increased immobility in the FST and induced region-specific alterations in Oprk1, Oprm1, and PDYN mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and striatum. All of these changes were normalized following BPN treatment. The KOR was identified as a key player mediating the effects of BPN in tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs in mice. These studies support further development of BPN as a novel antidepressant.

  20. New paradigms in the recognition and acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Sheftell, Fred D; Tepper, Stewart J

    2002-01-01

    It would be ideal if clinical decisions regarding acute migraine treatment could be made on the basis of three parameters: a critical appraisal of available scientific evidence, clinical experience (including knowledge of the individual patient and his/her attack characteristics), and, of course, patient preferences. Patients are likely to prefer agents that offer rapid relief, pain-free status within 2 hours, no recurrence or need for rescue medication, extended time to recurrence (if present), consistency of therapeutic effect over multiple attacks, oral administration. good tolerability, safety, and minimal drug interactions. Fortunately, a number of specific therapies now are available which place these objectives within the patient's reach. Ongoing barriers to optimal migraine care include underrecognition, underconsultation, undertreatment, restrictions imposed by insurance companies, and exaggerated concerns regarding the safety of the triptans. Overcoming these barriers is likely to prove a more important contribution to patient care than endeavoring to establish the relative merits of one triptan over another. We have described in detail a number of strategies for improving recognition and treatment of migraine. Many headache specialists now believe that recurrent episodes of disabling headache, with a stable pattern over years, should be viewed as migraine until proven otherwise. In the end, this may represent the most useful paradigm in the primary care setting, where time is of the essence. Studies to validate this approach are needed. Acute treatment intervention that is based on scientific evidence, clinical experience, and patients' needs and desires will provide better outcomes than those presently obtained. Preliminary evidence favors early intervention with oral triptans, and randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, ideally employing a crossover design, are required to confirm this. The US Consortium's evidence

  1. Acute and long-term effectiveness of clozapine in treatment-resistant psychotic depression.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-08-15

    The treatment of refractory major depression, including the psychotic subtype, is a therapeutic challenge. Three cases of resistant psychotic depression were treated with clozapine monotherapy, an atypical antipsychotic drug effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia and mania. Both psychotic and mood symptoms responded well to clozapine monotherapy, although response was delayed in one case. Tardive dyskinesia improved markedly, and tardive dystonia improved moderately in one patient. No patient relapsed during a follow-up period of 4-6 years of clozapine treatment. Clozapine was well-tolerated with few side effects. These observations suggest controlled trials of clozapine in the treatment of psychotic depression that fails to respond to electroconvulsive therapy or typical neuroleptics plus tricyclic antidepressants are indicated. The same is true for the use of clozapine in maintenance treatment for psychotic depression in those cases in which typical neuroleptic drugs are required, in order to reduce the risk of tardive dyskinesia and dystonia.

  2. Evaluation and treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kinkade, Scott

    2007-04-15

    Acute low back pain with or without sciatica usually is self-limited and has no serious underlying pathology. For most patients, reassurance, pain medications, and advice to stay active are sufficient. A more thorough evaluation is required in selected patients with "red flag" findings associated with an increased risk of cauda equina syndrome, cancer, infection, or fracture. These patients also require closer follow-up and, in some cases, urgent referral to a surgeon. In patients with nonspecific mechanical low back pain, imaging can be delayed for at least four to six weeks, which usually allows the pain to improve. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, skeletal muscle relaxants, heat therapy, physical therapy, and advice to stay active. Spinal manipulative therapy may provide short-term benefits compared with sham therapy but not when compared with conventional treatments. Evidence for the benefit of acupuncture is conflicting, with higher-quality trials showing no benefit. Patient education should focus on the natural history of the back pain, its overall good prognosis, and recommendations for effective treatments.

  3. Beginning treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: the family connection.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Paton, Mary Anne; Huff, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    There is a loud silence on psycho-oncology research in relation to pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). This article is part of a series that begins to address the psycho-social hiatus. The present article documents the less obvious, often hidden, aspect of beginning treatment for pediatric AML--the "behind the scenes" experience of the home and family connection. The findings are from the first stage of a five year longitudinal study that examines through qualitative research the experience of childhood leukemia from the perspective of the child, siblings and parents. Open-ended interviews, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, were thematically analyzed with the assistance of the Non-numerical Unstructured Data by processes of Indexing Searching and Theory-building (NUD*IST) computer program. The findings emphasize the disruption to normalcy in relation to home life, school, and work, which is exacerbated for families who relocate for specialist treatment. The findings emphasise the need for support for families coping with childhood AML.

  4. Successful implementation of spacer treatment guideline for acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C; Maskell, G; Marks, M; South, M; Robertson, C; LENNEY, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination.
METHODS—Defined strategies were used for the development and implementation of a guideline, assessed by a prospective, descriptive, study using notes review, and patient, nursing, and medical staff telephone contact. The setting was a tertiary referral hospital in Victoria, Australia with 25 000 yearly admissions, and asthma accounting for about 7% of total. The first 200 children and families to use the guideline after its introduction were evaluated.
RESULTS—A total of 191 (95.5%) children were treated according to the guideline. Six (3.0%) children were given nebulisers appropriately based on severity; five (2.5%) were given nebulisers at parental or child choice; and four (2.0 %) who did not have severe asthma, received nebulised treatment<